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Sample records for costimulatory molecule b7-h3

  1. Relationship between co-stimulatory molecule B7-H3 expression and gastric carcinoma histology and prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Ping Wu; Jing-Ting Jiang; Min Tan; Yi-Bei Zhu; Mei Ji; Kuan-Feng Xu; Jie-Min Zhao; Guang-Bo Zhang; Xue-Guang Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of co-stimulatory molecule B7-H3 in gastric carcinoma and adenoma tissue as well as normal gastric tissue and to explore the relationship between B7-H3 expression and pathological features and prognosis of gastric carcinoma.METHODS: B7-H3 expression was detected in 102samples of human gastric carcinoma and 10 samples of gastric adenoma and 10 samples of normal gastric tissue by immunohistochemical assay. Correlation between the expression of B7-H3 and the patients'age, sex,gastric carcinoma locus, tumor size, tissue type, tumor infiltration depth, differentiation degree, lymph node metastasis, and survival time was analyzed.RESULTS: B7-H3 was expressed in all gastric adenoma samples and in 58.8% samples of gastric carcinoma.B7-H3 expression in gastric carcinoma samples was not related with the patients' age, sex, lymph node metastasis, and tumor size (P>0.05), but with the survival time, infiltration depth of tumor and tissue type.CONCLUSION: Detection of B7-H3 expression in gastric carcinoma tissue is beneficial to the judgment of the prognosis of gastric carcinoma patients and the choice of treatment.

  2. Clinical significance of costimulatory molecule B7-H3 expression on CD3+T cells in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Yong; SUN Jing; WANG Wei-peng; ZHANG Xue-guang; HUA Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background B7-H3 has been widely studied in the context of tumor progression in recent years,and behaves as a tumor cell marker in a variety of tumors including colorectal carcinoma.The mechanism of B7-H3 in tumor progression is complicated and not clear yet.Studies have revealed that B7 family molecules are expressed on infiltrated lymphocytes as well as tumor cells in tumor microenvironment,which indicates that different expression pattern may lead to different clinical outcomes.Methods The expression of B7-H3 was detected in tissues of 98 colorectal carcinoma patients by using immunohistochemistry.Then the expression of B7-H3 on CD3+ T lymphocytes isolated from fresh cancer tissues of 12 colorectal carcinoma patients was analyzed by flow cytometry assay.The relationship between the expression of B7-H3 on CD3+ T lymphocytes and patients' clinical pathological parameters was demonstrated with statistical analysis.Results Patients with more CD3+ T cell infiltration survived much longer than patients with less CD3+ T cell infiltration (P <0.05); B7-H3 was highly expressed by infiltrating CD3+ T lymphocytes in colorectal carcinoma tissues.The expression of B7-H3 was found to be significantly related with lymph node metastasis status (P <0.05),but not with the patient's gender,age,tumor size,differentiation degree,depth of tumor invasion,Dukes' stage,distant metastasis and whether or not mucinous adenocarcinoma was present (P >0.05).Moreover,the survival time of patients with low expression of B7-H3 was obviously longer than those of high B7-H3 expression patients,but the seven-year survival rate showed no difference between the high and low B7-H3 expression patients (P >0.05).Conclusion The negative costimulatory molecule B7-H3 on infiltrating CD3+ T lymphocytes in colorectal carcinoma bears importance in the clinical pathological progress and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma.

  3. [Expression and Subcellular Distribution of Costimulatory Molecules B7-H1,B7-H3 and B7-H4 in Human Hematologic Malignancy Cell Lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan-Fang; Zhu, Ming-Xia; Wan, Wen-Li; Li, Hai-Shen; Wu, Fei-Fei; Yan, Xin-Xing; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the expression and subcellular distribution of costimulatory molecules B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 in human hematologic malignancy cell lines. The expression and subcellular distribution of B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 in 13 human hematologic malignancy cell lines were determined by RT-PCR, qPCR, Western blot and flow cytometry, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB MNC) of 12 volunteers were used as control. The mRNA of B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 was widely expressed in PB MNC and hematologic malignancy cell lines, with a lower level of B7-H4. The mRNA expression of 3 molecules was highest in Maver, Z138, and HL-60, respectively, while among them the B7-H3 and B7-H4 had no expression in CZ1. The nuclear and cytoplasmic protein of 3 costimulatory molecules abnormally overexpressed only in hematologic malignancy cell lines, with the highest level in U937, Z138, and Raji, respectively, while the B7-H3 and B7-H4 had no expression in CZ1. There were differences among mRNA expression, nuclear and cytoplasmic protein expression of 3 molecules in cell lines derived from the same type of tumor, but the differences of expression in mRNA and protein levels were not exactly the same. The B7-H3 expression abundance in membrane localization was higher in U937, Maver and Z138, while the membrane protein of B7-H1 and B7-H4 had no or low expression in 13 cell lines. The mRNA expression of costimulatory molecules B7-H1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 can be widely detected. The protein level of 3 costimulatory molecules abnormally overexpressed only in hematologic malignancy cell lines, moreover the subcellular localizations mostly was found in nucleus and cytoplasm, while the membrane protein expresses in low level or had no expression. There are differences among the expression of 3 molecules in cell lines derived from the same type of tumor.

  4. Origination of New Immunological Functions in the Costimulatory Molecule B7-H3: The Role of Exon Duplication in Evolution of the Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Sun; Fengqing Fu; Wenchao Gu; Ruhong Yan; Guangbo Zhang; Zhiyong Shen; Yinghui Zhou; Han Wang; Bairong Shen; Xueguang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    B7-H3, a recently identified B7 family member, has different isoforms in human and mouse. Mouse B7-H3 gene has only one isoform (2IgB7-H3) with two Ig-like domains, whereas human B7-H3 has two isoforms (2IgB7-H3 and 4IgB7-H3). In this study a systematic genomic survey across various species from teleost fishes to mammals revealed that 4IgB7-H3 isoform also appeared in pigs, guinea pigs, cows, dogs, African elephants, pandas, megabats and higher primate animals, which resulted from tandem exon...

  5. Origination of new immunological functions in the costimulatory molecule B7-H3: the role of exon duplication in evolution of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Fu, Fengqing; Gu, Wenchao; Yan, Ruhong; Zhang, Guangbo; Shen, Zhiyong; Zhou, Yinghui; Wang, Han; Shen, Bairong; Zhang, Xueguang

    2011-01-01

    B7-H3, a recently identified B7 family member, has different isoforms in human and mouse. Mouse B7-H3 gene has only one isoform (2IgB7-H3) with two Ig-like domains, whereas human B7-H3 has two isoforms (2IgB7-H3 and 4IgB7-H3). In this study a systematic genomic survey across various species from teleost fishes to mammals revealed that 4IgB7-H3 isoform also appeared in pigs, guinea pigs, cows, dogs, African elephants, pandas, megabats and higher primate animals, which resulted from tandem exon duplication. Further sequence analysis indicated that this duplication generated a new conserved region in the first IgC domain, which might disable 4IgB7-H3 from releasing soluble form, while 2IgB7-H3 presented both membrane and soluble forms. Through three-dimensional (3D) structure modeling and fusion-protein binding assays, we discovered that the duplicated isoform had a different structure and might bind to another potential receptor on activated T cells. In T cell proliferation assay, human 2IgB7-H3 (h2IgB7-H3) and mouse B7-H3 (mB7-H3) both increased T cell proliferation and IL-2, IFN-γ production, whereas human 4IgB7-H3 (h4IgB7-H3) reduced cytokine production and T cell proliferation compared to control. Furthermore, both h2IgB7-H3 and mB7-H3 upregulated the function of lipopolysacharide (LPS)-activated monocyte in vitro. Taken together, our data implied that during the evolution of vertebrates, B7-H3 exon duplication contributed to the generation of a new 4IgB7-H3 isoform in many mammalian species, which have carried out distinct functions in the immune responses.

  6. B7-H3在小鼠角膜移植免疫赦免中的作用探讨%The role and mechanism of costimulatory molecule B7-H3 in the immune reaction of corneal transplantation in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明; 吴京; 黄晓环; 熊柯; 陈林江

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of B7-H3 in the immune reaction of corneal transplantation in mice Methods Experimental study.Thirty Corneas of C57BL/6 mice were orthotopically transplanted into the eyes of BALB/c mice,and graft survival was assessed on the basis of Sonoda's standard.When the RI grade was ≥2,rejection was acknowledged and brought into the rejected group(R),and the others into the accepted group(A) ; 8 BALB/c Corneas into their own eyes belonged to isografts(Ⅰ) ;In addition,8 normal BALB/c mice were the control group(C).At last,three eyes in each group(C,I,A,R groups) were used for HE staining and IHC of B7-H3,and there were five eyes in each group for qPCR to detect B7-H3 mRNA expression.Repeated-measures analysis of variance (factorial analysis) followed by LSD test were used for post hoc analysis for expression differences of B7-H3 mRNA between groups.Results There were 9 accepted grafts and 21 rejected grafts in 30 mice,and transplantation survival rate was 30% in the allograft group,while all grafts were transparent,and transplantation survival rate was 100% in the isografts.IHC results showed that B7-H3 was expressed on the corneal epithelium,endothelium and irisciliary body of both normal corneas and Isografts; B7-H3 expression increased in the accepted group and decreased in the rejected group.The results of qPCR conformed to the IHC ; Repeated-measures analysis of variance (factorial analysis) followed by LSD test were used for post hoc analysis for differences between groups(F =429.546).there was a low B7-H3 mRNA expression in the R group(3.89 ±0.037) and high expression in the A group (5.04 ± 0.058) ; and C (4.30 ± 0.023),I (4.33 ± 0.031) groups had no significant difference (P =0.387) ; But there was a significant difference between group R and C (P =0.003) or group A and C (P =0.001).Conclusion All above show that B7-H3 may play an important role in the maintenance of ocular immune privilege.%目的 探讨共刺激分子B7

  7. The Expression of B7-H3 Molecule in Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Saumya; Kurumathur, Arun; Talwar, Avaneendra; Kumar, Keerthana; Abraham, Teenu; Alagiri, Ananthi; Walaja, Gnanasagar; Clements, Jasmine

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: T cells have been shown to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. B7-H3, a costimulatory molecule, is found to be associated with regulation of T cell function in some tumoral tissues, as well as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of B7-H3 molecule in healthy and diseased gingival tissue samples. Materials and Method: Gingival samples were taken from 2 groups (A and B) representing periodontal health and periodontal disease, respectively. These were paraffinized and processed to carry out immunostaining to identify B7-H3 expression. The slides were then examined under light microscope to assess the positive staining in epithelium and connective tissue. The intensity of positive staining in epithelium and the number of positive cells in the connective tissue were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done using kappa analysis and independent t-test. Results: Kappa analysis revealed good inter-examiner agreement for both the groups (group A: 0.718; group B: 0.797). Intensity of staining in the epithelium ranged from intense to moderate for both the groups. In the connective tissue, there was a statistically insignificant decrease (p value= 0.415) in the number of positive cells from group A (mean labeling index: 50.28±26.09) to group B (mean labeling index= 41.37±25.29). Conclusion: B7-H3 molecule has been found to be expressed in gingival tissue samples; however, it showed a statistically insignificant decrease in periodontal disease group compared to healthy group. PMID:28293664

  8. The Expression of B7-H3 Molecule in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya John

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: T cells have been shown to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. B7-H3, a costimulatory molecule, is found to be associated with regulation of T cell function in some tumoral tissues, as well as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of B7-H3 molecule in healthy and diseased gingival tissue samples. Materials and Method: Gingival samples were taken from 2 groups (A and B representing periodontal health and periodontal disease, respectively. These were paraffinized and processed to carry out immunostaining to identify B7-H3 expression. The slides were then examined under light microscope to assess the positive staining in epithelium and connective tissue. The intensity of positive staining in epithelium and the number of positive cells in the connective tissue were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done using kappa analysis and independent t-test. Results: Kappa analysis revealed good inter-examiner agreement for both the groups (group A: 0.718; group B: 0.797. Intensity of staining in the epithelium ranged from intense to moderate for both the groups. In the connective tissue, there was a statistically insignificant decrease (p value= 0.415 in the number of positive cells from group A (mean labeling index: 50.28±26.09 to group B (mean labeling index= 41.37±25.29. Conclusion: B7-H3 molecule has been found to be expressed in gingival tissue samples; however, it showed a statistically insignificant decrease in periodontal disease group compared to healthy group.

  9. Expressions of costimulate molecules PD-L1, B7-H3 and B7-H4 in ovarian cancer and their significance%协同刺激分子PD-L1、B7-H3与B7-H4在卵巢癌中的表达及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 吴昌平; 蒋敬庭

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1,B7-H3 and B7-H4 can bind to the receptors of T cells,leading to the inhibition of the proliferation and overactivation of T cells.PD-L1,B7-H3 and B7-H4 play negative modulation in cellular immune response and have been confirmed to be closely associated with immunogenicity.These three molecules do not express in normal ovary tissue but express strongly in ovarian cancer tissue,which enable the three molecules to be new tumor markers for diagnosing primary ovarian epithelial cancer.These three molecules are assumed to function in occurring and malignant transferring of ovarian cancer,and are valuable for diagnosing ovarian cancer in early stage and targeting therapy.%协同刺激分子PD-L1、B7-H3与B7-H4可与T细胞及其受体结合并抑制T细胞的增殖和过度活化,在细胞免疫应答过程中起重要的调控作用,已被多项研究证明与肿瘤的免疫原性及肿瘤的发生、发展密切相关.这3种分子在正常卵巢组织中均不表达,而在卵巢癌组织中呈不同程度的高表达,它们可能在促进卵巢癌的发生、转变及病情进展过程中起重要作用,研究其作用机制对卵巢癌的早期诊断及靶向治疗有一定的意义.

  10. Assessment of plasma B7-H3 levels in pediatric patients with different degrees of surgical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yuan, Qing; Huang, Jie; Li, Yi Ping; Pan, Jian; Feng, Xing; Zhang, Xue Guang; Wang, Jiang Huai; Wang, Jian

    2016-07-26

    Surgical stress initiates a series of host hormone, metabolism and immune responses, which predominantly affect the homeostatic mechanism of patients with major surgery. B7-H3 is a co-stimulatory molecule and has been shown to participate in both adaptive and innate immune responses. In this study we evaluated the clinical significance of plasma B7-H3 levels in pediatric patients with different types of operation and degrees of surgical stress. A total of 48 children received pediatric general and cardiac surgery were recruited into this study. Based on the surgical stress scoring, children were divided into moderate stress (n = 14) and severe stress (n = 34) groups. Plasma B7-H3 levels were assessed at selected time points: before surgery, immediately after surgery, at day 1, day 3, and day 7 after surgery. Correlations between plasma B7-H3 levels and surgical stress scores were also examined. Plasma B7-H3 levels were significantly decreased in all 48 pediatric patients after surgery compared to the B7-H3 level before surgery (p stress group, but not in the moderate stress group, immediately after surgery and at day 3 after surgery (p stress group had significantly lower plasma B7-H3 levels than moderate stress group at day 1, day 3, and day 7 after surgery (p levels at day 1 (p = 0.01) and day 3 (p = 0.025) after surgery correlated negatively with surgical stress scores. Plasma B7-H3 levels were decreased significantly in children subjected to pediatric general and cardiac surgery, which is closely associated with the severity of surgical stress. The negative correlation of plasma B7-H3 levels at day 1 and day 3 after surgery with surgical stress scoring implicates that the plasma B7-H3 level might be a useful biomarker for monitoring stress intensity during pediatric surgery.

  11. B7-H3 expression in colorectal cancer: associations with clinicopathological parameters and patient outcome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported overexpression of the immunoregulatory protein B7-H3 in colorectal cancer and that nuclear expression predicted poor outcome in colon cancer patients. The present study was performed to examine the prognostic role of B7-H3 in an independent colorectal cancer cohort. Methods Using tissue microarrays from 731 colorectal cancer patients, tumour B7-H3 expression was ...

  12. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3-Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Wilson, Katheryne E; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T-cell coregulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor, and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an IHC analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients.

  13. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  14. The role of costimulatory molecules in directing the functional differentiation of alloreactive T helper cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, C N; Boenisch, O; Najafian, N

    2012-10-01

    Costimulatory molecules are a heterogenous group of cell surface molecules that act to amplify or counteract the initial activating signals provided to T cells from the T cell receptor following its interaction with an antigen/major histocompatibility complex, thereby influencing T cell differentiation and fate. Although costimulation was previously thought to be indispensable for T cell activation at all stages of development, it is now known that the requirements for costimulation, and the costimulatory molecules involved, vary according to the stage of T cell differentiation. The ability to influence T cell fate is of paramount interest in the field of transplantation as we seek therapeutic options that inhibit detrimental alloimmune responses whilst simultaneously promoting allograft tolerance. As with many immune mechanisms, there is a degree of functional overlap between certain costimulatory molecules, whereas some have diametrically opposite effects on different T cell subsets despite sharing common ligands. This is a critical point when considering these molecules as therapeutic targets in transplantation, as blockade of a costimulatory pathway, although desirable in itself, may prevent the ligation of an essential regulatory coinhibitory molecule. This review discusses the T helper cell lineages pertinent to transplantation and the costimulatory molecules involved in their differentiation. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. Expression of Costimulatory Molecules B7/CD28 in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡绍先; 陶德定; 何培根

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The expression of the costimulatory molecules B7/CD28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its relation to the pathogenesis of SLE were studied. The expression of the costimulatory molecules in PBMC in 30 patients with active SLE and 20 cases of healthy controls was detected by using the techniques of immunofluorescence and flow cytometer. The result showed that the expression percentage of CD28+ ,CD4+ CD28+ in T cells of PBMC from the patients with SLE decreased significantly as compared with that in healthy control group, while the expression percentage of CD80+ , CD19+ CD80+ in B cells was significantly increased than that in healthy control group (P<0.01). It suggested that the abnormal expression of costimulatory molecules B7/CD28 played a role in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  16. 可溶性B7-H3(sB7-H3)在急性白血病中的检测及临床意义%Detection and clinical significance of the soluble B7-H3 in acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海洪; 张光波; 史进方; 李淑湘; 顾文超; 石小蕊; 周迎会; 张学光

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To detect the different expression of soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) in acute leukemia and analyze the association between the sB7-H3 level and the classification of acute leukemia. Methods: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were used to measure the expression of sB7-H3 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 176 patients with acute leukemia. Classification of acute leukemia was accordance with the FAB (French-American-British) classification system. Results:There was significant difference between acute lymphocyte leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia ( AML,P = 0. 038 1) , which was the same as what in some human leukemia cell strains. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the subtypes of ALL, but in the CSF of patients with AML, the level of sB7-H3 was significantly different between M3 and M5 (P = 0. 024 3) , M4 and M5 (P = 0. 022 3) . Conclusion:The level of sB7-H3 is associated with the classification of acute leukemia. B7-H3 has a role in the immune system balance. It may be useful in clinical diagnosis as a new technique.%目的:检测sB7-H3在急性白血病病人脑脊液中的不同表达,以及分析该分子的表达与急性白血病的亚型的相关性.方法:采用ELISA的方法来检测sB7-H3在176位白血病病人脑脊液中的表达.依据国际公认的FAB (French-American-British)分类系统将急性白血病病人分型.结果:sB7-H3在急性淋系白血病与急性髓系白血病中的表达差异显著(P=0.0381),这与人白血病细胞株的检测结果一致;在急性淋系白血病的亚型中,sB7-H3的表达没有显著性差异;在急性髓系白血病的亚型中,sB7-H3的表达在M3与M5和M4与M5之间存在显著性差异(分别为P=0.024 3和P=0.022 3).结论:sB7-H3的表达与白血病的分型具有一定的相关性,同时也进一步证实B7-H3参与了人体免疫平衡的调节,可能会为今后急性白血病的临床诊断提供依据.

  17. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  18. Costimulatory Molecule CD28 Participates in the Process of Embryo Implantation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shangjing; He, Junlin; Chen, Xuemei; Ding, Yubin; Geng, Yanqing; Wu, Mengyun

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process requiring reciprocal interactions between implantation-competent blastocysts and receptive uteri. Accumulating literatures have indicated that T cells are involved in this process. The first signal mediated by T-cell receptor/CD3 complex and the second signal delivered by costimulatory molecules are essential for the differentiation of T cell into an effector cell. Expression and function of CD28, an important costimulatory molecule, during early pregnancy in mice is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of CD28 in mouse uterus during early pregnancy and pseudopregnancy by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We found that injection of the uterine horn with CD28 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides leads to a decreased number of implantation sites. The expression pattern of CD3 protein examined by IHC is similar to that of CD28. These findings suggest that CD28 participates in the process of embryo implantation in mice, which might play its role through delivering the second costimulatory signal. PMID:24336670

  19. Cytosine arabinoside induces costimulatory molecule expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecque, R; Saudemont, A; Quesnel, B

    2004-07-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells mainly by direct cytotoxicity, but they might also induce a stronger host immune response by causing the tumor to produce costimulatory cell surface molecules like CD80. We previously reported that in myeloid leukemic cells, gamma-irradiation induced CD80 expression. In this study, we show that cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), even at low doses, induced CD80 expression in vitro in mouse DA1-3b leukemic cells, by a mechanism that involved reactive oxygen species. In vivo experiments in the mouse DA1-3b/C3H whole-animal acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model showed that injection of Ara-C induced expression of CD80 and CD86, and decreased expression of B7-H1, indicating that chemotherapy can modify costimulatory molecule expression in vivo, in a way not necessarily observed in vitro. Mouse leukemic cells exposed in vivo to Ara-C were more susceptible to specific cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. Ara-C also induced CD80 or CD86 expression in 14 of 21 primary cultured human AML samples. In humans being treated for AML, induction chemotherapy increased CD86 expression in the leukemic cells. These findings indicate possible synergistic strategies between CTL-based immunotherapy and chemotherapy for treatment. They also suggest an additional mechanism by which chemotherapy can eradicate AML blasts.

  20. 4-1BBL-B7-H3基因对免疫重建重症联合免疫缺陷荷瘤鼠的抑瘤作用%Suppression of tumor growth induced by human 4-1BBL-B7-H3 gene in reconstructed immune function in severe combined immunodeficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬腊梅; 杨宏宇; 罗娟; 苏铭扬

    2014-01-01

    -immune reconstitution group (group D), had reconstructed human partial immune system. The control group (group A) was injected with Tca8113 cells. The Ad4-1BBL-B7-H3 group (group B) was injected with Tca8113 cells transfected by adenovirus containing 4-1BBL-B7-H3 gene. The empty vector group (group C) was injected with Tca8113 cells transfected by adenovirus containing an empty vector. The non-immune reconstitution group (group D) was injected with Tca8113 cells. The non-tumor group (group E) was injected with PBS. The tumor volumes in each group were measured weekly. Human IgG in blood was obtained through the tail vein and was determined by enzyme-linked immu-nosorbent assay. Human CD3+ and D56+ lymphocytes were assessed by flow cytometry. Model animals were killed on the ninth week. Differences in the expression of the natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in tumor tissues of each group were observed by im-munohistochemical method. 4-1BBL-B7-H3 gene expression in mice tumor tissues was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the expressions of major histocompatibility complex 1 class related molecule (M1C) A, M1CB, and TLR2 were detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Results The tumor volumes of group B were remarkably lower than those in the other groups (P<0.05). Human IgG and CD3+ and CD56+ lymphocytes were detected in the peripheral blood of immune-reconstituted mice. These lymphocytes were remarkably higher in group B than those in groups A, C, and E (P<0.05). Higher NKG2D and TLR2 expression were observed in group B tumor than those in the other groups. The stable expression of 4-1BBL-B7-H3 gene in group B was proven. The expression of M1CA, M1CB, and TLR2 were significantly higher in the group B tumor than those in groups A, C, and D (P<0.05). Conclusion The high 4-1BBL-B7-H3 gene expression in tumor tissues could successfully induce the proliferation of CD3+ and CD56+ lymphocytes. This expression can also

  1. Costimulatory molecule programmed death-1 in the cytotoxic response during chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Ramón Larrubia; Selma Benito-Martínez; Joaquín Miquel; Miryam Calvino; Eduardo Sanz-de-Villalobos; Trinidad Parra-Cid

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8~+ T cells play an important role in the resolution of HCV infection. Nevertheless, during chronic hepatitis C these cells lack their effector functions and fail to control the virus.HCV has developed several mechanisms to escape immune control. One of these strategies is the upregulation of negative co-stimulatory molecules such us programmed death-1 (PD-1). This molecule is upregulated on intrahepatic and peripheral HCV-specific cytotoxic T cells during acute and chronic phases of the disease, whereas PD-1 expression is low in resolved infection. PD-1 expressing HCV-specific CD8~+ T cells are exhausted with impairment of several effector mechanisms, such as: type-1 cytokine production, expansion ability after antigen encounter and cytotoxic ability. However, PD-1 associated exhaustion can be restored by blocking the interaction between PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1). After this blockade, HCV-specific CD8~+ T cells reacquire their functionality. Nevertheless,functional restoration depends on PD-1 expression level.High PD-1-expressing intrahepatic HCV-specific CD8~+ T cells do not restore their effector abilities after PD-1/ PD-L1 blockade. The mechanisms by which HCV is able to induce PD-1 up-regulation to escape immune control are unknown. Persistent TCR stimulation by a high level of HCV antigens could favour early PD-1 induction, but the interaction between HCV core protein and gC1q receptor could also participate in this process. The PD-1/PD-L1 pathway modulation could be a therapeutic strategy, in conjunction with the regulation of others co-stimulatory pathways, in order to restore immune response against HCV to succeed in clearing the infection.

  2. Kinetics of expression of costimulatory molecules and their ligands in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Navikas, V; Schaub, M;

    1998-01-01

    We studied the kinetics of expression of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). During the natural course of EAE, B7-2 expression in the CNS correlated with clinical signs, while B7-1 was exclu...

  3. Gene expression analysis of dendritic cells that prevent diabetes in NOD mice: analysis of chemokines and costimulatory molecules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morel, P.A.; Srinivas, M.; Turner, M.S.; Fuschiotti, P.; Munshi, R.; Bahar, I.; Feili-Hariri, M.; Ahrens, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that BM-derived DCs can prevent diabetes development and halt progression of insulitis in NOD mice, the mouse model of type 1 diabetes. The DC population that was most effective in this therapy had a mature phenotype, expressed high levels of costimulatory molecules,

  4. Human Recombinant B7-H3 Expressed in E.coli Enhances T Lymphocyte Proliferation and IL-10 Secretion in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Bo ZHANG; Yong-Jing CHEN; Qin SHI; Hong-Bing MA; Yan GE; Qin WANG; Zhi JIANG; Ying XU; Xue-Guang ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    To explore the biofunctions of human B7-H3 on activated T lymphocyte,the gene of human B7-H3 encoding the extracellular region (IgV-like and IgC-like domains) was obtained by RT-PCR from human lung cells and subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-5X-3 to express glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein.A 49 kD fusion protein (named as GST/hB7-H3 hereafter) was induced by IPTG and purified by standard methods reported in prokaryotic system.In the presence of the first signal imitated by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody,T lymphocyte proliferation was observed by incubating purified T cells with soluble GST/hB7-H3 fusion protein by MTT assay.The concentrations of IFN-γ and IL-10 in the supernatants of T cells were determined by ELISA.The results showed that the GST/hB7-H3 protein produced in bacteria had modest biological activities to proliferate the T lymphocyte and enhance IFN-γ as well as IL-10 secretion.

  5. Alterations in lymphocyte subset patterns and co-stimulatory molecules in patients with Alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Shou-ru; XU Dong-hua; YANG Xin-xin; DONG Wan-li

    2009-01-01

    @@ Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain.1 More evidence of inflammatory parameters, such as, complement factors, proinflammatory cytokines and lymphocytes has been found to be co-localized with Aβ plaques,1,2 The research in the past decades has demonstrated abnormalities of both the humoral and cellular immune responses, suggesting an association of immunological aberration and AD. The total percentage of lymphocytes was not found to be altered, whereas the alterations of T-cell function, differentiation and subset distribution have still been unresolved.3,4 A significantly decreased function of suppressor as well as helper T-cells and natural killer (NK) cells in AD patients has been observed. Studies on lymphocyte subpopulations showed conflicting results, while other studies could not find alterations in lymphocyte subset distribution. In the present study, we assume the immune system dysregulation depending on a defective immune response which also affects lymphocyte differentiation and subset distribution. We investigated T lymphocyte subset pattems and co-stimulatory molecules, as well as B lymphocytes and NK cells in peripheral blood of AD patients and age matched healthy controls.

  6. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, J; Yuan, J; Chandrakar, A; Iacomini, J

    2015-09-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25(low) Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3(+) , CD25(high) , CD4(+) Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3(+) CD25(low) CD4(+) T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance.

  7. 转染B7-H3基因对前列腺癌细胞摄取18F-FDG和18F-FLT的影响%Gene Transfection B7-H3 to Prostate Cancer Cells to Absorb the Influence of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹宇; 王伟群; 李玥; 黄校青; 辛华

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze transfection B7-H3 gene of prostate cancer cells to absorb 18f -18f-FDG and the influence of FLT.Methods RM1 detection source sex of the rat prostate cancer cells and RM1-B7-H3 cells after different periods of absorbance (A) value, different concentration of sugar, cell number and time under the condition of intake, and to the cells of RM1 RM1-B7-H3 cells of 18F-FDG uptake rate calculation, comparison, in cell number 1 ×106,100 min of reaction under conditions of 18F-PLT intake experiments, and to add 4 h7 resistance of B7-H3 cells after 18 F-FDG uptake rate were determined.Results RM1-B7-H3 cells 1d,2d,3d A value higher than RMl cells (P0.05).Conclusion Transfection B7-H3 gene can improve the cell 18F-FDG and 18F-the PLT intake rate, its metabolism and prolif-eration of prostate cancer cells have promoting effect, add 4 h7 after single resistance, RM1-B7-H3 cells of 18F-FDG uptake rate decreased.%目的:分析转染B7-H3基因对前列腺癌细胞摄取18F-FDG和18F-FLT的影响。方法检测鼠源性前列腺癌RM1细胞和RM1-B7-H3细胞培养后不同时间段的吸光度(A)值,不同糖浓度、不同细胞数、不同摄取时间的条件下,对RM1细胞和RM1-B7-H3细胞的18F-FDG摄取率进行计算、比较,在细胞数1×106、反应100min的条件下行进行18F-FLT摄取实验,并对加入4H7单抗后的B7-H3细胞的18F-FDG摄取率进行测定。结果 RM1-B7-H3细胞培养1d、2d、3d的A值高于RMl细胞(P<0.05);随培养基糖浓度的增加,RM1细胞和RM1-B7-H3细胞18F-FDG摄取率逐渐降低,而随摄取时间、细胞数的增加有所升高;RM1和RM1-B7-H3细胞18F-FLT摄取率的对比差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);B组18F-FDG摄取率较A组低(P<0.05),与C组对比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论转染B7-H3基因可提高细胞18F-FDG和18F-FLT的摄取率,其对前列腺癌细胞的代谢和增殖具有促进作用,加入4H7单抗后,RM1-B7-H3

  8. Expression and induction of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on acute myeloid leukemic cells: implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, R E; Zwinderman, K H; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H

    2000-02-01

    Previously, we observed an increased recognition of malignant cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) when the target cells were cultured in vitro for 24 hours. In this study, we analyzed the expression of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and determined whether 24-hour culture of the cells was associated with upregulation of these molecules. We analyzed whether this incubation period improved recognition of AML cells by CTL. Expression of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on leukemic blasts of 34 patients comprising each AML FAB subclassification were analyzed directly and after 24 hours of culture, and the recognition of these AML cells by an HLA-A2 restricted CTL clone was determined. Blocking studies were performed with antibodies against CD54, CD58, and CD11a. Immunophenotyping showed a low expression of CD80 and CD40 and a variable CD86 expression on most AML cells. CD54 expression was generally low, CD58 expression was high, and CD11a expression was variable, with a higher expression in AML M0, M1, M4, and M5. Twenty-four hours of culture resulted in a significant upregulation of CD40, CD54, and CD58. Impaired recognition of AML cells by the HLA-A2 restricted CTL clone was enhanced 100-200% by 24 hours of preincubation of the leukemic cells. Blocking studies showed the importance of multiple adhesion molecules on the AML cells. Low expression of multiple costimulatory and adhesion molecules on AML could be upregulated by 24 hours of culture, which was associated with increased recognition of the AML blasts by CTL. Blocking multiple adhesion molecules completely abolished CTL recognition, showing the importance of the combination of these molecules for T-cell interaction with AML.

  9. Differential expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86, CD28, CD152 and PD-1 correlates with the host-parasite outcome in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Palermo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a spectral disease exhibiting two polar sides, namely, lepromatous leprosy (LL characterised by impaired T-cell responses and tuberculoid leprosy in which T-cell responses are strong. Proper T-cell activation requires signalling through costimulatory molecules expressed by antigen presenting cells and their ligands on T-cells. We studied the influence of costimulatory molecules on the immune responses of subjects along the leprosy spectrum. The expression of the costimulatory molecules was evaluated in in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of lepromatous and tuberculoid patients and healthy exposed individuals (contacts. We show that LL patients have defective monocyte CD86 expression, which likely contributes to the impairment of the antigen presentation process and to patients anergy. Accordingly, CD86 but not CD80 blockade inhibited the lymphoproliferative response to Mycobacterium leprae. Consistent with the LL anergy, there was reduced expression of the positive signalling costimulatory molecules CD28 and CD86 on the T-cells in these patients. In contrast, tuberculoid leprosy patients displayed increased expression of the negative signalling molecules CD152 and programmed death-1 (PD-1, which represents a probable means of modulating an exacerbated immune response and avoiding immunopathology. Notably, the contacts exhibited proper CD86 and CD28 expression but not exacerbated CD152 or PD-1 expression, suggesting that they tend to develop a balanced immunity without requiring immunosuppressive costimulatory signalling.

  10. Decreased Expression of T-Cell Costimulatory Molecule CD28 on CD4 and CD8 T Cells of Mexican Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Bernal-Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with tuberculosis frequently develop anergy, a state of T-cell hyporesponsiveness in which defective T-cell costimulation could be a factor. To know if the expression of T-cell costimulatory molecules was altered in tuberculosis, we analyzed the peripheral blood T-cell phenotype of 23 Mexican patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. There was severe CD4 (P<.001 and CD8 (P<.01 lymphopenia and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD30 on CD4 and CD8 T cells (P<.05; this increase was higher in relapsing tuberculosis. The main finding was severe downregulation of the major costimulatory molecule CD28 on both CD8 and CD4 T cells (P<.001. Depletion of the CD4/CD28 subset, a hitherto undescribed finding, is relevant because CD4 T cells constitute the main arm of the cell-mediated antimycobacterial immune response.

  11. Inhibiting the expression of CD28 costimulatory molecule on human lymphocytes by special siRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Kai-lin; ZHANG Ying; PAN Xiu-ying; LU Qun-xian

    2005-01-01

    Background The B7/CD28 pathway provides critical costimulatory signals for complete T cell activation, and members of this pathway have served as useful targets for immunotherapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated the RNA interference (RNAi) effect induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting CD28 mRNA on human lymphocytes and its specificity.Methods According to CD28 gene sequence, we designed and synthysized three different siRNAs (siRNA-1, siRNA-2, siRNA-3) containing 21 bases using SilencerTM siRNA construction kit. These siRNAs were transfected into freshly isolated human lymphocytes with Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. At 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour post transfection, these cells were collected and analyzed. The changes of surface expression of CD28 gene were detected by flow cytometry, and the changes of CD28 mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cell viability of transfected lymphocytes was determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Results Three siRNAs (siRNA-1, siRNA-2, siRNA-3) specifically targeting CD28 mRNA were successfully designed and constructed. Flow cytometry analysis showed that a decrease in CD28 expression was detectable at 24-hour post transfection. Different siRNA showed different inhibition effects on CD28 expression. At 48-hour post transfection, the degrees of reduction with siRNA-1, siRNA-2 and siRNA-3 were 22.10%±1.63%, 73.50%±1.02% and 42.90%±0.89% respectively compared with the control (P0.05). Moreover, lymphocytes treated with siRNA-co showed no marked reduction in CD28 expression (5.07%±0.96%) (P>0.05). The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay indicated CD28 mRNA level was inhibited after transfection of specific siRNAs. At least 4-fold of reduction in siRNA-2 group occurred at 48-hour post transfection compared with the control (P0.05). Conclusions Three different siRNAs were

  12. Interleukin 20 regulates dendritic cell migration and expression of co-stimulatory molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Rikke; Jalilian, Babak; Agger, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    , but not the STAT3, pathway. IL-20 increased the migration of MDDCs in a biphasic response narrowly controlled by the interleukin concentration. A concomitant change in the shedding of CD18 integrins suggested that these adhesion molecules play a role in the migration of the MDDCs through the extracellular matrix...

  13. Monocytes/macrophages infected with Toxoplasma gondii do not increase co-stimulatory molecules while maintaining their migratory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, Daniele; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia Lima; Barcelos, Michelle Willmen; Ramalho, André Villaça; Kanashiro, Milton M; Kipnis, Thereza Liberman; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Veto

    2009-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells and use them for dispersal throughout the body, but the activation state of those cells is unknown. We investigated the ability of human and murine cells from monocytic/macrophage lineages that had not previously been exposed to inflammatory cytokines to up-regulate co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules upon infection. Toxoplasma gondii-infected human monocytes (freshly isolated and THP1 lineage) were unable to up-regulate CD86, CD83, CD40 or CD1a. CD80 expression increased in infected cells but expression of l-selectin and beta2 integrin was unaltered. We evaluated the ability of infected macrophages from wild type C57/BL/6 or CD14(-/-) mice to migrate in 8 mum transwells. Infected cells from CD14(-/-) mice were more likely to de-adhere than infected cells from wild type mice but they did not show any increase in migratory ability. The non-stimulatory profile of these infected cells may contribute to parasite spread throughout the lymphatic circulation in the initial phases of infection.

  14. Cloning, Structural Organization and Chromosomal Mapping of Rat Costimulatory Molecule 4-1BBL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ming DONG; Xue-Guang ZHANG; Li-Jie MA; Guang-Bo ZHANG; Ya-Fang WU; Jia-Yao SHEN; Ying CHEN; Yong-Jing CHEN; Xiang-Ke PU; Sai-Yu HANG

    2005-01-01

    4-1BBL (TNFSF9) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand superfamily, which is expressed on some activated antigen presenting cells and B cells. We isolated a rat cDNA clone encoding the rat homologue of the human 4-1BBL (GenBank accession No. AY259541). The deduced rat 4-1BBL protein, consisting of 308 amino acids with a molecular weight of 33,469 Da, was a typical type Ⅱ transmembrane glycoprotein, the same as human and murine 4-1BBL. "SDAA" in the cytoplasmic domain of rat 4-1BBL was deduced to act as the phosphorylation site for casein kinase I ("SXXS" motif), which is present in the cytoplasmic domains of human and murine 4-1BBL, and all other TNF ligand family members known to utilize reverse signaling. The two introns of 4-1BBL were also cloned (GenBank accession No.AY332409). Rat 4-1BBL is much more homologous with murine 4-1BBL than with human 4-1BBL, in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Rat 4-1BBL was expressed in all tested tissues: brain, lung, colon, liver,thymus, testicle, kidney, adrenal, stomach, spleen and heart. The chromosomal location of rat 4-1BBL was first identified by bioinformatics, then by fluorescence in situ hybridization at 9q11 (GenBank accession UniGene No. Rn.46783). Rat, murine and human 4-1BBL genes are evolved from a common gene. The identification and characterization of the rat counterpart of human 4-1BBL will facilitate studies of the biological function of this molecule.

  15. Soluble ions more than particulate cobalt-alloy implant debris induce monocyte costimulatory molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines critical to metal-induced lymphocyte reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Marco S; Pennekamp, Peter H; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua J; Hallab, Nadim J

    2010-06-15

    Aseptic osteolysis has been associated with excessive immune reactivity to particulate implant debris; however, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that underlie implant debris reactivity remain incompletely understood. Although particulate debris has been implicated as the major type of implant debris mediating macrophage-induced osteolysis, the degree to which metal ions affect a proinflammatory response (if at all) remains unknown. We hypothesized that both soluble and particulate metal implant debris will induce proinflammatory responses in human monocytes resulting in cytokine production and elevated expression of T cell costimulatory molecules, facilitating adaptive immune responses. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the response of a human monocyte cell line (THP-1), isolated primary human monocytes and PBMCs challenged with Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles and soluble cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, and nickel ions. Our results indicate that soluble cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum can induce monocyte up-regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, ICAM-1) in human monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, cobalt, molybdenum ions, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles similarly induce elevated secretion of IL-1beta, TNFalpha, and IL-6. Antibody blockade of CD80 and CD86, crucial secondary molecules for adaptive responses, abrogated lymphocyte reactivity to metal challenge in metal reactive subjects. Also the addition of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), (which indirectly blocks pro-IL-1beta and thus IL-1beta release), significantly reduced lymphocyte reactivity in metal-reactive subjects. Thus, both soluble and particulate metal implant debris induce monocyte/macrophage proinflammatory responses that are metal and individual specific. This suggests metal-induced up-regulation of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokine production is necessary to induce lymphocyte activation/proliferation to metal implant debris.

  16. Sequential expression of adhesion and costimulatory molecules in graft-versus-host disease target organs after murine bone marrow transplantation across minor histocompatibility antigen barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyrich, Matthias; Burger, Gudrun; Marquardt, Katja; Budach, Wilfried; Schilbach, Karin; Niethammer, Dietrich; Schlegel, Paul G

    2005-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a potentially fatal complication after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, few data exist thus far on the molecular signals governing leukocyte trafficking during the disease. We therefore investigated the sequential pattern of distinct adhesion, costimulatory, and apoptosis-related molecules in GVHD organs (ileum, colon, skin, and liver) after transplantation across minor histocompatibility barriers (B10.D2 --> BALB/c, both H-2d). To distinguish changes induced by the conditioning regimen from effects achieved by allogeneic cell transfer, syngeneic transplant recipients (BALB/c --> BALB/c) and irradiated nontransplanted mice were added as controls. Irradiation upregulated the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-l, and B7-2 in ileum, as well as VCAM-1 and B7-2 in colon, on day 3 in all animals. Whereas in syngeneic mice these effects were reversed from day 9 on, allogeneic recipients showed further upregulation of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, B7-1, and B7-2 in these organs on day 22, when GVHD became clinically evident. Infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ donor T cells was noted on day 9 in skin and liver and on day 22 in ileum and colon. Surprisingly, the expression of several other adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-2, platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, E-selectin, and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1, did not change. Proapoptotic and antiapoptotic markers were balanced in GVHD organs with the exception of spleen, in which a preferential expression of the proapoptotic Bax could be noted. Our results indicate that irradiation-induced upregulation of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and B7-2 provides early costimulatory signals to incoming donor T cells in the intestine, followed by a cascade of proinflammatory signals in other organs once the alloresponse is established.

  17. Suppressive effects of anti-allergic agent suplatast tosilate (IPD-1151T on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on mouse splenocytes in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Kurokawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of IPD-1151T on the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80 and CD86, were investigated in vivo using mice with allergic disorders. BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with two doses of dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP-OVA at 1-week intervals. These mice then were treated intraperitoneally with 100μg/kg of IPD1151T once a day for 14 days, starting 7 days after the first immunization. On day 21, some mice were challenged intraperitoneally with DNP-OVA and the other mice were not challenged. All mice were autopsied on day 22 and assayed for immunoglobulin E, interleuken (IL-4 and IL-5 productions following DNP-OVA immunization. The intraperitoneal treatment with IPD-1151T strongly suppressed immunoglobulin E contents in serum, which were enhanced by DNA-OVA immunization. IPD-1151T also caused a decrease in both IL-4 and IL-5 levels in splenic lymphocytes. We next examined the influence of IPD1151T on co-stimulatory molecule expression on splenic lymphocytes. IPD-1151T caused suppression of CD40 and CD86 expression; however, the treatments did not affect CD80 expression.

  18. Effect of Chronic Uremia on the Cell Surface Expression of B7 Family Costimulatory Molecules in an HLA-A2 Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidon, Paul E; Smith, Douglas M; Groom Ii, Jeffery V; Cao, Zhengyi; Landers, Jeffery J; Baker, James R

    2015-08-01

    Uremia due to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans is associated with immune dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infections, immune-activation-associated inflammation, and poor responses to vaccines. The pathophysiologic basis of these immune defects is hypothesized to be associated with a wide range of immunologic abnormalities, including an inability to sufficiently express the B7 family (B7-1, CD80; B7-2, CD86) of T-cell costimulatory molecules. However, testing the hypothesis that a state of chronic uremia contributes to attenuated expression of CD80 or CD86 has been difficult because few animal models faithfully recapitulate the immune defects observed in human CKD patients. We used a humanized mouse in a model of surgically induced renal failure and secondary chronic uremia to evaluate the effect of uremia on the expression of these markers. In a manner that resembles the changes observed in CKD patients, surgically induced CKD in mice resulted in decreased costimulatory CD86 expression compared with that in sham-operated controls. Immunodeficiency was functionally demonstrated in this mouse model by documenting an attenuated immune response to a cholera-toxin-based hepatitis B vaccine. This model will be useful for investigating the mechanisms involved in chronic uremia-associated immunodeficiency, poor response to vaccination, and problems associated with immunization of CKD patients.

  19. Induction of antitumor immunity ex vivo using dendritic cells transduced with fowl pox vector expressing MUC1, CEA, and a triad of costimulatory molecules (rF-PANVAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasir, Baldev; Zarwan, Corrine; Ahmad, Rehan; Crawford, Keith D; Rajabi, Hassan; Matsuoka, Ken-Ichi; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Wu, Zekui; Mills, Heidi; Kufe, Donald; Avigan, David

    2012-09-01

    The fowl pox vector expressing the tumor-associated antigens, mucin-1 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the context of costimulatory molecules (rF-PANVAC) has shown promise as a tumor vaccine. However, vaccine-mediated expansion of suppressor T-cell populations may blunt clinical efficacy. We characterized the cellular immune response induced by ex vivo dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with (rF)-PANVAC. Consistent with the functional characteristics of potent antigen-presenting cells, rF-PANVAC-DCs demonstrated strong expression of mucin-1 and carcinoembryonic antigen and costimulatory molecules, CD80, CD86, and CD83; decreased levels of phosphorylated STAT3, and increased levels of Tyk2, Janus kinase 2, and STAT1. rF-PANVAC-DCs stimulated expansion of tumor antigen-specific T cells with potent cytolytic capacity. However, rF-PANVAC-transduced DCs also induced the concurrent expansion of FOXP3 expressing CD4CD25 regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibited T-cell activation. Moreover, Tregs expressed high levels of Th2 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13] together with phosphorylated STAT3 and STAT6. In contrast, the vaccine-expanded Treg population expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines IL-2 and interferon-γ and the proinflammatory receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and IL-17A suggesting that these cells may share effector functions with conventional TH17 T cells. These data suggest that Tregs expanded by rF-PANVAC-DCs, exhibit immunosuppressive properties potentially mediated by Th2 cytokines, but simultaneous expression of Th1 and Th17-associated factors suggests a high degree of plasticity.

  20. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Slawek, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA) were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice's (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb)1100Mjb/J) spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU), activation of these cells (flow cytometry), cytokine profile (ELISA), and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear. PMID:24771983

  1. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Maj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice’s (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb1100Mjb/J spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU, activation of these cells (flow cytometry, cytokine profile (ELISA, and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear.

  2. MHC class II molecules deliver costimulatory signals in human T cells through a functional linkage with IL-2-receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Kanner, S B; Ledbetter, J A;

    1993-01-01

    tyrosine phosphorylation of specific substrates including PLC-gamma 1. Combined stimulation of IL-2R and class II molecules had an additive effect on tyrosine phosphorylation. Pretreatment of T cells with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, inhibited IL-2 and class II-induced proliferation...

  3. Expression of the costimulatory molecule BB-1, the ligands CTLA-4 and CD28, and their mRNA in inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, K; Dalakas, M C

    1999-08-01

    To examine if the muscle fibers in patients with inflammatory myopathies have the potential to behave as antigen presenting cells (APCs), we investigated the expression of costimulatory molecules BB-1, B7-1 (CD80), and B7-2 (CD86), and their counterreceptors, CD28 or CTLA-4 (CD152), in the muscle biopsies of patients with polymyositis (PM), PM associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV-PM), sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM), dermatomyositis (DM), and normal or disease controls. The expression of the B7 family of molecules on the muscle fibers was limited to BB-1. In PM, HIV-PM, and s-IBM, but not the disease controls, the nonnecrotic, MHC-class I-expressing muscle fibers, invaded or not by CD8+ T cells, had prominent membrane expression of BB-1. Several of the BB-1-positive fibers bound strongly in a cell-to-cell contact with their CD28 or CTLA-4 ligands on the autoinvasive CD8+ T cells, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the expression of CD28 and CTLA-4 was up-regulated in PM, HIV-PM, and s-IBM, but not the controls. Because the BB-1-positive fibers expressed MHC-class I antigen and bound to up-regulated counterreceptors CD28 and CTLA-4 on the autoinvasive CD8+ T cells only in PM, HIV-PM, and s-IBM, the BB-1 molecule in these diseases should have a functional role in antigen presentation and T cell differentiation. These findings complement recent studies and suggest that in PM, HIV-PM, and s-IBM the muscle fibers are not only targets of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells but may also behave as "professional" APC.

  4. Effect of siRNA silencing of inducible co-stimulatory molecule on myocardial cell hypertrophy after cardiac infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W M; Liu, Z; Chen, G

    2016-05-20

    As the most common cardiac disease, myocardial infarction is followed by hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and reconstruction of ventricular structure. The up-regulation of a series of factors including metalloproteinases, inflammatory factors, and growth factors after primary infarction lead to the hypertrophy, apoptosis, necrosis, and fibroblast proliferation in cardiac muscle tissues. Recent studies have reported on the potency of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in treating cardiac diseases. We thus investigated the efficacy of inducible co-stimulatory molecule (ICOS)-specific siRNA silencing in myocardial hypertrophy in a cardiac infarction rat model. This cardiac infarction model was prepared by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. ICOS-siRNA treatment was administered in parallel with non-sense siRNA. After 18 days, the cross-sectional area of cardiac muscle tissues and the left ventricle weight index were measured, along with ICOS mRNA and protein expression levels, and pathological staining. Compared to those in the control groups, in myocardial infarcted rats, the application of ICOS-siRNA effectively decreased the left ventricle weight index, as well as the surface area of cardiac myocytes. Both mRNA and protein levels of ICOS were also significantly decreased. HE staining was consistent with these results. In conclusion, ICOS-targeted siRNA can effectively silence gene expression of ICOS, and provided satisfactory treatment efficacy for myocardial cell hypertrophy after infarction.

  5. Induction of antigen-presenting capacity in tumor cells upon infection with non-replicating recombinant vaccinia virus encoding murine MHC class II and costimulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, W R; Oertli, D; Meko, J B; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-01-15

    The possibility of inducing antigen-presenting capacity in cells normally lacking such capacity, currently represents a major goal in vaccine research. To address this issue we attempted to generate 'artificial' APC able to stimulate CD4+ T cell responses when tumor cells were infected with a single, recombinant, vaccinia virus (rVV) containing the two genes encoding murine MHC class II I-Ak and a third gene encoding the murine B7-1 (mB7-1) costimulatory molecule. To minimize the cytopathic effect and to improve safety, in view of possible in vivo applications, we made this rVV replication incompetent by Psoralen and long wave UV treatment. Tumor cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak alone, pulsed with hen egg white lysozyme peptide (HEL46-61), induced IL-2 secretion by an antigen-specific T hybridoma. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding mB7-1 provided costimulation for activating resting CD4+ T cells in the presence of ConA. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding I-Ak and mB7-1, and pulsed with chicken ovotransferrin peptide (conalbumin133-145), induced a significantly higher response in a specific Th2 cell clone (D10.G4.1) as compared to cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak molecules only. Thus, this replication incompetent rVV represents a safe, multiple gene, vector system able to confer in one single infection step effective APC capacity to non-professional APCs.

  6. Expression of costimulatory molecule CD86 in HL-60 cells induced by MG132 and its effect on allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei-Xia; Liu, Xun; Zhou, Yong-Ming; Cheng, Yan-Xiang; Cheng, Jing; Qiu, Yu-Zhen; Xing, Xiao-Lei; Yao, Chun-Hong; Bai, Ru-Jun

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to elucidate the expression of costimulatory molecule CD80 and CD86 in HL-60 cells induced by proteasome inhibitor MG132 and its effect on allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Acute myelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 and chronic myelocytic leukemia cell line K562 were cultured. The viability of the cells was measured by flow cytometry. Proteasome inhibitor MG132 at the concentrations of 2 or 3 µmol/L was used to stimulate the HL-60 cell cultured for 24 h and 48 h respectively, and the Annexin V/7-AAD staining and flow cytomotry were used to detect the apoptosis of the HL-60 cells. HL-60 and K562 cells were treated with 1 µmol/L MG132 for 24 h and 48 h respectively, then CD80 and CD86 antibodies were added, finally the expression of CD80 and CD86 was analysed by flow cytomery. The mRNA expression of CD86 in the HL-60 cells treated with 1 µmol/L MG132 was detected by RT-PCR. HL-60 and K562 cells were treated by 1 µmol/L MG132 and then underwent irradiation of 75 Gy (60)Co to kill the cells with their antigenicity preserved. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of healthy volunteers, as reactive cells, were isolated and inoculated into the (60)Co irradiated HL-60 cells of different concentrations, as stimulating cells, CCK-8 was added and then the A value of absorbance was measured at the wave length of 450 nm in an enzyme labeling instrument. The results showed that the cell viability of the HL-60 cells treated with 1 µmol/L MG132 for 24 h an d 48 h was 92.95% and 85.87% respectively. The apoptotic rates of the HL-60 cells treated with MG132 increased in dose-and time-dependent manner. High-concentration of MG132 directly killed HL-60 cells. Before MG132 treatment K562 cells did not express CD86, but the CD86 expression of the HL-60 cells was up-regulated time-dependently after MG132 treatment (P HL-60 treated with MG132 was up-regulated time-dependently (P HL-60 cells treated with MG132 and reached its peak when the concentration

  7. Expression of co-stimulatory molecules, chemokine receptors and proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells from normal and chronically inflamed rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Claudia; Guazzone, Vanesa A; von Wulffen, Werner; Hackstein, Holger; Schneider, Eva; Lustig, Livia; Meinhardt, Andreas; Fijak, Monika

    2007-12-01

    The presentation of self antigens by dendritic cells (DC) plays an important role in the initiation and maintenance of autoimmunity. In a model of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), we have previously characterized dominant testicular autoantigens and shown an increase in DC numbers during the course of disease. In this study, we have developed a protocol for the isolation of a highly pure population of DC ( approximately 97%) from the testis of EAO and control rats to analyse the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86), chemokine receptors (CCR2, CCR7) and cytokines (IL-10, IL-12p70, TNF-alpha). By flow cytometry, we observed similar percentage and intensity levels of MHC class II, CD80 and CD86 expression in testicular DC in all groups. Moreover, by real-time RT-PCR we have detected significantly higher CCR7 mRNA level in isolated testicular DC from rats with EAO compared to controls, whereas the expression of CCR2 was decreased in orchitis. Transcripts of IL-12p40 were observed in DC from all groups, whereas the expression of IL-10 and the rate limiting IL-12 subunit p35 were detectable exclusively in testicular DC from the inflamed testes. In co-culture experiments, testicular DC isolated from EAO animals significantly enhanced naïve T-cell proliferation compared with control DC. Taken together these results suggest that testicular DC in control testis is not mature and functionally tolerogenic, whereas in EAO testis, IL-12 expression and stimulation of T-cell proliferation points to a mature immunogenic state prior imminent migration to the lymph nodes to amplify immune responses against testicular antigens.

  8. 可诱导共刺激分子及其在肿瘤中的作用%Inducible costimulatory molecule and its roles in tumor microenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴栋娟; 华东

    2015-01-01

    可诱导共刺激分子(ICOS)是 CD28家族成员之一,可表达于肿瘤组织以及肿瘤微环境中的免疫细胞等。ICOS 参与 CD4+和 CD8+ T 细胞免疫应答,促进活化的 T 细胞和 NK 细胞分泌细胞因子,从而提高抗肿瘤活性。同时细胞毒 T 淋巴细胞相关抗原4(CTLA-4)单克隆抗体治疗疗效与 CD4+ T 细胞表达 ICOS 有关,因此 ICOS 可能会成为抗肿瘤的新型治疗靶点。%Inducible costimulatory molecule(ICOS)is a member of the CD28 family,which can be expressed on the tumor tissues and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. ICOS enhances its anti-tumor activity through participating in CD4 + T and CD8 + T cell immune response and enhancing the secretion of cyto-kines on the activated T cells and NK cells. While the curative effect of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated anti-gen-4(CTLA-4)monoclonal antibody is relevant with CD4 + T cells expressing ICOS,which suggesting ICOS may become a novel anti-tumor therapeutic target in the future.

  9. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity Ex Vivo Using Dendritic Cells Transduced with Fowl Pox Vector Expressing MUC1, CEA, and a Triad of Costimulatory Molecules (rF-PANVAC)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasir, Baldev; Zarwan, Corrine; Ahmad, Rehan; Crawford, Keith D; Rajabi, Hassan; Matsuoka, Ken-Ichi; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Wu, Zekui; Mills, Heidi; Kufe, Donald; Avigan, David

    2012-01-01

    The fowl pox vector expressing the tumor associated antigens MUC1 and CEA in the context of costimulatory molecules (rF-PANVAC) has shown promise as a tumor vaccine. However, vaccine mediated expansion of suppressor T cell populations may blunt clinical efficacy. We characterized the cellular immune response induced by ex-vivo dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with (rF)-PANVAC. Consistent with the functional characteristics of potent antigen presenting cells, rF-PANVAC-DCs demonstrated strong expression of MUC1 and CEA and costimulatory molecules, CD80, CD86, and CD83; decreased levels of phosphorylated STAT3, and increased levels of Tyk2, JAK2 and STAT1. rF-PANVAC-DCs stimulated expansion of tumor antigen specific T cells with potent cytolytic capacity. However, rF-PANVAC transduced DCs also induced the concurrent expansion of FOXP3 expressing CD4+CD25+high regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibited T cell activation. Moreover, Tregs expressed high levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) together with phosphorylated STAT3 and STAT6. In contrast, the vaccine expanded Treg population expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ and the proinflammatory RORγt and IL-17A suggesting that these cells may share effector functions with conventional TH17 T cells. These data suggest that Tregs expanded by rF-PANVAC-DCs, exhibit immunosuppressive properties potentially mediated by Th2 cytokines, but simultaneous expression of Th1 and Th17 associated factors suggests a high degree of plasticity. PMID:22892452

  10. CpG stimulation of precursor B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces a distinct change in costimulatory molecule expression and shifts allogeneic T cells toward a Th1 response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gregor S D; She, Kevin; Terrett, Luke; Food, Michael R; Trudeau, Jacqueline D; Schultz, Kirk R

    2005-05-01

    Immunostimulatory DNA containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) induces the development of T helper 1 (Th1) immune responses. The response of B cells to CpG stimulation involves increased proliferation, cytokine production, and costimulatory molecule expression. Similar effects have been observed following CpG stimulation of a variety of malignant B cells. Pediatric precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cells express low levels of costimulatory molecules and are generally poor stimulators of T-cell responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of CpG stimulation on precursor B-ALL cell lines and pediatric patient-derived samples. The ability to respond to CpG oligodeoxynucleotides was determined by the level of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression. In contrast to both nonleukemic B-cell precursors and mature B cells, the response of precursor B-ALL cells was characterized by increased CD40 expression but only small changes in CD86 levels and no induction of CD80 expression. CpG stimulation of ALL blasts produced increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-10 but no detectable IL-12p70 and led to a skewing of allogeneic T cells, with enhanced interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production and reduced secretion of IL-5. These results demonstrate the functional relevance of CpG stimulation of precursor B-ALL cells and provide a rational basis for study of these agents for use in treatment of this disease.

  11. Canine Distemper Virus Infection Leads to an Inhibitory Phenotype of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells In Vitro with Reduced Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules and Increased Interleukin-10 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M.; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper. PMID:24769532

  12. Canine distemper virus infection leads to an inhibitory phenotype of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro with reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased interleukin-10 transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visar Qeska

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs, responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper.

  13. The costimulatory molecule CD70 is regulated by distinct molecular mechanisms and is associated with overall survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, P; Maingonnat, C; Penther, D; Guney, S; Ruminy, P; Picquenot, J M; Mareschal, S; Alcantara, M; Bouzelfen, A; Dubois, S; Figeac, M; Bastard, C; Tilly, H; Jardin, F

    2013-08-01

    In diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), a recurrent deletion of the 19p13 region has recently been described. CD70 and TNFSF9 genes are suspected tumor suppressor genes, but previous studies suggest an oncogenic role for CD70. Therefore, we studied the consequences of variation in CD70 copy number and epigenetic modifications on CD70 expression. Copy-number variation was investigated in 144 de novo DLBCL tissues by comparative genomic hybridization array and quantitative multiplex PCR. Gene expression was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, and CD70 promoter methylation was determined by pyrosequencing. The 19p13.3.2 region was deleted in 21 (14.6%) cases, which allowed the minimal commonly deleted region of 57 Kb that exclusively includes the CD70 gene to be defined. Homozygous deletions were observed in four (2.7%) cases, and acquired single-nucleotide variations of CD70 were detected in nine (6.3%) cases. CD70 was highly expressed in both germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL compared to normal tissue, with distinct molecular mechanisms of mRNA expression regulation. A gene dosage effect was observed in the GCB subtype, whereas promoter methylation was the predominant mechanism of down regulation in the ABC subtype. However, high CD70 expression levels correlated to shorter overall survival in both the GCB (P = 0.0021) and the ABC (P =0.0158) subtypes. In conclusion, CD70 is targeted by recurrent deletions, somatic mutations and promoter hypermethylation, but its high level of expression is related to an unfavorable outcome, indicating that this molecule may constitute a potential therapeutic target in selected DLBCL. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. T cell retargeting with MHC class I-restricted antibodies: the CD28 costimulatory domain enhances antigen-specific cytotoxicity and cytokine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Willemsen (Ralph); C. Ronteltap; P. Chames; J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); R.L.H. Bolhuis (Reinder)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractT cells require both primary and costimulatory signals for optimal activation. The primary Ag-specific signal is delivered by engagement of the TCR. The second Ag-independent costimulatory signal is mediated by engagement of the T cell surface costimulatory molecule CD2

  15. A Phase I Trial of Pox PSA vaccines (PROSTVAC®-VF with B7-1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 co-stimulatory molecules (TRICOM™ in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lattime E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Based on previous studies that demonstrated the safety profile and preliminary clinical activity of prostate specific antigen (PSA targeted therapeutic vaccines, as well as recent laboratory data supporting the value of the addition of co-stimulatory molecules B7-1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 (designated TRICOM™ to these vaccines, we conducted a Phase I study to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a novel vaccinia and fowlpox vaccine incorporating the PSA gene sequence and TRICOM. Methods In this study, ten patients with androgen independent prostate cancer with or without metastatic disease were enrolled. Patients were treated with 2 × l08 pfu of a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine (PROSTVAC-V followed by 1 × 109 pfu of the booster recombinant fowlpox virus (PROSTVAC-F both with gene sequences for PSA and TRICOM. The mean age of patients enrolled in the study was 70 (range 63 to 79. The mean PSA at baseline was 434 (range 9 – 1424. Results There were no deaths, and no Grade 3 or 4 adverse events. The most commonly reported adverse events, regardless of causality, were injection site reactions and fatigue. One serious adverse event (SAE occurred that was unrelated to vaccine; this patient developed progressive disease with a new sphenoid metastasis. PSA was measured at week 4 and week 8. Four patients had stable disease (with less than 25% increase in PSA through the week 8 study period. Anti-PSA antibodies were not induced with therapy: however, anti-vaccinia titers increased in all patients. Conclusion This study demonstrated that vaccination with PROSTVAC-V and PROSTVAC-F combined with TRICOM is well-tolerated and generated an immune response to vaccinia. Therefore, PROSTVAC-VF/TRICOM represents a feasible therapeutic approach for further phase II and III study in patients with prostate cancer.

  16. Pancreatic tumors and immature immunosuppressive myeloid cells in blood and spleen: role of inhibitory co-stimulatory molecules PDL1 and CTLA4. An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Basso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood and spleen expansion of immature myeloid cells (IMCs might compromise the immune response to cancer. We studied in vivo circulating and splenic T lymphocyte and IMC subsets in patients with benign and malignant pancreatic diseases. We ascertained in vitro whether pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC-associated IMC subsets are induced by tumor-derived soluble factors and whether they are immunosuppressive focusing on the inhibitory co-stimulatory molecules PDL1 and CTLA4. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 103 pancreatic and/or splenic surgical patients were enrolled including 52 PDAC, 10 borderline and 10 neuroendocrine tumors (NETs. Lymphocytes and IMCs were analysed by flow cytometry in blood, in spleen and in three PDAC cell conditioned (CM or non conditioned PBMC. PDL1 and CTLA4 were studied in 30 splenic samples, in control and conditioned PBMC. IMCs were FACS sorted and co-coltured with allogenic T lymphocytes. In PDAC a reduction was found in circulating CD8(+ lymphocytes (p = 0.004 and dendritic cells (p = 0.01, which were reduced in vitro by one PDAC CM (Capan1; p = 0.03. Blood myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs CD33(+CD14(-HLA-DR(- were increased in PDAC (p = 0.022 and were induced in vitro by BxPC3 CM. Splenic dendritic cells had a higher PDL1 expression (p = 0.007, while CD33(+CD14(+HLA-DR(- IMCs had a lower CTLA4 expression (p = 0.029 in PDAC patients. In vitro S100A8/A9 complex, one of the possible inflammatory mediators of immune suppression in PDAC, induced PDL1 (p = 0.018 and reduced CTLA4 expression (p = 0.028 among IMCs. IMCs not expressing CTLA4 were demonstrated to be immune suppressive. CONCLUSION: In PDAC circulating dendritic and cytotoxic T cells are reduced, while MDSCs are increased and this might favour tumoral growth and progression. The reduced CTLA4 expression found among splenic IMCs of PDAC patients was demonstrated to characterize an immune suppressive phenotype and to be consequent to the

  17. Sex-Associated Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules CD80, CD86, and Accessory Molecules, PDL-1, PDL-2 and MHC-II, in F480+ Macrophages during Murine Cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cristián Togno-Peirce; Karen Nava-Castro; Luis Ignacio Terrazas; Jorge Morales-Montor

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are critically involved in the interaction between T. crassiceps and the murine host immune system. Also, a strong gender-associated susceptibility to murine cysticercosis has been reported. Here, we examined the sex-associated expression of molecules MHC-II, CD80, CD86, PD-L1, and PD-L2 on peritoneal F4/80hi macrophages of BALB/c mice infected with Taenia crassiceps. Peritoneal macrophages from both sexes of mice were exposed to T. crassiceps total extract (TcEx). BALB/c Females...

  18. 靶向CD40的shRNA干扰抗大鼠异体肢体移植急性排斥反应的实验研究%Resistance to acute rejection by shRNA interference from CD40 costimulatory molecule in limb allo-transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张震宇; 刘伟; 毕郑钢; 董清平

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨靶向CD40的RNA干扰对大鼠异体肢体移植急性排斥反应的影响. 方法以纯系SD大鼠为供体,纯系Wistar大鼠为受体,行同种异体右后肢移植.27只大鼠肢体移植后随机分为三组,A组:注射入梭华.Sofast.siCD40-2/pSilencer载体复合物600 μL;B组:注射Sofast-pSilencer4.1-CMV neo空载体复合物600 μL;C组:注射生理盐水600μL,以上均通过阴茎背静脉注射.观察移植物排斥反应征象及存活情况,并于第7天对产生免疫耐受大鼠进行混合淋巴细胞反应,同时进行组织学检查. 结果与B、C组相比,A组移植物发生排斥反应的时间及存活时间均显著延长,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)(>13 d),未见排斥反应征象;B、C组均于术后近期发牛排斥反应.A组大鼠对供体的淋巴细胞呈现低反应性,移植的供体同系大鼠的肢体得以存活. 结论术后不应用免疫抑制剂的情况下,靶向CD40的shRNA干扰可以抗大鼠异体肢体移植急性排斥反应.%Objective To study the resistance to acute reaction in composite tissue allotransplan-tation by shRNA interference from CD40 costimulatory molecule in rat lymphocytes. Methods The in-bred SD rats were chosen as donors and inbred Wistar rats as recipients. Twenty-seven recipients were divided into 3 groups randomly after allogeneic leg transplantation. On the day after transplantation, rats in group A were injected with 600 μL of Sofast-siCD40-2/pSilencer, rats in group B received 600 μL of Sofast-pSilencer 4.1-CMV neo, and rats in group C received injection of 600 μL of sodium chloride. The survival and rejection to grafts were observed. The rats which survived 7 days after operation were given the test of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MIR). Results The mean survival time of limb allografts in group A was obviously longer than that in the other two groups( P < 0.01 ) . Rejection to grafts was not observed in group A, but rejection e-merged shortly after

  19. Antigen presenting cells costimulatory signaling during pre-implantation pregnancy 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sławek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Success of pregnancy depends on many factors. Three phenomena inducing immune tolerance against semi-allogeneic conceptus may play a crucial role in the pre-implantation period of pregnancy: influence of sex hormones in sex cycle, presence of oocyte or embryo and the presence of semen in the female reproductive tract. On the other hand dendritic cells are the most effective antigen-presenting cells in regulation of immune phenomena and also are considered as potent participants in inducing immune tolerance in the pregnancy. They communicate with T cells in cell contact-dependent manner or via cytokines. During cell-cell contacts, costimulatory molecules play a key role and their expression is often dependent on cytokines milieu. Both costimulatory molecules and cytokines influence generation of T regulatory cells. Interactions of these molecules are closely related. In this paper we would like to pay attention to the importance of antigen presenting cells costimulatory potency in immune regulation during a pre-implantation period of pregnancy.

  20. Uso do rituximabe para o tratamento da plaquetopenia do lúpus eritematoso sistêmico: eficácia clínica e efeito nas moléculas de co-estimulação Use of rituximab for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus' thrombocytopenia: clinical efficacy and costimulatory molecules effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittermayer B. Santiago

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Plaquetopenia é uma complicação não raramente vista no contexto do lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES. O seu tratamento inclui o uso de corticosteróide, imunossupressores, imunoglobulina humana e, eventualmente, esplenectomia. Descreve-se um caso de LES com plaquetopenia persistente a despeito do uso de prednisona e azatioprina, que respondeu satisfatoriamente ao uso de rituximabe (RTX. O estudo de citometria de fluxo mostrou depleção dos linfócitos B do sangue periférico, assim como uma queda das moléculas de co-estimulação após o uso da medicação. Não foi observado efeito colateral relacionado à infusão da substância. Dessa forma, o RTX parece estar indicado para casos selecionados de LES com plaquetopenia de difícil controle.Thrombocytopenia is not a rare complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Its treatment includes the use of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, intravenous immunoglobulin and, eventually, splenectomy. We describe a SLE patient with persistent thrombocytopenia despite of the use of prednisone and azathioprine that improved after infusion of rituximab (RTX. Flow cytometry analysis revealed depletion of B cells from the peripheral blood as well as a decrease in costimulatory molecules after the administration of the medication. Side effects related to the infusion were not observed. It suggests that RTX may be indicated in selected cases of SLE with thrombocytopenia of difficult control.

  1. Targeting B7x and B7-H3 as New Immunotherapies for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    carcinoma cells line CT26 transfected with murine or human B7x resulted in a higher number of lung metastasis and shorter survival [65]. Blockade of...B7x with a mAb resulted in a reduction of number of lung metastasis in a CT26 as well as 4T1 based mouse models of lung metastasis [65]. B7x thus...score, seminal vesicle involvement, positive surgical margins, >4-fold increased risk of cancer progression after surgery (62) Osteosarcoma 91.8

  2. Targeting B7x and B7 H3 as New Immunotherapies for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Immunology , The Albert Einstein Comprehensive Cancer Center and Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461...colorectal cancers n-small cell lung cancer ; ORR, objective response rate; OS, overall survival, PFS, 591 Review Trends in Pharmacological Sciences September...the first success story of T-cell checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy [16]. A more recent success story in cancer immunology is that of PD-1. PD-1

  3. 强直性脊柱炎患者外周血T淋巴细胞亚群和T淋巴细胞上CD154表达的变化和意义%Changes of T lymphocyte subsets and expression of costimulatory molecule CD154 on T-cells in peripheral blood from patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林曲; 林智明; 古洁若; 黄烽; 李天旺; 魏秋静; 曹双燕; 江颖娟

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨强直性脊柱炎(AS)患者外周血T淋巴细胞亚群分布和T淋巴细胞上共刺激分子CD154的表达及依那西普治疗对其的影响.方法 用流式细胞仪检测66例AS患者(其中活动期39例,非活动期27例;按临床特征分为外周关节和中轴均受累者35例和单独中轴受累31例)、30例类风湿关节炎(RA)患者及30名健康志愿者外周血T淋巴细胞亚群分布和CD154在CD3+T淋巴细胞上的表达.此外,观察39例AS活动期患者在随机双盲依那西普和安慰剂对照试验中,用药前后CD154的变化.结果 ①AS和RA患者CD4+T淋巴细胞均较健康志愿者高(P<0.05),而CD8+T淋巴细胞较健康志愿者低(P<0.05);AS患者外周血T细胞上CD154的表达较健康志愿者和RA患者都明显升高(P<0.05);②活动期或外周关节受累AS患者T细胞CD154的表达分别较稳定期或单独中轴受累AS患者明显升高(P<0.05);且CD154的表达与关节压痛数、关节肿胀数呈正相关(P<0.05);③在依那西普试验的第6周,依那西普组AS患者(19例)T淋巴细胞CD154表达较安慰剂组(20例)明显下降(P<0.05),与健康志愿者差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 AS患者外周血存在T淋巴细胞亚群紊乱和T淋巴细胞上共刺激分子CD154异常表达,可作为临床评价AS病情活动性和依那西普疗效的生物指标之一.%Objective To study T lymphocyte subsets and expression of costimulatory molecule CD154 on T-cells in peripheral blood from patients with ankylosing spondylitis and their changes after treated with Enbrel. Methods Sixty-six patients with AS(39 active and 27 inactive, 35 axial and peripheral joint involvement and 31 axial involvement only), 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis(RA), 30 healthy volunteers were analyzed. The expression of CD154 on CD3+ T cell as well as T-cells subsets were evaluated using flow cytometry respectively. The changes of the expression of costimulatory molecule CD154 in 39 active

  4. CD160Ig fusion protein targets a novel costimulatory pathway and prolongs allograft survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca D'Addio

    Full Text Available CD160 is a cell surface molecule expressed by most NK cells and approximately 50% of CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Engagement of CD160 by MHC class-I directly triggers a costimulatory signal to TCR-induced proliferation, cytokine production and cytotoxic effector functions. The role of CD160 in alloimmunity is unknown. Using a newly generated CD160 fusion protein (CD160Ig we examined the role of the novel costimulatory molecule CD160 in mediating CD4(+ or CD8(+ T cell driven allograft rejection. CD160Ig inhibits alloreactive CD8(+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production in vitro, in particular in the absence of CD28 costimulation. Consequently CD160Ig prolongs fully mismatched cardiac allograft survival in CD4(-/-, CD28(-/- knockout and CTLA4Ig treated WT recipients, but not in WT or CD8(-/- knockout recipients. The prolonged cardiac allograft survival is associated with reduced alloreactive CD8(+ T cell proliferation, effector/memory responses and alloreactive IFN-γ production. Thus, CD160 signaling is particularly important in CD28-independent effector/memory CD8(+ alloreactive T cell activation in vivo and therefore may serve as a novel target for prevention of allograft rejection.

  5. Increased expression of costimulatory markers CD134 and CD80 on interleukin-17 producing T cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolff, Sebastian; Quandt, Daniel; Wilde, Benjamin; Feldkamp, Thorsten; Hua, Fan; Cai, Xin; Specker, Christof; Kribben, Andreas; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Witzke, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: There is growing evidence that interleukin 17 (IL-17) producing T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Previous studies showed that increased percentages of T-cell subsets expressing the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD134 are associated with

  6. Costimulatory receptors in a teleost fish: Typical CD28, elusive CTLA4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, D.; Riteau, B.; Hansen, J.D.; Phillips, R.B.; Michel, F.; Boudinot, P.; Benmansour, A.

    2006-01-01

    T cell activation requires both specific recognition of the peptide-MHC complex by the TCR and additional signals delivered by costimulatory receptors. We have identified rainbow trout sequences similar to CD28 (rbtCD28) and CTLA4 (rbtCTLA4). rbtCD28 and rbtCTLA4 are composed of an extracellular Ig-superfamily V domain, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail. The presence of a conserved ligand binding site within the V domain of both molecules suggests that these receptors likely recognize the fish homologues of the B7 family. The mRNA expression pattern of rbtCD28 and rbtCTLA4 in naive trout is reminiscent to that reported in humans and mice, because rbtCTLA4 expression within trout leukocytes was quickly up-regulated following PHA stimulation and virus infection. The cytoplasmic tail of rbtCD28 possesses a typical motif that is conserved in mammalian costimulatory receptors for signaling purposes. A chimeric receptor made of the extracellular domain of human CD28 fused to the cytoplasmic tail of rbtCD28 promoted TCR-induced IL-2 production in a human T cell line, indicating that rbtCD28 is indeed a positive costimulator. The cytoplasmic tail of rtrtCTLA4 lacked obvious signaling motifs and accordingly failed to signal when fused to the huCD28 extracellular domain. Interestingly, rbtCTLA4 and rbtCD28 are not positioned on the same chromosome and thus do not belong to a unique costimulatory cluster as in mammals. Finally, oar results raise questions about the origin and evolution of positive and negative costimulation in vertebrate immune systems. Copyright ?? 2006 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Costimulatory signal blockade in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub, M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Stadlbauer, T H;

    1999-01-01

    Blockade of the CD28-B7 or CD40L-CD40 T cell costimulatory signals prevents induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the effect of simultaneous blockade of these signals in EAE is unknown. We show that administration of either MR1 (to block CD40L) or CTLA4Ig (to block...... cells in the periphery. Selective B7-1 blockade did not protect from EAE. These observations have implications for therapy of autoimmune diseases....

  8. CD226 (DNAM-1) is involved in lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 costimulatory signal for naive T cell differentiation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kazuko; Shirakawa, Jun; Kameyama, Tomie; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Miyamoto, Akitomo; Onodera, Masafumi; Sumida, Takayuki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Shibuya, Akira

    2003-12-15

    Upon antigen recognition by the T cell receptor, lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) physically associates with the leukocyte adhesion molecule CD226 (DNAM-1) and the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn. We show that lentiviral vector-mediated mutant (Y-F322) CD226 transferred into naive CD4+ helper T cells (Ths) inhibited interleukin (IL)-12-independent Th1 development initiated by CD3 and LFA-1 ligations. Moreover, proliferation induced by LFA-1 costimulatory signal was suppressed in mutant (Y-F322) CD226-transduced naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the absence of IL-2. These results suggest that CD226 is involved in LFA-1-mediated costimulatory signals for triggering naive T cell differentiation and proliferation. We also demonstrate that although LFA-1, CD226, and Fyn are polarized at the immunological synapse upon stimulation with anti-CD3 in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, lipid rafts are polarized in CD4+, but not CD8+, T cells. Moreover, proliferation initiated by LFA-1 costimulatory signal is suppressed by lipid raft disruption in CD4+, but not CD8+, T cells, suggesting that the LFA-1 costimulatory signal is independent of lipid rafts in CD8+ T cells.

  9. C-Myc regulation by costimulatory signals modulates the generation of CD8+ memory T cells during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Wang, Youfei; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Norbury, Christopher; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    The signalling mechanisms of costimulation in the development of memory T cells remain to be clarified. Here, we show that the transcription factor c-Myc in CD8(+) T cells is controlled by costimulatory molecules, which modulates the development of memory CD8(+) T cells. C-Myc expression was dramatically reduced in Cd28(-/-) or Ox40(-/-) memory CD8(+) T cells, and c-Myc over-expression substantially reversed the defects in the development of T-cell memory following viral infection. C-Myc regulated the expression of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, which promoted the generation of virus-specific memory CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, over-expression of survivin with bcl-xL, a downstream molecule of NF-κB and intracellular target of costimulation that controls survival, in Cd28(-/-) or Ox40(-/-) CD8(+) T cells, reversed the defects in the generation of memory T cells in response to viral infection. These results identify c-Myc as a key controller of memory CD8(+) T cells from costimulatory signals.

  10. Immunotherapy of melanoma with the immune costimulatory monoclonal antibodies targeting CD137

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Shi-Yan Li, Yizhen Liu Cancer Research Institute, Scott and White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USA Abstract: Knowledge of how the immune system recognizes and attempts to control cancer growth and development has improved dramatically. The advent of immunotherapies for cancer has resulted in robust clinical responses and confirmed that the immune system can significantly inhibit tumor progression. Until recently, metastatic melanoma was a disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. CD137 (also known as 4-1BB a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily, is an activation-induced T cell costimulator molecule. Growing evidence indicates that anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies possess strong antitumor properties, the result of their powerful capability to activate CD8+ T cells, to produce interferon (IFN-γ, and to induce cytolytic markers. Combination therapy of anti-CD137 with other anticancer agents, such as radiation, has robust tumor-regressing abilities against nonimmunogenic or poorly immunogenic tumors. Of importance, targeting CD137 eliminates established tumors, and the fact that anti-CD137 therapy acts in concert with other anticancer agents and/or radiation therapy to eradicate nonimmunogenic and weakly immunogenic tumors is an additional benefit. Currently, BMS-663513, a humanized anti-CD137 antibody, is in clinical trials in patients with solid tumors, including melanoma, renal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, and B-cell malignancies. In this review, we discuss the basis of the therapeutic potential of targeting CD137 in cancer treatment, focusing in particular, on BMS-663513 as an immune costimulatory monoclonal antibody for melanoma immunotherapy. Keywords: anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies, immune costimulator molecule, BMS-663513

  11. Costimulatory Pathways: Physiology and Potential Therapeutic Manipulation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nien Yee Kow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available System lupus erythematosus (SLE is an immune-complex-mediated autoimmune condition with protean immunological and clinical manifestation. While SLE has classically been advocated as a B-cell or T-cell disease, it is unlikely that a particular cell type is more pathologically predominant than the others. Indeed, SLE is characterized by an orchestrated interplay amongst different types of immunopathologically important cells participating in both innate and adaptive immunity including the dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes, as well as traditional nonimmune cells such as endothelial, epithelial, and renal tubular cells. Amongst the antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes, and between lymphocytes, the costimulatory pathways which involve mutual exchange of information and signalling play an essential role in initiating, perpetuating, and, eventually, attenuating the proinflammatory immune response. In this review, advances in the knowledge of established costimulatory pathways such as CD28/CTLA-4-CD80/86, ICOS-B7RP1, CD70-CD27, OX40-OX40L, and CD137-CD137L as well as their potential roles involved in the pathophysiology of SLE will be discussed. Attempts to target these costimulatory pathways therapeutically will pave more potential treatment avenues for patients with SLE. Preliminary laboratory and clinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value of manipulating these costimulatory pathways in SLE will also be discussed in this review.

  12. Borrelia burgdorferi elicited-IL-10 suppresses the production of inflammatory mediators, phagocytosis, and expression of co-stimulatory receptors by murine macrophages and/or dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutein Chung

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb is a tick-borne spirochete that is the causative agent for Lyme disease. Our previous studies indicate that virulent Bb can potently enhance IL-10 production by macrophages (MØs and that blocking IL-10 production significantly enhances bacterial clearance. We hypothesize that skin-associated APC types, such as MØs and dendritic cells (DCs are potent producers of IL-10 in response to Bb, which may act in autocrine fashion to suppress APC responses critical for efficient Bb clearance. Our goal is to delineate which APC immune functions are dysregulated by Bb-elicited IL-10 using a murine model of Lyme disease. Our in vitro studies indicated that both APCs rapidly produce IL-10 upon exposure to Bb, that these levels inversely correlate with the production of many Lyme-relevant proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and that APCs derived from IL-10(-/- mice produced greater amounts of these proinflammatory mediators than wild-type APCs. Phagocytosis assays determined that Bb-elicited IL-10 levels can diminish Bb uptake and trafficking by MØs, suppresses ROS production, but does not affect NO production; Bb-elicited IL-10 had little effect on phagocytosis, ROS, and NO production by DCs. In general, Bb exposure caused little-to-no upregulation of several critical surface co-stimulatory markers by MØs and DCs, however eliminating Bb-elicited IL-10 allowed a significant upregulation in many of these co-stimulatory receptors. These data indicate that IL-10 elicited from Bb-stimulated MØs and DCs results in decreased production of proinflammatory mediators and co-stimulatory molecules, and suppress phagocytosis-associated events that are important for mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses by APCs.

  13. Combined LFA-1 and costimulatory blockade prevents transplant rejection mediated by heterologous immune memory alloresponses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, William H.; Haridas, Divya; Wagener, Maylene E.; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that alloreactive memory T cells are generated by the process of heterologous immunity, whereby memory T cells arising in response to pathogen infection cross-react with donor antigens. Due to their diminished requirements for costimulation during recall, these pathogen-elicited allo-crossreactive memory T cells are of particular clinical importance, especially given the emergence of costimulatory blockade as a transplant immunosuppression strategy. Methods We utilized an established model of heterologous immunity involving sequential infection of a naïve C57BL/6 recipient with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and vaccinia virus, followed by combined skin and bone marrow transplant from a BALB/c donor. Results We demonstrate that coupling the integrin antagonist anti-LFA-1 with costimulatory blockade could surmount the barrier posed by heterologous immunity in a fully allogeneic murine transplant system. The combined costimulatory and integrin blockade regimen suppressed proliferation of alloreactive memory T cells and attenuated their cytokine effector responses. This combined blockade regimen also promoted the retention of FoxP3+ Tregs in draining lymph nodes. Finally, we show that in an in vitro mixed lymphocyte reaction system using human T cells, the combination of belatacept and anti-LFA-1 was able to suppress cytokine production by alloreactive memory T cells that was resistant to belatacept alone. Conclusions As an antagonist against human LFA-1 exists and has been used clinically to treat psoriasis, these findings have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:22475765

  14. Augmented lymphocyte expansion from solid tumors with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin M; Devillier, Laura E; Feldman, Steven A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Dudley, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of patients with adoptive T-cell therapy requires expansion of unique tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) cultures from single-cell suspensions processed from melanoma biopsies. Strategies which increase the expansion and reliability of TIL generation from tumor digests are necessary to improve access to TIL therapy. Previous studies have evaluated artificial antigen presenting cells for their antigen-specific and costimulatory properties. We investigated engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement (ECCE) consisting of K562 cells that express 4-1BBL in the absence of artificial antigen stimulation. ECCE accelerated TIL expansion and significantly improved TIL numbers (P=0.001) from single-cell melanoma suspensions. TIL generated with ECCE contain significantly more CD8CD62L and CD8CD27 T cells then comparable interleukin-2-expanded TIL and maintained antitumor reactivity. Moreover, ECCE improved TIL expansion from nonmelanoma-cell suspensions similar to that seen with melanoma tumors. These data demonstrate that the addition of ECCE to TIL production will enable the treatment of patients that are ineligible using current methods.

  15. Effect of blockage of costimulatory signal on murine abortion-prone model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Fu-xi; ZHANG Yuan-yuan; LIU Run-hua; LI Shuan-ming

    2007-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the key costimulatory signals results in T cell anergy, indicating the alloantigen-specific immunologic unresponsiveness. In this study, the effect of blockage of costimulatory signal CD86 on murine abortion-prone model was studied.Methods Thirty CBA/J female mice cohabitated with DBA/2 male or BALB/c male mice were investigated. CBA/J ×DBA/2 matings were used as the abortion-prone model, and CBA/J × BALB/c matings were used as the normal pregnant model. The abortion-prone models were divided into experimental and control groups, and the normal pregnant models were set as a normal group (10 mice in each group). The mice in the experimental group were treated with anti-mouse CD86 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (100 μg) on day 4.5 of gestation, while the controls received irrelevant-isotype matched rat IgG2b. As for the normal group, nothing was given to the mice. The mice were killed on day 13.5 of gestation, embryo resorption rate and the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were detected. Then the data were analyzed by Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test.Results The embryo resorption rate in the experimental (8.2%) and normal groups (7.7%) was significantly lower than that of the control (23.5%, P<0.05). No significant difference was detected between the experimental and normal groups (P>0.05). The positive expression rates of TGF-β1 and PAI-1 proteins in the experimental and normal groups were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of MMP-9 protein in the experimental and normal groups was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). No significant difference in the positive expression rates of the three proteins was detected between the experimental and normal groups (P>0.05).Conclusions Blockage of costimulatory signal CD86 at early pregnancy can treat

  16. Cytotoxic T cells expressing the co-stimulatory receptor NKG2 D are increased in cigarette smoking and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behndig Annelie F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A suggested role for T cells in COPD pathogenesis is based on associations between increased lung cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CD8+ numbers and airflow limitation. CD69 is an early T cell activation marker. Natural Killer cell group 2 D (NKG2D receptors are co-stimulatory molecules induced on CD8+ T cells upon activation. The activating function of NKG2 D is triggered by binding to MHC class 1 chain-related (MIC molecules A and B, expressed on surface of stressed epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of MIC A and B in the bronchial epithelium and NKG2 D and CD69 on BAL lymphocytes in subjects with COPD, compared to smokers with normal lung function and healthy never-smokers. Methods Bronchoscopy with airway lavages and endobronchial mucosal biopsy sampling was performed in 35 patients with COPD, 21 healthy never-smokers and 16 smokers with normal lung function. Biopsies were immunohistochemically stained and BAL lymphocyte subsets were determined using flow cytometry. Results Epithelial CD3+ lymphocytes in bronchial biopsies were increased in both smokers with normal lung function and in COPD patients, compared to never-smokers. Epithelial CD8+ lymphocyte numbers were higher in the COPD group compared to never-smoking controls. Among gated CD3+cells in BAL, the percentage of CD8+ NKG2D+ cells was enhanced in patients with COPD and smokers with normal lung function, compared to never-smokers. The percentage of CD8+ CD69+ cells and cell surface expression of CD69 were enhanced in patients with COPD and smokers with normal lung function, compared to never-smokers. No changes in the expression of MIC A or MIC B in the airway epithelium could be detected between the groups, whereas significantly decreased soluble MICB was detected in bronchial wash from smokers with normal lung function, compared to never-smokers. Conclusions In COPD, we found increased numbers of cytotoxic T cells in both bronchial

  17. Targeting the CD80/CD86 costimulatory pathway with CTLA4-Ig directs microglia toward a repair phenotype and promotes axonal outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveau, Antoine; Nerrière-Daguin, Véronique; Vanhove, Bernard; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neunlist, Michel; Nicot, Arnaud; Boudin, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    Among the costimulatory factors widely studied in the immune system is the CD28/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4)-CD80/CD86 pathway, which critically controls the nature and duration of the T-cell response. In the brain, up-regulated expression of CD80/CD86 during inflammation has consistently been reported in microglia. However, the role of CD80/CD86 molecules has mainly been studied in a context of microglia-T cell interactions in pathological conditions, while the function of CD80/CD86 in the regulation of intrinsic brain cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we used a transgenic pig line in which neurons express releasable CTLA4-Ig, a synthetic molecule mimicking CTLA4 and binding to CD80/CD86. The effects of CTLA4-Ig on brain cells were analyzed after intracerebral transplantation of CTLA4-Ig-expressing neurons or wild-type neurons as control. This model provided in vivo evidence that CTLA4-Ig stimulated axonal outgrowth, in correlation with a shift of the nearby microglia from a compact to a ramified morphology. In a culture system, we found that the CTLA4-Ig-induced morphological change of microglia was mediated through CD86, but not CD80. This was accompanied by microglial up-regulated expression of the anti-inflammatory molecule Arginase 1 and the neurotrophic factor BDNF, in an astrocyte-dependent manner through the purinergic P2Y1 receptor pathway. Our study identifies for the first time CD86 as a key player in the modulation of microglia phenotype and suggests that CTLA4-Ig-derived compounds might represent new tools to manipulate CNS microglia.

  18. Immune-Signaling Molecules and Obesity-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation is closely associated with the development of metabolic complications such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Several immune-signaling receptors and their counterpart ligands are known to be crucial for crosstalk between the adaptive and innate immune system, and they are implicated in various inflammatory pathologies. In this mini-review, I will discuss the involvement of the immune costimulatory molecule 4-1BB and its ligand in obesity-induced inflammation and metabolic complications.

  19. Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 gene variants affect idiopathic recurrent miscarriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Singh, Bharti; Mishra, Aditi; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2016-12-01

    Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 genes are considered as a crucial player in the determination of inflammatory responses; genetic variability in these may modulate the risk for idiopathic recurrent miscarriages (IRM). We investigated the association of functional variants of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) with IRM cases. We recruited 200 IRM women with a history of at least three consecutive pregnancy losses before 20th week of pregnancy and 300 fertile control women. Determination of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) gene variants were based on the polymerase chain reaction pursued by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and validated with Sanger sequencing. Single marker analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) model used to predict the IRM risk. We observed nearly three- to twofold increased risk in single marker analysis for minor homozygous genotypes of rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G tag-SNPs in IRM cases, suggesting the risk association. In MDR analysis, we observed 10.5-fold augmented risk among IRM women in three-SNP model (rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G). The eQTL mapping analyses was performed to strengthen the results of our study. The eQTL mapping analysis revealed that the variations in CD28 and NFKB1 gene content might affect the abundance of transcripts of CD28 and Family with sequence similarity 177 member A1 (FAM177A1) genes, respectively. These results suggest that CD28 and NFKB1 gene variants may be associated with increased risks to IRM.

  20. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...... recipients but not into non-transgenic recipients. These data provide evidence that B7/CD28 interactions within the nervous tissue are critical determinants of disease development. Our findings have important implications for understanding the etiology of nervous system autoimmune diseases such as multiple...

  1. The role of CD154-CD40 versus CD28-B7 costimulatory pathways in regulating allogeneic Th1 and Th2 responses in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kishimoto, K; Dong, V M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh;

    2000-01-01

    We used signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and STAT6 gene knockout (-/-) mice as recipients of fully mismatched cardiac allografts to study the role of T-cell costimulatory pathways in regulating allogeneic T-helper 1 (Th1) versus Th2 responses in vivo. STAT4(-/-) mice hav...

  2. In vitro Catecholamine Exposure Produces Variable Effects on the B7 Costimulatory Pathway in Human Monocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicru, A. N.; Crucian, B.; Sams, Clarence; Actor, J. K.; Marshall, G. D., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Catecholamines have been associated with immunomodulation of the adaptive immune system towards a Th2 response in vitro. We therefore examined the role of in vitro epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) exposure on the B7 costimulatory expression of antigen presenting cells (APC) from human monocytic cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). THP1 monocytic cells and CD14+ cells from normal human PBMC were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and incubated with physiologic stress levels (10(exp -6) - 10(exp -8)M) of EPI or NE for 24 hours. Cells were subsequently stained with CD80 FITC, CD86 PE, and CD14 PC5 antibodies and analyzed by flow cytometry for changes in fluorescence and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Exposure of THP1 to EPI in vitro at concentrations of 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8)M significantly decreased mean CD80 from 42 plus or minus 0.7% to 11 plus or minus 0.44%, 19.1 plus or minus 2.0%, and 30.7 plus or minus 2.1% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). In addition, CD86 expression increased with EPI at 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8) M from 9.2 plus or minus 0.52% to 41 plus or minus 3.8%, 26.4 plus or minus 1.9%, and 15.74 plus or minus 1.8% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). Similar results for mean CD80 and CD86 percent expression were observed for CD14+ cells from PBMC with a sample size of N = 6 and for NE when substituted for EPI. The data show that in vitro exposure to catecholamines significantly decreases %CD86 expression and significantly increases %CD86 expression in THP1 cells and human CD14+ APC. Previous studies have suggested an association between increased CD86 expression and TH2 activity. Thus, these data suggest that immunomodulation by catecholamines results in part by the variable effects of the B7 costimulatory pathway in APC.

  3. Osteoimmunology: Major and Costimulatory Pathway Expression Associated with Chronic Inflammatory Induced Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania N. Crotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of osteoimmunology has emerged in response to the range of evidences demonstrating the close interrelationship between the immune system and bone metabolism. This is pertinent to immune-mediated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease, where there are chronic inflammation and local bone erosion. Periprosthetic osteolysis is another example of chronic inflammation with associated osteolysis. This may also involve immune mediation when occurring in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Similarities in the regulation and mechanisms of bone loss are likely to be related to the inflammatory cytokines expressed in these diseases. This review highlights the role of immune-related factors influencing bone loss particularly in diseases of chronic inflammation where there is associated localized bone loss. The importance of the balance of the RANKL-RANK-OPG axis is discussed as well as the more recently appreciated role that receptors and adaptor proteins involved in the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM signaling pathway play. Although animal models are briefly discussed, the focus of this review is on the expression of ITAM associated molecules in relation to inflammation induced localized bone loss in RA, chronic periodontitis, and periprosthetic osteolysis, with an emphasis on the soluble and membrane bound factor osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR.

  4. Evaluation of co-stimulatory effects of Tamarindus indica L. on MNU-induced colonic cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Shyamala Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2004-08-01

    Colonic cell proliferation is the prerequisite for the genesis of cancer. Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicate dietary factors to be one of the commonest predisposing factors in the development of several types of cancers including large intestine. Here we have investigated the role of the fruit pulp of Tamarindus indica L. (TI), a tropical plant-derived food material, on the proliferating colonic mucosa using Swiss albino mice. Crypt cell proliferation rate (CCPR), on histological basis and [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay were chosen to evaluate the modulating potential of TI per se and in response to a subacute dose of N-nitroso N'-methyl urea (MNU). Descending colonic segment showed greater rate of cell proliferation than the ascending colon and cecum tissues isolated from the group 2 (TI-per se) when compared with group 1 (negative controls). It also revealed a positive correlation with the incorporation studies. Significant increase in the CCPR and radiolabeled precursor incorporation (p <0.001) was observed in MNU-induced+TI fed group of animals (group 4) in all the three segments when compared with control diet fed normal (group 1) as well as MNU-induced (group 3) animals. This study therefore indicates a co-stimulatory effect of TI on MNU-induced colonic cell kinetics.

  5. Targeting the T-cell co-stimulatory CD27/CD70 pathway in cancer immunotherapy: rationale and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Koen; Borst, Jannie

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, cancer immunotherapy was named 'breakthrough of the year' based on the outcome of clinical trials with blocking antibodies to the T-cell co-inhibitory receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1. This success has emphasized that cytotoxic T-cell responses to cancer can occur, but are limited by peripheral tolerance and by immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. Targeting of CTLA-4, PD-1 or its ligands partly overcomes these limitations and can now be applied in multiple immunogenic cancer types. Furthermore, an increased success rate is expected from combining CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 blocking with deliberate engagement of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, particularly TNF receptor (R) family members. The TNFR family includes CD27 (Tnfrsf7), for which an agonistic antibody has recently entered clinical trials. In this review, we describe how CD27 co-stimulation impacts the T-cell response, with the purpose to illuminate how CD27 agonism can be exploited in cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement combined with IL-21 enhance the generation of PD-1-disrupted CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jie; Xu, Qiuping; Su, Shu; Meng, Fanyan; Zou, Zhengyun; Chen, Fangjun; Du, Juan; Qian, Xiaoping; Liu, Baorui

    2017-09-07

    Blockade of the immune cell checkpoint inhibitors programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) has become a powerful tool in cancer treatment, which is effective across various solid cancer types and hematologic malignancies. Our previous studies showed that by reducing immune tolerance, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) modified cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) rank highly in terms of immune responses and cytotoxicity. In this study, a genetically modified K562 cell line with surface expression of 4-1BBL was developed to expand PD-1-disrupted CTLs in vitro for further adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Our findings demonstrate that after a long-term, up to 28days, engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement (ECCE) combined with IL-21 promote the expansion of PD-1-disrupted CTLs with a less differentiated "young" phenotype, enhanced immune response and superior cytotoxic effector characteristics. These new in vitro conditions represent a nimble and cost-effective approach to developing PD-1-disrupted CTLs with improved therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. Costimulatory Effects of an Immunodominant Parasite Antigen Paradoxically Prevent Induction of Optimal CD8 T Cell Protective Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Eickhoff

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi infection is controlled but not eliminated by host immunity. The T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS gene superfamily encodes immunodominant protective antigens, but expression of altered peptide ligands by different TS genes has been hypothesized to promote immunoevasion. We molecularly defined TS epitopes to determine their importance for protection versus parasite persistence. Peptide-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination experiments demonstrated that one pair of immunodominant CD4+ and CD8+ TS peptides alone can induce protective immunity (100% survival post-lethal parasite challenge. TS DNA vaccines have been shown by us (and others to protect BALB/c mice against T. cruzi challenge. We generated a new TS vaccine in which the immunodominant TS CD8+ epitope MHC anchoring positions were mutated, rendering the mutant TS vaccine incapable of inducing immunity to the immunodominant CD8 epitope. Immunization of mice with wild type (WT and mutant TS vaccines demonstrated that vaccines encoding enzymatically active protein and the immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitope enhance subdominant pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. More specifically, CD8+ T cells from WT TS DNA vaccinated mice were responsive to 14 predicted CD8+ TS epitopes, while T cells from mutant TS DNA vaccinated mice were responsive to just one of these 14 predicted TS epitopes. Molecular and structural biology studies revealed that this novel costimulatory mechanism involves CD45 signaling triggered by enzymatically active TS. This enhancing effect on subdominant T cells negatively regulates protective immunity. Using peptide-pulsed DC vaccination experiments, we have shown that vaccines inducing both immunodominant and subdominant epitope responses were significantly less protective than vaccines inducing only immunodominant-specific responses. These results have important implications for T. cruzi vaccine development. Of broader significance, we demonstrate that increasing

  9. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with co-stimulatory blockade induces macrochimerism and tolerance without cytoreductive host treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, T; Kurtz, J; Ito, H; Ronquillo, J V; Dong, V; Zhao, G; Shaffer, J; Sayegh, M H; Sykes, M

    2000-04-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (in immunocompetent adults) has always required cytoreductive treatment of recipients with irradiation or cytotoxic drugs to achieve lasting engraftment at levels detectable by non-PCR-based techniques ('macrochimerism' or 'mixed chimerism'). Only syngeneic marrow engraftment at such levels has been achieved in unconditioned hosts. This requirement for potentially toxic myelosuppressive host pre-conditioning has precluded the clinical use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for many indications other than malignancies, including tolerance induction. We demonstrate here that treatment of naive mice with a high dose of fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow, followed by one injection each of monoclonal antibody against CD154 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 immunoglobulin, resulted in multi-lineage hematopoietic macrochimerism (of about 15%) that persisted for up to 34 weeks. Long-term chimeras developed donor-specific tolerance (donor skin graft survival of more than 145 days) and demonstrated ongoing intrathymic deletion of donor-reactive T cells. A protocol of high-dose bone marrow transplantation and co-stimulatory blockade can thus achieve allogeneic bone marrow engraftment without cytoreduction or T-cell depletion of the host, and eliminates a principal barrier to the more widespread use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Although efforts have been made to minimize host pre-treatment for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for tolerance induction, so far none have succeeded in eliminating pre-treatment completely. Our demonstration that this can be achieved provides the rationale for a safe approach for inducing robust transplantation tolerance in large animals and humans.

  10. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  11. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  12. Structural immunology of costimualtory and coinhibitory molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The T cell costimulatory pathways are central to regulating immune responses,and targeting these pathways represents one of the most promising approaches for achieving immunotherapy.The molecular structures of costimulation revealed invaluable mechanistic insights underlying costimulatory receptor/ligand specificity,affinity,oligomeric state,and valency,which provided the bases for better manipulation of these signaling pathways.The incredible growth of this field led to identification of new members and unexpected interactions,revealing a complicated regulatory network of immune responses.The advances in structural biology of costimulation will promise unprecedented opportunities for furthering our understanding and therapeutic application of T cell costimulatory pathways.

  13. Hadron Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Faessler, Amand; Lee, Ian Woo; Lyubovitskij, Valery E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a possible interpretation of the open charm mesons $D_{s0}^*(2317)$, $D_{s1}(2460)$ and the hidden charm mesons X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4140) as hadron molecules. Using a phenomenological Lagrangian approach we review the strong and radiative decays of the $D_{s0}^* (2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ states. The X(3872) is assumed to consist dominantly of molecular hadronic components with an additional small admixture of a charmonium configuration. Determing the radiative ($\\gamma J/\\psi$ and $\\gamma \\psi(2s)$) and strong ($J/\\psi 2\\pi $ and $ J/\\psi 3\\pi$) decay modes we show that present experimental observation is consistent with the molecular structure assumption of the X(3872). Finally we give evidence for molecular interpretations of the Y(3940) and Y(4140) related to the observed strong decay modes $J/\\psi + \\omega$ or $J/\\psi + \\phi$, respectively.

  14. Anergic cells induced by the blockade of CD40-CD154 and CD28-B7 costimulatory pathways act as potent immunoregulatory cells in vitro and vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡勇; 周佩军; 唐孝达

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was to evaluate whether anergic cells induced by the blockade of CD40-CD154 and CD28-B7 costimulatory pathways can act as potent immunoregulatory cells in vitro and prolong cardiac allograft survival after adoptive transfer.Methods Anergic cells were induced in vitro by the addition of anti-CD154 and anti-CD80 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to primary MLR (mixed lymphocyte reaction) consisting of BALB/c as responder and C3H as stimulator. Anergic cells were added to a newly formed MLR in assessing the regulatory capacity and antigen specificity of anergic cells. The ability of anergic cells to respond to antigen and/or exogenous recombinant mouse interleukin-2 (rmIL-2) was tested. For in vivo studies, anergic cells were intravenously injected into 3.0-Gy γ-irradiated BALB/c mice immediately after heterotopic abdominal cardiac transplantation. To prolong allograft survival, recipient mice injected with anergic cells received rapamycin therapy (1 mg·day-1·kg-1).Results Anergic cells strongly suppressed the proliferation of naǐve BALB/c splenocytes against the original (C3H) stimulator in a dose-dependent manner, but they failed to suppress the proliferation of naǐve BALB/c splenocytes against the third-party (C57BL/6J) stimulator. The anergic state was reversed by both original (C3H) stimulator and additional exogenous IL-2. In in vivo studies, untreated irradiated BALB/c mice rejected C3H cardiac allografts with a mean survival time of (8.6±1.1) days, whereas those injected with the anergic cells rejected the allografts with a mean survival time of (11.8±1.9) days, which was slightly longer than that of the untreated mice. The protocol based on anergic cells injection plus rapamycin therapy could prolong allograft survival significantly [(29.6±4.4) days]. Conclusions Anergic cells induced by the blockade of CD40-CD154 and CD28-B7 costimulatory pathways can act as potent immunoregulatory cells in vitro, and prolong cardiac allograft

  15. IN VITRO CO-STIMULATORY ACTIVITY OF HUMAN B7.2(IgV+C)PROTEIN PRODUCED BY ENGINEERED BACTERIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To express human B7.2 extracellular domain with prokaryote expression system and to evaluate its biological activity in vitro. Methods PCR was used to amplify the extracellular region of human B7. 2which contained both the IgV and IgC domains. The recombinant PGEX-4T-3/hB7. 2 (IgV+C) was obtained by cloning the PCR product into a prokaryote expression plasmid PGEX-4T-3 and was transformed into the host strain of DH5-α. The fusion protein consisted of GST and hB7.2(IgV+C) was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting.T cell activation was observed by exposing purified T lymphocytes to the fusion protein and [3H]-TdR incorporation with the presence of the first signal imitated by anti-CD3 antibody. Results The fusion protein GST-hB7.2 (IgV+C) was produced and detected in inclusive body form from engineered bacterial cells. With the first signal existed,T lymphocytes proliferated when it was co-stimulated by the fusion protein. Conclusion These results indicated that the functional human B7.2(IgV+C) fusion protein can be produced in bacterial cells and the fusion protein displays the co-stimulatory activity in T lymphocytes activation.

  16. Increasing the repeating units of ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates directed toward reduced oxidative stress and co-stimulatory factors expression in human monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Izumi; Yui, Nobuhiko; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates are commonly used in biomaterials and dental restorative materials as a cross-linking agent. In this study, toxic effect of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylates (PEG-DMAs) with various ethylene glycol repeating units was investigated in terms of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of co-stimulatory factors in human leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells) to verify the effect of ethylene glycol repeating units. Note that the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient of PEG-based dimethacrylates decreased with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units, indicating that the hydrophilicity of PEG-DMAs increased with ethylene glycol repeating units. The toxic effect of PEG-DMAs such as cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of CD86 in treated THP-1 cells are reduced with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units in PEG-DMAs. However, the expression of CD54 in treated THP-1 cells was not influenced with the ethylene glycol repeating units and the maximal expression level of CD54 was observed at the concentration range of 2-4 mM for all samples. Accordingly, hydrophilic character of PEG-DMAs with long ethylene glycol chains definitely alleviates the some toxic aspect of PEG-based DMAs. This finding would provide important insight into the design of new biomaterials and dental materials with superior biocompatibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The origin of thymic CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their co-stimulatory requirements are determined after elimination of recirculating peripheral CD4+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yifan; Bourges, Dorothee; Dromey, James A; Harrison, Leonard C; Lew, Andrew M

    2007-04-01

    Studies on the thymic ontogeny of naturally arising CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (TR cells) are complicated by the contamination of recirculating cells from the periphery (both activated CD4(+) T and TR cells). We investigated TR cells in anti-CD4 antibody transgenic (Tg) (GK) mice that continuously deplete peripheral CD4 T cells but not thymocytes so that the generation of thymic TR cells and their developmental requirement can be accurately assessed. We show that in the thymuses of mice that lack peripheral CD4(+) cells, TR cells were present but were fewer in number compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Therefore, we show that peripheral TR cells do re-enter the thymus, comprising 20% of TR cells in the normal thymus. TR cells from both WT and GK mice expressed Foxp3 and GITR, and suppressed the proliferation of CD25(-)CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the co-stimulation requirements for TR generation were evaluated in mice with or without peripheral CD4 cells. Splenic TR cells in CD40L(-/-) mice and CTLA4Ig Tg mice were fewer compared with WT mice. Mice deficient in both co-stimulatory pathways had further reduction in splenic TR cells. Unlike the periphery, the reduction in thymic TR cells was only seen for CD40L(-/-) but not for CTLA4Ig Tg mice. Therefore, we found that the co-stimulation requirements for the thymic development of TR cells differed from those for peripheral homeostasis.

  18. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells mediate anti-inflammatory responses to a gut commensal molecule via both innate and adaptive mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Ochoa-Reparaz, Javier; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-04-09

    Polysaccharide A (PSA), the archetypical immunomodulatory molecule of the gut commensal Bacteroides fragilis, induces regulatory T cells to secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). The cellular mediators of PSA's immunomodulatory properties are incompletely understood. In a mouse model of colitis, we find that PSA requires both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to generate protection. Plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) exposed to PSA do not produce proinflammatory cytokines, but instead they specifically stimulate IL-10 secretion by CD4+ T cells and efficiently mediate PSA-afforded immunoprotection. PSA induces and preferentially ligates Toll-like receptor 2 on PDCs but not on conventional DCs. Compared with other TLR2 ligands, PSA is better at enhancing PDC expression of costimulatory molecules required for protection against colitis. PDCs can thus orchestrate the beneficial immunoregulatory interaction of commensal microbial molecules, such as PSA, through both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Co-inhibitory Signaling Pathways in Transplantation and Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina M. McGrath

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Negative costimulatory molecules, acting through so-called inhibitory pathways, play a crucial role in the control of T cell responses. This negative ‘second signal’ opposes TCR activation and leads to downregulation of T cell proliferation and promotes antigen specific tolerance. Much interest has focused upon these pathways in recent years as a method to control detrimental alloresponses and promote allograft tolerance. However, recent experimental data highlights the complexity of negative costimulatory pathways in alloimmunity. Varying effects are observed from molecules expressed on donor and recipient tissues and also depending upon the activation status of immune cells involved. There appears to be significant overlap and redundancy within these systems, rendering this a challenging area to understand and exploit therapeutically. In this article, we will review the literature at the current time regarding the major negative costimulation pathways including CTLA-4:B7, PD-1:PD-L1/PD-L2 and PD-L1:B7-1, B7-H3, B7-H4, HVEM:BTLA/CD160 and TIM-3:Galectin-9. We aim to outline the role of these pathways in alloimmunity and discuss their potential applications for tolerance induction in transplantation.

  20. The B7 family of immunoregulatory receptors: A comparative and evolutionary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.D.; Pasquier, L.D.; Lefranc, M.-P.; Lopez, V.; Benmansour, A.; Boudinot, P.

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, T cell activation requires specific recognition of the peptide-MHC complex by the TcR and co-stimulatory signals. Important co-stimulatory receptors expressed by T cells are the molecules of the CD28 family, that regulate T cell activation, proliferation and tolerance. These receptors recognize B7s and B7-homologous (B7H) molecules that are typically expressed by the antigen presenting cells. In teleost fish, typical T cell responses have been described and the TcR, MHC and CD28/CTLA4 genes have been characterized. In contrast, the members of the B7 gene family have only been described in mammals and birds and have yet to be addressed in lower vertebrates. To learn more about the evolution of components guiding T cell activation in vertebrates, we performed a systematic genomic survey for the B7 co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory IgSF receptors in lower vertebrates with an emphasis on teleost fish. Our search identified fish sequences that are orthologous to B7, B7-H1/B7-DC, B7-H3 and B7-H4 as defined by sequence identity, phylogeny and combinations of short or long-range syntenic relationships. However, we were unable to identify clear orthologs for B7-H2 (CD275, ICOS ligand) in bony fish, which correlates with our prior inability to find ICOS in fish. Interestingly, our results indicate that teleost fish possess a single B7.1/B7.2 (CD80/86) molecule that likely interacts with CD28/CTLA4 as the ligand-binding regions seem to be conserved in both partners. Overall, our analyses implies that gene duplication (and loss) have shaped a molecular repertoire of B7-like molecules that was recruited for the refinement of T cell activation during the evolution of the vertebrates.

  1. The co-stimulatory effects of MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling on activation of murine γδ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Zhang

    Full Text Available γδ T cells express several different toll-like receptor (TLRs. The role of MyD88- dependent TLR signaling in TCR activation of murine γδ T cells is incompletely defined. Here, we report that Pam3CSK4 (PAM, TLR2 agonist and CL097 (TLR7 agonist, but not lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist, increased CD69 expression and Th1-type cytokine production upon anti-CD3 stimulation of γδ T cells from young adult mice (6-to 10-week-old. However, these agonists alone did not induce γδ T cell activation. Additionally, we noted that neither PAM nor CL097 synergized with anti-CD3 in inducing CD69 expression on γδ T cells of aged mice (21-to 22-month-old. Compared to young γδ T cells, PAM and CL097 increased Th-1 type cytokine production with a lower magnitude from anti-CD3- stimulated, aged γδ T cells. Vγ1+ and Vγ4+ cells are two subpopulations of splenic γδ T cells. PAM had similar effects in anti-CD3-activated control and Vγ4+ subset- depleted γδ T cells; whereas CL097 induced more IFN-γ production from Vγ4+ subset-depleted γδ T cells than from the control group. Finally, we studied the role of MyD88-dependent TLRs in γδ T cell activation during West Nile virus (WNV infection. γδ T cell, in particular, Vγ1+ subset expansion was significantly reduced in both MyD88- and TLR7- deficient mice. Treatment with TLR7 agonist induced more Vγ1+ cell expansion in wild-type mice during WNV infection. In summary, these results suggest that MyD88-dependent TLRs provide co-stimulatory signals during TCR activation of γδ T cells and these have differential effects on distinct subsets.

  2. 慢性再生障碍性贫血患者CD28共刺激分子及Fas的表达%Expressions of co-stimulatory molecule CD28 and Fas in chronic aplastic anemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏; 王运律; 胡琦; 孙思明; 刘元霞; 张晓峰

    2008-01-01

    再生障碍性贫血(aplastic anemia,AA)简称再障,是免疫介导的造血抑制的综合病症,其中又以慢性再生障碍性贫血(chronic aplastic anemia,CAA)患者多见。本文旨在观测CAA患者外周血共刺激分子CD28及Fas(CD95)的表达水平。

  3. The Role of Costimulatory Molecules in the Development of Memory and Effector T Helper 2 Cells During an in vivo Immune Response to the Murine Gastrointestinal Parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    not well understood. One model used to study the Th immune response involves oral infection of mice with the gastrointestinal nematode parasite...the development of the Th2 response to the gastrointestinal nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus.” Discussion...4-producing effector and memory Th2 cells following priming with the murine gastrointestinal nematode parasite H. polygyrus. Previous studies

  4. Major histocompatibility class I molecules present Urtica dioica agglutinin, a superantigen of vegetal origin, to T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, P; Buckle, M; Abastado, J P; Peumans, W J; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1999-05-01

    The Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) shares with the superantigens the property of activating T cell subsets bearing particular Vbeta segments of the TCR. However, UDA is a lectin capable of binding to many glycoproteins on cell membranes. The implication of MHC versus other glycoproteins in UDA presentation was presently studied. Using mutant mice lacking MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC class II (MHC-II) or both MHC antigens, we provided evidence that MHC-I and MHC-II molecules serve as UDA receptors. Presentation by either one of these molecules ensured similar T cell responses and co-stimulatory signals were mandatory for optimal T cell activation and proliferation both in MHC-I and MHC-II contexts. Remarkably, in the absence of MHC molecules, UDA could not be efficiently presented to T cells by other glycosylated proteins. Surface plasmon resonance studies were used to confirm the binding of UDA to MHC-I molecules using a fusion protein consisting of MHC-I domains and beta2-microglobulin. The results indicated that the interaction between UDA and MHC-I molecules implicated lectin-binding site(s) of UDA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that, in addition to MHC-II antigens, MHC-I molecules serve as an alternative ligand for UDA.

  5. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  6. Soluble Co-Signaling Molecules Predict Long-Term Graft Outcome in Kidney-Transplanted Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendreras, Susana G.; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Menéndez, Aurora; Bravo-Mendoza, Cristina; González-Vidal, Ana; Coto, Eliecer; Díaz-Corte, Carmen; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Larrea, Carlos; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Co-signaling molecules are responsible for full T-cell activation after solid organ transplantation. Their increased expression can lead to the release of a soluble form that can modulate the immune response post-transplantation. We analyzed the presence of co-signaling molecules (sCD30, sCD40, sCD137, sCTLA-4, sCD80, sCD28, sCD40L, sPD-1, and sPD-L1) in serum from kidney-transplanted patients (n = 59) obtained at different times (before transplantation, and 15 days, 3 months and 1 year post-transplantation) and their contribution to graft outcome was evaluated using principal component analysis. Before transplantation, high levels of soluble co-signaling molecules (mainly sCD30, sCD137 and sCD40) were detected in all patients. These molecules were modulated soon after receiving an allograft but never attained similar levels to those of healthy controls. A signature based on the determination of six soluble co-stimulatory (sCD30, sCD40, sCD137 and sCD40L) and co-inhibitory (sPD-1 and sPD-L1) molecules at 3 months post-transplantation allowed a group of patients to be identified (27.12%) with a worse long-term graft outcome. Patients with high levels of soluble molecules showed a progressive and gradual deterioration of kidney function (increased creatinine and proteinuria levels and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate) over time and a higher risk of graft loss at 6 years post-transplantation than patients with low levels of these molecules (62.55% versus 5.14%, pmolecules in kidney-transplanted patients whose quantification at 3 months post-transplantation might be a useful biomarker of immune status and help to predict long-term graft evolution. PMID:25478957

  7. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  8. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  9. Rhipicephalus microplus salivary gland molecules induce differential CD86 expression in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tidwell Jason P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tick parasitism is a major impediment for cattle production in many parts of the world. The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, is an obligate hematophagous parasite of domestic and wild animals that serves as vector of infectious agents lethal to cattle. Tick saliva contains molecules evolved to modulate host innate and adaptive immune responses which facilitates blood feeding and pathogen transmission. Tick feeding promotes CD4 T cell polarization to a Th2 profile usually accompanied by down-regulation of Th1 cytokines through as yet undefined mechanisms. Co-stimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells are central to development of T cell responses including Th1 and Th2 responses. Tick induced changes to antigen presenting cell signal transduction pathways are largely unknown. Here we document the ability of R. microplus salivary gland extracts (SGE to effect differential CD86 expression. Results We examined changes in co-stimulatory molecule expression in murine RAW 264.7 cells in response to R. microplus SGE exposure in the presence of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 ligand, LPS. After 24 hrs, CD86, but not CD80, was preferentially up-regulated on mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells when treated with SGE and then LPS, but not SGE alone. CD80 and CD40 expression was increased with LPS, but the addition of SGE did not alter expression. Higher concentrations of SGE were less effective at increasing CD86 RNA expression. The addition of mitogen or extracellular kinase (MEK inhibitor, PD98059, significantly reduced the ability for SGE to induce CD86 expression, indicating activation of MEK is necessary for SGE induced up-regulation. Conclusions Molecules in SGE of R. microplus have a concentration-dependent effect on differential up-regulation of CD86 in a macrophage cell line activated by the TLR4 ligand, LPS. This CD86 up-regulation is at least partially dependent on the ERK1/2 pathway and may serve to

  10. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  11. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  12. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  13. Molecules in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Omont, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The main achievements, current developments and prospects of molecular studies in external galaxies are reviewed. They are put in the context of the results of several decades of studies of molecules in local interstellar medium, their chemistry and their importance for star formation. CO observations have revealed the gross structure of molecular gas in galaxies. Together with other molecules, they are among the best tracers of star formation at galactic scales. Our knowledge about molecular abundances in various local galactic environments is progressing. They trace physical conditions and metallicity, and they are closely related to dust processes and large aromatic molecules. Major recent developments include mega-masers, and molecules in Active Galactic Nuclei; millimetre emission of molecules at very high redshift; and infrared H2 emission as tracer of warm molecular gas, shocks and photodissociation regions. The advent of sensitive giant interferometers from the centimetre to sub-millimetre range, espe...

  14. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  15. Heavy Exotic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general strictures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. The bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ to be observed.

  16. Heavy exotic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  17. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  18. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  19. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  20. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  1. Molecules as Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, Luca

    Molecular biology investigates the structure and function of biochemical systems starting from their basic building blocks: macromolecules. A macromolecule is a large, complex molecule (a protein or a nucleic acid) that usually has inner mutable state and external activity. Informal explanations of biochemical events trace individual macromolecules through their state changes and their interaction histories: a macromolecule is endowed with an identity that is retained through its transformations, even through changes in molecular energy and mass. A macromolecule, therefore, is qualitatively different from the small molecules of inorganic chemistry. Such molecules are stateless: in the standard notation for chemical reactions they are seemingly created and destroyed, and their atomic structure is used mainly for the bookkeeping required by the conservation of mass.

  2. Molecules in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The first molecules detected at infrared wavelengths in the ejecta of a Type II supernova, namely SN1987A, consisted of CO and SiO. Since then, confirmation of the formation of these two species in several other supernovae a few hundred days after explosion has been obtained. However, supernova environments appear to hamper the synthesis of large, complex species due to the lack of microscopically-mixed hydrogen deep in supernova cores. Because these environments also form carbon and silicate dust, it is of importance to understand the role played by molecules in the depletion of elements and how chemical species get incorporated into dust grains. In the present paper, we review our current knowledge of the molecular component of supernova ejecta, and present new trends and results on the synthesis of molecules in these harsh, explosive events.

  3. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  4. Molecules in \\eta\\ Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A; Rodriguez, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward \\eta\\ Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (about 100 km /s) indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be under-abundant in \\eta\\ Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of eta Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  5. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  6. Multicolor Bound Soliton Molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Rui; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We show a new class of bound soliton molecule that exists in a parametrically driven nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The composed solitons exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, bound together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor bound soliton molecule shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which may open up a great avenue towards versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy.

  7. Gated container molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; WANG Hao; HOUK K. N.

    2011-01-01

    Donald J.Cram,the great UCLA chemist,received the Nobel Prize for his discoveries about host-guest complexes [1].Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted about the nature and strength of interactions between the host and guest molecules.The concepts of constrictive binding (the activation energy of the binding process) and intrinsic binding (the free energy difference between the complex and the free host and guest molecules) were introduced to characterize different binding properties (Figure 1)[2].

  8. Synthesis beyond the molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhoudt, D.N.; Crego-Calama, M.

    2002-01-01

    Weak, noncovalent interactions between molecules control many biological functions. In chemistry, noncovalent interactions are now exploited for the synthesis in solution of large supramolecular aggregates. The aim of these syntheses is not only the creation of a particular structure, but also the i

  9. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  10. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  11. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  12. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  13. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  14. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yanxia [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Zhan Mingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2004-09-14

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules {rho}{sub I} introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZ), vertical bar W{sub N}) and vertical bar {phi}{sub N}). We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms {rho}{sub ij} is disentangled, the entanglement of the state vertical bar {psi}{sub N}){sub {alpha}} is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  15. Properties of entanglement molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Xia; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare a certain kind of N-atom entangled state that allows us to construct some possible types of entanglement molecules via cavity QED. The entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr are studied with respect to bipartite entanglement that is robust against the disposal of particles and are compared with entanglement molecules rgrI introduced in Dur (2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 020303). We also give the maximal amount of entanglement achievable for two particular situations in two possible configurations. Meanwhile, we investigate the entanglement properties of entanglement molecules |psgrNrangagr in terms of local measurement using the maximum connectedness and persistency and compare them with other kinds of N-atom entangled states such as |GHZrang, |WNrang and |phgrNrang. We show that the maximal value N - 1 of the persistency of the state |psgrNrangagr corresponds to the case that all atoms are pairwise entangled. If any pair of atoms rgrij is disentangled, the entanglement of the state |psgrNrangagr is very easy to destroy by a single local measurement.

  16. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  17. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  18. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  19. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  20. Hydrogen molecules in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: joerg.weber@tu-dresden.de; Hiller, Martin; Lavrov, Edward V. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Molecular hydrogen, the simplest of all molecules, allows a direct insight into the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In the case of H{sub 2}, the Pauli principle leads to two different species, para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. A conversion between these species is prohibited. Vibrational mode spectra reflect the fundamental properties and allow an unambiguous identification of the H{sub 2} molecules. Today, we have experimental evidence for the trapping of hydrogen molecules in the semiconductors Si, Ge and GaAs at the interstitial sites, within hydrogen-induced platelets, in voids and at impurities (interstitial oxygen in Si). Interstitial H{sub 2} is a nearly free rotor with a surprisingly simple behavior. We review on interstitial H{sub 2} in semiconductors and report on the unexpected preferential disappearance of the para-H{sub 2} or ortho-D{sub 2} species. The origin of the detected ortho-para conversion will be discussed.

  1. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  2. Augmented CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD56(-) cells in cytokine-induced killer cells cultured with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement from heavily pretreated patients with solid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Yi, Yongxiang; Yin, Dandan; Zhou, Zhenxian; Fan, Jing; Ye, Wei; Zhao, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) were shown to be a promising tool in the quest for new therapeutic approaches in the setting of metastatic solid tumors refractory to standard treatments. However, there is a practical clinical problem of different expansion rates and cell function as individual variability exists. Stimulatory molecular 4-1BB could promote division and survival of T cells and enhance effector activity including cytokine production. This study aimed to invest the contribution of co-stimulation signal to CIKs production for exploring new strategies, which increase the expansion and reliability of CIKs generation to improve access to CIKs therapy. We studied the larger-scale expansion of CIKs cultured with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement (ECCE) consisting of K562 cells that expressed 4-1BBL in heavily pretreated patients with solid tumor. The proliferation and cytotoxic capacity of CIKs were evaluated. Phenotypes of CIKs were analyzed using flow cytometry. Cytokine levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proliferation and cytotoxic activity of CIKs were significantly up-regulated by ECCE. The percentages of CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD56(-) CIKs were significantly increased while the percentage of CD3(+)CD56(+) CIKs was decreased. In addition, the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α by CIKs could also be enhanced significantly when ECCE were added into the culture system. This study suggests that ECCE may improve the efficacy of CIKs therapy and make CIKs therapy possible for the patients whose CIKs would be hard to be cultured using conventional methods. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecules in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  4. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  5. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  6. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  7. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  8. Astrochemistry and Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Y. C.

    2010-03-01

    Astrochemistry provides powerful tools to understand various cosmic phenomena, including those in our solar system to the large-scale structure of the universe. In addition, the chemical property of an astronomical body is a crucial factor which governs the evolution of the system. Recent progress in astrophysical theories, computational modelings, and observational techniques requires a detailed understanding of the interactions between the constituents of an astronomical system, which are atoms and molecules within the system. Especially the far-infrared/sub-millimeter wave range, which is called as the last frontier in astronomical observations, contains numerous molecular lines, which may provide a huge amount of new information. However, we need an astrochemical understanding to use this information fully. Although this review is very limited, I would like to stress the importance of astrochemical approach in this overview for the field, which is getting much more attention than ever before.

  9. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  10. Forces in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  11. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  12. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Yakhmi

    2009-06-01

    The conventional magnetic materials used in current technology, such as, Fe, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, SmCo5, Nd2Fe14B etc are all atom-based, and their preparation/processing require high temperature routes. Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material with long-range magnetic order, mainly because one can play with the weak intermolecular interactions. Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, metal-based systems, heterobimetallic assemblies, or mixed organic–inorganic systems. The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of molecular magnets. Being weakly coloured, unlike their opaque classical magnet ‘cousins’ listed above, possibilities of photomagnetic switching exist. Persistent efforts also continue to design the ever-elusive polymer magnets towards applications in industry. While providing a brief overview of the field of molecular magnetism, this article highlights some recent developments in it, with emphasis on a few studies from the author’s own lab.

  13. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  14. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  15. STM investigation of surfactant molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) have been studied on HOPG by using the in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on the HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. In the high-resolution images of STS and SHS molecules, one end of the molecules shows bright spots which are attributed to the SO3- groups.

  16. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  17. Clinical implications of co-inhibitory molecule expression in the tumor microenvironment for DC vaccination: a game of stop and go

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eVasaturo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of therapeutic dendritic cell (DC vaccines in cancer immunotherapy is to activate cytotoxic T cells to recognize and attack the tumor. T cell activation requires the interaction of the T cell receptor with a cognate major histocompatibility complex (MHC-peptide complex. Although initiated by antigen engagement, it is the complex balance between co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signals on DCs that results in T cell activation or tolerance. Even when already activated, tumor-specific T cells can be neutralized by the expression of co-inhibitory molecules on tumor cells. These and other immunosuppressive cues in the tumor microenvironment are major factors currently hampering the application of DC vaccination. In this review, we discuss recent data regarding the essential and complex role of co-inhibitory molecules in regulating the immune response within the tumor microenvironment. In particular, possible therapeutic intervention strategies aimed at reversing or neutralizing suppressive networks within the tumor microenvironment will be emphasized. Importantly, blocking co-inhibitory molecule signaling, often referred to as immune checkpoint blockade, does not necessarily lead to an effective activation of tumor-specific T cells. Therefore, combination of checkpoint blockade with other immune potentiating therapeutic strategies, such as DC vaccination, might serve as a synergistic combination, capable of reversing effector T cells immunosuppression while at the same time increasing the efficacy of T cell-mediated immunotherapies. This will ultimately result in long-term anti-tumor immunity.

  18. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  19. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...

  20. Triatomic molecules laser-cooled

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Molecules containing three atoms have been laser-cooled to ultracold temperatures for the first time. John Doyle and colleagues at Harvard University in the US used a technique called Sisyphus cooling to chill an ensemble of about a million strontium-monohydroxide molecules to 750 μK.

  1. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  2. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  3. Immunomodulatory molecules are released from the first trimester and term placenta via exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, S K; Alam, S M; Jasti, S; Hodes, H; Nauser, T; Gilliam, M; Billstrand, C; Hunt, J S; Petroff, M G

    2012-12-01

    The semiallogenic fetus is tolerated by the maternal immune system through control of innate and adaptive immune responses. Trophoblast cells secrete nanometer scale membranous particles called exosomes, which have been implicated in modulation of the local and systemic maternal immune system. Here we investigate the possibility that exosomes secreted from the first trimester and term placenta carry HLA-G and B7 family immunomodulators. Confocal microscopy of placental sections revealed intracellular co-localization of B7-H1 with CD63, suggesting that B7-H1 associates with subcellular vesicles that give rise to exosomes. First trimester and term placental explants were then cultured for 24 h. B7H-1 (CD274), B7-H3 (CD276) and HLA-G5 were abundant in pelleted supernatants of these cultures that contained microparticles and exosomes; the latter, however, was observed only in first trimester pellets and was nearly undetectable in term explant-derived pellets. Further purification of exosomes by sucrose density fractionation confirmed the association of these proteins specifically with exosomes. Finally, culture of purified trophoblast cells in the presence or absence of EGF suggested that despite the absence of HLA-G5 association with term explant-derived exosomes, it is present in exosomes secreted from mononuclear cytotrophoblast cells. Further, differentiation of cytotrophoblast cells reduced the presence of HLA-G5 in secreted exosomes. Together, the results suggest that the immunomodulatory proteins HLA-G5, B7-H1 and B7-H3, are secreted from early and term placenta, and have important implications in the mechanisms by which trophoblast immunomodulators modify the maternal immunological environment.

  4. ICOS-ligand expression on plasmacytoid dendritic cells supports breast cancer progression by promoting the accumulation of immunosuppressive CD4+ T cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faget, Julien; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Gobert, Michael; Durand, Isabelle; Olive, Daniel; Biota, Cathy; Bachelot, Thomas; Treilleux, Isabelle; Goddard-Leon, Sophie; Lavergne, Emilie; Chabaud, Sylvie; Blay, Jean Yves; Caux, Christophe; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we report that inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS), a T cell costimulatory molecule of the CTLA4/PD1/CD28 family, is expressed mostly by tumor-associated Treg in primary breast tumors...

  5. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makusu Tsutsui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  6. When water molecules meet air

    OpenAIRE

    Hsie, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Verde, Ana Vila; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-01-01

    About 70% of our planet is covered in water. Most of that water exists as water in the bulk – the neighbors of water molecules are other water molecules – and only a small fraction of molecules are at the air-water interface. Despite the small relative abundance of interfacial water, it is of the utmost importance: it governs the chemistry involving the surface of oceans and seawater aerosols, or the small water droplets forming clouds. Reactions at the air-water interface are directly releva...

  7. Absorption characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H K T Kumar; K Appaji Gowda

    2000-03-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin molecule absorbs light and undergoes a series of structural transformation following a well-defined photocycle. The complex photocycle is transformed to an equivalent level diagram by considering the lifetime of the intermediate states. Assuming that only and states are appreciably populated at any instant of time, the level diagram is further simplified to two-level system. Based on the rate equations for two-level system, an analytic expression for the absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin molecule is derived. It is applied to study the behaviour of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film in the visible wavelength region of 514 nm. The dependence of absorption coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin film on the thickness of the film, total number density of active molecules and initial number density of molecules in -state is presented in the graphical form.

  8. Cell adhesion molecules and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Emma Kate; Ballester Roig, Maria Neus; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play essential roles in the central nervous system, where some families are involved in synaptic development and function. These synaptic adhesion molecules (SAMs) are involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, and the formation of neuronal networks. Recent findings from studies examining the consequences of sleep loss suggest that these molecules are candidates to act in sleep regulation. This review highlights the experimental data that lead to the identification of SAMs as potential sleep regulators, and discusses results supporting that specific SAMs are involved in different aspects of sleep regulation. Further, some potential mechanisms by which SAMs may act to regulate sleep are outlined, and the proposition that these molecules may serve as molecular machinery in the two sleep regulatory processes, the circadian and homeostatic components, is presented. Together, the data argue that SAMs regulate the neuronal plasticity that underlies sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Special Issue: Single Molecule Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans H. Gorris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in the detection and manipulation of single molecules have enabled new insights into the function, structure and interactions of biomolecules. This Special Issue was launched to account for the rapid progress in the field of “Single Molecule Techniques”. Four original research articles and seven review articles provide an introduction, as well as an in-depth discussion, of technical developments that are indispensable for the characterization of individual biomolecules. Fluorescence microscopy takes center stage in this Special Issue because it is one of the most sensitive and flexible techniques, which has been adapted in many variations to the specific demands of single molecule analysis. Two additional articles are dedicated to single molecule detection based on atomic force microscopy.

  10. Quantum Transport Through Heterocyclic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    We explore electron transport properties in molecular wires made of heterocyclic molecules (pyrrole, furan and thiophene) by using the Green's function technique. Parametric calculations are given based on the tight-binding model to describe the electron transport in these wires. It is observed that the transport properties are significantly influenced by (a) the heteroatoms in the heterocyclic molecules and (b) the molecule-to-electrodes coupling strength. Conductance (g) shows sharp resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy levels in the limit of weak molecular coupling, while they get broadened in the strong molecular coupling limit. These resonances get shifted with the change of the heteroatoms in these heterocyclic molecules. All the essential features of the electron transfer through these molecular wires become much more clearly visible from the study of our current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, and they provide several key information in the study of molecular transport.

  11. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry; Roche, Joëlle

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule fam...

  12. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  13. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  14. Optofluidic single molecule flow proteometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Nan; Chou, Chao-Kai; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2009-02-01

    A microfluidic single molecule fluorescence-based detection scheme is developed to identify target protein direct from cell lysate by using polyclonal antibody. Relative concentration of target protein in solution is determined by twodimensional (2D) photon burst analysis. Compared to conventional ensemble measurement assays, this microfluidic single molecule approach combines the advantages of higher sensitivity, fast processing time, small sample consumption and high resolution quantitative analysis.

  15. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  16. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-09

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules.

  17. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Rohde, Bernhard

    2012-07-06

    Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach "Molecule Cloud". The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using

  18. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  19. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.;

    2012-01-01

    on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...... atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...

  20. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electric Deflection of Rotating Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gershnabel, E

    2010-01-01

    We provide a theory of the deflection of polar and non-polar rotating molecules by inhomogeneous static electric field. Rainbow-like features in the angular distribution of the scattered molecules are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, we demonstrate that one may efficiently control the deflection process with the help of short and strong femtosecond laser pulses. In particular the deflection process may by turned-off by a proper excitation, and the angular dispersion of the deflected molecules can be substantially reduced. We study the problem both classically and quantum mechanically, taking into account the effects of strong deflecting field on the molecular rotations. In both treatments we arrive at the same conclusions. The suggested control scheme paves the way for many applications involving molecular focusing, guiding, and trapping by inhomogeneous fields.

  2. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  3. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  4. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal...

  5. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  6. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  7. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  8. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  9. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  10. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update o

  11. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  12. WHAT ARE THE MOLECULES DOING?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Johnstone's identification of teaching and learning difficulties derived from the three levels of description in .... and in aqueous solution the molecules (say HA) dissociate into a hydrogen ion, H+ (aq) and an anion, A-(aq). This is a chemical ...

  13. Small Molecules Target Carcinogenic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    An ingenious cellular mechanism of effecting protein localization is prenylation: the covalent attachment of a hydrophobic prenyl group to a protein that facilitates protein association with cell membranes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate whether the oncogenic Stat3 protein can undergo artificial prenylation via high-affinity prenylated small-molecule binding agents and thus be rendered inactive by localization at the plasma membrane instead of nucleus. The measurements were performed on a home-built instrument capable of recording simultaneously several optical parameters (lifetime, polarization, color, etc) and with single-molecule sensitivity. A pH-invariant fluorescein derivative with double moiety was designed to bridge a prenyl group and a small peptide that binds Stat3 with high affinity. Confocal fluorescence images show effective localization of the ligand to the membrane of liposomes. Stat3 predominantly localizes at the membrane only in the presence of the prenylated ligand. Single-molecule FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) between donor-labeled prenylated agents and acceptor-labeled, surface tethered Stat3 protein is used to determine the dynamic heterogeneity of the protein-ligand interaction and follow individual binding-unbinding events in real time. The data indicates that molecules can effect protein localization, validating a therapeutic design that influences protein activity via induced localization.

  14. Niflumic acid renders dendritic cells tolerogenic and up-regulates inhibitory molecules ILT3 and ILT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svajger, Urban; Vidmar, Alenka; Jeras, Matjaz

    2008-07-01

    Niflumic acid is a member of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, from which aspirin was recently shown to inhibit maturation of human-monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are crucial regulators of the immune response, capable of inducing immunity as well as tolerance. In our in vitro study we showed a tolerogenic effect of NFA on phenotype and function of LPS-matured monocyte-derived DCs. Different drug concentrations dose-dependently down-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, particularly CD80 and lowered the expression of dendritic cell marker CD1a. Opposingly, the expressions of two inhibitory surface molecules, associated with tolerogenic DCs, immunoglobulin-like transcripts (ILT)3 and ILT4 were induced in treated DCs. The levels of TNFalpha production by NFA-treated DCs did not change significantly compared to controls, whereas the IL-12p70 and IL-10 production was completely abrogated at higher drug concentrations. However, at lower drug concentrations, the production of IL-12p70 was increased. There were no significant differences in the uptake of FITC labeled dextran by treated DCs compared to untreated cells. In allogeneic cultures with whole CD4+ T cells, dendritic cells differentiated in the presence of NFA appeared poor stimulators of CD4+ T-cell proliferation, even compared to immature DCs (iDCs). These results indicate the immunosuppressive properties of NFA, which may be therapeutically useful in controlling chronic immune and/or inflammatory diseases, by modulating DC characteristics towards tolerogenic DCs.

  15. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  16. Conservation of structural and functional features in a primordial CD80/86 molecule from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), a primitive teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-An; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Li, Jun; LaPatra, Scott E; Luo, Yan-Ping; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2009-07-01

    In mammals, interaction of CD28 with CD80 or CD86 molecules provides costimulatory signals for T cell activation that leads to increased IL-2 gene and protein expression by activated T cells. Thus far, CD80 and CD86 have been cloned and functionally characterized only in mammals and birds. To shed light into the evolution of CD80 and CD86, we have cloned and functionally characterized a rainbow trout (rt) molecule (rtCD80/86) that shows the highest degree of sequence conservation and phylogenetic relationship with CD80 and CD86 molecules. Moreover, its genomic organization was almost identical to that of human CD86. Rainbow trout possess one membrane-bound and two soluble CD80/86 transcripts, all of which are derived from the same rtCD80/86 gene. The membrane-bound form exhibited its highest degree of expression in lymphoid tissues, particularly on B cells. Incubation of trout leukocytes with LPS and bacteria leads to up-regulation of rtCD80/86 gene expression. Importantly, we show that trout and other teleost fish contain a single CD80/86 gene, thus suggesting that this gene may represent the ancestor from which CD80 and CD86 arose by gene duplication in more evolved species. To gain further insights into the function of rtCD80/86, we have identified and cloned trout IL-2 and have shown that recombinantly produced trout CD80/86 up-regulates the expression of IL-2 in trout blood leukocytes. Significantly, this finding indicates that the capacity to modulate IL-2 expression is a primordial function that has been conserved both in fish and mammalian CD80/CD86 molecules throughout 350 million years of evolution.

  17. Ballonet String Model of Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavril NIAC

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Strings of ballonets, modelling rows of orbitals, are assembled to molecule models by crossing them properly. The ballonets at the ends of the strings of 2, 3, 4 or 5 spheres represent bonding orbitals of hydrogen with other elements like C, N or O (the proton being inside the sphere, as well as nonbonding orbitals. The ballonets between them are modelling bonding orbitals among elements other than hydrogen - except the double bond in diborane, the atomic cores laying at the junction of two or more spheres.Advantages of elastic sphere models range from self-adjusting bond angles to resistance when closing cycles like cyclopropane or modeling double bonds.Examples comprise alkanes, including platonic hydrocarbons, ethene, acetylene, and some inorganic molecules.

  18. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  19. Small Molecules-Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter

    2016-11-17

    Quantum mechanics builds large-scale graphs (networks): the vertices are the discrete energy levels the quantum system possesses, and the edges are the (quantum-mechanically allowed) transitions. Parts of the complete quantum mechanical networks can be probed experimentally via high-resolution, energy-resolved spectroscopic techniques. The complete rovibronic line list information for a given molecule can only be obtained through sophisticated quantum-chemical computations. Experiments as well as computations yield what we call spectroscopic networks (SN). First-principles SNs of even small, three to five atomic molecules can be huge, qualifying for the big data description. Besides helping to interpret high-resolution spectra, the network-theoretical view offers several ideas for improving the accuracy and robustness of the increasingly important information systems containing line-by-line spectroscopic data. For example, the smallest number of measurements necessary to perform to obtain the complete list of energy levels is given by the minimum-weight spanning tree of the SN and network clustering studies may call attention to "weakest links" of a spectroscopic database. A present-day application of spectroscopic networks is within the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) approach, whereby the transitions information on a measured SN is turned into experimental energy levels via a weighted linear least-squares refinement. MARVEL has been used successfully for 15 molecules and allowed to validate most of the transitions measured and come up with energy levels with well-defined and realistic uncertainties. Accurate knowledge of the energy levels with computed transition intensities allows the realistic prediction of spectra under many different circumstances, e.g., for widely different temperatures. Detailed knowledge of the energy level structure of a molecule coming from a MARVEL analysis is important for a considerable number of modeling

  20. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  1. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  2. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  3. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  4. Small molecules for big tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    @@ One of the most important achievements in the post-genome era is discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), which widely exist from simple-genome organisms such as viruses and bacteria to complexgenome organisms such as plants and animals.miRNAs are single-stranded non-coding RNAs of 18-25 nucleotides in length, which are generated from larger precursors that are transcribed from noncoding genes.As a new type of regulatory molecules, miRNAs present unique features in regulating gene and its products, including rapidly turning off protein production, reversibly, and compartmentalized regulating gene expression.

  5. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qun-Chao; SUN Wei-Guo

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7LID, 7LiH, 6LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy-Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies Detheory, which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies Dexpte.

  6. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  7. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  8. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  9. The expression regulation of the costimulatory molecules 4-1BB and 4-1BBL on the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells%小鼠髓系树突状细胞4-1BB及4-1BBL表达调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张烽; 马倩茹; 席泓; 周桓; 张学光; 顾宗江

    2006-01-01

    探讨小鼠髓系树突状细胞(bone marrow-derived dendritic cells,BMDC)共刺激分子4-1BB及其配体4-1BBL表达的变化.将促 DC成熟活化因子CD40L-CHO、TNF-α、LPS和IFN-γ,免疫负性调节因子IL-10以及各成熟活化因子与IL-10联合加入BMDC中,观察BMDC上4-1BB及4-1BBL表达的变化.结果显示,加入成熟活化因子的各组BMDC上4-1BB及4-1BBL表达与对照组相比有显著上调(P<0.05).而IL-10组与对照组相比两者的表达显著下调(P<0.05),且各成熟活化因子与IL-10联合应用与单用IL-10组相比,BMDC上4-1BB和4-1BBL表达上调,有显著性差异(P<0.05).提示成熟活化因子不仅能上调BMDC上4-1BB和 4-1BBL的表达并且能有效拮抗mIL-10对BMDC上4-1BB和 4-1BBL表达的下调作用.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-like molecules derived from Wolbachia endobacteria of the filaria Onchocerca volvulus are candidate mediators in the sequence of inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattig, N W; Rathjens, U; Ernst, M; Geisinger, F; Renz, A; Tischendorf, F W

    2000-08-01

    The majority of Onchocerca volvulus-infected persons show signs of cellular anergy, and long-time survival of adult and larval parasites in subcutaneous tissue is observed. The mechanisms leading to immunological hyporesponsiveness are poorly understood. Monocytes/macrophages represent a link between the innate and acquired immune system and are candidate cells to promote inflammatory and antiinflammatory processes. In the present study we have shown that products of microfilarial (O. volvulus) and adult (O. volvulus and O. ochengi) parasites affect monocytes in vitro. An early production of TNF-alpha by exposed monocytes was followed by the production of IL-10 and a reduced expression of HLA-DR and the costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2, while other adhesion receptors remained unaffected. Downregulation of the functional membrane receptors failed to occur after treatment of the cells with anti-IL-10 antibodies. The engagement of CD14, a dominant membrane receptor on monocytes and major binding protein for lipopolysaccharides, was indicated by partial blocking of monocyte modulation by neutralizing antibodies to CD14 and by the antagonistic lipid A analog compound 406. Lipopolysaccharide-like molecules were detected in sterile products of O. volvulus stages which could originate from Wolbachia bacteria related to Gram-negative Rickettsiales, known to be abundant in the hypodermis and the female reproductive organs of O. volvulus. The present results indicate that the monocyte/macrophage may be a major target cell for immunomodulatory parasite-derived and intraparasitic, bacteria-derived molecules, thereby contributing to the host's cellular hyporesponsiveness.

  11. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Chapter 1: Proteins are the Body's Worker Molecules You've probably heard that proteins are important ... are much more than that. Proteins are worker molecules that are necessary for virtually every activity in ...

  12. Molecules in Studio v. 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-22

    A Powersim Studio implementation of the system dynamics’ ‘Molecules of Structure’. The original implementation was in Ventana’s Vensim language by James Hines. The molecules are fundamental constructs of the system dynamics simulation methodology.

  13. Similarity of atoms in molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioslowski, J.; Nanayakkara, A. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Similarity of atoms in molecules is quantitatively assessed with a measure that employs electron densities within respective atomic basins. This atomic similarity measure does not rely on arbitrary assumptions concerning basis functions or 'atomic orbitals', is relatively inexpensive to compute, and has straightforward interpretation. Inspection of similarities between pairs of carbon, hydrogen, and fluorine atoms in the CH[sub 4], CH[sub 3]F, CH[sub 2]F[sub 2], CHF[sub 3], CF[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 4], and C[sub 2]H[sub 6] molecules, calculated at the MP2/6-311G[sup **] level of theory, reveals that the atomic similarity is greatly reduced by a change in the number or the character of ligands (i.e. the atoms with nuclei linked through bond paths to the nucleus of the atom in question). On the other hand, atoms with formally identical (i.e. having the same nuclei and numbers of ligands) ligands resemble each other to a large degree, with the similarity indices greater than 0.95 for hydrogens and 0.99 for non-hydrogens. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençaǧa, Deniz; Carbon, Duane F.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  15. Is JPC = 3-+ molecule possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yan-Rui; Yao, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The confirmation of charged charmonium-like states indicates that heavy quark molecules should exist. Here we discuss the possibility of a molecule state with JPC = 3-+. In a one-boson-exchange model investigation for the S wave C = + D*D¯2* states, one finds that the strongest attraction is in the case J = 3 and I = 0 for both π and σ exchanges. Numerical analysis indicates that this hadronic bound state might exist if a phenomenological cutoff parameter around 2.3 GeV (1.5 GeV) is reasonable with a dipole (monopole) type form factor in the one-pion-exchange model. The cutoff for binding solutions may be reduced to a smaller value once the σ exchange contribution is included. If a state around the D*D¯2* threshold (≈4472 MeV) in the channel J/ψω (P wave) is observed, the heavy quark spin symmetry implies that it is not a cc¯ meson and the JPC are likely to be 3-+. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275115), Shandong Province Natural Science Foundation (ZR2010AM023), SRF for ROCS, SEM, and Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University

  16. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  17. How Is a Protein Molecule Nearsighted?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO De; JI Qing; L(U) Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The effect range of a local change of a protein molecule is calculated using a cluster method developed in this work based on the Gaussian software. This range is found to be about 8 A, which gives a concrete estimation on the "nearsightedness" by Kohn for protein molecules. The cluster method can be applied to calculation of the electronic density of a large molecule such as a motor protein and can provide a basis for the dynamical analysis of a single protein molecule.

  18. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  19. Faddeev Random Phase Approximation applied to molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Degroote, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis derives the equations of the Faddeev Random Phase Approximation (FRPA) and applies the method to a set of small atoms and molecules. The occurence of RPA instabilities in the dissociation limit is addressed in molecules and by the study of the Hubbard molecule as a test system with reduced dimensionality.

  20. Visualization of large elongated DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lee, Seonghyun; Jo, Kyubong

    2015-09-01

    Long and linear DNA molecules are the mainstream single-molecule analytes for a variety of biochemical analysis within microfluidic devices, including functionalized surfaces and nanostructures. However, for biochemical analysis, large DNA molecules have to be unraveled, elongated, and visualized to obtain biochemical and genomic information. To date, elongated DNA molecules have been exploited in the development of a number of genome analysis systems as well as for the study of polymer physics due to the advantage of direct visualization of single DNA molecule. Moreover, each single DNA molecule provides individual information, which makes it useful for stochastic event analysis. Therefore, numerous studies of enzymatic random motions have been performed on a large elongated DNA molecule. In this review, we introduce mechanisms to elongate DNA molecules using microfluidics and nanostructures in the beginning. Secondly, we discuss how elongated DNA molecules have been utilized to obtain biochemical and genomic information by direct visualization of DNA molecules. Finally, we reviewed the approaches used to study the interaction of proteins and large DNA molecules. Although DNA-protein interactions have been investigated for many decades, it is noticeable that there have been significant achievements for the last five years. Therefore, we focus mainly on recent developments for monitoring enzymatic activity on large elongated DNA molecules.

  1. Three-cluster nuclear molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2000-01-01

    A three-center phenomenological model able to explain, at least from a qualitative point of view, the difference in the observed yield of a particle-accompanied fission and that of binary fission was developed. It is derived from the liquid drop model under the assumption that the aligned configuration, with the emitted particle between the light and heavy fragment is obtained by increasing continuously the separation distance, while the radii of the light fragment and of the light particle are kept constant. During the first stage of the deformation one has a two-center evolution until the neck radius becomes equal to the radius of the emitted particle. Then the three center starts developing by decreasing with the same amount the two tip distances. In such a way a second minimum, typical for a cluster molecule, appears in the deformation energy. Examples are presented for $^{240}$Pu parent nucleus emitting $\\alpha$-particles and $^{14}$C in a ternary process.

  2. Molecule Formation on Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, G.

    2011-05-01

    The first experiments that were expressively designed to be applicable to hydrogen formation reactions in the ISM measured the efficiency of formation of molecular hydrogen on a polycrystalline olivine (Pirronello et al. (1997a)). It soon turned out that more was needed, and research began on the mechanism of reaction, on the in uence of the surface morphology, and on the excitation of the just- ormed molecule. In this review, I summarize what we learned from these and other experiments, and where more work is needed: in the elementary steps of reaction, in the bridging of the laboratory-ISM gap (large ux/large surface - small ux/small grain) using simulations, and in using realistic samples of dust grains. Understanding what experiments can and cannot deliver will help in designing and targeting observations, and vice-versa.

  3. Photoluminescence of a Plasmonic Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da; Byers, Chad P; Wang, Lin-Yung; Hoggard, Anneli; Hoener, Ben; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Chang, Wei-Shun; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2015-07-28

    Photoluminescent Au nanoparticles are appealing for biosensing and bioimaging applications because of their non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking emission. The mechanism of one-photon photoluminescence from plasmonic nanostructures is still heavily debated though. Here, we report on the one-photon photoluminescence of strongly coupled 50 nm Au nanosphere dimers, the simplest plasmonic molecule. We observe emission from coupled plasmonic modes as revealed by single-particle photoluminescence spectra in comparison to correlated dark-field scattering spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the dimers is found to be surprisingly similar to the constituent monomers, suggesting that the increased local electric field of the dimer plays a minor role, in contradiction to several proposed mechanisms. Aided by electromagnetic simulations of scattering and absorption spectra, we conclude that our data are instead consistent with a multistep mechanism that involves the emission due to radiative decay of surface plasmons generated from excited electron-hole pairs following interband absorption.

  4. Special Issue: "Molecules against Alzheimer".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michael; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego

    2016-12-16

    This Special Issue, entitled "Molecules against Alzheimer", gathers a number of original articles, short communications, and review articles on recent research efforts toward the development of novel drug candidates, diagnostic agents and therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of death worldwide. This Special Issue contains many interesting examples describing the design, synthesis, and pharmacological profiling of novel compounds that hit one or several key biological targets, such as cholinesterases, β-amyloid formation or aggregation, monoamine oxidase B, oxidative stress, biometal dyshomeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, serotonin and/or melatonin systems, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, or nuclear erythroid 2-related factor. The development of novel AD diagnostic agents based on tau protein imaging and the use of lithium or intranasal insulin for the prevention or the symptomatic treatment of AD is also covered in some articles of the Special Issue.

  5. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role\\'as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic\\'drugs

  6. Optoelectronics of Molecules and Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices are being developed at an extraordinary rate. Organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and electro-optical modulators are pivotal to the future of displays, photosensors and solar cells, and communication technologies. This book details the theories underlying the relevant mechanisms in organic materials and covers, at a basic level, how the organic components are made. The first part of this book introduces the fundamental theories used to detail ordered solids and localised energy levels. The methods used to determine energy levels in perfectly ordered molecular and macromolecular systems are discussed, making sure that the effects of quasi-particles are not missed. The function of excitons and their transfer between two molecules are studied, and the problems associated with interfaces and charge injection into resistive media are presented. The second part details technological aspects such as the fabrication of devices based on organic materials by dry etching. The princ...

  7. High-harmonic spectroscopy of aligned molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyeok; Yun, Sang Jae; Lee, Gae Hwang; Nam, Chang Hee

    2017-01-01

    High harmonics emitted from aligned molecules driven by intense femtosecond laser pulses provide the opportunity to explore the structural information of molecules. The field-free molecular alignment technique is an expedient tool for investigating the structural characteristics of linear molecules. The underlying physics of field-free alignment, showing the characteristic revival structure specific to molecular species, is clearly explained from the quantum-phase analysis of molecular rotational states. The anisotropic nature of molecules is shown from the harmonic polarization measurement performed with spatial interferometry. The multi-orbital characteristics of molecules are investigated using high-harmonic spectroscopy, applied to molecules of N2 and CO2. In the latter case the two-dimensional high-harmonic spectroscopy, implemented using a two-color laser field, is applied to distinguish harmonics from different orbitals. Molecular high-harmonic spectroscopy will open a new route to investigate ultrafast dynamics of molecules.

  8. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H; Ott, Herwig

    2016-10-05

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron-perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance.

  9. Spin polarization effect for Cr2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying

    2008-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) (B3P86) of Ganssian 03 has been used to optimize the structure of the Cr2 molecule, a transition metal element molecule. The result shows that the ground state for the Cr2 molecule is a 13-multiple state, indicating that there exists a spin polarization effect in the Cr2 molecule. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wave function of the ground state does not mingle with wave functions of higher-energy states. So the ground state for Cr2 molecule being a 13-multiple state is indicative of spin polarization effect of the Cr2 molecule among transition metal elements, that is, there are 12 parallel spin electrons in the Cr2 molecule. The number of non-conjugated electrons is greatest. These electrons occupy different spatial orbitals so that the energy of the Cr2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Cr2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition,the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and other states of the Cr2 molecule are derived. The dissociation energy De for the ground state of the Cr2 molecule is 0.1034eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.3396nm, and vibration frequency ωe is 73.81cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3 and f4 are 0.0835, -0.2831 and 0.3535 aJ·nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of the Cr2 molecule ωeχe, Be and αe are 1.2105, 0.0562 and 7.2938 × 10-4cm-1 respectively.

  10. Spin polarization effect of Ni2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Zhu Zheng-He

    2008-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) method (b3p86) of Gaussian 03 is used to optimize the structure of the Ni2 molecule. The result shows that the ground state for the Ni2 molecule is a 5-multiple state, symbolizing a spin polarization effect existing in the Ni2 molecule, a transition metal molecule, but no spin pollution is found because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions of higher-energy states. So the ground state for Ni2 molecule, which is a 5-multiple state, is indicative of spin polarization effect of the Ni2 molecule, that is, there exist 4 parallel spin electrons in Ni2 molecule. The number of non-conjugated electrons is greatest. These electrons occupy different spatial orbitals so that the energy of the Ni2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Ni2 molecule is larger than that of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters of the ground state and other states of the Ni2 molecule are derived. The dissociation energy De for the ground state of the Ni2 molecule is 1.835 eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2243 nm, vibration frequency ωe is 262.35 cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3 and f4 are 1.1901 aJ.nm-2, 5.8723 aJ.nm-3, and 21.2505 aJ.nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of the Ni2 molecule ωexe, Be and αe are 1.6315cm-1, 0.1141 cm-1, and 8.0145×10-4 cm-1 respectively.

  11. Spin squeezing an ultracold molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, M

    2015-01-01

    Most research on spin squeezing thus far has focused on realizations involving either atomic or nuclear degrees of freedom. In this article we discuss a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the ultracold ground state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify a parameter regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993)], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T Ng and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001)], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989)]. To support our conclusions, we provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounti...

  12. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  13. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  14. Coordination Programming of Photofunctional Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Nishihara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Our recent achievements relating to photofunctional molecules are addressed. Section 1 discloses a new concept of photoisomerization. Pyridylpyrimidine-copper complexes undergo a ring inversion that can be modulated by the redox state of the copper center. In combination with an intermolecular photoelectron transfer (PET initiated by the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT transition of the Cu(I state, we realize photonic regulation of the ring inversion. Section 2 reports on the first examples of heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinatozinc(II complexes. Conventional homoleptic bis(dipyrrinatozinc(II complexes suffered from low fluorescence quantum yields, whereas the heteroleptic ones feature bright fluorescence even in polar solvents. Section 3 describes our new findings on Pechmann dye, which was first synthesized in 1882. New synthetic procedures for Pechmann dye using dimethyl bis(arylethynylfumarate as a starting material gives rise to its new structural isomer. We also demonstrate potentiality of a donor-acceptor-donor type of Pechmann dye in organic electronics.

  15. Cochleates bridged by drug molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Uwais M; Woo, Amy F; Plakogiannis, Fotios; Jin, Tuo; Zhu, Hua

    2008-11-03

    A new type of cochleate, able to microencapsulate water-soluble cationic drugs or peptides into its inter-lipid bi-layer space, was formed through interaction between negatively charged lipids and drugs or peptides acting as the inter-bi-layer bridges instead of multi-cationic metal ions. This new type of cochleate opened up to form large liposomes when treated with EDTA, suggesting that cationic organic molecules can be extracted from these cochleates in a way similar to multivalent metal ions from metal ion-bridged cochleates. Cochleates can be produced in sub-micron size using a method known as "hydrogel isolated cochleation" or simply by increasing the ratio of multivalent cationic peptides over negatively charged liposomes. When nanometer-sized cochleates and liposomes containing the same fluorescent labeled lipid component were incubated with human fibroblasts cells under identical conditions, cells exposed to cochleates showed bright fluorescent cell surfaces, whereas those incubated with liposomes did not. This result suggests that cochleates' edges made them fuse with the cell surfaces as compared to edge free liposomes. This mechanism of cochleates' fusion with cell membrane was supported by a bactericidal activity assay using tobramycin cochleates, which act by inhibiting intracellular ribosomes. Tobramycin bridged cochleates in nanometer size showed improved antibacterial activity than the drug's solution.

  16. Coordination programming of photofunctional molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Kusaka, Shinpei; Hayashi, Mikihiro; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-04-05

    Our recent achievements relating to photofunctional molecules are addressed. Section 1 discloses a new concept of photoisomerization. Pyridylpyrimidine-copper complexes undergo a ring inversion that can be modulated by the redox state of the copper center. In combination with an intermolecular photoelectron transfer (PET) initiated by the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition of the Cu(I) state, we realize photonic regulation of the ring inversion. Section 2 reports on the first examples of heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes. Conventional homoleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes suffered from low fluorescence quantum yields, whereas the heteroleptic ones feature bright fluorescence even in polar solvents. Section 3 describes our new findings on Pechmann dye, which was first synthesized in 1882. New synthetic procedures for Pechmann dye using dimethyl bis(arylethynyl)fumarate as a starting material gives rise to its new structural isomer. We also demonstrate potentiality of a donor-acceptor-donor type of Pechmann dye in organic electronics.

  17. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  18. Single-molecule stochastic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Manosas, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F; 10.1103/PhysRevX.2.031012

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a well known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively folding/unfolding transitions under the action of an applied oscillating mechanical force with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigated the folding/unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measured several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins is a good quantifier of the SR. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance match...

  19. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining full control over the internal and external quantum states of molecules is the central goal of ultracold chemistry and allows for the study of coherent molecular dynamics, collisions and tests of fundamental laws of physics. When the molecules additionally have a permanent electric dipole moment, the study of dipolar quantum gases and spin-systems with long-range interactions as well as applications in quantum information processing are possible. Rydberg molecules constitute a class of exotic molecules, which are bound by the interaction between the Rydberg electron and the ground state atom. They exhibit extreme bond lengths of hundreds of Bohr radii and giant permanent dipole moments in the kilo-Debye range. A special type with exceptional properties are the so-called butterfly molecules, whose electron density resembles the shape of a butterfly. Here, we report on the photoassociation of butterfly Rydberg molecules and their orientation in a weak electric field. Starting from a Bose-Einstein cond...

  20. Rotational cooling of trapped polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Glöckner, Rosa; Englert, Barbara G U; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH3F) by optically pumping the population of 16 M-sublevels in the rotational states J=3,4,5, and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J=4, K=3, M=4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (~30mK) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 10^6 molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever larger molecules.

  1. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Shuman, E S; DeMille, D

    2011-01-01

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a vast array of fields. Unfortunately laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for many applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments which lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures make ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulation of condensed matter systems and quantum computation. Also ultracold molecules may provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme re...

  2. Small-Molecule Carbohydrate-Based Immunostimulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzabadi, Cecilia H; Franck, Richard W

    2017-02-03

    In this review, we discuss small-molecule, carbohydrate-based immunostimulants that target Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and cluster of differentiation 1D (CD1d) receptors. The design and use of these molecules in immunotherapy as well as results from their use in clinical trials are described. How these molecules work and their utilization as vaccine adjuvants are also discussed. Future applications and extensions for the use of these analogues as therapeutic agents will be outlined.

  3. Making "Operations" inside a Single Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Free and delicate manipulation of single molecules has long been expected by scientists so as to realize specific functions. In the 1990s, the laboratory led by Prof. Wison Ho from the University of California was successful in inducing chemical reactions at the single molecule level with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), revealing the extensive potentials of "single molecule operation." However, until recently, researchers have failed to utilize the reaction to give rise to special physical properties.

  4. Negative refraction in Möbius molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y. N.; Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in Möbius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the nontrivial topology of the molecules. With the Möbius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a Möbius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the DN symmetry is broken in Möbius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings provide an alternative architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the nontrivial topology of Möbius molecules.

  5. Ultracold Molecules: Physics in the Quantum Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, John [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-11-17

    Our research encompasses approaches to the trapping of diatomic molecules at low temperature plus the cooling and detection of polyatomic molecules in the kelvin temperature regime. We have cooled and trapped CaF and/or CaH molecules, loaded directly from a molecular beam. As part of this work, we are continuing to develop an important trapping technique, optical loading from a buffer-gas beam. This method was invented in our lab. We are also studying cold polyatomic molecules and their interactions with cold atoms.

  6. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  7. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  8. Theoretical spectra of floppy molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua

    2000-09-01

    Detailed studies of the vibrational dynamics of floppy molecules are presented. Six-D bound-state calculations of the vibrations of rigid water dimer based on several anisotropic site potentials (ASP) are presented. A new sequential diagonalization truncation approach was used to diagonalize the angular part of the Hamiltonian. Symmetrized angular basis and a potential optimized discrete variable representation for intermonomer distance coordinate were used in the calculations. The converged results differ significantly from the results presented by Leforestier et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 106 , 8527 (1997)]. It was demonstrated that ASP-S potential yields more accurate tunneling splittings than other ASP potentials used. Fully coupled 4D quantum mechanical calculations were performed for carbon dioxide dimer using the potential energy surface given by Bukowski et al [J. Chem. Phys., 110, 3785 (1999)]. The intermolecular vibrational frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants were estimated and compared with experiments. The inter-conversion tunneling dynamics was studied using the calculated virtual tunneling splittings. Symmetrized Radau coordinates and the sequential diagonalization truncation approach were formulated for acetylene. A 6D calculation was performed with 5 DVR points for each stretch coordinate, and an angular basis that is capable of converging the angular part of the Hamiltonian to 30 cm-1 for internal energies up to 14000 cm-1. The probability at vinylidene configuration were evaluated. It was found that the eigenstates begin to extend to vinylidene configuration from about 10000 cm-1, and the ra, coordinate is closely related to the vibrational dynamics at high energy. Finally, a direct product DVR was defined for coupled angular momentum operators, and the SDT approach were formulated. They were applied in solving the angular part of the Hamiltonian for carbon dioxide dimer problem. The results show the method is capable of giving very accurate

  9. Spin polarization effect for Tc2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Zhu Zheng-He

    2004-01-01

    Density functional method (DFT) (B3p86) of Gaussian98 has been used to optimize the structure of the Tc2 molecule. The result shows that the ground state for Tc2 molecule is an 11-multiple state and its electronic configuration is 11∑- g, which shows the spin polarization effect of Tc2 molecule of a transition metal element for the first time.Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions of higher energy states. So, that the ground state for Tc2 molecule is an 11-multiple state is indicative of the spin polarization effect of Tc2 molecule of a transition metal element: that is, there exist 10 parallel spin electrons. The non-conjugated electron is greatest in number. These electrons occupy different spacious tracks, so that the energy of Tc2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of the Tc2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization.In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state 11∑- g and other states of Tc2 molecule are derived. Dissociation energy De for the ground state of Tc2 molecule is 2.266eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2841nm, vibration frequency ωe is 178.52cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3, and f4 are 0.9200aJ.nm-2,-3.5700aJ.nm-3, 11.2748aJ.nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Tc2 molecule ωexe,Be, αe are 0.5523cm- 1, 0.0426cm- 1, 1.6331 × 10-4cm- 1 respectively.

  10. Spin polarization effect for Fe2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Zhu Zheng-He

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses the density functional theory (DFT)(B3p86) of Gaussian03 to optimize the structure of Fe2 molecule. The result shows that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state, which shows spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements for the first time. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions with higher energy states. So, that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state is indicative of the spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements. That is, there exist 8 parallel spin electrons. The non-conjugated electron is greatest in number. These electrons occupy different spacious tracks, so that the energy of the Fe2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of the Fe2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and other states of Fe2 molecule are derived. Dissociation energy De for the ground state of Fe2 molecule is 2.8586ev, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2124nm, vibration frequency ωe is 336.38 cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3, and f4 are 1.8615aJ·nm-2, -8.6704a J·nm-3, 29.1676aJ·nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Fe2 moleculeωeχe, Be, αe are 1.5461 cm-1, 0.1339 cm-1, 7.3428×10-4 cm-1 respectively.

  11. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, E S; Barry, J F; Demille, D

    2010-10-14

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a wide array of fields. Laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for a wide range of applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments that lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures makes ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulations of condensed-matter systems and in quantum computation. Also, ultracold molecules could provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the polar molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme requiring only three lasers, we have observed both Sisyphus and Doppler cooling forces that reduce the transverse temperature of a SrF molecular beam substantially, to a few millikelvin or less. At present, the only technique for producing ultracold molecules is to bind together ultracold alkali atoms through Feshbach resonance or photoassociation. However, proposed applications for ultracold molecules require a variety of molecular energy-level structures (for example unpaired electronic spin, Omega doublets and so on). Our method provides an alternative route to ultracold molecules. In particular, it bridges the gap between ultracold (submillikelvin) temperatures and the ∼1-K temperatures attainable with directly cooled molecules (for example with cryogenic buffer-gas cooling or decelerated supersonic beams). Ultimately, our technique should allow the production of large samples of molecules at ultracold temperatures for species that are chemically

  12. Small molecule inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase suppresses t cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telang Sucheta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell activation is associated with a rapid increase in intracellular fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP, an allosteric activator of the glycolytic enzyme, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. The steady state concentration of F2,6BP in T cells is dependent on the expression of the bifunctional 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatases (PFKFB1-4 and the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, TIGAR. Of the PFKFB family of enzymes, PFKFB3 has the highest kinase:bisphosphatase ratio and has been demonstrated to be required for T cell proliferation. A small molecule antagonist of PFKFB3, 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3PO, recently has been shown to reduce F2,6BP synthesis, glucose uptake and proliferation in transformed cells. We hypothesized that the induction of PFKFB3 expression may be required for the stimulation of glycolysis in T cells and that exposure to the PFKFB3 antagonist, 3PO, would suppress T cell activation. Methods We examined PFKFB1-4 and TIGAR expression and F2,6BP concentration in purified CD3+ T cells stimulated with microbead-conjugated agonist antibodies specific for CD3 and the co-stimulatory receptor, CD28. We then determined the effect of 3PO on anti-CD3/anti-CD28-induced T cell activation, F2,6BP synthesis, 2-[1-14C]-deoxy-d-glucose uptake, lactate secretion, TNF-α secretion and proliferation. Finally, we examined the effect of 3PO administration on the development of delayed type hypersensitivity to methylated BSA and on imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice. Results We found that purified human CD3+ T cells express PFKFB2, PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and TIGAR, and that anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated microbeads stimulated a >20-fold increase in F2,6BP with a coincident increase in protein expression of the PFKFB3 family member and a decrease in TIGAR protein expression. We then found that exposure to the PFKFB3 small molecule antagonist, 3PO (1–10 μM, markedly attenuated the stimulation of F2,6BP

  13. Controlled contact to a C-60 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neel, N.; Kröger, J.; Limot, L.;

    2007-01-01

    The tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope is approached towards a C-60 molecule adsorbed at a pentagon-hexagon bond on Cu(100) to form a tip-molecule contact. The conductance rapidly increases to approximate to 0.25 conductance quanta in the transition region from tunneling...

  14. Spectrum Generating Algebra for X$_{3}$ Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R; Leviatan, A

    1995-01-01

    A new spectrum generating algebra for a unified description of rotations and vibrations in polyatomic molecules is introduced. An application to nonlinear X$_3$ molecules shows that this model (i) incorporates exactly the relevant point group, (ii) provides a complete classification of oblate top states, and (iii) treats properly both degenerate and nondegenerate vibrations.

  15. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  16. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation

  17. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    There is very little known about the long-term evolution of the MHC and MHC-like molecules. This is because both the theory (the evolutionary questions and models) and the practice (the animals systems, functional assays and reagents to identify and characterize these molecules) have been difficu...

  18. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation o

  19. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom.

  20. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C6 H5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics.

  1. A storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields can be used to manipulate the motion of neutral molecules in phase-space, i.e., position-momentum space, via their electric dipole moment. A theoretical background is given on the motion of the molecules in phase-space. As the forces exerted on the

  2. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  3. Single-molecule dynamics at variable temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Single-molecule optics has evolved from a specialized variety of optical spectroscopy at low temperatures into a versatile tool to address questions in physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science. In this thesis, the potential of single-molecule (and ensemble) optical microscopy at variable t

  4. Near-field single molecule spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.S.; Dunn, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    The high spatial resolution and sensitivity of near-field fluorescence microscopy allows one to study spectroscopic and dynamical properties of individual molecules at room temperature. Time-resolved experiments which probe the dynamical behavior of single molecules are discussed. Ground rules for applying near-field spectroscopy and the effect of the aluminum coated near-field probe on spectroscopic measurements are presented.

  5. Matter-Wave Optics of Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    Lima , Peru (2010). S. Singh and P. Meystre, "Atomic probe Wigner tomography of a nanomechanical system," contributed paper, APS DAMOP Annual Meeting...Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS matter-wave optics, ultracold molecules, polar molecules, quantum optomechanics, quantum-degenerate

  6. Nanoscience: Single-molecule instant replay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camillone, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    A nanoscale imaging method that uses ultrashort light pulses to initiate and follow the motion of a single molecule adsorbed on a solid surface opens a window onto the physical and chemical dynamics of molecules on surfaces. See Letter p.263

  7. Spin polarization effect for Co2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Bao Wen-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT)(b3p86) of Gaussian 03 has been used to optimize the structure of the Co2molecule, a transition metal element molecule. The result shows that the ground state for the Co2 molecule is a 7-multiple state, indicating a spin polarization effect in the Co2 molecule. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state is not mingled with wavefunctions of higher-energy states. So for the ground state of Co2 molecule to be a 7-multiple state is the indicative of spin polarization effect of the Co2molecule, that is, there exist 6 parallel spin electrons in a Co2 molecule. The number of non-conjugated electrons is the greatest. These electrons occupy different spacial orbitals so that the energy of the Co2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Co2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule,which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and the other states of the Co2 molecule are derived. The dissociation energy De for the ground state of Co2 molecule is 4.0489eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2061 nm, and vibration frequency 11.2222 aJ.nm-4respectively(1 a.J=10-18 J). The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Co2 molecule ωexe,Be, and αe are 0.7202 cm-1, 0.1347 cm-1, and 2.9120× 10-1 cm-1 respectively. And ωexe is the non-syntonic part of frequency, Be is the rotational constant, αe is revised constant of rotational constant for non-rigid part of Co2 molecule.

  8. Quantum transport of the single metallocene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Chang, Jing; Wei, Rong-Kai; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    The Quantum transport of three single metallocene molecule is investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. We find that the three metallocen molecules structure become stretched along the transport direction, the distance between two Cp rings longer than the other theory and experiment results. The lager conductance is found in nickelocene molecule, the main transmission channel is the electron coupling between molecule and the electrodes is through the Ni dxz and dyz orbitals and the s, dxz, dyz of gold. This is also confirmed by the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance at Fermi level. In addition, negative differential resistance effect is found in the ferrocene, cobaltocene molecules, this is also closely related with the evolution of the transmission spectrum under applied bias.

  9. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research.

  10. Electronic and thermal properties of Biphenyl molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, F. G.; Ojeda, J. H.; Duque, C. A.; Laroze, D.

    2015-11-01

    Transport properties of a single Biphenyl molecule coupled to two contacts are studied. We characterise this system by a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Based on the non-equilibrium Green's functions technique with a Landauer-Büttiker formalism the transmission probability, current and thermoelectrical power are obtained. We show that the Biphenyl molecule may have semiconductor behavior for certain values of the electrode-molecule-electrode junctions and different values of the angle between the two rings of the molecule. In addition, the density of states (DOS) is calculated to compare the bandwidths with the profile of the transmission probability. DOS allows us to explain the asymmetric shape with respect to the molecule's Fermi energy.

  11. Small azomethine molecules and their use in photovoltaic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, T.J.; Petrus, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a small azomethine molecule having photovoltaic characteristics, a method of synthesizing said molecule, use of said molecule in a photovoltaic device, a solar cell comprising said molecule, and a film comprising said molecule. The present molecules may find

  12. Novel Applications of Buffer-Gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    2016-01-01

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In thi...

  13. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  14. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawawi, M.S.F. [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) (Malaysia); Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); McHugh, K.P. [University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Fl (United States); Haynes, D.R. [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Crotti, T.N., E-mail: tania.crotti@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  15. Spin polarization effect for Mn2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shi-Ying; Xu Guo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    The density functional theory method (DFT) (b3p86) of Gaussian 03 has been used to optimize the structure of the Mn2 molecule.The result shows that the ground state of the Mn2 molecule is an 11-multiple state,indicating a spin polarization effect in the Mn2 molecule,a transition metal element molecule.Meanwhile,we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions of higher-energy states.So the ground state for Mn2 molecule being of an 11-multiple state is the indicative of spin polarization effect of the Mn2 molecule among those in the transition metal elements:that is,there are 10 parallel spin electrons in a Mn2 molecule.The number of non-conjugated electrons is the greatest.These electrons occupy different spacious orbitals so that the energy of the Mn2 molecule is minimized.It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin in the Mn2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule,which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization.In addition,the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and other states of the Mn2 molecule are derived.The dissociation energy De for the ground state of the Mn2 molecule is 1.4477eV,equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2506 nm,vibration frequency ωe is 211.51 cm-1.Its force constants,f2,f3,and f4 are 0.7240 aJ·nm-2,-3.35574 aJ·nm-3,11.4813 aJ·nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of the Mn2 molecule ωeχe,Be,αe are 1.5301 cm-1,0.0978 cm-1,7.7825×10-4 cm-1 respectively.

  16. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  17. Optically active quantum-dot molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlykov, Alexander I; Baimuratov, Anvar S; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2017-02-20

    Chiral molecules made of coupled achiral semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots, show great promise for photonic applications owing to their prospective uses as configurable building blocks for optically active structures, materials, and devices. Here we present a simple model of optically active quantum-dot molecules, in which each of the quantum dots is assigned a dipole moment associated with the fundamental interband transition between the size-quantized states of its confined charge carriers. This model is used to analytically calculate the rotatory strengths of optical transitions occurring upon the excitation of chiral dimers, trimers, and tetramers of general configurations. The rotatory strengths of such quantum-dot molecules are found to exceed the typical rotatory strengths of chiral molecules by five to six orders of magnitude. We also study how the optical activity of quantum-dot molecules shows up in their circular dichroism spectra when the energy gap between the molecular states is much smaller than the states' lifetime, and maximize the strengths of the circular dichroism peaks by optimizing orientations of the quantum dots in the molecules. Our analytical results provide clear design guidelines for quantum-dot molecules and can prove useful in engineering optically active quantum-dot supercrystals and photonic devices.

  18. Molecular Wring Resonances in Chain Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the eigenfrequency of collective twist excitations in chain molecules can be in the megahertz and gigahertz range. Accordingly, resonance states can be obtained at specific frequencies, and phenomena that involve structural properties can take place. Chain molecules can alter...... their conformation and their ability to function, and a breaking of the chain can result. It is suggested that this phenomenon forms the basis for effects caused by the interaction of microwaves and biomolecules, e.g. microwave assisted hydrolysis of chain molecules....

  19. Nanopore analytics: sensing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2009-08-01

    In nanopore analytics, individual molecules pass through a single nanopore giving rise to detectable temporary blockades in ionic pore current. Reflecting its simplicity, nanopore analytics has gained popularity and can be conducted with natural protein as well as man-made polymeric and inorganic pores. The spectrum of detectable analytes ranges from nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and biomolecular complexes to organic polymers and small molecules. Apart from being an analytical tool, nanopores have developed into a general platform technology to investigate the biophysics, physicochemistry, and chemistry of individual molecules (critical review, 310 references).

  20. Nano-manipulation of single DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun; L(U) Jun-Hong; LI Hai-Kuo; AN Hong-Jie; WANG Guo-Hua; WANG Ying; LI Min-Qian; ZHANG Yi; LI Bin

    2004-01-01

    Nano-manipulation of single atoms and molecules is a critical technique in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This review paper will focus on the recent development of the manipulation of single DNA molecules based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Precise manipulation has been realized including varied manipulating modes such as "cutting", "pushing", "folding", "kneading", "picking up", "dipping", etc. The cutting accuracy is dominated by the size of the AFM tip, which is usually 10nm or less. Single DNA fragments can be cut and picked up and then amplified by single molecule PCR. Thus positioning isolation and sequencing can be performed.

  1. Formation of ultracold LiCs molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, S D; Lange, J; Vogel, L; Wester, R; Weidemüller, M; Kraft, Stephan D.; Staanum, Peter; Lange, Joerg; Vogel, Leif; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    We present the first observation of ultracold LiCs molecules. The molecules are formed in a two-species magneto-optical trap and detected by two-photon ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The production rate coefficient is found to be in the range $10^{-18}\\unit{cm^3s^{-1}}$ to $10^{-16}\\unit{cm^3s^{-1}}$, at least an order of magnitude smaller than for other heteronuclear diatomic molecules directly formed in a magneto-optical trap.

  2. Aligning molecules with intense nonresonant laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Safvan, C.P.; Sakai, H.

    1999-01-01

    Molecules in a seeded supersonic beam are aligned by the interaction between an intense nonresonant linearly polarized laser field and the molecular polarizability. We demonstrate the general applicability of the scheme by aligning I2, ICl, CS2, CH3I, and C6H5I molecules. The alignment is probed...... by mass selective two dimensional imaging of the photofragment ions produced by femtosecond laser pulses. Calculations on the degree of alignment of I2 are in good agreement with the experiments. We discuss some future applications of laser aligned molecules....

  3. Multichannel long-range Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eiles, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    A generalized class of ultra-long-range Rydberg molecules is proposed which consist of a multichannel Rydberg atom whose outermost electron creates a chemical bond with a distant ground state atom. Such multichannel Rydberg molecules exhibit favorable properties for laser excitation, because states exist where the quantum defect varies strongly with the principal quantum number. The resulting occurrence of near degeneracies with states of high orbital angular momentum promotes the admixture of low $l$ into the high $l$ deeply bound `trilobite' molecule states, thereby circumventing the usual difficulty posed by electric dipole selection rules. Such states also can exhibit multi-scale binding possibilities that could present novel options for quantum manipulation.

  4. Kondo effect in molecules with strong correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, Tetyana [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: tetyana@bgumail.bgu.ac.il; Kikoin, Konstantin [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Avishai, Yshai [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2005-04-30

    A theory of Kondo tunneling through molecules adsorbed on metallic substrate is constructed and the underlying physics is exposed. It is shown that in the case of weak chemisorption the sandwich-type molecules manifest a novel type of Kondo effect that has not been observed in magnetically doped bulk metals. The exchange Hamiltonian of these molecules unveils unusual dynamical SO(n) symmetries instead of conventional SU(2) symmetry. These symmetries can be experimentally realized and the specific value of n can be controlled by gate voltage.

  5. Population redistribution in optically trapped polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Deiglmayr, J; Dulieu, O; Wester, R; Weidemüller, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the rovibrational population redistribution of polar molecules in the electronic ground state induced by spontaneous emission and blackbody radiation. As a model system we use optically trapped LiCs molecules formed by photoassociation in an ultracold two-species gas. The population dynamics of vibrational and rotational states is modeled using an ab-initio electric dipole moment function and experimental potential energy curves. Comparison with the evolution of the v"=3 electronic ground state yields good qualitative agreement. The analysis provides important input to assess applications of ultracold LiCs molecules in quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry.

  6. Imaging Cold Molecules on a Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Marx, S; Abel, M J; Zehentbauer, T; Meijer, G; Santambrogio, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the integrated imaging of cold molecules in a microchip environment. The on-chip de- tection is based on REMPI, which is quantum-state-selective and generally applicable. We demon- strate and characterize time-resolved spatial imaging and subsequently use it to analyze the effect of a phase-space manipulation sequence aimed at compressing the velocity distribution of a molec- ular ensemble with a view to future high-resolution spectroscopic studies. The realization of such on-chip measurements adds the final fundamental component to the molecule chip, offering a new and promising route for investigating cold molecules.

  7. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-07-13

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  8. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  9. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  10. Stretching p -wave molecules by transverse confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lihong; Cui, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    We revisit the confinement-induced p -wave resonance in quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) atomic gases and study the induced molecules near resonance. We derive the reduced 1D interaction parameters and show that they can well predict the binding energy of shallow molecules in quasi-1D system. Importantly, these shallow molecules are found to be much more spatially extended compared to those in three dimensions (3D) without transverse confinement. Our results strongly indicate that a p -wave interacting atomic gas can be much more stable in quasi-1D near the induced p -wave resonance, where most weight of the molecule lies outside the short-range regime and thus the atom loss could be suppressed.

  11. Large molecules in diffuse interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Black, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of the presence of a substantial component of large molecules on the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds are explored, and detailed models of the zeta Persei and zeta Ophiuchi clouds are constructed. The major consequence is a reduction in the abundances of singly charged atomic species. The long-standing discrepancy between cloud densities inferred from rotational and fine-structure level populations and from the ionization balance can be resolved by postulating a fractional abundance of large molecules of 1 x 10 to the -7th for zeta Persei and 6 x 10 to the -7th for zeta Ophiuchi. If the large molecules are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) containing about 50 carbon atoms, they contain 1 percent of the carbon in zeta Persei and 7 percent in zeta Ophiuchi. Other consequences of the possible presence of PAH molecules are discussed.

  12. SINGLE MOLECULE ENZYMOLOGY FINDS ITS STRIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    More techniques aimed at probing the nature of single molecules are being developed and advanced in biophysics labs. Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at the scientists leading the charge into the micro-world.

  13. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  14. The evolution of polymorphic compatibility molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de

    1995-01-01

    Several primitive colonial organisms distinguish self from nonself by means of polymorphic compatibility molecules bearing similarity to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The evolution of such polymorphisms is generally explained in terms of resistance to parasites. Ignoring parasites, I d

  15. Spin polarization effect for Os2 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie An-Dong; Yan Shi-Ying; Zhu Zheng-He; Fu Yi-Bei

    2005-01-01

    Density functional Theory (DFT) (B3p86) of Gaussian03 has been used to optimize the structure of Os2 molecule.The result shows that the ground state for Os2 molecule is 9-multiple state and its electronic configuration is 9∑+g,which shows spin polarization effect of Os2 molecule of transition metal elements for the first time. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions with higher energy states. So, the fact that the ground state for Os2 molecule is a 9-multiple state is indicative of spin polarization effect of Os2 molecule of transition metal elements. That is, there exist 8 parallel spin electrons.The non-conjugated electron is greatest in number. These electrons occupy different spacious tracks, so that the energy of Os2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of Os2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state 9∑+g and other states of Os2 molecule are derived. Dissociation energy De for the ground state of Os2 molecule is 3.3971eV, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2403nm, vibration frequency ωe is 235.32cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3, and f4 are 3.1032×102aJ.nm-2,-14.3425×103aJ.nm-3 and 50.5792×104aJ.nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Os2 molecule ωeχe, Be and αe are 0.4277cm-1, 0.0307cm-1 and 0.6491× 10-4cm-1 respectively.

  16. Electron Transfer for Large Molecules through Delocalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, D.; Reslan, R.; Hernandez, S.; Arnsen, C.; Lopata, K.; Govind, N.; Gao, Y.; Tolbert, S.; Schwartz, B.; Rubin, Y.; Nardes, A.; Kopidakis, N.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer for large molecules lies in between a Marcus-Theory two-state transfer and a Landauer description. We discuss a delocalization formalism which,through the introduction of artificial electric fields which emulate bulk dipole fields, allows calculation between a pair of identical molecules (A+A- (R)A-+A) with several open states. Dynamical electron polarization effects can be inserted with TDDFT and are crucial for large separations.

  17. New issues in zero dimensions: magnetic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luban, M. E-mail: luban@ameslab.gov

    2004-05-01

    We discuss some major features of isolated magnetic molecules where intermolecular magnetic interactions are negligible and the magnetic properties are determined using a Heisenberg model of intramolecular exchange between a relatively small number of diverse paramagnetic ions. We survey some of the more challenging issues and results that have emerged to date, including the spectrum of excitations, effects of geometric frustration, and critical slowing down of the spin dynamics at low temperatures. Primary attention is given to realizable magnetic molecules.

  18. Novel Small-Molecule Antibacterial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Novel Small-Molecule Antibacterial Agents...Release; Distribution Unlimited Novel Small-Molecule Antibacterial Agents The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of...half life of ~31 days. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO

  19. Probing halo molecules with nonresonant light

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We show that halo molecules can be probed by "shaking" in a pulsed nonresonant laser field. The field introduces a centrifugal term which expels the highest vibrational level from the potential that binds it. Our numerical simulations as well as an analytic model applied to the Rb$_2$ and KRb Feshbach molecules indicate that shaking by feasible laser pulses can be used to accurately recover the square of the vibrational wavefunction and, by inversion, also the molecular potential.

  20. On Chiral Space Groups and Chiral Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This note explains the relationship (as well as the absence of a relationship) between chiral space groups and chiral molecules (which have absolute configurations). For a chiral molecule, which must crystallize in a chiral space group, the outcome of the absolute configuration determination must be linked to some other properties of the chiral crystal such as its optical activity for the observation to the relevant.

  1. On Chiral Space Groups and Chiral Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NgSeikWng; HUSheng-Zhi

    2003-01-01

    This note explains the relationship (as well as the absence of a relationship) between chiral space groups and chiral molecules (which have absolute configurations).For a chiral molecule,which must crystallize in a chiral space group,the outcome of the absolute configuration determination must be linked to some other properties of the chiral crystal such as its optical activity for the observation to the relevant.

  2. (pro)renin receptor: A stable molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-01-01

    Background: Basically, (pro)renin acts via a specific receptor, (pro)renin receptor (PRR) binding between renin and prorenin, its inactive proenzyme form. The study on the molecular level of PRR can give useful knowledge to help understand many renal disorders. Method: Here, the author focuses on the stability of the PRR molecule. The mutation prone positions within the PRR molecule was assessed using standard reference technique. Result: The study showed there is no identified mutation prone...

  3. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    -molecule allosteric inhibitor trametinib in 2013, the progress of more than 10 other allosteric inhibitors in clinical trials, and the emergence of a pipeline of highly selective and potent preclinical molecules, have been reported in the past decade. In this article, we present the current knowledge on allosteric...... inhibition in terms of conception, classification, potential advantages, and summarized debatable topics in the field. Recent progress and allosteric inhibitors that were identified in the past three years are highlighted in this paper....

  4. Recollision induced superradiance of ionized nitrogen molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi; Lambert, Guillaume; Houard, Aurelien; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Mysyrowicz, Andre

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism to explain the origin of optical gain in the transitions between excited and ground state of the ionized nitrogen molecule following irradiation of neutral nitrogen molecules with an intense ultra short laser pulse. An efficient transfer of population to the excited state is achieved via field-induced multiple recollisions. We show that the proposed excitation mechanism must lead to a super-radiant emission, a feature that we confirm experimentally.

  5. Hadronic molecules in the heavy baryon spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entem, D. R.; Ortega, P. G.; Fernández, F.

    2016-01-01

    We study possible baryon molecules in the non-strange heavy baryon spectrum. We include configurations with a heavy-meson and a light baryon. We find several structures, in particular we can understand the Λc(2940) as a D*N molecule with JP = 3/2- quantum numbers. We also find D(*)Δ candidates for the recently discovered Xc(3250) resonance.

  6. Molecules on si: electronics with chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilan, Ayelet; Yaffe, Omer; Biller, Ariel; Salomon, Adi; Kahn, Antoine; Cahen, David

    2010-01-12

    Basic scientific interest in using a semiconducting electrode in molecule-based electronics arises from the rich electrostatic landscape presented by semiconductor interfaces. Technological interest rests on the promise that combining existing semiconductor (primarily Si) electronics with (mostly organic) molecules will result in a whole that is larger than the sum of its parts. Such a hybrid approach appears presently particularly relevant for sensors and photovoltaics. Semiconductors, especially Si, present an important experimental test-bed for assessing electronic transport behavior of molecules, because they allow varying the critical interface energetics without, to a first approximation, altering the interfacial chemistry. To investigate semiconductor-molecule electronics we need reproducible, high-yield preparations of samples that allow reliable and reproducible data collection. Only in that way can we explore how the molecule/electrode interfaces affect or even dictate charge transport, which may then provide a basis for models with predictive power.To consider these issues and questions we will, in this Progress Report, review junctions based on direct bonding of molecules to oxide-free Si.describe the possible charge transport mechanisms across such interfaces and evaluate in how far they can be quantified.investigate to what extent imperfections in the monolayer are important for transport across the monolayer.revisit the concept of energy levels in such hybrid systems.

  7. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  8. Vibrational Cooling of Photoassociated Homonuclear Cold Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passagem, Henry; Ventura, Paulo; Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we produce vibrationally cold homonuclear Rb molecules using spontaneous optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. In the first step, we use a photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the singlet ground state. Then in a second step, a 50 W broadband laser at 1071 nm, which bandwidth is about 2 nm, is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the excited state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels below ν = 35 . The molecules can be further cooled using a broadband light source near 685 nm. In order to obtain such broadband source, we have used a 5 mW superluminescent diode, which is amplified in a tapered amplifier using a double pass configuration. After the amplification, the spectrum is properly shaped and we end up with about 90 mW distributed in the 682-689 nm range. The final vibrational distribution is probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm operating at 4KHz. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  9. Chapter 3: Small molecules and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Wishart

    Full Text Available "Big" molecules such as proteins and genes still continue to capture the imagination of most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians. "Small" molecules, on the other hand, are the molecules that most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians prefer to ignore. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that small molecules such as amino acids, lipids and sugars play a far more important role in all aspects of disease etiology and disease treatment than we realized. This particular chapter focuses on an emerging field of bioinformatics called "chemical bioinformatics"--a discipline that has evolved to help address the blended chemical and molecular biological needs of toxicogenomics, pharmacogenomics, metabolomics and systems biology. In the following pages we will cover several topics related to chemical bioinformatics. First, a brief overview of some of the most important or useful chemical bioinformatic resources will be given. Second, a more detailed overview will be given on those particular resources that allow researchers to connect small molecules to diseases. This section will focus on describing a number of recently developed databases or knowledgebases that explicitly relate small molecules--either as the treatment, symptom or cause--to disease. Finally a short discussion will be provided on newly emerging software tools that exploit these databases as a means to discover new biomarkers or even new treatments for disease.

  10. Spin polarization effect for molecule Ta2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie An-Dong

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) (B3p86) has been used to optimize the structure of the molecule Taa- The result shows that the ground state of molecule Ta,2 is a 7- multiple state and its electronic configuration is 7∑+u which shows the spin polarization effect for molecule Ta2 of transition metal elements for the first time. Meanwhile, spin pollution has not been found because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mix with those of higher states. So, the fact that the ground state of molecule Ta2 is a 7-multiple state indicates a spin polarization effect of molecule Ta2 of the transition metal elements, i.e. there exist 6 parallel spin electrons and the non-conjugated electrons are greatest in number. These electrons occupy different space orbitals so that the energy of molecule Ta2 is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of the molecule Ta2 is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of d-electron delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with parameters for the ground state 7∑+u and other states of the molecule Ta2 are derived. The dissociation energy De, equilibrium bond length Re and vibration frequency ωe for the ground state of molecule Ta2 are 4.5513eV, 0.2433nm and 173.06cm-1, respectively. Its force constants f2,f3 and f4 are 1.5965×l02aJ·nm-2,-6.4722×l03aJ·nm-3 and 29.4851×04aJ·nm-4, respectively. Other spectroscopic data ωe χe, Be and αe for the ground state of Ta2 are 0.2078cm-1, 0.0315cm-1 and 0.7858×104 cm-1, respectively.

  11. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    , which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......, the electrons can tunnel in- elastically from the left to the right electrode. This is the process behind inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS), which is a single-molecule spectroscopic method, where the vibrational ngerprint of a molecule is di- rectly observed by the tunnelling current......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  12. Universal deceleration of highly polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamda, Mehdi; Pillet, Pierre; Lignier, Hans; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We propose a method to produce, in a pulsed or continuous way, cold samples of highly polar molecules. Using a pulsed or continuous standard (supersonic) beam of these molecules, our idea consists of transforming the molecules into their anionic counterparts, which are decelerated to a standstill by a well-controlled external electric field and ultimately neutralized. The neutral-to-anion transformation occurs through collisions with Rydberg atoms coming from an additional atomic beam. This Rydberg electron transfer process is possible provided that the molecular species has a sufficiently strong electric dipole (\\gt 2.5 D, i.e., \\gt 8.3× {{10}-30} cm). Whatever the mass of the species, the deceleration stage is realized by a temporally and spatially controlled electric field within a range of less than one centimeter, which is much shorter than in current deceleration experiments of neutral molecules. Once stopped, the molecular anions are neutralized by laser photodetachment or a pulsed electric field process. The resulting molecules might be held and accumulated, for instance, in a magnetic trap.

  13. Classical interaction model for the water molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, András; Bartók, Albert

    2007-05-14

    The authors propose a new classical model for the water molecule. The geometry of the molecule is built on the rigid TIP5P model and has the experimental gas phase dipole moment of water created by four equal point charges. The model preserves its rigidity but the size of the charges increases or decreases following the electric field created by the rest of the molecules. The polarization is expressed by an electric field dependent nonlinear polarization function. The increasing dipole of the molecule slightly increases the size of the water molecule expressed by the oxygen-centered sigma parameter of the Lennard-Jones interaction. After refining the adjustable parameters, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to check the ability of the new model in the ice, liquid, and gas phases. They determined the density and internal energy of several ice polymorphs, liquid water, and gaseous water and calculated the heat capacity, the isothermal compressibility, the isobar heat expansion coefficients, and the dielectric constant of ambient water. They also determined the pair-correlation functions of ambient water and calculated the energy of the water dimer. The accuracy of theirs results was satisfactory.

  14. Direct laser cooling of the BH molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Darren; Truppe, Stefan; Hendricks, Richard; Sauer, Ben; Tarbutt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Ultracold polar molecules are of interest for a variety of applications, including tests of fundamental physics, ultracold chemistry, and simulation of many-body quantum systems. The laser cooling techniques that have been so successful in producing ultracold atoms are difficult to apply to molecules. Recently however, laser cooling has been applied successfully to a few molecular species, and a magneto-optical trap of SrF molecules has now been demonstrated. We have investigated the BH molecule as a candidate for laser cooling. We have produced a molecular beam of BH and have measured the branching ratios for the excited electronic state, A1 Π (v' = 0) , to decay to the various vibrational states of the ground electronic state, X1 Σ . We verify that the branching ratio for the spin-forbidden transition to an intermediate triplet state is inconsequentially small. We measure the frequency of the lowest rotational transition of the X state, and the hyperfine structure in the relevant levels of both the X and A states, and determine the nuclear electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole coupling constants. Our results show that a relatively simple laser cooling scheme can be used to cool, slow and trap BH molecules.

  15. Quantum Computer Using Coupled Quantum Dot Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, N J; Natori, A; Yasunaga, H; Wu*, Nan-Jian

    1999-01-01

    We propose a method for implementation of a quantum computer using artificial molecules. The artificial molecule consists of two coupled quantum dots stacked along z direction and one single electron. One-qubit and two-qubit gates are constructed by one molecule and two coupled molecules, respectively.The ground state and the first excited state of the molecule are used to encode the |0> and |1> states of a qubit. The qubit is manipulated by a resonant electromagnetic wave that is applied directly to the qubit through a microstrip line. The coupling between two qubits in a quantum controlled NOT gate is switched on (off) by floating (grounding) the metal film electrodes. We study the operations of the gates by using a box-shaped quantum dot model and numerically solving a time-dependent Schridinger equation, and demonstrate that the quantum gates can perform the quantum computation. The operating speed of the gates is about one operation per 4ps. The reading operation of the output of the quantum computer can...

  16. Capillary condensation of short-chain molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, Paweł; Pizio, Orest; Sokolowski, Stefan

    2005-05-15

    A density-functional study of capillary condensation of fluids of short-chain molecules confined to slitlike pores is presented. The molecules are modeled as freely jointed tangent spherical segments with a hard core and with short-range attractive interaction between all the segments. We investigate how the critical parameters of capillary condensation of the fluid change when the pore width decreases and eventually becomes smaller than the nominal linear dimension of the single-chain molecule. We find that the dependence of critical parameters for a fluid of dimers and of tetramers on pore width is similar to that of the monomer fluid. On the other hand, for a fluid of chains consisting of a larger number of segments we observe an inversion effect. Namely, the critical temperature of capillary condensation decreases with increasing pore width for a certain interval of values of the pore width. This anomalous behavior is also influenced by the interaction between molecules and pore walls. We attribute this behavior to the effect of conformational changes of molecules upon confinement.

  17. Half-lives of trinuclear molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstoiu, F.; Bulboacă, I.; Săndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    2000-04-01

    Recent discoveries of 10Be and 12C accompanied cold fission in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf lead to the surprising result that long living trinuclear molecules may exists. For the description of the dynamics and decay of such molecules, we used a coplanar three body cluster model (two deformed fragments and an α particle) with a three body potential computed by a double folding potential generated by M3Y effective interaction. A repulsive compression term was included. The computed α ternary cold fission yields are in agreement with the experiment. The energy and angular distributions of the three clusters at infinity and the half-lives are strongly dependent of the initial positions of the α particle relative to the two fragments and of mass asymmetry of the fragments. The evaluated lifetimes of such trinuclear molecules are quite large, of the order of one second.

  18. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  19. Diamond based single molecule magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, J -M; Plenio, M B; Retzker, A

    2011-01-01

    The detection of a nuclear spin in an individual molecule represents a key challenge in physics and biology whose solution has been pursued for many years. The small magnetic moment of a single nucleus and the unavoidable environmental noise present the key obstacles for its realization. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond can be used to construct a nano-scale single molecule spectrometer that is capable of detecting the position and spin state of a single nucleus and can determine the distance and alignment of a nuclear or electron spin pair. In combination with organic spin labels, this device will find applications in single molecule spectroscopy in chemistry and biology, such as in determining protein structure or monitoring macromolecular motions and can thus provide a tool to help unravelling the microscopic mechanisms underlying bio-molecular function.

  20. Adhesion molecules in experimental phacoanaphylactic endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, G O; Lee, S; Mulligan, M S; Wolter, J R; Smith, C W; Ward, P A; Marak, G E

    1992-11-01

    Intraocular accumulation of inflammatory neutrophils is an important feature of experimental phacoanaphylactic endophthalmitis (EPE). Increasing evidence suggests that localization of neutrophils to the site of inflammation requires the participation of neutrophil and endothelial adhesion molecules. These studies were undertaken to determine if blocking of adhesion molecules on neutrophils (CD18) or endothelium (ELAM-1) could attenuate EPE in Lewis rats. Treatment of experimental animals with anti-CD18 or anti-ELAM-1 significantly suppressed intraocular neutrophil accumulation, retinal hemorrhage, and vasculitis, and attenuated retinal edema formation by 48% and 70%, respectively. These observations demonstrate that antibodies directed against adhesion molecules on the neutrophil (CD18) or the vascular endothelial cell (ELAM-1) exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, resulting in a striking amelioration of injury in EPE in rats.

  1. Single Molecule Sensitive FRET in Attoliter Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Milas, Peker; Gamari, Ben D; Goldner, Lori S

    2013-01-01

    Single molecular-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) has become an cross-disciplinary tool for understanding molecular folding and interactions. While providing detailed information about the individual members of a molecular ensemble, this technique is always limited by fluorophore brightness and stability. In the case of diffusing molecules, the experiment is further limited by the number of photons that can be collected during the time it takes for a molecule to diffuse across the detection volume. To maximize the number of photons it is common to either increase the detection volume at the expense of increased background, or increase the diffusion time by adding glycerol or sucrose to increase viscosity. Here we demonstrate that FRET from attoliter volume (100 nm radius) aqueous droplets in perfluorinated oil has significantly higher signal-to-noise and a much wider dynamic range than FRET from molecules diffusing in solution. However, our measurements also reveal a droplet environment th...

  2. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Jason [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mishra, Bud [Departments of Computer Science and Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Pittenger, Bede [Veeco Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Magonov, Sergei [Veeco Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Troke, Joshua [Department of Pathology and Center for Cell Control, an NIH Nanomedicine Development Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Teitell, Michael A [Department of Pathology and Center for Cell Control, an NIH Nanomedicine Development Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations.

  3. Observational astrochemistry: The quest for interstellar molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guélin M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 160 molecular species, not counting isotopologues, have been identified in circumstellar envelopes and interstellar clouds. These species have revealed a wealth of familiar, as much as exotic molecules and in complex organic (and silicon compounds, that was fully unexpected in view of the harshness of surrounding conditions: vanishingly low densities, extreme temperatures and intense embedding UV radiation. They illustrate the diversity of astrochemistry and show robust prebiotic molecules may be. In this lecture, we review the quest for interstellar molecules and show how tributary it is from theoretical ideas and technology developments. A. A. Penzias, who discovered interstellar CO and the 2.7 K Cosmic Background radiation, used to joke that astronomical research is easy: the great questions have largely been formulated; one only has to wait until technological progress makes it possible to answer.

  4. Complex Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, H.; Herbst, E.; Widicus-Weaver, S.

    2013-06-01

    Protoplanetary disks are vital objects in star and planet formation. In addition to aiding mass accretion onto the central star and angular momentum dissipation, they also contain all material which may form an orbiting planetary system. Of great interest to the astrochemistry and astrobiology communities is the origin of prebiotic molecules, considered the "building blocks" of Life. Is it possible for complex molecules to form in protoplanetary disks and survive assimilation into planets and other planetary system objects, such as, comets? We explore the synthesis of large complex organic molecules (COMs) in protoplanetary disks which encompass young stars. We use a chemical network primarily developed for use in hot core models to calculate the abundance and distribution of gas-phase and grain-mantle (ice) COMs and discuss the potential of observing the gas-phase form of these species with new facilities, such as, ALMA.

  5. Prebiotically Important Molecules in Orion KL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling

    Many interstellar, complex organic molecules are known to be prebiotically important and have essential functions in terrestrial biochemistry. Observations of complex organic molecular species in molecular clouds can thus enable us to test the origin of the primitive organic material found in the Solar System. Interstellar pyrimidine and glycine, the building block of nucleic acid and the simplest amino acid, respectively, are key molecules for astrobiology and were both detected in meteorites and comets. Although the formation of prebiotic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and their contribution to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life remains unsettled, the connection between interstellar organic chemistry, meteoritic pyrimidines and amino acids, and the emergence of life on the early Earth would be strengthened with the discovery of interstellar pyrimidine and glycine. We have therefore observed the Orion KL hot molecular core to search for interstellar pyrimidine and for the confirmation of interstellar glycine using the ALMA array. We will present some of the encouraging, positive results.

  6. Enlarged Molecules from Excited Atoms in Nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Boström, Mathias; Sernelius, Bo E; Dou, Maofeng; Persson, Clas; Ninham, Barry W

    2012-01-01

    The resonance interaction that takes place in planar nanochannels between pairs of excited state atoms is explored. We consider interactions in channels of silica, zinc oxide and gold. The nanosized channels induce a dramatically different interaction from that in free space. Illustrative calculations for two lithium and cesium atoms, demonstrate that there is a short range repulsion followed by long range attraction. The binding energy is strongest near the surfaces. The size of the enlarged molecule is biggest at the center of the cavity and increases with channel width. Since the interaction is generic, we predict that enlarged molecules are formed in porous structures, and that the molecule size depends on the size of the nanochannels

  7. Relativistic Scott correction for atoms and molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovej, Jan Philip; Sørensen, Thomas Østergaard; Spitzer, Wolfgang Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    We prove the first correction to the leading Thomas-Fermi energy for the ground state energy of atoms and molecules in a model where the kinetic energy of the electrons is treated relativistically. The leading Thomas-Fermi energy, established in [25], as well as the correction given here, are of ......We prove the first correction to the leading Thomas-Fermi energy for the ground state energy of atoms and molecules in a model where the kinetic energy of the electrons is treated relativistically. The leading Thomas-Fermi energy, established in [25], as well as the correction given here......, are of semiclassical nature. Our result on atoms and molecules is proved from a general semiclassical estimate for relativistic operators with potentials with Coulomb-like singularities. This semiclassical estimate is obtained using the coherent state calculus introduced in [36]. The paper contains a unified treatment...

  8. Theoretical study on single-molecule spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Guang-cun; HUANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The photon-by-photon approach for single molecule spectroscopy experiments utilizes the information carried by each detected photon and allows the measurements of conformational fluctuation with time resolution on a vast range of time scales,where each photon represents a data point.Here,we theoretically simulate the photon emission dynamics of a single molecule spectroscopy using the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to understand the underlying complex photon dynamic process of a single molecule.In addition,by following the molecular process in real time,the mechanism of complex biochemical reactions can be revealed.We hope that this theoretical study will serve as an introduction and a guideline into this exciting new field.

  9. RNA干扰技术阻断CD40/CD40L共刺激通路对小鼠移植心存活时间的影响%Effects of blocking CD40/CD40L costimulatory pathway by RNA interference on the survival of mouse cardiac allograft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱杰昌; 付蔚华; 朱理玮

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of blocking CD40/CD40L costimulatory pathway by the lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference on the survival of mouse cardiac allograft. Methods Mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were infected by CD40-RNAi lentiviral vector in vitro, and tolerogenic DCs (Tol-DCs) with decreased CD40 expression were prepared. Fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression of CD40 mRNA and DC surface antigens CD40, CD11c, MHC Ⅱ before and after infection. Mouse model of heterotropic abdominal heart transplantation was established. Seven days prior to heart transplantation, Tol-DCs with decreased CD40 expression were transfused into recipient mice intravenously (lentivirus infected DC group). Control group and non-infected DC group were assigned simultaneously. The survival of cardiac allograft was monitored and pathological grade of acute rejection 7 days after heterotropic abdominal heart transplantation was determined. Results The transcription of CD40 mRNA of DCs was down-regulated significantly at 48 h after CD40-RNAi lentiviral vector infection, and the inhibition rate was 80. 9%. The expression of CD40 protein was also significantly decreased as compared with control group (40. 07% ± 4. 03% ) ( P < 0. 05 ).Compared to control group (8 ± 2 days) and non-infected DC group (9 ± 1 days), the survival time of cardiac allograft in CD40-RNAi lentivirus infected DC group (14 ± 4 days) was significantly prolonged (P< 0. 05 ), and the pathological grade of acute rejection decreased significantly ( P < 0. 05 ).Conclusion Blocking CD40/CD40L costimulatory pathway could hamper the activation of allogeneic T lymphocyte, inhibit the acute rejection and prolong the survival of mouse cardiac allograft.%目的 探讨慢病毒介导RNA干扰(RNAi)技术阻断CD40/CD40L共刺激通路对小鼠移植心存活时间的影响.方法 以针对小鼠CD40基因的RNAi慢病毒载体在体外

  10. Molecule capture by olfactory antennules: mantis shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Mark T; Mead, Kristina S; Koehl, Mimi A R

    2002-01-01

    A critical step in the process of olfaction is the movement of odorant molecules from the environment to the surface of a chemosensory structure. Many marine crustaceans capture odorant molecules with arrays of chemosensory sensilla (aesthetascs) on antennules that they flick through the water. We developed a model to calculate molecule flux to the surfaces of aesthetascs in order to study how the size, aesthetasc spacing, and flick kinematics of olfactory antennules affect their performance in capturing molecules from the surrounding water. Since the three-dimensional geometry of an aesthetasc-bearing antennule is complex, dynamically-scaled physical models can often provide an efficient method of determining the fluid velocity field through the array. Here we present a method to optimize the incorporation of such measured velocity vector fields into a numerical simulation of the advection and diffusion of odorants to aesthetasc surfaces. Furthermore, unlike earlier models of odorant interception by antennae, our model incorporates odorant concentration distributions that have been measured in turbulent ambient flows. By applying our model to the example of the olfactory antennules of mantis shrimp, we learned that flicking velocity can have profound effects on odorant flux to the aesthetascs if they operate in the speed range in which the leakiness of the gaps between the aesthetascs to fluid movement is sensitive to velocity. This sensitivity creates an asymmetry in molecule fluxes between outstroke and return stroke, which results in an antennule taking discrete samples in space and time, i.e. "sniffing". As stomatopods grow and their aesthetasc Reynolds number increases, the aesthetasc arrangement on the antennule changes in a way that maintains these asymmetries in leakiness and molecule flux between the outstroke and return stroke, allowing the individual to continue to take discrete samples as it develops.

  11. Chiral Molecules Revisited by Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Chiral molecules have fascinated chemists for more than 150 years. While their physical properties are to a very good approximation identical, the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule can have completely different (bio)chemical activities. For example, the right-handed enantiomer of carvone smells of spearmint while the left-handed one smells of caraway. In addition, the active components of many drugs are of one specific handedness, such as in the case of ibuprofen. However, in nature as well as in pharmaceutical applications, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) remains a challenging task for analytical chemistry, despite its importance for modern drug development. We present here a new method of differentiating enantiomers of chiral molecules in the gas phase based on broadband rotational spectroscopy. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the combined quantity, μ_a μ_b μ_c, which is of opposite sign between enantiomers. It thus also provides information on the absolute configuration of the particular enantiomer. Furthermore, the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee. A significant advantage of our technique is its inherent mixture compatibility due to the fingerprint-like character of rotational spectra. In this contribution, we will introduce the technique and present our latest results on chiral molecule spectroscopy and enantiomer differentiation. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J.M. Doyle, Nature 497 (2013) 475-477 V.A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J.M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014) 1152-1155

  12. Simple and advanced ferromagnet/molecule spinterfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M.; Ibrahim, F.; Djedhloul, F.; Barraud, C.; Garreau, G.; Boukari, S.; Isshiki, H.; Joly, L.; Urbain, E.; Peter, M.; Studniarek, M.; Da Costa, V.; Jabbar, H.; Bulou, H.; Davesne, V.; Halisdemir, U.; Chen, J.; Xenioti, D.; Arabski, J.; Bouzehouane, K.; Deranlot, C.; Fusil, S.; Otero, E.; Choueikani, F.; Chen, K.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Wulfhekel, W.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Wetzel, P.; Seneor, P.; Mattana, R.; Petroff, F.; Scheurer, F.; Weber, W.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Bowen, M.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-polarized charge transfer between a ferromagnet and a molecule can promote molecular ferromagnetism 1, 2 and hybridized interfacial states3, 4. Observations of high spin-polarization of Fermi level states at room temperature5 designate such interfaces as a very promising candidate toward achieving a highly spin-polarized, nanoscale current source at room temperature, when compared to other solutions such as half-metallic systems and solid-state tunnelling over the past decades. We will discuss three aspects of this research. 1) Does the ferromagnet/molecule interface, also called an organic spinterface, exhibit this high spin-polarization as a generic feature? Spin-polarized photoemission experiments reveal that a high spin-polarization of electronics states at the Fermi level also exist at the simple interface between ferromagnetic cobalt and amorphous carbon6. Furthermore, this effect is general to an array of ferromagnetic and molecular candidates7. 2) Integrating molecules with intrinsic properties (e.g. spin crossover molecules) into a spinterface toward enhanced functionality requires lowering the charge transfer onto the molecule8 while magnetizing it1,2. We propose to achieve this by utilizing interlayer exchange coupling within a more advanced organic spinterface architecture. We present results at room temperature across the fcc Co(001)/Cu/manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) system9. 3) Finally, we discuss how the Co/MnPc spinterface's ferromagnetism stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature onto subsequent molecules away from the spinterface, which in turn can exchange bias the Co layer at low temperature10. Consequences include tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance across a CoPc tunnel barrier11. This augurs new possibilities to transmit spin information across organic semiconductors using spin flip excitations12.

  13. Small Molecule Subgraph Detector (SMSD toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding one small molecule (query in a large target library is a challenging task in computational chemistry. Although several heuristic approaches are available using fragment-based chemical similarity searches, they fail to identify exact atom-bond equivalence between the query and target molecules and thus cannot be applied to complex chemical similarity searches, such as searching a complete or partial metabolic pathway. In this paper we present a new Maximum Common Subgraph (MCS tool: SMSD (Small Molecule Subgraph Detector to overcome the issues with current heuristic approaches to small molecule similarity searches. The MCS search implemented in SMSD incorporates chemical knowledge (atom type match with bond sensitive and insensitive information while searching molecular similarity. We also propose a novel method by which solutions obtained by each MCS run can be ranked using chemical filters such as stereochemistry, bond energy, etc. Results In order to benchmark and test the tool, we performed a 50,000 pair-wise comparison between KEGG ligands and PDB HET Group atoms. In both cases the SMSD was shown to be more efficient than the widely used MCS module implemented in the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK in generating MCS solutions from our test cases. Conclusion Presently this tool can be applied to various areas of bioinformatics and chemo-informatics for finding exhaustive MCS matches. For example, it can be used to analyse metabolic networks by mapping the atoms between reactants and products involved in reactions. It can also be used to detect the MCS/substructure searches in small molecules reported by metabolome experiments, as well as in the screening of drug-like compounds with similar substructures. Thus, we present a robust tool that can be used for multiple applications, including the discovery of new drug molecules. This tool is freely available on http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/SMSD/

  14. Hadronic molecules with hidden charm and bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Feng-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the new structures observed since 2003 in experiments in the heavy quarkonium mass region, such as the X(3872 and Zc (3900, are rather close to certain thresholds, and thus can be good candidates of hadronic molecules, which are loose bound systems of hadrons. We will discuss the consequences of heavy quark symmetry for hadronic molecules with heavy quarks. We will also emphasize that the hadronic molecular component of a given structure can be directly probed in long-distance processes, while the short-distance processes are not sensitive to it.

  15. Magneto-optical trap for polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Sawyer, Brian C; Wang, Dajun; Ye, Jun

    2008-12-12

    We propose a method for laser cooling and trapping a substantial class of polar molecules and, in particular, titanium (II) oxide (TiO). This method uses pulsed electric fields to nonadiabatically remix the ground-state magnetic sublevels of the molecule, allowing one to build a magneto-optical trap based on a quasicycling J' = J'' -1 transition. Monte Carlo simulations of this electrostatically remixed magneto-optical trap demonstrate the feasibility of cooling TiO to a temperature of 10 micrpK and trapping it with a radiation-pumping-limited lifetime on the order of 80 ms.

  16. Nanoscale methods for single-molecule electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Aartsma, Thijs J; Canters, Gerard W; Lemay, Serge G

    2014-01-01

    The development of experiments capable of probing individual molecules has led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from molecular electronics to biophysics, allowing direct tests of knowledge derived from macroscopic measurements and enabling new assays that probe population heterogeneities and internal molecular dynamics. Although still somewhat in their infancy, such methods are also being developed for probing molecular systems in solution using electrochemical transduction mechanisms. Here we outline the present status of this emerging field, concentrating in particular on optical methods, metal-molecule-metal junctions, and electrochemical nanofluidic devices.

  17. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  18. Photoassociative production of ultracold heteronuclear ytterbium molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciurylo, Roman [Instytut Fizyki, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, ul. Grudziadzka 5/7, PL-87-100 Torun (Poland); Julienne, Paul S. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8423, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States); Yamazaki, Rekishu; Takahashi, Yoshiro [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); CREST, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Hara, Hideaki; Taie, Shintaro; Sugawa, Seiji; Takasu, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Enomoto, Katsunari [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    We report observations of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line in isotopic mixtures of ultracold ytterbium gases. Several heteronuclear bound states have been found for the excited {sup 170}Yb{sup 174}Yb and {sup 174}Yb{sup 176}Yb molecules. We develop a single-channel mass-scaled interaction model for the excited state molecule which well reproduces the measured bound state energies. This is an important step toward optical control of interactions in mixtures of ultracold ytterbium gases using heteronuclear optical Feshbach resonances. The model developed is applicable in collisions of other similar systems, such as cadmium and mercury.

  19. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  20. A toy model for a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a toy model for a diatomic molecule which is based on coupling electronic and nuclear spins to a rigid rotor. Despite its simplicity, the model can be used scientifically to analyze and understand complex molecular hyperfine spectra. In addition, the model has educational value as a number of fundamental symmetries and conservation laws of the molecule can be studied. Because of its simple structure, the model can be readily implemented as a computer program with comparatively short computing times on the order of a few seconds.

  1. Organic- and molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joel S Miller

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of organic- and molecule-based magnets has led to design and synthesis of several families with magnetic ordering temperatures as high as ∼ 125° C. Examples of soft and hard magnets with coercivities as high as 27 kOe have also been reported. Examples from our laboratory of organic-based magnets using the tetracya- noethylene radical anion, [TCNE]$^{\\bullet -}$, are discussed. In addition, several molecule-based magnets based on Prussian Blue structured materials as well as dicyanamide are discussed.

  2. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical...... tweezers. We first focused on the mechanical properties and unfolding pathway of the four-helix acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP). Contrary to previous studies which have shown protein native states to be brittle, we observed extraordinary compliance for ACBP along two orthogonal pulling axis...

  3. Detecting gas molecules via atomic magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heechae; Lee, Minho; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-09-14

    Adsorptions of gas molecules were found to alter the directions and magnitudes of magnetic moments of transition metal (Co, Fe) atoms adsorbed on graphene. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrated that magnetism of surface atoms can be used to identify the kind of existing gas molecules via spin-reorientation and/or demagnetizations caused by the reconfigurations of 3d electron energy levels of Co and Fe. We suggest for the first time that magnetic properties of transition metal-embedded nanostructures can be used in highly selective gas-sensing applications.

  4. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  5. Evidence of disorder in biological molecules from single molecule pulling experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity in biological molecules, resulting in molecule-to-molecule variations in their dynamics and function, is an emerging theme. To elucidate the consequences of heterogeneous behavior at the single molecule level, we propose an exactly solvable model in which the unfolding rate due to mechanical force depends parametrically on an auxiliary variable representing an entropy barrier arising from fluctuations in internal dynamics. When the rate of fluctuations, a measure of dynamical disorder, is comparable to or smaller than the rate of force-induced unbinding, we show that there are two experimentally observable consequences: non-exponential survival probability at constant force, and a heavy-tailed rupture force distribution at constant loading rate. By fitting our analytical expressions to data from single molecule pulling experiments on proteins and DNA, we quantify the extent of disorder. We show that only by analyzing data over a wide range of forces and loading rates can the role of disorder due...

  6. Strategy to discover diverse optimal molecules in the small molecule universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupakheti, Chetan; Virshup, Aaron; Yang, Weitao; Beratan, David N

    2015-03-23

    The small molecule universe (SMU) is defined as a set of over 10(60) synthetically feasible organic molecules with molecular weight less than ∼500 Da. Exhaustive enumerations and evaluation of all SMU molecules for the purpose of discovering favorable structures is impossible. We take a stochastic approach and extend the ACSESS framework ( Virshup et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013 , 135 , 7296 - 7303 ) to develop diversity oriented molecular libraries that can generate a set of compounds that is representative of the small molecule universe and that also biases the library toward favorable physical property values. We show that the approach is efficient compared to exhaustive enumeration and to existing evolutionary algorithms for generating such libraries by testing in the NKp fitness landscape model and in the fully enumerated GDB-9 chemical universe containing 3 × 10(5) molecules.

  7. Making More-Complex Molecules Using Superthermal Atom/Molecule Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Brian; Chutjian, Ara; Orient, Otto

    2008-01-01

    A method of making more-complex molecules from simpler ones has emerged as a by-product of an experimental study in outer-space atom/surface collision physics. The subject of the study was the formation of CO2 molecules as a result of impingement of O atoms at controlled kinetic energies upon cold surfaces onto which CO molecules had been adsorbed. In this study, the O/CO system served as a laboratory model, not only for the formation of CO2 but also for the formation of other compounds through impingement of rapidly moving atoms upon molecules adsorbed on such cold interstellar surfaces as those of dust grains or comets. By contributing to the formation of increasingly complex molecules, including organic ones, this study and related other studies may eventually contribute to understanding of the origins of life.

  8. The Molecules of the Cell Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretscher, Mark S.

    1985-01-01

    Cell membrane molecules form a simple, two-dimensional liquid controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Discusses cell membrane molecular architecture, plasma membranes, epithelial cells, cycles of endocytosis and exocytosis, and other topics. Indicates that some cells internalize, then recycle, membrane area equivalent to their entire surface…

  9. Organic chemistry: Precision pruning of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kin S.; Engle, Keary M.

    2016-05-01

    If organic molecules were trees, then the numerous carbon-hydrogen bonds within them would be leaves. A catalyst that targets one 'leaf' out of many similar other ones looks set to be a huge leap for synthetic chemistry. See Letter p.230

  10. The formation of molecules in protostellar winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassgold, A.E.; Mamon, G.A.; Huggins, P.J. (New York University, NY (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The production and destruction processes for molecules in very fast protostellar winds are analyzed and modeled with a one-dimensional chemical kinetics code. Radial density and temperature distributions suggested by protostellar theory are explored as are a range of mass-loss rates. The efficiency of in situ formation of heavy molecules is found to be high if the wind temperature falls sufficiently rapidly, as indicated by theory. The degree of molecular conversion is a strong function of the mass-loss rate and of density gradients associated with the acceleration and collimation of the wind. Even in cases where essentially all of the heavy atoms are processed into molecules, a significant fraction of atomic hydrogen remains so that hghly molecular, protostellar winds are able to emit the 21-cm line. Although CO has a substantial abundance in most models relevant to very young protostars, high abundances of other molecules such as SiO and H2O signify more complete association characteristic of winds containing regions of very high density. Although the models apply only to regions close to the protostar, they are in qualitative accord with recent observations at much larger distances of both atomic and molecular emission from extremely high-velocity flow. 57 refs.

  11. The formation of molecules in protostellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Huggins, P. J.

    1991-05-01

    The production and destruction processes for molecules in very fast protostellar winds are analyzed and modeled with a one-dimensional chemical kinetics code. Radial density and temperature distributions suggested by protostellar theory are explored as are a range of mass-loss rates. The efficiency of in situ formation of heavy molecules is found to be high if the wind temperature falls sufficiently rapidly, as indicated by theory. The degree of molecular conversion is a strong function of the mass-loss rate and of density gradients associated with the acceleration and collimation of the wind. Even in cases where essentially all of the heavy atoms are processed into molecules, a significant fraction of atomic hydrogen remains so that highly molecular, protostellar winds are able to emit the 21-cm line. Although CO has a substantial abundance in most models relevant to very young protostars, high abundances of other molecules such as SiO and H2O signify more complete association characteristic of winds containing regions of very high density. Although the models apply only to regions close to the protostar, they are in qualitative accord with recent observations at much larger distances of both atomic and molecular emission from extremely high-velocity flow.

  12. The formation of molecules in protostellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Huggins, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The production and destruction processes for molecules in very fast protostellar winds are analyzed and modeled with a one-dimensional chemical kinetics code. Radial density and temperature distributions suggested by protostellar theory are explored as are a range of mass-loss rates. The efficiency of in situ formation of heavy molecules is found to be high if the wind temperature falls sufficiently rapidly, as indicated by theory. The degree of molecular conversion is a strong function of the mass-loss rate and of density gradients associated with the acceleration and collimation of the wind. Even in cases where essentially all of the heavy atoms are processed into molecules, a significant fraction of atomic hydrogen remains so that hghly molecular, protostellar winds are able to emit the 21-cm line. Although CO has a substantial abundance in most models relevant to very young protostars, high abundances of other molecules such as SiO and H2O signify more complete association characteristic of winds containing regions of very high density. Although the models apply only to regions close to the protostar, they are in qualitative accord with recent observations at much larger distances of both atomic and molecular emission from extremely high-velocity flow.

  13. Mathematics and Molecules: Exploring Connections via Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploger, Don; Carlock, Margaret

    1996-01-01

    Examines the self-directed activity of two students who learned about molecular structure by writing computer programs. The programs displayed the solution of a mathematics problem, then the programs were extended to represent several classes of organic molecules. Different ways to enhance mathematical connections to chemistry education are…

  14. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  15. Origin of organic molecules and biomolecular homochirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlech, J

    2001-01-01

    Theories about the origin of biomolecular homochirality, which seems to be a prerequisite for the creation of life, are discussed. First, possible terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources of organic molecules are outlined. Then, mechanisms for the formation of enantiomerically enriched compounds and for the amplification of their chirality are described.

  16. Predicting the Stability of Hypervalent Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tracy A.; Finnocchio, Debbie; Kua, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is described which introduces students to using concepts in thermochemistry to predict relative stability of a hypervalent molecule. Students will compare the energies of formation for both fluoride and the hydride by calculations and they will also explore the issue of partial ionic character in polar covalent bonds.

  17. Writing with molecules on molecular printboards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespo biel, O.; Ravoo, B.J.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology aspires to create functional materials with characteristic dimensions of the order 1–100 nm. One requirement to make nanotechnology work is to precisely position molecules and nanoparticles on surfaces, so that they may be addressed and manipulated for bottom-up construction of

  18. Comprehensive Map of Molecules Implicated in Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaisri Jagannadham

    Full Text Available Obesity is a global epidemic affecting over 1.5 billion people and is one of the risk factors for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We have constructed a comprehensive map of the molecules reported to be implicated in obesity. A deep curation strategy was complemented by a novel semi-automated text mining system in order to screen 1,000 full-length research articles and over 90,000 abstracts that are relevant to obesity. We obtain a scale free network of 804 nodes and 971 edges, composed of 510 proteins, 115 genes, 62 complexes, 23 RNA molecules, 83 simple molecules, 3 phenotype and 3 drugs in "bow-tie" architecture. We classify this network into 5 modules and identify new links between the recently discovered fat mass and obesity associated FTO gene with well studied examples such as insulin and leptin. We further built an automated docking pipeline to dock orlistat as well as other drugs against the 24,000 proteins in the human structural proteome to explain the therapeutics and side effects at a network level. Based upon our experiments, we propose that therapeutic effect comes through the binding of one drug with several molecules in target network, and the binding propensity is both statistically significant and different in comparison with any other part of human structural proteome.

  19. Polypetide signaling molecules in plant development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercellular communication mediated by small signaling molecules is a key mechanism for coordinating plant growth and development. In the past few years, polypeptide signals have been shown to play prominent roles in processes as diverse as shoot and root meristem maintenance, vascular differentiat...

  20. Aging-From molecules to populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Miriam; Avlund, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin;

    2008-01-01

    -From Molecules to Populations. The following questions about human aging were discussed at the workshop: What is the limit of human life expectancy? What are the key indicators of human aging? What are the key drivers of human aging? Which genes have the greatest impact on human aging? How similar is aging...

  1. Field-free orientation of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machholm, Mette; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2001-01-01

    The excitation of angular motion, in particular, the creation of a wave packet in the angular degrees of freedom via short-pulse, off-resonant excitation with respect to rotational transitions, was examined. The key result was that field-free time-dependent orientation for a molecule like LiH can...

  2. Tunneling ionization of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Zon, Boris A.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization of molecular nitrogen plays an important role in the process of light-filament formation in air. In the present paper we theoretically investigated tunneling ionization of the valence 3 σg and 1 πu shells in a N2 molecule using a strong near-infrared laser field. This research is based on our previously proposed theory of anti-Stokes-enhanced tunneling ionization with quantum accounting for the vibrationally excited states of the molecules [A. S. Kornev and B. A. Zon, Phys. Rev. A 86, 043401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.043401]. We demonstrated that if the N2 molecule is ionized from the ground vibrational state, then the contribution of the 1 πu orbital is 0.5%. In contrast, for vibrationally excited states with a certain angle between the light polarization vector and the molecule axis, both shells can compete and even reverse their contributions due to the anti-Stokes mechanism. The structure constants of molecular orbitals are extracted from numerical solutions to the Hartree-Fock equations. This approach correctly takes into account the exchange interaction. Quantum consideration of vibrational motion results in the occurrence of the critical vibrational state, the tunneling ionization from which has the maximum rate. The numbers of the critical vibrational states are different for different valence shells. In addition, quantum description of vibrations changes the rate of ionization from the ground vibrational state by 20%-40% in comparison with the quasiclassical results.

  3. Cluster ions and van der Waals molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    1992-01-01

    This review discusses current ideas in the physics and chemistry of cluster ions and Van der Waals molecules as well as presenting numerical data on their parameters and the processes involving them. It is also a detailed reference on basic data relating to many species.

  4. Modified "DMC" technique for stretching DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A modified "dynamic molecular combing"(DMC)technique used for stretching double-strandedDNA is reported. DNA molecules were stretched on the silanized mica surface by thistechnique, its speed being precisely controlled with a computer. This approachcombinedthe precise DNA stretching method with high resolution AFM imaging at nanometer scale,thusmaking it useful for DNA alignment manipulation and subsequent gene research.

  5. Molecules during stellar formation and death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the chemistry of interstellar and circumstellar molecules during star formation and death. From the perspective of chemical physics, the most important outcome of this thesis lies in that the rates for two important reactions are determined accurately for the first time: N2 phot

  6. Chain-like molecules confined in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick; Soprunyuk, Viktor; Hofmann, Tommy; Knorr, Klaus

    2004-03-01

    We present an x-ray diffraction study on chain-like molecules, i.e. a selection of n-alkane molecules, embedded in the pores of nanoporous silica matrices. The lengths of the hydrocarbon chains are comparable to the mean diameter ( 7nm) of the tubular like nanopores which leads to drastic geometric restrictions. Diffraction patterns, recorded on heating and cooling between 200 K and 310 K, elucidate how the structure and phase behavior of the molecules is affected by the random substrate disorder and the confinement. The confined n-alkanes form close-packed structures by aligning parallel to the pore axis. In the case of the medium-length hydrocarbon chains one basic ordering principle known from the bulk crystalline state, i.e. the lamellar ordering of the molecules, is quenched[1], whereas for shorter n-alkanes this ordering principle survives[2]. The confined solids mimic the orientational order-disorder transitions known from the 3D unconfined crystals albeit in a modified fashion. 1. P. Huber, D. Wallacher, J. Albers, K. Knorr, Europhysics Letters, in press; 2. P. Huber, D. Wallacher, J. Albers, K. Knorr, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 15, 309 (2003).

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.G.

    1979-07-01

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target.

  8. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    to develop. There is no molecular evidence yet to decide whether vertebrate immune systems (and particularly the MHC molecules) are evolutionarily related to invertebrate allorecognition systems, and the functional evidence can be interpreted either way. Even among the vertebrates, there is great...

  9. Chiral Sensitivity in Electron-Molecule Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiling, Joan

    2015-09-01

    All molecular forms of life possess a chiral asymmetry, with amino acids and sugars found respectively in L- and D-enantiomers only. The primordial origin of this enantiomeric excess is unknown. One possible explanation is given by the Vester- Ulbricht hypothesis, which suggests that left-handed electrons present in beta-radiation, produced by parity-violating weak decays, interacted with biological precursors and preferentially destroyed one of the two enantiomers. Experimental tests of this idea have thus far yielded inconclusive results. We show direct evidence for chirally-dependent bond breaking through a dissociative electron attachment (DEA) reaction when spin-polarized electrons are incident on gas-phase chiral molecules. This provides unambiguous evidence for a well-defined, chirally-sensitive destructive molecular process and, as such, circumstantial evidence for the Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis. I will also present the results of our systematic study of the DEA asymmetry for different chiral halocamphor molecules. Three halocamphor molecules were investigated: 3-bromocamphor (C10H15BrO), 3-iodocamphor(C10H15IO), and 10-iodocamphor. The DEA asymmetries collected for bromocamphor and iodocamphor are qualitatively different, suggesting that the atomic number of the heaviest atom in the molecule plays a crucial role in the asymmetric interactions. The DEA asymmetry data for 3- and 10-iodocamphor have the same qualitative behavior, but the 10-iodocamphor asymmetry is about twice as large at the lowest energies investigated, so the location of the heavy atom in the camphor molecule also affects the asymmetries. This work was performed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This project is funded by NSF Grant PHY-1206067.

  10. Single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, S C; Cherayil, Binny J; Min, Wei; English, Brian P; Xie, X Sunney

    2005-10-20

    This paper summarizes our present theoretical understanding of single-molecule kinetics associated with the Michaelis-Menten mechanism of enzymatic reactions. Single-molecule enzymatic turnover experiments typically measure the probability density f(t) of the stochastic waiting time t for individual turnovers. While f(t) can be reconciled with ensemble kinetics, it contains more information than the ensemble data; in particular, it provides crucial information on dynamic disorder, the apparent fluctuation of the catalytic rates due to the interconversion among the enzyme's conformers with different catalytic rate constants. In the presence of dynamic disorder, f(t) exhibits a highly stretched multiexponential decay at high substrate concentrations and a monoexponential decay at low substrate concentrations. We derive a single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equation for the reciprocal of the first moment of f(t), 1/, which shows a hyperbolic dependence on the substrate concentration [S], similar to the ensemble enzymatic velocity. We prove that this single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equation holds under many conditions, in particular when the intercoversion rates among different enzyme conformers are slower than the catalytic rate. However, unlike the conventional interpretation, the apparent catalytic rate constant and the apparent Michaelis constant in this single-molecule Michaelis-Menten equation are complicated functions of the catalytic rate constants of individual conformers. We also suggest that the randomness parameter r, defined as )2> / t2, can serve as an indicator for dynamic disorder in the catalytic step of the enzymatic reaction, as it becomes larger than unity at high substrate concentrations in the presence of dynamic disorder.

  11. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  12. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  13. Synthesis of single-molecule nanocars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Guillaume; Tour, James M

    2009-03-17

    The drive to miniaturize devices has led to a variety of molecular machines inspired by macroscopic counterparts such as molecular motors, switches, shuttles, turnstiles, barrows, elevators, and nanovehicles. Such nanomachines are designed for controlled mechanical motion and the transport of nanocargo. As researchers miniaturize devices, they can consider two complementary approaches: (1) the "top-down" approach, which reduces the size of macroscopic objects to reach an equivalent microscopic entity using photolithography and related techniques and (2) the "bottom-up" approach, which builds functional microscopic or nanoscopic entities from molecular building blocks. The top-down approach, extensively used by the semiconductor industry, is nearing its scaling limits. On the other hand, the bottom-up approach takes advantage of the self-assembly of smaller molecules into larger networks by exploiting typically weak molecular interactions. But self-assembly alone will not permit complex assembly. Using nanomachines, we hope to eventually consider complex, enzyme-like directed assembly. With that ultimate goal, we are currently exploring the control of nanomachines that would provide a basis for the future bottom-up construction of complex systems. This Account describes the synthesis of a class of molecular machines that resemble macroscopic vehicles. We designed these so-called nanocars for study at the single-molecule level by scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The vehicles have a chassis connected to wheel-terminated axles and convert energy inputs such as heat, electric fields, or light into controlled motion on a surface, ultimately leading to transport of nanocargo. At first, we used C(60) fullerenes as wheels, which allowed the demonstration of a directional rolling mechanism of a nanocar on a gold surface by STM. However, because of the low solubility of the fullerene nanocars and the incompatibility of fullerenes with photochemical processes, we developed new

  14. 共刺激分子OX40/OX40L在小鼠变应性鼻炎发病机制中的作用%Effect of the costimulatory pathway OX40/OX40L on pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 甘敏; 刘尚耀; 朱凤华; 杜明; 赵建东

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨OX40/OX40L在小鼠变应性鼻炎发病机制中的可能作用.方法 精选30只清洁级小白鼠,随机分成对照组、模型组、干预组.通过免疫组织化学方法 测定对照组和模型组小鼠鼻黏膜中OX40的表达,同时应用ILISA法测定各组中IL-4、IL-10、IFN-γ的水平.结果 OX40在变应性鼻炎小鼠鼻黏膜上皮细胞、腺体细胞、血管内皮细胞、CD4T细胞中均呈现高表达,OX40主要表达于细胞膜、细胞浆,在对照组中极少表达(P<0.05).ILISA法测定IL-4、IL-10、IFN-γ在对照组与模型组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),模型组和干预组相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 OX40/OX40L在变应性鼻炎小鼠发病机制中起重要作用.%Objective To evaluate the role of another costimulatory pathway OX40/OX40 ligand(L) in pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis in mice. Methods 30 mice were divided into three groups: the control group, the allergic rhinitis group, and the OX40LmAb interfere group. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine expression of OX40 in the first two groups. IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ in the peripheral blood were analyzed by ELISA. Results OX40 showed a strong expression in the epithelium, glandular epithelium cells, vascular endotheliocytes and CD4 + T cells. OX40 was mainly expressed in cytomembrance and cytoplasm, while OX40 was a stained a little in the control group. There was a statistically significant deviation between the allergic rhinitis and control groups ( P <0.05). Compared with the control group, the allergic rhinitis group had higher IL-4 and IL-10 levels and lower IFN-γlevel in peripheral blood (P <0.05). Compared with the allergic rhinitis group, the OX40LmAb interfere group had lower IL-4 level and higher IFN-γlevel in peripheral blood(P <0.05). Conclusion OX40/OX40L plays an important role in pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis in mice.

  15. Nondestructive Detection of Polar Molecules via Rydberg Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive, general, and preferably nondestructive technique to detect polar molecules would greatly advance a number of fields, in particular quantum science with cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we propose using resonant energy transfer between molecules and Rydberg atoms to detect molecules. Based on an energy transfer cross section of $>10^{-6}\\,$cm$^2$ for sufficiently low collision energies, a near unit efficiency non-destructive detection of basically any polar molecule spec...

  16. Molecule by molecule, the physics and chemistry of life: SMB 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Steven M; Larson, Matthew H; Greenleaf, William J; Herbert, Kristina M; Guydosh, Nicholas R; Anthony, Peter C

    2007-04-01

    Interdisciplinary work in the life sciences at the boundaries of biology, chemistry and physics is making enormous strides. This progress was showcased at the recent Single Molecule Biophysics conference.

  17. From the molecule to the mole: improving heterogeneous copper catalyzed click chemistry using single molecule spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Durantini, Javier; Decan, Matthew R; Nie, Jun; Lanterna, Anabel E; Scaiano, Juan C

    2016-12-22

    Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) inspired the optimization of a heterogeneous 'click' catalyst leading to enhanced yields of the Cu-catalyzed reaction of azides with terminal alkynes. Changes in SMS data after optimization confirm the improvements in catalyst performance.

  18. Adsorption. Cage molecules to pick up the pollutants; Adsorption. Des molecules cages pour capter les polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-12-01

    The cyclo-dextrins have the property to be cage molecules, that is to say they are able to shut up organic molecules in their structure. To use them in remedial action against pollution it is necessary to find a support on which they can be grafted. The Laboratory of organic chemistry and macromolecules from the University of Sciences and Technologies of Lilles is looking for this. The researchers have used a textile material in non weaved polypropylene, a support chemically steady that resists to aggressive media such polluted effluents. To graft the cage molecule, the technique of electrons bombing has been chosen. It produces a monomer (methacrylate of glycidyl) that allows to have a tissue bearer of epoxide functions susceptible to react with the cyclo-dextrin. The studies are continued in particular to valid the use of cage molecules on the dioxin and pesticides, and also to adapt the filter to gaseous media (volatile organic compounds, smells). (N.C.)

  19. Manifestation of the strong quadrupole light-molecule interaction in the SEHR spectra of symmetrical molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Polubotko, A M

    2009-01-01

    The paper demonstrates possibility of giant enhancement of Surface Enhanced Hyper Raman Scattering on the base of qualitative consideration of electromagnetic field near some models of rough metal surfaces and of some features of the dipole and quadrupole light-molecule interaction, such as it was made in the dipole-quadrupole SERS theory. Consideration of symmetrical molecules permits to obtain selection rules for their SEHR spectra and establish such regularity as appearance of the bands, caused by the totally symmetric vibrations, transforming after the unitary irreducible representation in molecules with C2h,D and higher symmetry groups, which are forbidden in usual HRS spectra. Analysis of literature data on trans-1,2-bis (4-pyridyle) ethylene and pyridine molecules demonstrates that their SEHR spectra can be explained by the SEHRS dipole-quadrupole theory, while analysis of the SEHR spectrum of pyrazine reveals appearance of the strong forbidden bands, caused by vibrations transforming after the unitary...

  20. Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen the development of a number of novel biophysical methods that allow the manipulation and study of individual biomolecules. The ability to monitor biological processes at this fundamental level of sensitivity has given rise to an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Through the removal of ensemble averaging, distributions and fluctuations of molecular properties can be characterized, transient intermediates identified, and catalytic mechanisms elucidated. By applying forces on biomolecules while monitoring their activity, important information can be obtained on how proteins couple function to structure. The Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics provides an introduction to these techniques and presents an extensive discussion of the new biological insights obtained from them. Coverage includes: Experimental techniques to monitor and manipulate individual biomolecules The use of single-molecule techniques in super-resolution and functional imaging Single-molec...

  1. Multiorbital tunneling ionization of the CO molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Meckel, M; Voss, S; Sann, H; Kim, H; Jahnke, T; Czasch, A; Dörner, R

    2012-01-01

    We coincidently measure the molecular frame photoelectron angular distribution and the ion sum-momentum distribution of single and double ionization of CO molecules by using circularly and elliptically polarized femtosecond laser pulses, respectively. The orientation dependent ionization rates for various kinetic energy releases allow us to individually identify the ionizations of multiple orbitals, ranging from the highest occupied to the next two lower-lying molecular orbitals for various channels observed in our experiments. Not only the emission of a single electron, but also the sequential tunneling dynamics of two electrons from multiple orbitals are traced step by step. Our results confirm that the shape of the ionizing orbitals determine the strong laser field tunneling ionization in the CO molecule, whereas the linear Stark effect plays a minor role.

  2. Optical slowing of calcium monofluoride molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Aakash; Chae, Eunmi; Hemmerling, Boerge; Anderegg, Loic; Augenbraun, Benjamin; Drayna, Garrett; Hutzler, Nicholas; Collopy, Alejandra; Wu, Yewei; Ding, Shiqian; Ye, Jun; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Doyle, John

    2016-05-01

    We report white-light slowing of calcium monofluoride molecules. A single main laser (606 nm) plus two additional vibrational repump lasers (628 nm) are employed. The slowing lasers are spectrally broadened to address the molecules' velocity spread and hyperfine splittings. We use a background-free two-photon fluorescence detection scheme to make high signal-to-noise measurements of our molecular beam's longitudinal velocity distribution. This method is applied to slow CaF produced by a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas beam source by > 30 m/s to near the capture velocity of a molecular magneto-optical trap (MOT). Due to the presence of magnetic dark states which inhibit optical cycling, we will use an AC-MOT. We characterize the performance of this AC-MOT used in the trapping of Li and Yb.

  3. Interstellar molecules - Formation in solar nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Herbig's (1970) hypothesis that solar nebulae might be the principal source of interstellar grains and molecules is investigated. The investigation includes the determination of physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. The production of organic compounds in the solar nebula is studied, and the compounds in meteorites are compared with those obtained in Miller-Urey and Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions, taking into consideration aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, porphyrins, and aspects of carbon-isotope fractionation. It is found that FTT reactions account reasonably well for all well-established features of organic matter in meteorites investigated. The distribution of compounds produced by FTT reactions is compared with the distribution of interstellar molecules. Biological implications of the results are considered.

  4. Trace Molecules in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, D. L.; Smith, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Chemical kinetics matters in the upper atmospheres of giant planets in our solar system and in extrasolar systems. The composition of a volume of gas depends not only on where it is, but also on how it got there. The giant planets in our own solar system still have much to teach us about what we will be observing on extrasolar giant planets and how to interpret what we observe. Some molecules, such as CO, C2H2, C2H6, PH3, and NH3, which we call tracer molecules, provide remotely observable signatures of vertical transport. PH3 and NH3 especially have complicated thermochemistry and chemical kinetics that, until recently, have been poorly understood. Based on analysis of recent literature, we have identified new chemical mechanisms for interconverting NH3 and N2 and for interconverting PH3 and NH4-H2PO4.

  5. Diiododurene: four centrosymmetric molecules in general positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Doyle; Gleason, William B

    2003-08-01

    Diiododurene (1,4-diodo-2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzene), C(10)H(12)I(2), packs with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. All four of these moleules violate Kitaigorodsky's suggestion that molecules with centers of symmetry will lie on crystallographic centers of symmetry. There is 5.6% disorder at one of the sites. Most of the I atoms are in contact with other I atoms, but only six of the I.I contacts are shorter than 4.2 A. Of these six contacts, one set of three contacts forms a triangular set in which all of the I.I distances are less than 3.9 A.

  6. Is the Focus on ``Molecules'' Obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M.

    2013-06-01

    The technologies developed in analytical chemistry have defined in spectacular detail the properties of molecules. The field now faces enormously important and interesting problems of which molecules are only a part: for example, understanding the nature of life; helping to manage megacities, oceans, and atmospheres; and making health care (especially diagnostics) affordable and relevant. The emergence of these problems involving molecular systems raises the issue of how (and what) analytical chemistry should teach. Historically, it has been essential to chemistry in teaching the science of measurement. As complicated analytical techniques proliferate, it must consider how to balance teaching the uses of sophisticated devices and the fundamentals of analysis and measurement. This review (by an admiring but nonanalytical chemist) sketches the essential role of analytical methods—especially simple ones made up on the spot—in guiding research in new fields, with examples from self-assembled monolayers, soft lithography, paper diagnostics, and self-assembly; and suggests issues in teaching.

  7. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  8. Effective interaction between helical bio-molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Allahyarov, E

    1999-01-01

    The effective interaction between two parallel strands of helicalbio-molecules, such as deoxyribose nucleic acids (DNA), is calculated usingcomputer simulations of the "primitive" model of electrolytes. In particular westudy a simple model for B-DNA incorporating explicitly its charge pattern as adouble-helix structure. The effective force and the effective torque exertedonto the molecules depend on the central distance and on the relativeorientation. The contributions of nonlinear screening by monovalent counterionsto these forces and torques are analyzed and calculated for different saltconcentrations. As a result, we find that the sign of the force dependssensitively on the relative orientation. For intermolecular distances smallerthan $6\\AA$ it can be both attractive and repulsive. Furthermore we report anonmonotonic behaviour of the effective force for increasing saltconcentration. Both features cannot be described within linear screeningtheories. For large distances, on the other hand, the results agree...

  9. Multichannel quantum defect theory for polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfimov, Sergei V.; Dorofeev, Dmitrii L.; Zon, Boris A.

    2014-02-01

    Our work is devoted to developing a general approach for nonpenetrating Rydberg states of polar molecules. We propose a method to estimate the accuracy of calculation of their wave functions and quantum defects. Basing on this method we estimate the accuracy of Born-Oppenheimer (BO) and inverse Born-Oppenheimer (IBO) approximations for these states. This estimation enables us to determine the space and energy regions where BO and IBO approximations are valid. It depends on the interplay between l coupling (due to dipole potential of the core) and l uncoupling (due to rotation the core). Next we consider the intermediate region where both BO and IBO are not valid. For this intermediate region we propose a modification of Fano's multichannel quantum defect theory to match BO and IBO wave functions and show that it gives more reliable results. They are demonstrated on the example of SO molecule.

  10. Vibrational and coherence dynamics of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhedong

    2015-01-01

    We {\\it analytically} investigate the population and coherence dynamics and relaxations in the vibrational energy transport in molecules. The corresponding two time scales $t_1$ and $t_2$ are explored. Coherence-population entanglement is found to considerably promote the time scale $t_2$ for dephasing and the amplitude of coherence. This is attributed to the suppression of the environment-induced drift force by coherence. Moreover the population imbalance (magnetization) is shown to be significantly amplified with the coherence-population entanglement. Contrary to the previous studies, we exactly elucidate a coherent process by showing $t_1molecules dissolved in D$_2$O. Finally we explore the coherence effect on the heat current at the macroscopic level.

  11. Is the focus on "molecules" obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M

    2013-01-01

    The technologies developed in analytical chemistry have defined in spectacular detail the properties of molecules. The field now faces enormously important and interesting problems of which molecules are only a part: for example, understanding the nature of life; helping to manage megacities, oceans, and atmospheres; and making health care (especially diagnostics) affordable and relevant. The emergence of these problems involving molecular systems raises the issue of how (and what) analytical chemistry should teach. Historically, it has been essential to chemistry in teaching the science of measurement. As complicated analytical techniques proliferate, it must consider how to balance teaching the uses of sophisticated devices and the fundamentals of analysis and measurement. This review (by an admiring but nonanalytical chemist) sketches the essential role of analytical methods--especially simple ones made up on the spot--in guiding research in new fields, with examples from self-assembled monolayers, soft lithography, paper diagnostics, and self-assembly; and suggests issues in teaching.

  12. Rotational dynamics of simple asymmetric molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were carried out on rigid diatomic molecules, which exhibit both α (structural) and β (secondary) dynamics. The relaxation scenarios range from onset behavior, in which a distinct α process emerges on cooling, to merging behavior, associated with two relaxation peaks that converge at higher temperature. These properties, as well as the manifestation of the β peak as an excess wing, depend not only on thermodynamic conditions, but also on both the symmetry of the molecule and the correlation function (odd or even) used to analyze its dynamics. These observations help to reconcile divergent results obtained from different experiments. For example, the β process is more intense and the α-relaxation peak is narrower in dielectric relaxation spectra than in dynamic light scattering or NMR measurements. In the simulations herein, this follows from the weaker contribution of the secondary relaxation to even-order correlation functions, related to the magnitude of the relevant angular jumps.

  13. Modelling proton transfer in water molecule chains

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhimanov, Artem; Shutova, Tatiana; Samuelsson, Goran

    2011-01-01

    The process of protons transport in molecular water chains is of fundamental interest for many biological systems. Although many features of such systems can be analyzed using large-scale computational modeling, other features are better understood in terms of simplified model problems. Here we have tested, analytically and numerically, a model describing the classical proton hopping process in molecular water chains. In order to capture the main features of the proton hopping process in such molecular chains, we use a simplified model for our analysis. In particular, our discrete model describes a 1D chain of water molecules situated in an external protein channel structure, and each water molecule is allowed to oscillate around its equilibrium point in this system, while the protons are allowed to move along the line of neighboring oxygen atoms. The occurrence and properties of nonlinear solitary transport structures, allowing for much faster proton transport, are discussed, and the possible implications of...

  14. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Bo; Pupillo, Guido; Zoller, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  15. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B.; Glaetzle, A. W.; Pupillo, G.; Zoller, P.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss laser-dressed dipolar and van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the μK regime by cold atoms.

  16. Clinical review: Oxygen as a signaling molecule

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is obviously essential for conserving energy in a form useable for aerobic life; however, its utilization comes at a cost - the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can be highly damaging to a range of biological macromolecules, and in the past the overproduction of these short-lived molecules in a variety of disease states was thought to be exclusively toxic to cells and tissues such as the lung. Recent basic research, however, has indicated that ROS production -...

  17. Single Molecule Data Analysis: An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Meysam; Li, Chun-Biu; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Pressé, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We review methods of data analysis for biophysical data with a special emphasis on single molecule applications. Our review is intended for anyone, from student to established researcher. For someone just getting started, we focus on exposing the logic, strength and limitations of each method and cite, as appropriate, the relevant literature for implementation details. We review traditional frequentist and Bayesian parametric approaches to data analysis and subsequently extend our discussion to recent non-parametric and information theoretic methods.

  18. DNA, the central molecule of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenart, Peter; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of aging could have enormous medical implications. Despite a century of research, however, there is no universally accepted theory regarding the molecular basis of aging. On the other hand, there is plentiful evidence suggesting that DNA constitutes the central molecule in this process. Here, we review the roles of chromatin structure, DNA damage, and shortening of telomeres in aging and propose a hypothesis for how their interplay leads to aging phenotypes.

  19. Small Talk: Children's Everyday `Molecule' Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Cheryl

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports on 6-11-year-old children's `sayings and doings' (Harré 2002) as they explore molecule artefacts in dialectical-interactive teaching interviews (Fleer, Cultural Studies of Science Education 3:781-786, 2008; Hedegaard et al. 2008). This sociocultural study was designed to explore children's everyday awareness of and meaning-making with cultural molecular artefacts. Our everyday world is populated with an ever increasing range of molecular or nanoworld words, symbols, images, and games. What do children today say about these artefacts that are used to represent molecular world entities? What are the material and social resources that can influence a child's everyday and developing scientific ideas about `molecules'? How do children interact with these cognitive tools when given expert assistance? What meaning-making is afforded when children are socially and materially assisted in using molecular tools in early chemical and nanoworld thinking? Tool-dependent discursive studies show that provision of cultural artefacts can assist and direct developmental thinking across many domains of science (Schoultz et al., Human Development 44:103-118, 2001; Siegal 2008). Young children's use of molecular artefacts as cognitive tools has not received much attention to date (Jakab 2009a, b). This study shows 6-11-year-old children expressing everyday ideas of molecular artefacts and raising their own questions about the artefacts. They are seen beginning to domesticate (Erneling 2010) the words, symbols, and images to their own purposes when given the opportunity to interact with such artefacts in supported activity. Discursive analysis supports the notion that using `molecules' as cultural tools can help young children to begin `putting on molecular spectacles' (Kind 2004). Playing with an interactive game (ICT) is shown to be particularly helpful in assisting children's early meaning-making with representations of molecules, atoms, and their chemical symbols.

  20. Interstellar Molecules Their Laboratory and Interstellar Habitat

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Koichi M T

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the astrophysics and spectroscopy of the interstellar molecules. In the introduction, overview and history of interstellar observations are described in order to help understanding how the modern astrophysics and molecular spectroscopy have been developed interactively. The recent progress in the study of this field, after the 4th Cologne-Bonn-Zermatt symposium 2003 is briefly summarized. Furthermore, the basic knowledge of molecular spectroscopy, which is essential to correctly comprehend the astrophysical observations, is presented in a compact form.

  1. Electron correlation in molecules and condensed phases

    CERN Document Server

    March, N H

    1996-01-01

    This reference describes the latest research on correlation effects in the multicenter problems of atoms, molecules, and solids The author utilizes first- and second-order matrices, including the important observable electron density rho(r), and the Green function for discussing quantum computer simulations With its focus on concepts and theories, this volume will benefit experimental physicists, materials scientists, and physical and inorganic chemists as well as graduate students

  2. Molecules as tracers of galaxy evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costagliola, F.; Aalto, S.; I. Rodriguez, M.;

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the molecular gas properties of a sample of 23 galaxies in order to find and test chemical signatures of galaxy evolution and to compare them to IR evolutionary tracers. Observation at 3 mm wavelengths were obtained with the EMIR broadband receiver, mounted on the IRAM 30 m telesco...... detect the molecule in its vibrationally excited state.We find low HNC/HCN line ratios (...

  3. Potential energy landscapes of tetragonal pyramid molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Sato, Hirofumi; Morgan, John W. R.; Wales, David J.

    2016-11-01

    Hiraoka et al. have developed a self-assembling system referred to as a nanocube (Hiraoka et al., 2008). In the present contribution a coarse-grained model for this system is analysed, focusing on how the potential energy landscape for self-assembly is related to the geometry of the building blocks. We find that six molecules assemble to form various clusters, with cubic and sheet structures the most stable. The relative stability is determined by the geometry of the building blocks.

  4. 'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveline, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    At scales below micrometers, Brownian motion dictates most of the behaviors. The simple observation of a colloid is striking: a permanent and random motion is seen, whereas inertial forces play a negligible role. This Physics, where velocity is proportional to force, has opened new horizons in biology. The random feature is challenged in living systems where some proteins--molecular motors--have a directed motion whereas their passive behaviors of colloid should lead to a Brownian motion. Individual proteins, polymers of living matter such as DNA, RNA, actin or microtubules, molecular motors, all these objects can be viewed as chains of colloids. They are submitted to shocks from molecules of the solvent. Shapes taken by these biopolymers or dynamics imposed by motors can be measured and modeled from single molecules to their collective effects. Thanks to the development of experimental methods such as optical tweezers, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micropipettes, and quantitative fluorescence (such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, FRET), it is possible to manipulate these individual biomolecules in an unprecedented manner: experiments allow to probe the validity of models; and a new Physics has thereby emerged with original biological insights. Theories based on statistical mechanics are needed to explain behaviors of these systems. When force-extension curves of these molecules are extracted, the curves need to be fitted with models that predict the deformation of free objects or submitted to a force. When velocity of motors is altered, a quantitative analysis is required to explain the motions of individual molecules under external forces. This lecture will give some elements of introduction to the lectures of the session 'Nanophysics for Molecular Biology'.

  5. Soliton molecules for advanced optical telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschke, Fedor; Hause, Alexander; Mahnke, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Recent developments in the technology of optical telecommunications are pushed forward by the rapidly growing demand for data-carrying capacity. Current approaches are discussed; most lines of investigation are limited to the linear (i.e. low power) regime. It is shown how this restriction poses a limit for further evolution. If, on the other hand, the nonlinear regime is entered, recent developments about soliton molecules offer a possibility to advance further.

  6. Nuclear fusion in excited hydrogen molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, M.; Casetti, L.; Rosa-Clot, M. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy))

    1990-10-01

    We evaluate the nuclear fusion rates in the excited vibrational states of molecules of hydrogen isotopes. The ground state fusion rate is increased by about eight order of magnitude but even in the most favorable situation it is out of any possible experimental test. We discuss the effects due to the nuclear potential in different hyperfine states, and the improvements attainable using coherent states and a solid phase. (orig.).

  7. Circular Intensity Differential Scattering of chiral molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, C.J.

    1980-12-01

    In this thesis a theory of the Circular Intensity Differential Scattering (CIDS) of chiral molecules as modelled by a helix oriented with respect to the direction of incidence of light is presented. It is shown that a necessary condition for the existence of CIDS is the presence of an asymmetric polarizability in the scatterer. The polarizability of the scatterer is assumed generally complex, so that both refractive and absorptive phenomena are taken into account.

  8. Isatin, a versatile molecule: studies in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.iq@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Isatin is a small, versatile and widely applicable pharmacological molecule. These characteristics make isatin and its derivatives attractive to many research groups as resources for chemical and pharmacological studies. Although it has a relatively simple structure, isatin is a useful chemical scaffold for a variety of chemical transformations. This article discusses several studies performed by Brazilian groups, including investigations of its structural changes, biological assay designs and new methods for the synthesis of isatin. (author)

  9. Detecting electron motion in atoms and molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F

    2010-12-31

    The detection of spatial and temporal electronic motion by scattering of subfemtosecond pulses of 10 keV electrons from coherent superpositions of electronic states of both H and T2(+) is investigated. For the H atom, we predict changes in the diffraction images that reflect the time-dependent effective radius of the electronic charge density. For an aligned T2(+) molecule, the diffraction image changes reflect the time-dependent localization or delocalization of the electronic charge density.

  10. Origins of the handedness of biological molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, S F

    1991-01-01

    Pasteur (1860) showed that many organic molecules form enantiomeric pairs with non-superposable mirror-image shapes, characterized by their oppositely signed optical rotation but otherwise apparently identical. Equal numbers of left-handed and right-handed molecules resulted from laboratory synthesis, whereas biosynthetic processes afforded only one of the two enantiomers, leading Pasteur to conclude that biosynthesis involves a chiral force. Fischer demonstrated (1890-1919) that functional biomolecules are composed specifically of the D-sugars and the L-amino acids and that the laboratory synthetic reactions of such molecules propagate with chiral stereoselectivity. Given a primordial enantiomer, biomolecular homochirality follows without the intervention of a chiral natural force, except prebiotically. Chiral forces known at the time were found to be even handed on a time and space average, exemplifying parity conservation (1927). The weak nuclear force, shown to violate parity (1956), was unified with electro-magnetism in the electroweak force (1970). Ab initio estimations including the chiral electroweak force indicate that the L-amino acids and the D-sugars are more stable than the corresponding enantiomers. The small energy difference between these enantiomeric pairs, with Darwinian reaction kinetics in a flow reactor, account for the choice of biomolecular handedness made when life began.

  11. Physiological roles of small RNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaux, Charlotte; Verneuil, Nicolas; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2014-06-01

    Unlike proteins, RNA molecules have emerged lately as key players in regulation in bacteria. Most reviews hitherto focused on the experimental and/or in silico methods used to identify genes encoding small RNAs (sRNAs) or on the diverse mechanisms of these RNA regulators to modulate expression of their targets. However, less is known about their biological functions and their implications in various physiological responses. This review aims to compile what is known presently about the diverse roles of sRNA transcripts in the regulation of metabolic processes, in different growth conditions, in adaptation to stress and in microbial pathogenesis. Several recent studies revealed that sRNA molecules are implicated in carbon metabolism and transport, amino acid metabolism or metal sensing. Moreover, regulatory RNAs participate in cellular adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. through quorum sensing systems or development of biofilms, and analyses of several sRNAs under various physiological stresses and culture conditions have already been performed. In addition, recent experiments performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens showed that regulatory RNAs play important roles in microbial virulence and during infection. The combined results show the diversity of regulation mechanisms and physiological processes in which sRNA molecules are key actors.

  12. Partially dark optical molecule via phase control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. H.; Xu, Xun-Wei; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    We study the tunable photonic distribution in an optical molecule consisting of two linearly coupled single-mode cavities. With the intercavity coupling and two driving fields, the energy levels of the optical-molecule system form a closed cyclic energy-level diagram, and the phase difference between the driving fields serves as a sensitive controller on the dynamics of the system. Due to the quantum interference effect, we can realize a partially dark optical molecule, where the steady-state mean photon number in one of the cavities achieves zero even under the external driving. And the dark cavity can be changed from one of the cavities to the other by only adjusting the phase difference. We also show that our proposal is robust to the noise at zero temperature. Furthermore, we show that when one of the cavities couples with an atomic ensemble, it will be dark under the same condition as that in the case without atoms, but the condition for the other cavity to be dark is modified.

  13. Small molecule-guided thermoresponsive supramolecular assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2012-10-23

    Small organic molecules with strong intermolecular interactions have a wide range of desirable optical and electronic properties and rich phase behaviors. Incorporating them into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules opens new routes to generate functional responsive materials. Using oligothiophene- containing supramolecules, we present systematic studies of critical thermodynamic parameters and kinetic pathway that govern the coassemblies of BCP and strongly interacting small molecules. A number of potentially useful morphologies for optoelectronic materials, including a nanoscopic network of oligothiophene and nanoscopic crystalline lamellae, were obtained by varying the assembly pathway. Hierarchical coassemblies of oligothiophene and BCP, rather than macrophase separation, can be obtained. Crystallization of the oligothiophene not only induces chain stretching of the BCP block the oligothiophene is hydrogen bonded to but also changes the conformation of the other BCP coil block. This leads to an over 70% change in the BCP periodicity (e.g., from 31 to 53 nm) as the oligothiophene changes from a melt to a crystalline state, which provides access to a large BCP periodicity using fairly low molecular weight BCP. The present studies have demonstrated the experimental feasibility of generating thermoresponsive materials that convert heat into mechanical energy. Incorporating strongly interacting small molecules into BCP supramolecules effectively increases the BCP periodicity and may also open new opportunities to tailor their optical properties without the need for high molecular weight BCP. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Heavy Exotic Molecules with Charm and Bottom

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the $(0^+, 1^+)$ multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the $(0^-,1^-)$ multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets $(0^\\pm, 1^\\pm)$ cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for $J\\leq 1$. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral $X(3872)$. Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with $J^{PC}=1^{+-}$ binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics $Z^+_b(10610)$ and $Z^+_b(10650)$. The bound isosinglet with $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ is suggested as a possible neutral $X_b(10532)$ not yet reported.

  15. Fixman compensating potential for general branched molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Abhinandan, E-mail: Abhi.Jain@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Kandel, Saugat; Wagner, Jeffrey; Larsen, Adrien; Vaidehi, Nagarajan, E-mail: nvaidehi@coh.org [Division of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, California 91010 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    The technique of constraining high frequency modes of molecular motion is an effective way to increase simulation time scale and improve conformational sampling in molecular dynamics simulations. However, it has been shown that constraints on higher frequency modes such as bond lengths and bond angles stiffen the molecular model, thereby introducing systematic biases in the statistical behavior of the simulations. Fixman proposed a compensating potential to remove such biases in the thermodynamic and kinetic properties calculated from dynamics simulations. Previous implementations of the Fixman potential have been limited to only short serial chain systems. In this paper, we present a spatial operator algebra based algorithm to calculate the Fixman potential and its gradient within constrained dynamics simulations for branched topology molecules of any size. Our numerical studies on molecules of increasing complexity validate our algorithm by demonstrating recovery of the dihedral angle probability distribution function for systems that range in complexity from serial chains to protein molecules. We observe that the Fixman compensating potential recovers the free energy surface of a serial chain polymer, thus annulling the biases caused by constraining the bond lengths and bond angles. The inclusion of Fixman potential entails only a modest increase in the computational cost in these simulations. We believe that this work represents the first instance where the Fixman potential has been used for general branched systems, and establishes the viability for its use in constrained dynamics simulations of proteins and other macromolecules.

  16. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  17. Evaluating enzymatic synthesis of small molecule drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Matthew; Finkle, Justin; Stainbrook, Sarah; Greene, Jennifer; Broadbelt, Linda J; Tyo, Keith E J

    2016-01-01

    There have been many achievements in applying biochemical synthetic routes to the synthesis of commodity chemicals. However, most of these endeavors have focused on optimizing and increasing the yields of naturally existing pathways. We sought to evaluate the potential for biosynthesis beyond the limits of known biochemistry towards the production of small molecule drugs that do not exist in nature. Because of the potential for improved yields compared to total synthesis, and therefore lower manufacturing costs, we focused on drugs for diseases endemic to many resource poor regions, like tuberculosis and HIV. Using generalized biochemical reaction rules, we were able to design biochemical pathways for the production of eight small molecule drugs or drug precursors and identify potential enzyme-substrate pairs for nearly every predicted reaction. All pathways begin from native metabolites, abrogating the need for specialized precursors. The simulated pathways showed several trends with the sequential ordering of reactions as well as the types of chemistries used. For some compounds, the main obstacles to finding feasible biochemical pathways were the lack of appropriate, natural starting compounds and a low diversity of biochemical coupling reactions necessary to synthesize molecules with larger molecular size.

  18. Rydberg States of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Dunning, F. B.

    2011-03-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics A. Dalgarno; 2. Theoretical studies of hydrogen Rydberg atoms in electric fields R. J. Damburg and V. V. Kolosov; 3. Rydberg atoms in strong fields D. Kleppner, Michael G. Littman and Myron L. Zimmerman; 4. Spectroscopy of one- and two-electron Rydberg atoms C. Fabre and S. Haroche; 5. Interaction of Rydberg atoms with blackbody radiation T. F. Gallagher; 6. Theoretical approaches to low-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with atoms and ions A. P. Hickman, R. E. Olson and J. Pascale; 7. Experimental studies of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with atomic species at thermal energies F. Gounand and J. Berlande; 8. Theoretical studies of collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules Michio Matsuzawa; 9. Experimental studies of thermal-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules F. B. Dunning and R. F. Stebbings; 10. High-Rydberg molecules Robert S. Freund; 11. Theory of Rydberg collisions with electrons, ions and neutrals M. R. Flannery; 12. Experimental studies of the interactions of Rydberg atoms with charged particles J. -F. Delpech; 13. Rydberg studies using fast beams Peter M. Koch; Index.

  19. Sorption of small molecules in polymeric media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camboni, Federico; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the sorption of penetrant molecules from the gas phase by a polymeric medium within a model which is very close in spirit to the dual sorption mode model: the penetrant molecules are partly dissolved within the polymeric matrix, partly fill the preexisting voids. The only difference with the initial dual sorption mode situation is the assumption that the two populations of molecules are in equilibrium with each other. Applying basic thermodynamics principles we obtain the dependence of the penetrant concentration on the pressure in the gas phase and find that this is expressed via the Lambert W-function, a different functional form than the one proposed by dual sorption mode model. The Lambert-like isotherms appear universally at low and moderate pressures and originate from the assumption that the internal energy in a polymer-penetrant-void ternary mixture is (in the lowest order) a bilinear form in the concentrations of the three components. Fitting the existing data shows that in the domain of parameters where the dual sorption mode model is typically applied, the Lambert function, which describes the same behavior as the one proposed by the gas-polymer matrix model, fits the data equally well.

  20. Self and directed assembly: people and molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony D. James

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly and directed-assembly are two very important aspects of supramolecular chemistry. As a young postgraduate student working in Canada with Tom Fyles my introduction to Supramolecular Chemistry was through the self-assembly of phospholipid membranes to form vesicles for which we were developing unimolecular and self-assembling transporter molecules. The next stage of my development as a scientist was in Japan with Seiji Shinkai where in a “Eureka” moment, the boronic acid templating unit (directed-assembly of Wulff was combined with photoinduced electron transfer systems pioneered by De Silva. The result was a turn-on fluorescence sensor for saccharides; this simple result has continued to fuel my research to the present day. Throughout my career as well as assembling molecules, I have enjoyed bringing together researchers in order to develop collaborative networks. This is where molecules meet people resulting in assemblies worth more than the individual “molecule” or “researcher”. My role in developing networks with Japan was rewarded by the award of a Daiwa-Adrian Prize in 2013 and I was recently rewarded for developing networks with China with an Inaugural CASE Prize in 2015.

  1. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  2. Electron attachment to the phthalide molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asfandiarov, N. L. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Bashkir State Pedagogical University, Oktyabrskoy Revolutsii St., 3a, 450000 Ufa (Russian Federation); Pshenichnyuk, S. A. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); St.-Petersburg State University, Uljanovskaja, 1, 198504 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vorob’ev, A. S.; Nafikova, E. P. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Lachinov, A. N. [Bashkir State Pedagogical University, Oktyabrskoy Revolutsii St., 3a, 450000 Ufa (Russian Federation); Kraikin, V. A. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect Oktyabrya 59, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation); Modelli, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Universitá di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali (CIRSA), Universitá di Bologna, Via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    Phthalide, the simplest chain of conductive polymer thin film, was investigated by means of Electron Transmission Spectroscopy, Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry, and density functional theory quantum chemistry. It has been found that formation of gas-phase long-lived molecular anions of phthalide around 0.7 eV takes place through cleavage of a C–O bond of the pentacyclic ring of the parent molecular anion to give a vibrationally excited (electronically more stable) open-ring molecular anion. The energy of the transition state for ring opening of the parent negative ion is calculated to be 0.65 eV above the neutral ground state of the molecule. The energy (2.64 eV) evaluated for the corresponding transition state in the neutral molecule is much higher, so that the process of electron detachment from the anion must lead to a neutral molecule with its initial pentacyclic structure. The average lifetime of the molecular negative ions formed at an electron energy of 0.75 eV and 80 °C is measured to be about 100 μs. The known switching effect of thin phthalide films could stem from the presence of a similar open/closed transition state also in the polymer.

  3. The origin of large molecules in primordial autocatalytic reaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, Varun

    2011-01-01

    Large molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids are crucial for life, yet their primordial origin remains a major puzzle. The production of large molecules, as we know it today, requires good catalysts, and the only good catalysts we know that can accomplish this task consist of large molecules. Thus the origin of large molecules is a chicken and egg problem in chemistry. Here we present a mechanism, based on autocatalytic sets (ACSs), that is a possible solution to this problem. We discuss a mathematical model describing the population dynamics of molecules in a stylized but prebiotically plausible chemistry. Large molecules can be produced in this chemistry by the coalescing of smaller ones, with the smallest molecules, the `food set', being buffered. Some of the reactions can be catalyzed by molecules within the chemistry with varying catalytic strengths. Normally the concentrations of large molecules in such a scenario are very small, diminishing exponentially with their size. ACSs, if present in the c...

  4. Niflumic acid renders dendritic cells tolerogenic and up-regulates inhibitory molecules ILT3 and ILT4

    OpenAIRE

    Vidmar, Alenka; Švajger, Urban; Jeras, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Niflumic acid is a member of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, from which aspirin was recently shown to inhibit maturation of human-monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are crucial regulators of the immune response, capable of inducing immunity as well as tolerance. In our in vitro study we showed a tolerogenic effect of NFA on phenotype and function of LPSmatured monocyte-derived DCs. Different drug concentrations dose-dependently downregulated the expression of co-stimulatory m...

  5. Synthesis and characterization of lower generation broom molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wang; Cui Qin Li; Shu Yan Zhang; Fang Sun; Teng Jie Ge

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic molecules with dodecyl groups as the hyperbranchs were synthesized in methanol by Michael addition withdodecylamine and methyl acrylate as raw materials. This new-type dendritic molecules were called vividly "broom molecules" inthis report. The surface tension of the aqueous solution of broom molecule terminated amino group was measured by using the drop-volume method. The demulsification performance of the broom molecules for the oil/water (O/W) simulated crude oil emulsion wasexamined. The experimental results revealed that, as a new-type of surfactants, the broom molecules terminated amino groupsshowed demulsification for the O/W simulated crude oil emulsion.

  6. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Täuber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule (SM methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC. Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  7. Oligomer Molecules for Efficient Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-02-16

    Solar cells, a renewable, clean energy technology that efficiently converts sunlight into electricity, are a promising long-term solution for energy and environmental problems caused by a mass of production and the use of fossil fuels. Solution-processed organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted much attention in the past few years because of several advantages, including easy fabrication, low cost, lightweight, and flexibility. Now, OSCs exhibit power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 10%. In the early stage of OSCs, vapor-deposited organic dye materials were first used in bilayer heterojunction devices in the 1980s, and then, solution-processed polymers were introduced in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices. Relative to polymers, vapor-deposited small molecules offer potential advantages, such as a defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, and good batch-to-batch reproducibility. However, the limited solubility and high crystallinity of vapor-deposited small molecules are unfavorable for use in solution-processed BHJ OSCs. Conversely, polymers have good solution-processing and film-forming properties and are easily processed into flexible devices, whereas their polydispersity of molecular weights and difficulty in purification results in batch to batch variation, which may hamper performance reproducibility and commercialization. Oligomer molecules (OMs) are monodisperse big molecules with intermediate molecular weights (generally in the thousands), and their sizes are between those of small molecules (generally with molecular weights 10000). OMs not only overcome shortcomings of both vapor-deposited small molecules and solution-processed polymers, but also combine their advantages, such as defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, good batch-to-batch reproducibility, good solution processability, and film-forming properties. Therefore, OMs are a

  8. Contacting organic molecules by soft methods: towards molecule-based electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haick, Hossam; Cahen, David

    2008-03-01

    Can we put organic molecules to use as electronic components? The answer to this question is to no small degree limited by the ability to contact them electrically without damaging the molecules. In this Account, we present some of the methods for contacting molecules that do not or minimally damage them and that allow formation of electronic junctions that can become compatible with electronics from the submicrometer to the macroscale. In "Linnaean" fashion, we have grouped contacting methods according to the following main criteria: (a) is a chemical bond is required between contact and molecule, and (b) is the contact "ready-made", that is, preformed, or prepared in situ? Contacting methods that, so far, seem to require a chemical bond include spin-coating a conductive polymer and transfer printing. In the latter, a metallic pattern on an elastomeric polymer is mechanically transferred to molecules with an exposed terminal group that can react chemically with the metal. These methods allow one to define structures from several tens of nanometers size upwards and to fabricate devices on flexible substrates, which is very difficult by conventional techniques. However, the requirement for bifunctionality severely restricts the type of molecules that can be used and can complicate their self-assembly into monolayers. Methods that rely on prior formation of the contact pad are represented by two approaches: (a) use of a liquid metal as electrode (e.g., Hg, Ga, various alloys), where molecules can be adsorbed on the liquid metal and the molecularly modified drop is brought into contact with the second electrode, the molecules can be adsorbed on the second electrode and then the liquid metal brought into contact with them, or bilayers are used, with a layer on both the metal and the second electrode and (b) use of preformed metal pads from a solid substrate and subsequent pad deposition on the molecules with the help of a liquid. These methods allow formation of

  9. Deep learning for single-molecule science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Slabaugh, Gregory; Alonso, Eduardo; Al-Arif, Masudur R

    2017-08-01

    Exploring and making predictions based on single-molecule data can be challenging, not only due to the sheer size of the datasets, but also because a priori knowledge about the signal characteristics is typically limited and poor signal-to-noise ratio. For example, hypothesis-driven data exploration, informed by an expectation of the signal characteristics, can lead to interpretation bias or loss of information. Equally, even when the different data categories are known, e.g., the four bases in DNA sequencing, it is often difficult to know how to make best use of the available information content. The latest developments in Machine Learning (ML), so-called Deep Learning (DL) offers an interesting, new avenues to address such challenges. In some applications, such as speech and image recognition, DL has been able to outperform conventional Machine Learning strategies and even human performance. However, to date DL has not been applied much in single-molecule science, presumably in part because relatively little is known about the 'internal workings' of such DL tools within single-molecule science as a field. In this Tutorial, we make an attempt to illustrate in a step-by-step guide how one of those, a Convolutional Neural Network, may be used for base calling in DNA sequencing applications. We compare it with a Support Vector Machine as a more conventional ML method, and and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In particular, a 'deep' neural network has many features of a 'black box', which has important implications on how we look at and interpret data. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. What are nuclear molecules?: past and present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, P.O [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    A brief history of nuclear molecules, which was discovered for the first time in 1960, is presented. A couple of simple models for their description are discussed, as the Double Resonance Mechanisms and the Two-Center Shell Model. These classical nuclear molecules live only about the order of 10{sup -2}1 seconds, barely sufficient to orbit once around each other. Recently, a new type of nuclear molecules was discovered, with three clusters, which live of the order of 10{sup -1}3 seconds. We discuss shortly the experiment and the conclusions of it. At the end, we present a geometric model and apply it to {sup 9}6Sr + {sup 1}0Be + {sup 1}46Ba observed in the cold fission decay of {sup 2}52 Cf. [Spanish] Se presenta una breve historia de moleculas nucleares, que fueron identificadas por primera vez en 1960. Unos modelos sencillos, para su descripcion, son discutidos, como el Mecanismo de Doble Resonancia y Modelo de Dos Centros. Estas moleculas clasicas solo viven un orden de 10{sup -2}1 segundos, apenas suficiente para dar una vuelta. Recientemente se han descubierto moleculas nucleares de tres cumulos que viven un orden de 10{sup -1}3 segundos. Se discute un poco el experimento y las conclusiones de el. Al final se presenta un modelo geometrico que aplicamos a {sup 9}6Sr + {sup 1}0Be + {sup 1}46Ba, observado en el decaimiento frio de {sup 2}52 Cf.

  11. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mathew D; Bradshaw, David S; Andrews, David L

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  12. Deep learning for single-molecule science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Slabaugh, Gregory; Alonso, Eduardo; Al-Arif, SM Masudur R.

    2017-10-01

    Exploring and making predictions based on single-molecule data can be challenging, not only due to the sheer size of the datasets, but also because a priori knowledge about the signal characteristics is typically limited and poor signal-to-noise ratio. For example, hypothesis-driven data exploration, informed by an expectation of the signal characteristics, can lead to interpretation bias or loss of information. Equally, even when the different data categories are known, e.g., the four bases in DNA sequencing, it is often difficult to know how to make best use of the available information content. The latest developments in machine learning (ML), so-called deep learning (DL) offer interesting, new avenues to address such challenges. In some applications, such as speech and image recognition, DL has been able to outperform conventional ML strategies and even human performance. However, to date DL has not been applied much in single-molecule science, presumably in part because relatively little is known about the ‘internal workings’ of such DL tools within single-molecule science as a field. In this Tutorial, we make an attempt to illustrate in a step-by-step guide how one of those, a convolutional neural network (CNN), may be used for base calling in DNA sequencing applications. We compare it with a SVM as a more conventional ML method, and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In particular, a ‘deep’ neural network has many features of a ‘black box’, which has important implications on how we look at and interpret data.

  13. Effect of lysosomotropic molecules on cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Omer F; Toprak, Mesut; Noory, M Anwar; Robertson, Gavin P

    2017-03-01

    Weak bases that readily penetrate through the lipid bilayer and accumulate inside the acidic organelles are known as lysosomotropic molecules. Many lysosomotropic compounds exhibit therapeutic activity and are commonly used as antidepressant, antipsychotic, antihistamine, or antimalarial agents. Interestingly, studies also have shown increased sensitivity of cancer cells to certain lysosomotropic agents and suggested their mechanism of action as a promising approach for selective destruction of cancer cells. However, their chemotherapeutic utility may be limited due to various side effects. Hence, understanding the homeostatic alterations mediated by lysosomotropic compounds has significant importance for revealing their true therapeutic potential as well as toxicity. In this review, after briefly introducing the concept of lysosomotropism and classifying the lysosomotropic compounds into two major groups according to their cytotoxicity on cancer cells, we focused on the subcellular alterations mediated by class-II lysosomotropic compounds. Briefly, their effect on intracellular cholesterol homeostasis, autophagy and lysosomal sphingolipid metabolism was discussed. Accordingly, class-II lysosomotropic molecules inhibit intracellular cholesterol transport, leading to the accumulation of cholesterol inside the late endosomal-lysosomal cell compartments. However, the accumulated lysosomal cholesterol is invisible to the cellular homeostatic circuits, hence class-II lysosomotropic molecules also upregulate cholesterol synthesis pathway as a downstream event. Considering the fact that Niemann-Pick disease, a lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder, also triggers similar pathologic abnormalities, this review combines the knowledge obtained from the Niemann-Pick studies and lysosomotropic compounds. Taken together, this review is aimed at allowing readers a better understanding of subcellular alterations mediated by lysosomotropic drugs, as well as their potential

  14. Spectral simulations of polar diatomic molecules immersed in He clusters: application to the ICl (X) molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, P [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Lara-Castells, M P de [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Prosmiti, R [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Barrio, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Duran, D [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Gianturco, F A [Department of Chemistry and INFM, The University of Rome, Citta Universitaria, 00185, Rome (Italy); Jellinek, J [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    A recently developed quantum-chemistry-like methodology to study molecules solvated in atomic clusters is applied to the ICl (iodine chloride) polar diatomic molecule immersed in clusters of He atoms. The atoms of the solvent clusters are treated as the 'electrons' and the solvated molecule as a structured 'nucleus' of the combined solvent-solute system. The helium-helium and helium-dopant interactions are represented by parametrized two-body and ab initio three-body potentials, respectively. The ground-state wavefunctions are used to compute the infrared (IR) spectra of the solvated molecule. In agreement with the experimental observations, the computed spectra exhibit considerable differences depending on whether the solvent cluster is comprised of bosonic ({sup 4}He) or fermionic ({sup 3}He) atoms. The source of these differences is attributed to the different spin-statistics of the solvent clusters. The bosonic versus fermionic nature of the solvent is reflected in the IR absorption selection rules. Only P and R branches with single state transitions appear in the spectrum when the molecule is solvated in a bosonic cluster. On the other hand, when the solvent represents a fermionic environment, quasi-degenerate multiplets of spin states contribute to each branch and, in addition, the Q-branch becomes also allowed. Combined, these two factors explain the more congested nature of the spectrum in the fermionic case.

  15. Single-molecule visualization of ROS-induced DNA damage in large DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-02-07

    We present a single molecule visualization approach for the quantitative analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced DNA damage, such as base oxidation and single stranded breaks in large DNA molecules. We utilized the Fenton reaction to generate DNA damage with subsequent enzymatic treatment using a mixture of three types of glycosylases to remove oxidized bases, and then fluorescent labeling on damaged lesions via nick translation. This single molecule analytical platform provided the capability to count one or two damaged sites per λ DNA molecule (48.5 kb), which were reliably dependent on the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion at the micromolar level. More importantly, the labeled damaged sites that were visualized under a microscope provided positional information, which offered the capability of comparing DNA damaged sites with the in silico genomic map to reveal sequence specificity that GTGR is more sensitive to oxidative damage. Consequently, single DNA molecule analysis provides a sensitive analytical platform for ROS-induced DNA damage and suggests an interesting biochemical insight that the genome primarily active during the lysogenic cycle may have less probability for oxidative DNA damage.

  16. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of /sup 79/Br/sup 35/Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed.

  17. Photonic molecules formed by coupled hybrid resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Bo; Zhu, Jiangang; Yang, Lan; 10.1364/OL.37.003435

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method that enables free-standing whispering-gallery-mode microresonators, and report spectral tuning of photonic molecules formed by coupled free and on-chip resonators with different geometries and materials. We study direct coupling via evanescent fields of free silica microtoroids and microspheres with on-chip polymer coated silica microtoroids. We demonstrate thermal tuning of resonance modes to achieve maximal spectral overlap, mode splitting induced by direct coupling, and the effects of distance between the resonators on the splitting spectra.

  18. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  19. Plasmonic molecules via glass annealing in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redkov, Alexey; Chervinskii, Semen; Baklanov, Alexander; Reduto, Igor; Zhurikhina, Valentina; Lipovskii, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied. The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules. The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled.

  20. Bringing molecules back into molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus O Wilke

    Full Text Available Much molecular-evolution research is concerned with sequence analysis. Yet these sequences represent real, three-dimensional molecules with complex structure and function. Here I highlight a growing trend in the field to incorporate molecular structure and function into computational molecular-evolution work. I consider three focus areas: reconstruction and analysis of past evolutionary events, such as phylogenetic inference or methods to infer selection pressures; development of toy models and simulations to identify fundamental principles of molecular evolution; and atom-level, highly realistic computational modeling of molecular structure and function aimed at making predictions about possible future evolutionary events.

  1. Faddeev Random Phase Approximation for Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Degroote, Matthias; Barbieri, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The Faddeev Random Phase Approximation is a Green's function technique that makes use of Faddeev-equations to couple the motion of a single electron to the two-particle--one-hole and two-hole--one-particle excitations. This method goes beyond the frequently used third-order Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction method: all diagrams involving the exchange of phonons in the particle-hole and particle-particle channel are retained, but the phonons are described at the level of the Random Phase Approximation. This paper presents the first results for diatomic molecules at equilibrium geometry. The behavior of the method in the dissociation limit is also investigated.

  2. Structure of molecules and internal rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Mizushima, San-Ichiro

    1954-01-01

    Structure of Molecules and Internal Rotation reviews early studies on dihalogenoethanes. This book is organized into two parts encompassing 8 chapters that evaluate the Raman effect in ethane derivatives, the energy difference between rotational isomers, and the infrared absorption of ethane derivatives. Some of the topics covered in the book are the potential barrier to internal rotation; nature of the hindering potential; entropy difference between the rotational isomers; internal rotation in butane, pentane, and hexane; and internal rotation in long chain n-paraffins. Other chapters deal wi

  3. Electron impact excitations of S2 molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Motomichi

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy electron impact excitations of S_2 molecules are studied using the fixed-bond R-matrix method based on state-averaged complete active space SCF orbitals. Integral cross sections are calculated for elastic electron collision as well as impact excitation of the 7 lowest excited electronic states. Also, differential cross sections are obtained for elastic collision and excitation of the a^1 Delta_g, b^1 Sigma_g^+ and B^3 Sigma_u^- states. The integrated cross section of optically allowed excitation of the B^3 Sigma_u^- state agrees reasonably well with the available theoretical result.

  4. Kondo tunneling through real and artificial molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikoin, K; Avishai, Y

    2001-03-05

    When an asymmetric double dot is hybridized with itinerant electrons, its singlet ground state and lowly excited triplet state cross, leading to a competition between the Zhang-Rice mechanism of singlet-triplet splitting in a confined cluster and the Kondo effect (which accompanies the tunneling through quantum dot under a Coulomb blockade restriction). The rich physics of an underscreened S = 1 Kondo impurity in the presence of low-lying triplet-singlet excitations is exposed and estimates of the magnetic susceptibility and the electric conductance are presented, together with applications for molecule chemisorption on metallic substrates.

  5. Inorganic Nanoparticles Conjugated with Biofunctional Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.H.Choy

    2007-01-01

    1 Results We have attempted to conjugate inorganic nanoparticles with biofunctional molecules.Recently we were quite successful in demonstrating that a two-dimensional inorganic compound like layered double hydroxide (LDH),and natural and synthetic clays can be used as gene or drug delivery carriers1-4.To the best of our knowledge,such inorganic vectors are completely new and different from conventionally developed ones such as viruses and cationic liposomes,those which are limited in certain cases of ap...

  6. Humidity Effects on Conductivity of DNA Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xun-Ling; DONG Rui-Xin; LIN Qing-De

    2006-01-01

    We present a model related to the humidity to describe the conductivity of homogeneous DNA molecule,where the hydration of phosphate group and bases are taken into account. The calculated results show the oscillation feature of dⅠ/dⅤ-Ⅴ curves and the semiconductor behavior of DNA. With the relative humidity increasing, the voltage gap becomes narrow and the maximum of conductance increases nonlinearly. The conductivity of DNA approaches to stabilization when the relative humidity reaches a certain value. These results are in agreement with experimental measurements.

  7. Spectra of Linear Polyene Molecule-canthaxanthin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Shun-li; LI Zuo-wei; CHEN Yuan-zheng; MEN Zhi-wei; WU Nan-nan; SUN Cheng-lin

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectra and ultraviolet-visible(UV-Vis) absorption spectra of linear polyene molecule-canthaxanthin in n-hexane are measured and analyzed.In addition,the optimized structure of canthaxanthin was calculated via density functional theory(DFT) functional B3LYP.With decreasing the concentration,Raman scattering cross section (RSCS) of fundamental frequency is extremely high,and the UV-Vis absorption bands become narrower.The results of coherent weakly damped electron-Lattice vibration model were analyzed.

  8. Alignment of D-state Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Krupp, Alexander T; Balewski, Jonathan B; Ilzhöfer, Philipp; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Löw, Robert; Pfau, Tilman; Kurz, Markus; Schmelcher, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We report on the formation of ultralong-range Rydberg D-state molecules via photoassociation in an ultracold cloud of rubidium atoms. By applying a magnetic offset field on the order of 10 G and high resolution spectroscopy, we are able to resolve individual rovibrational molecular states. A full theory, using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation including s- and p-wave scattering, reproduces the measured binding energies. The calculated molecular wavefunctions show that in the experiment we can selectively excite stationary molecular states with an extraordinary degree of alignment or anti-alignment with respect to the magnetic field axis.

  9. Control of dephasing in rotationally hot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, David; Ivanov, Misha

    2010-04-01

    We consider a rotationally hot diatomic molecule as an example of an open quantum system, where molecular vibrational wave packets are subject to dephasing due to rovibrational coupling. We report analytical and numerical results addressing whether the dephasing rate can be controlled by adjustment of the initial wave packet phases. It appears that over long time scales, phase-only control is not possible, but for earlier time scales the possibility of phase-only control of dephasing remains. In addition, we point out that the time dependence of the dephasing process depends significantly upon the degeneracy of the rotational environment states.

  10. Nonrelativistic Lamb shift for muonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Robert; Jeziorski, Bogumil

    1993-03-01

    A recently developed formula [R. Bukowski and B. Jeziorski, Phys. Rev. A46 (1992) 5437]. has been applied to estimate the soft-photon Lamb shift contribution to the energies of the muonic molecules ppμ, ddμ, ttμ, pdμ, ptμ and dtμ. The corresponding corrections to the dissociation energies for the excited P states of ddμ and dtμ have been found to be almost identical and equal to 0.048 meV. The magnitude of this stabilizing effect is too small to affect seriously the formation rates predictions.

  11. Assembling molecular electronic junctions one molecule at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifas, Andrew P; McCreery, Richard L

    2011-11-01

    Diffusion of metal atoms onto a molecular monolayer attached to a conducting surface permits electronic contact to the molecules with minimal heat transfer or structural disturbance. Surface-mediated metal deposition (SDMD) involves contact between "cold" diffusing metal atoms and molecules, due to shielding of the molecules from direct exposure to metal vapor. Measurement of the current through the molecular layer during metal diffusion permits observation of molecular conductance for junctions containing as few as one molecule. Discrete conductance steps were observed for 1-10 molecules within a monolayer during a single deposition run, corresponding to "recruitment" of additional molecules as the contact area between the diffusing Au layer and molecules increases. For alkane monolayers, the molecular conductance measured with SDMD exhibited an exponential dependence on molecular length with a decay constant (β) of 0.90 per CH(2) group, comparable to that observed by other techniques. Molecular conductance values were determined for three azobenzene molecules, and correlated with the offset between the molecular HOMO and the contact Fermi level, as expected for hole-mediated tunneling. Current-voltage curves were obtained during metal deposition showed no change in shape for junctions containing 1, 2, and 10 molecules, implying minimal intermolecular interactions as single molecule devices transitioned into several molecules devices. SDMD represents a "soft" metal deposition method capable of providing single molecule conductance values, then providing quantitative comparisons to molecular junctions containing 10(6) to 10(10) molecules.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    Cold and ultracold molecules are the next wave of ultracold physics, giving rise to an exciting array of scientific opportunities, including many body physics for novel quantum phase transitions, new states of matter, and quantum information processing. Precision tests of fundamental physical laws benefit from the existence of molecular internal structure with exquisite control. The study of novel collision and reaction dynamics will open a new chapter of quantum chemistry. Cold molecules bring together researchers from a variety of fields, including atomic, molecular, and optical physics, chemistry and chemical physics, quantum information science and quantum simulations, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics, a truly remarkable synergy of scientific explorations. For the past decade there have been steady advances in direct cooling techniques, from buffer-gas cooling to cold molecular beams to electro- and magneto-molecular decelerators. These techniques have allowed a large variety of molecules to be cooled for pioneering studies. Recent amazing advances in experimental techniques combining the ultracold and the ultraprecise have furthermore brought molecules to the point of quantum degeneracy. These latter indirect cooling techniques magnetically associate atoms from a Bose-Einstein condensate and/or a quantum degenerate Fermi gas, transferring at 90% efficiency highly excited Fano-Feshbach molecules, which are on the order of 10 000 Bohr radii in size, to absolute ground state molecules just a few Bohr across. It was this latter advance, together with significant breakthroughs in internal state manipulations, which inspired us to coordinate this focus issue now, and is the reason why we say the next wave of ultracold physics has now arrived. Whether directly or indirectly cooled, heteronuclear polar molecules offer distinct new features in comparison to cold atoms, while sharing all of their advantages (purity, high coherence

  13. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2017-01-03

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  14. Formation of Ultracold NaRb Feshbach Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudong; Li, Xiaoke; Zhu, Bing; Chen, Jun; Wang, Dajun

    2015-01-01

    We report the creation of ultracold bosonic $^{23}$Na$^{87}$Rb Feshbach molecules via magneto-association. By ramping the magnetic field across an interspecies Feshbach resonance, at least 4000 molecules can be produced out of the near degenerate ultracold mixture. Fast loss due to inelastic atom-molecule collisions is observed, which limits the pure molecule number, after residual atoms removal, to 1700. The pure molecule sample can live for 21.8(8) ms in the optical trap, long enough for future molecular spectroscopy studies toward coherently transferring to the singlet ro-vibrational ground state, where these molecules are stable against chemical reaction and have a permanent electric dipole moment of 3.3 Debye. We have also measured the Feshbach molecule's binding energy near the Feshbach resonance by the oscillating magnetic field method and found these molecules have a large closed-channel fraction.

  15. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2014-07-15

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  16. Nonlinear optical absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi-Piao

    2012-04-01

    A mathematical formulation of the relationship between optical absorption coefficient of photosynthetic pigment molecules and light intensity was developed. It showed that physical parameters of photosynthetic pigment molecule (i.e., light absorption cross-section of photosynthetic pigment molecule, its average lifetime in the excited state, total photosynthetic pigment molecules, the statistical weight, or degeneracy of energy level of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the ground state and in the excited state) influenced on both the light absorption coefficient and effective light absorption cross-section of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Moreover, it also showed that both the light absorption coefficient and effective light absorption cross-section of photosynthetic pigment molecules were not constant, they decreased nonlinearly with light intensity increasing. The occupation numbers of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited states increased nonlinearly with light intensity increasing.

  17. Grafting single molecule magnets on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Mauro; Pineider, Francesco; Poggini, Lorenzo; Otero, Edwige; Mannini, Matteo; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sangregorio, Claudio; Cornia, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-01-29

    The chemical synthesis and characterization of the first hybrid material composed by gold nanoparticles and single molecule magnets (SMMs) are described. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized via ligand exchange using a tetrairon(III) SMM containing two 1,2-dithiolane end groups. The grafting is evidenced by the shift of the plasmon resonance peak recorded with a UV-vis spectrometer, by the suppression of nuclear magnetic resonance signals, by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy peaks, and by transmission electron microscopy images. The latter evidence the formation of aggregates of nanoparticles as a consequence of the cross-linking ability of Fe4 through the two 1,2-dithiolane rings located on opposite sides of the metal core. The presence of intact Fe4 molecules is directly proven by synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy, while a detailed magnetic characterization, obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance and alternating-current susceptibility, confirms the persistence of SMM behavior in this new hybrid nanostructure. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Organic- and molecule-based magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Miller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnets have been known for millennia and are strongly associated with metals (e.g. Fe, Co, Ni, Gd, intermetallics (e.g. Co17Sm2, Nd2Fe14B, or their oxides (e.g. CrO2, Fe3O4. The development of new magnetic materials has led to ubiquitous uses for electricity generation, memory storage media, and devices such as electric motors, microphones, telephones and computers. These magnets are fabricated via energy demanding metallurgical methods and are frequently brittle, chemically reactive, and possess elements in limited supply. The end of the last millennium has seen a surge in using organic, molecular, and polymeric materials as substitutes for metal and ceramic materials in many applications. Also, in the past few decades organic and molecule-based materials have been shown to magnetically order with examples having ordering temperatures exceeding room temperature, higher-than-iron saturation magnetizations, large coercive fields, etc. An overview of organic-based, and more generally molecule-based magnetic materials that exhibit unusual magnetic properties ranging from ferromagnets to synthetic antiferromagnets with emphasis on magnetic ordering using examples possessing organic nitriles (—CN or inorganic cyanide (CN− is described.

  19. Half collision resonance phenomena in molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximo Garcia-Sucre (Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela)); Raseev, G. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)); Ross, S.C. (New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada)) (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    The Escuela Latinoamericana de Fisica (ELAF) is a series of meeting s that for 28 years has played an important role in research-level teaching of physics in Latin America. This book contains the proceedings of ELAF 90 which was held at the Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC) in Caracas, Venezuela from July 23 to August 3, 1990, as part of the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of IVIC. In contrast to previous ELAF's that were of general scope, ELAF 90 centered on a particular subject matter: Half Collisional Resonance Phenomena in Molecules, Experimental and Theoretical Approaches. The term Half Collision'' refers to the fragmentation of a molecular system following is excitation by light. The lack of an incident fragmentation of a molecular system following is excitation by light. The lack of an incident particle (other than the photon) in the fragmentation process is what leads to the term. The purpose of this volume is to present current results in the experimental and theoretical study of half collisions and also to include pedagogical papers at an introductory or intermediate level. The contributions are grouped into several sections; light sources; ionization; dissociation-experimental; dissociation-theory; competition between ionization and dissociation; and particle-molecule collisions.

  20. Radiolytic and hydrolytic stability of extractant molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cames, B.; Caniffi, B.; Rudloff, D. [CEA Marcoule - DRCP/SCPS/LCSE: BP 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze, 30207 cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    In nuclear spent fuel reprocessing industry, actinide partitioning processes are based on solvent extraction and organic phase recycling. It is well-known that both radiolysis and acidic hydrolysis leads to degradation of extractant molecules. To have more information on the stability of extractant molecules used in a reprocessing plant, batch studies have been carried out to determine parameters governing the extractant consumption kinetic under hydrolysis and radiolysis effects (dose rate, degradation time and nitric acidity of the organic phase). For gamma radiation, results about DMDOHEMA (N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-di-octyl-hexyl-ethoxy-malonamide) and DEHiBA (N,N'-di(ethyl-2-hexyl)iso-butanamide) show that degradation of DMDOHEMA and DEHiBA depends only on nitric acidity of the organic phase, dose rate and radiolysis time (DMDOHEMA consumption kinetic constant is 2 times slower than for DEHiBA). For same degradation conditions, it has been shown that {alpha}-radiolysis of DMDOHEMA is 4 times slower than {gamma}-radiolysis, and acidic hydrolysis of DMDOHEMA is effective whereas that of DEHiBA is not. (authors)

  1. Floppy Molecules with Internal Rotation and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreglewski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    There are different ways to analyze rovibrational structure of molecules having several large amplitude motions of different type, like internal rotation and inversion or ring-puckering. In my research group we have developed and used methods starting from potential surfaces for large amplitude motions but also applied purely effective Hamiltonians, where tunneling splittings were key parameters. Whatever is the method the following problems must be solved when addressing a rovibrational problem with large amplitude vibrations: 1) a definition of the permutation-inversion molecular symmetry group, 2) a choice of the internal coordinates and their transformation in the symmetry group, 3) derivation of the Hamiltonian in chosen coordinates, 4) calculation of the Hamiltonian matrix elements in a symmetrized basis set. These points will be discussed. The advantage of methods which start from the geometry and potential surface for large amplitude vibrations give much clearer picture of internal dynamics of molecules but generally the fit to experimental data is much poorer. The fitting procedure is strongly non-linear and the iteration procedure much longer. The effective Hamiltonians the fit is generally much better since almost all optimized parameters are linear but the parameters have no clear physical meaning. This method is very useful in the assignment of experimental spectra. Results of the application of both method to methylamine and hydrazine will be presented.

  2. Chemokines: Small Molecules Participate in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines are small protein molecules involved in cell signaling processes. They play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological processes. Chemokines are functionally classified into two categories; inflammatory/inducible and constitutive. Their biologic functional differences are the result of their receptors structural differences. Recently some studies were performed about the chemokines changes in diabetes. Inflammatory mechanisms have an important role in diabetes.Materials and Methods: In this review article we searched the keywords chemokines, diabetes, diabetes pathogenesis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes in Persian resources, PubMed and famous English-language websites through advanced search engines and found the newest studies about the role of chemokines in the pathogenesis of diabetes.Results: The results of the studies showed that diabetes and its disorders enhance the activation of immune cells and the expression of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, SDF-1, INF-γ, TGF-β, MCP-1, IP-10, TNF-α, and RANTES; most of them have impact on the pathogenesis of diabetes.Conclusion: Comparison and analysis of the results obtained from our research and the results of performed studies in the world and Iran shows that chemokines, like other protein molecules involved in the pathogenesis and etiology of diabetes, play a role in this process.

  3. Processing of apple pomace for bioactive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Shashi; Kalia, Kalpana; Sharma, Madhu; Singh, Bikram; Ahuja, P S

    2008-01-01

    The growth of horticulture industries worldwide has generated huge quantities of fruit wastes (25%-40% of the total fruits processed). These residues are generally a good source of carbohydrates, especially cell wall polysaccharides and other functionally important bioactive molecules such as proteins, vitamins, minerals and natural antioxidants. "Apple pomace" is a left-over solid biomass with a high moisture content, obtained as a by-product during the processing of apple fruits for juice, cider or wine preparation. Owing to the high carbohydrate content, apple pomace is used as a substrate in a number of microbial processes for the production of organic acids, enzymes, single cell protein, ethanol, low alcoholic drinks and pigments. Recent research trends reveal that there is an increase in the utilization of apple pomace as a food processing residue for the extraction of value added products such as dietary fibre, protein, natural antioxidants, biopolymers, pigments and compounds with unique properties. However, the central dogma is still the stability, safety and economic feasibility of the process(s)/product(s) developed. This review is mainly focused on assessing recent research developments in extraction, isolation and characterization of bioactive molecules from apple pomace, along with their commercial utilization, in food fortification.

  4. Laser Spectroscopy of bi-alkali molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Altaf, A.; Lorenz, J.; Elliott, D.; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We report a study of laser spectroscopy of bi-alkali molecules, such as Li2, Rb2 and LiRb (work is in progress). We have constructed a dual-species (Li/Rb) heat pipe oven with a side viewport. The molecular fluorescence is excited by a dye laser with Rh6G dye (operating between 564 nm and 610 nm) and various home-made diode lasers (operating near 635 nm and 665 nm). The fluorescence is recorded using a .5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex4 m monochromator with a 0.1 nm (˜ 3 cm-1) spectral resolution. Transitions to the X^1σg^+ in Li2 and Rb2 have been measured and studies on LiRb are in progress. Molecular parameters, such as force constant, may be obtained from the analysis of the data (which agree with previously known values to within ˜ 3%). Using the known values of dissociation energy De and harmonic frequency φe for the alkali dimers, we also demonstrate that simple calculations with Morse potential approximation can be used to estimate the molecular transition wavelengths to within a few (1-3) nanometers from the experimentally measured values. Such information will aid in creating cold molecules via photoassociation in a dual species magneto-optical trap (LiRb in our case).

  5. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  6. Proteinaceous molecules mediating Bifidobacterium-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Ruiz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract.Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs.

  7. Conformational elasticity theory of chain molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Xiaozhen

    2001-01-01

    This paper develops a conformational elasticity theory of chain molecules, which is based on three key points: (ⅰ) the molecular model is the rotational isomeric state (RIS) model; (ⅱ) the conformational distribution function of a chain molecule is described by a function of two variables, the end-to-end distance of a chain conformation and the energy of the conformation; (ⅲ) the rule of changes in the chain conformational states during deformation is that a number of chain conformations would vanish. The ideal deformation behavior calculated by the theory shows that the change in chain conformations is physically able to make the upward curvature of the stress-strain curve at the large-scale deformation of natural rubber. With the theory, different deformation behaviors between polymers with different chemical structures can be described, the energy term of the stress in the deformations can be predicted, and for natural rubber the fraction of the energy term is around 13%, coinciding with the experimental results.

  8. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  9. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  10. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis.

  11. Single molecule and single cell epigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; McElwee, John L; Soloway, Paul D

    2015-01-15

    Dynamically regulated changes in chromatin states are vital for normal development and can produce disease when they go awry. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted to characterizing these states under normal and pathological conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method to characterize where in the genome transcription factors, modified histones, modified nucleotides and chromatin binding proteins are found; bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) and its variants are commonly used to characterize the locations of DNA modifications. Though very powerful, these methods are not without limitations. Notably, they are best at characterizing one chromatin feature at a time, yet chromatin features arise and function in combination. Investigators commonly superimpose separate ChIP-seq or BS-seq datasets, and then infer where chromatin features are found together. While these inferences might be correct, they can be misleading when the chromatin source has distinct cell types, or when a given cell type exhibits any cell to cell variation in chromatin state. These ambiguities can be eliminated by robust methods that directly characterize the existence and genomic locations of combinations of chromatin features in very small inputs of cells or ideally, single cells. Here we review single molecule epigenomic methods under development to overcome these limitations, the technical challenges associated with single molecule methods and their potential application to single cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Complex molecules in W51 North region

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Jialei; Zapata, Luis A; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Chengpeng; Peng, Yaping; Zhang, Li; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) molecular line observations in two 2 GHz-wide bands centered at 217.5 and 227.5 GHz, toward the massive star forming region W51 North. We identified 84 molecular line transitions from 17 species and their isotopologues. The molecular gas distribution of these lines mainly peaks in the continuum position of W51 North, and has a small tail extending to the west, probably associated with W51 d2. In addition to the commonly detected nitrogen and oxygen-bearing species, we detected a large amount of transitions of the Acetone (CH$_3$COCH$_3$) and Methyl Formate (CH$_3$OCHO), which may suggest that these molecules are present in an early evolutionary stage of the massive stars. We also found that W51 North is an ethanol-rich source. There is no obvious difference in the molecular gas distributions between the oxygen-bearing and nitrogen-bearing molecules. Under the assumption of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), with the XCLASS tool, the molecular column densities, and rota...

  13. Filovirus tropism: Cellular molecules for viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayato eTakada

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In human and nonhuman primates, filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg viruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever.Recently, other animals such as pigs and some species of fruit bats have also been shown to be susceptible to these viruses. While having a preference for some cell types such as hepatocytes, endothelial cells, dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, filoviruses are known to be pantropic in infection of primates. The envelope glycoprotein (GP is responsible for both receptor binding and fusion of the virus envelope with the host cell membrane. It has been demonstrated that filovirus GP interacts with multiple molecules for entry into host cells, whereas none of the cellular molecules so far identified as a receptor/coreceptor fully explains filovirus tissue tropism and host range. Available data suggest that the mucin-like region (MLR on GP plays an important role in attachment to the preferred target cells, whose infection is likely involved in filovirus pathogenesis, whereas the MLR is not essential for the fundamental function of the GP in viral entry into cells in vitro. Further studies elucidating the mechanisms of cellular entry of filoviruses may shed light on the development of strategies for prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers.

  14. Spin-crossover molecule based thermoelectric junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Parida, Prakash [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Pati, Swapan K. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2015-05-11

    Using ab-initio numerical methods, we explore the spin-dependent transport and thermoelectric properties of a spin-crossover molecule (i.e., iron complex of 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)pyridine) based nano-junction. We demonstrate a large magnetoresistance, efficient conductance-switching, and spin-filter activity in this molecule-based two-terminal device. The spin-crossover process also modulates the thermoelectric entities. It can efficiently switch the magnitude as well as spin-polarization of the thermocurrent. We find that thermocurrent is changed by ∼4 orders of magnitude upon spin-crossover. Moreover, it also substantially affects the thermopower and consequently, the device shows extremely efficient spin-crossover magnetothermopower generation. Furthermore, by tuning the chemical potential of electrodes into a certain range, a pure spin-thermopower can be achieved for the high-spin state. Finally, the reasonably large values of figure-of-merit in the presence and absence of phonon demonstrate a large heat-to-voltage conversion efficiency of the device. We believe that our study will pave an alternative way of tuning the transport and thermoelectric properties through the spin-crossover process and can have potential applications in generation of spin-dependent current, information storage, and processing.

  15. Sisyphus Laser Cooling of a Polyatomic Molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Matsuda, Kyle; Augenbraun, Benjamin L; Anderegg, Loic; Sedlack, Alexander P; Doyle, John M

    2016-01-01

    We perform magnetically-assisted Sisyphus laser cooling of the triatomic free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). This is achieved with principal optical cycling in the rotationally closed $P\\left(N"=1\\right)$ branch of either the $\\tilde{X}^{2}\\Sigma^{+}\\left(000\\right)\\leftrightarrow\\tilde{A}^{2}\\Pi_{1/2}\\left(000\\right)$ or the $\\tilde{X}^{2}\\Sigma^{+}\\left(000\\right)\\leftrightarrow\\tilde{B}^{2}\\Sigma^{+}\\left(000\\right)$ vibronic transitions. Molecules lost into the excited vibrational states during the cooling process are repumped back through the $\\tilde{B}\\left(000\\right)$ state for both the $\\left(100\\right)$ level of the Sr-O stretching mode and the $\\left(02^{0}0\\right)$ level of the bending mode. The transverse temperature of a SrOH molecular beam is reduced in one dimension by two orders of magnitude to $\\sim700\\ {\\rm \\mu K}$. This approach opens a path towards creating a variety of ultracold polyatomic molecules, including much larger ones, by means of direct laser cooling.

  16. Sisyphus Laser Cooling of a Polyatomic Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Augenbraun, Benjamin L; Anderegg, Loic; Sedlack, Alexander P; Doyle, John M

    2017-04-28

    We perform magnetically assisted Sisyphus laser cooling of the triatomic free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). This is achieved with principal optical cycling in the rotationally closed P(N^{''}=1) branch of either the X[over ˜]^{2}Σ^{+}(000)↔A[over ˜]^{2}Π_{1/2}(000) or the X[over ˜]^{2}Σ^{+}(000)↔B[over ˜]^{2}Σ^{+}(000) vibronic transitions. Molecules lost into the excited vibrational states during the cooling process are repumped back through the B[over ˜](000) state for both the (100) level of the Sr-O stretching mode and the (02^{0}0) level of the bending mode. The transverse temperature of a SrOH molecular beam is reduced in one dimension by 2 orders of magnitude to ∼750  μK. This approach opens a path towards creating a variety of ultracold polyatomic molecules by means of direct laser cooling.

  17. Axion Dark Matter Detection with Cold Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Current techniques cannot detect axion dark matter over much of its parameter space, particularly in the theoretically well-motivated region where the axion decay constant f_a lies near the GUT and Planck scales. We suggest a novel experimental method to search for QCD axion dark matter in this region. The axion field oscillates at a frequency equal to its mass when it is a component of dark matter. These oscillations induce time varying CP-odd nuclear moments, such as electric dipole and Schiff moments. The coupling between internal atomic fields and these nuclear moments gives rise to time varying shifts to atomic energy levels. These effects can be enhanced by using elements with large Schiff moments such as the light Actinides, and states with large spontaneous parity violation, such as molecules in a background electric field. The energy level shift in such a molecule can be ~ 10^-24 eV or larger. While challenging, this energy shift may be observable in a molecular clock configuration with technology pr...

  18. Theory of long-range ultracold atom-molecule photoassociation

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The creation of ultracold molecules is currently limited to diatomic species. In this letter we present a theoretical description of the photoassociation of ultracold atoms and molecules to create ultracold excited triatomic molecules, thus being a novel example of light-assisted ultracold chemical reaction. The calculation of the photoassociation rate of ultracold Cs atoms with ultracold Cs2 molecules in their rovibrational ground state is reported, based on the solution of the quantum dynam...

  19. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  20. New frontiers for quantum gases of polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Steven A.; Covey, Jacob P.; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared to atoms, molecules possess additional degrees of freedom that can be exploited in fundamental tests, ultracold chemistry, and engineering new quantum phases in many-body systems. Here, we review the recent progress in creating and manipulating ultracold bialkali molecules to study quantum gases of polar molecules.

  1. The Stereochemistry of Biochemical Molecules: A Subject to Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centelles, Josep J.; Imperial, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Although Fischer's convention for stereoisomers is useful for simple molecules, the stereochemistry of complex biochemical molecules is often poorly indicated in textbooks. This article reports on errors in stereochemistry of complex hydrosoluble vitamin B12 molecule. Twenty-five popular biochemistry textbooks were examined for their treatment of…

  2. Molecular electronics with single molecules in solid-state devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate aim of molecular electronics is to understand and master single-molecule devices. Based on the latest results on electron transport in single molecules in solid-state devices, we focus here on new insights into the influence of metal electrodes on the energy spectrum of the molecule...

  3. Interstellar molecules in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L. E. B.; Olofsson, H.; Hjalmarson, A.; Gredel, R.; Black, J. H.

    1994-11-01

    We present the results of a mm-wave molecular line search in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) obtained with the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST) in the area of the N 159 complex of HII regions. Isotopomers of CO, CS, SO, CN, HCN, HNC, HCO(+) and H2CO have been detected. Some of these molecules have been observed in two transitions allowing excitation temperature estimates, For (13)CO and (12)CO we find temperatures close to, or in excess of 10 K, while C(18)O, CS and HCO(+) show temperatures between 5 and 10 K. All observed isotopomer intensity ratios suggest small optical depths provided that Galactic isoptopic abundances ratios apply. From the C-12 and C-13-isotopomer data of CS and HCO(+), combined with the C(34)S line emission we estimate the gas phase C-12/C-13 abundance ratio to be 50+25, sub-20 in N 159. The 0-18/0-17 abundance ratio is observed to be a factor of about 2 lower than in the Galaxy, and another factor of 2 lower than in starburst galaxies. Using the OSO 20m telescope, we have mapped the Galactic molecular cloud associated with the H II region S 138 in the 3 mm transitions of most of the molecules detected in the LMC. These data have been used to investigate the effects of linear resolution on line ratios and fractional abundances. Based upon cloud luminosities, normalized to that of the CO(1-0) line, the detected lines in the LMC are weaker by a factor of 1.5 to 3 relative to those of the S 138 cloud. The exception is HCO(+), which shows stronger normalized emission in N 159. The normalized luminosities of the S 138 cloud are similar to those observed in a sample of strong CO galaxies. Fractional abundances of the detected molecules have been estimated using the conversion factor from CO emission to H2 column density. While the derived fractional abundances of S 138 generally agree to within a factor of 3 with those reported for Orion KL and TMC-1, all molecular concentrations observed in the LMC are typically a factor of 10 lower.

  4. The Origin of Large Molecules in Primordial Autocatalytic Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Varun; Jain, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Large molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids are crucial for life, yet their primordial origin remains a major puzzle. The production of large molecules, as we know it today, requires good catalysts, and the only good catalysts we know that can accomplish this task consist of large molecules. Thus the origin of large molecules is a chicken and egg problem in chemistry. Here we present a mechanism, based on autocatalytic sets (ACSs), that is a possible solution to this problem. We discuss a mathematical model describing the population dynamics of molecules in a stylized but prebiotically plausible chemistry. Large molecules can be produced in this chemistry by the coalescing of smaller ones, with the smallest molecules, the ‘food set’, being buffered. Some of the reactions can be catalyzed by molecules within the chemistry with varying catalytic strengths. Normally the concentrations of large molecules in such a scenario are very small, diminishing exponentially with their size. ACSs, if present in the catalytic network, can focus the resources of the system into a sparse set of molecules. ACSs can produce a bistability in the population dynamics and, in particular, steady states wherein the ACS molecules dominate the population. However to reach these steady states from initial conditions that contain only the food set typically requires very large catalytic strengths, growing exponentially with the size of the catalyst molecule. We present a solution to this problem by studying ‘nested ACSs’, a structure in which a small ACS is connected to a larger one and reinforces it. We show that when the network contains a cascade of nested ACSs with the catalytic strengths of molecules increasing gradually with their size (e.g., as a power law), a sparse subset of molecules including some very large molecules can come to dominate the system. PMID:22238620

  5. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin

    2012-10-25

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  7. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, J.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  8. Hard molecule-based magnet of Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, M. G. F.; Ardisson, J. D.; Stumpf, H. O.; Macedo, W. A. A.

    2001-05-01

    A new molecule-based magnet containing Fe 2+, Fe 3+, Cu(opba) 2- and Bu 4N +, with opba=ortho-phenylenebis(oxamato) and Bu 4N +=tetra-n-butylammonium, was synthesized. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, atomic absorption, vibrating sample magnetometry and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic measurements show that the compound presents a magnetic transition around 25 K and a high coercivity, around 1.3 T. Above the transition temperature, the Mössbauer spectrum is dominated by a broad doublet characteristic of Fe 2+. At 20 K, the spectrum shows clear magnetic splitting and at least two non-equivalent Fe sites can be identified. To the best of our knowledge, this compound presents the highest coercive field observed for an iron-based molecular magnetic system.

  9. Hard molecule-based magnet of Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, M.G.F. E-mail: vaz@urano.cdtn.br; Ardisson, J.D.; Stumpf, H.O.; Macedo, W.A.A

    2001-05-01

    A new molecule-based magnet containing Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Cu(opba){sup 2-} and Bu{sub 4}N{sup +}, with opba=ortho-phenylenebis(oxamato) and Bu{sub 4}N{sup +}=tetra-n-butylammonium, was synthesized. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, atomic absorption, vibrating sample magnetometry and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic measurements show that the compound presents a magnetic transition around 25 K and a high coercivity, around 1.3 T. Above the transition temperature, the Moessbauer spectrum is dominated by a broad doublet characteristic of Fe{sup 2+}. At 20 K, the spectrum shows clear magnetic splitting and at least two non-equivalent Fe sites can be identified. To the best of our knowledge, this compound presents the highest coercive field observed for an iron-based molecular magnetic system.

  10. Magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hummon, Matthew T; Stuhl, Benjamin K; Collopy, Alejandra L; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The development of the magneto-optical trap revolutionized the fields of atomic and quantum physics by providing a simple method for the rapid production of ultracold, trapped atoms. A similar technique for producing a diverse set of dense, ultracold diatomic molecular species will likewise transform the study of strongly interacting quantum systems, precision measurement, and physical chemistry. We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). Using a quasicycling optical transition we observe transverse Doppler cooling of a YO molecular beam to a temperature of 5 mK, limited by interaction time. With the addition of an oscillating magnetic quadrupole field we demonstrate a transverse magneto-optical trap and achieve temperatures of 2 mK.

  11. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, Mariusz [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Faculty of Physics, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  12. Coupled Cluster Theory for Large Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudin, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of local approximations to coupled cluster (CC) theory for large molecules. Two different methods are presented, the divide–expand–consolidate scheme (DEC), for the calculation of ground state energies, and a local framework denoted LoFEx, for the calculation...... of electronic excitation energies and oscillator strengths. After an introduction to the relevant notions of electronic-structure theory, the principal aspects of DEC and LoFEx are summarized. For comparison, a selected review of the state-of-the-art is presented for each domain. This thesis should serve...... as an introduction to the work developed and presented in the scientific articles collected as appendices. The DEC scheme has been applied successfully to the calculation of MP2, CCSD and CCSD(T) ground state energies. The intrinsic structure of DEC allows for a linear-scaling (with system size) and massively...

  13. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  14. [Action of antibiotics as signalling molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, V G; Vinogradova, K A; Orlova, T I; Kozhevin, P A; Polin, A N

    2014-01-01

    It was thought that antibiotics should be produced by soil microorganisms to inhibit the growth of competitors in natural habitats. Yet it has been shown that antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations may have a role as signalling molecules providing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria in the environment. Antibiotics modulate gene transcription and regulate gene expression in microbial populations. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics may cause a number of phenotypic and genotypic changes in microorganisms. These transcription changes are dependent on the interaction of antibiotics with macromolecular receptors such as ribosome or RNA-polymerase. Antibiotic signalling and quorum-sensing system are important regulatory mechanisms in bacteria. It was demonstrated that antibiotics interfered with quorum-sensing system.

  15. Special Issue: “Molecules against Alzheimer”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Decker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue, entitled “Molecules against Alzheimer”, gathers a number of original articles, short communications, and review articles on recent research efforts toward the development of novel drug candidates, diagnostic agents and therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of death worldwide. This Special Issue contains many interesting examples describing the design, synthesis, and pharmacological profiling of novel compounds that hit one or several key biological targets, such as cholinesterases, β-amyloid formation or aggregation, monoamine oxidase B, oxidative stress, biometal dyshomeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, serotonin and/or melatonin systems, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, or nuclear erythroid 2-related factor. The development of novel AD diagnostic agents based on tau protein imaging and the use of lithium or intranasal insulin for the prevention or the symptomatic treatment of AD is also covered in some articles of the Special Issue.

  16. CO-releasing molecule (CORM) conjugate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Anna Christin; Kunz, Peter C; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-11-15

    The development of CORMs (CO-releasing molecules) as a prodrug for CO administration in living organisms has attracted significant attention. CORMs offer the promising possibility of a safe and controllable release of CO in low amounts triggered by light, ligands, enzymes, etc. For the targeting of specific tissues or diseases and to prevent possible side effects from metals and other residues after CO release, these CORMs are attached to biocompatible systems, like peptides, polymers, nanoparticles, dendrimers, protein cages, non-wovens, tablets, and metal-organic frameworks. We discuss in this review the known CORM carrier conjugates, in short CORM conjugates, with covalently-bound or incorporated CORMs for medicinal and therapeutic applications. Most conjugates are nontoxic, show increasing half-lives of CO release, and make use of the EPR-effect, but still show problems because of a continuous background of CO release and the absence of an on/off-switch for the CO release.

  17. Discrete energy transport in collagen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alain, Mvogo; Germain, H. Ben-Bolie; Timoléon, C. Kofané

    2014-09-01

    The modulational instability in the three coupled α-polypeptide chains of a collagen molecule is investigated. Choosing symmetric and asymmetric solutions, and applying the so-called rotating-wave approximation, we describe the dynamics of the system by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation. The linear stability analysis of the continuous wave solution is performed. The numerical simulations show the generation of trains of solitonic structures in the lattice with increasing amplitude as time progresses. The effect of damping and noise forces of the physiological temperature (T = 300 K) introduces an erratic behavior to the formed patterns, reinforcing the idea that the energy used in metabolic processes is confined to specific regions for efficiency.

  18. Resonant electron capture by orotic acid molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftakhov, M. V.; Shchukin, P. V.; Khatymov, R. V.

    2017-09-01

    Resonant electron attachment by orotic acid molecules (6-COOH-uracil) are studied in the energy range of 0-14 eV via negative ion mass spectrometry. Molecular ions, whose lifetimes relative to electron autodetachment are found to be 300 μs are recorded in the region of thermal electron energies; they form in the valence state through a vibration-excited resonance mechanism. Unlike unsubstituted uracil, most dissociative processes occur in the low-energy region of <4 eV and are due to carboxylic anions. An absolute cross section of 2.4 × 10-17 cm2 is found for the most intense fragment ions [M-H]- at an output energy of 1.33 eV. The kinetics of decarboxylation is considered for these ions. This could be a model reaction for the last stage of uridine monophosphate biosynthesis.

  19. Absorption and Scattering by Molecules and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoble, Jacqueline; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Herman, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere absorbs, scatters, and emits electromagnetic radiation. Although air molecules are the primary actors in these processes, aerosol particles are also present ubiquitously and modify the radiation field. In fact, this modification constitutes the very physical basis of aerosol remote sensing. Whenever clouds are present, they have a much larger influence on radiation which largely overshadows the aerosol impact. Therefore, in aerosol remote sensing, one often has to limit observations to cloudless conditions and screen cloudy pixels. In the solar part of the spectrum, molecular absorption is mostly limited to ultraviolet (UV; ozone) and near-infrared (near-IR; carbon dioxide, water vapor) wavelengths and is characterized by strong and narrow oxygen bands. A brief description of atmospheric molecular absorption is presented in Section 2.2. Shortwave aerosol remote sensing is usually performed outside the absorption bands, but some instruments also have channels capturing absorption bands with the objective of quantifying gaseous components.

  20. Simulated single molecule microscopy with SMeagol

    CERN Document Server

    Lindén, Martin; Boucharin, Alexis; Fange, David; Elf, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in single particle tracking (SPT) microscopy 1 make it possible to obtain tens of thousands macromolecular trajectories from within a living cell in just a few minutes. Since molecules typically change their movement properties upon interactions, these trajectories contain information about both locations and rates of intracellular reactions. This information is unfortunately obscured by physical limitations of the optical microscope and noise in detection systems, making statistical methods development for SPT analysis a very active research field. Unbiased testing and comparison of such methods are however difficult given the absence of in vivo data of intracellular dynamics where the true states of interaction are known, a.k.a. the ground truth. A common resort is to instead use simulated, synthetic, data. However, tests using such data give unrealistically optimistic results if the simplifying assumptions underlying the analysis method are satisfied in the synthetic data, a practice known ...