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Sample records for counting gas detector

  1. Cluster counting in helium based gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, G.; Grancagnolo, F.; Spagnolo, S.

    1997-02-01

    The statistical advantages deriving from counting primary ionization, as opposed to the conventional energy loss measurement, are extensively discussed. A primary ionization counting method is proposed for a "traditional", cylindrical, single sense wire cell drift chamber, which makes use of a helium based gas mixture. Its conceptual feasibility is proven by means of a simple Monte Carlo simulation. A counting algorithm is developed and tested on the simulation output. A definition of the parameters of the read-out and of the digitizing electronics is given, assuming the described counting algorithm applied to a general detector design, in order to have a complete and realistic planning of a cluster counting measurement. Finally, some interesting results from a beam test, performed according to the described parameters, on primary ionization measurements and on {π}/{μ} separation are shown.

  2. Photon counting detector for the personal radiography inspection system "SIBSCAN"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Leonov, V. V.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray detectors operating in the energy integrating mode are successfully used in many different applications. Nevertheless the direct photon counting detectors, having the superior parameters in comparison with the integrating ones, are rarely used yet. One of the reasons for this is the low value of the electrical signal generated by a detected photon. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based scintillation counters have a high detection efficiency, high electronic gain and compact dimensions. This makes them a very attractive candidate to replace routinely used detectors in many fields. More than 10 years ago the digital scanning radiography system based on multistrip ionization chamber (MIC) was suggested at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The detector demonstrates excellent radiation resistance and parameter stability after 5 year operations and an imaging of up to 1000 persons per day. Currently, the installations operate at several Russian airports and at subway stations in some cities. At the present time we design a new detector operating in the photon counting mode, having superior parameters than the gas one, based on scintillator - SiPM assemblies. This detector has close to zero noise, higher quantum efficiency and a count rate capability of more than 5 MHz per channel (20% losses), which leads to better image quality and improved detection capability. The suggested detector technology could be expanded to medical applications.

  3. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Zbijewski, W; Gang, G; Stayman, J W; Taguchi, K; Lundqvist, M; Fredenberg, E; Carrino, J A; Siewerdsen, J H

    2014-10-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1-7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f50 (spatial-frequency at which the MTF falls to a value of

  4. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  5. High Count Rate Single Photon Counting Detector Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optical communications receiver requires efficient and high-rate photon-counting capability so that the information from every photon, received at the aperture,...

  6. A Novel Method for Ion Track Counting in Polycarbonate Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Roshani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A computer program for recognizing and counting the track of ions that are detected with polycarbonate detector has been written using MATLAB software. There are different programs for counting the track of ions in different detectors. Algorithm of this program specially has been written for polycarbonate detector and also for low magnification of optical microscope. Thus, with this method as per image of optical microscope, greater numbers of ions are visible and general distribution of ions can be better known. However, the accuracy of counting program is very high.

  7. A gas secondary electron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Drouart, A; Alamanos, N; Auger, F; Besson, P; Bougamont, E; Bourgeois, P; Lobo, G; Pollacco, E C; Riallot, M

    2002-01-01

    A new Secondary Electron gas Detector (SED) is under development to be used in conjunction with an emissive foil to detect low energy heavy ions as an alternative to micro-channel plates. It could measure position and time of flight. Secondary electrons are accelerated to 10 keV so that they can cross through the 0.9 mu m Mylar entrance window. The electrons then are multiplied in the isobutane gas of the detector at 4-10 Torr. A time resolution of 150 ps and a spatial resolution of 3 mm have been obtained by using californium fission fragments on a prototype detector of 7x7 cm sup 2. The advantage of the SED against MCP is that its size is not limited. Our final goal is to build a large size detector (15x40 cm sup 2) that will operate at the focal plane of the VAMOS magnetic spectrometer at GANIL.

  8. Tutorial on X-ray photon counting detector characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2017-11-16

    Recent advances in photon counting detection technology have led to significant research interest in X-ray imaging. As a tutorial level review, this paper covers a wide range of aspects related to X-ray photon counting detector characterization. The tutorial begins with a detailed description of the working principle and operating modes of a pixelated X-ray photon counting detector with basic architecture and detection mechanism. Currently available methods and techniques for charactering major aspects including energy response, noise floor, energy resolution, count rate performance (detector efficiency), and charge sharing effect of photon counting detectors are comprehensively reviewed. Other characterization aspects such as point spread function (PSF), line spread function (LSF), contrast transfer function (CTF), modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), bias voltage, radiation damage, and polarization effect are also remarked. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixelated photon counting detector is employed for part of the characterization demonstration and the results are presented. This review can serve as a tutorial for X-ray imaging researchers and investigators to understand, operate, characterize, and optimize photon counting detectors for a variety of applications.

  9. Noble gas detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aprile, Elena

    2006-01-01

    ... that is reflected in the high-quality discussions of principles and devices that will be found throughout the book. Noble gases in compressed or liquid form are regarded as an attractive detection medium from several standpoints. Detector volume is not limited by the need for crystal growth required in many alternative approaches, and the statistical limit on energy resolution is quite small due to moderate values for average ionization energy and a relatively low Fano factor. These media ...

  10. Hydrogen gas detector card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sánchez Niño

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A small card used for detecting hydrogen gas in a crystal growth system by the liquid phase epitaxy technique was designed and built. The small size of the card enables its portability to other laboratories where leakage detection of hydrogen or other flammable gas is required. Card dimensions are approximately 10 cm long and 5 cm wide enabling easy transportation. The design is based on a microcontroller which reads the signal from the hydrogen sensor and internally compares the read value with preset values. Depending on the signal voltage a red, yellow or green LED will light to indicate the levels of concentration of the flammable gas. The card is powered by a 9 V battery.

  11. Micro-pattern gas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Micro-strip gas chambers, with their excellent localization properties, high rate capability and good granularity, have been adopted by many experiments in particle physics. Two recurrent problems however have been reported: a slow degradation under sustained irradiation (or aging), and the rare but devastating occurrence of discharges. New breeds of detectors aim at improving on these crucial points, the micro-dot, CAT, micromegas, the gas electron multiplier are examples. Very performing, they are moreover robust and reliable. Two-stage devices, making use of a gas electron multiplier as first element, permit larger gains in presence of high rates and heavily ionizing tracks. Possible promising future developments in the field are outlined.

  12. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  13. Multiplicity counting from fission detector signals with time delay effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, L.; Pázsit, I.; Pál, L.

    2018-03-01

    In recent work, we have developed the theory of using the first three auto- and joint central moments of the currents of up to three fission chambers to extract the singles, doubles and triples count rates of traditional multiplicity counting (Pázsit and Pál, 2016; Pázsit et al., 2016). The objective is to elaborate a method for determining the fissile mass, neutron multiplication, and (α, n) neutron emission rate of an unknown assembly of fissile material from the statistics of the fission chamber signals, analogous to the traditional multiplicity counting methods with detectors in the pulse mode. Such a method would be an alternative to He-3 detector systems, which would be free from the dead time problems that would be encountered in high counting rate applications, for example the assay of spent nuclear fuel. A significant restriction of our previous work was that all neutrons born in a source event (spontaneous fission) were assumed to be detected simultaneously, which is not fulfilled in reality. In the present work, this restriction is eliminated, by assuming an independent, identically distributed random time delay for all neutrons arising from one source event. Expressions are derived for the same auto- and joint central moments of the detector current(s) as in the previous case, expressed with the singles, doubles, and triples (S, D and T) count rates. It is shown that if the time-dispersion of neutron detections is of the same order of magnitude as the detector pulse width, as they typically are in measurements of fast neutrons, the multiplicity rates can still be extracted from the moments of the detector current, although with more involved calibration factors. The presented formulae, and hence also the performance of the proposed method, are tested by both analytical models of the time delay as well as with numerical simulations. Methods are suggested also for the modification of the method for large time delay effects (for thermalised neutrons).

  14. Eco gases for future particle gas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kjølbro, Jógvan Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    Due to global regulations of non environmental refrigerants, some of the gas mixtures used in gas detectors at CERN has to be replaced. This report is a review that summarises and predicts some properties that are important when selecting new gases to operate in the gas detectors.

  15. Active Well Counting Using New PSD Plastic Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Newby, Jason [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report presents results and analysis from a series of proof-of-concept measurements to assess the suitability of segmented detectors constructed from Eljen EJ-299-34 PSD-plastic scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination capability for the purposes of quantifying uranium via active neutron coincidence counting. Present quantification of bulk uranium materials for international safeguards and domestic materials control and accounting relies on active neutron coincidence counting systems, such as the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL), that use moderated He-3 proportional counters along with necessarily low-intensity 241Am(Li) neutron sources. Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are a potentially superior technology to the existing AWCC and UNCL designs due to their spectroscopic capability and their inherently short neutron coincidence times that largely eliminate random coincidences and enable interrogation by stronger sources. One of the past impediments to the investigation and adoption of scintillation counters for the purpose of quantifying bulk uranium was the commercial availability of scintillators having the necessary neutron-gamma pulse-shape discrimination properties only as flammable liquids. Recently, Eljen EJ-299-34 PSD-plastic scintillator became commercially available. The present work is the first assessment of an array of PSD-plastic detectors for the purposes of quantifying bulk uranium. The detector panel used in the present work was originally built as the focal plane for a fast-neutron imager, but it was repurposed for the present investigation by construction of a stand to support the inner well of an AWCC immediately in front of the detector panel. The detector panel and data acquisition of this system are particularly well suited for performing active-well fast-neutron counting of LEU and HEU samples because the active detector volume is solid, the 241Am(Li) interrogating

  16. Spectroscopic X-ray imaging with photon counting pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, L

    2010-01-01

    Single particle counting hybrid pixel detectors simultaneously provide low noise, high granularity and high readout speed and make it possible to build detector systems offering high spatial resolution paired with good energy resolution. A limiting factor for the spectroscopic performance of such detector systems is charge sharing between neighbouring pixels in the sensor part of the detector. The signal spectrum at the collection electrodes of the readout electronics deviates significantly from the photonic spectrum when planar segmented sensor geometries are used. The Medipix3 implements a novel, distributed signal processing architecture linking neighbouring pixels and aims at eliminating the spectral distortion produced in the sensor by charge sharing and at reducing the impact of fluorescence photons generated in the sensor itself. Preliminary results from the very first Medipix3 readouts bump bonded to 300 pm Si sensor are presented. Material reconstruction is a possible future application of spectrosco...

  17. High quantum efficiency S-20 photocathodes in photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, D. A.; DeFazio, J.; Duarte Pinto, S.; Glazenborg, R.; Kernen, E.

    2016-04-01

    Based on conventional S-20 processes, a new series of high quantum efficiency (QE) photocathodes has been developed that can be specifically tuned for use in the ultraviolet, blue or green regions of the spectrum. The QE values exceed 30% at maximum response, and the dark count rate is found to be as low as 30 Hz/cm2 at room temperature. This combination of properties along with a fast temporal response makes these photocathodes ideal for application in photon counting detectors, which is demonstrated with an MCP photomultiplier tube for single and multi-photoelectron detection.

  18. Multielement detector for gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the results of a study to improve the capabilities of a gas chromatography-microwave-induced plasma (GC- MIP) detector system, determine the feasibility of empirical formula determination for simple mixtures containing elements of interest to fossil fuel analysis and, subsequently, explore applications for analysis of the complex mixtures associated with fossil fuels. The results of this study indicate that the GC-MIP system is useful as a specific-element detector that provides excellent elemental specificity for a number of elements of interest to the analysis of fossil fuels. It has reasonably good sensitivity for carbon, hydrogen, sulfur, and nickel, and better sensitivity for chlorine and fluorine. Sensitivity is poor for nitrogen and oxygen, however, probably because of undetected leaks or erosion of the plasma tube. The GC-MIP can also provide stoichiometric information about components of simple mixtures. If this powerful technique is to be available for complex mixtures, it will be necessary to greatly simplify the chromatograms by chemical fractionation. 38 refs., 46 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  20. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Performances of photodiode detectors for top and bottom counting detectors of ISS-CREAM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, H.J. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Anderson, T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Angelaszek, D. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Baek, S.J. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Copley, M. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Coutu, S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Han, J.H.; Huh, H.G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Hwang, Y.S. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Im, S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jeon, H.B.; Kah, D.H.; Kang, K.H.; Kim, H.J. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.C.; Kwashnak, K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Lee, J. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M.H. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Link, J.T. [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); CRESST(USRA), Columbia, MD 21044 (United States); Lutz, L. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); and others

    2015-07-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) experiment at the International Space Station (ISS) aims to elucidate the source and acceleration mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays by measuring the energy spectra from protons to iron. The instrument is planned for launch in 2015 at the ISS, and it comprises a silicon charge detector, a carbon target, top and bottom counting detectors, a calorimeter, and a boronated scintillator detector. The top and bottom counting detectors are developed for separating the electrons from the protons, and each of them comprises a plastic scintillator and a 20×20 silicon photodiode array. Each photodiode is 2.3 cm×2.3 cm in size and exhibits good electrical characteristics. The leakage current is measured to be less than 20 nA/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage. The signal-to-noise ratio is measured to be better than 70 using commercial electronics, and the radiation hardness is tested using a proton beam. A signal from the photodiode is amplified by VLSI (very-large-scale integration) charge amp/hold circuits, the VA-TA viking chip. Environmental tests are performed using whole assembled photodiode detectors of a flight version. Herein, we present the characteristics of the developed photodiode along with the results of the environmental tests.

  2. Electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    An electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detector (EGGSRAD) useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems is described. The radiation detector employs doping of the semiconductor and variation of the semiconductor detector material to form a two-dimensional electron gas, and to allow transistor action within the detector. This radiation detector provides superior energy resolution and radiation detection sensitivity over the conventional semiconductor radiation detector and the "electron-only" semiconductor radiation detectors which utilize a grid electrode near the anode. In a first embodiment, the EGGSRAD incorporates delta-doped layers adjacent the anode which produce an internal free electron grid well to which an external grid electrode can be attached. In a second embodiment, a quantum well is formed between two of the delta-doped layers, and the quantum well forms the internal free electron gas grid to which an external grid electrode can be attached. Two other embodiments which are similar to the first and second embodiment involve a graded bandgap formed by changing the composition of the semiconductor material near the first and last of the delta-doped layers to increase or decrease the conduction band energy adjacent to the delta-doped layers.

  3. High-resolution neutron microtomography with noiseless neutron counting detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E.; Butler, L. G.; Dawson, M.

    2011-10-01

    The improved collimation and intensity of thermal and cold neutron beamlines combined with recent advances in neutron imaging devices enable high-resolution neutron radiography and microtomography, which can provide information on the internal structure of objects not achievable with conventional X-ray imaging techniques. Neutron detection efficiency, spatial and temporal resolution (important for the studies of dynamic processes) and low background count rate are among the crucial parameters defining the quality of radiographic images and tomographic reconstructions. The unique capabilities of neutron counting detectors with neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) and with Timepix CMOS readouts providing high neutron detection efficiency (˜70% for cold neutrons), spatial resolutions ranging from 15 to 55 μm and a temporal resolution of ˜1 μs—combined with the virtual absence of readout noise—make these devices very attractive for high-resolution microtomography. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of an MCP-Timepix detection system applied to microtomographic imaging, performed at the ICON cold neutron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. The high resolution and the absence of readout noise enable accurate reconstruction of texture in a relatively opaque wood sample, differentiation of internal tissues of a fly and imaging of individual ˜400 μm grains in an organic powder encapsulated in a ˜700 μm thick metal casing.

  4. Development of Fast High-Resolution Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00287945; Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Adomeit, S.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.; Zibell, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized drift-tube chambers are e?cient detectors for high-precision tracking over large areas. The Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach a spatial resolution of 35 micons and almost 100% tracking e?ciency with 6 layers of 30 mm diameter drift tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at 3 bar and a gas gain of 20000. The ATLAS MDT chambers are designed to cope with background counting rates due to neutrons and gamma-rays of up to about 300 kHz per tube which will be exceeded for LHC luminosities larger than the design value of 10-34 per square cm and second. Decreasing the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm while keeping the other parameters, including the gas gain, unchanged reduces the maximum drift time from about 700 ns to 200 ns and the drift-tube occupancy by a factor of 7. New drift-tube chambers for the endcap regions of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been designed. A prototype chamber consisting of 12 times 8 l...

  5. A gas microstrip wide angle X-ray detector for application in synchrotron radiation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Mir, J A; Simmons, J E; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R; Dobson, B R; Farrow, R C; Helsby, W I; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Microstrip Detector has counting rate capabilities several orders of magnitude higher than conventional wire proportional counters while providing the same (or better) energy resolution for X-rays. In addition the geometric flexibility provided by the lithographic process combined with the self-supporting properties of the substrate offers many exciting possibilities for X-ray detectors, particularly for the demanding experiments carried out on Synchrotron Radiation Sources. Using experience obtained in designing detectors for Particle Physics we have developed a detector for Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies. The detector has a fan geometry which makes possible a gas detector with high detection efficiency, sub-millimetre spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a wide range of X-ray energy. The detector is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  6. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    Improved binary and tertiary gas mixture for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below about 0.5 eV; whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  7. Combination of current-integrating/photon-counting detector modules for spectral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jiyang; Cong, Wenxiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by compressive sensing theory and spectral detection technology, here we propose a novel design of a CT detector array that uses current-integrating/photon-counting modules in an interlacing fashion so that strengths of each detector type can be synergistically combined. For geometrical symmetry, an evenly alternating pattern is initially assumed for these detector modules to form a hybrid detector array. While grayscale detector modules acquire regular raw data in a large dynamic range cost-effectively, spectral detector modules simultaneously sense energy-discriminative data in multiple energy bins. A split Bregman iterative algorithm is developed for spectral CT reconstruction from projection data of an object collected with the hybrid detector array. With mathematical phantoms, an optimal ratio of the number of the spectral elements over the number of grayscale elements is determined based on classic image quality evaluation. This hybrid detector array is capable of delivering a performance comparable with that of a full spectral detector array.

  8. Turn-key Near-Infrared Photon-Counting Detector Module for LIDAR Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design and deliver a turn-key photon counting detector module for near-infrared wavelengths, based on large-area InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes...

  9. Turn-key Near-Infrared Photon-Counting Detector Module for LIDAR Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the prototype photon counter developed during Phase I, we will deliver a next-generation photon counting detector optimized for LIDAR applications within...

  10. Highly Sensitive Photon Counting Detectors for Deep Space Optical Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of a photon-counting photodetector is proposed to advance the state-of the-art in deep space optical communications technology. The proposed detector...

  11. Counting in visual question answering : A concept detector based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.H.T. de; Reitsma, S.; Schutte, K.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Question Answering is a field that combines vision techniques and natural language processing techniques. One of the most challenging question types in this field is counting, such as How many sheep are in this picture. In this paper, we focus on counting questions and improve upon the

  12. Vacuum ultraviolet detector for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Kevin A; Sawicki, Ian; Carlton, Doug D; Fan, Hui; McNair, Harold M; Nimmo, John P; Kroll, Peter; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Harrison, Dale

    2014-08-19

    Analytical performance characteristics of a new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography (GC) are reported. GC-VUV was applied to hydrocarbons, fixed gases, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, pesticides, drugs, and estrogens. Applications were chosen to feature the sensitivity and universal detection capabilities of the VUV detector, especially for cases where mass spectrometry performance has been limited. Virtually all chemical species absorb and have unique gas phase absorption cross sections in the approximately 120-240 nm wavelength range monitored. Spectra are presented, along with the ability to use software for deconvolution of overlapping signals. Some comparisons with experimental synchrotron data and computed theoretical spectra show good agreement, although more work is needed on appropriate computational methods to match the simultaneous broadband electronic and vibronic excitation initiated by the deuterium lamp. Quantitative analysis is governed by Beer-Lambert Law relationships. Mass on-column detection limits reported for representatives of different classes of analytes ranged from 15 (benzene) to 246 pg (water). Linear range measured at peak absorption for benzene was 3-4 orders of magnitude. Importantly, where absorption cross sections are known for analytes, the VUV detector is capable of absolute determination (without calibration) of the number of molecules present in the flow cell in the absence of chemical interferences. This study sets the stage for application of GC-VUV technology across a wide breadth of research areas.

  13. P-Type Point Contact Germanium Detectors for Low-Level Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    P-TYPE POINT CONTACT GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR LOW-LEVEL COUNTING Ethan L. Hull1, Richard H. Pehl1, James R. Lathrop1, Peggy L. Mann1, Ronnie B...closed end were left square. Generally these corners are rounded off, beveled , or bulletized for coaxial detector fabrication to improve the charge

  14. Phoswich detectors for simultaneous counting of α-, β(γ)-rays and neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Shigekazu; Sakurai, Satoshi; Yasuda, Kenichiro

    1997-02-01

    Simultaneous counting of α-, β(including γ)-rays, fast and thermal neutrons was accomplished by devising phoswich detectors with pulse-shape discrimination. The detectors consisted of ZnS(Ag), anthracene and 6Li-glass (NS8) scintillators: ZnS(Ag)/anthracene phoswich for simultaneous α, β(γ) and fast-neutron counting and ZnS(Ag)/anthracene/NS8 phoswich for simultaneous α, β(γ), fast- and thermal-neutron counting. Satisfactory properties of pulse-shape discrimination among the respective radiations are presented in this paper.

  15. Single ion counting with a MCP (microchannel plate) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawara, Hiroko; Sasaki, Shinichi; Miyajima, Mitsuhiro [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shibamura, Eido

    1996-07-01

    In this study, a single-ion-counting method using alpha-particle-impact ionization of Ar atoms is demonstrated and the preliminary {epsilon}{sub mcp} for Ar ions with incident energies of 3 to 4.7 keV is determined. The single-ion counting by the MCP is aimed to be performed under experimental conditions as follows: (1) A signal from the MCP is reasonably identified as incidence of single Ar-ion. (2) The counting rate of Ar ions is less than 1 s{sup -1}. (3) The incident Ar ions are not focused on a small part of an active area of the MCP, namely, {epsilon}{sub mcp} is determined with respect to the whole active area of the MCP. So far, any absolute detection efficiency has not been reported under these conditions. (J.P.N.)

  16. Characterization of spectrometric photon-counting X-ray detectors at different pitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdit, M.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2017-09-01

    There is growing interest in energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors based on high flux X-ray imaging. Their potential applications include medical imaging, non-destructive testing and security. Innovative detectors of this type will need to count individual photons and sort them into selected energy bins, at several million counts per second and per mm2. Cd(Zn)Te detector grade materials with a thickness of 1.5 to 3 mm and pitches from 800 μm down to 200 μm were assembled onto interposer boards. These devices were tested using in-house-developed full-digital fast readout electronics. The 16-channel demonstrators, with 256 energy bins, were experimentally characterized by determining spectral resolution, count rate, and charge sharing, which becomes challenging at low pitch. Charge sharing correction was found to efficiently correct X-ray spectra up to 40 × 106 incident photons.s-1.mm-2.

  17. Impact of Compton scatter on material decomposition using a photon counting spectral detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cale; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.; Das, Mini

    2017-03-01

    Photon counting spectral detectors are being investigated to allow better discrimination of multiple materials by collecting spectral data for every detector pixel. The process of material decomposition or discrimination starts with an accurate estimation of energy dependent attenuation of the composite object. Photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are two important constituents of the attenuation. Compton scattering while results in a loss of primary photon, also results in an increase in photon counts in the lower ene1rgy bins via multiple orders of scatter. This contribution to each energy bin may change with material properties, thickness and x-ray energies. There has been little investigation into the effect of this increase in counts at lower energies due to presence of these Compton scattered photons using photon counting detectors. Our investigations show that it is important to account for this effect in spectral decomposition problems.

  18. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  19. A dynamic attenuator improves spectral imaging with energy-discriminating, photon counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2015-03-01

    Energy-discriminating, photon counting (EDPC) detectors have high potential in spectral imaging applications but exhibit degraded performance when the incident count rate approaches or exceeds the characteristic count rate of the detector. In order to reduce the requirements on the detector, we explore the strategy of modulating the X-ray flux field using a recently proposed dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator. A previous paper studied this modulation for photon counting detectors but did not explore the impact on spectral applications. In this work, we modeled detection with a bipolar triangular pulse shape (Taguchi et al., 2011) and estimated the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the variance of material selective and equivalent monoenergetic images, assuming deterministic errors at high flux could be corrected. We compared different materials for the dynamic attenuator and found that rare earth elements, such as erbium, outperformed previously proposed materials such as iron in spectral imaging. The redistribution of flux reduces the variance or dose, consistent with previous studies on benefits with conventional detectors. Numerical simulations based on DICOM datasets were used to assess the impact of the dynamic attenuator for detectors with several different characteristic count rates. The dynamic attenuator reduced the peak incident count rate by a factor of 4 in the thorax and 44 in the pelvis, and a 10 Mcps/mm (2) EDPC detector with dynamic attenuator provided generally superior image quality to a 100 Mcps/mm (2) detector with reference bowtie filter for the same dose. The improvement is more pronounced in the material images.

  20. An optimised method for material identification using a photon counting detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beldjoudi, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.beldjoudi@cea.fr [LETI MINATEC Campus, CEA Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Rebuffel, Veronique; Verger, Loieck [LETI MINATEC Campus, CEA Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Kaftandjian, Valerie [CNDRI - INSA Lyon, 20, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, Cedex (France); Rinkel, Jean [LETI MINATEC Campus, CEA Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-01-21

    X-ray photon counting detectors have become a competitive alternative to energy integrating systems in certain domains. However, processing methods currently used in radiography for investigating the composition of an object are an extension of dual energy methods and have started to show their limits with an increasing number of counting windows (bins). Thus, in a context of material recognition for homeland security, this study aims to introduce a new data processing method suitable for any type of detector, in integrating or counting mode, regardless of the number of bins. Additionally, a criterion to quantify the influence of the number of counting windows as well as the influence of their threshold position has been developed. The optimisation process is conducted in simulation by considering ideal detectors, and the results, for detectors with m=2, 3, 4 and 5 counting windows, are compared to those obtained with an analytical criterion developed in the literature and adapted to our study context. Both methods give identical results. In the final part, the performances of a spectrometric detector (energy windows width of 1 keV) and of optimised systems with m=2, 3, 4 and 5 bins are analysed for homogeneous plastic identification. The results show an increase in performance with increase in bin number until the performance level of the spectrometric detector is reached. Moreover, a discussion on the optimisation robustness as a function of material thickness to be identified is presented. The spectrometric detector, which does not require any optimisation of the bins thresholds, appears then to be a candidate of choice for material recognition when using X-ray photon counting detectors.

  1. Beta-gated gamma coincidence counting with a phoswich detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, J.H.; Warner, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A special type of phoswich detector system has been evaluated for measurement of radionuclides which decay with emission of time coincident beta and gamma radiation. Background reductions of more than two orders of magnitude have been obtained for the energy region from 500 to 950 keV. Both NE 102 plastic scintillators and anthracene were evaluated. Advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  2. Characteristic evaluation of a novel CdTe photon counting detector for X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Kim, Hee-Joung; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Yu-Na

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of a novel cadmium-telluride (CdTe) photon counting detector optimized for X-ray imaging applications. CdTe was studied as a potential detector material for hard X-ray and gamma-ray detection. In this study, we used a CdTe photon counting detector manufactured by AJAT Ltd. (PID 350, Finland) for the purposes of both X-ray and gamma-ray detection. However, it is noted that X-ray detection can be limited by the characteristics of gamma-ray detectors. For the investigation of the characteristics of a detector for X-ray imaging, the detector has been studied in terms of detector calibration, count rate, and pixel sensitivity variation by using a poly-energetic X-ray. The detector calibration was evaluated to determine the effects of offset, gain, and energy. An optimal calibration increases the accuracy of the output energy spectrum. The pixel sensitivity variation was evaluated using profiles of various rows and columns from white (with X-ray) and dark (without X-ray) images. The specific trend of each image was observed around the edges of the hybrids. These pixel variations of the CdTe sensor were corrected. The image quality was improved by using the optimal correction method based on an understanding of the pixel sensitivity variation. The maximum recorded count rate of the detector was measured in all pixels. The count rate was measured by setting the energy windows from just above the noise level to the maximum energy. The average count rate was fairly linear up to 1.6 × 106 cps/8 modules and saturated at about 2.2 × 106 cps/8 modules. In this paper, we present several characteristics of the detector and demonstrate the improved spectrum and image obtained after calibration and correction. These results show that the novel CdTe photon counting detector can be used in conventional X-ray imaging, but exhibits limitations when applied to spectral X-ray imaging.

  3. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalluri, Kesava S. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Mahd, Mufeed [Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  4. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Kesava S; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J

    2013-08-01

    Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%-63% and 4%-34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%-30% (with Al filtration) and 32%-38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

  5. Hybrid tracking detector based on semiconductor and gas technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashindzhagyan, George; Korotkova, Natalia; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Sinev, Nikolai; Tikhomirov, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    New Silicon-Gas Pixel Detector (SiGPD) is the result of the further development already proposed Gas-Pixel Detector (GPD). The only disadvantage of GPD was the uncertainty of the particle arriving time. The problem can be solved by additional silicon pixels implementation inside existed electronic chip epitaxial layer during regular chip production. The cost of new Si-Gas Pixel Detector remains practically the same. The new detectors have self-triggering properties and can be used for a first level trigger generation in the particle physics experiments and for many other applications.

  6. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    CERN Document Server

    Lapington, J S; Miller, G M; Ashton, T J R; Jarron, P; Despeisse, M; Powolny, F; Howorth, J; Milnes, J

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchanne...

  7. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  8. Ultrafast time measurements by time-correlated single photon counting coupled with superconducting single photon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcheslavskiy, V., E-mail: vis@becker-hickl.de; Becker, W. [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Morozov, P.; Divochiy, A. [Scontel, Rossolimo St., 5/22-1, Moscow 119021 (Russian Federation); Vakhtomin, Yu. [Scontel, Rossolimo St., 5/22-1, Moscow 119021 (Russian Federation); Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1/1 M. Pirogovskaya St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Smirnov, K. [Scontel, Rossolimo St., 5/22-1, Moscow 119021 (Russian Federation); Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1/1 M. Pirogovskaya St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya St., Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    Time resolution is one of the main characteristics of the single photon detectors besides quantum efficiency and dark count rate. We demonstrate here an ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup consisting of a newly developed single photon counting board SPC-150NX and a superconducting NbN single photon detector with a sensitive area of 7 × 7 μm. The combination delivers a record instrument response function with a full width at half maximum of 17.8 ps and system quantum efficiency ∼15% at wavelength of 1560 nm. A calculation of the root mean square value of the timing jitter for channels with counts more than 1% of the peak value yielded about 7.6 ps. The setup has also good timing stability of the detector–TCSPC board.

  9. A miniaturized 4 K platform for superconducting infrared photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Nathan R.; Hills, Matthew; Bradshaw, Tom; Rawlings, Tom; Green, Ben; Heath, Robert M.; Tsimvrakidis, Konstantinos; Dobrovolskiy, Sergiy; Zwiller, Val; Dorenbos, Sander N.; Crook, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2017-11-01

    We report on a miniaturized platform for superconducting infrared photon counting detectors. We have implemented a fibre-coupled superconducting nanowire single photon detector in a Stirling/Joule-Thomson platform with a base temperature of 4.2 K. We have verified a cooling power of 4 mW at 4.7 K. We report 20% system detection efficiency at 1310 nm wavelength at a dark count rate of 1 kHz. We have carried out compelling application demonstrations in single photon depth metrology and singlet oxygen luminescence detection.

  10. Solid-State Neutron Multiplicity Counting System Using Commercial Off-the-Shelf Semiconductor Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhdestvenskyy, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-09

    This work iterates on the first demonstration of a solid-state neutron multiplicity counting system developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by using commercial off-the-shelf detectors. The system was demonstrated to determine the mass of a californium-252 neutron source within 20% error requiring only one-hour measurement time with 20 cm2 of active detector area.

  11. A prototype High Purity Germanium detector for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J., E-mail: rjcooper@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Where energy resolution is paramount, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors continue to provide the optimum solution for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy. Conventional large-volume HPGe detectors are typically limited to count rates on the order of ten thousand counts per second, however, limiting their effectiveness for high count rate applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel prototype HPGe detector designed to be capable of achieving fine energy resolution and high event throughput at count rates in excess of one million counts per second. We report here on the concept, design, and initial performance of the first prototype device.

  12. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-06-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchannel plate devices with very high time resolution, and high-speed multi-channel ASIC electronics developed for the LHC at CERN, provides the necessary building blocks for a high-throughput detector system with up to 1024 parallel counting channels and 20 ps time resolution. We describe the detector and electronic design, discuss the current status of the HiContent project and present the results from a 64-channel prototype system. In the absence of an operational detector, we present measurements of the electronics performance using a pulse generator to simulate detector events. Event timing results from the NINO high-speed front-end ASIC captured using a fast digital oscilloscope are compared with data taken with the proposed electronic configuration which uses the multi-channel HPTDC timing ASIC.

  13. Initial characterization of unequal-length, low-background proportional counters for absolute gas-counting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, E. K.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Overman, C. T.; Seifert, A.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g., 37Ar). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counter designs and now operate in PNNL's shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity copper components for use in a shielded above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates, gas gain, and energy resolution. These results will be presented along with a shielding study for the above-ground cave.

  14. Si-strip photon counting detectors for contrast-enhanced spectral mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Reiser, Ingrid; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasi; Chen, Chin-Tu; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barber, William C.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the development of silicon strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical mammography. Typically, X-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a-Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting Si strip detectors. The required performance for mammography in terms of the output count rate, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view for the application, thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and particular scanning techniques. Room temperature Si strip detector, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the X-ray energy ranges of the application. We present our methods and results from the optimization of Si-strip detectors for contrast enhanced spectral mammography. We describe the method being developed for quantifying iodine contrast using the energy-resolved detector with fixed thresholds. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method by scanning an iodine phantom with clinically relevant contrast levels.

  15. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm2/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a 57Co source. An output rate of 6×106 counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and energy

  16. Muon counting using silicon photomultipliers in the AMIGA detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollant, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valbuena-Delgado, A.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-03-01

    AMIGA (Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array) is an upgrade of the Pierre Auger Observatory designed to extend its energy range of detection and to directly measure the muon content of the cosmic ray primary particle showers. The array will be formed by an infill of surface water-Cherenkov detectors associated with buried scintillation counters employed for muon counting. Each counter is composed of three scintillation modules, with a 10 m2 detection area per module. In this paper, a new generation of detectors, replacing the current multi-pixel photomultiplier tube (PMT) with silicon photo sensors (aka. SiPMs), is proposed. The selection of the new device and its front-end electronics is explained. A method to calibrate the counting system that ensures the performance of the detector is detailed. This method has the advantage of being able to be carried out in a remote place such as the one where the detectors are deployed. High efficiency results, i.e. 98% efficiency for the highest tested overvoltage, combined with a low probability of accidental counting (~2%), show a promising performance for this new system.

  17. Aging and materials Lessons for detectors and gas systems

    CERN Document Server

    Capéans-Garrido, M

    2003-01-01

    Aging of gaseous detectors is known as the degradation of their performance under the exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a complex phenomenon that depends on many parameters. Among others, aging depends on the gas mixture and may be enhanced by the presence of pollutants in the gas. The origin of the impurities is diverse and includes outgassing from assembly materials, contamination of the detector during the assembly process and the gas system itself. Systematic studies on this topic have been carried out. The methods used to ascertain the outgassing properties of materials are described and compared. Materials that might be used for assembling gaseous detectors and associated gas systems are catalogued according to their outgassing rate. Some factors affecting the aging rate of some fast gases are presented. Finally, a set of recommendations to build and operate gaseous detectors in high-luminosity experiments is given.

  18. A portable gas recirculation unit for gaseous detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, R.; Mandelli, B.

    2017-10-01

    The use of greenhouse gases (usually C2H2F4, CF4 and SF6) is sometimes necessary to achieve the required performance for some gaseous detectors. The consumption of these gases in the LHC systems is reduced by recycling the gas mixture thanks to a complex gas recirculation system. Beyond greenhouse gas consumption due to LHC systems, a considerable contribution is generated by setups used for LHC detector upgrade projects, R&D activities, detector quality assurance or longevity tests. In order to minimise this emission, a new flexible and portable gas recirculation unit has been developed. Thanks to its low price, flexibility and user-friendly operation it can be easily adapted for the different types of detector systems and set-ups.

  19. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, A; Ballabriga, R; Bisello, F; Campbell, M; Celi, J C; Fauler, A; Fiederle, M; Jensch, M; Kochanski, N; Llopart, X; Michel, N; Mollenhauer, U; Ritter, I; Tennert, F; Wölfel, S; Wong, W; Michel, T

    2015-01-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation wa...

  20. Test results of a counting type SOI device for a new x-ray area detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, R., E-mail: ryo.hashimoto@kek.jp; Igarashi, N.; Kumai, R.; Kishimoto, S. [Inst. of Materials Structure Science, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Arai, Y.; Miyoshi, T. [Inst. of Particle and Nuclear Physics. KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    Development of a new detector using Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology has been started in the Photon Factory, KEK. The aim of this project is to develop a pulse-counting-type X-ray detector that can be used in synchrotron radiation experiments using soft X-rays. We started to make a Test Element Group of SOI chip, which is called CPIXPTEG1 and evaluated its performance. We succeeded in readout of output signals for 16 keV X-rays from the SOI chips. We also found that the middle-SOI structure was effective against a signal distortion caused by hole traps in the buried oxide layer.

  1. A single-photon counting “edge-on” silicon detector for synchrotron radiation mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Menk, R.-H.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2009-09-01

    The Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn (PICASSO) project is developing an "edge-on" silicon microstrip detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation. The sensor is equipped with a fast single-photon counting electronics based on the Mythen-II application-specific integrated circuit. A first prototype has been assembled and tested at the SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. The first results are presented in this study including evidence of high-rate single-photon counting with negligible losses up to 1.2×10 6 incident photons per pixel per second; spatial resolution consistent with the pixel aperture (0.3 mm×0.05 mm); high-quality imaging of test-objects, obtained with a dose comparable to the one delivered in modern full-field digital mammographic systems.

  2. Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors Technologies

    CERN Multimedia

    Richer, J; Santos, D; Barsuk, S; Hamar, G; Shah, M K; Catanesi, M G; Colaleo, A; Maggi, M; Loddo, F; Berardi, V; Bagliesi, M; Menon, G; Richter, R; Lahonde-hamdoun, C; Dris, M; Chechik, R; Ochi, A; Hartjes, F; Lopes, I M; Deshpande, A; Franz, A; Dabrowski, W; Fiutowski, T A; Ferreira, A; Bastos de oliveira, C A; Miller, B W; Monrabal-capilla, F; Liubarsky, I; Plazas de pinzon, M C; Tsarfati, T; Voss, B J R; Carmona martinez, J M; Stocchi, A; Dinu, N; Semeniouk, I; Giebels, B; Marton, K; De leo, R; De lucia, E; Alviggi, M; Bellerive, A; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Giomataris, I; Peyaud, A; Schune, P; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Charles, G; Wang, W; Markou, A; Arazi, L; Cibinetto, G; Edo, Y; Neves, F F; Solovov, V; Stoll, S; Sampsonidis, D; Mindur, B; Zielinska, A Z; Sauli, F; Calapez de albuquerque veloso, J F; Kahlaoui, N; Sharma, A; Zenker, K; Cebrian guajardo, S V; Luzon marco, G M; Guillaudin, O J H; Cornebise, P; Lounis, A; Bruel, P J; Laszlo, A; Mukerjee, K; Nappi, E; Nuzzo, S V; Bencivenni, G; Tessarotto, F; Levorato, S; Dixit, M S; Riallot, M; Jeanneau, F; Nizery, F G; Maltezos, S; Kyriakis, A; Lyashenko, A; Van der graaf, H; Ferreira marques, R; Alexa, C; Liyanage, N; Dehmelt, K; Hemmick, T K; Polychronakos, V; Cisbani, E; Garibaldi, F; Koperny, S Z; Das neves dias carramate, L F; Munoz-vidal, J; Gutierrez, R; Fuentes, F; Van stenis, M; Resnati, F; Lupberger, M; Desch, K K; Soyk, D; Adloff, C J; Chefdeville, M; Vouters, G; Ranieri, A; Lami, S; Shekhtman, L; Dolgov, A; Bamberger, A; Landgraf, U; Kortner, O; Ferrero, A; Aune, S; Attie, D M; Bakas, G; Tsigaridas, S; Surrow, B; Gnanvo, K A K; Feege, N M; Woody, C L; Bhattacharya, S; Capogni, M; Veenhof, R J; Tapan, I; Dangendorf, V; Monteiro bernades, C M; Castro serrato, H F; De oliveira, R; Ropelewski, L; Behnke, T; Boudry, V; Radicioni, E; Lai, A; Shemyakina, E; Giganon, A E; Titov, M; Papakrivopoulos, I; Komai, H; Van bakel, N A; Tchepel, V; Repond, J O; Li, Y; Kourkoumelis, C; Tzamarias, S; Majumdar, N; Kowalski, T; Da rocha azevedo, C D; Serra diaz cano, L; Alvarez puerta, V; Trabelsi, A; Riegler, W; Ketzer, B F; Rosemann, C G; Herrera munoz, D C; Drancourt, C; Mayet, F; Geerebaert, Y; De robertis, G; Felici, G; Scribano memoria, A; Cecchi, R; Dalla torre, S; Gregori, M; Buzulutskov, A; Schwegler, P; Sanchez nieto, F J; Colas, P M A; Gros, M; Neyret, D; Zito, M; Ferrer ribas, E; Breskin, A; Martoiu, V S; Purschke, M L; Loomba, D; Gasik, P J; Petridou, C; Kordas, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Bucciantonio, M; Bhopatkar, V S; Biagi, S F; Ji, X; Kanaki, K; Zavazieva, D; Capeans garrido, M D M; Schindler, H; Kaminski, J; Krautscheid, T; Lippmann, C; Arora, R; Dafni, T; Garcia irastorza, I; Puill, V; Wicek, F B; Burmistrov, L; Singh, K P; Pugliese, G; Kroha, H; Kunne, F; Alexopoulos, T; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Bettoni, D; Heijhoff, K; Xiao, Z; Tzanakos, G; Leisos, A; Frullani, S; Sahin, O; Kalkan, Y; Giboni, K; Krieger, C; Breton, D R; Bhattacharyya, S; Abbrescia, M; Erriquez, O; Paticchio, V; Cardini, A; Aloisio, A; Turini, N; Bressan, A; Tikhonov, Y; Schumacher, M; Simon, F R; Nowak, S; Herlant, S; Chaus, A; Fanourakis, G; Bressler, S; Homma, Y; Timmermans, J; Fonte, P; Underwood, D G; Azmoun, B; Fassouliotis, D; Wiacek, P; Dos santos covita, D; Monteiro da silva, A L; Yahlali haddou, N; Marques ferreira dos santos, J; Domingues amaro, F

    The proposed R&D collaboration, RD51, aims at facilitating the development of advanced gas-avalanche detector technologies and associated electronic-readout systems, for applications in basic and applied research. Advances in particle physics have always been enabled by parallel advances in radiation-detector technology. Radiation detection and imaging with gas-avalanche detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with a low material budget, have been playing an important role in many fields. Besides their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, gaseous detectors are employed in many other fields: astro-particle research and applications such as medical imaging, material science, and security inspection. While extensively employed at the LHC, RHIC, and other advanced HEP experiments, present gaseous detectors (wire-chambers, drift-tubes, resistive-plate chambers and others) have limitations which may prevent their use in future experiments. Present tec...

  3. Low background germanium detectors: From environmental laboratory to underground counting facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceuppens, M. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium)]|[Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States); Verplancke, J. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium)]|[Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States); Tench, O. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium)]|[Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Presentation and overview of different Low Level measuring systems ranging from the environmental lab to low-background detection systems and to the deep underground counting facility. Examples and performances for each of these will be given. Attention will be given to the standardised ultra low-background detectors and shields which provide excellent performance without the high cost in time and money associated with custom designed systems. (orig./DG)

  4. XPAD: A photons counting pixel detector for material sciences and small-animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpierre, P.; Basolo, S.; Berar, J.-F.; Bordesoule, M.; Boudet, N.; Breugnon, P.; Caillot, B.; Chantepie, B.; Clemens, J. C.; Dinkespiler, B.; Hustache-Ottini, S.; Meessen, C.; Menouni, M.; Morel, C.; Mouget, C.; Pangaud, P.; Potheau, R.; Vigeolas, E.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments on high-flux and high-brilliance third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources are now limited by detector performance. Photon-counting hybrid pixel detectors are being investigated as a solution to improve the dynamic range and the readout speed of the available 2D detectors. The XPAD2 is a large-surface hybrid pixel detector (68×65 mm 2) with a dynamic response, which ranges from 0.01 to 10 6 photons/pixel/s. High-resolution data were recorded using the XPAD2. The comparison with data measured using a conventional setup shows a gain on measurement duration by a factor 20 and on dynamic range. A new generation of pixel detector (XPAD3) is presently under development. For this, a new electronic chip (the XPAD3) is designed to improve spatial resolution by using 130 μm pixels and detector efficiency by using CdTe sensors. XPAD2 is also operated with PIXSCAN, a CT scanner for mice.

  5. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  6. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X; Colyer, R A; Scalia, G; Ingargiola, A; Lin, R; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Tremsin, Anton S; Vallerga, John V; Cheng, A; Levi, M; Aharoni, D; Arisaka, K; Villa, F; Guerrieri, F; Panzeri, F; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Zappa, F; Ghioni, M; Cova, S

    2013-02-05

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level.

  7. Development of Data Acquisition Methods for an FPGA-Based Photon Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambily, S.; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Mathew, Joice; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    MCP-based detectors are widely used in the ultraviolet (UV) region due to their low noise levels, high sensitivity and good spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a compact near-UV (NUV) detector for high-altitude balloon and space flights, using off-the-shelf MCP, CMOS sensor, and optics. The detector is designed to be capable of working in the direct frame transfer mode as well in the photon counting mode for single photon event detection. The identification and centroiding of each photon event are done using an FPGA-based data acquisition and real-time processing system. In this paper, we discuss various algorithms and methods used in both operating modes, as well as their implementation on the hardware.

  8. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S

    2013-10-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs.

  9. Effects of high count rates on the signals from GEM-based detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenning, Konstantin; Ketzer, Bernhard; Ball, Markus [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Lippmann, Christian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Future upgrades of accelerator-based particle physics experiments aim at drastically increased event rates and challenge both detector and readout performance. At high count rates in particle detectors effects like signal pileup, baseline shift and fluctuations become important. Large size GEM detectors as envisaged e.g. for the ongoing ALICE TPC upgrade have the advantage of delivering a fast signal without ion tail in comparison to wire chambers but the large capacitive coupling between channels via the GEM electrode facing the readout pads leads to significant baseline shift and fluctuations (common mode effect). The poster is presenting the work on quantifying the common mode effect as a function of rate and the result of application of different filters in the digital data path. The results are needed for the design finalization of the read out electronics to be used at ALICE and other experiments.

  10. Investigation of photon counting pixel detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talla, Patrick Takoukam

    2011-04-07

    The Medipix2 and Medipix3 detectors are hybrid pixelated photon counting detectors with a pixel pitch of 55 {mu}m. The sensor material used in this thesis was silicon. Because of their small pixel size they suffer from charge sharing i.e. an incoming photon can be registered by more than one pixel. In order to correct for charge sharing due to lateral diffusion of charge carriers, the Medipix3 detector was developed: with its Charge Summing Mode, the charge collected in a cluster of 2 x 2 pixel is added up and attributed to only one pixel whose counter is incremented. The adjustable threshold of the detectors allows to count the photons and to gain information on their energy. The main purposes of the thesis are to investigate spectral and imaging properties of pixelated photon counting detectors from the Medipix family such as Medipix2 and Medipix3. The investigations are based on simulations and measurements. In order to investigate the spectral properties of the detectors measurements were performed using fluorescence lines of materials such as molybdenum, silver but also some radioactive sources such as Am-241 or Cd-109. From the measured data, parameters like the threshold dispersion and the gain variation from pixel-to-pixel were extracted and used as input in the Monte Carlo code ROSI to model the responses of the detector to monoenergetic photons. The measured data are well described by the simulations for Medipix2 and for Medipix3 operating in Charge Summing Mode. Due to charge sharing and due to the energy dependence of attenuation processes in silicon and to Compton scattering the incoming and the measured spectrum differ substantially from each other. Since the responses to monoenergetic photons are known, a deconvolution was performed to determine the true incoming spectrum. Several direct and iterative methods were successfully applied on measured and simulated data of an X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrum is

  11. Development and characterisation of a visible light photon counting imaging detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Barnstedt, J

    2002-01-01

    We report on the development of a visible light photon counting imaging detector system. The detector concept is based on standard 25 mm diameter microchannel plate image intensifiers made by Proxitronic in Bensheim (Germany). Modifications applied to these image intensifiers are the use of three microchannel plates instead of two and a high resistance ceramics plate used instead of the standard phosphor output screen. A wedge and strip anode mounted directly behind the high resistance ceramics plate was used as a read out device. This wedge and strip anode picks up the image charge of electron clouds emerging from the microchannel plates. The charge pulses are fed into four charge amplifiers and subsequently into a digital position decoding electronics, achieving a position resolution of up to 1024x1024 pixels. Mounting the anode outside the detector tube is a new approach and has the great advantage of avoiding electrical feedthroughs from the anode so that the standard image intensifier fabrication process...

  12. Status of the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors for the ISS-CREAM Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. M.; ISS-CREAM Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    It is important to measure the cosmic ray spectra to study the origin, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays. A payload of the Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass experiment is scheduled to be launched in 2017 to the International Space Station for measuring cosmic ray elemental spectra at energies beyond the reach of balloon instruments. Top Counting Detector and Bottom Counting Detector (T/BCD) as a two-dimensional detector are to separate electrons from protons for electron/gamma-ray physics. The T/BCD each consists of a plastic scintillator read out by 20 by 20 photodiodes and is placed before and after the Calorimeter, respectively. Energy and hit information of the T/BCD can distinguish shower profiles of electrons and protons, which show narrower and shorter showers from electrons at a given energy. The T/BCD performance has been studied with the Silicon Charge Detector and the calorimeter by using a GEANT3 + FLUKA 3.21 simulation package. By comparing the number of hits and shower width distributions between electrons and protons, we have studied optimal parameters for the e/p separation.

  13. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed with more

  14. Progress in simulations of micropattern gas avalanche detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cwetanski, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Helpful for a better understanding of the intrinsic processes in the various gas avalanche detectors are simulations, involving three- dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) field map computations in order to describe the more and more complex geometries. Drift, multiplication and attachment procedures are simulated using Monte Carlo techniques. Recent results show a remarkable agreement with gain and energy resolution measurements thanks to the refined computations of gas transport properties and improved avalanching models. As examples the influence of wire eccentricity on gas gain and energy resolution in the ATLAS TRT straws is shown as well as performed studies of the Micromegas detector. 8 Refs.

  15. Radiation-Resistant Photon-Counting Detector Package Providing Sub-ps Stability for Laser Time Transfer in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochzaka, Ivan; Kodat, Jan; Blazej, Josef; Sun, Xiaoli (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction and performance of photon-counting detector packages based on silicon avalanche photodiodes. These photon-counting devices have been optimized for extremely high stability of their detection delay. The detectors have been designed for future applications in fundamental metrology and optical time transfer in space. The detectors have been qualified for operation in space missions. The exceptional radiation tolerance of the detection chip itself and of all critical components of a detector package has been verified in a series of experiments.

  16. A method for the selection of the optimum counting conditions in a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujo, L; Suarez-Navarro, J A; Montero, M

    2000-04-01

    The well-known criteria for the selection of the optimum counting conditions in a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector seem to restrict its applicability. These do not consider simultaneously operating voltage and electronic threshold variation to reach the best counting conditions. Therefore, a more general method for the determination of the optimum counting conditions in ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors is proposed. In this method, a relationship between voltage and electronic threshold is derived for counting efficiency. In order to test the method, quality control procedures have been carried out as well as the determination of gross alpha activity in environmental samples.

  17. Comparison of contrast enhancement methods using photon counting detector in spectral mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyemi; Park, Su-Jin; Jo, Byungdu; Kim, Dohyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    The photon counting detector with energy discrimination capabilities provides the spectral information and energy of each photon with single exposure. The energy-resolved photon counting detector makes it possible to improve the visualization of contrast agent by selecting the appropriate energy window. In this study, we simulated the photon counting spectral mammography system using a Monte Carlo method and compared three contrast enhancement methods (K-edge imaging, projection-based energy weighting imaging, and dual energy subtraction imaging). For the quantitative comparison, we used the homogeneous cylindrical breast phantom as a reference and the heterogeneous XCAT breast phantom. To evaluate the K-edge imaging methods, we obtained images by increasing the energy window width based on K-edge absorption energy of iodine. The iodine which has the K-edge discontinuity in the attenuation coefficient curve can be separated from the background. The projection-based energy weighting factor was defined as the difference in the transmissions between the contrast agent and the background. Each weighting factor as a function of photon energy was calculated and applied to the each energy bin. For the dual energy subtraction imaging, we acquired two images with below and above the iodine K-edge energy using single exposure. To suppress the breast tissue in high energy images, the weighting factor was applied as the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast tissue at high and low energies. Our results demonstrated the CNR improvement of the K-edge imaging was the highest among the three methods. These imaging techniques based on the energy-resolved photon counting detector improved image quality with the spectral information.

  18. X-ray Imaging Using a Hybrid Photon Counting GaAs Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, C; Göppert, R; Heijne, Erik H M; Ludwig, J; Meddeler, G; Mikulec, B; Pernigotti, E; Rogalla, M; Runge, K; Smith, K M; Snoeys, W; Söldner-Rembold, S; Watt, J

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hybrid GaAs pixel detectors as X-ray imaging sensors were investigated at room temperature. These hybrids consist of 300 mu-m thick GaAs pixel detectors, flip-chip bonded to a CMOS Single Photon Counting Chip (PCC). This chip consists of a matrix of 64 x 64 identical square pixels (170 mu-m x 170 mu-m) and covers a total area of 1.2 cm**2. The electronics in each cell comprises a preamplifier, a discriminator with a 3-bit threshold adjust and a 15-bit counter. The detector is realized by an array of Schottky diodes processed on semi-insulating LEC-GaAs bulk material. An IV-charcteristic and a detector bias voltage scan showed that the detector can be operated with voltages around 200 V. Images of various objects were taken by using a standard X-ray tube for dental diagnostics. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also determined. The applications of these imaging systems range from medical applications like digital mammography or dental X-ray diagnostics to non destructive material testing (...

  19. Liquid noble gas detectors for low energy particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Chepel, Vitaly; Araújo, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We review the current status of liquid noble gas radiation detectors with energy threshold in the keV range, wich are of interest for direct dark matter searches, measurement of coherent neutrino scattering and other low energy particle physics experiments. Emphasis is given to the operation principles and the most important instrumentation aspects of these detectors, principally of those operated in the double-phase mode. Recent technological advances and relevant developments in photon dete...

  20. Amplitude distributions of dark counts and photon counts in NbN superconducting single-photon detectors integrated with the HEMT readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaygorsky, J. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft, Delft University of Technology, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0231 (United States); Słysz, W., E-mail: wslysz@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Electron Technology, PL-02 668 Warsaw (Poland); Shouten, R.; Dorenbos, S.; Reiger, E.; Zwiller, V. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft, Delft University of Technology, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Sobolewski, Roman [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0231 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new operation regime of NbN superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). • A better understanding of the origin of dark counts generated by the detector. • A promise of PNR functionality in SSPD measurements. - Abstract: We present a new operation regime of NbN superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) by integrating them with a low-noise cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor and a high-load resistor. The integrated sensors are designed to get a better understanding of the origin of dark counts triggered by the detector, as our scheme allows us to distinguish the origin of dark pulses from the actual photon pulses in SSPDs. The presented approach is based on a statistical analysis of amplitude distributions of recorded trains of the SSPD photoresponse transients. It also enables to obtain information on energy of the incident photons, as well as demonstrates some photon-number-resolving capability of meander-type SSPDs.

  1. Energy-sensitive photon counting detector-based X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-03-01

    Energy-sensitive photon counting detectors (PCDs) have recently been developed for medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging and a handful of prototype PCD-CT systems have been built and evaluated. PCDs detect X-rays by using mechanisms that are completely different from the current CT detectors (i.e., energy integrating detectors or EIDs); PCDs count photons and obtain the information of the object tissues (i.e., the effective atomic numbers and mass densities) to be imaged. Therefore, these PCDs have the potential not only for evolution-to improve the current CT images such as providing dose reduction-but also for a revolution-to enable novel applications with a new concept such as molecular CT imaging. The performance of PCDs, however, is not flawless, and thus, it requires integrated efforts to develop PCD-CT for clinical use. In this article, we review the current status and the prediction for the future of PCDs, PCD-CT systems, and potential clinical applications.

  2. Neutron measurements with Time-Resolved Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, M.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Friedman, E.; Czasch, A.; Mardor, I.; Mor, I.; Weierganz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Results are presented from the latest experiment with a new neutron/gamma detector, a Time-Resolved, Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector. It is composed of a scintillating fiber-screen converter, bending mirror, lens and Event-Counting Image Intensifier (ECII), capable of specifying the position and time-of-flight of each event. TRECOR is designated for a multipurpose integrated system that will detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and explosives in cargo. Explosives are detected by Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography, and SNM by Dual Discrete-Energy gamma-Radiography. Neutrons and gamma-rays are both produced in the 11B(d,n+γ)12C reaction. The two detection modes can be implemented simultaneously in TRECOR, using two adjacent radiation converters that share a common optical readout. In the present experiment the neutron detection mode was studied, using a plastic scintillator converter. The measurements were performed at the PTB cyclotron, using the 9Be(d,n) neutron spectrum obtained from a thick Be-target at Ed ~ 13 MeV\\@. The basic characteristics of this detector were investigated, including the Contrast Transfer Function (CTF), Point Spread Function (PSF) and elemental discrimination capability.

  3. {sup 18}F-FDG positron autoradiography with a particle counting silicon pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, P; Lauria, A; Mettivier, G; Montesi, M C [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Marotta, M [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Aloj, L; Lastoria, S [Medicina Nucleare, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione G. Pascale, I-80131 Napoli (Italy)], E-mail: adele.lauria@na.infn.it

    2008-11-07

    We report on tests of a room-temperature particle counting silicon pixel detector of the Medipix2 series as the detector unit of a positron autoradiography (AR) system, for samples labelled with {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical used in PET studies. The silicon detector (1.98 cm{sup 2} sensitive area, 300 {mu}m thick) has high intrinsic resolution (55 {mu}m pitch) and works by counting all hits in a pixel above a certain energy threshold. The present work extends the detector characterization with {sup 18}F-FDG of a previous paper. We analysed the system's linearity, dynamic range, sensitivity, background count rate, noise, and its imaging performance on biological samples. Tests have been performed in the laboratory with {sup 18}F-FDG drops (37-37 000 Bq initial activity) and ex vivo in a rat injected with 88.8 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG. Particles interacting in the detector volume produced a hit in a cluster of pixels whose mean size was 4.3 pixels/event at 11 keV threshold and 2.2 pixels/event at 37 keV threshold. Results show a sensitivity for {beta}{sup +} of 0.377 cps Bq{sup -1}, a dynamic range of at least five orders of magnitude and a lower detection limit of 0.0015 Bq mm{sup -2}. Real-time {sup 18}F-FDG positron AR images have been obtained in 500-1000 s exposure time of thin (10-20 {mu}m) slices of a rat brain and compared with 20 h film autoradiography of adjacent slices. The analysis of the image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio in a rat brain slice indicated that Poisson noise-limited imaging can be approached in short (e.g. 100 s) exposures, with {approx}100 Bq slice activity, and that the silicon pixel detector produced a higher image quality than film-based AR.

  4. A proposal of a counting and recording system for cosmic ray muon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, C. R.; Campos, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Dal Lago, A.

    2013-02-01

    A multidirecional high energy cosmic ray (muon) telescope is operational at the Southern Space Observatory, in Sao Martinho da Serra, RS, Brazil. This telescope is part of the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and aims to study and forecast Space Weather. This paper proposes a new counting, correlation and recording solution based on an embedded system able to interface observational data by internet for remote monitoring. It is built around a Rabbit 3000 microcontroller with TCP/IP Ethernet 10Base-T connectivity. It is able to detect and count 200 ns pulses generated by the sensor system (scintillator plastics coupled with photomultipliers) during a specified period of time (generally one second). A preliminary version of a monitoring web page was developed and it is able to show the cosmic ray (muon) data of one detector in real time. The current system is an attempt to improve the reliability of the telescope when comparing to the recording system based on a personal computer, currently under operation. One advantage is the easy maintenance, since all the counting and correlation boards currently under operation can be replaced by an embedded system. Besides, as the hardware is off-the-shelf, it is only necessary to develop software routines, which is based on royalty-free libraries.

  5. Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Miller, Fred S.

    1999-01-01

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  6. The PASERO Project: parallel and serial readout systems for gas proportional synchrotron radiation X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.H.J. E-mail: koch@embl-hamburg.de; Boulin, C.; Briquet-Laugier, F.; Epstein, A.; Sheldon, S.; Beloeuvre, E.; Gabriel, A.; Herve, C.; Kocsis, M.; Koschuch, A.; Laggner, P.; Leingartner, W.; Raad Iseli, C. de; Reimann, T.; Golding, F.; Torki, K

    2001-07-21

    A project aiming at producing more efficient position sensitive gas proportional detectors and readout systems is presented. An area detector with reduced electrode spacing and a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm and two time to digital convertors (TDC) based on ASICs were produced. The first TDC, intended for use with linear detectors, relies on time to space conversion, whereas the second one, for area detectors, uses a ring oscillator with a phase locked loop. A parallel readout system for multi-anode detectors aiming at a maximum count rate extensively uses RISC microcontrollers. An electronic simulator of linear detectors built for test purposes and a mechanical chopper used for attenuation of the X-ray beam are also briefly described.

  7. Setup optimization toward accurate ageing studies of gas filled detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuhoza, A., E-mail: a.abuhoza@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); National Center for Mathematics and Physics, KACST, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, H.R. [Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany); Biswas, S.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    An infrastructure has been set up at the GSI detector laboratory to study the influence of construction materials on the ageing properties of gas filled detectors, such as multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC), gas electron multiplier (GEM). Optimization of an ageing setup was performed by observing the variation of the normalized gain obtained using two identical MWPCs. An accuracy in the relative gain measurement below 1% has been achieved by monitoring environmental conditions and by systematic improvements of the measuring equipment. Ageing test of fiberglass G11 has been performed.

  8. Gas microstrip detectors for X-ray tomographic flow imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Key, M J; Luggar, R D; Kundu, A

    2003-01-01

    A investigation into the suitability of gas microstrip detector technology for a high-speed industrial X-ray tomography system is reported. X-ray energies in the region 20-30 keV are well suited to the application, which involves imaging two-dimensional slices through gas/liquid multiphase pipeline flows for quantitative component fraction measurement. Stable operation over a period representing several hundred individual tomographic scans at gas gains of 500 is demonstrated using a Penning gas mixture of krypton/propylene.

  9. High resolution micro-pattern gas detectors for particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhtman, L.; Aulchenko, V.; Bobrovnikov, V.; Bondar, A.; Fedotovich, G.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Maltsev, T.; Nikolenko, D.; Rachek, I.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-07-01

    Micro-pattern gaseous detectors (MPGDs) allow operation at very high background particle flux with high efficiency and spatial resolution. This combination of parameters determines the main application of these detectors in particle physics experiments: precise tracking in the areas close to the beam and in the end-cap regions of general-purpose detectors. MPGDs of different configurations have been developed and are under development for several experiments in the Budker INP. The system of eight two-coordinate detectors based on a cascade of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) is working in the KEDR experiment at the VEPP-4M collider in the tagging system that detects electrons and positrons that lost their energy in two-photon interactions and left the equilibrium orbit due to a dedicated magnetic system. Another set of cascaded GEM detectors is developed for the almost-real Photon Tagging System (PTS) of the DEUTRON facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring. The PTS contains three very light detectors with very high spatial resolution (below 50 μm). Dedicated detectors based on cascaded GEMs are developed for the extracted electron beam facility at the VEPP-4M collider. These devices will allow precise particle tracking with minimal multiple scattering due to very low material content. An upgrade of the coordinate system of the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 collider is proposed on the basis of the resistive micro-WELL (μ-rWELL). A research activity on this subject has just started.

  10. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector and high-Z sensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Tolbanov, O.; Zarubin, A.; Tyazhev, A.; Shelkov, G.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Many X-ray experiments at third-generation synchrotrons benefit from using single-photon-counting detectors, due to their high signal-to-noise ratio and potential for high-speed measurements. LAMBDA (Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array) is a pixel detector system based on the Medipix3 readout chip. It combines the features of Medipix3, such as a small pixel size of 55 μm and flexible functionality, with a large tileable module design consisting of 12 chips (1536 × 512 pixels) and a high-speed readout system capable of running at 2000 frames per second. To enable high-speed experiments with hard X-rays, the LAMBDA system has been combined with different high-Z sensor materials. Room-temperature systems using GaAs and CdTe systems have been produced and tested with X-ray tubes and at synchrotron beamlines. Both detector materials show nonuniformities in their raw image response, but the pixel yield is high and the uniformity can be improved by flat-field correction, particularly in the case of GaAs. High-frame-rate experiments show that useful information can be gained on millisecond timescales in synchrotron experiments with these sensors.

  11. Effects, determination, and correction of count rate nonlinearity in multi-channel analog electron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, T. J.; Plumb, N. C.; Waugh, J. A.; Dessau, D. S.

    2014-04-01

    Detector counting rate nonlinearity, though a known problem, is commonly ignored in the analysis of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy where modern multichannel electron detection schemes using analog intensity scales are used. We focus on a nearly ubiquitous "inverse saturation" nonlinearity that makes the spectra falsely sharp and beautiful. These artificially enhanced spectra limit accurate quantitative analysis of the data, leading to mistaken spectral weights, Fermi energies, and peak widths. We present a method to rapidly detect and correct for this nonlinearity. This algorithm could be applicable for a wide range of nonlinear systems, beyond photoemission spectroscopy.

  12. Simultaneous counting of alpha, beta and gamma rays with phoswich detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Shigekazu; Abe, Hitoshi; Mihara, Akira

    1994-10-01

    Phoswich detectors for simultaneous counting of alpha, beta and gamma rays have been developed, which were prepared by combining two or three scintillators, ZnS(Ag), NE102A and/or BGO or NaI(Tl), with different rise times from each other. In order to adjust the pulse height ascribed to each scintillator within a dynamic range, a sheet of Au-Mylar was used, if necessary, as an optical neutral density filter for lowering the transmittance of scintillation of the ZnS(Ag). Characteristics of these phoswiches were examined by a pulse shape discrimination technique. Excellent discrimination among the radiations was attained for the prepared phoswiches.

  13. Design of micro-sensor-array detector for toxic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hai-yang; Tian, Peng

    2010-08-01

    To quickly measure the trace concentration of the single component toxic gas (e.g. sarin), a micro-array toxic gas detector is designed. A 3 x 3 gas sensor array with metalloporphyrins as sensitive materials is introduced. A micro-capsule that can be easy to be loaded and unloaded is designed for the gas reaction. A fiber-array optical path is designed, which is based on the principle that gas sensors will show different colors after reaction with the toxic gas. The tricolor information about the concentration of gas is collected by the color liner CCD. A control handling system with C8051F021 MCU as the core is implemented and embedded into the detector to perform the functions of gas sampling, data collection and analysis calculation. Data acquisition experimental results show that the proposed scheme can effectively collect the color information after gas reaction. Moreover, the system has many important advantages, such as small size, compact structure, high degree of automation, fast detection speed and high performance-cost ratio, etc.

  14. Assessment of the spectral performance of hybrid photon counting x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueb, Peter; Zambon, Pietro; Broennimann, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid Photon Counting (HPC) detectors profoundly improved x-ray diffraction experiments at third generation synchrotron facilities. Enabling the simultaneous measurement of x-ray intensities in multiple energy bins, they also have many potential applications in the field of medical imaging. A prerequisite for this is a clean spectral response. To quantify how efficiently HPC detectors are able to assign photons to the correct energy bin, a quantity called Spectral Efficiency (SE) is introduced. This figure of merit measures the number of x-rays with correctly assigned energy normalized to the number of incoming photons. A prototype HPC detector has been used to perform precision measurements of x-ray spectra at the BESSY synchrotron. The detector consists of a novel ASIC with pixels of 75 × 75 μm2 size and a 750 μm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data are complemented by the results of a Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation, which not only includes the physical detection process but also pulse pile-up at high photon fluxes. The spectra and the measured photon flux are used to infer the Spectral Efficiency. In the energy range from 10 to 60 keV, both the Quantum Efficiency and the Spectral Efficiency were precisely measured and simulated. Good agreement between simulation and experiment has been achieved. For the small pixels of the prototype detector, a SE between 15% and 77% has been determined. The MC simulation is used to predict the SE for various pixel sizes at different photon fluxes. For a typical flux of 5∙107  photons/mm2 /s used in human Computed Tomography (CT), the highest SE is achieved for pixel sizes in the range between 150 × 150 μm2 and 300 × 300 μm2 . The Spectral Efficiency turns out to be a useful figure of merit to quantify the spectral performance of HPC detectors. It allows a quantitative comparison of detectors with different sensor and ASIC configurations over a broad range of x-ray energies and fluxes. The maximization of

  15. Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Majewski, Lucasz A.

    1999-09-28

    This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

  16. FGLD A novel and compact micro-pattern gas detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dick, Louis; Watts, David

    2004-01-01

    A new gas detector which combines in the same structure the gas amplification mechanism and the position sensitive readout, named the field gradient lattice detector (FGLD), is being developed at CERN. The detector, reminiscent in geometry of a multi-wire proportional chamber but with a different field configuration can be fabricated as two or more layers of micro-patterned parallel tracks on a variety of substrate materials. Two preliminary proof-of-concept designs without position sensitivity have been fabricated as copper tracks of 50 mum width and 150 mum pitch on polyimide in a 3D geometry and on epoxy in a 2D geometry. They have been shown to detect the 5.9 keV X-rays of an $^{55}Fe$ source with a stable gain ranging from 500 to 5000 in a 3 mm drift chamber containing an argon carbon-dioxide gas mixture. The elegance and compactness of the FGLD design make it a very attractive gas detector solution both economically and mechanically. Most interestingly, the 3D FGLD design on flexible polyimide should gr...

  17. Development and applications of gas electron multiplier detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the recent developments in the field of gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors was presented. Cascading of several GEM foils permits the sustaining of large gains and thereby allows the detection of minimum ionizing particles. The application of GEM included, fast and position sensitive detection in particle physics, medicine, neutron spectrometry, and astrophysics. (Edited abstract) 19 Refs.

  18. A pressurized argon gas TPC as DUNE near detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Albo, J.; DUNE Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    DUNE is a new international experiment for neutrino physics and nucleon decay searches. It will consist of two detectors, about 1300 km apart, exposed to a multi-megawatt neutrino beam that will be built at Fermilab. One of the two detectors will be installed several hundred meters downstream of the neutrino production point with the primary role of characterising the energy spectrum and composition of the beam as well as performing precision measurements of neutrino cross sections. For the design of this so-called near detector, the DUNE Collaboration is considering, among other technologies, a pressurized argon gas time projection chamber. Such a detector, thanks to its low density and low detection thresholds, would allow the detailed measurement in argon of nuclear effects at the neutrino interaction vertex, which are considered at present one of the most important sources of systematic uncertainty for neutrino oscillation measurements.

  19. K-edge energy-based calibration method for photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, potential applications of energy-resolved photon counting detectors (PCDs) in the x-ray medical imaging field have been actively investigated. Unlike conventional x-ray energy integration detectors, PCDs count the number of incident x-ray photons within certain energy windows. For PCDs, the interactions between x-ray photons and photoconductor generate electronic voltage pulse signals. The pulse height of each signal is proportional to the energy of the incident photons. By comparing the pulse height with the preset energy threshold values, x-ray photons with specific energies are recorded and sorted into different energy bins. To quantitatively understand the meaning of the energy threshold values, and thus to assign an absolute energy value to each energy bin, energy calibration is needed to establish the quantitative relationship between the threshold values and the corresponding effective photon energies. In practice, the energy calibration is not always easy, due to the lack of well-calibrated energy references for the working energy range of the PCDs. In this paper, a new method was developed to use the precise knowledge of the characteristic K-edge energy of materials to perform energy calibration. The proposed method was demonstrated using experimental data acquired from three K-edge materials (viz., iodine, gadolinium, and gold) on two different PCDs (Hydra and Flite, XCounter, Sweden). Finally, the proposed energy calibration method was further validated using a radioactive isotope (Am-241) with a known decay energy spectrum.

  20. A risk-based approach to flammable gas detector spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defriend, Stephen; Dejmek, Mark; Porter, Leisa; Deshotels, Bob; Natvig, Bernt

    2008-11-15

    Flammable gas detectors allow an operating company to address leaks before they become serious, by automatically alarming and by initiating isolation and safe venting. Without effective gas detection, there is very limited defense against a flammable gas leak developing into a fire or explosion that could cause loss of life or escalate to cascading failures of nearby vessels, piping, and equipment. While it is commonly recognized that some gas detectors are needed in a process plant containing flammable gas or volatile liquids, there is usually a question of how many are needed. The areas that need protection can be determined by dispersion modeling from potential leak sites. Within the areas that must be protected, the spacing of detectors (or alternatively, number of detectors) should be based on risk. Detector design can be characterized by spacing criteria, which is convenient for design - or alternatively by number of detectors, which is convenient for cost reporting. The factors that influence the risk are site-specific, including process conditions, chemical composition, number of potential leak sites, piping design standards, arrangement of plant equipment and structures, design of isolation and depressurization systems, and frequency of detector testing. Site-specific factors such as those just mentioned affect the size of flammable gas cloud that must be detected (within a specified probability) by the gas detection system. A probability of detection must be specified that gives a design with a tolerable risk of fires and explosions. To determine the optimum spacing of detectors, it is important to consider the probability that a detector will fail at some time and be inoperative until replaced or repaired. A cost-effective approach is based on the combined risk from a representative selection of leakage scenarios, rather than a worst-case evaluation. This means that probability and severity of leak consequences must be evaluated together. In marine and

  1. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-15

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  2. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  3. Development of scintillation-light-transmission type phoswich detector for simultaneous alpha- and beta (gamma)-ray counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K.; Usuda, S.; Gunji, H.

    2000-08-01

    A new type of scintillation-light-transmission ZnS(Ag)/NE102A phoswich detector has been developed, in which scintillation light emitted from the phoswich is transmitted through an optical fiber to a photomultiplier tube. By adjusting wavelength of the scintillation light to transmittance region of the optical fiber, the phoswich detector was capable of successfully performing simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta (including gamma)-rays. In addition, the detector has been applied to a dip-type inline monitor, which directly contacts with actinide solution. The detector will be available especially in a narrow and/or isolated space such as glove box and hot cell.

  4. Counting radon tracks in Makrofol detectors with the 'image reduction and analysis facility' (IRAF) software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, F. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)]. E-mail: fimerall@ull.es; Gonzalez-Manrique, S. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Karlsson, L. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hernandez-Armas, J. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna. Avenida. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    Makrofol detectors are commonly used for long-term radon ({sup 222}Rn) measurements in houses, schools and workplaces. The use of this type of passive detectors for the determination of radon concentrations requires the counting of the nuclear tracks produced by alpha particles on the detecting material. The 'image reduction and analysis facility' (IRAF) software package is a piece of software commonly used in astronomical applications. It allows detailed counting and mapping of sky sections where stars are grouped very closely, even forming clusters. In order to count the nuclear tracks in our Makrofol radon detectors, we have developed an inter-disciplinary application that takes advantage of the similitude that exist between counting stars in a dark sky and tracks in a track-etch detector. Thus, a low cost semi-automatic system has been set up in our laboratory which utilises a commercially available desktop scanner and the IRAF software package. A detailed description of the proposed semi-automatic method and its performance, in comparison to ocular counting, is described in detail here. In addition, the calibration factor for this procedure, 2.97+/-0.07kBqm{sup -3}htrack{sup -1}cm{sup 2}, has been calculated based on the results obtained from exposing 46 detectors to certified radon concentrations. Furthermore, the results of a preliminary radon survey carried out in 62 schools in Tenerife island (Spain), using Makrofol detectors, counted with the mentioned procedure, are briefly presented. The results reported here indicate that the developed procedure permits a fast, accurate and unbiased determination of the radon tracks in a large number of detectors. The measurements carried out in the schools showed that the radon concentrations in at least 12 schools were above 200Bqm{sup -3} and, in two of them, above 400Bqm{sup -3}. Further studies should be performed at those schools following the European Union recommendations about radon concentrations in

  5. Heavy Gas Cerenkov Detector for Jefferson Lab Hall C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenliang

    2013-10-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) has undertaken the 12 GeV Upgrade to double the accelerating energy of its electron beam. This attracts many interesting proposals to probe the quark-gluon nature of nuclear matter at higher energy therefore a new set of equipment are required. A new Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is currently under construction for the experimental Hall C. University of Regina is assigned to construct the Heavy Gas Cerenkov Detector as part of SHMS focal plane detectors. This detector will be used as critical component for good pion identification in the SHMS experimental program. In this presentation, we will report the design, current status and expected performance. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  6. Optimization of micro-strip gas chamber as two-dimensional neutron detector using gadolinium converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaoka, Sei; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    A micro-strip gas chamber (MSGC) has been developing as a two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector for neutron scattering experiments using high-intensity pulsed-neutron source in a high-intensity proton accelerator facility. MSGC is required for the high count rate, high detective efficiency, high positional resolution, stabilization and covering large area. Our purpose in this paper is to verify the proper of Gadolinium as MSGC converter. First, the basic property of Gadolinium converter was examined by simple experiments using a zero-dimensional neutron detector on the purpose of deriving the detective efficiency. Second, the optimization of the arrangement of a capillary plate in MSGC has been done by simulation on the MSGC using Gadolinium converter. As a result of that, it has been proved that Gadolinium can be theoretically used as a converter of MSGC. (author)

  7. An Effective Multilevel Offset Correction Technique for Single Photon Counting Pixel Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmon, P.; Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a novel technique of an in-pixel multilevel offset correction to be used in hybrid pixel detector readout circuits operating in a single photon counting mode. This technique was implemented in a prototype integrated circuit consisting of 23,552 square shaped pixels of 75 μm pitch, which was designed and manufactured in CMOS 130 nm technology. Each pixel contains a charge sensitive amplifier, shaper, two discriminators, two 14-bit counters and a block for multilevel offset correction. The effective gain and offset are controlled individually in each pixel. The measurement results prove very good uniformity of the prototype integrated circuit with an offset spread of only 7e- rms and a gain spread of 2.5%.

  8. Position and time sensitive photon counting detector with image charge delay-line readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czasch, Achim; Dangendorf, Volker; Milnes, James; Schössler, Sven; Lauck, Ronald; Spillmann, Uwe; Howorth, Jon; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2007-09-01

    We have developed single photon counting image intensifier tubes combining position and time information read-out with at least 500x500 pixels and sub-nanosecond time resolution. This image intensifier type uses a resistive screen instead of a phosphor screen and the image charge pickup anode is placed outside the sealed tube. We present a novel delay-line anode design which allows for instance detecting simultaneously arriving pairs of photons. Due to the very low background this technique is suited for applications with very low light intensity and especially if a precise time tagging for each photon is required. We show results obtained with several anode types on a 25 mm image intensifier tube and a 40 mm open-face MCP detector and discuss the performance in neutron radiography, e.g. for homeland security, and the prospects for applications like Fluorescence Life-time Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), astronomy and X-ray polarimetry.

  9. K-edge energy-based calibration method for photon counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-10-26

    In recent years, potential applications of energy-resolved photon counting detectors (PCDs) in the x-ray medical imaging field have been actively investigated. Unlike conventional x-ray energy integration detectors, PCDs count the number of incident x-ray photons within certain energy windows. For PCDs, the interactions between x-ray photons and photoconductor generate electronic voltage pulse signals. The pulse height of each signal is proportional to the energy of the incident photons. By comparing the pulse height with the preset energy threshold values, x-ray photons with specific energies are recorded and sorted into different energy bins. To quantitatively understand the meaning of the energy threshold values, and thus to assign an absolute energy value to each energy bin, energy calibration is needed to establish the quantitative relationship between the threshold values and the corresponding effective photon energies. In practice, the energy calibration is not always easy, due to the lack of well-calibrated energy references for the working energy range of the PCDs. In this paper, a new method was developed to use the precise knowledge of the characteristic K-edge energy of materials to perform energy calibration. The proposed method was demonstrated using experimental data acquired from three K-edge materials (viz., iodine, gadolinium, and gold) on two different PCDs (Hydra and Flite, XCounter, Sweden). Finally, the proposed energy calibration method was further validated using a radioactive isotope (Am-241) with a known decay energy spectrum. © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  10. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  11. TU-EF-207-02: Spectral Mammography Based on Photon Counting Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S. [University of California (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  12. A position- and time-sensitive photon-counting detector with delay- line read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagutzki, Ottmar; Dangendorf, Volker; Lauck, Ronald; Czasch, Achim; Milnes, James

    2007-05-01

    We have developed image intensifier tubes with delay-anode read-out for time- and position-sensitive photon counting. The timing precision is better than 1 ns with 1000x1000 pixels position resolution and up to one megacounts/s processing rate. Large format detectors of 40 and 75 mm active diameter with internal helical-wire delay-line anodes have been produced and specified. A different type of 40 and 25 mm tubes with semi-conducting screen for image charge read-out allow for an economic and robust tube design and for placing the read-out anodes outside the sealed housing. Two types of external delay-line anodes, i.e. pick-up electrodes for the image charge, have been tested. We present tests of the detector and anode performance. Due to the low background this technique is well suited for applications with very low light intensity and especially if a precise time tagging for each photon is required. As an example we present the application of scintillator read-out in time-of-flight (TOF) neutron radiography. Further applications so far are Fluorescence Life-time Microscopy (FLIM) and Astronomy.

  13. Near UV imager with an MCP-based photon counting detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambily, S.; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a compact UV Imager using light weight components, that can be own on a small CubeSat or a balloon platform. The system has a lens-based optics that can provide an aberration-free image over a wide field of view. The backend instrument is a photon counting detector with off-the-shelf MCP, CMOS sensor and electronics. We are using a Z-stack MCP with a compact high voltage power supply and a phosphor screen anode, which is read out by a CMOS sensor and the associated electronics. The instrument can be used to observe solar system objects and detect bright transients from the upper atmosphere with the help of CubeSats or high altitude balloons. We have designed the imager to be capable of working in direct frame transfer mode as well in the photon-counting mode for single photon event detection. The identification and centroiding of each photon event are done using an FPGA-based data acquisition and real-time processing system.

  14. Thermal neutron radiative capture on cadmium as a counting technique at the INES beam line at ISIS: A preliminary investigation of detector cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, G; Grazzi, F; Pietropaolo, A; Scherillo, A; Schooneveld, E M

    2017-12-01

    Experimental tests are presented that assess the cross-talk level among three scintillation detectors used as neutron counters exploiting the thermal neutron radiative capture on Cd. The measurements were done at the INES diffractometer operating at the ISIS spallation neutron source (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK). These tests follow a preliminary set of measurements performed on the same instrument to study the effectiveness of this thermal neutron counting strategy in neutron diffraction measurements, typically performed on INES using squashed 3He filled gas tubes. The experimental data were collected in two different geometrical configurations of the detectors and compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations, performed using the MCNP code. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Description of the SAltro-16 chip for gas detector readout

    CERN Document Server

    Aspell, P; Garcia Garcia, E; de Gaspari, M; Mager, M; Musa, L; Rehman, A; Trampitsch, G

    2010-01-01

    The S-ALTRO prototype chip is a mixed-signal integrated circuit designed to be one of the building blocks of the readout electronics for gas detectors. Its architecture is based in the ALTRO (ALICE TPC Read Out) chip, being its main difference the integration of the charge shaping amplifier in the same IC. Just like ALTRO chip, the prototype architecture and programmability make it suitable for the readout of a wider class of detectors. In one single chip, 16 analogue signals from the detector are shaped, digitised, processed, compressed and stored in a multi-acquisition memory. The Analogue-to- Digital converters embedded in the chip have a 10-bit dynamic range and a maximum sampling rate up to 40MHz. After digitisation, a pipelined Data Processor is able to remove from the input signal a wide range of perturbations, related to the non- ideal behaviour of the detector, temperature variation of the electronics, environmental noise, etc. Moreover, the Data Processor is able to suppress the pulse tail within 1�...

  16. Renal stone characterization using high resolution imaging mode on a photon counting detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, A.; Gutjahr, R.; Henning, A.; Kappler, S.; Halaweish, A.; Abdurakhimova, D.; Peterson, Z.; Montoya, J.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C.

    2017-03-01

    In addition to the standard-resolution (SR) acquisition mode, a high-resolution (HR) mode is available on a research photon-counting-detector (PCD) whole-body CT system. In the HR mode each detector consists of a 2x2 array of 0.225 mm x 0.225 mm subpixel elements. This is in contrast to the SR mode that consists of a 4x4 array of the same subelements, and results in 0.25 mm isotropic resolution at iso-center for the HR mode. In this study, we quantified ex vivo the capabilities of the HR mode to characterize renal stones in terms of morphology and mineral composition. Forty pure stones - 10 uric acid (UA), 10 cystine (CYS), 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and 10 apatite (APA) - and 14 mixed stones were placed in a 20 cm water phantom and scanned in HR mode, at radiation dose matched to that of routine dual-energy stone exams. Data from micro CT provided a reference for the quantification of morphology and mineral composition of the mixed stones. The area under the ROC curve was 1.0 for discriminating UA from CYS, 0.89 for CYS vs COM and 0.84 for COM vs APA. The root mean square error (RMSE) of the percent UA in mixed stones was 11.0% with a medium-sharp kernel and 15.6% with the sharpest kernel. The HR showed qualitatively accurate characterization of stone morphology relative to micro CT.

  17. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do

  18. Illicit material detector based on gas sensors and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Vincent; Politano, Jean-Luc

    1997-02-01

    In accordance with its missions, le Centre de Recherches et d'Etudes de la Logistique de la Police Nationale francaise (CREL) has been conducting research for the past few years targeted at detecting drugs and explosives. We have focused our approach of the underlying physical and chemical detection principles on solid state gas sensors, in the hope of developing a hand-held drugs and explosives detector. The CREL and Laboratory and Scientific Services Directorate are research partners for this project. Using generic hydrocarbon, industrially available, metal oxide sensors as illicit material detectors, requires usage precautions. Indeed, neither the product's concentrations, nor even the products themselves, belong to the intended usage specifications. Therefore, the CREL is currently investigating two major research topics: controlling the sensor's environment: with environmental control we improve the detection of small product concentration; determining detection thresholds: both drugs and explosives disseminate low gas concentration. We are attempting to quantify the minimal concentration which triggers detection. In the long run, we foresee a computer-based tool likely to detect a target gas in a noisy atmosphere. A neural network is the suitable tool for interpreting the response of heterogeneous sensor matrix. This information processing structure, alongside with proper sensor environment control, will lessen the repercussions of common MOS sensor sensitivity characteristic dispersion.

  19. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  20. Spectral CT of the extremities with a silicon strip photon counting detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Taguchi, K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are an important emerging technology for spectral imaging and material differentiation with numerous potential applications in diagnostic imaging. We report development of a Si-strip PCXD system originally developed for mammography with potential application to spectral CT of musculoskeletal extremities, including challenges associated with sparse sampling, spectral calibration, and optimization for higher energy x-ray beams. Methods: A bench-top CT system was developed incorporating a Si-strip PCXD, fixed anode x-ray source, and rotational and translational motions to execute complex acquisition trajectories. Trajectories involving rotation and translation combined with iterative reconstruction were investigated, including single and multiple axial scans and longitudinal helical scans. The system was calibrated to provide accurate spectral separation in dual-energy three-material decomposition of soft-tissue, bone, and iodine. Image quality and decomposition accuracy were assessed in experiments using a phantom with pairs of bone and iodine inserts (3, 5, 15 and 20 mm) and an anthropomorphic wrist. Results: The designed trajectories improved the sampling distribution from 56% minimum sampling of voxels to 75%. Use of iterative reconstruction (viz., penalized likelihood with edge preserving regularization) in combination with such trajectories resulted in a very low level of artifacts in images of the wrist. For large bone or iodine inserts (>5 mm diameter), the error in the estimated material concentration was decomposition in joint imaging proved feasible through a combination of rotation-translation acquisition trajectories and iterative reconstruction with optimized regularization.

  1. Optimization of the equalization procedure for a single-photon counting CdTe detector used for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, P.; Brombal, L.; Di Trapani, V.; Donato, S.; Bottigli, U.; Dreossi, D.; Golosio, B.; Oliva, P.; Rigon, L.; Longo, R.

    2017-11-01

    SYRMA-3D (SYnchrotron Radiation MAmmography 3D) aims to develop a breast CT system based on monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a single photon counting detector (PIXIRAD-8) with CdTe sensor. Due to the demanding requests on high contrast resolution and low dose, images in breast CT are particularly sensitive to small imperfections of the flat field correction applied before the CT reconstruction. Detectors based on high Z crystal sensors show inhomogeneous pixels gain, which depends on the time from the switching-on of the high voltage polarization. This effect has been studied in our CdTe detector with the purpose of develop an effective flat field correction procedure. In the PIXIRAD-8 detector, the time-dependent inhomogeneities of the flat field signal appear to be local, small and systematically reproducible, with the exception of the pixels on the sensors edges.

  2. Results from prototypes of environmental and health alarm devices based on gaseous detectors operating in air in counting mode

    CERN Document Server

    Martinengo, P; Peskov, V; Benaben, P; Charpak, G; Breuil, P

    2011-01-01

    We have developed and successfully tested two prototypes of detectors of dangerous gases based on wire-type counters operating in air in avalanche mode: one is for radon (Rn) detection whereas the other one is for the detection of gases with an ionization potential less than the air components. Due to the operation in pulse counting mode these prototypes have sensitivities comparable to (in the case of the Rn detector) or much higher than (in the case of the detector for low ionization gases) the best commercial devices currently available on the market. We believe that due to their high sensitivity, simplicity and low cost such new detectors will find massive applications. One of them, discussed in this paper, could be the on-line monitoring of Rn for the prediction of earthquakes. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectral CT modeling and reconstruction with hybrid detectors in dynamic-threshold-based counting and integrating modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2015-03-01

    Spectral CT with photon counting detectors can significantly improve CT performance by reducing image noise and dose, increasing contrast resolution and material specificity, as well as enabling functional and molecular imaging with existing and emerging probes. However, the current photon counting detector architecture is difficult to balance the number of energy bins and the statistical noise in each energy bin. Moreover, the hardware support for multi-energy bins demands a complex circuit which is expensive. In this paper, we promote a new scheme known as hybrid detectors that combine the dynamic-threshold-based counting and integrating modes. In this scheme, an energy threshold can be dynamically changed during a spectral CT scan, which can be considered as compressive sensing along the spectral dimension. By doing so, the number of energy bins can be retrospectively specified, even in a spatially varying fashion. To establish the feasibility and merits of such hybrid detectors, we develop a tensor-based PRISM algorithm to reconstruct a spectral CT image from dynamic dual-energy data, and perform experiments with simulated and real data, producing very promising results.

  4. Gas Electron Multiplier Detectors for TREK at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongwi, Bishoy

    2013-10-01

    Lepton flavor universality is a basic assumption of the Standard Model (SM). The proposed experiment E36 at J-PARC in Japan measures decay widths of stopped K+ using the TREK (Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons) detector system to conduct precision measurements of RK = Γ (K+ -->e+ ν) / Γ (K+ -->μ+ ν) in search of lepton flavor universality violation. The SM prediction for the ratio of leptonic K+ decays is highly precise with an uncertainty of △RK /RK = 4 .10-4 . Any observed deviation from the SM prediction would yield clear indication of New Physics beyond the Standard Model. To test lepton flavor universality violation a total uncertainty for the decay ratio of Ke 2 /Kμ 2 is aimed to be 0 . 25 % (0 . 20 % stat + 0 . 15 % sys). The second portion of the experiment searches for heavy sterile neutrinos (N) in the K+ -->μ+ N decay and allows for further stringent searches for light new particles as a byproduct. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors will be constructed for this experiment in order to measure charged tracks of μ+ and e+ from charged K+ decay. I will present Geant4 simulations of the TREK setup augmented with the GEM detectors. This work has been supported by DOE Early Career Award DE-SC0003884.

  5. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, E.N., E-mail: Eva.Gimenez@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Oxforshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Astromskas, V. [University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, Oxforshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e{sup −} collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system. - Highlights: • A high atomic number (CdTe sensor based) photon-counting detector was developed. • Polarization effects affected the image were minimized by regularly refreshing the bias voltage and stabilizing the temperature. • Good spatial resolution and image quality was achieved following this procedure.

  6. Mitigating gas emissions at signalised intersections using wireless vehicle detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Kwasi Torkudzor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion on roads wastes travel times and increases fuel consumption as well as gas emissions which are dangerous to human health. This has led to growing concern about environmental protection and energy conservation and a number of studies to increase fuel economy and reduce gas emissions. To increase travel times so as to reduce fuel consumption and gas emissions, traffic signals at intersections must be well implemented. It is therefore necessary to employ the current technology of wireless sensor networks to enhance the optimisation of the signalised intersections so as to address such a concern. In this study, a vehicular traffic control model was developed to optimise a signalised intersection, using wireless vehicle detectors. Real-time traffic volume gathered were analysed to obtain the peak hour traffic volume causing congestion. The intersection was modelled and simulated in Synchro7 as an actuated signalised model using results from the analysed data. The model for morning peak and evening peak periods gave optimal cycle lengths which result in the reduction of gas emissions, fuel consumption and delay at the intersection.

  7. 18k Channels single photon counting readout circuit for hybrid pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.; Sakumura, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed measurements of an integrated circuit named PXD18k designed for hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications. The PXD18k integrated circuit, fabricated in CMOS 180 nm technology, has dimensions of 9.64 mm×20 mm and contains approximately 26 million transistors. The core of the IC is a matrix of 96×192 pixels with 100 μm×100 μm pixel size. Each pixel works in a single photon counting mode. A single pixel contains two charge sensitive amplifiers with Krummenacher feedback scheme, two shapers, two discriminators (with independent thresholds A and B) and two 16-bit ripple counters. The data are read out via eight low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) outputs with 100 Mbps rate. The power consumption is dominated by analog blocks and it is about 23 μW/pixel. The effective peaking time at the discriminator input is 30 ns and is mainly determined by the time constants of the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). The gain is equal to 42.5 μV/e- and the equivalent noise charge is 168 e- rms (with bump-bonded silicon pixel detector). Thanks to the use of trim DACs in each pixel, the effective threshold spread at the discriminator input is only 1.79 mV. The dead time of the front end electronics for a standard setting is 172 ns (paralyzable model). In the standard readout mode (when the data collection time is separated from the time necessary to readout data from the chip) the PXD18k IC works with two energy thresholds per pixel. The PXD18k can also be operated in the continuous readout mode (with a zero dead time) where one can select the number of bits readout from each pixel to optimize the PXD18k frame rate. For example, for reading out 16 bits/pixel the frame rate is 2.7 kHz and for 4 bits/pixel it rises to 7.1 kHz.

  8. Time-over-threshold readout to enhance the high flux capabilities of single-photon-counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Radicci, Valeria; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Stoppani, Laura

    2011-11-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting (SPC) detector has been characterized using the time-over-threshold (ToT) readout method, i.e. measuring the time that the signal produced by the detected X-rays remains above the comparator threshold. In the following it is shown that the ToT readout preserves the sensitivity, dynamic range and capability of background suppression of the SPC mode, while enhancing the count-rate capability, which is the main limitation of state-of-the-art SPC systems.

  9. A unified statistical framework for material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kang, Dong-Goo; Kang, Sunghoon; Sung, Younghun [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), San 14, Nong-seo dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin, Kyunggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Jong Chul [Bio-Imaging and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) has been an active research area over the past few years. Even with some success, the problem of optimal energy selection and three material decomposition including malignant tissue is still on going research topic, and more systematic studies are required. This paper aims to address this in a unified statistical framework in a mammographic environment.Methods: A unified statistical framework for energy level optimization and decomposition of three materials is proposed. In particular, an energy level optimization algorithm is derived using the theory of the minimum variance unbiased estimator, and an iterative algorithm is proposed for material composition as well as system parameter estimation under the unified statistical estimation framework. To verify the performance of the proposed algorithm, the authors performed simulation studies as well as real experiments using physical breast phantom and ex vivo breast specimen. Quantitative comparisons using various performance measures were conducted, and qualitative performance evaluations for ex vivo breast specimen were also performed by comparing the ground-truth malignant tissue areas identified by radiologists.Results: Both simulation and real experiments confirmed that the optimized energy bins by the proposed method allow better material decomposition quality. Moreover, for the specimen thickness estimation errors up to 2 mm, the proposed method provides good reconstruction results in both simulation and real ex vivo breast phantom experiments compared to existing methods.Conclusions: The proposed statistical framework of PCXD has been successfully applied for the energy optimization and decomposition of three material in a mammographic environment. Experimental results using the physical breast phantom and ex vivo specimen support the practicality of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  11. Ultra-high spatial resolution multi-energy CT using photon counting detector technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, S.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Kappler, S.; Henning, A.; Halaweish, A.; Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; McCollough, C.

    2017-03-01

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed.

  12. [Verification of complete blood cell count (CBC) data from heparinized blood gas samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoguchi, Takafumi; Fujii, Seiji; Inuzumi, Koji; Kaminoh, Yoshiroh; Hirose, Munetaka; Masaki, Mitsuru; Koshiba, Masahiro

    2014-02-01

    Complete blood cell count (CBC) data from heparinized blood gas (H-Gas) samples were verified with primary focus on the platelet count (PLT). When a part of H-Gas sample was taken to a separation tube from the blood collection syringe and CBC of the sample in the separation tube was repeatedly measured (Procedure 1), the PLT from 5 samples relative to that obtained immediately after the separation was gradually reduced to 72.6-94.2% during serial measurements (every 5 minutes, up to 30 minutes). The change in the scattergram pattern suggested that this PLT decrease was due to the formation of platelet clumps. The white blood cell count (WBC), red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Ht) values did not significantly change during the repeated measurements. On the other hand, PLT was significantly improved to 96.8-99.8% when the H-Gas sample was kept in the blood collection syringe so as to minimizing the exposure to the air, and the sample for the measurement from H-Gas was taken every time to separation tube from the syringe, followed by CBC measurement without delay (Procedure 2). In addition, while there were significant variations (CV: 11.8-18.2%) in PLT reproducibility among H-Gas samples by Procedure 1, measurements utilizing the Procedure 2 resulted in much smaller variations (CV: 2.2-3.7%). Thus the CBC data obtained from H-Gas samples were equivalent to those from EDTA samples when the Procedure 2 was applied. These data suggest that H-Gas samples can be used for the accurate CBC measurement, including PLT, by applying the Procedure 2.

  13. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.karellas@umassmed.edu; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pisa 56127, Italy and Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l., L. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  14. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  15. Development of a fast read-out system of a single photon counting detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, F. C.; Rigon, L.; Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2011-12-01

    A single-photon counting detector read-out system for mammography with synchrotron radiation has been developed with the aim to meet the needs of the mammographic imaging station of the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. The system called PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) is a modular detector that implements a read-out system with MYTHEN II ASICs, an embedded Linux-based controller board and a Scientific Linux acquisition workstation. The system architecture and characteristics are herein presented. The system was tested at the SYRMEP beamline and achieved a frame rate of 33 Hz for 8448 channels at 24-bit dynamic range, and it is capable of continuously acquiring up to 2000 frames. Standard mammographic phantoms were imaged and good quality images were obtained at doses comparable with what is delivered in conventional full field mammographic systems.

  16. Photon-Counting Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) for Far/Mid-Infrared Space Spectroscopy with the Origins Space Telescope (OST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozian, Omid; Barrentine, Emily M.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Brown, Ari D.; Moseley, Samuel Harvey; Wollack, Edward; Pontoppidan, Klaus Martin; U-Yen, Konpop; Mikula, Vilem

    2018-01-01

    Photon-counting detectors are highly desirable for reaching the ~ 10-20 W/√Hz power sensitivity permitted by the Origins Space Telescope (OST). We are developing unique Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) with photon counting capability in the far/mid-IR. Combined with an on-chip far-IR spectrometer onboard OST these detectors will enable a new data set for exploring galaxy evolution and the growth of structure in the Universe. Mid-IR spectroscopic surveys using these detectors will enable mapping the composition of key volatiles in planet-forming material around protoplanetary disks and their evolution into solar systems. While these OST science objectives represent a well-organized community agreement they are impossible to reach without a significant leap forward in detector technology, and the OST is likely not to be recommended if a path to suitable detectors does not exist.To reach the required sensitivity we are experimenting with superconducting resonators made from thin aluminum films on single-crystal silicon substrates. Under the right conditions, small-volume inductors made from these films can become ultra-sensitive to single photons >90 GHz. Understanding the physics of these superconductor-dielectric systems is critical to performance. We achieved a very high quality factor of 0.5 x 106 for a 10-nm Al resonator at n ~ 1 microwave photon drive power, by far the highest value for such thin films in the literature. We measured a residual electron density of 95% efficiency at 0.5 - 1.0 THz is achievable.We report on these developments and discuss plans to test in our facility through funding from our recently awarded ROSES-APRA grant and Roman Technology Fellowship award.

  17. A Compact Gas Cerenkov Detector with Novel Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Sivertz, M; Ehrlich, R; Bartlet, J; Csorna, S E; Jain, V; Marka, S; Kinoshita, K; Pomianowski, P A; Sivertz, Michael; Berger, Bruce; Ehrlich, Richard; Bartlet, John; Csorna, Steven; Jain, Vivek; Marka, Szabolcs; Kinoshita, Kay; Pomianowski, Paula

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a threshold Cerenkov counter for identification of charged hadrons. The radiator is pressurized gas, which is contained in thin-walled cylindrical modules. A mirror system of novel design transports Cerenkov photons to photomultiplier tubes. This system is compact, contains relatively little material, and has a large fraction of active volume. A prototype of a module designed for the proposed CLEO III detector has been studied using cosmic rays. Results from these studies show good agreement with a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the module and indicate that it should achieve separation of pions and kaons at the 2.5-3.0sigma level in the momentum range 0.8-2.8 GeV/c. We predict performance for specific physics analyses using a GEANT-based simulation package.

  18. Automatic counting of fission fragments tracks using the gas permeation technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, I M

    1999-01-01

    An automatic counting system for fission tracks induced in a polycarbonate plastic Makrofol KG (10 mu m thickness) is described. The method is based on the gas transport mechanism proposed by Knudsen, where the gas permeability for a porous membrane is expected to be directly related to its track density. In this work, nitrogen permeabilities for several Makrofol films, with different fission track densities, have been measured using an adequate gas permeation system. The fission tracks were produced by irradiating Makrofol foils with a 252Cf calibrated source in a 2 pi geometry. A calibration curve fission track number versus nitrogen permeability has been obtained, for track densities higher than 1000/cm sup 2 , where the spark gap technique and the visual methods employing a microscope, are not appropriate for track counting.

  19. High-Bandwidth Photon-Counting Detectors with Enhanced Near-Infrared Response Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-range optical telecommunications (LROT) impose challenging requirements on detector array sensitivity at 1064nm and arrays timing bandwidth. Large photonic...

  20. High-resolution pulse-counting array detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn; Bybee, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance characteristics of multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems which have formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels and which have application to imaging and spectroscopy at UV wavelengths are evaluated. Sealed and open-structure MAMA detector tubes with opaque CsI photocathodes can determine the arrival time of the detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. Very large format MAMA detectors with CsI and Cs2Te photocathodes and active areas of 52 x 52 mm (2048 x 2048 pixels) will be used as the UV solar blind detectors for the NASA STIS.

  1. Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors: State of the Art and R&D

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Gaseous detectors are radiation detection instruments designed to point out the presence of ionizing particles and to measure their properties. They use the ionizing effect produced by the incoming particle onto a gas-filled sensor. The classical wire chambers, that were one of the first gas detectors, have a lot of advantages, but have also a limited rate capabilities. Then, in the 1980s, were introduced the Micro Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGDs) that perform better than classic wire chambers. The aim of my work as Summer Student was simulate, optimize and produce two new kind of MPGD: conic Thick GEM (ThGEM) and Spiral Detector.

  2. Detection of microcalcifications and tumor tissue in mammography using a CdTe-series photon-counting detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ai; Ihori, Akiko; Nishide, Hiroko; Koyama, Shuji; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we proposed a method for detecting microcalcifications and tumor tissue using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series linear detector. The CdTe series detector was used as an energy resolved photon-counting (hereafter referred to as the photon-counting) mammography detector. The CdTe series linear detector and two types of phantom were designed using a MATLAB simulation. Each phantom consisted of mammary gland and adipose tissue. One phantom contained microcalcifications and the other contained tumor tissue. We varied the size of these structures and the mammary gland composition. We divided the spectrum of an x-ray, which is transmitted to each phantom, into three energy bins and calculated the corresponding linear attenuation coefficients from the numbers of input and output photons. Subsequently, the absorption vector length that expresses the amount of absorption was calculated. When the material composition was different between objects, for example mammary gland and microcalcifications, the absorption vector length was also different. We compared each absorption vector length and tried to detect the microcalcifications and tumor tissue. However, as the size of microcalcifications and tumor tissue decreased and/or the mammary gland content rate increased, there was difficulty in distinguishing them. The microcalcifications and tumor tissue despite the reduction in size or increase in mammary gland content rate can be distinguished by increasing the x-ray dosage. Therefore, it is necessary to find a condition under which a low exposure dose is optimally balanced with high detection sensitivity. It is a new method to indicate the image using photon counting technology.

  3. Assessment of applicability of portable HPGe detector with in situ object counting system based on performance evaluation of thyroid radiobioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Seok; Kwon, Tae Eun; Pak, Min Jung; Park, Se Young; Ha, Wi Ho; Jin, Young Woo [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Different cases exist in the measurement of thyroid radiobioassays owing to the individual characteristics of the subjects, especially the potential variation in the counting efficiency. An In situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) was developed to perform an efficiency calibration based on the Monte Carlo calculation, as an alternative to conventional calibration methods. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of ISOCS to thyroid radiobioassays by comparison with a conventional thyroid monitoring system. The efficiency calibration of a portable high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was performed using ISOCS software. In contrast, the conventional efficiency calibration, which needed a radioactive material, was applied to a scintillator-based thyroid monitor. Four radioiodine samples that contained 125I and 131I in both aqueous solution and gel forms were measured to evaluate radioactivity in the thyroid. ANSI/HPS N13.30 performance criteria, which included the relative bias, relative precision, and root-mean-squared error, were applied to evaluate the performance of the measurement system. The portable HPGe detector could measure both radioiodines with ISOCS but the thyroid monitor could not measure 125I because of the limited energy resolution of the NaI(Tl) scintillator. The 131I results from both detectors agreed to within 5% with the certified results. Moreover, the 125I results from the portable HPGe detector agreed to within 10% with the certified results. All measurement results complied with the ANSI/HPS N13.30 performance criteria. The results of the intercomparison program indicated the feasibility of applying ISOCS software to direct thyroid radiobioassays. The portable HPGe detector with ISOCS software can provide the convenience of efficiency calibration and higher energy resolution for identifying photopeaks, compared with a conventional thyroid monitor with a NaI(Tl) scintillator. The application of ISOCS software in a radiation

  4. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsayed Eldib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT. In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD. Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast.

  5. The development of a high count rate neutron flux monitoring channel using silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi Fard, Mehdi

    In this dissertation, a fast neutron flux-monitoring channel, which is based on the use of SiC semiconductor detectors is designed, modeled and experimentally evaluated as a power monitor for the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactors. A detailed mathematical model of the SiC diode detector and the electronic processing channel is developed using TRIM, MATLAB and PSpice simulation codes. The flux monitoring channel is tested at the OSU Research Reactor. The response of the SiC neutron-monitoring channel to neutrons is in close agreement to simulation results. Linearity of the channel response to thermal and fast neutron fluxes, pulse height spectrum of the channel, energy calibration of the channel and the detector degradation in a fast neutron flux are presented. Along with the model of the neutron monitoring channel, a Simulink model of the GT-MHR core has been developed to evaluate the power monitoring requirements for the GT-MHR that are most demanding for the SiC diode power monitoring system. The Simulink model is validated against a RELAP5 model of the GT-MHR. This dyanamic model is used to simulate reactor transients at the full power and at the start up, in order to identify the response time requirements of the GT-MHR. Based on the response time requirements that have been identified by the Simulink model and properties of the monitoring channel, several locations in the central reflector and the reactor cavity are identified to place the detector. The detector lifetime and dynamic range of the monitoring channel at the detector locations are calculated. The channel dynamic range in the GT-MHR central reflector covers four decades of the reactor power. However, the detector does not survive for a reactor refueling cycle in the central reflector. In the reactor cavity, the detector operates sufficiently long; however, the dynamic range of the channel is smaller than the dynamic range of the channel in the central reflector.

  6. Fast Readout for Large Area Photon-Counting Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many NASA space and Earth programs in the infrared range 1060-1550 nm are limited by the detector performance that require long exposure time due to their low...

  7. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ({sup 10}B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where {sup 3}He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector`s response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the {sup 10}B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keV{sub ee}) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn, AmLi, and {sup 252}Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of {approximately}10% and a die-away time of {approximately}10 {micro}s are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm{sup 3}. Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 {micro}s are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this

  8. Quantum key distribution over a 72 dB channel loss using ultralow dark count superconducting single-photon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Toshimori; Shimizu, Kaoru

    2014-09-01

    We report the first quantum key distribution (QKD) experiment over a 72 dB channel loss using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SSPD, SNSPD) with the dark count rate (DCR) of 0.01 cps. The DCR of the SSPD, which is dominated by the blackbody radiation at room temperature, is blocked by introducing cold optical bandpass filter. We employ the differential phase shift QKD (DPS-QKD) scheme with a 1 GHz system clock rate. The quantum bit error rate (QBER) below 3% is achieved when the length of the dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) is 336 km (72 dB loss), which is low enough to generate secure keys.

  9. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  10. Muon counting using silicon photomultipliers in the AMIGA detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Blažek, Jiří; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Mandát, Dušan; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Mar (2017), 1-24, č. článku P03002. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015038; GA MŠk LG15014; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : pattern recognition * cluster finding * calibration and fitting methods * performance of high energy physics detectors * front-end electronics for detectors Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  11. X-ray imaging with sub-micron resolution using large-area photon counting detectors Timepix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, J.; Karch, J.; Holcova, K.; Zemlicka, J.

    2017-12-01

    As X-ray micro-CT became a popular tool for scientific purposes a number of commercially available CT systems have emerged on the market. Micro-CT systems have, therefore, become widely accessible and the number of research laboratories using them constantly increases. However, even when CT scans with spatial resolution of several micrometers can be performed routinely, data acquisition with sub-micron precision remains a complicated task. Issues come mostly from prolongation of the scan time inevitably connected with the use of nano-focus X-ray sources. Long exposure time increases the noise level in the CT projections. Furthermore, considering the sub-micron resolution even effects like source-spot drift, rotation stage wobble or thermal expansion become significant and can negatively affect the data. The use of dark-current free photon counting detectors as X-ray cameras for such applications can limit the issue of increased image noise in the data, however the mechanical stability of the whole system still remains a problem and has to be considered. In this work we evaluate the performance of a micro-CT system equipped with nano-focus X-ray tube and a large area photon counting detector Timepix for scans with effective pixel size bellow one micrometer.

  12. Design, simulation and construction of a position sensitive X-ray gas detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Karami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a one dimentional position-sensitive X-ray gas detector has been designed, simulated and constructed based on Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC with delay line position readout. These kinds of detectors are useful in soft X-ray imaging and are capable of being extended to two dimensions position readout easily. The position resolution of this detector is estimated to be 230µm  

  13. Spectral performance of a whole-body research photon counting detector CT: quantitative accuracy in derived image sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Zhou, Wei; Yu, Zhicong; Halaweish, Ahmed; Krauss, Bernhard; Schmidt, Bernhard; Yu, Lifeng; Kappler, Steffen; McCollough, Cynthia

    2017-09-01

    Photon-counting computed tomography (PCCT) uses a photon counting detector to count individual photons and allocate them to specific energy bins by comparing photon energy to preset thresholds. This enables simultaneous multi-energy CT with a single source and detector. Phantom studies were performed to assess the spectral performance of a research PCCT scanner by assessing the accuracy of derived images sets. Specifically, we assessed the accuracy of iodine quantification in iodine map images and of CT number accuracy in virtual monoenergetic images (VMI). Vials containing iodine with five known concentrations were scanned on the PCCT scanner after being placed in phantoms representing the attenuation of different size patients. For comparison, the same vials and phantoms were also scanned on 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source, dual-energy scanners. After material decomposition, iodine maps were generated, from which iodine concentration was measured for each vial and phantom size and compared with the known concentration. Additionally, VMIs were generated and CT number accuracy was compared to the reference standard, which was calculated based on known iodine concentration and attenuation coefficients at each keV obtained from the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Results showed accurate iodine quantification (root mean square error of 0.5 mgI/cc) and accurate CT number of VMIs (percentage error of 8.9%) using the PCCT scanner. The overall performance of the PCCT scanner, in terms of iodine quantification and VMI CT number accuracy, was comparable to that of EID-based dual-source, dual-energy scanners.

  14. A compact 7-cell Si-drift detector module for high-count rate X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K; Reckleben, C; Diehl, I; Klär, H

    2008-05-01

    A new Si-drift detector module for fast X-ray spectroscopy experiments was developed and realized. The Peltier-cooled module comprises a sensor with 7 × 7-mm2 active area, an integrated circuit for amplification, shaping and detection, storage, and derandomized readout of signal pulses in parallel, and amplifiers for line driving. The compactness and hexagonal shape of the module with a wrench size of 16mm allow very short distances to the specimen and multi-module arrangements. The power dissipation is 186mW. At a shaper peaking time of 190 ns and an integration time of 450 ns an electronic rms noise of ~11 electrons was achieved. When operated at 7 °C, FWHM line widths around 260 and 460 eV (Cu-Kα) were obtained at low rates and at sum-count rates of 1.7 MHz, respectively. The peak shift is below 1% for a broad range of count rates. At 1.7-MHz sum-count rate the throughput loss amounts to 30%.

  15. The Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    BALOUZA, Samah

    2014-01-01

    This work is aimed to study the electron transparency in 3-D woven mesh that is used in micromegas detector. The importance of calculating the transparency is because it is enter in the gain calibration of the detector. The simulation tool is COMSOL Multiphysics in which it is solved the differential equations by Finite Element Method.

  16. Study of the Influence of Construction Materials on the Ageing Properties of High Rate Gas Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhoza, Alhussain; Biswas, S.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.

    An infrastructure has been set up at the GSI detector laboratory to study the influence of construction materials on the ageing properties of gas filled detectors such as multi wire proportional chambers (MWPC), gas electron multipliers (GEM) etc. As a first step an ageing test of silicone-based glue (RTV-3145)(Dow Corning) has been performed. In this article details of the experimental set-up and the first result on (RTV3145) will be presented.

  17. Small animal positron emission tomography with gas detectors. Simulations, prototyping, and quantitative image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernekohl, Don

    2014-04-15

    The physical background of limiting factors on spatial resolution and coincidence sensitivity were introduced, and details about the first sub-millimeter resolution preclinical PET scanner, the HIDAC, were described in this thesis. As the coincidence sensitivity of the HIDAC is rather moderate, the first subject of investigation was to study the sensitivity optimization potential of the HIDAC converter concept. The HIDAC photon converters consist of a stack of alternating conversion and insulation foils perforated with a dense matrix of holes. First, photon conversion and detection probabilities for different converter geometries were systematically explored with a Geant4 model of the HIDAC, which uses Monte-Carlo methods. Additionally, new charge transport in gas and detection models were developed, and their results for different hole dimensions were combined with the conversion probability outcomes. In a next step, it was explored whether the optimized converter hole patterns prospected by the simulations can be manufactured. In conclusion, currently only etching, screen printing, and drilling are potential methods for producing large-scale converters. Second, a test-bench was established to examine differently produced converter prototypes and to test the performance of newly developed readout electronics for the desired application. It was possible to verify that the developer version of the SPADIC works well if coupled to a MWPC/HIDAC-converter detector setup. In this combination, the setup was able to detect the majority of ionization clusters. This was validated by exploring the impact of drift thickness on the count rate. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the test-bench is able to distinguish relative efficiency differences of converter prototypes with a precision of around 10%, if it was equipped with an extra drift layer. Additionally, single-lead-layer-converters were investigated, whereby the relative count rate difference between structured and

  18. Quality-control gas-detector tube readers: optical versus observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, H.B. Jr.

    1976-12-01

    The influence of temperature and humidity upon two length-of-stain gas detector tube systems was studied. Length-of-stain tubes were exposed under carefully controlled laboratory conditions, then read by a panel of observers and a newly developed optical tube reader. Data from the study show, generally, good correlation of results between the observer panel and the optical tube reader. Also, the data indicated that temperature and humidity calibration curves or tables were needed for several of the detector tubes. The two detector tube systems were comparable in reliability; however, for detecting a particular gas, one system may be selected over the other.

  19. Neutrino counting with the CELLO detector and search for supersymmetric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, H.-J.; Criegee, L.; Dainton, J. B.; Field, J. H.; Franke, G.; Jung, H.; Meyer, J.; Schröder, V.; Winter, G. G.; Bussey, P. J.; Buttar, C.; Campbell, A. J.; Hendry, D.; McCurrach, G.; Scarr, J. M.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smith, K. M.; Ahme, J.; Blobel, V.; Feindt, M.; Fenner, H.; Harjes, J.; Peters, J. H.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Apel, W.-D.; Böhrer, A.; Engler, J.; Flügge, G.; Fries, D. C.; Fuster, J.; Gamerdinger, K.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Hansmeyer, J.; Knapp, J.; Küster, H.; Mayer, P.; Müller, H.; Ranitzsch, K. H.; Schneider, H.; Wolf, J.; de Boer, H.; Buschhorn, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, Ch.; Kotthaus, R.; Kroha, H.; Lüers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Scholz, S.; Shooshtari, G.; Wiedenmann, W.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J. F.; Haissinski, J.; Janot, P.; Journé, V.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Spadafora, A.; Veillet, J.-J.; Blohm, K.; George, R.; Goldberg, M.; Hamon, O.; Kapusta, F.; Poggioli, L.; Rivoal, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gaspero, M.; Iacovacci, M.; Stella, B.; Cozzika, G.; Ducros, Y.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Grunhaus, J.; Klatchko, A.; Levy, A.; Milsténe, C.; Cello Collaboration

    1988-12-01

    A search for single photons, produced in e +e - collisions together with particles interacting only weakly with matter, has been performed using the CELLO detector at the PETRA storage ring. We report on results from data taken at 35 GeV < √ s<46.57 GeV. An upper limit of 8.7 (90% CL) on the number of light neutrino species is set. Combining our result with published results from other e +e - experiments the number of light neutrinos is limited to Nv < 4.6 at 90% CL. We also set lower limits on the masses of supersymmetric particles.

  20. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Le Marois, Alix; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Becker, Wolfgang; Smietana, Stefan [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas [Photek Ltd., 26 Castleham Rd, Saint Leonards-on-Sea TN38 9NS (United Kingdom); Jagutzki, Ottmar [Institut für Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  1. On the analogy between pulse-pile-up in energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors and level-crossing of shot noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ewald; Bartels, Matthias; Daerr, Heiner; Proksa, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Shot noise processes are omnipresent in physics and many of their properties have been extensively studied in the past, including the particular problem of level crossing of shot noise. Energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors using comparators to discriminate pulse-heights are currently heavily investigated for medical applications, e.g. for x-ray computed tomography and x-ray mammography. Surprisingly, no mention of the close relation between the two topics can be found in the literature on photon-counting detectors. In this paper, we point out the close analogy between level crossing of shot noise and the problem of determining count rates of photon- counting detectors subject to pulse pile-up. The latter is very relevant for obtaining precise forward models for photon-counting detectors operated under conditions of very high x-ray flux employed in clinical x-ray computed tomography. Although several attempts have been made to provide reasonably accurate, approximative models for the registered number of counts in x-ray detectors under conditions of high flux and arbitrary x-ray spectra, see, e.g., no exact, analytic solution is given in the literature for general continuous pulse shapes. In this paper we present such a solution for arbitrary response functions, x-ray spectra and continuous pulse shapes based on a result from the theory of level crossing. We briefly outline the theory of level crossing including the famous Rice theorem and translate from the language of level crossing to the language of photon-counting detection.

  2. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071648; Bianco, S; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjølbro, J; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Sharma, A

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for op- timal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally un- friendly Freon-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  3. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071648; Bianco, S; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjølbro, J; Sharma, A; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  4. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a photon-counting detector: quantitative accuracy and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced mammography has been used to demonstrate functional information about a breast tumor by injecting contrast agents. However, a conventional technique with a single exposure degrades the efficiency of tumor detection due to structure overlapping. Dual-energy techniques with energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) also cause an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy of material decomposition due to the limitations of EIDs. On the other hands, spectral mammography with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) is able to resolve the issues induced by the conventional technique and EIDs using their energy-discrimination capabilities. In this study, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was implemented by using a polychromatic dual-energy model, and the proposed technique was compared with the dual-energy technique with an EID in terms of quantitative accuracy and radiation dose. The results showed that the proposed technique improved the quantitative accuracy as well as reduced radiation dose comparing to the dual-energy technique with an EID. The quantitative accuracy of the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was slightly improved as a function of radiation dose. Therefore, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumors and improving diagnostic accuracy.

  5. Performance of a compact position-sensitive photon counting detector with image charge coupling to an air-side anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagutzki, O.; Czasch, A.; Schössler, S.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a novel micro-channel plate (MCP) photomultiplier with resistive screen (RS-PMT) as a detection device for space- and time-correlated single photon counting, illustrated by several applications. The photomultiplier tube resembles a standard image intensifier device. However, the rear phosphor screen is replaced by a ceramic "window" with resistive coating. The MCP output is transferred through the ceramic plate to the read-out electrode (on the air side) via capacity-coupling of the image charge. This design allows for an easy reconfiguration of the read-out electrode (e.g. pixel, charge-sharing, cross-strip, delay-line) without breaking the vacuum for optimizing the detector performance towards a certain task. It also eases the design and manufacturing process of such a multi-purpose photomultiplier tube. Temporal and spatial resolutions well below 100 ps and 100 microns, respectively, have been reported at event rates as high as 1 MHz, for up to 40 mm effective detection diameter. In this paper we will discuss several applications like wide-field fluorescence microscopy and dual γ/fast-neutron radiography for air cargo screening and conclude with an outlook on large-area detectors for thermal neutrons based on MCPs.

  6. Intercomparison of radon gas detectors 1997 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 1997 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph; Butterweck-Dempewolf, Gernot

    1998-05-01

    Between Nov 14 and Nov 20, 1997, the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut performed the 1997 Radon Intercomparison Exercise. Radon gas detectors and instruments were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber during seven days in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 3860 Bqm{sup -3}. The majority of the participants at this intercomparison were Swiss Radon Gas Measurement Laboratories acknowledged by the Swiss Federal Office for Health. Criteria for this acknowledgement are a deviation of the measurement results to the reference value below 15% (traceability criterion) and a standard deviation of the mean of five detector measurement results below 15% (reproducibility criterion). With the exception of three participants, the results of electret ionisation chambers, track etch detectors and measuring instruments fulfilled the demanded traceability and reproducibility criteria. (author) 8 figs., 8 tabs., 6 refs.

  7. Study of a sealed high gas pressure THGEM detector and response of alpha particle spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ning; Liu, Qian; Liu, Hong-Bang; Xie, Yi-Gang; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Shi; Huang, Wen-Qian; Hong, Dao-Jin; Zheng, Yang-Heng

    2017-04-01

    A sealed high gas pressure detector working in pure argon is assembled. It consists of a 5 cm × 5 cm PCB THGEM (THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier). The detector structure and experimental setup are described. The performance under high pressure (2 atm) is examined, selecting optimal voltages for the ionization region and induction region. The dependence of the shape of alpha particle spectra measured with relative gas gain on gas pressure (1.3-2.0 atm) has been studied. Eight data sets of relative gas gain versus working voltage of THGEM, expressed by weighting field E/P, are normalized, consistent with theory. The results show that the air tightness of the chamber is good, measured by a sensitive barometer and checked with gas gain. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition without gas gain involved. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575193, 11205240, 11265003, U1431109)

  8. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  9. Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Efficiency with a Photon-Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris; Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We first review the state-of-the-art coherent on-off-keying (OOK) with a photoncounting measurement, illustrating its asymptotic inefficiency relative to the Holevo limit. We show that a commonly made Poisson approximation in thermal noise leads to unbounded photon information efficiencies, violating the conjectured Holevo limit. We analyze two binary-modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with conventional OOK. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  10. On Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Moision, Bruce E.; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement scheme is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We analyze two binary modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with the state-of-the-art coherent-state on-off keying modulation. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  11. Beta-cell Assembly for the Quad Gas Sampling Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Ripplinger, Michael D.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2008-05-05

    The beta-cells used in the beta-gamma detector have taken time to develop and to standardize the assembly of them. In making the assembly routine it is important to have step by step assembly instructions as well as a list of potential problems and their solutions. This document attempts to accomplish these goals.

  12. Gas pixel detector for x-ray observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Delagnes, E.; Giomataris, Y.; Campbell, M.; Llopart, X.; Chefdeville, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the status of the R&D for a digital Time Projection Chamber based on Micromegas detectors using the CMOS chip TimePix as a direct readout anode protected by highly resistive a-Si:H layer. A small chamber was built as a demonstrator of the 2-D and 3-D imaging capabilities of this

  13. A Two-dimensional event-counting detector for HV-CSA electrostatic analyzer at SpLine the Spanish CRG beamline at the ESRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Escher, M.; Weber, N.; Merkel, M.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A novel 2D-detector has been designed, manufactured and installed on the high voltage cylindrical sector electrostatic analyzer (HV-CSA300/15) of the HAXPES station of SpLine the Spanish CRG beamline at the ESRF. This original 2D-detector constitutes an important improvement of the HAXPES station. A drawback of electrostatic analyzer in HAXPES, is that the electron counter must be raised to high voltages (up to 15 kV). Hence the development of a 2D detector system compatible with a high voltage electrostatic analyzer is a scientific instrumentation challenge. The developed two-dimensional event-counting detector consists of a 2D image intensifier (combination of scintillating screen and MCP) optically coupled with a CMOS-camera and a data processing system. The accumulated event image is transferred to the image processing software on the PC, where the events are classified by their position to give single detector readout. The energy window accepted by the area detector ranges from 100 meV to 50 eV, depending on the analyzer pass energy. Hence, for single shot measurements, i.e, without sweeping the pre-retarding lens voltages up to 200 detector channels can be used compared to a single channel. This results in a gain of the analyser transmission of at least a factor of 20. Thus we overcome the limitations imposed by the low count rate when dealing with high excitation energies and high kinetic-energy electrons.

  14. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography with a photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Hemmendorff, Magnus; Cederström, Björn; Aslund, Magnus; Danielsson, Mats

    2010-05-01

    Spectral imaging is a method in medical x-ray imaging to extract information about the object constituents by the material-specific energy dependence of x-ray attenuation. The authors have investigated a photon-counting spectral imaging system with two energy bins for contrast-enhanced mammography. System optimization and the potential benefit compared to conventional non-energy-resolved absorption imaging was studied. A framework for system characterization was set up that included quantum and anatomical noise and a theoretical model of the system was benchmarked to phantom measurements. Optimal combination of the energy-resolved images corresponded approximately to minimization of the anatomical noise, which is commonly referred to as energy subtraction. In that case, an ideal-observer detectability index could be improved close to 50% compared to absorption imaging in the phantom study. Optimization with respect to the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, commonly referred to as energy weighting, yielded only a minute improvement. In a simulation of a clinically more realistic case, spectral imaging was predicted to perform approximately 30% better than absorption imaging for an average glandularity breast with an average level of anatomical noise. For dense breast tissue and a high level of anatomical noise, however, a rise in detectability by a factor of 6 was predicted. Another approximately 70%-90% improvement was found to be within reach for an optimized system. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography is feasible and beneficial with the current system, and there is room for additional improvements. Inclusion of anatomical noise is essential for optimizing spectral imaging systems.

  15. Improving the gas gain monitoring system in multiwire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinskaia, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    The gas gain monitoring system in multi-wire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb has been constructed and commissioned. It includes an online- monitoring, tools for analysis the archived data and an alarm system on the quality of the gas mixture. Finally, it will be implemented in the main ECS of LHCb for MUON detector and as a part of safety system of LHCb as a permanent online monitor of the quality of the gas mixture in MWPCs. The main advantage of this setup is a monitoring of Gas Gain (GG) in MWPCs with radioactive sources independently from the presence of beam at LHC. It also provides an option for prompt reaction in case of a problem with the gas.

  16. A High Position Resolution X-ray Detector: an Edge on Illuminated Capillary Plate Combined with a Gas Amplification Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Iacobaeus, C.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Ostling, J.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Peskov, V.; Tokanai, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and successfully tested a prototype of a new type of high position resolution hybrid X-ray detector. It contains a thin wall lead glass capillary plate converter of X-rays combined with a microgap parallel-plate avalanche chamber filled with gas at 1 atm. The operation of these converters was studied in a wide range of X-ray energies (from 6 to 60 keV) at incident angles varying from 0-90 degree. The detection efficiency, depending on the geometry, photon energy, incident angle and the mode of operation, was between 5-30 percent in a single step mode and up to 50 percent in a multi-layered combination. Depending on the capillary geometry, the position resolution achieved was between 0.050-0.250 mm in digital form and was practically independent of the photon energy or gas mixture. The usual lead glass capillary plates operated without noticeable charging up effects at counting rates of 50 Hz/mm2, and hydrogen treated capillaries up to 10E5 Hz/mm2. The developed detector may open new possibil...

  17. A Beam Gas Vertex detector for beam size measurement in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hopchev, P; Barschel, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Chritin, N; Dehning, B; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Gaspar, C; Giovannozzi, M; van Herwijnen, E; Jacobsson, R; Jensen, L; Rhodri Jones, O; Jurado, N; Kain, V; Kuhn, M; Luthi, B; Magagnin, P; Matev, R; Neufeld, N; Panman, J; Rihl, M; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salvant, B; Veness, R; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Gianì, S; Haefeli, G; Nakada, T; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Veyrat, Q; Xu, Z; Greim, R; Karpinski, W; Kirn, T; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Wlochal, M

    2014-01-01

    The Beam Gas Vertex (BGV) detector is foreseen as a possible non-invasive beam size measurement instrument for the LHC and its luminosity upgrade. This technique is based on the reconstruction of beam-gas interaction vertices, where the charged particles produced in inelastic beam-gas interactions are measured with high-precision tracking detectors. The design studies and expected performance of the currently developed BGV prototype will be presented with an overview given of the associated vacuum, detector and readout systems. A brief description will be given of the BGV Monte Carlo simulation application, which is based on the LHCb computing framework (Gaudi) and allows simulation studies to be performed and online event reconstruction algorithms to be developed.

  18. Studying discharges in the Gas Electron Multiplies in Alice Detector

    CERN Document Server

    EُlGedawy, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing discharges is very important in the operation of the GEM detector. Once the discharges happen, a current will go through the GEM, the voltages across the GEM foils sides drop, charge amplification cannot take place anymore, resulting in a loss of signal. So the goal is to understand how the discharges evolve and propagate, in order to find requirements on the voltage settings, which allow to decrease the discharge probability.

  19. Spectral and spatial resolution properties of photon counting X-ray detectors like the Medipix-Detector; Spektrale und bildgebende Eigenschaften photonenzaehlender Roentgendetektoren am Beispiel des Medipix-Detektors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, A.

    2007-05-14

    The Medipix detector is a hybrid photon counting X-ray detector, consisting of an ASIC and a semiconducting layer as the sensor. This makes the Medipix a direct converting detector. A special feature of the Medipix is a signal processing circuit in every single pixel. This circuit amplifies the input signal triggered by a photon and then transforms the pulse into a digital signal. This early stage digitalisation is one of the main advantages of the detector, since no dark currents are integrated into the signal. Furthermore, the energy information of each single photon is partly preserved. The high number of pixels lends the detector a wide dynamic range, starting from single counts up to a rate of 1010 photons per cm2 and second. Apart from the many advantages, there are still some problems with the detector. Some effects lead to a deterioration of the energy resolution as well as the spatial resolution. The main reasons for this are two effects occuring in the detector, charge sharing and backscattering inside the detector. This study investigates the influence of those two effects on both the energy and spatial resolution. The physical causes of these effects are delineated and their impact on the detector output is examined. In contrast to high energy photon detectors, the repulsion of the charge carriers drifting inside the sensor must not be neglected in a detailed model of X-ray detectors with an energy range of 5 keV-200 keV. For the simulation of the Medipix using Monte Carlo simulations, the software ROSI was augmented. The added features allow a detailed simulation of the charge distribution, using the relevant physical effects that alter the distribution width during the drift towards the sensor electrodes as well further influences on the detector output, including electronical noise, threshold noise or the geometry of the detector. The measured energy and spatial resolution of several different models of Medipix is compared to the simulated

  20. Intercomparison of radon gas detectors 1998 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 1998 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph; Butterweck-Dempewolf, Gernot

    1999-05-01

    The Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut performed the 1998 Radon Intercomparison Exercise. During Oct 23rd to 29th, 1998, radon gas detectors and instruments were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 2100 Bqm{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 290 kBqhm{sup -3}. The aim of this intercomparison exercise was to check the performance of electret ionisation chambers, track etch detectors and measuring instruments at a rather low radon gas exposure. Limits expected to befulfilled were a deviation of the measurement results to the reference radon gas concentration value of less than 15% (traceability criterion) and a standard deviation of the mean of five detector measurement results of less than 15% (reproducibility criterion). The mean value of five measuring results delivered by each measurement laboratory participating with detectors as well as each measuring instrument result lay within the traceability limits given above; an exceeding of the allowed reproducibility of 15 % for a few samples of five detector measuring results was partly due to single results to be regarded as outliers. Participants were asked in this intercomparison to estimate the uncertainty at the 95% confidence level for a single detector measuring result. Compared with results from other methods used to estimate this uncertainty, reported uncertainty values were low. Taking extended field tests delivering realistic uncertainty estimates as basis, uncertainty estimates derived from exposures in controlled chamber conditions showed to be too small. (author)

  1. Multiplicity Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  2. Collection of a radioactive source of $^{83}$Kr to study the gas distribution dynamics in a large GRPC detector

    CERN Multimedia

    An ultra-granular hadronic calorimeter was built using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber (GRPC) detectors as the sensitive medium. The gas of those detectors of $1 \\times 1$ m$^{2}$ each is constrained to be on one side of the detector. To ensure good gas distribution a prototype was built. Such a scheme could be extended to larger GRPC detectors of more than 2 m$^{2}$ if found efficient. To check the performance a radioactive gas could be used in association with the usual gas mixture used to operate the GRPC. The distribution of the radioactive gas can be monitored thanks to the 1 cm$^2$ resolution provided by the embedded electronics used to read out the detector. The radioactive $^{83}$Kr source (obtained from $^{83}$Rb decay) could be produced at the ISOLDE facility and will be used to study larger GRPC detectors at CERN.

  3. Signal and noise characteristics of a CdTe-based photon counting detector: cascaded systems analysis and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Ke

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in single photon counting detectors (PCDs) are opening up new opportunities in medical imaging. However, the performance of PCDs is not flawless. Problems such as charge sharing may deteriorate the performance of PCD. This work studied the dependence of the signal and noise properties of a cadmium telluride (CdTe)-based PCD on the charge sharing effect and the anti-charge sharing (ACS) capability offered by the PCD. Through both serial and parallel cascaded systems analysis, a theoretical model was developed to trace the origin of charge sharing in CdTe-based PCD, which is primarily related to remote k-fluorescence re-absorption and spatial spreading of charge cloud. The ACS process was modeled as a sub-imaging state prior to the energy thresholding stage, and its impact on the noise power spectrum (NPS) of PCD can be qualitatively determined by the theoretical model. To validate the theoretical model, experimental studies with a CdTe-based PCD system (XC-FLITE X1, XCounter AB) was performed. Two x-ray radiation conditions, including an RQA-5 beam and a 40 kVp beam, were used for the NPS measurements. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results showed that ACS makes the NPS of the CdTe-based PCD flatter, which corresponds to reduced noise correlation length. The flatness of the NPS is further boosted by increasing the energy threshold or reducing the x-ray energy, both of which reduce the likelihood of registering multiple counts from the same incidenting x-ray photon.

  4. Micro flame-based detector suite for universal gas sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Thomas Warren; Washburn, Cody M.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Manley, Robert George; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Miller, James Edward; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Okandan, Murat

    2005-11-01

    A microflame-based detector suit has been developed for sensing of a broad range of chemical analytes. This detector combines calorimetry, flame ionization detection (FID), nitrogen-phosphorous detection (NPD) and flame photometric detection (FPD) modes into one convenient platform based on a microcombustor. The microcombustor consists in a micromachined microhotplate with a catalyst or low-work function material added to its surface. For the NPD mode a low work function material selectively ionizes chemical analytes; for all other modes a supported catalyst such as platinum/alumina is used. The microcombustor design permits rapid, efficient heating of the deposited film at low power. To perform calorimetric detection of analytes, the change in power required to maintain the resistive microhotplate heater at a constant temperature is measured. For FID and NPD modes, electrodes are placed around the microcombustor flame zone and an electrometer circuit measures the production of ions. For FPD, the flame zone is optically interrogated to search for light emission indicative of deexcitation of flame-produced analyte compounds. The calorimetric and FID modes respond generally to all hydrocarbons, while sulfur compounds only alarm in the calorimetric mode, providing speciation. The NPD mode provides 10,000:1 selectivity of nitrogen and phosphorous compounds over hydrocarbons. The FPD can distinguish between sulfur and phosphorous compounds. Importantly all detection modes can be established on one convenient microcombustor platform, in fact the calorimetric, FID and FPD modes can be achieved simultaneously on only one microcombustor. Therefore, it is possible to make a very universal chemical detector array with as little as two microcombustor elements. A demonstration of the performance of the microcombustor in each of the detection modes is provided herein.

  5. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  6. A gas scintillation counter with imaging optics and large area UV-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickles, J. E-mail: nickles@hsb.uni-frankfurt.de; Braeuning, H.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Rauschnabel, K.; Schmidt-Boecking, H

    2002-01-21

    We report on the improvements in the position sensitive readout of a xenon-filled gas scintillation proportional counter. Using an imaging optic for UV-light in the region of 170 nm, the position resolution could be improved by more than 30%. In addition, we have obtained first encouraging results for the use of the recently developed gas electron multiplier together with a CsI-photocathode as a large area UV-detector system.

  7. A gas scintillation counter with imaging optics and large area UV-detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nickles, J; Bräuning-Demian, A; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, R; Dangendorf, V; Rauschnabel, K; Schmidt-Böcking, H

    2002-01-01

    We report on the improvements in the position sensitive readout of a xenon-filled gas scintillation proportional counter. Using an imaging optic for UV-light in the region of 170 nm, the position resolution could be improved by more than 30%. In addition, we have obtained first encouraging results for the use of the recently developed gas electron multiplier together with a CsI-photocathode as a large area UV-detector system.

  8. Thermoregulated Nitric Cryosystem for Cooling Gas-Filled Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zharkov I.P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryosystem for cooling and filling of gas-filled detectors of ionizing radiation with compressed inert gas on the basis of wide-nitrogen cryostat, which provides detetector temperature control in a range of 173 — 293 K and its stabilization with accuracy of ± 1°. The work was carried out within the Ukraine — NATO Program of Collaboration, Grant SfP #984655.

  9. Near Detectors based on gas TPCs for neutrino long baseline experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A

    2017-01-01

    Time Projection Chambers have been used with success for the T2K ND280 near detector and are proposed for an upgrade of the T2K near detector. High pressure TPCs are also being considered for future long-baseline experiments like Hyper-Kamiokande and DUNE. A High Pressure TPC would be a very sensitive detector for the detailed study of neutrino-nucleus interactions, a limiting factor for extracting the ultimate precision in long baseline experiments. The requirements of TPCs for neutrino detectors are quite specific. We propose here the development of state-of-the-art near detectors based on gas TPC: atmospheric pressure TPCs for T2K-II and a high-pressure TPC for neutrino experiments. The project proposed here benefits from a strong involvement of the European (CERN) members of the T2K collaboration and beyond. It is a strongly synergetic precursor of other projects of near detectors using gas TPCs that are under discussion for the long baseline neutrino projects worldwide. It will help maintain and develop...

  10. Enhanced discrimination of calcified and soft arterial plaques using computed tomography with a multi-energy-window photon counting x-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Xu, Jingyan; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Patt, Bradley E.; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Frey, Eric C.

    2009-02-01

    This work aims at discriminating between soft and calcified coronary artery plaques using microCT with a multi-energywindow photon counting X-ray detector (PCXD). We have previously investigated a solid state X-ray detector which has the capability to count individual photons in different energy windows. The data from these energy windows may be treated as multiple simultaneous X-ray acquisitions within non-overlapping energy windows that can provide additional information about tissue differences. In this work, we simulated a photon counting detector with five energy windows. We investigated two approaches for using the energy information provided by this detector. First, we applied energy weighting to the reconstruction from different energy windows to improve the signal-to-noise ratio between calcified and soft plaques. This resulted in a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio. Second, we applied the basis material decomposition method to discriminate coronary artery plaques based on their calcium content. The results were compared with those obtained using dual-kVp material decomposition. We observed significantly improved contrast-tonoise ratios for the PCXD-based approaches.

  11. Noble Gas Leak Detector for Use in the SNS Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Chad; Huffman, Paul; Leung, Kent; Korobkina, Ekaterina; White, Christian; nEDM Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Common practice for leak-checking high vacuum systems uses helium as the probing gas. However, helium may permeate some materials at room temperature, making leak characterization difficult. The experiment to find a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM), to be conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, will employ a large volume of liquid helium housed by such a helium-permeable composite material. It is desirable to construct a leak detector that can employ alternative test gases. The purpose of this experiment is to create a leak detector that can quantify the argon gas flux in a high vacuum environment and interpret this flux as a leak-rate. This apparatus will be used to check the nEDM volumes for leaks at room temperature before cooling down to cryogenic temperatures. Our leak detector uses a residual gas analyzer and a vacuum pumping station to characterize the gas present in an evacuated volume. The introduction of argon gas into the system is interpreted as a leak-rate into the volume. The device has been calibrated with NIST certified calibrated leaks and the machine's sensitivity has been calculated using background gas analysis. As a result of the device construction and software programming, we are able to leak-check composite and polyamide volumes This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41042.

  12. Development and characterization of micro-pattern gas detectors for intense beams of hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, Maxence

    2012-07-02

    This thesis work is dedicated to the design, development and characterization of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors. The performances of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) equipped with a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure are reported. The intrinsic ion backflow suppression of GEM foils drastically reduces the space charge produced by wire readout in traditional TPC. The GEM solution allows the operation of a TPC at much higher event rate. The second part of this thesis describes the development of a 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} Micromegas detector with a highly segmented central area. A reduction of discharges compared to conventional Micromegas detectors is needed for stable operation in intense beams of hadrons. Spark reduction technologies have been successfully studied and results are presented.

  13. A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Cist; Alan Schutz

    2005-03-30

    A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

  14. Modelling and simulation of pixelated photon counting X-ray detectors for imaging; Modellierung und Simulation physikalischer Eigenschaften photonenzaehlender Roentgenpixeldetektoren fuer die Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Juergen

    2008-07-22

    First of all the physics processes generating the energy deposition in the sensor volume are investigated. The spatial resolution limits of photon interactions and the range of secondary electrons are discussed. The signatures in the energy deposition spectrum in pixelated detectors with direct conversion layers are described. The energy deposition for single events can be generated by the Monte-Carlo-Simulation package ROSI. The basic interactions of photons with matter are evaluated, resulting in the ability to use ROSI as a basis for the simulation of photon counting pixel detectors with direct conversion. In the context of this thesis a detector class is developed to simulate the response of hybrid photon counting pixel detectors using high-Z sensor materials like Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) in addition to silicon. To enable the realisation of such a simulation, the relevant physics processes and properties have to be implemented: processes in the sensor layer (provided by EGS4/LSCAT in ROSI), generation of charge carriers as electron hole pairs, diffusion and repulsion of charge carriers during drift and lifetime. Furthermore, several noise contributions of the electronics can be taken into account. The result is a detector class which allows the simulation of photon counting detectors. In this thesis the multiplicity framework is developed, including a formula to calculate or measure the zero frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE). To enable the measurement of the multiplicity of detected events a cluster analysis program was developed. Random and systematic errors introduced by the cluster analysis are discussed. It is also shown that the cluster analysis method can be used to determine the averaged multiplicity with high accuracy. The method is applied to experimental data. As an example using the implemented detector class, the discriminator threshold dependency of the DQE and modulation transfer function is investigated in

  15. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  16. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  17. X-ray spectrometry and spectrum image mapping at output count rates above 100 kHz with a silicon drift detector on a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E

    2005-01-01

    A third-generation silicon drift detector (SDD) in the form of a silicon multicathode detector (SMCD) was tested as an analytical x-ray spectrometer on a scanning electron microscope. Resolution, output count rate, and spectral quality were examined as a function of the detector peaking time from 8 micros to 250 ns and over a range of input count rate (dead time). The SDD-SMCD (50 mm2 active area) produced a resolution of 134 eV with a peaking time of 8 micros. The peak width and peak channel were nearly independent of the input count rate (at 8 micros peaking time, the peak width degradation was 0.003 eV/percent dead time and peak position change was -0.7 eV over the dead time range tested). Maximum output count rates as high as 280 kHz were obtained with a 500 ns peaking time (188 eV resolution) and 500 kHz with a 250 ns peaking time (217 eV resolution). X-ray spectrum imaging was achieved with a pixel dwell time as short as 10 ms (with 1.3 ms overhead) in which a 2048 channel (10 eV/channel) spectrum with 2-byte intensity range was recorded at each pixel (scanned at 128 x 128). With a 220 kHz output count rate, a minor constituent of iron (present at a concentration of 0.04 mass fraction or 4 weight %) in an aluminum-nickel alloy could be readily detected in the x-ray maps derived from the x-ray spectrum image database accumulated in 185 s.

  18. A high resolution, high frame rate detector based on a microchannel plate read out with the Medipix2 counting CMOS pixel chip.

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulec, Bettina; McPhate, J B; Tremsin, A S; Siegmund, O H W; Clark, Allan G; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The future of ground-based optical astronomy lies with advancements in adaptive optics (AO) to overcome the limitations that the atmosphere places on high resolution imaging. A key technology for AO systems on future very large telescopes are the wavefront sensors (WFS) which detect the optical phase error and send corrections to deformable mirrors. Telescopes with >30 m diameters will require WFS detectors that have large pixel formats (512x512), low noise (<3 e-/pixel) and very high frame rates (~1 kHz). These requirements have led to the idea of a bare CMOS active pixel device (the Medipix2 chip) functioning in counting mode as an anode with noiseless readout for a microchannel plate (MCP) detector and at 1 kHz continuous frame rate. First measurement results obtained with this novel detector are presented both for UV photons and beta particles.

  19. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  20. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O' Connor

    2007-08-10

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  1. VHMPID RICH prototype using pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and VUV photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, T. V.; Agócs, A. G.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Bellwied, R.; Bencédi, G.; Bencze, G.; Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cindolo, F.; Cossyleon, K.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L.; Dash, A. K.; D`Ambrosio, S.; De Cataldo, G.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Futó, E.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hamar, G.; Harton, A.; Iannone, G.; Jimenez, R. T.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. S.; Knospe, A.; Kovács, L.; Lévai, P.; Markert, C.; Martinengo, P.; Molnár, L.; Nappi, E.; Oláh, L.; Paić, G.; Pastore, C.; Patimo, G.; Patino, M. E.; Peskov, V.; Pinsky, L.; Piuz, F.; Pochybová, S.; Sgura, I.; Sinha, T.; Song, J.; Takahashi, J.; Timmins, A.; Van Beelen, J. B.; Varga, D.; Volpe, G.; Weber, M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Yi, J.; Yoo, I.-K.

    2014-12-01

    A small-size prototype of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector using for the first time pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode has been built and tested at the PS accelerator at CERN. It contained all the functional elements of the detector proposed as Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range starting from 5 potentially up to 25 GeV/c. In the paper the equipment and its elements are described and some characteristic test results are shown.

  2. arXiv Simulation of gain stability of THGEM gas-avalanche particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, P.M.M.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Breskin, A.; Bressler, S.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Silva, A.L.M.; Veenhof, R.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.

    2018-01-19

    Charging-up processes affecting gain stability in Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM) were studied with a dedicated simulation toolkit. Integrated with Garfield++, it provides an effective platform for systematic phenomenological studies of charging-up processes in MPGD detectors. We describe the simulation tool and the fine-tuning of the step-size required for the algorithm convergence, in relation to physical parameters. Simulation results of gain stability over time in THGEM detectors are presented, exploring the role of electrode-thickness and applied voltage on its evolution. The results show that the total amount of irradiated charge through electrode's hole needed for reaching gain stabilization is in the range of tens to hundreds of pC, depending on the detector geometry and operational voltage. These results are in agreement with experimental observations presented previously.

  3. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment; Etude d`un detecteur a micropistes pour l`experience Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clergeau, J. F. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-06-19

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 {mu}m. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10{sup 4} Hz/mm{sup 2}. The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author) 55 refs.

  4. Construction and performance of a micro-pattern stereo detector with two gas electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barvich, T.; Bluem, P.; Erdmann, M. E-mail: Martin.Erdmann@cern.ch; Fahrer, M.; Kaercher, K.; Kuehn, F.; Moermann, D.; Mueller, Th.; Neuberger, D.; Roederer, F.; Simonis, H.J.; Skiba, A.; Thuemmel, W.H.; Weiler, Th.; Weseler, S

    2002-06-11

    The construction of a micro-pattern gas detector of dimensions 40x10 cm{sup 2} is described. Two gas electron multiplier foils (GEM) provide the internal amplification stages. A two-layer readout structure was used, manufactured using the same technology as the GEM foils. The strips of each layer cross at an effective crossing angle of 6.7 deg. and have a 406 {mu}m pitch. The performance of the detector has been evaluated in a muon beam at CERN using a silicon telescope as reference system. The position resolutions of two orthogonal coordinates are measured to be 50 {mu}m and 1 mm, respectively. The muon detection efficiency for two-dimensional space points reaches 96%.

  5. Design and fabrication of a window for the gas Cherenkov detector 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, V. E., E-mail: vef@lanl.gov; Bingham, D. A.; Cartelli, M. D.; Griego, J. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); DiDomizio, R. A.; Pollack, M. J. [EnvirOptics, Inc., Colmar, Pennsylvania 18915 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The gas Cherenkov detector 3 was designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in inertial confinement fusion experiments at both the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility. This instrument uses a low-Z gamma-to-electron convertor plate and high pressure gas to convert MeV gammas into UV/visible Cherenkov photons for fast optical detection. This is a follow-on diagnostic from previous versions, with two notable differences: the pressure of the gas is four times higher, and it allows the use of fluorinated gas, requiring metal seals. These changes force significant changes in the window component, having a unique set of requirements and footprint limitations. The selected solution for this component, a sapphire window brazed into a stainless steel flange housing, is described.

  6. Microcontroller ATMEGA8535 based Design of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Gas Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Suyuti, Ansar

    2012-01-01

    1218204-3737-IJECS-IJENS ?? August 2012 IJENS This paper presents design of Carbon Monoxide (CO) gas detector based on microcontroller performance. The device is embedded with real-time measurement through visualization in Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and computer monitor. In addition, the data processing utilizes microcontroller ATMEGA8535 under programming environment of CodeVision AVR V2.03.4. The visualization itself is designed based on the combination between programming language of ...

  7. Determination of Beeswax Hydrocarbons by Gas Chromatography with a Mass Detector (GC -MS ) Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Waś Ewa; Szczęsna Teresa; Rybak-Chmielewska Helena

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a method of hydrocarbon (alkanes, alkenes, dienes) identification and quantitative determination of linear saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes) in beeswax using gas chromatography with a mass detector technique (GC -MS ). Beeswax hydrocarbons were isolated using a solid-phase extraction (SPE ) technique with neutral aluminum oxide (Alumina - N, 1000 mg, 6 mL), then were separated on a non-polar gas chromatography column ZB-5HT INFERNO (20 m×0.18 mm×0.18 μm). Qquantitative analy...

  8. Measurement of fecal sulfide using gas chromatography and a sulfur chemiluminescence detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fume, J K; Springfield, J; Koenig, T; Suarez, F; Levitt, M D

    2001-04-15

    We describe a simple technique to measure sulfide in fecal homogenates (or any other liquid milieu), which involves acidification followed by the G.C. measurement of H2S in a gas space equilibrated with a small quantity of homogenate. An internal standard of Zn35S added to the homogenate permits correction for incomplete recovery of H2S in the gas space. The use of a sulfur chemiluminescence detector, which specifically and sensitively responds to sulfur-containing compounds, greatly facilitates this measurement.

  9. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline........ The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration...

  10. Measurement of Odor-Plume Structure in a Wind Tunnel Using a Photoionization Detector and a Tracer Gas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Justus, Kristine

    2002-01-01

    The patterns of stimulus available to moths flying along pheromone plumes in a 3-m-long wind tunnel were characterized using a high frequency photoionization detector in conjunction with an inert tracer gas...

  11. Optimization of K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-06

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters, such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution and the number of energy bins, on the image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. A maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of the plaque's inflammation. The simulation studies used a single-slice parallel beam CT geometry with an x-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33 × 24 cm(2)) phantoms, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium and gold. In the simulation studies, GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression tasks were pursued. The x-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% full width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution) implementations of the photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with a pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to a performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the x-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio with respect to the patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at the 125 kVp x-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 µmol mL(-1) (0.21 mg mL(-1)) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 µmol mL(-1) (0.49 mg mL(-1)) for a more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal

  12. Optimization of the K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy-resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution, and number of energy bins on image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. Maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of plaque's inflammation. The simulations studies used a single slice parallel beam CT geometry with an X-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33x24 cm2) phantom, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium, and gold. In the simulation studies GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression task were pursued. The X-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% FWHM energy resolution) implementations of photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to the performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the X-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with respect to patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at 125 kVp X-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 μmol/mL (0.21 mg/mL) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 μmol/mL (0.49 mg/mL) for more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal imaging parameters at lowest patient dose using an energy resolved photon counting detector

  13. Performance of a four-element Si drift detector for X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy: resolution, maximum count rate, and dead-time correction with incorporation into the ATHENA data analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woicik, J C; Ravel, B; Fischer, D A; Newburgh, W J

    2010-05-01

    The performance of a four-element Si drift detector for energy-dispersive fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements is reported, operating at the National Institute of Standards and Technology beamline X23A2 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector can acquire X-ray absorption fine-structure spectra with a throughput exceeding 4 x 10(5) counts per second per detector element (>1.6 x 10(6) total counts per second summed over all four channels). At this count rate the resolution at 6 keV is approximately 220 eV, which adequately resolves the Mn Kalpha and Kbeta fluorescence lines. Accurate dead-time correction is demonstrated, and it has been incorporated into the ATHENA data analysis program. To maintain counting efficiency and high signal to background, it is suggested that the incoming count rate should not exceed approximately 70% of the maximum throughput.

  14. EXCALIBUR: a small-pixel photon counting area detector for coherent X-ray diffraction - Front-end design, fabrication and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, J.; Horswell, I.; Willis, B.; Plackett, R.; Gimenez, E. N.; Spiers, J.; Ballard, D.; Booker, P.; Thompson, J. A.; Gibbons, P.; Burge, S. R.; Nicholls, T.; Lipp, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2013-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction experiments on synchrotron X-ray beamlines require detectors with high spatial resolution and large detection area. The read-out chip developed by the MEDIPIX3 collaboration offers a small pixel size of 55 microns resulting in a very high spatial resolution when coupled to a direct X-ray conversion segmented silicon sensor. MEDIPIX3 assemblies present also the advantages of hybrid pixel detectors working in single photon counting mode: noiseless imaging, large dynamic range, extremely high frame rate. The EXCALIBUR detector is under development for the X-ray Coherence and Imaging Beamline I13 of the Diamond Light Source. This new detector consists of three modules, each with 16 MEDIPIX3 chips which can be read-out at 100 frames per second in continuous mode or 1000 frames per second in burst mode. In each module, the sensor is a large single silicon die covering 2 rows of 8 individual MEDIPIX3 read-out chips and provides a continuous active detection region within a module. Each module includes 1 million solder bumps connecting the 55 microns pixels of the silicon sensor to the 55 microns pixels of the 16 MEDIPIX3 read-out chips. The detection area of the 3-module EXCALIBUR detector is 115 mm × 100 mm with a small 6.8 mm wide inactive region between modules. Each detector module is connected to 2 FPGA read-out boards via a flexi-rigid circuit to allow a fully parallel read-out of the 16 MEDIPIX3 chips. The 6 FPGA read-out boards used in the EXCALIBUR detector are interfaced to 6 computing nodes via 10Gbit/s fibre-optic links to maintain the very high frame-rate capability. The standard suite of EPICS control software is used to operate the detector and to integrate it with the Diamond Light Source beamline software environment. This article describes the design, fabrication and characterisation of the MEDIPIX3-based modules composing the EXCALIBUR detector.

  15. A gas ionisation Direct-STIM detector for MeV ion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norarat, Rattanaporn, E-mail: rattanaporn@rmutl.ac.th [University of Applied Sciences (HES-SO), Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Gris 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Faculty of Science and Agriculture, Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna, Chiang Rai, 57120 Chiang Rai (Thailand); Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, Jyväskylä FI-40014 (Finland); Guibert, Edouard; Jeanneret, Patrick; Dellea, Mario; Jenni, Josef [University of Applied Sciences (HES-SO), Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Gris 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Roux, Adrien; Stoppini, Luc [Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Campus Biotech, Chemin des Mines 9, Geneva (Switzerland); Whitlow, Harry J. [University of Applied Sciences (HES-SO), Haute Ecole Arc Ingénierie, Eplatures-Gris 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    Direct-Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (Direct-STIM) is a powerful technique that yields structural information in sub-cellular whole cell imaging. Usually, a Si p-i-n diode is used in Direct-STIM measurements as a detector. In order to overcome the detrimental effects of radiation damage which appears as a broadening in the energy resolution, we have developed a gas ionisation detector for use with a focused ion beam. The design is based on the ETH Frisch grid-less off-axis Geiger–Müller geometry. It is developed for use in a MeV ion microscope with a standard Oxford Microbeams triplet lens and scanning system. The design has a large available solid angle for other detectors (e.g. proton induced fluorescence). Here we report the performance for imaging ReNcells VM with μm resolution where energy resolutions of <24 keV fwhm could be achieved for 1 MeV protons using isobutane gas.

  16. The ALTRO Chip A 16-channel A/D Converter and Digital Processor for Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Esteve-Bosch, R; Mota, B; Musa, L

    2003-01-01

    The ALTRO (ALICE TPC Read Out) chip is a mixed-signal integrated circuit designed to be one of the building blocks of the readout electronics for gas detectors. Originally conceived and optimised for the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC, its architecture and programmability makes it suitable for the readout of a wider class of gas detectors. In one single chip, the analogue signals from 16 channels are digitised, processed, compressed and stored in a multi-acquisition memory. The Analogue-to- Digital converters embedded in the chip have a 10-bit dynamic range and a maximum sampling rate in the range of 20 to 40MHz. After digitisation, a pipelined hardwired Processor is able to remove from the input signal a wide range of systematic and non-systematic perturbations, related to the non-ideal behaviour of the detector, temperature variation of the electronics, environmental noise, etc. Moreover, the Processor is able to suppress the signal tail within 1mus after the pulse pea...

  17. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendolia, S R; Bisogni, M G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Paternoster, G; Rosso, V; Stefanini, A

    2009-04-01

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics.

  18. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Paternoster, G.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A. [Str. Dip. di Matematica e Fisica dell' Universita di Sassari, Via Vienna 2, I-07100, Sassari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Dip. di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Dip. di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy); Dip. di Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' , Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics.

  19. THick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) detector readout based on TDC-FPGAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Joerg, Philipp; Kremser, Paul; Schopferer, Sebastian [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Collaboration: THGEM Group of the COMPASS Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The RD51 program has been investigating a novel photon detector technology called THGEM, aimed to be operated in future Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) Counters. The THGEM design is adopted from the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) using Printed Circuit Board (PCB) material. The manufacturing process uses standard PCB drilling and etching techniques which allows to cover large detector areas at gains up to 10{sup 6} in a mechanically robust and very cost-efficient manner. Promising results have also been obtained with a hybrid approach, which combines the THGEM with a Micromega layer to further suppress the ion back flow to the photocathode. In the course of the RICH-1 detector upgrade of the COMPASS experiment at CERN, the existing Multi Wire Proportional Chambers will partly be replaced by a set of THGEMs. For the digital readout, we are designing a front-end board processing 384 detector channels by TDC-FPGAs. The boards reading a single THGEM chamber are connected in a star topology in order to exploit the data rate capability of the optical transceivers interfacing with the downstream data acquisition system.

  20. Simulation results for PLATO: a prototype hybrid X-ray photon counting detector with a low energy threshold for fusion plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, A.; Menouni, M.; Pangaud, P.; Fenzi, C.; Colledani, G.; Moureau, G.; Escarguel, A.; Morel, C.

    2017-01-01

    PLATO is a prototype hybrid X-ray photon counting detector that has been designed to meet the specifications for plasma diagnostics for the WEST tokamak platform (Tungsten (W) Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) in southern France, with potential perspectives for ITER. PLATO represents a customized solution that fulfills high sensitivity, low dispersion and high photon counting rate. The PLATO prototype matrix is composed of 16 × 18 pixels with a 70 μm pixel pitch. New techniques have been used in analog sensitive blocks to minimize noise coupling through supply rails and substrate, and to suppress threshold dispersion across the matrix. The PLATO ASIC is designed in CMOS 0.13 μm technology and was submitted for a fabrication run in June 2016. The chip is designed to be bump-bonded to a silicon sensor. This paper presents pixel architecture as well as simulation results while highlighting novel solutions.

  1. Amperometric detector for gas chromatography based on a silica sol-gel solid electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinecker, William H; Miecznikowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J; Sandlin, Zechariah D; Cox, James A

    2017-11-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a silica sol-gel solid electrolyte, a working electrode that protrudes into a gas phase, and reference and counter electrodes that contact the solid electrolyte comprises an amperometric detector for gas chromatography. Under potentiostatic conditions, a current related to the concentration of an analyte in the gas phase is produced by its oxidation at the three-phase boundary among the sol-gel, working electrode, and the gas phase. The sol-gel is processed to contain an electrolyte that also serves as a humidistat to maintain a constant water activity even in the presence the gas chromatographic mobile phase. Response was demonstrated toward a diverse set of analytes, namely hydrogen, 1,2-ethandithiol, phenol, p-cresol, and thioanisole. Using flow injection amperometry of hydrogen with He as the carrier gas, 90% of the steady-state current was achieved in < 1s at a flow rate of 20mLmin(-1). A separation of 1,2-ethandithiol, phenol, p-cresol, and thioanisole at a 2.2mLmin(-1) flow rate was achieved with respective detection limits (k = 3 criterion) of 4, 1, 3, and 70 ppmv when the working electrode potential was 800mV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intercomparison of radon gas detectors 2001 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2001 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Schuler, Christoph

    2001-06-01

    Fifteen radon measurement services participated in the 2001 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) during March 2nd to 11th, 2001. Eleven of these laboratories were approved by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant traceability to national or international standards. Radon gas detectors (etched-track and electret ionization chambers) and instruments (ionization chambers and electrostatic precipitation) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 6100 Bqm{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 1300 kBqhm{sup -3}. Due to the low aerosol concentration during this intercomparison exercise, etched-track detectors without diffusion chamber showed a significant deviation to the reference exposure and an increase of the standard deviation of an ensemble of five detectors compared to intercomparisons with aerosol concentration in the specified range of these detectors. Radon monitors with electrostatic precipitation, which were recently introduced on the Swiss market, showed insufficient factory calibration and correction of the influence of air humidity on the measured radon gas activity concentrations. (author) [German] Kandidaten fuer diese vom 2. bis 11. Maerz 2001 durchgefuehrte Vergleichsmessung waren Firmen, Institutionen oder Privatpersonen, welche die Anerkennung des Bundesamtes fuer Gesundheit (BAG) als Radonmessstelle besitzen und deshalb nachweisen muessen, dass die geforderte Rueckverfolgbarkeit der Messresultate auf national oder international anerkannte Normale gewaehrleistet ist. Dem Aufruf des BAG zur Teilnahme folgten neben 11 anerkannten vier weitere Messstellen. Sechs verschiedene Detektor- oder Messgeraetearten waren vertreten. Neben Kernspurdetektoren wurden bei den passiven Systemen

  3. Performance test of a micro-pattern stereo detector with two gas electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barvich, T.; Bluem, P.; Erdmann, M. E-mail: martin.erdmann@cern.ch; Fahrer, M.; Kaercher, K.; Kuehn, F.; Moermann, D.; Mueller, Th.; Neuberger, D.; Roederer, F.; Simonis, H.J.; Skiba, A.; Thuemmel, W.H.; Weiler, Th.; Weseler, S

    2002-02-01

    We report on the performance of a large micro-pattern detector with two gas electron multiplier foils and a two-layer readout structure at ground potential. The two readout layers each have a 406 {mu}m pitch and cross at an effective angle of 6.7 deg. . This structure allows for two orthogonal coordinates to be determined. Using a muon beam at CERN together with a silicon tracking system, the position resolutions of the two coordinates are measured to be 50 {mu}m and 1 mm respectively (1 standard deviation). The muon detection efficiency for the two-dimensional space points reaches 96%. The detector was found to be well operational over a wide range in the settings of the different electrical fields.

  4. A large-scale low-background liquid scintillation detector: the counting test facility at Gran Sasso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimonti, G.; Arpesella, C.; Bacchiocchi, G.; Balata, M.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Brigatti, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F. P.; Cavaletti, R.; Cecchet, G.; Chen, M.; Darnton, N.; Debari, A.; Deutsch, M.; Elisei, F.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Galbiati, C.; Garagiola, A.; Gatti, F.; Giammarchi, M. G.; Giugni, D.; Goldbrunner, T.; Golubchikov, A.; Goretti, A.; Grabar, S.; Hagner, T.; Hartmann, F.; von Hentig, R.; Heusser, G.; Ianni, A.; Jochum, J.; Johnson, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Loeser, F.; Lombardi, P.; Magni, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manno, I.; Manuzio, G.; Masetti, F.; Mazzucato, U.; Meroni, E.; Neff, M.; Nisi, S.; Nostro, A.; Oberauer, L.; Perotti, A.; Preda, A.; Raghavan, P.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Resconi, E.; Ruscitti, P.; Scardaoni, R.; Schoenert, S.; Smirnov, O.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Ullucci, P.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Vitale, S.; Zaimidoroga, O.

    1998-02-01

    A 4.8 m3 unsegmented liquid scintillation detector at the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso has shown the feasibility of multi-ton low-background detectors operating to energies as low as 250 keV. Detector construction and the handling of large volumes of liquid scintillator to minimize the background are described. The scintillator, 1.5 g PPO/L-pseudocumene, is held in a flexible nylon vessel shielded by 1000 t of purified water. The active detector volume is viewed by 100 photomultipliers, which measure time and charge for each event, from which energy, position and pulse shape are deduced. On-line purification of the scintillator by water extraction, vacuum distillation and nitrogen stripping removed radioactive impurities. Upper limits were established of < 10-7 Bq/kg-scintillator for events with energies 250 keV < E < 800 keV, and < 10-9 Bq/kg-scintillator due to the decay products of uranium and thorium. The isotopic abundance of 14C/12C in the scintillator was shown to be approximately 10-18 by extending the energy window of the detector to 25-250 keV. The 14C abundance and uranium and thorium levels in the CTF are compatible with the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment.

  5. Pulse Shape Analysis and Discrimination for Silicon-Photomultipliers in Helium-4 Gas Scintillation Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Cathleen; Zhu, Ting; Rolison, Lucas; Kiff, Scott; Jordan, Kelly; Enqvist, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Using natural helium (helium-4), the Arktis 180-bar pressurized gas scintillator is capable of detecting and distinguishing fast neutrons and gammas. The detector has a unique design of three optically separated segments in which 12 silicon-photomultiplier (SiPM) pairs are positioned equilaterally across the detector to allow for them to be fully immersed in the helium-4 gas volume; consequently, no additional optical interfaces are necessary. The SiPM signals were amplified, shaped, and readout by an analog board; a 250 MHz, 14-bit digitizer was used to examine the output pulses from each SiPMpair channel. The SiPM over-voltage had to be adjusted in order to reduce pulse clipping and negative overshoot, which was observed for events with high scintillation production. Pulse shaped discrimination (PSD) was conducted by evaluating three different parameters: time over threshold (TOT), pulse amplitude, and pulse integral. In order to differentiate high and low energy events, a 30ns gate window was implemented to group pulses from two SiPM channels or more for the calculation of TOT. It was demonstrated that pulses from a single SiPM channel within the 30ns window corresponded to low-energy gamma events while groups of pulses from two-channels or more were most likely neutron events. Due to gamma pulses having lower pulse amplitude, the percentage of measured gamma also depends on the threshold value in TOT calculations. Similarly, the threshold values were varied for the optimal PSD methods of using pulse amplitude and pulse area parameters. Helium-4 detectors equipped with SiPMs are excellent for in-the-field radiation measurement of nuclear spent fuel casks. With optimized PSD methods, the goal of developing a fuel cask content monitoring and inspection system based on these helium-4 detectors will be achieved.

  6. Low-noise mid-IR upconversion detector for improved IR-degenerate four-wave mixing gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Sahlberg, Anna-Lena; Li, Zhongshan; Aldén, Marcus; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2014-09-15

    We compare a nonlinear upconversion detector with a conventional cryogenic InSb detector for the detection of coherent infrared light showing near-shot-noise-limited performance in the upconversion system. The InSb detector is limited by dark noise, which results in a 500 times lower signal-to-noise ratio. The two detectors are compared for the detection of a coherent degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) signal in the mid-infrared, and applied to measure trace-level acetylene in a gas flow at atmospheric pressure, probing its fundamental rovibrational transitions. In addition to lower noise, the upconversion system provides image information of the signal, thus adding new functionality compared to standard point detection methods. We further show that the upconversion detector system can be implemented as a simple replacement of the cryogenic detector.

  7. Study of gas Cherenkov detectors for high momentum charged particle identification

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, G; García, E; Di Mauro, A; Nappi, E; Martinengo, P; Shileev, K A; Paic, G

    2007-01-01

    We present here an exhaustive study of the possibilities offered by a combination of a gas radiator of the highest index of refraction commercially available (C5F12) with the proven concept of large area CsI photocathodes instrumenting either a multiwire chamber or a GEM detector. We will present two geometries. One of them is proximity-focusing, nevertheless allows identification in a large momentum range. The second geometry deals with the possibilities of using focusing with a spherical mirror. Simulations of the performance are presented.

  8. Investigation of quad-energy high-rate photon counting for X-ray computed tomography using a cadmium telluride detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Yuichi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2017-12-01

    To obtain four kinds of tomograms at four different X-ray energy ranges simultaneously, we have constructed a quad-energy (QE) X-ray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and microcomputers (MCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses produced using amplifiers are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 33, 50 and 65keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-33, 33-50, 50-65 and 65-100keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. We performed QE computed tomography (QE-CT) at a tube voltage of 100kV. Using a 0.5-mm-diam lead pinhole, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously at four energy ranges. K-edge CT using iodine and gadolinium media was carried out utilizing two energy ranges of 33-50 and 50-65keV, respectively. At a tube voltage of 100kV and a current of 60 μA, the count rate was 15.2 kilocounts per second (kcps), and the minimum count rates after penetrating objects in QE-CT were regulated to approximately 2 kcps by the tube current. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The new X-ray mapping: X-ray spectrum imaging above 100 kHz output count rate with the silicon drift detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E

    2006-02-01

    Electron-excited X-ray mapping is a key operational mode of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The popularity of X-ray mapping persists despite the significant time penalty due to the relatively low output count rates, typically less than 25 kHz, that can be processed with the conventional EDS. The silicon drift detector (SDD) uses the same measurement physics, but modifications to the detector structure permit operation at a factor of 5-10 times higher than conventional EDS for the same resolution. Output count rates as high as 500 kHz can be achieved with 217 eV energy resolution (at MnKalpha). Such extraordinarily high count rates make possible X-ray mapping through the method of X-ray spectrum imaging, in which a complete spectrum is captured at each pixel of the scan. Useful compositional data can be captured in less than 200 s with a pixel density of 160 x 120. Applications to alloy and rock microstructures, ultrapure materials with rare inclusions, and aggregate particles with complex chemistry illustrate new approaches to characterization made practical by high-speed X-ray mapping with the SDD.Note: The Siegbahn notation for characteristic X-rays is commonly used in the field of electron beam X-ray spectrometry and will be used in this article. The equivalent IUPAC notation is indicated in parentheses at the first use. In this article, the following arbitrary definitions will be used when referring to concentration (C) ranges: major: C > 0.1 (10 wt%), minor: 0.01

  10. Spatial Resolution Studies of Micro Pattern Gas Detectors Using the Charge Dispersion Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellerive, A.

    2008-06-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for the International Linear Collider will need to measure about 200 track points with a spatial resolution close to 100 μm. A Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) readout TPC could achieve the desired resolution with existing techniques using sub-millimeter pad width at the expense of a large increase in the detector cost and complexity. A new MPGD readout concept of charge dispersion developed in Canada has been recently applied to small prototypes MPGD-TPC. Using cosmic-ray tracks, it demonstrated the feasibility of achieving good resolution with pads similar in width to the ones used for the proportional wire TPC. The charge dispersion technique was used with GEM and micromegas and results on resolution studies are presented. The TPC resolution with GEM and micromegas readout are compared to the earlier results without charge dispersion. First results of performance with charge dispersion in a magnetic field of strength comparable to that for the ILC detector are presented. An unprecedented 50 μm resolution has been achieved, which is an important step toward demonstrating the feasibility of meeting the challenging ILC TPC goal.

  11. Development of a cost efficient methodology to perform allocation of flammable and toxic gas detectors applying CFD tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, Rafael Brod; Rocha, Gean Felipe Almeida [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nalvarte, Gladys Augusta Zevallos [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Novik (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    This paper is aimed to present a computational procedure for flammable and toxic gas detector allocation and quantification developed by DNV. The proposed methodology applies Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as operational and safety characteristics of the analyzed region to assess the optimal number of toxic and flammable gas detectors and their optimal location. A probabilistic approach is also used when applying the DNV software ThorEXPRESSLite, following NORSOK Z013 Annex G and presented in HUSER et al. 2000 and HUSER et al. 2001, when the flammable gas detectors are assessed. A DNV developed program, DetLoc, is used to run in an iterative way the procedure described above leading to an automatic calculation of the gas detectors location and number. The main advantage of the methodology presented above is the independence of human interaction in the gas detector allocation leading to a more precise and free of human judgment allocation. Thus, a reproducible allocation is generated when comparing several different analyses and a global criteria appliance is guaranteed through different regions in the same project. A case study is presented applying the proposed methodology. (author)

  12. GOSSIP: A vertex detector combining a thin gas layer as signal generator with a CMOS readout pixel array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M. [CERN/MediPix Consortium, Geneva (Switzerland); Heijne, E.H.M. [CERN/MediPix Consortium, Geneva (Switzerland); Llopart, X. [CERN/MediPix Consortium, Geneva (Switzerland); Colas, P. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Giganon, A. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Giomataris, Y. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Chefdeville, M. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Colijn, A.P. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fornaini, A. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Graaf, H. van der [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: vdgraaf@nikhef.nl; Kluit, P. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Timmermans, J. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visschers, J.L. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schmitz, J. [University of Twente/MESA (Netherlands)

    2006-05-01

    A small TPC has been read out by means of a Medipix2 chip as direct anode. A Micromegas foil was placed 50{mu}m above the chip, and electron multiplication occurred in the gap. With a He/isobutane 80/20 mixture, gas multiplication factors up to tens of thousands were achieved, resulting in an efficiency for detecting single electrons of better than 90%. With this new readout technology for gas-filled detectors we recorded many image frames containing 2D images with tracks from cosmic muons. Along these tracks, electron clusters were observed, as well as {delta}-rays. With a gas layer thickness of only 1mm, the device could be applied as vertex detector, outperforming all Si-based detectors.

  13. GOSSIP: A vertex detector combining a thin gas layer as signal generator with a CMOS readout pixel array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Llopart, X.; Colas, P.; Giganon, A.; Giomataris, Y.; Chefdeville, M.; Colijn, A. P.; Fornaini, A.; van der Graaf, H.; Kluit, P.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.; Schmitz, J.

    2006-05-01

    A small TPC has been read out by means of a Medipix2 chip as direct anode. A Micromegas foil was placed 50 μm above the chip, and electron multiplication occurred in the gap. With a He/isobutane 80/20 mixture, gas multiplication factors up to tens of thousands were achieved, resulting in an efficiency for detecting single electrons of better than 90%. With this new readout technology for gas-filled detectors we recorded many image frames containing 2D images with tracks from cosmic muons. Along these tracks, electron clusters were observed, as well as δ-rays. With a gas layer thickness of only 1 mm, the device could be applied as vertex detector, outperforming all Si-based detectors.

  14. Performance Testing of Tracer Gas and Tracer Aerosol Detectors for use in Radionuclide NESHAP Compliance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lattin, Rebecca Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-28

    The Rad-NESHAP program, part of the Air Quality Compliance team of LANL’s Compliance Programs group (EPC-CP), and the Radiation Instrumentation & Calibration team, part of the Radiation Protection Services group (RP-SVS), frequently partner on issues relating to characterizing air flow streams. This memo documents the most recent example of this partnership, involving performance testing of sulfur hexafluoride detectors for use in stack gas mixing tests. Additionally, members of the Rad-NESHAP program performed a functional trending test on a pair of optical particle counters, comparing results from a non-calibrated instrument to a calibrated instrument. Prior to commissioning a new stack sampling system, the ANSI Standard for stack sampling requires that the stack sample location must meet several criteria, including uniformity of tracer gas and aerosol mixing in the air stream. For these mix tests, tracer media (sulfur hexafluoride gas or liquid oil aerosol particles) are injected into the stack air stream and the resulting air concentrations are measured across the plane of the stack at the proposed sampling location. The coefficient of variation of these media concentrations must be under 20% when evaluated over the central 2/3 area of the stack or duct. The instruments which measure these air concentrations must be tested prior to the stack tests in order to ensure their linear response to varying air concentrations of either tracer gas or tracer aerosol. The instruments used in tracer gas and aerosol mix testing cannot be calibrated by the LANL Standards and Calibration Laboratory, so they would normally be sent off-site for factory calibration by the vendor. Operational requirements can prevent formal factory calibration of some instruments after they have been used in hazardous settings, e.g., within a radiological facility with potential airborne contamination. The performance tests described in this document are intended to demonstrate the reliable

  15. Evaluation of Timepix3 based CdTe photon counting detector for fully spectroscopic small animal SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanova, E.; Jakubek, J.; Turecek, D.; Sykora, V.; Francova, P.; Kolarova, V.; Sefc, L.

    2018-01-01

    The imaging method of SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) is used in nuclear medicine for diagnostics of various diseases or organs malfunctions. The distribution of medically injected, inhaled, or ingested radionuclides (radiotracers) in the patient body is imaged using gamma-ray sensitive camera with suitable imaging collimator. The 3D image is then calculated by combining many images taken from different observation angles. Most of SPECT systems use scintillator based cameras. These cameras do not provide good energy resolution and do not allow efficient suppression of unwanted signals such as those caused by Compton scattering. The main goal of this work is evaluation of Timepix3 detector properties for SPECT method for functional imaging of small animals during preclinical studies. Advantageous Timepix3 properties such as energy and spatial resolution are exploited for significant image quality improvement. Preliminary measurements were performed on specially prepared plastic phantom with cavities filled by radioisotopes and then repeated with in vivo mouse sample.

  16. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  17. Quantum filtering theory and the reduction of dark count, dark current and optical crosstalk in optical detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Armien John

    2016-04-01

    In developing sensitive optical sensors, issues associated with optical crosstalk, dark count, and dark current persist. While designs have been created to mitigate the effects of these optical noises on the performance of the sensors, they are never fully addressed. This is mainly due to the highly probabilistic nature of the interaction of light and matter. This paper theoretically explores possible solutions that could lead to the significant reduction of these optical noises by presenting the problem in both the Markovian and Bayesian quantum feedback schemes and identifying the parameters that can be controlled and/or regulated. This paper then attempts to translate the quantum processes into realizable materials and/or systems suitable for fabrication or integration to existing system.

  18. New design features of gas ionization detectors used for elastic recoil detection

    CERN Document Server

    Timmers, H; Ophel, T R

    2000-01-01

    Several alternative design features of large acceptance, gas ionization detectors have proven to be successful for application to elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). In particular, effects due to the distortion of the entrance field by a large area window have been eliminated in a simple fashion, to allow measurement of the initial rate of energy loss and to provide an energy- and species-independent cathode signal. No less importantly, use of a divided electrode in the anode plane has enabled a more straightforward means of determining the scattering angle that is required for kinematic corrections. An intermediate grid was found to provide a direct and true total energy signal, with only slightly diminished resolution compared with that of the summed total anode equivalent.

  19. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christopher R.; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  20. A proposal for location and optimization of gas detectors using mathematic programming and computational fluid dynamics; Uma proposta para otimizacao e localizacao de detectores de gas utilizando programacao matematica e fluidodinamica computacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Savio S.V. [Det Norske Veritas PRINCIPIA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira Filho, Virgilio Jose [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia de Producao

    2004-07-01

    Nowadays, worry about produce under safe conditions increased. This compromising with environment and safety systems is somehow careless regarding mathematics models in order to foreseen day by day production scenarios. The present paper suggests a methodology based on computational fluid dynamics and mathematics programming using graph theory to optimize gas detectors location on offshore facility plant. (author)

  1. Response functions of multi-pixel-type CdTe detector: toward development of precise material identification on diagnostic x-ray images by means of photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Asahara, Takashi; Kimoto, Natsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Yamasaki, Masashi; Okada, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Currently, an X-ray imaging system which can produced information used to identify various materials has been developed based on photon counting. It is important to estimate the response function of the detector in order to accomplish highly accurate material identification. Our aim is to simulate the response function of a CdTe detector using Monte-Carlo simulation; at this time, the transportation of incident and scattered photons and secondary produced electrons were precisely simulated without taking into consideration the charge spread in the collecting process of the produced charges (charge sharing effect). First, we set pixel sizes of 50-500μm, the minimum irradiation fields which produce equilibrium conditions were determined. Then, observed peaks in the response function were analyzed with consideration paid to the interactions between incident X-rays and the detector components, Cd and Te. The secondary produced characteristic X-rays play an important role. Accordingly ratios of full energy peak (FEP), scattering X-rays and penetrating X-rays in the calculated response functions were analyzed. When the pixel size of 200μm was used the scattered X-rays were saturated at equilibrium with relatively small fields and efficiency of FEP was kept at a high value (<50%). Finally, we demonstrated the X-ray spectrum which is folded by the response function. Even if the charge sharing effect is not completely corrected when using the electric circuit, there is a possibility that disturbed portions in the measured X-ray spectra can be corrected by using proper calibration, in which the above considerations are taken into account.

  2. A Chemical Detector for Gas Chromatography Using Pulsed Discharge Emission Spectroscopy on a Microchip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X.; Zhu, W.; Mitra, B.; Liu, J.; Liu, T.; Fan, X.; Gianchandani, Y.

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in miniaturized systems for chemical analysis in harsh environments. Chemical detection by emission spectroscopy of on-chip microdischarges [1-3] can be performed at >200°C [4], suggesting utility inspace exploration, volcanic monitoring, and oil well monitoring. This abstract describes the first use of pulsed microdischarge spectroscopy for gas chromatography (GC).This effort supports NASA interests in monitoring closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The microdischarge occurs on a 1cm2 glass chip (Fig. 1a), with thin-film Ni electrodes separated by 160μm. A glass lid with a grooved gas-flow channel, and inlet/outlet capillary tubes are epoxy-sealed to the chip. Located downstream of the 1.7m-long, RTX-1-coated, GC separation column, the microdischarge chip is read by a spectrometer. In a typical experiment (Fig. 1b), a mixture of acetone 3.6μg, 1-hexanol 2.8μg and nitrobenzene 3.0μg, is injected, with He carrier gas at 1.56sccm, through the GC. Acetone elutes quickly while nitrobenzene is slower. Microdischarges are triggered at 0.5Hz for 6 min., and 0.04Hz thereafter. Each microdischarge consumes ≈8mJ; the average power is ≈1.14mW. The spectrum (Fig. 1b, inset) shows that the 388nm peak, representing CN/CH fragments [5], is enhanced by carbon compounds. Its strength relative to the 588nm peak of He provides a chromatogram. Fig. 1b also shows a benchmark result from a commercial flame ionization detector (FID). The differences in elution time are attributed to differences in the gas flow paths for the two detectors [1]. REFERENCES [1] Eijkel et al, Anal. Chem, 2000 [2] Mitra et al, IEEE Trans Plasma Sci, 2008 [3] Mitra et al, IEEE Sensors, 2008 [4] Wright et al, APL, 2009 [5] Pearse et al, The Identification of Molecular Spectra, 1963

  3. Low-noise mid-IR upconversion detector for improved IR-degenerate four-wave mixing gas sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Sahlberg, Anna-Lena

    2014-01-01

    -to-noise ratio. The two detectors are compared for the detection of a coherent degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) signal in the mid-infrared, and applied to measure trace-level acetylene in a gas flow at atmospheric pressure, probing its fundamental rovibrational transitions. In addition to lower noise...

  4. Simulation and Digitization of a Gas Electron Multiplier Detector Using Geant4 and an Object-Oriented Digitization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Timothy; Liyanage, Nilanga; Xiong, Weizhi; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    Our research has focused on simulating the response of a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector using computational methods. GEM detectors provide a cost effective solution for radiation detection in high rate environments. A detailed simulation of GEM detector response to radiation is essential for the successful adaption of these detectors to different applications. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo (GEMC), a wrapper around Geant4 which has been successfully used to simulate the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) at Jefferson Lab, we are developing a simulation of a GEM chamber similar to the detectors currently used in our lab. We are also refining an object-oriented digitization program, which translates energy deposition information from GEMC into electronic readout which resembles the readout from our physical detectors. We have run the simulation with beta particles produced by the simulated decay of a 90Sr source, as well as with a simulated bremsstrahlung spectrum. Comparing the simulation data with real GEM data taken under similar conditions is used to refine the simulation parameters. Comparisons between results from the simulations and results from detector tests will be presented.

  5. Large Area and High Efficiency Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with High Time and Spatial Resolution for Night Time Sensing and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2012-09-01

    The development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors with high performance has significance for applications in astronomy (such as our sensor on the SAAO SALT 10m telescope), night time remote reconnaissance, airborne/space situational awareness, and high-speed adaptive optics. Sealed tube configurations for optical/IR sensing also have applications in detection of Cherenkov light (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and neutron imaging applications. In open faced configurations these devices are important for UV and particle detection in space astrophysics, mass spectroscopy and many time-of flight applications. Currently available devices are limited to sizes of about 5 cm and use either conventional microchannel plates, or dynode multipliers for amplification, coupled coarse pad array readouts. Extension of these schemes to devices as large as 20 cm with high spatial resolution presents significant problems and potentially considerable cost. A collaboration (Large Area Picosecond Photon Detector) of the U. Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, U.C. Berkeley, U. Hawaii and a number of other institutions has developed novel technologies to realize 20 cm format detectors in open face or sealed tube configurations. One critical component of this development is novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays. The microchannel plates are based on a novel concept where the substrate is constructed from a borosilicate micro-capillary array that is made to function as a microchannel plate by deposition of resistive and secondary emissive layers using atomic layer deposition. The process is relatively inexpensive compared with conventional microchannel plates and allows very large microchannel plates to be produced with pore sizes as small as 10 microns. These provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional microchannel plates, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have

  6. The Gas Pixel Detector as a solar X-ray polarimeter and imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; di Cosimo, Sergio; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Muleri, Fabio; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria

    The sun is the nearest astrophysical source with an interesting emission in the X-ray band. The study of energetic events, such as solar flares, can help us to understand the behaviour of the magnetic field of our star. There are in literature numerous studies published about polarization predictions, for a wide range of solar flare models. All these models involve emission from thermal and/or nonthermal processes. Furthermore, results of flare observations in the X-ray band have never been exhaustive. We want to present a new kind of instrument with polarimetric and imaging capabilities in the X-ray band. This instrument is the Gas Pixel Detector (GPD). It has been developed by the INFN and the IASF-Roma / INAF Italian research institutes. The GPD was born to achieve X-ray polarimetric measurements as well as X-ray images for astrophysical sources. It has a good spectroscopic sensitivity thanks to an energy resolution of some per cent and it allows also to perform timing measurements. Differently from all the other kinds of today's polarimeters, it doesn't need rotation! The GPD exploits the dependence of photoelectric cross section to photon polarization direction to the aim of measuring polarization. This instrument is essentially a ionization chamber: a cell filled by gas into which radiation enters through a window of 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm. The cell has a depth of some centimeters: typically from 1 to 2 cm. Every time that a photon is absorbed by the gas, a photoelectron is emitted with more probability in the direction of the electric vector of the photon absorbed. The photoelectron propagates and produces a track of ionization that is drifted, amplified and actually collected on a fine sub-divided pixeled detector, whose pixels have a dimension of 50 µm. At the present the chip integrates more than 16.5 millions of transistors. It has an active area of 105600 pixels organized in a honeycomb matrix 300x352. It is a self triggered system able to select itself the

  7. Performance of a four-element Si drift detector for X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy: resolution, maximum count rate, and dead-time correction with incorporation into the ATHENA data analysis software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woicik, J.C.; Newburgh, W.; Ravel, B.; Fischer, D.A.

    2010-03-09

    The performance of a four-element Si drift detector for energy-dispersive fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements is reported, operating at the National Institute of Standards and Technology beamline X23A2 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector can acquire X-ray absorption fine-structure spectra with a throughput exceeding 4 x 10{sup 5} counts per second per detector element (>1.6 x 10{sup 6} total counts per second summed over all four channels). At this count rate the resolution at 6 keV is approximately 220 eV, which adequately resolves the Mn K{sub {alpha}} and K{sup {beta}} fluorescence lines. Accurate dead-time correction is demonstrated, and it has been incorporated into the ATHENA data analysis program. To maintain counting efficiency and high signal to background, it is suggested that the incoming count rate should not exceed {approx}70% of the maximum throughput.

  8. R&D studies of a RICH detector using pressurized C$_{4}$F$_{8}$O radiator gas and a CsI-based gaseous photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Agócs, A.G; Barnaföldi, G.G; Bellwied, R; Bencédi, G; Bencze, G; Berényi, D; Boldizsár, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chinellato, D.D; Cindolo, F; Das-Bose, L; Das, D; Das, K; De Cataldo, G; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Futó, E; Garcia, E; Hamar, G; Harton, A; Jimenez, R.T; Kim, D.W; Kim, J.S; Knospe, A; Kovacs, L; Lévai, P; Markert, C; Martinengo, P; Molnar, L; Nappi, E; Olah, L; Paic, G; Pastore, C; Patino, M.E; Peskov, V; Pinsky, L; Piuz, F; Pochybova, S; Sgura, I; Sinha, T; Song, J; Timmins, A; Van Beelen, J.B; Varga, D; Volpe, G; Weber, M; Xaplanteris, L; Yi, J; Yoo, I.-K

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of layout and performance of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector using for the fi rst time pressurized C 4 F 8 O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of a MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode. In particular, we present here the results of beam tests of a MWPC having an adjustable anode – cathode gap, aiming at the optimization of single photoelectron detection and Cherenkov angle resolution. This system was proposed as a Very High Momentum Particle Identi fi cation (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identi fi cation in the momentum range 5 – 25 GeV/c.

  9. R&D studies of a RICH detector using pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a CsI-based gaseous photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agócs, A. G.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Bellwied, R.; Bencédi, G.; Bencze, G.; Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cindolo, F.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L.; De Cataldo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Futó, E.; Garcia, E.; Hamar, G.; Harton, A.; Jimenez, R. T.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. S.; Knospe, A.; Kovacs, L.; Lévai, P.; Markert, C.; Martinengo, P.; Molnar, L.; Nappi, E.; Olah, L.; Paić, G.; Pastore, C.; Patino, M. E.; Peskov, V.; Pinsky, L.; Piuz, F.; Pochybová, S.; Sgura, I.; Sinha, T.; Song, J.; Timmins, A.; Van Beelen, J. B.; Varga, D.; Volpe, G.; Weber, M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Yi, J.; Yoo, I.-K.

    2013-12-01

    We report on studies of layout and performance of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector using for the first time pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of a MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode. In particular, we present here the results of beam tests of a MWPC having an adjustable anode-cathode gap, aiming at the optimization of single photoelectron detection and Cherenkov angle resolution. This system was proposed as a Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range 5-25 GeV/c.

  10. Test beam studies of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for the upgrade of CMS endcap muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ram Krishna

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide exceptional high instantaneous and integrated luminosity. The forward region $\\mid \\eta \\mid \\geq 1.5$ of the CMS detector will face extremely high particle rates in tens of $KHz/cm^{2}$ and hence it will affect the momentum resolution and longevity of the muon detectors. To overcome these issues the CMS collaboration has decided to install new large size rate capable Triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors in the forward region of CMS muon system. The first set of Triple GEM detectors will be installed in the GE1/1 region $(1.5 \\leq \\eta \\leq 2.2)$ of muon endcap during the LS2 of the LHC and the next one will be installed in the GE2/1 region $(1.6 \\leq \\eta \\leq 2.5)$, during the LS3. Towards this goal, full-size CMS Triple GEM prototype chambers have been fabricated and put under the test beam at the CERN SPS test beam facility. The GEM detectors were operated with two gas mixtures $Ar/CO_{2}$ (70/30) and $Ar/CO_{2}/CF_{4}$ (40/15/45). In 2014 and 2016, ...

  11. Gossipo-3 A prototype of a Front-End Pixel Chip for Read-Out of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Brezina, Christpoh; van der Graaf, Haryy; Gromov, Vladimir; Kluit, Ruud; Kruth, Andre; Zappon, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In a joint effort of Nikhef (Amsterdam) and the University of Bonn, the Gossipo-3 integrated circuit (IC) has been developed. This circuit is a prototype of a chip dedicated for read-out of various types of position sensitive Micro-Pattern Gas detectors (MPGD). The Gossipo-3 is defined as a set of building blocks to be used in a future highly granulated (60 μm) chip. The pixel circuit can operate in two modes. In Time mode every readout pixel measures the hit arrival time and the charge deposit. For this purpose it has been equipped with a high resolution TDC (1.7 ns) covering dynamic range up to 102 μs. Charge collected by the pixel will be measured using Time-over- Threshold method in the range from 400 e- to 28000 e- with accuracy of 200 e- (standard deviation). In Counting mode every pixel operates as a 24-bit counter, counting the number of incoming hits. The circuit is also optimized to operate at low power consumption (100 mW/cm2) that is required to avoid the need for massive power transport and coo...

  12. The pin pixel detector--X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a soft X-ray gas pixel detector, which uses connector pins for the anodes is reported. Based on a commercial 100 pin connector block, a prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mm centre dot 25.4 mm can be economically fabricated. The individual pin anodes all show the expected characteristics of small gas detectors capable of counting rates reaching 1 MHz per pin. A 2-dimensional resistive divide readout system has been developed to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics.

  13. Analysis of neonicotinoids by gas chromatography coupled to nuclide {sup 63}Ni - Electron Capture Detector - GC/ECD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Priscila O.; Leao, Claudio; Redigolo, Marcelo M.; Crepaldi, Caike; Bustillos, Oscar V., E-mail: priscilaoamaral@gmail.com, E-mail: claudio.leao@usp.br, E-mail: marceloredigolo@gmail.com, E-mail: caike1995@gmail.com, E-mail: ovega@ipen.bremails [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Recently, several reports have been published discussing reduction in bee population which polymerizes cultures around the world this phenomenon is known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). The phenomenon describes the lack of worker honeybees in the colony despite having pups and food. The causes of this problem are unknown but there are studies that claim that reduction of population of bees is linked to poisoning through insecticides specifically neonicotinoids. Among this type of pesticide are imidacloprid (C{sub 9}H{sub 10}ClN{sub 5}O{sub 2}), clothianidin (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}ClN{sub 5}O{sub 2}S) and thiamethoxam (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}ClN{sub 5}O{sub 3}S). This paper presents the analysis of neonicotinoids - clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam - by the technique of gas chromatography coupled to nuclide {sup 63}Ni electron capture detector (GC/ECD). The electron capture detector (ECD) is a gas chromatography detector that has been used for the detection of organic halogens, nitriles, nitrates and organometallic compounds. The ECD detector ionizes the analytes by the beta particles from the nuclide sources {sup 63}Ni within carrier gas N{sub 2}. The electrons produced in this process are collected and create a current that are amplified and generates a chromatographic peak. Methodology and details of the analysis are present in this work. (author)

  14. 18th International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The International Workshops on Radiation Imaging Detectors are held yearly and provide an international forum for discussing current research and developments in the area of position sensitive detectors for radiation imaging, including semiconductor detectors, gas and scintillator-based detectors. Topics include processing and characterization of detector materials, hybridization and interconnect technologies, design of counting or integrating electronics, readout and data acquisition systems, and applications in various scientific and industrial fields. The workshop will have plenary sessions with invited and contributed papers presented orally and in poster sessions. The invited talks will be chosen to review recent advances in different areas covered in the workshop.

  15. Determination of Beeswax Hydrocarbons by Gas Chromatography with a Mass Detector (GC -MS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waś Ewa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a method of hydrocarbon (alkanes, alkenes, dienes identification and quantitative determination of linear saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in beeswax using gas chromatography with a mass detector technique (GC -MS . Beeswax hydrocarbons were isolated using a solid-phase extraction (SPE technique with neutral aluminum oxide (Alumina - N, 1000 mg, 6 mL, then were separated on a non-polar gas chromatography column ZB-5HT INFERNO (20 m×0.18 mm×0.18 μm. Qquantitative analysis of n-alkanes was conducted by the method of internal standard with squalane used as the internal standard. The basic parameters of validation (linearity and working range, limit of determination, repeatability and reproducibility, recovery were determined. For all of the identified compounds, satisfactory (≥0.997 coefficients of correlation in the working ranges of the method (from 0.005 to 5.0 g/100 g were obtained. The elaborated method was characterized by satisfactory repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility. The average coefficients of variation for the total n-alkanes did not exceed 2% under conditions of repeatability or 4% under conditions of reproducibility. The recovery for individual n-alkanes was above 94%; for their total content, it was 100.5%. In beeswax originating from Apis mellifera, n-alkanes containing from 20 to 35 carbon atoms in their molecules were determined. The total content of these alkanes was between 9.08 g and 10.86 g/100 g (on average, 9.81 g/100 g. Additionally, apart from the saturated hydrocarbons, unsaturated hydrocarbons and dienes were identified.

  16. Calculating green house gas emissions for buildings: analysis of the performance of several carbon counting tools in different climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Roche, P.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings is to be able to count them. If this counting is integrated in the design process the impact of architectural design strategies can be evaluated more easily and a building with reduced emissions can be developed. Fifty greenhouse gas calculators and energy modeling software were compared in the main areas in which buildings are responsible for carbon emissions: operation, water, construction, waste and transportation to and from the building. These tools had to be free and easy to use so that they could be used by everybody in the initial phases of the architectural design process, while providing sufficient precision to provide useful input to the designer. The effect of modifying the envelope insulation, the quality of the windows, the efficiency of the heating and cooling systems, and integrating direct gain and night ventilation, on operation emissions was evaluated with two energy modeling tools: HEED and Design Builder. Results demonstrated that implementing appropriate design strategies significantly reduced emissions from operation in all climates. An easy to implement protocol that combines several tools for GHG counting in buildings is provided at the end.

    El primer paso para reducir las emisiones de gases invernadero generadas por las edificaciones es el poder calcularlas adecuadamente. Si esta actividad se integra al proceso de diseño arquitectónico; entonces el impacto de las estrategias de diseño se puede evaluar más fácilmente; resultando un edificio con menores emisiones. Cincuenta herramientas de cálculo de emisiones y programas de modelaje se compararon en las áreas en las cuales los edificios son responsables de las emisiones de gases invernadero: operación; agua; construcción; basura; y transporte desde y hasta el edificio. Las herramientas comparadas debían ser fáciles de utilizar; pero con suficiente precisión para proveer información de

  17. Material decomposition through weighted imaged subtraction in dual-energy spectral mammography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Ji Soo; Kang, Soon Cheol; Lee, Seung Wan [Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Mammography is commonly used for screening early breast cancer. However, mammographic images, which depend on the physical properties of breast components, are limited to provide information about whether a lesion is malignant or benign. Although a dual-energy subtraction technique decomposes a certain material from a mixture, it increases radiation dose and degrades the accuracy of material decomposition. In this study, we simulated a breast phantom using attenuation characteristics, and we proposed a technique to enable the accurate material decomposition by applying weighting factors for the dual-energy mammography based on a photon-counting detector using a Monte Carlo simulation tool. We also evaluated the contrast and noise of simulated breast images for validating the proposed technique. As a result, the contrast for a malignant tumor in the dual-energy weighted subtraction technique was 0.98 and 1.06 times similar than those in the general mammography and dual-energy subtraction techniques, respectively. However the contrast between malignant and benign tumors dramatically increased 13.54 times due to the low contrast of a benign tumor. Therefore, the proposed technique can increase the material decomposition accuracy for malignant tumor and improve the diagnostic accuracy of mammography.

  18. Estimation of Basis Line-Integrals in a Spectral Distortion-Modeled Photon Counting Detector Using Low-Order Polynomial Approximation of X-ray Transmittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkyun Lee; Kappler, Steffen; Polster, Christoph; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-02-01

    Photon counting detector (PCD)-based computed tomography exploits spectral information from a transmitted x-ray spectrum to estimate basis line-integrals. The recorded spectrum, however, is distorted and deviates from the transmitted spectrum due to spectral response effect (SRE). Therefore, the SRE needs to be compensated for when estimating basis line-integrals. One approach is to incorporate the SRE model with an incident spectrum into the PCD measurement model and the other approach is to perform a calibration process that inherently includes both the SRE and the incident spectrum. A maximum likelihood estimator can be used to the former approach, which guarantees asymptotic optimality; however, a heavy computational burden is a concern. Calibration-based estimators are a form of the latter approach. They can be very efficient; however, a heuristic calibration process needs to be addressed. In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient three-step estimator for the former approach using a low-order polynomial approximation of x-ray transmittance. The low-order polynomial approximation can change the original non-linear estimation method to a two-step linearized approach followed by an iterative bias correction step. We show that the calibration process is required only for the bias correction step and prove that it converges to the unbiased solution under practical assumptions. Extensive simulation studies validate the proposed method and show that the estimation results are comparable to those of the ML estimator while the computational time is reduced substantially.

  19. Front-end Intelligence for triggering and local track recognition in Gas Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hessey, NP; The ATLAS collaboration; van der Graaf, H; Vermeulen, J; Jansweijer, P; Romaniouk, A

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gaseous detectors with pixel readout chips gives unprecedented hit resolution (improving from O(100 um) for wire chambers to 10 um), as well as high-rate capability, low radiation length and giving in addition angular information on the local track. These devices measure individually every electron liberated by the passage of a charged particle, leading to a large quantity of data to be read out. Typically an external trigger is used to start the read-out. We are investigating the addition of local intelligence to the pixel read-out chip. A first level of processing detects the passage of a particle through the gas volume, and accurately determines the time of passage. A second level measures in an approximate but fast way the tilt-angle of the track. This can be used to trigger a third stage in which all hits associated to the track are processed locally to give a least-squares-fit to the track. The chip can then send out just the fitted track parameters instead of the individual electron ...

  20. Modular data acquisition system and its use in gas-filled detector readout at ESRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, F.; Epaud, F.; Poncet, F.; Grave, M.; Rey-Bakaikoa, V.

    1996-09-01

    Since 1992, 18 ESRF beamlines are open to users. Although the data acquisition requirements vary a lot from one beamline to another, we are trying to implement a modular data acquisition system architecture that would fit with the maximum number of acquisition projects at ESRF. Common to all of these systems are large acquisition memories and the requirement to visualize the data during an acquisition run and to transfer them quickly after the run to safe storage. We developed a general memory API handling the acquisition memory and its organization and another library that provides calls for transferring the data over TCP/IP sockets. Interesting utility programs using these libraries are the `online display' program and the `data transfer' program. The data transfer program as well as an acquisition control program rely on our well-established `device server model', which was originally designed for the machine control system and then successfully reused in beamline control systems. In the second half of this paper, the acquisition system for a 2D gas-filled detector is presented, which is one of the first concrete examples using the proposed modular data acquisition architecture.

  1. Modular data acquisition system and its use in gas-filled detector readout at ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sever, F.; Epaud, F.; Poncet, F.; Grave, M.; Rey-Bakaikoa, V. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    1996-09-01

    Since 1992, 18 ESRF beamlines are open to users. Although the data acquisition requirements vary a lot from one beamline to another, we are trying to implement a modular data acquisition system architecture that would fit with the maximum number of acquisition projects at ESRF. Common to all of these systems are large acquisition memories and the requirement to visualize the data during an acquisition run and to transfer them quickly after the run to safe storage. We developed a general memory API handling the acquisition memory and its organization and another library that provides calls for transferring the data over TCP/IP sockets. Interesting utility programs using these libraries are the {open_quote}online display{close_quote} program and the {open_quote}data transfer{close_quote} program. The data transfer program as well as an acquisition control program rely on our well-established {open_quote}device server model{close_quote}, which was originally designed for the machine control system and then successfully reused in beamline control systems. In the second half of this paper, the acquisition system for a 2D gas-filled detector is presented, which is one of the first concrete examples using the proposed modular data acquisition architecture. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Performance of the CAPRICE98 balloon-borne gas-RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, D; Carlson, P J; Francke, T; Grinstein, S; Weber, N; Suffert, Martin; Hof, M; Kremer, J; Menn, W; Simon, M; Stephens, S A; Ambriola, M; Bellotti, R; Cafagna, F; Castellano, M G; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; De Marzo, C; Finetti, N; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Spillantini, P; Bartalucci, S; Ricci, M; Bidoli, V; Casolino, M; De Pascale, M P; Morselli, A; Picozza, P; Sparvoli, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Schiavon, R P; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Mitchell, J W; Ormes, J F; Streitmatter, R E; Bravar, U; Stochaj, S J

    2001-01-01

    A RICH counter using a gas radiator of C/sub 4/F/sub 10/ and a photosensitive MWPC with pad readout has been developed, tested in particle beam at CERN and used in the CAPRICE98 balloon-borne experiment. The MWPC was operated with a TMAE and ethane mixture at atmospheric pressure and used a cathode pad plane to give an unambiguous image of the Cherenkov light. The induced signals in the pad plane were read our using the AMPLEX chip and CRAMS. The good efficiency of the Cherenkov light collection, the efficient detection of the weak signal from single UV photons together with a low noise level in the electronics of the RICH detector, resulted in a large number of detected photoelectrons per event. For beta approximately=1 charge one particles, an average of 12 photoelectrons per event were detected. The reconstructed Cherenkov angle of 50 mrad for a beta approximately=1 particle had a resolution of 1.2 mrad (rms). The RICH was flown with the CAPRICE98 magnetic spectrometer and was the first RICH counter ever u...

  3. Implementation of the next-generation Gas Cherenkov Detector at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Khater, H. Y.; Carpenter, A. C.; Beeman, B. V.; Hernandez, J. E.; Sitaraman, S.; Lopez, F. E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Griego, J. R.; Kim, Y. H.; Gales, S. A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Milnes, J. S.; Hares, J. D.

    2017-08-01

    The newest Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) diagnostic has completed its Phase I commissioning/milestone at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). GCD-3 was fielded for several years at the Omega Laser Facility in its initial configuration, before being moved to the NIF. Installation at the NIF involved optimization of GCD-3 for the higher background environment and designing a new insertion carrier assembly. GCD-3 serves as the initial phase towards the implementation of the "Super GCD" (SGCD) at the NIF. During this phase of development GCD-3 took measurements from a re-entrant well, 3.9 meters from target chamber center (TCC). Plans to insert GCD-3 within 20 cm of TCC with a Target and Diagnostic Manipulator (TANDM) will be discussed. Data was collected using a Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) in combination with a Mach-Zehnder based recording system. These measurements were used to aid in shielding analysis, validate MCNP models, and fuel design efforts for the SGCD. Findings from the initial data will be covered extensively, including an in-depth look into sources of background and possible mitigation strategies. Ongoing development of phase two, the addition of an ultra-high bandwidth Pulse Dilatation Photomultiplier Tube (PD-PMT), will also be presented.

  4. VHMPID RICH prototype using pressurized C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O radiator gas and VUV photon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acconcia, T.V. [UNICAMP, University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Agócs, A.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Barile, F. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); Barnaföldi, G.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bellwied, R. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Bencédi, G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bencze, G., E-mail: Gyorgy.Bencze@cern.ch [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Chinellato, D.D. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Cindolo, F. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); Cossyleon, K. [Chicago State University, Chicago, IL (United States); Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Dash, A.K. [UNICAMP, University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); D' Ambrosio, S. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); De Cataldo, G. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); De Pasquale, S. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); and others

    2014-12-11

    A small-size prototype of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector using for the first time pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode has been built and tested at the PS accelerator at CERN. It contained all the functional elements of the detector proposed as Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range starting from 5 potentially up to 25 GeV/c. In the paper the equipment and its elements are described and some characteristic test results are shown.

  5. Low-cost fiber optic hydrogen gas detector using guided-wave surface-plasmon resonance in chemochromic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Ed; Hishmeh, Gary A.; Ciszek, Paul E.; Lee, Se-Hee; Haberman, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel- cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the nd of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic materials, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemichromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal.

  6. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  7. Properties and applications of photon counting and energy resolved X-ray matrix detectors; Eigenschaften und Einsatzgebiete photonenzaehlender und energieaufloesender Roentgenmatrixdetektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, David; Zscherpel, Uwe; Ewert, Uwe [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany); Ullberg, Christer; Weber, Niclas; Urech, Mattias [XCounter AB, Danderyd (Sweden); Pantsar, Tuomas; Perez-Fuster, Katya [Ajat Oy Ltd., Espoo (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    The use of highly absorbing photoconductor materials (e.g. CdTe) for the production of matrix X-ray detectors allows for a number of years, the direct conversion of X-rays into evaluable electrical signals, for the NDT energy to 300 keV too. The conventional scintillator is omitted, resulting in a reduction of image blurring and an increase in efficiency due to the much larger absorption thicknesses result. Also can be at a sufficiently fast readout speed (50 - 100 ns dead time) count single photons and determine their energy. Thus, the readout noise and the dark image correction omitted. Furthermore, one can detect or hide selectively certain areas of the X-ray energy spectrum by defining energy threshold values. This feature allows one the one hand, the discrimination of materials through the dual energy technology and on the other hand, the reduction of the detected scattered radiation, thereby increasing the contrast sensitivity. In order to use these advantages efficiently, a special calibration procedure is required, which must take into account time-dependent processes in the detector layer. Presented here are the properties of this new generation of X-ray detectors matrix compared to traditional indirect converting detectors based on reference measurements on fiber composite components and thick-walled steel tubes (up to 35 mm). Further possible applications in NDT are discussed with regard to the material discrimination especially within fiber composites (eg CFRP and GFRP).(Contains PowerPoint slides). [German] Der Einsatz von hochabsorbierenden Photoleitermaterialien (z.B. CdTe) zur Herstellung von Roentgen-Matrixdetektoren ermoeglicht seit einigen Jahren die direkte Konvertierung von Roentgenstrahlen in auswertbare elektrische Signale, auch fuer den ZfP-Energiebereich bis 300 keV. Die herkoemmliche Szintillatorschicht entfaellt, was eine Verringerung der Bildunschaerfe und eine Effizienzsteigerung aufgrund der deutlich groesseren Absorptionsdicken zur

  8. Design and fabrication of data logger to measure the ambient parameters in gas detector R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, S.; Nag, D.; Rudra, S.; Swain, S.; Biswas, S.; Das, S.; Sahu, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient parameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. With this data logger continuous recording of temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and the time stamp can be done with a programmable sampling interval. The device is interfaced with computer by Lab-view software. This instrument is very economical and these parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics of gas filled detectors such as Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device have been presented.

  9. Intercomparison of radon gas detectors 1999 and 2000 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessungen 1999 und 2000 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph; Butterweck, Gernot

    2000-10-01

    This report describes the results of two radon intercomparison exercises performed by the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut from Sep 9th to Oct 6th, 1999, and from March 21st to 28th, 2000. Radon gas detectors and instruments were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in reference atmospheres to 1060 kBqhm{sup -3} radon gas exposure at an average radon gas concentration of 6400 Bqm{sup -3} and to 2050 kBqhm{sup -3} radon gas exposure at an average radon gas concentration of 12500 Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. These intercomparison exercises determined the performance of electret ionisation chambers, track etch detectors and measuring instruments at high humidity (1999 Intercomparison Exercise) and at a high radon gas exposure (2000 Intercomparison Exercise). In the 1999 Intercomparison Exercise, electret ionisation chambers revealed an influence on high humidity. This effect may be due to impurities on a microscopic scale on the electrets of these detectors. With few exceptions, in both the 1999 and the 2000 Radon Intercomparison Exercise the deviations of the measurement results to the reference radon gas concentration values were less than 15% (traceability criterion) and the standard deviation of the results of five detectors less than 15% (reproducibility criterion). (author) [German] Im Referenzlabor fuer Radongas-Konzentrationsmessungen des PSI, welches der Eichstelle fuer Strahlenschutzmessgeraete des PSI angegliedert und seit 1997 vom Eidgenoessischen Amt fuer Messwesen akkreditiert ist, werden zur Ueberpruefung von Rueckverfolgbarkeit und Reproduzierbarkeit von Messresultaten Vergleichsmessungen durchgefuehrt. Kandidaten fuer die Teilnahme an diesen Vergleichsmessungen sind Firmen, Institutionen oder Privatpersonen, welche die Anerkennung des Bundesamtes fuer Gesundheit als Radongasmessstelle besitzen und deshalb nachweisen muessen, dass die geforderte Rueckverfolgbarkeit der Messresultate auf national

  10. Reducing radiation dose by application of optimized low-energy x-ray filters to K-edge imaging with a photon counting detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-01-01

    K-edge imaging with photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) can improve image quality compared with conventional energy integrating detectors. However, low-energy x-ray photons below the K-edge absorption energy of a target material do not contribute to image formation in the K-edge imaging and are likely to be completely absorbed by an object. In this study, we applied x-ray filters to the K-edge imaging with a PCXD based on cadmium zinc telluride for reducing radiation dose induced by low-energy x-ray photons. We used aluminum (Al) filters with different thicknesses as the low-energy x-ray filters and implemented the iodine K-edge imaging with an energy bin of 34-48 keV at the tube voltages of 50, 70 and 90 kVp. The effects of the low-energy x-ray filters on the K-edge imaging were investigated with respect to signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and figure of merit (FOM). The highest value of SDNR was observed in the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, and the SDNR decreased as a function of the filter thicknesses. Compared to the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, the ESAK was reduced by 66%, 48% and 39% in the K-edge imaging with a 12 mm Al filter for 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. The FOM values, which took into account the ESAK and SDNR, were maximized for 8, 6 to 8 and 4 mm Al filters at 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. We concluded that the use of an optimal low-energy filter thickness, which was determined by maximizing the FOM, could significantly reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in the K-edge imaging with the PCXD.

  11. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs] in processed meat products using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Olatunde S; Fatoki, Olalekan S; Opeolu, Beatrice O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2014-08-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked, grilled and boiled meats were determined using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GC-FID). PAHs in the processed meats were extracted in n-hexane after hydrolysis with methanolic KOH. Clean-up was achieved using solid phase extraction in neutral-Si/basic-Si/acidic-Si/neutral-Si frits. The fractions, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkP), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), indeno[123-cd]pyrene (IP) and benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) were separated and quantified using GC-FID. The method and instrument limits of detections were 0.1, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3μg/kg and 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5μg/kg, respectively, for BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP. The method's recovery and precision generally varied between 83.69% and 94.25% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.18-15.60%; and 90.38-96.71% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.82-12.87% respectively. The concentration of BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP in smoked, grilled and boiled meat samples were ranged 0.64-31.54μg/kg, 0.07-7.04μg/kg, 0.09-15.03, 0.51-46.67μg/kg and 0.01-5.11μg/kg, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A feasibility study of projection-based energy weighting based on a photon-counting detector in contrast-enhanced digital subtraction mammography: a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yuna; Kim, Heejoung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Contrast media, such as iodine and gadolinium, are generally used in digital subtraction mammography to enhance the contrast between target and background materials. In digital subtraction mammography, where one image (with contrast medium) is subtracted from another (anatomical background) to facilitate visualization of the tumor structure, tumors can be more easily distinguished after the injection of a contrast medium. In order to have more an effective method to increase the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), we applied a projection-based energy-weighting method. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the projection-based energy-weighting method in digital subtraction mammography. Unlike some other previous studies, we applied the projection-based energy-weighting method to more practical mammography conditions by using the Monte Carlo method to simulate four different iodine solutions embedded in a breast phantom comprised of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues. We also considered an optimal tube voltage and anode/filter combination in digital iodine contrast media mammography in order to maximize the figure-of-merit (FOM). The simulated source energy was from 20 to 45 keV to prevent electronic noise and include the k-edge energy of iodine (33.2 keV). The results showed that the projection-based energy-weighting improved the CNR by factors of 1.05 - 1.86 compared to the conventionally integrated images. Consequently, the CNR of digital subtraction mammography images can be improved by using projection-based energy-weighting with photon-counting detectors.

  13. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP1-02: Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Kang, S; Eom, J [Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Photon-counting detectors (PCDs) allow multi-energy X-ray imaging without additional exposures and spectral overlap. This capability results in the improvement of accuracy of material decomposition for dual-energy X-ray imaging and the reduction of radiation dose. In this study, the PCD-based contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (CEDM) was compared with the conventional CDEM in terms of radiation dose, image quality and accuracy of material decomposition. Methods: A dual-energy model was designed by using Beer-Lambert’s law and rational inverse fitting function for decomposing materials from a polychromatic X-ray source. A cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based PCD, which has five energy thresholds, and iodine solutions included in a 3D half-cylindrical phantom, which composed of 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissues, were simulated by using a Monte Carlo simulation tool. The low- and high-energy images were obtained in accordance with the clinical exposure conditions for the conventional CDEM. Energy bins of 20–33 and 34–50 keV were defined from X-ray energy spectra simulated at 50 kVp with different dose levels for implementing the PCD-based CDEM. The dual-energy mammographic techniques were compared by means of absorbed dose, noise property and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE). Results: Comparing to the conventional CEDM, the iodine solutions were clearly decomposed for the PCD-based CEDM. Although the radiation dose for the PCD-based CDEM was lower than that for the conventional CEDM, the PCD-based CDEM improved the noise property and accuracy of decomposition images. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the PCD-based CDEM allows the quantitative material decomposition, and reduces radiation dose in comparison with the conventional CDEM. Therefore, the PCD-based CDEM is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumor and enhancing diagnostic accuracy in mammography.

  14. Imaging performance of phase-contrast breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation and a CdTe photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, A; Mettivier, G; Golosio, B; Oliva, P; Spandre, G; Di Lillo, F; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Russo, P

    2016-05-01

    Within the SYRMA-CT collaboration based at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation (SR) facility the authors investigated the imaging performance of the phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) system dedicated to monochromatic in vivo 3D imaging of the female breast, for breast cancer diagnosis. Test objects were imaged at 38keV using monochromatic SR and a high-resolution CdTe photon-counting detector. Signal and noise performance were evaluated using modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum. The analysis was performed on the images obtained with the application of a phase retrieval algorithm as well as on those obtained without phase retrieval. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the capability of detecting test microcalcification clusters and soft masses were investigated. For a voxel size of (60μm)(3), images without phase retrieval showed higher spatial resolution (6.7mm(-1) at 10% MTF) than corresponding images with phase retrieval (2.5mm(-1)). Phase retrieval produced a reduction of the noise level and an increase of the CNR by more than one order of magnitude, compared to raw phase-contrast images. Microcalcifications with a diameter down to 130μm could be detected in both types of images. The investigation on test objects indicates that breast CT with a monochromatic SR source is technically feasible in terms of spatial resolution, image noise and contrast, for in vivo 3D imaging with a dose comparable to that of two-view mammography. Images obtained with the phase retrieval algorithm showed the best performance in the trade-off between spatial resolution and image noise. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lung nodule volume quantification and shape differentiation with an ultra-high resolution technique on a photon counting detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; McCollough, C.; Leng, S.

    2017-03-01

    A new ultra high-resolution (UHR) mode has been implemented on a whole body photon counting-detector (PCD) CT system. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm by 0.25 mm at the iso-center, while the conventional (macro) mode is limited to 0.5 mm by 0.5 mm. A set of synthetic lung nodules (two shapes, five sizes, and two radio-densities) was scanned using both the UHR and macro modes and reconstructed with 2 reconstruction kernels (4 sets of images in total). Linear regression analysis was performed to compare measured nodule volumes from CT images to reference volumes. Surface curvature was calculated for each nodule and the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the curvature histogram was used as a shape index to differentiate sphere and star shape nodules. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used as a figure of merit for the differentiation task. Results showed strong linear relationship between measured nodule volume and reference standard for both UHR and macro mode. For all nodules, volume estimation was more accurate using UHR mode with sharp kernel (S80f), with lower mean absolute percent error (MAPE) (6.5%) compared with macro mode (11.1% to 12.9%). The improvement of volume measurement from UHR mode was more evident particularly for small nodule size (3mm, 5mm), or star-shape nodules. Images from UHR mode with sharp kernel (S80f) consistently demonstrated the best performance (AUC = 0.85) when separating star from sphere shape nodules among all acquisition and reconstruction modes. Our results showed the advantages of UHR mode on a PCD CT scanner in lung nodule characterization. Various clinical applications, including quantitative imaging, can benefit substantially from this high resolution mode.

  16. Novel gas chromatographic detector utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance of a gold nanoparticle monolayer inside a glass capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fong-Yi; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Jian, Rih-Sheng; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2014-06-03

    This paper presents the design, assembly, and evaluation of a novel gas chromatographic detector intended to measure the absorbance of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of a gold nanoparticle monolayer in response to eluted samples from a capillary column. Gold nanoparticles were chemically immobilized on the inner wall of a glass capillary (i.d. 0.8 mm, length = 5-15 cm). The eluted samples flowed through the glass capillary and were adsorbed onto a gold nanoparticle surface, which resulted in changes in the LSPR absorbance. The LSPR probing light source used a green light-emitting diode (LED; λ(center) = 520 nm), and the light traveled through the glass wall of the capillary with multiple total reflections. The changes in the light intensity were measured by a photodiode at the rear of the glass capillary. The sensitivity of this detector can be improved by using a longer spiral glass capillary. The detector is more sensitive when operated at a lower temperature and at a slower carrier velocity. The calibration lines of 8 preliminary test compounds were all linear (R(2) > 0.99). The detection limits (3σ) ranged from 22 ng (n-butanol) to 174 ng (2-pentanone) depending on the volatility of the chemicals and the affinity to the citrate lignads attached to the gold nanoparticle surface. This detector consumed a very low amount of energy and could be operated with an air carrier gas, which makes this detector a promising option for portable GC or μGC.

  17. On the localization properties of an RPWELL gas-avalanche detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleri, L.; Bhattacharya, P.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Breskin, A.; Bressler, S.

    2017-10-01

    A study of the localization properties of a single-element Resistive Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector is presented. The detector comprises of a single-sided THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) coupled to a segmented readout anode through a doped silicate-glass plate of 1010 Ωṡcm bulk resistivity. Operated in ambient \

  18. arXiv On the localization properties of an RPWELL gas-avalanche detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moleri, Luca; Coimbra, Artur E. C.; Breskin, Amos; Bressler, Shikma

    2017-10-23

    A study of the localization properties of a single-element Resistive Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector is presented. The detector comprises of a single-sided THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) coupled to a segmented readout anode through a doped silicate-glass plate of 10(10) Ω⋅cm bulk resistivity. Operated in ambient \

  19. Muon Chamber Endcap Upgrade of the CMS Experiment with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detectors and their Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gola, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    As the CERN LHC is heading towards a high luminosity phase a very high flux is expected in the endcaps of the CMS Detector. The presence of muons in collision events can be due to rare or new physics so it is important to maintain the high trigger efficiency of the CMS muon system. The CMS Collaboration has proposed to instrument the high-eta region (1.6 lt IetaI lt 2.2) of the muon endcaps with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, referred to as GE1/1 chambers, during the LS2. This technology will help in maintaining optimum trigger performance with maximum selection efficiency of muons even in a high flux environment. We describe plans for a Slice Test to installa few GE1/1 chambers covering 50 degrees in azimuthal angle within the CMS detector in 2017, with subsequent operation during the current Run 2 of the LHC. We show the performance of the GE1/1 chambers to be installed during the slice test, specifically GEM foil leakage currents, chamber gas volume integrity, high voltage circuit performanc...

  20. Design of a portable gas chromatography with a conducting polymer nanocomposite detector device and a method to analyze a gas mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsa, Sajad

    2017-04-01

    A portable chromatography device and a method were developed to analyze a gas mixture. The device comprises a chromatographic column for separating components of a sample of the gas mixture. It has an air pump coupled to the inlet of a chromatographic column for pumping air and an injector coupled to the inlet of chromatographic column for feeding the sample using the air as a carrier gas. A detector is arranged downstream from and coupled to the outlet of the chromatographic column. The detector is a nanostructure semiconductive microfiber. The device further comprises an evaluation unit arranged and configured to evaluate each detected component to determine the concentration. The designed portable system was used for simultaneous detection of amines. The possibility of applying dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of analytes in trace levels is demonstrated. The reproducibility of this method is acceptable, and good standard deviations were obtained. The relative standard deviation value is less than 6% for all analytes. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of analytes in water samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Measurement of the evolution of the CsI quantum efficiency in gas photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Dalla Torre, S.; Duic, V.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Martin, A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Sozzi, F.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-12-01

    We present an indirect measurement of possible long term variations of the CsI quantum efficiency in solid state photocathodes in MWPC. This type of photon detectors has been used since 2001 in the Cherenkov Imaging detector RICH-1 of the COMPASS experiment at CERN SPS. Data from six years of COMPASS data taking are used to evaluate the mean number of detected photons per particle. The results do not indicate any severe CsI quantum efficiency ageing effect.

  2. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  3. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  4. [Determination of sulfur compounds in fluid catalytic cracking gasoline by gas chromatography with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongtan; Wang, Zheng; Zong, Baoning; Yang, Haiying

    2004-05-01

    A method for the separation and determination of sulfur compounds in fluid catalytic cracking gasoline (FCC gasoline) by gas chromatography with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (GC-SCD) was established. Fifty eight sulfur compounds including mercaptan, sulfide, disulfide, thiophene, alkyl thiophenes, benzothiophene and alkyl benzothiophenes were identified based on their retention indexes and the data obtained from gas chromatography with an atomic emission detector (GC-AED). The effects of flow rate of carrier gas and oven temperature were discussed. Detection reproducibilities of main sulfur compounds (thiophene, n-butyl mercaptan, 2-methylthiophene, 3-methylthiophene, 2,4-dimethylthiophene) in FCC gasoline were satisfactory (RSDs were no more than 5.0%) and detection limit for sulfur was 0.1 mg/L. Using thiophene and benzothiophene as testing samples, it was determined that response factor was independent of the molecular structure of sulfur compounds. The linear range was 0.5-800.0 mg/L sulfur with a correlation coefficient of 0.999.

  5. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  6. Analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in soils by headspace and gas chromatography/flame ionization detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Pereira Pinto

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The constituents of gasoline: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX are frequently found in soils due to leaks in fuel storage tanks and they present chronic toxicity. In this work it was developed and validated a methodology of BTEX analysis in soil by gas chromatography/ flame ionization detector and static headspace. The recovery of BTEX in soil samples was evaluated using soils with different textures (sandy and loamy. The analysis method showed good resolution, in a low time of analysis (less than 30 minutes. Limits of quantification of 0.05 mg Kg¯¹ soil for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes are below the guiding values that range from 0.15 to 95 mg Kg¯¹ soil, established to determine soil quality. It was verified that the methodology enables the use of this method for BTEX analysis of soil samples for passive environmental identification of gas stations.

  7. High-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-CT of ex-vivo soft tissue murine organs utilizing ethanol fixation and large area photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Karch, Jakub; Patzelt, Matej; Mrzilkova, Jana; Zach, Petr; Hermanova, Zuzana; Kvacek, Jiri; Krejci, Frantisek

    2016-07-27

    Using dedicated contrast agents high-quality X-ray imaging of soft tissue structures with isotropic micrometre resolution has become feasible. This technique is frequently titled as virtual histology as it allows production of slices of tissue without destroying the sample. The use of contrast agents is, however, often an irreversible time-consuming procedure and despite the non-destructive principle of X-ray imaging, the sample is usually no longer usable for other research methods. In this work we present the application of recently developed large-area photon counting detector for high resolution X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography of whole ex-vivo ethanol-preserved mouse organs. The photon counting detectors provide dark-current-free quantum-counting operation enabling acquisition of data with virtually unlimited contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thanks to the very high CNR even ethanol-only preserved soft-tissue samples without addition of any contrast agent can be visualized in great detail. As ethanol preservation is one of the standard steps of tissue fixation for histology, the presented method can open a way for widespread use of micro-CT with all its advantages for routine 3D non-destructive soft-tissue visualisation.

  8. Infra-red detector continuously monitors sulphur dioxide in flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, J.

    1984-09-01

    An infra-red detector for the continuous monitoring of SO/sub 2/ in flue gases is described. It is designed for use on emissions from boilers with no desulphurisation equipment. A second instrument is under development for measurement in the 100-200 ppm range for use on flue gases after desulphurisation.

  9. Network origin-destination demand estimation using limited link traffic counts : strategic deployment of vehicle detectors through an integrated corridor management framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-15

    In typical road traffic corridors, freeway systems are generally well-equipped with traffic surveillance systems such as vehicle detector (VD) and/or closed circuit television (CCTV) systems in order to gather timely traffic information for traffic c...

  10. 2π proportional counting chamber for large-area-coated β sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with gas flow and a source mounted within the sensitive volume of the detector. Design of the counter enables efficient counting of emissions in 2π solid angle. A provision is made for change of the source and immediate measurement of source activity. These sources are used to calibrate the efficiency of contamination ...

  11. Gaseous Detectors: Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, H J

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous Detectors in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors 3.1.2.1 Introduction 3.1.2.2 Basic Processes 3.1.2.2.1 Gas ionization by charged particles 3.1.2.2.1.1 Primary clusters 3.1.2.2.1.2 Cluster size distribution 3.1.2.2.1.3 Total number of ion pairs 3.1.2.2.1.4 Dependence of energy deposit on particle velocity 3.1.2.2.2 Transport of...

  12. Gas-filled position-sensitive detectors of thermal neutrons at the Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. A.; Ganzha, G. A.; Ivanov, E. A.; Ilyin, D. S.; Kovalenko, S. N.; Kolkhidashvili, M. R.; Krivshich, A. G.; Nadtochy, A. V.; Runov, V. V.; Soloveĭ, V. A.; Shabanov, G. D.

    2010-05-01

    The manufacturing line for the development and fabrication of position-sensitive detectors of thermal neutrons has been organized at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Three detectors with sensitive regions 300 × 170 (prototype), 200 × 200, and 300 × 300 mm in size have been constructed to date. The detectors represent multiwire proportional chambers with cathode data readout to a delay line. The devices are filled with the 3He/CF4 gas mixture. These detectors are intended for modernizing the detector systems of the Vector and Membrana-2 diffractometers (VVR-M reactor, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Russia).

  13. Measurement of the evolution of the CsI quantum efficiency in gas photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S., E-mail: silvia.dallatorre@ts.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Duic, V.; Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Martin, A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Sozzi, F.; Tessarotto, F. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    We present an indirect measurement of possible long term variations of the CsI quantum efficiency in solid state photocathodes in MWPC. This type of photon detectors has been used since 2001 in the Cherenkov Imaging detector RICH-1 of the COMPASS experiment at CERN SPS. Data from six years of COMPASS data taking are used to evaluate the mean number of detected photons per particle. The results do not indicate any severe CsI quantum efficiency ageing effect. - Highlights: • We determine the evolution of the CsI effective quantum efficiency. • We analyse samples of COMPASS RICH-1 from six years. • The integrated ion backflow to the photocathodes is below 10μC/cm{sup 2}. • The data indicate at most a very low rate QE reduction of a few per cent per year. • The result is relevant for MPGD-based photon counters presently under development.

  14. New Efficient Detector for Radiation Therapy Imaging using Gas Electron Multipliers

    OpenAIRE

    Östling, Janina

    2006-01-01

    Currently film is being replaced by electronic detectors for portal imaging in radiation therapy. This development offers obvious advantages such as on-line quality assurance and digital images that can easily be accessed, processed and communicated. In spite of the improvements, the image quality has not been significantly enhanced, partly since the quantum efficiency compared to film is essentially the same, and the new electronic devices also suffer from sensitivity to the harsh radiation ...

  15. Charged particle detection performance of gas electron multiplier detector for the upgrade of CMS endcap muon system at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is one of two general-purpose detectors at the CERN LHC. LHC will provide exceptional high instantaneous and integrated luminosities after second long shutdown. The forward region $\\mid \\eta \\mid \\geq 1.5$ of the CMS detector will face extremely high particle rates in 10s of kHz/cm2 and hence it will affect the momentum resolution and longevity of the muon detectors. To overcome these issues, the CMS-GEM collaboration has proposed to install new large size high rate capable triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors in the forward region of CMS muon system. The proposal has been approved recently. The first set of Triple GEM detectors will be installed in the GE1/1 region ($1.6 < \\mid \\eta \\mid < 2.2$) of muon endcap during phase-II upgrade of the LHC. Towards this goal, full size CMS Triple GEM prototype chambers have been fabricated and put under the test beam at the CERN SPS test beam facility. The GEM detectors were operated with two gas mixtures: Ar:CO2 (70:30) and Ar:CO2:CF4 (...

  16. Gas Detectors Performance in CMS and Excited Muon Search Feasibility Study at 14 teV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00572294; Mahrous, Ayman; Yasein, Mohamed Nabil

    Within the Standard Model(SM) of particle physics, quarks and leptons are understood to be the fundamental particles and Their existence have been verified experimentally. A search for substructure of quarks or study of quark compositeness is carried out with the CMS detector at LHC, using $ 300 fb^{-1} $ of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy$ \\sqrt{s} =14 TeV $. The discovery of excited muons ($ \\mu^{*} $) would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. In the current study, $ \\mu^{*} $ is assumed to be produced via four-fermions contact interactions in association with a muon ($ \\mu $) and to decay via the gauge mediated process $ \\mu^{*} \\to \\mu\\gamma$, yielding a final state with two muons and a photon. Monte Carlo (MC) samples are produced via MadGraph5 and PYTHIA 8 event generators. To simulate the detector response, GEANT4 which interfaced to CMS software was used for full simulation and Delphes was used for fast simulation, assuming the CMS detector configuration. Objects and ev...

  17. Solar Axion search with Micromegas detectors in the CAST Experiment with $^{3}$He as buffer gas

    CERN Document Server

    García, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Axions are well motivated particles proposed in an extension of the Standard Model (SM) as a solution to the CP problem in strong interactions. On the other hand, there is the category of axion-like particles (ALPs) which appear in diverse extensions of the SM and share the same phenomenology of the axion. Axions and ALPs are hypothetical neutral particles that interact weakly with matter, being candidates to solve the Dark Matter problem. CAST, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope is looking for solar axions since 2003. CAST exploit the helioscope technique using a decommissioned LHC dipole magnet in which solar axions could be reconverted into photons. The magnet is mounted on a movable platform that allows tracking the Sun $\\sim$1.5 hours during sunset and during sunrise. The axion signal would be an excess of X-rays in the detectors located at the magnet bore ends and thus low background detectors are mandatory. Three of the four detectors operating at CAST are of the Micromegas type. The analysis of the data o...

  18. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sinha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH. Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor" or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS. Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID. Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques.

    Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60–70 s, sensitivity (LOD 3–6 s−1 and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests it

  19. Design of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Gas Distribution System for the Micromegas Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00084094; The ATLAS collaboration; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Maltezos, Stavros; Vlachos, Sotirios; Karentzos, Efstathios; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Moschovakos, Paris; Koutelieris, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present and describe the methodology, the particular calculations and simulations accordingly to achieve the appropriate gas flow rates ensuring a uniform gas distribution among the same type of NSW Micromegas modules. The majority of the components used are in large multiplicity so space saving criteria is taking into account and simplicity on the performance with respect to the total cost as well. An appropriate simulation program has been developed for studying the overall gas system determining the gauge pressure, flow rate in the crucial points and branches, respectively. Moreover, an overall prototype configuration, implemented at the NTUA laboratory and based on the Lock-in Amplifier technique to be used in conjunction with the gas leak test via the FRL method is presented. The obtained performances, by means of sensitivity and S/N ratio improvement, are also discussed.

  20. Duration of Greenland Stadial 22 and ice-gas Δage from counting of annual layers in Greenland NGRIP ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bigler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution measurements of chemical impurities and methane concentrations in Greenland ice core samples from the early glacial period allow the extension of annual-layer counted chronologies and the improvement of gas age-ice age difference (Δage essential to the synchronization of ice core records. We report high-resolution measurements of a 50 m section of the NorthGRIP ice core and corresponding annual layer thicknesses in order to constrain the duration of the Greenland Stadial 22 (GS-22 between Greenland Interstadials (GIs 21 and 22, for which inconsistent durations and ages have been reported from Greenland and Antarctic ice core records as well as European speleothems. Depending on the chronology used, GS-22 occurred between approximately 89 (end of GI-22 and 83 kyr b2k (onset of GI-21. From annual layer counting, we find that GS-22 lasted between 2696 and 3092 years and was followed by a GI-21 pre-cursor event lasting between 331 and 369 yr. Our layer-based counting agrees with the duration of stadial 22 as determined from the NALPS speleothem record (3250 ± 526 yr but not with that of the GICC05modelext chronology (2620 yr or an alternative chronology based on gas-marker synchronization to EPICA Dronning Maud Land ice core. These results show that GICC05modelext overestimates accumulation and/or underestimates thinning in this early part of the last glacial period. We also revise the possible ranges of NorthGRIP Δdepth (5.49 to 5.85 m and Δage (498 to 601 yr at the warming onset of GI-21 as well as the Δage range at the onset of the GI-21 precursor warming (523 to 654 yr, observing that temperature (represented by the δ15N proxy increases before CH4 concentration by no more than a few decades.

  1. Gaseous Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  2. Determination of N-containing halogenated natural products using gas chromatography in combination of a nitrogen-phosphorus-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, J.; Vetter, W. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Lebensmittelchemie

    2004-09-15

    In the last few years several nonpolar halogenated natural products (HNPs) such as Q1, MHC-1, BC-2, BC-3, BC-10 were detected at elevated concentrations in marine biota samples. In addition, there are still some abundant peaks of halogenated compounds frequently found in the gas chromatograms of many marine samples which have not yet been identified. Some of the known halogenated natural products (Q1, HDBPs including BC-10, bromoindoles) contain N-heterocyclic backbones. Since nitrogen is scarcely found in anthropogenic halogenated compounds, the detection of N-containing halogenated substances may be used as a first indicator for the presence of HNPs in a sample extract. In the presented method we studied the suitability of a nitrogen phosphorous detector (NPD) for quantification of Q1 and the detection of Ncontaining compounds in marine biota. Analyses were accompanied with GC/ECD analyses.

  3. Effect of the Detector Width and Gas Pressure on the Frequency Response of a Micromachined Thermal Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Courteaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the design and the environmental conditions of a micromachined thermal accelerometer, based on convection effect, are discussed and studied in order to understand the behavior of the frequency response evolution of the sensor. It has been theoretically and experimentally studied with different detector widths, pressure and gas nature. Although this type of sensor has already been intensively examined, little information concerning the frequency response modeling is currently available and very few experimental results about the frequency response are reported in the literature. In some particular conditions, our measurements show a cut-off frequency at −3 dB greater than 200 Hz. By using simple cylindrical and planar models of the thermal accelerometer and an equivalent electrical circuit, a good agreement with the experimental results has been demonstrated.

  4. Seal Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of seal counts from aerial photography. Counts by image, site, species, and date are stored in the database along with information on entanglements and...

  5. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  6. Phoswich detectors combining doubly or triply ZnS(Ag), NE102A, BGO and/or NaI(Tl) scintillators for simultaneous counting of α, β and γ rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Shigekazu; Abe, Hitoshi; Mihara, Akira

    1994-03-01

    Phoswich detectors for simultaneous counting of α, β and γ rays have been developed: ZnS(Ag)/Au Mylar/NE102A, ZnS(Ag)/Au Mylar/BGO and ZnS(Ag)/NaI(Tl) for α and β(γ) rays and ZnS(Ag)/Au Mylar/NE102A/BGO and ZnS(Ag)/NE102A/NaI(Tl) for α, β and γ rays. They were prepared by coupling a ZnS(Ag) film scintillator for α counting with a scintillator(s) for β and γ counting having different rise time. In order to adjust each component of pulse height within a given dynamic range, a sheet of Au-coated Mylar (Au Mylar) was used, if necessary, as an optical ND filter for lowering transmittance of scintillation of the ZnS(Ag). Characteristics of these phoswiches were examined by a technique of pulse-shape discrimination. Excellent discrimination among the radiations was attained and small tailings from each other peak were obtained for the prepared phoswiches.

  7. Performance of wire-type Rn detectors operated with gas gain in ambient air in view of its possible application to early earthquake predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Charpak, Georges; Breuil, P; Nappi, E; Martinengo, P; Peskov, V

    2010-01-01

    We describe a detector of alpha particles based on wire type counters (single-wire and multiwire) operating in ambient air at high gas gains (100-1000). The main advantages of these detectors are: low cost, robustness and ability to operate in humid air. The minimum detectable activity achieved with the multiwire detector for an integration time of 1 min is 140 Bq per m3, which is comparable to that featured by commercial devices. Owing to such features the detector is suited for massive application, for example for continuous monitoring of Rn or Po contaminations or, as discussed in the paper, its use in a network of Rn counters in areas affected by earth-quakes in order to verify, on a solid statistical basis, the envisaged correlation between the sudden Rn appearance and a forthcoming earthquake.

  8. PETRRA: Preliminary experimental results from the first full size detector and dead time simulation of the count rate performance of a unique whole body PET camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D.; Wells, K.; Ott, R.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom); Stephenson, R.; Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.; Tappern, G. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    The design and construction of the first of two BaF{sub 2}-TMAE large area detectors to be incorporated in a unique double headed whole body PET system (PETRRA) has been completed. Preliminary experimental work carried out with the first large area detector shows an absolute detection efficiency of 20.5% and a time resolution of 3.5ns (FWHM) and 8.0ns (FWTM), using 8mm thick scintillation crystals. An analytical model of the electronic read-out system has been developed to investigate the rate capability of the new scanner. This model predicts that under typical imaging conditions, with 40MBq of activity in the field of view, the proposed scanner will acquire coincidence data at 20--25kcps.

  9. Design of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Gas Leak Tightness Station for the Micromegas Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gazis, Evangelos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this work we describe advanced data processing and analysis techniques intended to be used in the gas tightness station at CERN for Quality Assurance and Quality Control of the New Small Wheel Micromegas Quadruplets. We combine two methods: a conventional one based on the Pressure Decay Rate and an alternative-novel one, based on the Flow Rate Loss. A prototype setup has been developed based on a Lock-in Amplifier device and should be operated in conjunction with the gas leak test via the Flow Rate Loss. Both methods have been tested by using emulated leak branches based on specific thin medical needles. The semi-automatic data acquisition, monitoring and processing system is presented also in this work while a more sophisticated environment based on the WinCC-OA SCADA is under development.

  10. Preliminary results of the experimental and simulated intrinsic properties of the Compteur A Trou (CAT) detector: behavior with synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplier, G; Bouillot, C; Lemonnier, M; Megtert, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a wireless proportional gas detector using a new type of intrinsic electric field shape for electronic amplification cascade. Its properties are analyzed by means of numerical simulations compared with experimental measurements. Electronic gain, energy resolution and count rate are established for pure argon gas and a mixture of argon and CO sub 2. Measurements with a synchrotron light source show that CAT can achieve count rates as high as 10 sup 7 mm sup 2 S.

  11. Persistence of ethion residues on cucumber, Cucumis sativus (Linn.) using gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorus detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Singh, B; Battu, R S; Jyot, G; Singh, B; Joia, B S

    2007-10-01

    Residues of ethion were estimated in cucumber by gas liquid chromatography following three applications of the insecticide at 375 and 750 g a.i ha(-1). The average initial deposits of ethion on cucumber fruits were found to be 2.40 and 4.97 mg kg(-1) at single and double dosages, respectively. Residues of ethion dissipated below the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.5 mg kg(-1) in 7 days. Half-life (T1/2) for degradation of ethion on cucumber was observed to be 2.92 days at recommended dosage. A waiting period of 7 days is suggested for safe consumption of cucumber.

  12. Highly sensitive gas leak detector based on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic SF6 sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Giglio, Marilena; Chieco, Leonardo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-07-11

    The implementation, performance validation, and testing of a gas-leak optical sensor based on mid-IR quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) spectroscopic technique is reported. A QEPAS sensor was integrated in a vacuum-sealed test station for mechatronic components. The laser source for the sensor is a quantum cascade laser emitting at 10.56 µm, resonant with a strong absorption band of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which was selected as a leak tracer. The minimum detectable concentration of the QEPAS sensor is 2.7 parts per billion with an integration time of 1 s, corresponding to a sensitivity of leak flows in the 10-9 mbar∙l/s range, comparable with state-of-the-art leak detection techniques.

  13. Computed tomography with thermal neutrons and gaseous position sensitive detector; Tomografia computadorizada com neutrons termicos e detetor a gas sensivel a posicao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Maria Ines Silvani

    2001-12-01

    A third generation tomographic system using a parallel thermal neutron beam and gaseous position sensitive detector has been developed along three discrete phases. At the first one, X-ray tomographic images of several objects, using a position sensitive detector designed and constructed for this purpose have been obtained. The second phase involved the conversion of that detector for thermal neutron detection, by using materials capable to convert neutrons into detectable charged particles, testing afterwards its performance in a tomographic system by evaluation the quality of the image arising from several test-objects containing materials applicable in the engineering field. High enriched {sup 3} He, replacing the argon-methane otherwise used as filling gas for the X-ray detection, as well as, a gadolinium foil, have been utilized as converters. Besides the pure enriched {sup 3} He, its mixture with argon-methane and later on with propane, have been also tested, in order to evaluate the detector efficiency and resolution. After each gas change, the overall performance of the tomographic system using the modified detector, has been analyzed through measurements of the related parameters. This was done by analyzing the images produced by test-objects containing several materials having well known attenuation coefficients for both thermal neutrons and X-rays. In order to compare the performance of the position sensitive detector as modified to detect thermal neutrons, with that of a conventional BF{sub 3} detector, additional tomographs have been conducted using the last one. The results have been compared in terms of advantages, handicaps and complementary aspects for different kinds of radiation and materials. (author)

  14. Residual solvent determination by head space gas chromatography with flame ionization detector in omeprazole API

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Pandey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Residual solvents in pharmaceutical samples are monitored using gas chromatography with head space. Based on good manufacturing practices, measuring residual solvents is mandatory for the release testing of all active pharmaceutical ingredients (API. The analysis of residual organic solvents (methanol, acetone, cyclohexane, dichloromethane, toluene in Omeprazole, an active pharmaceutical ingredient was investigated. Omeprazole is a potent reversible inhibitor of the gastric proton pump H+/K+-ATPase. The Head space gas chromatography (HSGC method described in this investigation utilized a SPB TM-624, Supelco, 30 m long x 0.25 mm internal diameter, 1.4µm-thick column. Since Omeprazole is a thermally labile compound, the selection of the proper injector temperature is critical to the success of the analysis. The injector temperature was set at 170ºC to prevent degradation. The initial oven temperature was set at 40ºC for 12 min and programmed at a rate of 10ºC min-1 to a final temperature of 220ºC for 5 min. Nitrogen was used as a carrier gas. The sample solvent selected was N,N-dimethylacetamide. The method was validated to be specific, linear, precise, sensitive, rugged and showed excellent recovery.Solventes residuais em amostras farmacêuticas são monitoradas utilizando-se cromatografia a gás "headspace". Com base nas boas práticas de fabricação, a medida de solventes residuais é obrigatória para o teste de liberação de todos os ingredientes farmacêuticos (API. Efetuou-se a análise de solventes orgânicos residuais (metanol, acetona, cicloexano, diclorometano, tolueno em omeprazol, ingrediente farmacêutico ativo. O omeprazol é potente inibidor reversível da bomba de prótons H+/K+-ATPase. A cromatografia a gás "headspace" (HSGC descrita nessa pesquisa utilizou um SPB TM-624, Supelco, de 30 m de comprimento x 0,25 mm de diâmetro interno, e coluna de 1,4 µm de espessura. Considerando-se que o omeprazol é termicamente l

  15. Determination of Cyanide in Biological and Non-biological Matrices by Headspace Gas Chromatography coupled to Flame- Ionization Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humera Shafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid and reliable method for quantitation of cyanide was developed on a headspace gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionization detector using a HP-Innovax (Polyethylene glycol bonded column on an Agilent 7890A GC. Cyanide in blood or other matrices was liberated by conversion of potassium cyanide to the volatile hydrogen cyanide (HCN through addition of 5N sulfuric acid in a headspace vial and analyzed using an Agilent G1888 headspace auto-sampler. HCN gas diffuses into the headspace above the specimen in a sealed vial based on Henry’s Law of partial pressure. This method showed good linearity (r2= 0.9996 in the range of 8.0-60.0 μg/mL with 1.0 μg/mL of HCN as the limit of detection. The accuracy of the method at three different concentrations (8.0, 16.0, 50.0 μg/ mL of HCN was in the range of 95.0% to 101.9% and inter-day precision (%CV ranged from 1.3% to 3.8%. Identical calibration curves with a coefficient of correlation above 0.990 were obtained when blood, gastric contents, liver tissue homogenate, urine and water were used as calibration standard matrices. Therefore, a single calibration curve is sufficient for diverse matrices and preparation of matrix-matched standards is not required. The method showed successful quantitation of Hydrogen cyanide in gastric contents, which is one of the most variable matrices in forensic toxicology. The method is well adopted for postmortem specimens because of its wide linear range, adaptability to various matrices, ease and rapidity of use.

  16. Development of superconducting tunnel junction as photon counting detector in astronomy; Developpement de jonctions supraconductrices a effet tunnel pour le comptage de photons en astronomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorel, C

    2004-12-15

    This work describes the development of S/Al-AlOx-Al/S Superconducting Tunnel Junctions (STJ) to count photons for astronomical applications in the near-infrared. The incoming light energy is converted into excited charges in a superconducting layer (S, either Nb or Ta) with a population proportional to the deposited energy. The photon energy can thus be evaluated by integrating the tunnel current induced in a voltage biased junction at a very low temperature (100 mK). The performance of STJ for light detection is discussed in the first chapter and compared with the best performances obtained with other techniques based on either superconductors. At the beginning of the thesis, a previous manufacturing process made it possible to obtain good quality Nb based junctions and preliminary results for photon counting. The objective of the thesis was to replace Nb as absorber with Ta, an intrinsically more sensitive material, and secondly to develop a new and more efficient manufacturing process. We first focused on the optimization of the Tantalum thin film quality. Structural analysis showed that these films can be grown epitaxially by magnetron sputtering onto an R-plane sapphire substrate heated to 600 Celsius degrees and covered by a thin Nb buffer layer. Electrical transport measurement from room to low temperatures gave excellent Relative Resistive Ratios of about 50 corresponding to mean free path of the order of 100 nm. Then, we conceived an original manufacturing process batch on 3 inch diameter sapphire substrate with five mask levels. These masks made it possible to produce single pixel STJ of different sizes (from 25*25 to 50*50 square microns) and shapes. We also produced multiple junctions onto a common absorber as well as 9-pixel arrays. Thanks to the development of this process we obtained a very large percentage of quality junctions (>90%) with excellent measured normal resistances of a few micro-ohm cm{sup 2} and low leakage currents of the order of one

  17. Counting cormorants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Thomas; Carss, David N; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on Cormorant population counts for both summer (i.e. breeding) and winter (i.e. migration, winter roosts) seasons. It also explains differences in the data collected from undertaking ‘day’ versus ‘roost’ counts, gives some definitions of the term ‘numbers’, and presents two e...

  18. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kiptily, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  19. Application of Gas Chromatography with the Mass Detector (GC-MS Technique for Detection of Beeswax Adulteration with Paraffin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waś Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To detect beeswax adulteration with hydrocarbons of alien origin (e.g. paraffin, gas chromatography with mass detector (GC-MS technique was used. The method has been verified here on beeswax samples with different addition (3, 5, 10, 30, and 50% of paraffin and validated under the conditions of repeatability and within - laboratory reproducibility. The addition of paraffin to beeswax can already be detected on the basis of an analysis of the chromatograms. The intensity of individual alkane peaks increased with the increase of the amount of paraffin added to the beeswax. This increase was the mostly visible for the alkanes with even numbers of carbon atoms in the molecule: C24H50, C26H54, C28H58, C30H62, C32H66, and C34H70. These observations have also been proven by quantitative analysis performed using the internal standard method. Adding paraffin to beeswax resulted in an increase in the total contents of n-alkanes as well as individual alkanes, and in particular, of the even-numbered alkanes. The addition of paraffin to beeswax also resulted in the appearance of alkanes containing over 35 carbon atoms in the molecule, which were not detected in beeswax. The method for determination of beeswax hydrocarbons with the GC-MS technique is characterised by satisfactory repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility. This method can be used for the detection of beeswax adulteration with hydrocarbons of alien origin (e.g. paraffin.

  20. Determination of iodopropynyl butylcarbamate in cosmetic formulations utilizing pulsed splitless injection, gas chromatography with electron capture detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kevin B; LaFon, William; Burford, Mark D

    2017-09-22

    Current analytical methodology for iodopropynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC) analysis focuses on the use of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometer (LC-MS), but the high instrumentation and operator investment required has resulted in the need for a cost effective alternative methodology. Past publications investigating gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) for IPBC quantitation proved largely unsuccessful, likely due to the preservatives limited thermal stability. The use of pulsed injection techniques commonly used for trace analysis of thermally labile pharmaceutical compounds was successfully adapted for IPBC analysis and utilizes the selectivity of GC-ECD analysis. System optimization and sample preparation improvements resulted in substantial performance and reproducibility gains. Cosmetic formulations preserved with IPBC (50-100ppm) were solvated in toluene/isopropyl alcohol and quantified over the 0.3-1.3μg/ml calibration range. The methodology was robust (relative standard deviation 4%), accurate (98% recovery), and sensitive (limit of detection 0.25ng/ml) for use in routine testing of cosmetic formulation preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Testing CuO nanowires as a novel X-ray to electron converter for gas-filled radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, H.; Saramad, S.; Razaghi, S.

    2017-10-01

    Nanowires, due to their special physical properties and also high surface to volume ratio, can have considerable applications in designing and development of novel nanodevices. For the radiation shielding, higher absorption coefficient of nanostructures in comparison to bulk ones is an advantage. In gas detectors, designing a proper converter that absorbs higher energy of gamma and X-rays and convert it to more free electrons is one of the major problems. Since the nanowires have higher surface to volume ratio in comparison to the bulk one, so it is expected that by optimizing the thickness, the generated electrons can have higher chance to escape from the surface. In this work, the random CuO nanowires with diameter of 40 nm are deposited on thin glass slide. This nanostructure with different thicknesses are tested by plastic and CsI scintillators by X-ray tube with HVs in the range of 16 to 25 kV. The results show that for the same thickness, the CuO nanowires can release electrons six times more than the bulk ones and for the same energy the optimum QE of nanoconverter can be three times greater than the bulk converter. This novel nanoconverter with higher detection efficiency can have applications in high energy physics, medical imaging and also astronomy.

  2. Signal processors for position-sensitive detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Ken-ichi [Hosei Univ., Koganei, Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSD) are widely used in following various fields: condensed matter studies, material engineering, medical radiology particle physics, astrophysics and industrial applications. X-ray diffraction analysis is one of the field where PSDs are the most important instruments. In this field, many types of PSAs are employed: position-sensitive proportional counters (PSPC), multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC), imaging plates, image intensifiers combined CCD cameras and semiconductor array devices. Two readout systems used for PSDs, where one is a charge-division type with high stability and the other is an encoder with multiple delay, line readout circuits useful for fast counting, were reported in this paper. The multiple delay line encoding system can be applicable to high counting rate 1D and 2D gas proportional detectors. (G.K.)

  3. Realization of the low background neutrino detector Double Chooz. From the development of a high-purity liquid and gas handling concept to first neutrino data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfahler, Patrick

    2012-12-17

    produced and, together with all other ingredients of muon veto and buffer, delivered to the experiment, where they were mixed and tuned in due consideration of the individual requirements of the different liquids. For the filling and handling of the DC-far detector, the underground laboratory was equipped with a comprehensive liquid-handling, gas-handling and monitoring-system, which provides all necessary functions to flush, fill, operate and empty the detector safely. Using these systems, the DC-far detector was flushed and filled in accordance with an especially developed sequence, which considered critical filling points and avoided unnecessary stress on the different detector vessels. By the means of this, the far detector of Double Chooz could be filled without damaging the detector vessels. In addition, it could be demonstrated that the quality and cleanliness of the detector liquids were maintained during filling. As a result of this, Double Chooz was able to acquire first neutrino data and to publish its first result of {Theta}{sub 13} with sin{sup 2}(2{Theta}{sub 13})=0.109 {+-} 0.030(stat.) {+-} 0.025(syst.).

  4. Simultaneous analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples by membrane-assisted solvent extraction combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xizhi; Tang, Zigang; Sun, Aili; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Jian; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Pan, Daodong

    2014-12-01

    A highly efficient and environment-friendly membrane-assisted solvent extraction system combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector was applied in the simultaneous determination of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. Variables affecting extraction efficiency, including extraction solvent used, stirring rate, extraction time, and temperature, were optimized extensively. Under optimal extraction conditions, recoveries between 76.9% and 104.6% in seawater samples were achieved, and relative standard deviation values below 10% were obtained. The limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) and limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio=10) of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater ranged from 0.14ngL(-1) to 0.36ngL(-1) and 0.46ngL(-1) to 1.19ngL(-1), respectively. Matrix effects on extraction efficiency were evaluated by comparing with the results obtained using tap water. The extraction effect of developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction method was further demonstrated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry which can provide structural information of the analytes for more accurate identification, and results identical to those produced by gas chromatography-electron capture detector were obtained. These findings demonstrate the applicability of the developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction determination method for coupling to gas chromatography-electron capture detector or tandem mass spectrometry for determining polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tower counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  6. New micropattern gas detectors for the endcap muon system of the CMS experiment at the high-luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Calabria, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    For the era of the high-luminosity LHC, new detectors are planned to enhance the performance of the endcap muon system of the CMS detector. We report on two types of these detectors that will be installed during the third long shutdown (LS3) of the LHC. In the pseudo-rapidity region $1.6 < \\lvert\\eta\\rvert < 2.4$, new triple-foil large-area Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors will be installed in the third of five detector stations in each endcap, the first station being closest to the interaction point. These GEM detectors are in addition to ones that will have already been installed in the second station during LS2. We present a design for the third station detectors that must cover a larger geometrical area than those in the second station, while maintaining good performance for efficiency and spatial resolution. A new innermost (first) detector station will be installed in the endcaps to extend the range of muon identification up to about $ \\lvert\\eta\\rvert = 3.0$. We describe the geometric...

  7. Monte Carlo Study on Gas Pressure Response of He-3 Tube in Neutron Porosity Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIAN Li-li;ZHANG Feng;WANG Xin-guang;LIU Jun-tao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal neutrons are detected by (n,p reaction of Helium-3 tube in the compensated neutron logging. The helium gas pressure in the counting area influences neutron detection efficiency greatly, and then it is an important parameter for neutron porosity measurement accuracy. The variation law of counting rates of a near detector and a far one with helium gas pressure under different formation condition was simulated by Monte Carlo method. The results showed that with the increasing of helium pressure the counting rate of these detectors increased firstly and then leveled off. In addition, the neutron counting rate ratio and porosity sensitivity increased slightly, the porosity measurement error decreased exponentially, which improved the measurement accuracy. These research results can provide technical support for selecting the type of Helium-3 detector in developing neutron porosity logging.

  8. Estimation of Basis Line-Integrals in a Spectral Distortion-Modeled Photon Counting Detector Using Low-Rank Approximation-Based X-Ray Transmittance Modeling: K-Edge Imaging Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen; Polster, Christoph; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-11-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) provide multiple energy-dependent measurements for estimating basis line-integrals. However, the measured spectrum is distorted from the spectral response effect (SRE) via charge sharing, K-fluorescence emission, and so on. Thus, in order to avoid bias and artifacts in images, the SRE needs to be compensated. For this purpose, we recently developed a computationally efficient three-step algorithm for PCD-CT without contrast agents by approximating smooth X-ray transmittance using low-order polynomial bases. It compensated the SRE by incorporating the SRE model in a linearized estimation process and achieved nearly the minimum variance and unbiased (MVU) estimator. In this paper, we extend the three-step algorithm to K-edge imaging applications by designing optimal bases using a low-rank approximation to model X-ray transmittances with arbitrary shapes (i.e., smooth without the K-edge or discontinuous with the K-edge). The bases can be used to approximate the X-ray transmittance and to linearize the PCD measurement modeling and then the three-step estimator can be derived as in the previous approach: estimating the x-ray transmittance in the first step, estimating basis line-integrals including that of the contrast agent in the second step, and correcting for a bias in the third step. We demonstrate that the proposed method is more accurate and stable than the low-order polynomial-based approaches with extensive simulation studies using gadolinium for the K-edge imaging application. We also demonstrate that the proposed method achieves nearly MVU estimator, and is more stable than the conventional maximum likelihood estimator in high attenuation cases with fewer photon counts.

  9. Application of gas chromatography/flame ionization detector-based metabolite fingerprinting for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Development of authenticity screening for Asian palm civet coffee, the world-renowned priciest coffee, was previously reported using metabolite profiling through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, a major drawback of this approach is the high cost of the instrument and maintenance. Therefore, an alternative method is needed for quality and authenticity evaluation of civet coffee. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective analysis employing a universal detector, GC coupled with flame ionization detector (FID), and metabolite fingerprinting has been established for discrimination analysis of 37 commercial and non-commercial coffee beans extracts. gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) provided higher sensitivity over a similar range of detected compounds than GC/MS. In combination with multivariate analysis, GC/FID could successfully reproduce quality prediction from GC/MS for differentiation of commercial civet coffee, regular coffee and coffee blend with 50 wt % civet coffee content without prior metabolite details. Our study demonstrated that GC/FID-based metabolite fingerprinting can be effectively actualized as an alternative method for coffee authenticity screening in industries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. High spatial and time resolutions with gas ionization detectors; Hautes resolutions en position et temps avec des detecteurs gazeux a ionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouthas, J

    2001-09-01

    This document presents the principles and the characteristics of the gaseous ionisation detectors used in position and timing measurements. The first two parts recall the main notions (electron and ion motions, gaseous amplification, signal formation) and their applications to the proportional counter and the wire chamber. The explanation of the signal formation makes use of the Ramo theorem. The third part is devoted to the different types of wire chambers: drift or cathode strip chambers, TPC (time projection chamber). Some aspects on construction and ageing are also presented. Part 4 is on the detectors in which the multiplication is performed by a 'Parallel Plate' system (PPAC, Pestov counter). Special attention is paid to the RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers) and their timing resolutions. Part 5 concentrates on 'Micro-pattern detectors' which use different kinds of microstructure for gaseous amplification. The new detectors MICROMEGAS, CAT (compteur a trous) and GEM (gas electron multiplier) and some of their applications are presented. The last part is a bibliography including some comments on the documents. (author)

  11. Characterizations of GEM detector prototype

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00522505; Rudra, Sharmili; Bhattacharya, P.; Sahoo, Sumanya Sekhar; Biswas, S.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T.K.; Sahu, P.K.; Sahu, S.

    2016-01-01

    At NISER-IoP detector laboratory an initiative is taken to build and test Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for ALICE experiment. The optimisation of the gas flow rate and the long-term stability test of the GEM detector are performed. The method and test results are presented.

  12. Characterisations of GEM detector prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Rajendra Nath [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Nanda, Amit [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Rudra, Sharmili [Department of Applied Physics, CU, 92, APC Road, Kolkata 700009, West Bengal (India); Bhattacharya, P.; Sahoo, Sumanya Sekhar [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Biswas, S., E-mail: saikat.ino@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Mohanty, B. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Nayak, T.K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Sahu, P.K.; Sahu, S. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, P.O.: Sainik School, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India)

    2016-07-11

    At NISER-IoP detector laboratory an initiative is taken to build and test Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for ALICE experiment. The optimisation of the gas flow rate and the long-term stability test of the GEM detector are performed. The method and test results are presented.

  13. Counting Penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  14. Quantification of Triacylglycerol Molecular Species in Edible Fats and Oils by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector Using Correction Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Obi, Junji; Nagai, Toshiharu; Iioka, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the resolution parameters and correction factors (CFs) of triacylglycerol (TAG) standards were estimated by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) to achieve the precise quantification of the TAG composition in edible fats and oils. Forty seven TAG standards comprising capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and/or linolenic acid were analyzed, and the CFs of these TAGs were obtained against tripentadecanoyl glycerol as the internal standard. The capillary column was Ultra ALLOY + -65 (30 m × 0.25 mm i.d., 0.10 μm thickness) and the column temperature was programmed to rise from 250°C to 360°C at 4°C/min and then hold for 25 min. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of the TAG standards were > 0.10 mg and > 0.32 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively, except for LnLnLn, and the LOD and LOQ values of LnLnLn were 0.55 mg and 1.84 mg per 100 mg fat and oil, respectively. The CFs of TAG standards decreased with increasing total acyl carbon number and degree of desaturation of TAG molecules. Also, there were no remarkable differences in the CFs between TAG positional isomers such as 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-stearoyl-rac-glycerol, 1-stearoyl-2-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, and 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol, which cannot be separated by GC-FID. Furthermore, this method was able to predict the CFs of heterogeneous (AAB- and ABC-type) TAGs from the CFs of homogenous (AAA-, BBB-, and CCC-type) TAGs. In addition, the TAG composition in cocoa butter, palm oil, and canola oil was determined using CFs, and the results were found to be in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Therefore, the GC-FID method using CFs can be successfully used for the quantification of TAG molecular species in natural fats and oils.

  15. A study of materials used for muon chambers at the CMS Experiment at the LHC: interaction with gas, new materials and new technologies for detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, Stefano

    This thesis lays its foundation in both technological and theoretical stud- ies carried out between several aspects of applied engineering. There are several original contributions within the material science. The first is the detailed studies about the CMS RPC gas filters, which required an intense 3 years data-taking and ended up with a complete characterization of purifier materials. On top of this a stable ad − hoc setup (GGM) has been devel- oped for the CMS Experiment in order to monitor the RPC muon chamber working point. Finally a complete new detector has been designed, build and tested using new technology and new electronics establishing the word’s record in size for this kind of detector, which is taken under consideration for the upgrade of the high-η region of the CMS Experiment.

  16. A LaF{sub 3}:Nd(10%) scintillation detector with microgap gas chamber read-out for the detection of {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Marel, J.; Bom, V.R.; van Eijk, C.W.E.; Hollander, R.W. [Delft Univ. of Technol. (Netherlands). Radiat. Technol. Group; Sarro, P.M. [Delft Institute of Microelectronics and Submicrontechnology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-06-21

    A LaF{sub 3}:Nd(10%) scintillator crystal has been placed in a microgap gas chamber to obtain a position-sensitive detector for {gamma}-rays. Directly on the crystal a thin layer of nickel is evaporated, and on top of that a thin semi-transparant CsI photocathode. {gamma}-rays absorbed in the scintillator crystal produce a UV-light flash, which liberates electrons in the photocathode. These electrons are multiplied and detected in the microgap chamber. By comparing the spectrum measured when this detector is irradiated with 511 keV {gamma}-rays with a spectrum that is computed in a Monte Carlo simulation, it is concluded that the probability that a UV-light photon created in the scintillator produces a photoelectron in the photocathode, is about 2.5%. (orig.).

  17. Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for the Upgrade of the Muon System of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, Othmane

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the long awaited Higgs boson in 2012, the Large hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its two general purpose experiments (ATLAS and CMS) are preparing to break new grounds in High Energy Physics (HEP). The international HEP collaboration has established a rigorous research program of exploring new physics at the high energy frontiers. The program includes substantial increase in the luminosity of the LHC putting detectors into a completely new and unprecedented harsh environment. In order to maintain their excellent performance, an upgrade of the existing detectors is mandatory. In this work we will describe ongoing efforts for the upgrade of the CMS muon detection system, in particular the addition of detection layers based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. We will summarize the past 5-year R\\ and D program and the future installation and operation plans.

  18. Pressure Drop Versus Flow Rate Analysis of the Limited Streamer Tube Gas System of the BaBar Muon Detector Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, M.

    2004-09-03

    It has been proposed that Limited Streamer Tubes (LST) be used in the current upgrade of the muon detector in the BaBar detector. An LST consists of a thin silver plated wire centered in a graphite-coated cell. One standard LST tube consists of eight such cells, and two or three such tubes form an LST module. Under operation, the cells are filled with a gas mixture of CO{sub 2}, argon and isobutane. During normal operation of the detector, the gas will be flushed out of the system at a constant low rate of one volume change per day. During times such as installation, however, it is often desired to flush and change the LST gas volumes very rapidly, leading to higher than normal pressure which may damage the modules. This project studied this pressure as a function of flow rate and the number of modules that are put in series in search of the maximal safe flow rate at which to flush the modules. Measurements of pressure drop versus flow rate were taken using a flow meter and a pressure transducer on configurations of one to five modules put in series. Minimal Poly-Flo tubing was used for all connections between test equipment and modules. They contributed less than 25% to all measurements. A ratio of 0.00022 {+-} 0.00001 mmHg per Standard Cubic Centimeter per Minute (SCCM) per module was found, which was a slight overestimate since it included the contributions from the tubing connections. However, for the purpose of finding a flow rate at which the modules can be safely flushed, this overestimate acts as a safety cushion. For a standard module with a volume of 16 liters and a known safe overpressure of 2 inches of water, the ratio translates into a flow rate of 17000 {+-} 1000SCCM and a time requirement of 56 {+-} 5 seconds to flush an entire module.

  19. Detailed compositional characterization of plastic waste pyrolysis oil by comprehensive two-dimensional gas-chromatography coupled to multiple detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Hilal E; Dijkmans, Thomas; Djokic, Marko R; Van Geem, Kevin M; Marin, Guy B

    2014-09-12

    The detailed compositional characterization of plastic waste pyrolysis oil was performed with comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) coupled to four different detectors: a flame ionization detector (FID), a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD), a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The performances of different column combinations were assessed in normal i.e. apolar/mid-polar and reversed configurations for the GC×GC-NCD and GC×GC-SCD analyses. The information obtained from the four detectors and the use of internal standards, i.e. 3-chlorothiophene for the FID and the SCD and 2-chloropyridine for the NCD analysis, enabled the identification and quantification of the pyrolysis oil in terms of both group type and carbon number: hydrocarbon groups (n-paraffins, iso-paraffins, olefins and naphthenes, monoaromatics, naphthenoaromatics, diaromatics, naphthenodiaromatics, triaromatics, naphthenotriaromatics and tetra-aromatics), nitrogen (nitriles, pyridines, quinolines, indole, caprolactam, etc.), sulfur (thiols/sulfides, thiophenes/disulfides, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, etc.) and oxygen containing compounds (ketones, phenols, aldehydes, ethers, etc.). Quantification of trace impurities is illustrated for indole and caprolactam. The analyzed pyrolysis oil included a significant amount of nitrogen containing compounds (6.4wt%) and to a lesser extent sulfur containing compounds (0.6wt%). These nitrogen and sulfur containing compounds described approximately 80% of the total peak volume for respectively the NCD and SCD analysis. TOF-MS indicated the presence of the oxygen containing compounds. However only a part of the oxygen containing compounds (2.5wt%) was identified because of their low concentrations and possible overlap with the complex hydrocarbon matrix as no selective detector or preparative separation for oxygen compounds was used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Single gas chromatography method with nitrogen phosphorus detector for urinary cotinine determination in passive and active smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusiane Malafatti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is a major addictive compound in cigarettes and is rapidly and extensively metabolized to several metabolites in humans, including urinary cotinine, considered a biomarker due to its high concentration compared to other metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a single method for determination of urinary cotinine, in active and passive smokers, by gas chromatography with a nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD. Urine (5.0 mL was extracted with 1.0 mL of sodium hydroxide 5 mol L-1, 5.0 mL of chloroform, and lidocaine used as the internal standard. Injection volume was 1 μL in GC-NPD. Limit of quantification was 10 ng mL-1. Linearity was evaluated in the ranges 10-1000 ng mL-1 and 500-6000 ng mL-1, with determination coefficients of 0.9986 and 0.9952, respectively. Intra- and inter-assay standard relative deviations were lower than 14.2 %, while inaccuracy (bias was less than +11.9%. The efficiency of extraction was greater than 88.5%. Ruggedness was verified, according to Youden's test. Means of cotinine concentrations observed were 2,980 ng mL-1 for active smokers and 132 ng mL-1, for passive smokers. The results revealed that satisfactory chromatographic separation between the analyte and interferents was obtained with a ZB-1 column. This method is reliable, precise, linear and presented ruggedness in the range evaluated. The results suggest that it can be applied in routine analysis for passive and active smokers, since it is able to quantify a wide range of cotinine concentrations in urine.A nicotina é uma substância presente no cigarro capaz de causar dependência, sendo biotransformada em vários metabólitos nos seres humanos, dentre eles a cotinina urinária, que é considerada um indicador biológico de exposição à nicotina, devido a suas altas concentrações, comparado a outras matrizes. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi desenvolver um único método para determinação de cotinina urinária, em amostras de

  1. Data acquisition and online control system for new gas-electron multiplier detectors in the endcap muon system of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz Alvarez, Jose David

    2016-01-01

    A new data acquisition and on-line control system is being developed for gas-electron multiplier (GEM) detectors which will be installed in the forward region (1.6 \\( < \\eta < \\) 2.2) of the CMS muon spectrometer during the 2nd long shutdown of the LHC, planned for the period 2018-2019. A prototype system employs the TOTEM VFAT2 ASIC that will eventually be replaced with the VFAT3 ASIC, under development. The front-end ASIC communicates over printed circuit lines with an intermediate on-detector board called the opto-hybrid. Data, trigger, and control information is transmitted via optical fiber between the opto-hybrid and an off-detector readout system using micro-TCA technology. On-line software, implemented in the CMS XDAQ framework, includes applications for latency and HV scans, and system management. We report on the operational status of the prototype system that has been tested using cosmic ray muons and extracted high-energy particle beams. This work is preparatory for the operation of a prot...

  2. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. New gas electron-multiplier detectors for the endcap muon system of the CMS experiment at the high-luminosity LHC design and prototype performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gruchala, Marek Michal

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity LHC will require new detectors in the CMS endcap muon system to suppress the trigger rate of background events, to maintain high trigger efficiency for low transverse momentum muons, to enhance the robustness of muon detection in the high-flux environment of the endcap, and to extend the geometrical acceptance. We report on the design and recent progress towards implementing a new system of large-area, triple-foil gas electron-multiplier (GEM) detectors that will be installed in the first three of five muon detector stations in each endcap, the first station being closest to the interaction point. The first station will extend the geometric acceptance in pseudo-rapidity to eta lt 3.0 from the current limit of eta lt 2.4. The second and third stations will enhance the performance in the range 1.6 lt eta lt 2.4. We describe the design of the chambers and readout electronics and report on the performance of prototype systems in tests with cosmic ray muons, high-energy particlebeams, a...

  4. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  5. Determination of sulfur-containing compounds in diesel oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ruixiang; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Wei; Zheng, Jincheng; Wei, Haibo; Wang, Jinghua; Lu, Xin; Kong, Hongwei; Xu, Guowang

    2003-11-26

    This article reports an analytical method for separating, identifying and quantitating sulfur-containing compounds and their groups in diesel oils (170-400 degrees C) using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector. The identification of target compounds and their groups was based on standard substances, the group separation feature and tile-effect of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography. The quantitative analysis on major sulfur compounds and total sulfur was carried out based on the linear response of sulfur chemiluminescence detector and the internal standards method. The results of total sulfur determination in the samples were compared with those from ASTM D 4294 standard method, the R.S.D. percentage were fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), residuum fluid catalytic cracking (RFCC) diesel oils mainly exist in the form of alkyl-substituted dibenzothiophenes that add up to about 40-50% of the total sulfur, while this number is only 6-8 and 20-28% in visbreaking (VB) and delayed-coking (DC) diesel oils, respectively.

  6. R and D studies of a RICH detector using pressurized C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O radiator gas and a CsI-based gaseous photon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agócs, A.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Barile, F. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); Barnaföldi, G.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bellwied, R. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Bencédi, G.; Bencze, G.; Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Chinellato, D.D. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Cindolo, F. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); De Cataldo, G.; Di Bari, D. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); Di Mauro, A., E-mail: antonio.di.mauro@cern.ch [CERN, CH1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Futó, E. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Garcia, E. [Chicago State University, Chicago, IL (United States); Hamar, G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); and others

    2013-12-21

    We report on studies of layout and performance of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector using for the first time pressurized C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of a MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode. In particular, we present here the results of beam tests of a MWPC having an adjustable anode–cathode gap, aiming at the optimization of single photoelectron detection and Cherenkov angle resolution. This system was proposed as a Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range 5–25 GeV/c. -- Highlights: •The concept and design of a novel RICH counter operated with pressurized gaseous Cherenkov radiator have been validated. •We used for the first time C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O gaseous Cherenkov radiator pressurized up to 3.5 atm in a RICH counter. •The refractive index of C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O in the UV range is similar to the per-mil level to that of C{sub 4}F{sub 10}. •A variable gap MWPC has been used to optimize the layout of the gaseous photon counter, based on CsI photocathodes and MWPC, for the detection of single photoelectrons.

  7. Multi-Detector CT Findings of the Normal Appendix in Children: Evaluation of the Position, Diameter, and Presence or Absence of Intraluminal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Woon Ju; Kim, Jong Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To assess the usefulness of multi-detector CT (MDCT) with multiplanar reformations (MPR) for the evaluation of the position, diameter and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the normal appendix in children. From 2007 to 2010, we retrospectively analyzed the MDCT images of normal appendices in 133 children, and evaluated the position, diameter, and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the appendix. Among the 133 appendices, type I (postileal and medial paracecal position) was found in 64 children, type II (subcecal position) in 22, type III (retrocecal and retrocolic/laterocolic position) in 15, type IV (preileal and medial colic position) in 16, and type V (lower pelvic position) in 16 children. The mean diameter was 5.8 mm {+-} 1.2 (SD) (range; 3.2-8.7 mm). There was a high correlation between the appendiceal diameter and age (p = 0.000).There was no statistically significant difference in the appendiceal diameter between boys and girls (p = 0.470). Intraluminal gas was found in 115 appendices and there was no statistically significant correlation between the appendiceal diameter and intraluminal gas (p = 0.502). The MDCT with MPR was useful for the evaluation of the normal appendices in children. The procedure may be useful for the diagnosis of equivocal or unusual appendicitis in children.

  8. Photon-counting image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Teranishi, Nobukazu; Theuwissen, Albert; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The field of photon-counting image sensors is advancing rapidly with the development of various solid-state image sensor technologies including single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs) and deep-sub-electron read noise CMOS image sensor pixels. This foundational platform technology will enable opportunities for new imaging modalities and instrumentation for science and industry, as well as new consumer applications. Papers discussing various photon-counting image sensor technologies and selected new applications are presented in this all-invited Special Issue.

  9. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraz, J.F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the “quenching” factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  10. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraz, J. F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the "quenching" factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  11. Performances of keystone geometry micro-strip gas chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Chiari, M; Tonetto, F; Travaglini, L

    2002-01-01

    The performances of micro-strip gas chamber detectors with CF sub 4 counting gas have been tested with a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am alpha source. The behaviour of the gain as a function of gas pressure, the dependence of the energy resolution on gas pressure and anode voltage, and the gain variation along the strip length due to the keystone geometry of the micro-strip pads are reported. An empirical response function to describe such a position dependence of the gain is proposed.

  12. Development of a micro electrochemical cell for in-situ deposition of {sup 63}Ni for use in electron capture detector (ECD) in gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, A.; Udhayakumar, J.; Kumar, M.; Gandhi, S.S.; Venkatesh, M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiopharmaceuticals Div.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Chemistry Div.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we describe a novel electrochemical approach to deposit {sup 63}Ni coatings on the inner surface of a copper annular ring for its application as an ionization source in electron capture detector of gas chromatograph. A description of the electrolytic cell, the process of deposition and the experimental set up used, analysis of the nickel deposit and results are presented in this article. Sources containing {proportional_to}370 MBq ({proportional_to}10 mCi) {sup 63}Ni could be prepared. The quality of the prepared source in terms of nonleachability, uniform distribution of activity and stability that are necessary before application were evaluated and found to be highly satisfactory. (orig.)

  13. Halogenated pesticide analysis in orange juice by gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) with {sup 63}Ni nuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manhani, Kelly C.; Amaral, Priscila O.; Bustillos, José O.V.; Mendes, Cristiana de A.; Lacerda, João P.A. de; Silva, Jorge L. da, E-mail: ovega@ipen.br, E-mail: kmanhani@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CQMA/IPEN-CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Química e Meio Ambiente; Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnológicas do Estado de São Paulo (LAQ- CQuim/IPT-SP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análises Químicas

    2017-11-01

    Brazil has been gain space in the market of orange juice in the last years. For the exportation of this product to keep growing, its quality of this product must be ensured by putting in force more strict legislations and custom barriers, in order to improve the well-being and health of the population. In this work were analyzed four orange juices brands produced in the State of São Paulo. It was quantified the acaricide known as Dicofol (2,2,2-trichloro-1,1-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethanol) widely used to combat the Citrusleprosis virus, transmitted by mites to the citrus culture. This pesticide was chosen due to its importance in the production of orange in large scale and their indiscriminate use may pose risks to humans and of environment. The analytical technique applied was gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) using the {sup 63}Ni nuclide. This beta (β) radiation source ionizes the carrier gas (N{sub 2}), generating an electron current that forms the baseline. The analites pass through the detector and capture electrons, generating the analytical signal that is proportional to the concentration of analite. The sample preparation was done by QuEChERS. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) found were 0.005 and 0.025 mg kg{sup -1} respectively. The applied methodology was efficient and presented excellent analytical sensitivity for the pesticide Dicofol, being that of four samples analyzed, only in one was found concentration of 0.03 mg kg{sup -1}, above the LOQ, however below the Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) for fruits (0.1 mg kg{sup -1}) established by Codex alimentarius. (author)

  14. Golden Jubilee photos: A New Class of Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In the 1960s, detection in particle physics mainly meant examining millions of photographs from bubble chambers or spark chambers. This was slow, labour intensive and not suitable for studies into rare phenomena, so there was a bottleneck that could have affected further progress in high energy physics. The transistor revolution triggered new ideas. While a camera could detect a spark, a detector wire connected to an amplifier could detect a much smaller effect. In 1968, Georges Charpak developed the 'multiwire proportional chamber', a gas-filled box with a large number of parallel detector wires, each connected to individual amplifiers. Linked to a computer, it could achieve a counting rate a thousand times better than existing techniques - without a camera in sight. Today practically every experiment in particle physics uses some type of track detector that is based on the principle of the multiwire proportional chamber. The technology is also used in many other fields using ionising radiation such as biol...

  15. Application of portable gas chromatography-photo ionization detector combined with headspace sampling for field analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You-Ya; Yu, Ji-Fang; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Chao-Yan; Xie, Ya-Bo; Ma, Li-Qiang; Gu, Qing-Bao; Li, Fa-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    A method based on headspace (HS) sampling coupling with portable gas chromatography (GC) with photo ionization detector (PID) was developed for rapid determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in soils. Optimal conditions for HS gas sampling procedure were determined, and the influence of soil organic matter on the recovery of BTEX from soil was investigated using five representative Chinese soils. The results showed that the HS-portable-GC-PID method could be effectively operated at ambient temperature, and the addition of 15 ml of saturated NaCl solution in a 40-ml sampling vial and 60 s of shaking time for sample solution were optimum for the HS gas sampling procedure. The recoveries of each BTEX in soils ranged from 87.2 to 105.1 %, with relative standard deviations varying from 5.3 to 7.8 %. Good linearity was obtained for all BTEX compounds, and the detection limits were in the 0.1 to 0.8 μg kg(-1) range. Soil organic matter was identified as one of the principal elements that affect the HS gas sampling of BTEX in soils. The HS-portable-GC-PID method was successfully applied for field determination of benzene and toluene in soils of a former chemical plant in Jilin City, northeast China. Considering its satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility and particular suitability to be operated in ambient environment, HS sampling coupling with portable GC-PID is, therefore, recommended to be a suitable screening tool for rapid on-site determination of BTEX in soils.

  16. Design, development and performance study of six-gap glass MRPC detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, M.M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Mondal, N.K.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India)

    2016-12-15

    The multigap resistive plate chambers (MRPCs) are gas ionization detectors with multiple gas sub-gaps made of resistive electrodes. The high voltage (HV) is applied on the outer surfaces of outermost resistive plates only, while the interior plates are left electrically floating. The presence of multiple narrow sub-gaps with high electric field results in faster signals on the outer electrodes, thus improving the detector's time resolution. Due to their excellent performance and relatively low cost, the MRPC detector has found potential application in time-of-flight (TOF) systems. Here we present the design, fabrication, optimization of the operating parameters such as the HV, the gas mixture composition, and, performance of six-gap glass MRPC detectors of area 27 cm x 27 cm, which are developed in order to find application as trigger detectors, in TOF measurement etc. The design has been optimized with unique spacers and blockers to ensure a proper gas flow through the narrow sub-gaps, which are 250 μm wide. The gas mixture consisting of R134A, Isobutane and SF{sub 6}, and the fraction of each constituting gases has been optimized after studying the MRPC performance for a set of different concentrations. The counting efficiency of the MRPC is about 95% at 17.9 kV. At the same operating voltage, the time resolution, after correcting for the walk effect, is found to be about 219 ps. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of imaging pixel detectors of Si and CdTe read out with the counting X-ray chip MPEC 2.3; Charakterisierung von bildgebenden Pixeldetektoren aus Si und CdTe ausgelesen mit dem zaehlenden Roentgenchip MPEC 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loecker, M.

    2007-04-15

    Single photon counting detectors with Si- and CdTe-sensors have been constructed and characterized. As readout chip the MPEC 2.3 is used which consists of 32 x 32 pixels with 200 x 200 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size and which has a high count rate cabability (1 MHz per pixel) as well as a low noise performance (55 e{sup -}). Measurements and simulations of the detector homogeneity are presented. It could be shown that the theoretical maximum of the homogeneity is reached (quantum limit). By means of the double threshold of the MPEC chip the image contrast can be enhanced which is demonstrated by measurement and simulation. Also, multi-chip-modules consisting of 4 MPEC chips and a single Si- or CdTe-sensor have been constructed and successfully operated. With these modules modulation-transfer-function measurements have been done showing a good spatial resolution of the detectors. In addition, multi-chip-modules according to the Sparse-CMOS concept have been built and tests characterizing the interconnection technologies have been performed.

  18. CERN_DxCTA counting mode chip

    CERN Document Server

    Moraes, D; Nygård, E

    2008-01-01

    This ASIC is a counting mode front-end electronic optimized for the readout of CdZnTe/CdTe and silicon sensors, for possible use in applications where the flux of ionizing radiation is high. The chip is implemented in 0.25 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 128 channels equipped with a transimpedance amplifier followed by a gain shaper stage with 21 ns peaking time, two discriminators and two 18-bit counters. The channel architecture is optimized for the detector characteristics in order to achieve the best energy resolution at counting rates of up to 5 M counts/second. The amplifier shows a linear sensitivity of 118 mV/fC and an equivalent noise charge of about 711 e−, for a detector capacitance of 5 pF. Complete evaluation of the circuit is presented using electronic pulses and pixel detectors.

  19. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  20. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  1. Development and operation of laser machined MicroWell Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pitts, W K; Belolipetskiy, S V; Crain, M; Hutchins, J B; Matos, S; Walsh, K M; Solberg, K

    1999-01-01

    Arrays of 100 mu m diameter cylindrical wells were laser micromachined on a 200 micrometer Cartesian grid, producing MicroWell Detectors (MWD). The substrate was 125 mu m thick polyimide foil, more than twice as thick as a typical GEM or WELL detector. An advantage of the laser micromachining process is that the wells are produced with nearly vertical sidewalls, in contrast to the sloping sidewalls characteristic of conventional chemical etching processes. With the steeper sidewall, active elements may be more closely packed than is possible with wet etching techniques. Thicker substrates can be patterned, increasing the length of the charge multiplication region and reducing the internal capacitance per unit element. A series of prototypes have been produced and tested in a counting gas composed of 85% argon and 15% carbon dioxide, with a maximum measured gas gain of approximately 12 000.

  2. Standard test method for determining whether gas-leak-detector fluid solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking of brass alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an accelerated test method for evaluating the tendency of gas leak detection fluids (LDFs) to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass components in compressed gas service. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Development and Validation of a Method for Alcohol Analysis in Brain Tissue by Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Hao-Jung; Poklis, Justin L.; Poklis, Alphonse; Wolf, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used and abused drug. While blood is the preferred specimen for analysis, tissue specimens such as brain serve as alternative specimens for alcohol analysis in post-mortem cases where blood is unavailable or contaminated. A method was developed using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the detection and quantification of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol in brain tissue specimens. Unfixed volatile-free br...

  4. Measurement of the performance of TGC detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Feng Cun Feng; Lu Tai Guo; Sun Yan Sheng; Wang Suo Jie; Yan Zhen; Zhu Cheng Guang

    2005-01-01

    Shandong University is in charge of the research and production of T9 type TGC (Thin Gap Chamber) detectors for ATLAS experiment. In this paper, the stability and the leak current of the detectors working at 3200 V voltage were measured, and the plateau curves of the detectors were measured too. The counting rate of each channel was measured with same working condition and counting time interval for all the TGC detectors, in order to check the consistency of all signal channels. The performance of T9 type TGC detectors produced by Shandong University has met the requirement of the ATLAS experiment according to the preliminary results of measurement.

  5. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  6. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  7. One- and Two-Coordinate Detectors in BINP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulchenko, V M; Baru, S E; Dubrovin, M S; Savinov, G A; Shekhtman, L I; Titov, V M; Velikzhanin, Y S; Ancharov, A I; Gaponov, Y A; Evdokov, O V; Tolochko, B P

    1998-05-01

    One- and two-coordinate detectors with proportional chambers developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) are presented. The parallax-free 10 MHz one-coordinate OD-3.1 and OD-3.2 detectors are used in synchrotron radiation powder diffraction and SAXS experiments. The two-coordinate DED-3 detector with a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) is used in Laue diffraction. The latest modification of this detector, DED-5, with a working area of 384 x 384 mm, is briefly described. The micro-strip detector prototype MSGC-100 has passed test synchrotron radiation experiments and the next modification (MSGC-500), with 500 channels for high energy, is under construction. The one-coordinate MWPC OD-160 detector, with an angle aperture of 160 degrees and a count rate of 3.3 GHz, is under construction. It will be used for high-resolution powder diffraction. Two types of gas chamber will be used: L for low energies (5-30 keV) and H for high energies (30-70 keV). A 16 degrees section with an H-chamber has been produced and tested on the synchrotron radiation beamline.

  8. Development of a monitor system for gas based detectors and measurement of electron attachment in the chamber gas; Aufbau eines Monitorsystems fuer gasbasierte Detektoren und Messung der Elektronenanlagerung im Kammergas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2009-01-15

    In the framework of an international collaboration a new electron-positron linear accelerator (ILC) with a c. m. energy up to 500 GeV is planned. For the International Large Detector Concept (ILD) a time projection chamber (TPC) shall perform precise measurements of the particle tracks. In order to fulfil the high requirements on the resolution, a microstructure gas-amplification system is used for read-out. For research and development of the detector principle for the application at the ILC at DESY a large TPC prototype is developed. For the operation of the detector it is necessary to monitor its state and especially that of the measurement gas. For this purpose in the framework of this thesis a slow control system is built, which shall make possible for the different collaboration partners to operate the prototype and to integrate the slow control data into their measurement. For this with an object-oriented control system a graphic user interface was created, which makes an overview over the applied measurement devices and a driving allows. Furthermore the influence of impurities of the gas mixture by oxygen was studied. For this with a small TPC prototype measurements of the electron attachment coefficient at different oxygen concentrations were performed with a magnetic flux density of 4 T. From the amplitude of the measurement signal a rate for the electron attachment could be determined. The values obtained for this agree sufficiently in comparison with literature values. [German] Im Rahmen einer internationalen Kollaboration ist ein neuer Elektronen-Positronen-Linearbeschleuniger (ILC) mit einer Schwerpunktsenergie bis zu 500 GeV geplant. Fuer das International Large Detector Concept (ILD) soll eine Zeitprojektionskammer (TPC) praezise Vermessungen der Teilchenspuren durchfuehren. Um die hohen Anforderungen an die Aufloesung zu erfuellen, wird ein Mikrostruktur-Gasverstaerkungssystem zur Auslese verwendet. Zur Erforschung und Entwicklung des

  9. Experimental research on a boron-coated multi-wire proportional chamber neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Hu; Tu, Xiao-qing; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Yang, Bo; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Cao, Ping; An, Qi; Gong, Jian

    2017-06-01

    A boron-coated multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) neutron detector coupled with a delay line readout system has been investigated to possibly replace the 3He neutron detector. MWPC worked on the gas flow mode with Ar/ CO2 (90%/10%) and its readout system was based on the time-to-digital converter. The detection efficiency for a neutron wavelength of 0.247 nm was approximately 3.5%, and the spatial resolution was 5 mm. Other experimental results, such as gain and counting rate plateau, were also obtained.

  10. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  11. Development of a scintillator detector set with counter and data acquisition for flow measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, F E D

    2002-01-01

    A portable counter with data acquisition system for flow measurements was developed, using the pulse velocity technique. This consists in determining the tracer transit time mixed homogeneously to the liquid or gas pipelines. The counter comprises: (a) two CsI(Tl) crystals solid state detectors, associated with Si PIN photodiodes, with compatible sensitivity to the injected radiotracers activities; (b) amplification units; (c) analogue-to-digital interface, which processes and displays the detectors counting separately and in real time, but in a same temporal axis, via a computer screen and (d) 30-m coaxial cables for signals transmission from each detector to the processing unit. Experiments were carried out for the detector and associated electronic characterizations. The equipment showed to be suitable for flow measurements in an industrial plant, in the real situation.

  12. B Counting at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  13. ULY JUP GRB SOLAR X-RAY/COSMIC GAMMA-RAY RAW COUNT RATE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The archived data consist of count rates from the sum of two hemispherical detectors covering 4 pi steradians and operating continuously. The detectors are 3 mm...

  14. Simultaneous extraction of trace organophosphorous pesticides from plasma sample by automated solid phase extraction and determination by gas chromatography coupled with pulsed flame photometric detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Du, Ran

    2010-05-20

    The purpose of our work was to develop a simple and efficient analytical method for simultaneous determination of different species of organic phosphorus pesticides from plasma sample by using automated solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/pulsed flame photometric detector (GC/PFPD) as a diagnostic tool. Firstly, the developed extraction method was validated using 5 certified reference materials; then, it was applied to plasma sample. Such factors as the category and volume of wash and elution solvent were examined separately. Among these factors, the category of elution solvent is most important. Hexane-acetone (50:50, v/v) seems to be the best choice for it. The eluent was evaporated on a nitrogen stream at room temperature and redissolved by acetone. 1microL of aliquots was chromatographed on GC/PFPD. Response versus the amount of pesticides injected ranging from 0.05 to 2ng showed a good linearity. The detection limits were 0.01ng for dimethoate, 0.03ng for methyl-parathion and malathion, 0.04ng for terbufos and 0.02ng for parathion. Extraction recoveries range from 84.3% to 109.1%.This extraction method for multispecies analysis incorporates many benefits in terms of speed, low solvent use, accuracy of measurement, sensitivity, relative simplicity, as well as the time saving and convenience of multiple species measurement through sample preparation and analysis as an integrated step.

  15. Determination of acetanilide herbicides in cereal crops using accelerated solvent extraction, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaping; Yang, Jun; Shi, Ronghua; Su, Qingde; Yao, Li; Li, Panpan

    2011-07-01

    A method was developed to determine eight acetanilide herbicides from cereal crops based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) analysis. During the ASE process, the effect of four parameters (temperature, static time, static cycles and solvent) on the extraction efficiency was considered and compared with shake-flask extraction method. After extraction with ASE, four SPE tubes (graphitic carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA), GCB, Florisil and alumina-N) were assayed for comparison to obtain the best clean-up efficiency. The results show that GCB/PSA cartridge gave the best recoveries and cleanest chromatograms. The analytical process was validated by the analysis of spiked blank samples. Performance characteristics such as linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), precision and recovery were studied. At 0.05 mg/kg spiked level, recoveries and precision values for rice, wheat and maize were 82.3-115.8 and 1.1-13.6%, respectively. For all the herbicides, LOD and LOQ ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 μg/kg and from 2.4 to 5.3 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed analytical methodology was applied for the analysis of the targets in samples; only three herbicides, propyzamid, metolachlor and diflufenican, were detected in two samples. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [Analysis of pesticides including chlorine in welsh onions and mushrooms using gas chromatograph with an atomic emission detector (GC-AED)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Yukinari; Takano, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Maki; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Sakai, Naoko; Kamijo, Kyoko; Nagayama, Toshihiro; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2004-12-01

    An analytical method for the determination of 32 kinds of pesticide residues in onions, Welsh onions and mushrooms using gas chromatograph with an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) was developed. The pesticides were extracted with acetone-n-hexane (2:3) mixture. The crude extract was partitioned between 5% sodium chloride and ethyl acetate-n-hexane (1:4) mixture. The extract was passed through a Florisil mini-column for cleanup with 10 mL of acetone-n-hexane (1:9) mixture. Although the sensitivity of GC-AED was inferior to that of GC-ECD, GC-AED has a superior element-selectivity. Therefore pesticide residues in foods could be analyzed more exactly by using GC-AED. Thirty-two pesticides including chlorine in onion, Welsh onion and shiitake mushroom were detected without interference. Recoveries of these pesticides from samples determined by GC-AED were 64-114%, except for a few pesticides.

  17. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    *160*400 mm), light (8 kg) and provides a good time resolution (50-60 sec). The method is able to operate in ambient conditions, requires no external carrier gas, and an internal battery provides power for ca. 12 hours which makes the instrument suitable for outdoor field campaigns. The GC-PID detection limit for pyrrole is 3 ppb, which is adequate for this application and total OH reactivity can be measured under optimum conditions down to 4 sec-1. The new set-up has been tested in parallel to previously validated PTR-MS measurements for CRM in laboratory experiments, a plant chamber, and boreal forest field studies. Advantages and drawbacks of the new technique are discussed. Although the polymerization of pyrrole on the detector window remains a weakness in the present version of the system, in general the GC-PID produces acceptable results. [1] Calpini et al, 1999, Analusis, 27, 328 [2] Kovacs and Brune. 2001, Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 39, 105-122 [3] V. Sinha et al, 2008, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 2213-2227 [4] http://www.environics-iut.de/

  18. Thermal neutron counts and derivated charts | Odusote | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thermal neutrons)” approximation. The resulting equation was applied with a mixing index, , for various formation matrices and porosities. The ratio of counts from two different detectors was plotted as a function of porosity for these formations.

  19. Development and Validation of a Method for Alcohol Analysis in Brain Tissue by Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hao-Jung; Poklis, Justin L; Poklis, Alphonse; Wolf, Carl E

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol is the most widely used and abused drug. While blood is the preferred specimen for analysis, tissue specimens such as brain serve as alternative specimens for alcohol analysis in post-mortem cases where blood is unavailable or contaminated. A method was developed using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) for the detection and quantification of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol in brain tissue specimens. Unfixed volatile-free brain tissue specimens were obtained from the Department of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Calibrators and controls were prepared from 4-fold diluted homogenates of these brain tissue specimens, and were analyzed using t-butanol as the internal standard. The chromatographic separation was performed with a Restek BAC2 column. A linear calibration was generated for all analytes (mean r(2) > 0.9992) with the limits of detection and quantification of 100-110 mg/kg. Matrix effect from the brain tissue was determined by comparing the slopes of matrix prepared calibration curves with those of aqueous calibration curves; no significant differences were observed for ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol. The bias and the CVs for all volatile controls were ≤10%. The method was also evaluated for carryover, selectivity, interferences, bench-top stability and freeze-thaw stability. The HS-GC-FID method was determined to be reliable and robust for the analysis of ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, methanol and n-propanol concentrations in brain tissue, effectively expanding the specimen options for post-mortem alcohol analysis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    OpenAIRE

    Takaki Hatsui; Heinz Graafsma

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivit...

  1. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  2. On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Thomas; Robbat, Albert

    2008-02-15

    A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in "real-time", while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and atwhat concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment.

  3. Microradiography with Semiconductor Pixel Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubek, Jan; Cejnarova, Andrea; Dammer, Jiří; Holý, Tomáš; Platkevič, Michal; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Vavřík, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdeněk

    2007-11-01

    High resolution radiography (with X-rays, neutrons, heavy charged particles, …) often exploited also in tomographic mode to provide 3D images stands as a powerful imaging technique for instant and nondestructive visualization of fine internal structure of objects. Novel types of semiconductor single particle counting pixel detectors offer many advantages for radiation imaging: high detection efficiency, energy discrimination or direct energy measurement, noiseless digital integration (counting), high frame rate and virtually unlimited dynamic range. This article shows the application and potential of pixel detectors (such as Medipix2 or TimePix) in different fields of radiation imaging.

  4. FY16 ISCP Nuclear Counting Facility Hardware Expansion Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, Jennifer A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kashgarian, Michaele [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wooddy, Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haslett, Bob [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Torretto, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Hardware expansion and detector calibrations were the focus of FY 16 ISCP efforts in the Nuclear Counting Facility. Work focused on four main objectives: 1) Installation, calibration, and validation of 4 additional HPGe gamma spectrometry systems; including two Low Energy Photon Spectrometers (LEPS). 2) Re-Calibration and validation of 3 previously installed gamma-ray detectors, 3) Integration of the new systems into the NCF IT infrastructure, and 4) QA/QC and maintenance of current detector systems.

  5. Investigation of the profile of phenolic compounds in the leaves and stems of Pandiaka heudelotii using gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeanacho, Mercy O; Ikewuchi, Catherine C; Ikewuchi, Jude C

    2017-05-01

    The profile of phenolic compounds in the leaves and stems of Pandiaka heudelotii was investigated using gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector. The leaves and stems had high flavonoids and benzoic acid derivatives content, and moderate levels of lignans and hydroxycinnamates. Twenty-eight known flavonoids were detected, which consisted mainly of kaempferol (41.93% in leaves and 47.97% in stems), (+)-catechin (17.12% in leaves and 16.11% in stems), quercetin (13.83% in leaves and 9.39% in stems), luteolin (7.34% in leaves and 7.71% in stems), and artemetin (6.53% in leaves and 4.83% in stems). Of the six known hydroxycinnamates detected, chlorogenic acid (80.79% in leaves and 87.56% in stems) and caffeic acid (18.98% in leaves and 12.30% in stems) were the most abundant, while arctigenin (77.81% in leaves and 83.40% in stems) and retusin (13.82% in leaves and 10.59% in stems) were the most abundant of the nine known lignans detected. Twelve known benzoic acid derivatives were detected, consisting mainly of ellagic acid (65.44% in leaves and 72.89% in stems), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (25.10% in leaves and 18.95% in stems), and vanillic acid (8.80% in leaves and 7.30% in stems). The rich phytochemical profile of the leaves and stems is an indication of their ability to serve as sources of nutraceuticals.

  6. Particle detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Introduction, interaction of radiation with matter measurement of momentum of charged particles, of energy of e/gamma, hadrons, identification of particles. Design of HEP detectors. Principle of operation and performance of tracking sub-detectors, calorimeters and muon system.

  7. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  8. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the ...

  9. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 117 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 3 Loading... Loading... Transcript The ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 115 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 3 Loading... Loading... Transcript The ...

  11. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  12. Maximum-likelihood analysis and goodness-of-fit estimation in low count-rate experiments: {sup 85}Kr {beta} activity in the test facility of the Borexino detector and double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge in the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, A. E-mail: aldo.ianni@lngs.infn.it

    2004-01-01

    Statistical methods for low count-rate experiments are reviewed and applied to two samples of experimental data. In one case the {beta} activity of {sup 85}Kr in the test facility of the Borexino detector is determined. In another case a data sample from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment used to claim the discovery of the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge is analyzed. Exploiting a Bayesian technique a conservative upper limit on the half-life of the 0{nu}2{beta} decay of {sup 76}Ge is found at T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}}{>=}1.2x10{sup 25} yr (90% CL) in the window (2000-2080) keV.

  13. Results obtained with LEGe detectors applied for partial-body counting in the low-energy range (3-150 keV); Erfahrungen mit LEGe-Detektoren bei Teilkoerpermessungen im Bereich niedriger Energien (3-150 keV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettmann, K. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Due to a change in the field of duties, the Phoswich detector hitherto used for organ and partial-body scanning for measuring low-energy {gamma} radiation and X-radiation had to be replaced by a modern detector system. A key application of the new system is detection and in vivo measurement of {sup 210}Pb in the human skeleton. This method of measuring {sup 210}Pb as a long-lived daughter product of radon is applied for retrospective assessment of radiation doses emanatingfrom the radon decay chain, applied to former uranium miners (WISMUT) and members of the population living or having lived in houses with high radon concentrations. The bone activities to be expected from relevant exposures are only slightly above those of the normal {sup 210}Pb content in the bones (10-30 Bq), and the Phoswich detector system was not able to detect incorporated activity down to these low levels. The new system was also tested for its suitability and efficiency in detecting radionuclide depositions in body organs, particularly the actinides that are difficult to identify, in compliance with the relevant regulatory guide. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der Inkorporationsmessstelle musste auf Grund neuer Aufgabenstellungen der fuer Organ- und Teilkoerpermessungen zum Nachweis niederenergetischer {gamma}- und Roentgenstrahlung eingesetzte Phoswich-Detektor durch ein modernes Detektorsystem ersetzt werden. Ein wichtiges Einsatzgebiet des neuen Systems ist die Bestimmung von {sup 210}Pb im menschlichen Skelett ueber In-vivo-Messungen. Diese Methode der Bestimmung von {sup 210}Pb als langlebiges Folgeprodukt des Radons dient der retrospektiven Ermittlung der Exposition durch Radon-Zerfallsprodukte bei ehemaligen Uranbergleuten (WISMUT) und Personen aus der Bevoelkerung, die in Wohnhaeusern mit hohen Radonkonzentrationen leben bzw. gelebt haben. Die fuer relevante Expositionen zu erwartenden Skelettaktivitaeten liegen nur wenig ueber dem {sup 210}Pb-Normalgehalt (10-30 Bq). Mit einer

  14. Study of the physical processes involved in the operating mode of the micro-strips gas detector Micromegas; Analyse des phenomenes physiques lies au fonctionnement du detecteur gazeux a micropistes micromegas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barouch, G

    2001-04-01

    Micromegas is a micro-strip gaseous detector invented in 1996. It consists of two volumes of gas separated by a micro-mesh. The first volume of gas, 3 mm thick, is used to liberate ionization electrons from the incident charged particle. In the second volume, only 100 {mu}m thick, an avalanche phenomenon amplifies the electrons produced in the first volume. Strips printed on an insulating substrate collect the electrons from the avalanche. The geometrical configuration of Micromegas showed many advantages. The short anode-cathode distance combined with a high granularity provide high rate capabilities due to a fast collection of ions produced during the avalanche development. Moreover, the possibility to localize the avalanche with strips printed about every hundreds of micrometers allows to measure the position of the incident particle with a good resolution. In this work, experimental tests of Micromegas are presented along with detailed Monte Carlo simulations used to understand and optimize the detector's performances. The prototypes were tested several times at the PS accelerator at CERN. The analysis of the date showed a stable and efficient behavior of Micromegas combined with an excellent space resolution. In fact, spatial resolutions of less than 15 {mu}m were obtained. In parallel with the in-beam tests, several simulations have been developed in order to gain a better understanding of the detector's response. (author)

  15. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gatti, E. [Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milano (Italy)

    1992-12-31

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported.

  16. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gatti, E. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elletronica e Informazione, Piazza Leondardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    1995-07-10

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; (i) classical semiconductor diode detectors and (ii) semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Detector response artefacts in spectral reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Christensen, Erik D.; Khalil, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Energy resolved detectors are gaining traction as a tool to achieve better material contrast. K-edge imaging and tomography is an example of a method with high potential that has evolved on the capabilities of photon counting energy dispersive detectors. Border security is also beginning to see i...

  18. The Micromegas detector of the CAST experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P.; Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Delagnes, E.; de Oliveira, R.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer Ribas, E.; Franz, J.; Geralis, T.; Gros, M.; Giomataris, Y.; Irastorza, I.G.; Kousouris, K.; Morales, J.; Papaevangelou, T.; Ruz, J.; Zachariadou, K.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-01-01

    A low background Micromegas detector has been operating in the CAST experiment at CERN for the search of solar axions during the first phase of the experiment (2002-2004). The detector, made out of low radioactivity materials, operated efficiently and achieved a very low level of background rejection (5 x 10^-5 counts/keV/cm^2/s) without shielding.

  19. Simultaneous counting of α-, β(γ)-rays and thermal neutrons with phoswich detectors consisting of ZnS(Ag), 6Li-glass and/or NE102A scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Shigekazu

    1995-02-01

    Simultaneous counting of α-, β(including γ)-rays and thermal neutrons was realized by combining doubly or triply ZnS(Ag) film, NS8 6Li glass and/or NE102A plastic scintillators with or without Au Mylar (Au-coated Mylar films). The Au Mylar was used as an optical ND filter to discriminate thermal neutrons detected with the NS8 from α-rays detected with the ZnS(Ag) in pulse height by interposing behind the ZnS(Ag). The other discriminations were achieved by pulse shape analysis. Satisfactory discrimination among α-, β(γ)-rays and thermal neutrons was obtained with the ZnS(Ag)/Au Mylar/NS8 and ZnS(Ag)/NE102A/NS8 phoswiches. Discrimination characteristics of the devised phoswiches were described.

  20. The DELPHI Detector (DEtector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification)

    CERN Multimedia

    Crawley, B; Munich, K; Mckay, R; Matorras, F; Joram, C; Malychev, V; Behrmann, A; Van dam, P; Drees, J K; Stocchi, A; Adam, W; Booth, P; Bilenki, M; Rosenberg, E I; Morton, G; Rames, J; Hahn, S; Cosme, G; Ventura, L; Marco, J; Tortosa martinez, P; Monge silvestri, R; Moreno, S; Phillips, H; Alekseev, G; Boudinov, E; Martinez rivero, C; Gitarskiy, L; Davenport, M; De clercq, C; Firestone, A; Myagkov, A; Belous, K; Haider, S; Hamilton, K M; Lamsa, J; Rahmani, M H; Malek, A; Hughes, G J; Peralta, L; Carroll, L; Fuster verdu, J A; Cossutti, F; Gorn, L; Yi, J I; Bertrand, D; Myatt, G; Richard, F; Shapkin, M; Hahn, F; Ferrer soria, A; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Sekulin, R; Timmermans, J; Baillon, P

    2002-01-01

    % DELPHI The DELPHI Detector (Detector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification) \\\\ \\\\DELPHI is a general purpose detector for physics at LEP on and above the Z$^0$, offering three-dimensional information on curvature and energy deposition with fine spatial granularity as well as identification of leptons and hadrons over most of the solid angle. A superconducting coil provides a 1.2~T solenoidal field of high uniformity. Tracking relies on the silicon vertex detector, the inner detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the outer detector and forward drift chambers. Electromagnetic showers are measured in the barrel with high granularity by the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) and in the endcaps by $ 1 ^0 $~x~$ 1 ^0 $ projective towers composed of lead glass as active material and phototriode read-out. Hadron identification is provided mainly by liquid and gas Ring Imaging Counters (RICH). The instrumented magnet yoke serves for hadron calorimetry and as filter for muons, which are identified in t...

  1. Operation of sealed microstrip gas chambers at the ILL

    CERN Document Server

    Clergeau, J F; Feltin, D; Fischer, H E; Guérard, B; Hansen, T; Manzin, G; Oed, A; Palleau, P

    2001-01-01

    Microstrip Gas Counters (MSGCs) were introduced at the ILL as a response to the problem of fabricating the large area neutron detector of the D20 neutron powder diffractometer. This banana-like detector consists of 48 MSGCs, each comprising 32 counting cells. It was in operation during 18 months before being stopped due to the progressive deterioration of the anode strips. In order to increase its lifetime, significant modifications were introduced in the recently assembled new version. Another instrument, D4C, was recently equipped with a modular detector made of nine MSGCs, each of them in an individual gas vessel. Besides the unidimensional individual readout MSGC of D20 and D4C, the ILL has developed bidimensional MSGCs with a charge division readout. All these detectors employ sealed vessels containing a gas mixture at a pressure which can be as high as 15 bar, necessitating very clean conditions. This paper describes the experience acquired at the ILL in the fabrication and operation of these detectors.

  2. In matrix derivatization of trichloroethylene metabolites in human plasma with methyl chloroformate and their determination by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Jain, Rajeev; Varshney, Meenu; Ch, Ratnasekhar; Chauhan, Abhishek; Goyal, Sudhir Kumar; Khan, Haider A; Murthy, R C

    2013-04-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common industrial chemical that has been widely used as metal degreaser and for many industrial purposes. In humans, TCE is metabolized into dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trichloroethanol (TCOH). A simple and rapid method has been developed for the quantitative determination of TCE metabolites. The procedure involves the in situ derivatization of TCE metabolites with methyl chloroformate (MCF) directly in diluted plasma samples followed by extraction and analysis with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Factors which can influence the efficiency of derivatization such as amount of MCF and pyridine (PYR), ratio of water/methanol were optimized. The factors which can affect the extraction efficiencies of SPME were screened using 2(7-4) Placket-Burman Design (PBD). A central composite design (CCD) was then applied to further optimize the most significant factors for optimum SPME extraction. The optimum factors for the SPME extraction were found to be 562.5mg of NaCl, pH at 1 and an extraction time of 22 min. Recoveries and detection limits of all three analytes in plasma were found to be in the range of 92.69-97.55% and 0.036-0.068 μg mL(-1) of plasma, respectively. The correlation coefficients were found to be in the range of 0.990-0.995. The intra- and inter-day precisions for TCE metabolites were found to be in the range of 2.37-4.81% and 5.13-7.61%, respectively. The major advantage of this method is that MCF derivatization allows conversion of TCE metabolites into their methyl esters in very short time (≤30 s) at room temperature directly in the plasma samples, thus makes it a solventless analysis. The method developed was successfully applied to the plasma samples of humans exposed to TCE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternative particle identification techniques to Cherenkov detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnew, Neville, E-mail: n.harnew@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    Alternative particle identification methods to Cherenkov techniques are reviewed. Particular focus is given to recent advances in Transition Radiation Detectors (TRDs), improvements in dE/dx ionization loss by cluster counting, and Time of Flight (ToF) techniques. In each case several state of the art detectors are highlighted. For advances in ToF techniques, the status of fast photon detectors and electronics developments is summarized.

  4. A study of an optimal technological solution for the electronics of particle position sensitive gas detectors (multiwire proportional chambers); Etude d`une solution technologique optimale pour l`electronique de localisation des particules avec des detecteurs a gaz (chambre proportionelle multifils)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zojceski, Z. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work aims at optimizing the electronics for position sensitive gas detectors. The first part is a review of proportional chamber operation principles and presents the different possibilities for the architecture of the electronics. The second part involves electronic signal processing for best signal-to-noise ratio. We present a time-variant filter based on a second order base line restorer.It allows a simple pole-zero and tail cancellation at high counting rates. Also, various interpolating algorithms for cathode strip chambers have been studied. The last part reports the development of a complete electronic system, from the preamplifiers up to the readout and control interface, for the cathode strip chambers in the focal plane of the BBS Spectrometer at KVI, Holland. The system is based on application specific D-size VXI modules. In all modules, the 16-bit ADCs and FIFO memory are followed by a Digital Signal Processor, which performs data filtering and cathode induced charge interpolation. Very good analog noise performance is obtained in a multi-processor environment. (author). 127 refs.

  5. Fire detector response in aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, S. J.; Mckee, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Photoelectric, ionization, and gas sensors were used to detect the signatures from the radiant heat or flame of various aircraft materials. It was found that both ionization and photoelectric detectors are about equally capable of detecting products of pyrolysis and combustion of synthetic polymers, especially those containing fire-retardant additives. Ionization detectors alone appeared to be sensitive to combustion products of simple cellulosic materials. A gas sensor detector appeared to be insensitive to pyrolysis or combustion products of many of the materials.

  6. Particlc detectors. Foundations and applications; Teilchendetektoren. Grundlagen und Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolanoski, Hermann; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Interaction of particles with matter, motion of charge carriers in electric and magnetic fields, signal generation by moving charges, non-electronic detectors, gas-filled detectors, semiconductor detectors, track reconstruction and momentum measurement, photodetectors, Cherenkov detectors, transition-radiation detectors, scintillation detectors, particle identification, calorimeters, detection of cosmic particles, signal processing and noise, trigger and data acquisition systems. (HSI)

  7. The 4th Concept Detector for the ILC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzacane, A.

    2010-05-01

    The 4th Concept Detector is designed for high precision measurements of Physics processes accessible at ILC. It consists of four basic subsystems: a pixel vertex detector for high precision vertex definitions, impact parameter tagging and near-beam occupancy reduction; a cluster-counting low-mass drift chamber for robust pattern recognition with over 100 three-dimensional space-points each with about 55 μm resolution, 3.5% specific ionization measurement; a high precision dual-readout fiber calorimeter, complemented with an EM dual-readout crystal calorimeter, both with time-history readout, for the energy measurement of hadrons, jets, electrons, photons, missing momentum, and the tagging of muons; and, an iron-free dual-solenoid to return the flux and provide a second field region for the inverse direction bending of muons in a gas volume to achieve high acceptance and good muon momentum resolution. All four subsystems separately achieve the important scientific goal to be 2-to-10 times better than the already excellent LEP detectors, Aleph, Delphi, L3, and Opal. All four sub-detector will be described along with their performance and Physics capabilities obtained with full simulation studies.

  8. Bayesian analysis of energy and count rate data for detection of low count rate radioactive sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, John; Brandl, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    A particle counting and detection system is proposed that searches for elevated count rates in multiple energy regions simultaneously. The system analyzes time-interval data (e.g., time between counts), as this was shown to be a more sensitive technique for detecting low count rate sources compared to analyzing counts per unit interval (Luo et al. 2013). Two distinct versions of the detection system are developed. The first is intended for situations in which the sample is fixed and can be measured for an unlimited amount of time. The second version is intended to detect sources that are physically moving relative to the detector, such as a truck moving past a fixed roadside detector or a waste storage facility under an airplane. In both cases, the detection system is expected to be active indefinitely; i.e., it is an online detection system. Both versions of the multi-energy detection systems are compared to their respective gross count rate detection systems in terms of Type I and Type II error rates and sensitivity.

  9. Integrability detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-29

    Oct 29, 2015 ... Abstract. In this short review, we present some applications and historical facts about the integrability detectors: Painlevé analysis, singularity confinement and algebraic entropy.

  10. Automated differential leukocyte counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E; Nashed, A; Spilove, L

    1989-01-01

    Automated differential counts have the advantage of precision, efficiency, safety, and economy. They could potentially serve effectively in 90 percent of patients with normal counts or in 75 percent of patients with anemia only (64 percent of the total in this study). Even patients with increased white blood cell counts and major population shifts (toward granulocytes or lymphocytes) could be followed with automated differential counts. Such a tactic would decrease turnaround time for results, be less expensive, and reduce exposure of technologists to direct contact with patients' blood. However, presently available instruments fail to detect patients' blood samples with small numbers of abnormal cells, e.g., blasts in early relapse of acute leukemia, atypical lymphocytes in viral diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, eosinophils in allergic or parasitic disease, and band forms in early infectious diseases. Clinical judgment should be used in selectively ordering manual differential counts for these patients. While automated differential counts can be very useful in screening general medical and surgical patients in the ambulatory setting, in referral centers where hematologic abnormalities are more prevalent, the manual differential count and further examination of a smear is particularly necessary at least on initial presentation. Selective manual differential counts may improve efficiency, economy, and safety while not compromising patient care. Further studies of the correlation of clinical disease with automated differential counts are necessary.

  11. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  12. Additivity of detector responses of a portable direct-reading 10. 2 eV photoionization detector and a flame ionization gas chromatograph for atmospheres of multicomponent organics: use of PID/FID ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.N.; Hee, S.S.Q.; Clark, C.S.

    1987-05-01

    The H-Nu PI-101 with a photoionization detector (PID) of 10.2 eV and Century OVA-128 equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) were evaluated for the additivity of their responses to a defined mixtures of dissimilar organic vapors at a 0 and 90% relative humidity (RH). The responses of both instruments were additive as long as the effect of RH was accounted for the PID. The PI-101 was not as precise as the Century OVA-128 for 90% RH atmospheres. PID/FID ratios did not change in the presence of 90% RH as long as the effect of RH also was accounted for in the PID reading. The compounds investigated included: toluene, benzaldehyde; 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, methyl chloroform, methylene dichloride, methyl ethyl ketone, ethanol and acetonitrile.

  13. Timing Characterization of Helium-4 Fast Neutron Detector with EJ-309 Organic Liquid Scintillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yinong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors is being used in time-sensitive measurements, such time-of-flight and multiplicity counting. In this paper, a set of time aligned signals was acquired in a coincidence measurement using the Helium-4 gas detectors and EJ-309 liquid scintillators. The high-speed digitizer system is implanted with a trigger moving average window (MAW unit combing with its constant fraction discriminator (CFD feature. It can calculate a “time offset” to the timestamp value to get a higher resolution timestamp (up to 50 ps, which is better than the digitizer's time resolution (4 ns [1]. The digitized waveforms were saved to the computer hard drive and post processed with digital analysis code to determine the difference of their arrival times. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM of the Gaussian fit was used as to examine the resolution. For the cascade decay of Cobalt-60 (1.17 and 1.33 MeV, the first version of the Helium-4 detector with two Hamamatsu R580 photomultipliers (PMT installed at either end of the cylindrical gas chamber (20 cm in length and 4.4 cm in diameter has a time resolution which is about 3.139 ns FWHM. With improved knowledge of the timing performance, the Helium-4 scintillation detectors are excellent for neutron energy spectrometry applications requiring high temporal and energy resolutions.

  14. A multiwire proportional counter for very high counting rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A.F.; Guedes, G.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tamura, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pepe, I.M.; Oliveira, N.B. [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-01

    Preliminary measurements in a proportional counter with two independently counting wires showed that counting rates up to 10{sup 6} counts/s per wire can be reached without critical loss in the true versus measured linearity relation. Results obtained with a detector containing 30 active wires (2 mm pitch) are presented. To each wire is associated a fast pre-amplifier and a discriminator channel. Global counting rates in excess to 10{sup 7} events/s are reported. Data acquisition systems are described for 1D (real time) and 2D (off-line) position sensitive detection systems. (author) 13 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  16. Cross-Talk Characterization in Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting of Radioactive Waste Drums With Plastic Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simony, B.; Deyglun, C.; Pérot, B.; Carasco, C.; Saurel, N.; Colas, S.; Collot, J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on a numerical feasibility study of a passive neutron coincidence counting system for radioactive waste drums with plastic scintillators. The motivation is to replace 3He gas counters generally used for this type of measurement. Indeed, plastic scintillators present several advantages for the measurement of neutron coincidences such as a good efficiency for detecting fast neutrons, short detection time, and low cost comparatively to 3He. However, unlike 3He counters, their high sensitivity to gamma rays and cross talk constitutes a drawback as parasite random and true coincidences are detected together with the useful signal of plutonium. Simulations are performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX-PoliMi v2.0 coupled to data processing algorithms developed with ROOT data analysis software. Performances of the coincidence counting system are studied for the case of a vitrified waste drum containing Pu and 241Am, focusing particularly on multiplicity 1 and 2, i.e., 2 or 3 pulses recorded in a short time gate in different detectors. Cross talk induced by neutrons and gamma rays has been characterized in terms of time and distance between detectors, and strategies to limit this phenomenon are reported, consisting of ignoring neighboring detectors signal. A significant improvement of the Pu to 241Am ratio for multiplicity 2 coincidences has thus been obtained, at the expense of counting statistics. Alternative case studies with organic and metallic matrixes of technological wastes are also reported, for which the part of useful signal of plutonium is significantly higher, showing the feasibility of the measurement method.

  17. Development of high sensitivity radon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Y; Kajita, T; Tasaka, S; Hori, H; Nemoto, M; Okazawa, H

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity detectors for radon in air and in water have been developed. We use electrostatic collection and a PIN photodiode for these detectors. Calibration systems have been also constructed to obtain collection factors. As a result of the calibration study, the absolute humidity dependence of the radon detector for air is clearly observed in the region less than about 1.6 g/m sup 3. The calibration factors of the radon detector for air are 2.2+-0.2 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3) at 0.08 g/m sup 3 and 0.86+-0.06 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3) at 11 g/m sup 3. The calibration factor of the radon detector for water is 3.6+-0.5 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3). The background level of the radon detector for air is 2.4+-1.3 counts/day. As a result, one standard deviation excess of the signal above the background of the radon detector for air should be possible for 1.4 mBq/m sup 3 in a one-day measurement at 0.08 g/m sup 3.

  18. Detector system for the study of low energy heavy ion reactions using kinematic coincidence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhingan, Akhil; Kalkal, S.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Ahuja, R.; Gehlot, J.; Madhavan, N.; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics and performance of a new detector system developed for the study of low energy heavy ion binary reactions using the kinematic coincidence technique are presented. The detector system has been developed to carry out experiments such as multi-nucleon transfer reactions using the General Purpose Scattering Chamber (GPSC) facility at IUAC [1,2]. The detector system consists of a pair of two-dimensional position sensitive multi wire proportional counter (MWPC) and a ΔE - E gas ionization chamber. Both MWPC have an active area of 5×5 cm2, and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane, and timing signal for time of flight measurements. The main design feature of MWPC is the reduced wire pitch of 0.025 in. (0.635 mm) in all electrodes, giving uniform field and faster charge collection, and usage of 10 μm diameter in anode frame which gives higher gains. The position resolution of the detectors was determined to be 0.45 mm FWHM and time resolution was estimated to be 400 ps FWHM. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 100 kHz without any break down. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for kinematic coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass and angular distributions. The ionization chamber has a conventional transverse field geometry with segmented anode providing multiple ΔE signals for nuclear charge (Z) identification. This article describes systematic study of these detectors in terms of efficiency, count rate handling capability, time, position and energy resolution.

  19. Detector system for the study of low energy heavy ion reactions using kinematic coincidence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingan, Akhil, E-mail: akhil@iuac.res.in [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P. O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kalkal, S. [Deptartment of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, Delhi 110007 (India); Sugathan, P.; Golda, K.S.; Ahuja, R.; Gehlot, J.; Madhavan, N. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P. O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Behera, B.R. [Deptartment of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Mandal, S.K. [Deptartment of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics and performance of a new detector system developed for the study of low energy heavy ion binary reactions using the kinematic coincidence technique are presented. The detector system has been developed to carry out experiments such as multi-nucleon transfer reactions using the General Purpose Scattering Chamber (GPSC) facility at IUAC [1,2]. The detector system consists of a pair of two-dimensional position sensitive multi wire proportional counter (MWPC) and a ΔE−E gas ionization chamber. Both MWPC have an active area of 5×5 cm{sup 2}, and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane, and timing signal for time of flight measurements. The main design feature of MWPC is the reduced wire pitch of 0.025 in. (0.635 mm) in all electrodes, giving uniform field and faster charge collection, and usage of 10μm diameter in anode frame which gives higher gains. The position resolution of the detectors was determined to be 0.45 mm FWHM and time resolution was estimated to be 400 ps FWHM. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 100 kHz without any break down. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for kinematic coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass and angular distributions. The ionization chamber has a conventional transverse field geometry with segmented anode providing multiple ΔE signals for nuclear charge (Z) identification. This article describes systematic study of these detectors in terms of efficiency, count rate handling capability, time, position and energy resolution.

  20. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  1. Vapor Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  2. EcoCount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip P. Allen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Techniques that analyze biological remains from sediment sequences for environmental reconstructions are well established and widely used. Yet, identifying, counting, and recording biological evidence such as pollen grains remain a highly skilled, demanding, and time-consuming task. Standard procedure requires the classification and recording of between 300 and 500 pollen grains from each representative sample. Recording the data from a pollen count requires significant effort and focused resources from the palynologist. However, when an adaptation to the recording procedure is utilized, efficiency and time economy improve. We describe EcoCount, which represents a development in environmental data recording procedure. EcoCount is a voice activated fully customizable digital count sheet that allows the investigator to continuously interact with a field of view during the data recording. Continuous viewing allows the palynologist the opportunity to remain engaged with the essential task, identification, for longer, making pollen counting more efficient and economical. EcoCount is a versatile software package that can be used to record a variety of environmental evidence and can be installed onto different computer platforms, making the adoption by users and laboratories simple and inexpensive. The user-friendly format of EcoCount allows any novice to be competent and functional in a very short time.

  3. Measurement of 238U and 232Th in Petrol, Gas-oil and Lubricant Samples by Using Nuclear Track Detectors and Resulting Radiation Doses to the Skin of Mechanic Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misdaq, M A; Chaouqi, A; Ouguidi, J; Touti, R; Mortassim, A

    2015-10-01

    Workers in repair shops of vehicles (cars, buses, truck, etc.) clean carburetors, check fuel distribution, and perform oil changes and greasing. To explore the exposure pathway of (238)U and (232)Th and its decay products to the skin of mechanic workers, these radionuclides were measured inside petrol, gas-oil, and lubricant material samples by means of CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), and corresponding annual committed equivalent doses to skin were determined. The maximum total equivalent effective dose to skin due to the (238)U and (232)Th series from the application of different petrol, gas-oil, and lubricant samples by mechanic workers was found equal to 1.2 mSv y(-1) cm(-2).

  4. Performance of the micro-PIC gaseous area detector in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Ken'ichi; Ito, Kazuki; Okada, Yoko; Fujii, Kotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Takata, Masaki; Tanimori, Toru; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2009-03-01

    The application of a two-dimensional photon-counting detector based on a micro-pixel gas chamber (micro-PIC) to high-resolution small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and its performance, are reported. The micro-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector fabricated by printed circuit board technology. This article describes the performance of the micro-PIC in SAXS experiments at SPring-8. A dynamic range of >10(5) was obtained for X-ray scattering from a polystyrene sphere solution. A maximum counting rate of up to 5 MHz was observed with good linearity and without saturation. For a diffraction pattern of collagen, weak peaks were observed in the high-angle region in one accumulation of photons.

  5. Relationship of Ambient Atmosphere and Biological Aerosol Responses from a Fielded Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Bioanalytical Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, A

    2003-01-01

    .... A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry stand-alone bioaerosol system was interfaced to an aerosol concentrator to collect ambient background aerosols and produce bioanalytical...

  6. Microscopic Simulation of Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, Heinrich

    Detailed computer simulations are indispensable tools for the development and optimization of modern particle detectors. The interaction of particles with the sensitive medium, giving rise to ionization or excitation of atoms, is stochastic by its nature. The transport of the resulting photons and charge carriers, which eventually generate the observed signal, is also subject to statistical fluctuations. Together with the readout electronics, these processes - which are ultimately governed by the atomic cross-sections for the respective interactions - pose a fundamental limit to the achievable detector performance. Conventional methods for calculating electron drift lines based on macroscopic transport coefficients used to provide an adequate description for traditional gas-based particle detectors such as wire chambers. However, they are not suitable for small-scale devices such as micropattern gas detectors, which have significantly gained importance in recent years. In this thesis, a novel approach, bas...

  7. Photon counting arrays for AO wavefront sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Vallerga, J; McPhate, J; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan G; Siegmund, O; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Future wavefront sensors for AO on large telescopes will require a large number of pixels and must operate at high frame rates. Unfortunately for CCDs, there is a readout noise penalty for operating faster, and this noise can add up rather quickly when considering the number of pixels required for the extended shape of a sodium laser guide star observed with a large telescope. Imaging photon counting detectors have zero readout noise and many pixels, but have suffered in the past with low QE at the longer wavelengths (>500 nm). Recent developments in GaAs photocathode technology, CMOS ASIC readouts and FPGA processing electronics have resulted in noiseless WFS detector designs that are competitive with silicon array detectors, though at ~40% the QE of CCDs. We review noiseless array detectors and compare their centroiding performance with CCDs using the best available characteristics of each. We show that for sub-aperture binning of 6x6 and greater that noiseless detectors have a smaller centroid error at flu...

  8. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  9. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  10. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe ...

  11. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  12. Clean Hands Count

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  14. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also ... views 3:56 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  15. Clean Hands Count

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  16. White Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... smoking status. It is not uncommon for the elderly to fail to develop high WBC count ( leukocytosis ) ...

  17. Calorie count - fast food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000887.htm Calorie count - fast food To use the sharing features on this page, ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  18. Clean Hands Count

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  1. Reticulocyte Count Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain clinical conditions and in assessing iron deficiency anemia in children. Can the reticulocyte count be done on the ... Irwin, J. and Kirchner, J. (2001 October 15). Anemia in Children. American Family Physician [On-line journal]. Available online ...

  2. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  3. MS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  4. Emission detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bolozdynya, Alexander I

    2010-01-01

    After decades of research and development, emission detectors have recently become the most successful instrumentation used in modern fundamental experiments searching for cold dark matter, and are also considered for neutrino coherent scattering and magnetic momentum neutrino measurement. This book is the first monograph exclusively dedicated to emission detectors. Properties of two-phase working media based on noble gases, saturated hydrocarbon, ion crystals and semiconductors are reviewed.

  5. Detectors course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    This lecture series on detectors, will give a general, although somewhat compressed, introduction to particle interaction with matter and magnetic fields. Tracking detectors and calorimeters will also be covered as well as particle identification systems. The lectures will start out with a short review of particle interaction with fields and then we will discuss particle detection. At the end some common composite detection systems will be described.

  6. Damage track detectors in radioprotection dosimetry: A novel approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tommasino, L

    1999-01-01

    Limited sensitivity and unpredictable background are the major drawbacks of damage track detectors in the assessment of low neutron doses and low concentrations of alpha emitters in biological and environmental samples. The simplest way to increase the sensitivity of the damage track detectors is to increase both the exposure time and the detector area. However, the strong variability of the background may make this task often impossible. This background problem has been finally solved by a new registration method based on counting coincidence spots in geometrically matched pair of detectors. By using spark counting and electrochemical etching, both of which produce spots visible at low magnification, coincidences induced in two matched detector-surfaces by a few-microns-long tracks can be easily seen. This novel counting approach can be considered just the converse of those used in the past with Bi-fission detectors and cosmic ray stacks.

  7. Studies of the Effects of Oxygen and $CO_{2}$ Contamination of the Neon Gas Radiator on the Performance of the NA62 RICH Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00357178

    2011-01-01

    The NA62 RICH detector is used for the separation of pions and muons in the momentum range 15 -- 35 GeV/c and is expected to provide a muon suppression factor better than $10^{-2}$. A prototype of the final detector equipped with about 400 PMs (RICH-400 prototype) was built and tested in a dedicated run in 2009. The $\\pi-\\mu$ separation was tested, as well as the effect of the pollution of the neon radiator with different amounts of oxygen and CO_2. The $\\mu$ misidentification probability is about 0.7% and the time resolution better than 100 ps in the whole momentum range. We did not observe any absorption of the light due to the pollution of the radiator, however an effect on the ring radius is clearly observed due to the change of the change of the refractive index of the medium. The conclusion of the studies is that the amount of CO_2 in the final detector should be well known or the quality of the pion identification could be seriously compromised.

  8. First examination of CASCADE-X-ray-detector and measurement of neutron-mirrorneutron-oscillation; Erste Untersuchungen zum CASCADE-Roentgendetektor und Messung zur Neutron-Spiegelneutron-Oszillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, B.

    2007-02-07

    The detection of X-radiation is of utmost importance for both fundamental physics and medical diagnostics. This work investigates whether or not the CASCADE detector working principle, first developed for the detection of neutrons, can be adapted for the detection of X-rays. This modular detector concept combines the use of a solid neutron or X-ray converter with the advantages of a counting gas detector. Thus, it gives the possibility to optimize efficiency, dynamics and spatial resolution independently. Firstly, it is necessary to find a suitable converter material that allows for the best possible detector efficiency. In order to do so, a mathematical model of the complete detector system was developed that yields the total efficiency for any given material. Respecting technical constraints, gold and gadolinium showed to be favorable choices. Based on these theoretical considerations a prototype of a CASCADE X-ray detector was built, and measurements for the determination of this detector's efficiency were conducted. In the second part of this work a CASCADE neutron detector was used to conduct the first measurement the neutron-mirrorneutron oscillation time. Mirrormatter was proposed in 1956 by Lee and Yang to allow for symmetry in the description of the universe despite the existence of parity violation. By using neutrons it was possible to determine a lower limit for the oscillation time in this work. (orig.)

  9. Advanced Multilayer Composite Heavy-Oxide Scintillator Detectors for High Efficiency Fast Neutron Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryzhikov Vladimir D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and evaluated a new approach to fast neutron and neutron-gamma detection based on large-area multilayer composite heterogeneous detection media consisting of dispersed granules of small-crystalline scintillators contained in a transparent organic (plastic matrix. Layers of the composite material are alternated with layers of transparent plastic scintillator material serving as light guides. The resulting detection medium – designated as ZEBRA – serves as both an active neutron converter and a detection scintillator which is designed to detect both neutrons and gamma-quanta. The composite layers of the ZEBRA detector consist of small heavy-oxide scintillators in the form of granules of crystalline BGO, GSO, ZWO, PWO and other materials. We have produced and tested the ZEBRA detector of sizes 100x100x41 mm and greater, and determined that they have very high efficiency of fast neutron detection (up to 49% or greater, comparable to that which can be achieved by large sized heavy-oxide single crystals of about Ø40x80 cm3 volume. We have also studied the sensitivity variation to fast neutron detection by using different types of multilayer ZEBRA detectors of 100 cm2 surface area and 41 mm thickness (with a detector weight of about 1 kg and found it to be comparable to the sensitivity of a 3He-detector representing a total cross-section of about 2000 cm2 (with a weight of detector, including its plastic moderator, of about 120 kg. The measured count rate in response to a fast neutron source of 252Cf at 2 m for the ZEBRA-GSO detector of size 100x100x41 mm3 was 2.84 cps/ng, and this count rate can be doubled by increasing the detector height (and area up to 200x100 mm2. In summary, the ZEBRA detectors represent a new type of high efficiency and low cost solid-state neutron detector that can be used for stationary neutron/gamma portals. They may represent an interesting alternative to expensive, bulky gas counters based on 3He or

  10. Advanced Multilayer Composite Heavy-Oxide Scintillator Detectors for High Efficiency Fast Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Naydenov, Sergei V.; Pochet, Thierry; Onyshchenko, Gennadiy M.; Piven, Leonid A.; Smith, Craig F.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a new approach to fast neutron and neutron-gamma detection based on large-area multilayer composite heterogeneous detection media consisting of dispersed granules of small-crystalline scintillators contained in a transparent organic (plastic) matrix. Layers of the composite material are alternated with layers of transparent plastic scintillator material serving as light guides. The resulting detection medium - designated as ZEBRA - serves as both an active neutron converter and a detection scintillator which is designed to detect both neutrons and gamma-quanta. The composite layers of the ZEBRA detector consist of small heavy-oxide scintillators in the form of granules of crystalline BGO, GSO, ZWO, PWO and other materials. We have produced and tested the ZEBRA detector of sizes 100x100x41 mm and greater, and determined that they have very high efficiency of fast neutron detection (up to 49% or greater), comparable to that which can be achieved by large sized heavy-oxide single crystals of about Ø40x80 cm3 volume. We have also studied the sensitivity variation to fast neutron detection by using different types of multilayer ZEBRA detectors of 100 cm2 surface area and 41 mm thickness (with a detector weight of about 1 kg) and found it to be comparable to the sensitivity of a 3He-detector representing a total cross-section of about 2000 cm2 (with a weight of detector, including its plastic moderator, of about 120 kg). The measured count rate in response to a fast neutron source of 252Cf at 2 m for the ZEBRA-GSO detector of size 100x100x41 mm3 was 2.84 cps/ng, and this count rate can be doubled by increasing the detector height (and area) up to 200x100 mm2. In summary, the ZEBRA detectors represent a new type of high efficiency and low cost solid-state neutron detector that can be used for stationary neutron/gamma portals. They may represent an interesting alternative to expensive, bulky gas counters based on 3He or 10B neutron

  11. The LUCID-2 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pinfold, James; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUCID-2 detector is the main online and offline luminosity provider of the ATLAS experiment. It provides over 100 different luminosity measurements from different algorithms for each of the 2808/3546 filled/total LHC bunches. LUCID was entirely redesigned in preparation for LHC Run 2: both the detector and the electronics were upgraded in order to cope with the challenging conditions expected at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 TeV with only 25 ns bunch-spacing. While LUCID-1 used gas as a Cherenkov medium, the LUCID-2 detector is in a new unique way using the quartz windows of small photomultipliers as the Cherenkov medium. The main challenge for a luminometer is to keep the efficiency constant during years of data-taking. LUCID-2 is using an innovative calibration system based on radioactive 207 Bi sources deposited on the quartz window of the readout photomultipliers. This makes it possible to accurately monitor and control the gain of the photomultipliers so that the detector efficiency can be kept...

  12. The LUCID-2 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Soluk, Richard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUCID-2 detector is the main online and offline luminosity provider of the ATLAS experiment. It provides over 100 different luminosity measurements from different algorithms for each of the 2808 LHC bunches. LUCID was entirely redesigned in preparation for LHC Run 2: both the detector and the electronics were upgraded in order to cope with the challenging conditions expected at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 TeV with only 25 ns bunch-spacing. While LUCID-1 used gas as a Cherenkov medium, the LUCID-2 detector is in a new unique way using the quartz windows of small photomultipliers as the Cherenkov medium. The main challenge for a luminometer is to keep the efficiency constant during years of data-taking. LUCID-2 is using an innovative calibration system based on radioactive 207 Bi sources deposited on the quartz window of the readout photomultipliers. This makes it possible to accurately monitor and control the gain of the photomultipliers so that the detector efficiency can be kept stable at a perce...

  13. Improved fission neutron energy discrimination with {sup 4}He detectors through pulse filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ting, E-mail: ting.zhu@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Liang, Yinong; Rolison, Lucas; Barker, Cathleen; Lewis, Jason; Gokhale, Sasmit [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Chandra, Rico [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., Räffelstrasse 11, Zürich (Switzerland); Kiff, Scott [Sandia National Laboratories, CA (United States); Chung, Heejun [Korean Institute for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, 1534 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ray, Heather; Baciak, James E.; Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-11

    This paper presents experimental and computational techniques implemented for {sup 4}He gas scintillation detectors for induced fission neutron detection. Fission neutrons are produced when natural uranium samples are actively interrogated by 2.45 MeV deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction neutrons. Fission neutrons of energies greater than 2.45 MeV can be distinguished by their different scintillation pulse height spectra since {sup 4}He detectors retain incident fast neutron energy information. To enable the preferential detection of fast neutrons up to 10 MeV and suppress low-energy event counts, the detector photomultiplier gain is lowered and trigger threshold is increased. Pile-up and other unreliable events due to the interrogating neutron flux and background radiation are filtered out prior to the evaluation of pulse height spectra. With these problem-specific calibrations and data processing, the {sup 4}He detector's accuracy at discriminating fission neutrons up to 10 MeV is improved and verified with {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission neutrons. Given the {sup 4}He detector's ability to differentiate fast neutron sources, this proof-of-concept active-interrogation measurement demonstrates the potential of special nuclear materials detection using a {sup 4}He fast neutron detection system.

  14. MD456: Monitoring of abort gap population with diamond particle detectors at the BGI in IP 4

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In this MD, diamond based particle detectors (dBLM) were used for measuring showers of the beam interactions with the in the BGI induced neon gas. This setup was proposed in a feasibility study for using dBLMs at the BGI to measure the abort gap population by detecting the beam gas interactions. During the MD neon gas was induced in the BGI vacuum chamber to increase the interaction rate. Two nominal bunches were injected and accelerated up to 6.5 TeV. The measurements lasted for 140 minutes. The bunches could be clearly identified. But the resulting count rate of the beam gas interactions was a factor 70 lower than predicted by the feasibility study. In addition, a problem with the timing information lead to a widening of the histogram peaks.

  15. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Hatsui

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  16. Rainflow counting revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeker, H. [Deutsches Windenergie-Institut (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    As state of the art method the rainflow counting technique is presently applied everywhere in fatigue analysis. However, the author feels that the potential of the technique is not fully recognized in wind energy industries as it is used, most of the times, as a mere data reduction technique disregarding some of the inherent information of the rainflow counting results. The ideas described in the following aim at exploitation of this information and making it available for use in the design and verification process. (au)

  17. A mower detector to judge soil sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Johnson, N.R. [Thermo Nuclear Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Thermo Nuclear Services (TNS) has developed a mower detector as an inexpensive and fast means for deciding potential value of soil sorting for cleanup. It is a shielded detector box on wheels pushed over the ground (as a person mows grass) at 30 ft/min with gamma-ray counts recorded every 0.25 sec. It mirror images detection by the TNS transportable sorter system which conveys soil at 30 ft/min and toggles a gate to send soil on separate paths based on counts. The mower detector shows if contamination is variable and suitable for sorting, and by unique calibration sources, it indicates detection sensitivity. The mower detector has been used to characterize some soil at Department of Energy sites in New Jersey and South Carolina.

  18. P-type silicon drift detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, J.T.; Krieger, B.; Krofcheck, D.; O`Donnell, R.; Odyniec, G.; Partlan, M.D.; Wang, N.W.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary results on 16 CM{sup 2}, position-sensitive silicon drift detectors, fabricated for the first time on p-type silicon substrates, are presented. The detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested recently at LBL and show interesting properties which make them attractive for use in future physics experiments. A pulse count rate of approximately 8 {times} l0{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1} is demonstrated by the p-type silicon drift detectors. This count rate estimate is derived by measuring simultaneous tracks produced by a laser and photolithographic mask collimator that generates double tracks separated by 50 {mu}m to 1200 {mu}m. A new method of using ion-implanted polysilicon to produce precise valued bias resistors on the silicon drift detectors is also discussed.

  19. Calibration of pressure gauge for Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saponjic, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Solartron/Hamilton pressure gauges are used to monitor the gas pressure in the particle beam detectors installed in the experimental areas. Here is description of the test bench for the calibration of these gauges in Labview.

  20. Timepix, a 65k programmable pixel readout chip for arrival time, energy and/or photon counting measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Llopart, X; Campbell, M; Tlustos, L; Wong, W

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the readout of a TPC at the future linear collider is to use a CMOS pixel detector combined with some kind of gas gain grid. A first test using the photon counting chip Medipix2 with GEM or Micromegas demonstrated the feasibility of such an approach. Although this experiment demonstrated that single primary electrons could be detected the chip did not provide information on the arrival time of the electron in the sensitive gas volume nor did it give any indication of the quantity of charge detected. The Timepix chip uses an external clock with a frequency of up to 100 MHz as a time reference. Each pixel contains a preamplifier, a discriminator with hysteresis and 4-bit DAC for threshold adjustment, synchronization logic and a 14-bit counter with overflow control. Moreover, each pixel can be independently configured in one of four different modes: masked mode: pixel is off, counting mode: 1-count for each signal over threshold, TOT mode: the counter is incremented continuously as long as t...

  1. Low level counting from meteorites to neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Gerd

    2005-09-01

    The development in low level counting at Heidelberg with NaI(Tl) crystals, proportional counters and Germanium detectors is reviewed throughout the course of almost 40 years of experience. Research subjects changed from cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites to solar neutrinos and double beta decay. Driven by screening measurements for these rare event experiments, the sensitivity in single gamma counting has gained almost 3 orders of magnitude. With Ge spectrometry the μBq/kg range is now accessible. It is discussed how further improvements can be realized. There is potential to reach a sensitivity at the level of 10 to 100 nBq/kg for cryogenic liquid type Gespectroscopy, a technique which the next generation 76Ge double beta decay experiment GERDA is based on.

  2. Dual concentric crystal low energy photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmette, R.A.

    A photon detector for biological samples includes a block of NaI(T1) having a hole containing a thin walled cylinder of CsI(T1). At least three photo multiplier tubes are evenly spaced around the parameter of the block. Biological samples are placed within the hole, and emissions which are sensed by at least two of the photo multipliers from only the NaI(T1) detector are counted.

  3. What Counts as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a component of the Clean Hands Count campaign, which also aims to address myths and misperceptions ... views 3:56 Creative Communication - LifeBouy Hand Washing Campaign - Duration: 2:08. LIQVD ASIA 15,338 views ...

  5. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine whether platelet count, plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width. (PDW) and their ratios can predict mortality in hospitalised children. Methods: Children who died during hospital stay were the cases. Controls were age matched children admitted contempora- neously.

  6. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Music makes for happy holidays Loading... Even the scrooges ... smile at 3 free months of ad-free music with YouTube Red. Working... No thanks Try it ...

  7. What Counts as Prostitution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available What counts, or should count, as prostitution? In the criminal law today, prostitution is understood to involve the provision of sexual services in exchange for money or other benefits. But what exactly is a ‘sexual service’? And what exactly is the nature of the required ‘exchange’? The key to answering these questions is to recognize that how we choose to define prostitution will inevitably depend on why we believe one or more aspects of prostitution are wrong or harmful, or should be criminalized or otherwise deterred, in the first place. These judgements, in turn, will often depend on an assessment of the contested empirical evidence on which they rest. This article describes a variety of real-world contexts in which the ‘what counts as prostitution’ question has arisen, surveys a range of leading rationales for deterring prostitution, and demonstrates how the answer to the definition question depends on the answer to the normative question. The article concludes with some preliminary thoughts on how analogous questions about what should count as sexual conduct arise in the context of consensual offences such as adultery and incest, as well as non-consensual offences such as sexual assault.

  8. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in to report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Statistics Add translations 30,667 views 113 Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 114 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to ...

  9. A new life for the wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS): incorporation of a silicon drift detector into the WDS for improved quantification and X-ray mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhrer, R.; Moran, K.

    2018-01-01

    The wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) has been around for a long time and the design has not changed much since its original development. The electron microprobe operator using WDS has to be meticulous in monitoring items such as gas flow, gas purity, gas pressure, noise levels of baseline and window, gas flow proportional counter (GFPC) voltage levels, count rate suppression, anode wire contamination and other detector parameters. Recent development and improvements of silicon drift detectors (SDD’s) has allowed the incorporation of a SDD as the X-ray detector in place of the proportional counter (PC) and/or gas flow proportional counter (GFPC). This allows minimal mechanical alteration and no loss of movement range. The superiority of a WDS with a SDD, referred to as SD-WDS, is easily seen once in operation. The SD-WDS removes many artefacts including the worse of all high order diffraction, thus allowing more accurate analysis. The incorporation of the SDD has been found to improve the light and mid element range and consequently improving the detection limit for these elements. It is also possible to obtain much more reliable results at high count rates with almost no change in resolution, gain and zero-peak characteristics of the energy spectrum.

  10. Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh radiation environment at the LHC without severe compromises in performance. From these developments a number of different applications have spun off, most notably for biomedical imaging. Beyond hybrid pixels, a number of monolithic or semi-monolithic developments, which do not require complicated hybridization but come as single sensor/IC entities, have appeared and are currently developed to greater maturity. Most advanced in terms of maturity are so called CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels. The present state in the ...

  11. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, "Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors," Med. Phys. 37, 822-841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The constant covariance approximation

  12. Electronic detectors for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, A R; McMullan, G

    2011-08-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is an important tool for high-resolution structure determination in applications ranging from condensed matter to biology. Electronic detectors are now used in most applications in EM as they offer convenience and immediate feedback that is not possible with film or image plates. The earliest forms of electronic detector used routinely in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were charge coupled devices (CCDs) and for many applications these remain perfectly adequate. There are however applications, such as the study of radiation-sensitive biological samples, where film is still used and improved detectors would be of great value. The emphasis in this review is therefore on detectors for use in such applications. Two of the most promising candidates for improved detection are: monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) and hybrid pixel detectors (of which Medipix2 was chosen for this study). From the studies described in this review, a back-thinned MAPS detector appears well suited to replace film in for the study of radiation-sensitive samples at 300 keV, while Medipix2 is suited to use at lower energies and especially in situations with very low count rates. The performance of a detector depends on the energy of electrons to be recorded, which in turn is dependent on the application it is being used for; results are described for a wide range of electron energies ranging from 40 to 300 keV. The basic properties of detectors are discussed in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of spatial frequency.

  13. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  14. Speckle imaging with the PAPA detector. [Precision Analog Photon Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaliolios, C.; Nisenson, P.; Ebstein, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new 2-D photon-counting camera, the PAPA (precision analog photon address) detector has been built, tested, and used successfully for the acquisition of speckle imaging data. The camera has 512 x 512 pixels and operates at count rates of at least 200,000/sec. In this paper, technical details on the camera are presented and some of the laboratory and astronomical results are included which demonstrate the detector's capabilities.

  15. Precision measurements of gas refractivity by means of a Fabry-Perot interferometer illustrated by the monitoring of radiator refractivity in the DELPHI RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Filippas-Tassos, A; Fokitis, E; Maltezos, S; Patrinos, K

    2002-01-01

    With an updated, flexible, highly efficient and easily installed system we obtained accurate refractivity (n-1) values. This system is a refractometer based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer and was used to monitor the refractivity of DELPHI RICH Cherenkov radiators near the VUV region. By using a Pt-Ne spectral lamp and improved alignment and temperature control, the refractivities of C//5F//1//2 and C//4F//1 //0 have been monitored since 1996. With this light source, selected to have large coherence lengths, we can extract the refractivity at several wavelengths from one data set only. The estimated errors of the refractivity measurements are less than 1.2%, and depend on wavelength and the type of gas used. The various parameters affecting the accuracy of the refractometer are also discussed. Finally, results from special sample refractivity measurements of the liquid radiator (C//6F//1//4) in its gas phase, are presented.

  16. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  17. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  18. Mixture formation of direct gasoline injection engine. In cylinder gas sampling using fast response ionization detector; Tonai funsha gasoline engine no kongoki keisei. Kosoku FID ni yoru tonai gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, H.; Marubara, M.; Ota, N.; Kudo, H.; Yamamoto, H. [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Local mixture concentration near the spark plug of a direct gasoline injection engine was observed by a fast flame ionization detector. To ensure combustion stability and good fuel economy in DISC operation, the swirl ratio and the piston configuration were optimized. Swirl is needed to retain well-vaporized and stable mixture near the spark plug especially in light load. And adequate volume in piston cavity is required for trapping curved fuel spray in it. With these specifications, the fuel economy improvement of 13 to 30 % was realized. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  20. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  1. DAWN GRAND MAP VESTA GAMMA FE UNCORRECTED COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides tables of net counting rates of Fe gamma rays at 7.6 MeV measured by the BGO detector of Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector acquired at the...

  2. DAWN GRAND MAP VESTA GAMMA FE CORRECTED COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides tables of net counting rates of Fe gamma rays at 7.6 MeV measured by the BGO detector of Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector acquired at the...

  3. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinase, Sakae [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of {sup 137}Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for

  4. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  5. Measurement of ion beam angular distribution at different helium gas pressures in a plasma focus device by large-area polycarbonate detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M., E-mail: mortezahabibi@gmail.com; Ramezani, V. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Energy Engineering and Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The paper presents an experimental study and analysis of full helium ion density angular distributions in a 4-kJ plasma focus device (PFD) at pressures of 10, 15, 25, and 30 mbar using large-area polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) (15-cm etchable diameter) processed by 50-Hz-HV electrochemical etching (ECE). Helium ion track distributions at different pressures, in particular, at the main axis of the PFD are presented. Maximum ion track density of ~4.4 × 10{sup 4} tracks/cm{sup 2} was obtained in the PCTD placed 6 cm from the anode. The ion distributions for all pressures applied are ring-shaped, which is possibly due to the hollow cylindrical copper anode used. The large-area PCTD processed by ECE proves, at the present state-of-theart, a superior method for direct observation and analysis of ion distributions at a glance with minimum efforts and time. Some observations of the ion density distributions at different pressures are reported and discussed.

  6. UA1 prototype detector

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    Prototype of UA1 central detector inside a plexi tube. The UA1 experiment ran at CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron and made the Nobel Prize winning discovery of W and Z particles in 1983. The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was essentially a wire chamber - a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6...

  7. The MAC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaby, J.V.; Ash, W.W.; Band, H.R.; Baksay, L.A.; Blume, H.T.; Bosman, M.; Camporesi, T.; Chadwick, G.B.; Clearwater, S.H.; Coombes, R.W.; Delfino, M.C.; De Sangro, R.; Faissler, W.L.; Fernandez, E.; Ford, W.T.; Gettner, M.W.; Goderre, G.P.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Y.; Gottschalk, B.; Groom, D.E.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hurst, R.B.; Johnson, J.R.; Kaye, H.S.; Lau, K.H.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, H.Y.; Leedy, R.E.; Leung, S.P.; Lippi, I.; Loh, E.C.; Lynch, H.L.; Marini, A.; Marsh, J.S.; Maruyama, T.; Messner, R.L.; Meyer, O.A.; Michaloswki, S.J.; Morcos, S.; Moromisato, J.H.; Morse, R.M.; Moss, L.J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H.N.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Prepost, R.; Pyrlik, J.; Qi, N.; Read, A.L. Jr.; Rich, K.; Ritson, D.M.; Ronga, F.; Rosenberg, L.J.; Shambroom, W.D.; Sleeman, J.C.; Smith, J.G.; Venuti, J.P.; Verdini, P.G.; Goeler, E. von; Wald, H.B.; Weinstein, R.; Wiser, D.E.; Zdarko, R.W. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Dept. of Physics; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab.

    1989-09-01

    The MAC detector at PEP recorded data for an integrated luminosity of 335 pb{sup -1} between 1980 and 1986. The design of this low-cost MAgnetic Calorimeter was optimized for electron and muon identification, as well as for the measurement of hadronic energy flow. Muon identification is available over 96% of the solid angle, and MAC was the first detector to make large-scale use of gas-sampling calorimetry. Electromagnetic calorimetry in the central selection employs alternating layers of lead and proportional wire chambers (PWCs), and hadron and the remaining electromagnetic calorimetry is accomplished with iron plate and PWC layers. A relatively small central drift chamber in an axial magnetic field provides pattern recognition and modest momentum determination. An outer blanket of drift tubes completes the muon identification system. During the latter two years of operation an innovative 'soda straw' vertex chamber made more precise lifetime measurements possible. With an evolving trigger system and highly automated data acquisition system, this modest detector has exceeded most of its designers' expectations and has produced a gratifying spectrum of physics results. (orig.).

  8. Memory systems for signal generating photoelectric image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Digital systems are discussed which have the capacity to handle the large amounts of information contained in a typical image. It was used with a high gain pulse counting television camera tube, with a silicon target image detector and an analog to digital converter between the detector and the memory.

  9. Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Marsili, Francesco; Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Painter, Oskar J.; Shaw, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated WSi-based superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors coupled to SiNx waveguides with integrated ring resonators. This photonics platform enables the implementation of robust and efficient photon-counting detectors with fine spectral resolution near 1550 nm.

  10. Comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with fast-quadrupole mass spectrometry detector analysis of polar compounds extracted from the bio-oil from the pyrolysis of sawdust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jaderson K; da Cunha, Michele E; dos Santos, Anaí L; Maciel, Gabriela P S; Brasil, Márcia C; Pinho, Andrea R; Mendes, Fábio L; Jacques, Rosângela A; Caramão, Elina B

    2014-08-22

    In this paper it is studied the most polar fractions of bio-oil produced by fast pyrolysis of Lignocel BK40-90 (sawdust from forest timber). The biomass was submitted to the pyrolysis in an existing FCC pilot plant that was adapted for this procedure. The equipment consists of a fluidized bed reactor with nitrogen injection. The unit operates with continuous biomass feeding and continuous solids circulation. The produced bio-oil was submitted to an aqueous alkaline extraction, isolating the acidic compounds that were analyzed by one-dimensional gas chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with quadrupole mass spectrometry detection (qMS). One hundred and thirty compounds (mainly phenols and ketones) were tentatively identified in the extract, some of them by the use of retention indexes. The main differences between chromatographic techniques were the substantial increasing in the peak capacity of GC×GC and the resolution of some co-elutions that occurred in GC/qMS. It is also possible to conclude that this extract is rich in important raw materials for the chemical industry and can be used for this end. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The right to count does not always count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The best prescription against illness is learning to read and to count. People who are unable to count have a harder time learning to read. People who have difficulty counting make poorer decisions, are less able to combine information and are less likely to have a strategy for life...

  12. Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanvo, Kondo

    2017-09-01

    Gaseous detectors have played a pivotal role as tracking devices in the field of particle physics experiments for the last fifty years. Recent advances in photolithography and micro processing techniques have enabled the transition from Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and Drift Chambers to a new family of gaseous detectors refer to as Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs). MPGDs combine the basic gas amplification principle with micro-structure printed circuits to provide detectors with excellent spatial and time resolution, high rate capability, low material budget and high radiation tolerance. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEMs) is a well-established MPGD technology invented by F. Sauli at CERN in 1997 and deployed various high energy physics (HEP) and nuclear NP experiment for tracking systems of current and future NP experiments. GEM detector combines an exceptional high rate capability (1 MHz / mm2) and robustness against harsh radiation environment with excellent position and timing resolution performances. Recent breakthroughs over the past decade have allowed the possibility for large area GEMs, making them cost effective and high-performance detector candidates to play pivotal role in current and future particle physics experiments. After a brief introduction of the basic principle of GEM technology, I will give a brief overview of the GEM detectors used in particle physics experiments over the past decades and especially in the NP community at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). I will follow by a review of state of the art of the new GEM development for the next generation of colliders such as Electron Ion Collider (EIC) or High Luminosity LHC and future Nuclear Physics experiments. I will conclude with a presentation of the CERN-based RD51 collaboration established in 2008 and its major achievements regarding technological developments and applications of MPGDs.

  13. The MCP-based vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gevorkov, L G; CERN. Geneva; Laptev, V D; Patarakin, O O; Valiev, F F

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the possible application of large area microchannel plates (MCPs) as a basic Abstract: element of a vertex detector unit. Two types of basic modules : (MCP + Delay Line) and (MCP + Microstrips) are suggested. The proposal exploits unique MCPàs features i.e. fine granularity, high intrinsic gain, high counting rates, good performance in the presence of a magnetic field.

  14. CLIC inner detectors cooling simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, F.; Villarejo Bermudez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concepts require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sen- sors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detec- tor specifications. This note introduces a detector cooling strategy using dry air as a coolant and shows the results of computational fluid dynamics simulations used to validate the proposed strategy.

  15. LHCb Level-0 Trigger Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sarti, Alessio

    2006-01-01

    The calorimeter and muon systems are essential components to provide a trigger for the LHCb experiment. The calorimeter system comprises a scintillating pad detector and pre-shower, followed by electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. The calorimeter system allows photons, electrons and hadrons to be identified, and their energy to be measured. The muon system consists of five measuring stations equipped with Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and triple-Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, separated by iron filters. It allows the muons identification and transverse momentum measurement. The status of the two systems and their expected performance is presented.

  16. CalCOFI Egg Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish egg counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets], and...

  17. Analytical Method for the Detection of Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODC) in Commercial Products Using a Gas Chromatograph with an Electron Capture Detector (GC-ECD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Richard N.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Wright, Bob W.

    2008-08-01

    This document describes an analytical procedure that was developed for the trace level detection of residual ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) associated with the manufacture of selected commercial products. To ensure the United States meets it obligation under the Montreal Protocol, Congress enacted legislation in 1989 to impose an excise tax on electronic goods imported into the United States that were produced with banned chemicals. This procedure was developed to technically determine if residual ODC chemicals could be detected on electronic circuit boards. The analytical method utilizes a “purge and trap” technique followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection to capture and analyze the volatile chemicals associated with the matrix. The method describes the procedure, the hardware, operating conditions, calibration, and quality control measures in sufficient detail to allow the capability to be replicated. This document corresponds to internal Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) EFL-130A, Rev 4.

  18. Radiation detection of gas compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, C.D.; Wright, P.

    1981-10-27

    The invention relates to gas monitoring. Hitherto gas, such as flue gas has been analysed either by sampling and analysing the sample or by a spectrometer. However sampling is unreliable, and spectrography involves sensitive and expensive equipment needing extensive protection against vibration. In the invention, gas is monitored in situ by providing an infra red source and an infra red detector spaced across a gas flow, with a filter cell filled with the gas component to be monitored disposed between them. The detector detects radiation direct from the source and passing through the filter cell, and the outputs from the detector are fed to a differencing and dividing circuit to provide an output that is a function of the amount of monitored gas component in the gas flow.

  19. Design of a hybrid gas proportional counter with CdTe guard counters for sup 1 sup 4 C dating system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L; Hinamoto, N; Nakazawa, M; Yoshida, K

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays uniform, low-cost and large-size compound semiconductor detectors are available up to several square centimeters. We are trying to combine this technology with conventional gas detectors to upgrade an anticoincidence type proportional counter, Oeschger-type thin wall counter of 2.2 l, used for a sup 1 sup 4 C dating facility at the University of Tokyo. In order to increase the ratio of the signal to the background for smaller quantity of samples less than 1 g, an effective approach is to minimize the detector volume at higher gas pressure. However, the anticoincidence function suffers from such a small volume. Therefore we designed a new active wall gas counter of 0.13 l counting volume using CdTe compound semiconductor detectors as the wall of the gas proportional counter to perform anticoincidence. Simulation study showed that at noise thresholds less than 70 keV, the wall counters can reject above 99.8% of events arising from outer gamma rays. Measured noise levels of CdTe detectors were smaller t...

  20. Development and preliminary tests of resistive microdot and microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Peskov, V; Nappi, E; Martinengo, P; Oliveira, R; Pietropaolo, F; Picchi, P

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years our group have focused on developing various designs of spark-protected micropattern gaseous detectors featuring resistive electrodes instead of the traditional metallic ones: resistive microstrip counters, resistive GEM, resistive MICROMEGAS. These detectors combine in one design the best features of RPCs (spark-protection) and micropattern detectors (a high position resolution). In this paper we report the progress so far made in developing other types of resistive micropattern detectors: a microdot-microhole detector and a microgap-microstrip detector. The former detector is an optimal electron amplifier for some special designs of dual phase noble liquid TPCs, for example with a CsI photocathode immersed inside the noble liquid. Preliminary tests of such a detector, for the first time built and investigated, are reported in this paper. The latter detector is mainly orientated towards medical imaging applications such as X-ray scanners. However, we believe that after a proper gas opti...