WorldWideScience

Sample records for cost solar array

  1. Glass for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquet, F.L.

    1980-02-01

    In photovoltaic systems, the encapsulant material that protects the solar cells should be highly transparent and very durable. Glass satisfies these two criteria and is considered a primary candidate for low-cost, photovoltaic encapsulation systems. In this report, various aspects of glass encapsulation are treated that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The criteria for consideration of the glass encapsulation systems were based on the LSA (Low-cost Solar Array) Project goals for arrays: (a) a low degradation rate, (b) high reliability, (c) an efficiency greater than 10 percent, (d) a total array price less than $500/kW, and (e) a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. The glass design areas treated herein include the types of glass, sources and costs, physical properties and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings. 78 references.

  2. Cost competitiveness of a solar cell array power source for ATS-6 educational TV terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A cost comparison is made between a terrestrial solar cell array power system and a variety of other power sources for the ATS-6 Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) TV terminals in India. The solar array system was sized for a typical Indian location, Lahore. Based on present capital and fuel costs, the solar cell array power system is a close competitor to the least expensive alternate power system. A feasibility demonstration of a terrestrial solar cell array system powering an ATS-6 receiver terminal at Cleveland, Ohio is described.

  3. Phase 1 of the automated array assembly task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, R. A.; Grenon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a study of process variables and solar cell variables are presented. Interactions between variables and their effects upon control ranges of the variables are identified. The results of a cost analysis for manufacturing solar cells are discussed. The cost analysis includes a sensitivity analysis of a number of cost factors.

  4. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Low-cost Solar Array Project, Task 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M.

    1978-01-01

    Work was done to verify the technological readiness of a select process sequence with respect to satisfying the Low Cost Solar Array Project objectives of meeting the designated goals of $.50 per peak watt in 1986 (1975 dollars). The sequence examined consisted of: (1) 3 inches diameter as-sawn Czochralski grown 1:0:0 silicon, (2) texture etching, (3) ion implanting, (4) laser annealing, (5) screen printing of ohmic contacts and (6) sprayed anti-reflective coatings. High volume production projections were made on the selected process sequence. Automated processing and movement of hardware at high rates were conceptualized to satisfy the PROJECT's 500 MW/yr capability. A production plan was formulated with flow diagrams integrating the various processes in the cell fabrication sequence.

  5. Assessment of low-cost manufacturing process sequences. [photovoltaic solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    An extensive research and development activity to reduce the cost of manufacturing photovoltaic solar arrays by a factor of approximately one hundred is discussed. Proposed and actual manufacturing process descriptions were compared to manufacturing costs. An overview of this methodology is presented.

  6. Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. Project quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April through June 1978 is described. It includes reports on silicon material processing, large-area silicon sheet development, encapsulation materials testing and development, project engineering and operations activities, and manufacturing techniques, plus the steps taken to integrate these efforts.

  7. Solar array deployment mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  8. The Array Automated Assembly Task for the Low Cost Solar Array Project, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B. (Editor); Farukhi, S. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    During the program a process sequence was proposed and tested for the fabrication of dendritic welb silicon into solar modules. This sequence was analyzed as to yield and cost and these data suggest that the price goals of 1986 are attainable. Specifically, it was shown that a low cost POCL3 is a suitable replacement for the semiconductor grade, and that a suitable CVD oxide can be deposited from a silane/air mixture using a Silox reactor. A dip coating method was developed for depositing an antireflection coating from a metalorganic precursor. Application of photoresist to define contact grids was made cost effective through use of a dip coating technique. Electroplating of both Ag and Cu was shown feasible and cost effective for producing the conductive metal grids on the solar cells. Laser scribing was used to separate the cells from the dendrites without degradation. Ultrasonic welding methods were shown to be feasible for interconnecting the cells. A study of suitable low cost materials for encapsulation suggest that soda lime glass and phenolic filled board are preferred.

  9. Array automated assembly task low cost silicon solar array project, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C.

    1980-01-01

    Analyses of solar cell and module process steps for throughput rate, cost effectiveness, and reproductibility are reported. In addition to the concentration on cell and module processing sequences, an investigation was made into the capability of using microwave energy in the diffusion, sintering, and thick film firing steps of cell processing. Although the entire process sequence was integrated, the steps are treated individually with test and experimental data, conclusions, and recommendations.

  10. The automated array assembly task of the low-cost silicon solar array project, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. G.; Pryor, R. A.; Sparks, T. G.; Legge, R.; Saltzman, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Several specific processing steps as part of a total process sequence for manufacturing silicon solar cells were studied. Ion implantation was identified as the preferred process step for impurity doping. Unanalyzed beam ion implantation was shown to have major cost advantages over analyzed beam implantation. Further, high quality cells were fabricated using a high current unanalyzed beam. Mechanically masked plasma patterning of silicon nitride was shown to be capable of forming fine lines on silicon surfaces with spacings between mask and substrate as great as 250 micrometers. Extensive work was performed on advances in plated metallization. The need for the thick electroless palladium layer was eliminated. Further, copper was successfully utilized as a conductor layer utilizing nickel as a barrier to copper diffusion into the silicon. Plasma etching of silicon for texturing and saw damage removal was shown technically feasible but not cost effective compared to wet chemical etching techniques.

  11. Residential photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-Cost Solar Array Project engineering area. Final report appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This volume contains the appendices to a study to identify design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications. Appendices include: (1) codes, standards, and manuals of accepted practice-definition and importance; (2) regional code variations-impact; (3) model and city codes-review; (4) National Electric Code (NEC)-review; (5) types of standards-definition and importance; (6) federal standards-review; (7) standards review method; (8) manuals of accepted practice; (9) codes and referenced standards-summary; (10) public safety testing laboratories; (11) insurance review; (12) studies approach; (13) mounting configurations; (14) module/panel size and shape cost analysis; (15) grounding, wiring, terminal and voltage studies; (16) array installation cost summary; (17) photovoltaic shingle/module comparison; (18) retrofit application; (19) residential photovoltaic module performance criteria; (20) critique of JPL's solar cell module design and test specifications for residential applications; and (21) CSI format specification. (WHK)

  12. Silicon material task - Low cost solar array project /JPL/DOE/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwack, R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the silicon material task of the low-cost solar array project, which has the objective of establishing a silicon production capability equivalent to 500 mW per year at a price less than 10 dollars/kg (1975 dollars) in 1986. The task program is divided into four phases: technical feasibility, scale-up studies (the present phase), experimental process system development units, and implementation of large-scale production plants, and it involves the development of processes for two groups of materials, that is, semiconductor grade and solar cell grade. In addition, the effects of impurities on solar cell performance are being investigated. Attention is given to problem areas of the task program, such as environmental protection, material compatibility between the reacting chemicals and materials of construction of the equipment, and waste disposal.

  13. Overview - Flat-plate technology. [review of Low Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Progress and continuing plans for the joint NASA/DoE program at the JPL to develop the technologies and industrial processes necessary for mass production of low-cost solar arrays (LSA) which produce electricity from solar cells at a cost of less than $0.70/W are reviewed. Attention is given to plans for a demonstration Si refinement plant capable of yielding 1000 MT/yr, and to a CVD process with chlorosilane, which will yield material at a cost of $21/kg. Ingot and shaped-sheet technologies, using either Czochralski growth and film fed growth methods have yielded AM1 15% efficient cells in an automated process. Encapsulation procedures have been lowered to $14/sq m, and robotics have permitted assembled cell production at a rate of 10 sec/cell. Standards are being defined for module safety features. It is noted that construction of a pilot Si purification plant is essential to achieving the 1986 $0.70/W cost goals.

  14. Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Studies were conducted on several fundamental aspects of electroless nickel/solder metallization for silicon solar cells. A process, which precedes the electroless nickel plating with several steps of palladium plating and heat treatment, was compared directly with single step electroless nickel plating. Work was directed toward answering specific questions concerning the effect of silicon surface oxide on nickel plating, effects of thermal stresses on the metallization, sintering of nickel plated on silicon, and effects of exposure to the plating solution on solar cell characteristics. The process was found to be extremely lengthy and cumbersome, and was also found to produce a product virtually identical to that produced by single step electroless nickel plating, as shown by adhesion tests and electrical characteristics of cells under illumination.

  15. Phase 2: Array automated assembly task low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.

    1979-01-01

    Several microwave systems for use in solar cell fabrication were developed and experimentally tested. The first system used a standing wave rectangular waveguide horn applicator. Satisfactory results were achieved with this system for impedance matching and wafer surface heating uniformity. The second system utilized a resonant TM sub 011 mode cylindrical cavity but could not be employed due to its poor energy coupling efficiency. The third and fourth microwave systems utilized a circular waveguide operating in the TM sub 01 and TM sub 11 but had problems with impedance matching, efficiency, and field uniformity.

  16. Array automated assembly task, phase 2. Low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, S. S.; Jones, G. T.; Allison, K. T.

    1978-01-01

    Several modifications instituted in the wafer surface preparation process served to significantly reduce the process cost to 1.55 cents per peak watt in 1975 cents. Performance verification tests of a laser scanning system showed a limited capability to detect hidden cracks or defects, but with potential equipment modifications this cost effective system could be rendered suitable for applications. Installation of electroless nickel plating system was completed along with an optimization of the wafer plating process. The solder coating and flux removal process verification test was completed. An optimum temperature range of 500-550 C was found to produce uniform solder coating with the restriction that a modified dipping procedure is utilized. Finally, the construction of the spray-on dopant equipment was completed.

  17. Phase 2 of the Array Automated Assembly Task for the Low Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B.; Rai-Choundhury, P.; Seman, E. J.; Rohatgi, A.; Davis, J. R.; Ostroski, J. W.; Stapleton, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Two process specifications supplied by contractors were tested. The aluminum silk screening process resulted in cells comparable to those from sputtered Al. The electroless plating of contacts specification could be used only with extensive modification. Several experiments suggest that there is some degradation of the front junction during the Al back surface field (BSF) fabrication. A revised process sequence was defined which incorporates Al BSF formation. A cost analysis of this process yielded a selling price of $0.75/watt peak in 1980.

  18. Phase Two of the Array Automated Assembly Task for the Low Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B.; Page, D. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Seman, E. J.; Hanes, M. H.; Rohatgi, A.; Davis, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Various top contact metal systems were studied. Only Ti Pd Cu approaches baseline (Ti Pd Ag) quality, but this system shows a lack of long term stability. Aluminum back surface field structures were fabricated and thicknesses of p superscript + material of up to 7.0 microns were achieved with open circuit voltages of 0.59V. A general purpose ultrasonic welder was purchased and tests using various metal foils are under way. During fabrication of the demonstration module, several cells became cracked. Due to redundancy of interconnections, the module was not open circuited but the efficiency was reduced to 8.8%. The broken cell was interconnected with a strap across the back and the efficiency was increased to 11.5%. A cost analysis was made and the results indicate a selling price of $0.56/watt peak (in 1986 with 1975 dollars).

  19. Low cost, high concentration ratio solar cell array for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.; Whang, U. S.; Crabtree, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian-type concentrator solar array concept for space applications is described. In-orbit cell operating temperatures near 80 C are achieved with purely passive cell cooling and a net concentration ratio of 100. A multiplicity of miniaturized, rigid solar cell concentrator subassemblies are electrically interconnected in conventional fashion and mounted into rigid frames to form concentrator solar panel assemblies approximately 14-mm thick. A plurality of such interconnected panels forms a stowable and deployable solar cell blanket. It is projected that for 20% efficient silicon cells an array of 500 kW beginning-of-life output capability, including orbiter cradle structures, can be transported by a single shuttle orbiter flight into low earth orbit. In-orbit array specific performance is calculated to be approximately 100 W/sq m and 20 W/kg, including all stowage, deployment and array figure control equipment designed for a 30-year orbital life. Higher efficiency gallium arsenide and multiple band gap solar cells will improve these performance factors correspondingly.

  20. Commercial/industrial photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-cost solar array project engineering area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in commercial and industrial applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to commercial and industrial photovoltaic array installation. Four general installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Each of the generic mounting types can be used in vertical wall mounting systems. This implies eight mounting types exist in the commercial/industrial sector. Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Cost drivers were identified. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. The general conclusion is that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in commercial/industrial arrays.

  1. Phase 2 of the automated array assembly task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, M.G.; Grenon, L.P.; Pastirik, E.M.; Pryor, R.A.; Sparks, T.G.

    1978-11-01

    This report presents the results of investigations and analyses of an advanced process sequence for manufacturing high efficiency solar cells and modules in a cost-effective manner. The entire process sequence is presented and discussed step by step. Emphasis is on process simplicity and minimizing consumed materials. The process sequence incorporates texture etching, plasma processes for damage removal and patterning, ion implantation, low pressure silicon nitride deposition, and plated metal. A reliable module design is presented. Specific process step developments are presnted. Further, a detailed cost analysis has been performed to indicate future areas of fruitful cost reduction effort. Finally, recommendations for advanced investigations are presented.

  2. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  3. Automated array assembly task development of low-cost polysilicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    Development of low cost, large area polysilicon solar cells was conducted in this program. Three types of polysilicon materialk were investigated. A theoretical and experimenal comparison between single crystal silicon and polysilicon solar cell efficiency was performed. Significant electrical performance differences were observed between types of wafer material, i.e. fine grain and coarse grain polysilicon and single crystal silicon. Efficiency degradation due to grain boundaries in fin grain and coarse grain polysilicon was shown to be small. It was demonstrated that 10 percent efficient polysilicon solar cells can be produced with spray on n+ dopants. This result fulfills an important goal of this project, which is the production of batch quantity of 10 percent efficient polysilicon solar cells.

  4. Solar collector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  5. Phase I of the automated array assembly task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Annual technical report. Motorola report No. 2258/4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, M.G.; Pryor, R.A.; Grenon, L.A.; Lesk, I.A.

    1977-02-01

    Work performed to analyze, both technically and economically, the state of technology readiness for the automated production of solar cells and modules is compiled and reviewed critically. The long-term objective solar module characteristics include a selling price of less than $.50/peak watt and a mean-time-before-failure (MTBF) of 20 years in any terrestrial environment. While efficiency is important to attaining the cost goal, it is a most significant factor in array economics; accordingly, this program has stressed high efficiency, with a suggested cell goal of 15 percent. The analysis emphasized technical evaluation of individual process steps first, and then concentrated upon process sequences for making solar cells and modules. Further analysis was performed to yield a detailed cost study of individual process steps; this was applied to the cost analysis of potential process sequences. Potentially economical process sequences formed from process steps deemed to have high technical merit were then identified. Potentially promising technologies needing further development to achieve satisfactory maturity were then identified. It is concluded that, while specific areas of technology need advanced development and the source of silicon needs definition, no fundamentally new technology needs to be developed to permit manufacture of solar cells which will meet the 1985 LSSA Program cost goals.

  6. Research and development of low cost processes for integrated solar arrays. Final report, April 15, 1974--January 14, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, C.D.; Kulkarni, S.; Louis, E.

    1976-05-01

    Results of a program to study process routes leading to a low cost large area integrated silicon solar array manufacture for terrestrial applications are reported. Potential processes for the production of solar-grade silicon are evaluated from thermodynamic, economic, and technical feasibility points of view. Upgrading of the present arc-furnace process is found most favorable. Experimental studies of the Si/SiF/sub 4/ transport and purification process show considerable impurity removal and reasonable transport rates. Silicon deformation experiments indicate production of silicon sheet by rolling at 1350/sup 0/C is feasible. Significant recrystallization by strain-anneal technique has been observed. Experimental recrystallization studies using an electron beam line source are discussed. A maximum recrystallization velocity of approximately 9 m/hr is calculated for silicon sheet. A comparative process rating technique based on detailed cost analysis is presented.

  7. Normative price for a manufactured product: the SAMICS methodology. Volume II. Analysis. JPL publication 78-98. [Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, R.G.

    1979-01-15

    The Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS) provide standard formats, data, assumptions, and procedures for determining the price a hypothetical solar array manufacturer would have to be able to obtain in the market to realize a specified after-tax rate of return on equity for a specified level of production. This document presents the methodology and its theoretical background. It is contended that the model is sufficiently general to be used in any production-line manufacturing environment. Implementation of this methodology by the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation computer program (SAMIS III, Release 1) is discussed.

  8. Low-Cost Solar-Array Project. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of the LSA Silicon Material Task is to establish a chemical process for producing silicon at a rate and price commensurate with the production goals of the LSA project for solar-cell modules. As part of the overall Silicon Material Task, Union Carbide developed the silane-silicon process and advanced the technology to the point where it has a definite potential for providing high-purity polysilicon on a commercial scale at a price of $14/kg by 1986 (1980 dollars). This work, completed under Phases I and II of the contract, provided a firm base for the Phase III Program (initiated in April 1979) aimed at establishing the practicality of the process by pursuing the following specific objectives: (1) design, fabricate, install, and operate an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) sized for 100 MT/yr to obtain extensive performance data to establish the data base for the design of commercial facilities; (2) perform support research and development to provide an information base usable for the EPSDU and for technological design and economic analysis for potential scale-up of the process; and (3) perform iterative economic analyses of the estimated product cost for the production of semiconductor-grade silicon in a facility capable of producing 1000 MT/yr. This process for preparing semiconductor-grade silicon in the EPSDU from metallurgical-grade (M-G) silicon is based on a well-integrated arrangement of purification steps that provides a cost-effective process system. The three basic steps entail converting M-G silicon to trichlorosilane, redistributing the trichlorosilane to produce silane, and thermally decomposing the silane to form amorphous silicon powder. The powder is then melted and the molten silicon is cast to polycrystalline for subsequent use in fabricating solar cells. Progress is reported in detail. (WHK)

  9. Study program for encapsulation materials interface for low-cost solar array. Annual report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaelble, D.H.; Mansfeld, F.B.; Kendig, M.; Leung, C.

    1981-02-01

    Emphasis is placed on the development of ac impedance as a nondestructive evaluation methodology for solar arrays and the further development of corrosion models and materials selection criteria for corrosion resistant interfaces.

  10. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  11. Silicon nanowire arrays coupled with cobalt phosphide spheres as low-cost photocathodes for efficient solar hydrogen evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Xiao-Qing; Cerqueira, M.F.; Alpuim, P.; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first example of silicon nanowire array photocathodes coupled with hollow spheres of the emerging earth-abundant cobalt phosphide catalysts. Compared to bare silicon nanowire arrays, the hybrid electrodes exhibit significantly improved photoelectrochemical performance toward the solar-driven H2 evolution reaction. L. F. Liu acknowledges the financial support by the FCT Investigator grant (IF/01595/2014).

  12. Silicon nanowire arrays coupled with cobalt phosphide spheres as low-cost photocathodes for efficient solar hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiao-Qing; Fatima Cerqueira, M; Alpuim, Pedro; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the first example of silicon nanowire array photocathodes coupled with hollow spheres of the emerging earth-abundant cobalt phosphide catalysts. Compared to bare silicon nanowire arrays, the hybrid electrodes exhibit significantly improved photoelectrochemical performance toward the solar-driven H2 evolution reaction.

  13. Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, R.C.

    1980-11-01

    Studies were conducted on several fundamental aspects of electroless nickel/solder metallization for silicon solar cells. A process proposed by Motorola, which precedes the electroless nickel plating with several steps of palladium plating and heat treatment, was compared directly with single step electroless nickel plating. Work has directed toward answering specific questions concerning the effect of silicon surface oxide on nickel plating, effects of thermal stresses on the metallization, sintering of nickel plated on silicon, and effects of exposure to the plating solution on solar cell characteristics. The Motorola process was compared with simple electroless nickel plating in a series of parallel experiments. Results are presented. (WHK)

  14. Investigation of Proposed Process Sequence for the Array Automated Assembly Task, Phase 2. [low cost silicon solar array fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Bunyan, S.; Pepe, A.

    1979-01-01

    The technological readiness of the proposed process sequence was reviewed. Process steps evaluated include: (1) plasma etching to establish a standard surface; (2) forming junctions by diffusion from an N-type polymeric spray-on source; (3) forming a p+ back contact by firing a screen printed aluminum paste; (4) forming screen printed front contacts after cleaning the back aluminum and removing the diffusion oxide; (5) cleaning the junction by a laser scribe operation; (6) forming an antireflection coating by baking a polymeric spray-on film; (7) ultrasonically tin padding the cells; and (8) assembling cell strings into solar circuits using ethylene vinyl acetate as an encapsulant and laminating medium.

  15. Analysis and evaluation in the production process and equipment area of the low-cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of solar cell metallization pattern design on solar cell performance and the costs and performance effects of different metallization processes are discussed. Definitive design rules for the front metallization pattern for large area solar cells are presented. Chemical and physical deposition processes for metallization are described and compared. An economic evaluation of the 6 principal metallization options is presented. Instructions for preparing Format A cost data for solar cell manufacturing processes from UPPC forms for input into the SAMIC computer program are presented.

  16. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  17. Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Progress report 14, August 1979-December 1979 and proceedings of the 14th Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period August through November 1979, is described. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area sheet silicon, and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations, and the steps taken to integrate these efforts are detailed. A report on the Project Integration Meeting held December 5-6, 1979, including copies of the visual materials used, is presented.

  18. Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Progress report 12, January-April 1979 and proceedings of the 12th Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This report describes progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period January through April 1979. It includes reports on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area sheet silicon, and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering and operations, and a discussion of the steps taken to integrate these efforts. It includes a report on, and copies of viewgraphs presented at the Project Integration Meeting held April 4-5, 1979.

  19. Low cost solar array project production process and equipment task. A Module Experimental Process System Development Unit (MEPSDU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Technical readiness for the production of photovoltaic modules using single crystal silicon dendritic web sheet material is demonstrated by: (1) selection, design and implementation of solar cell and photovoltaic module process sequence in a Module Experimental Process System Development Unit; (2) demonstration runs; (3) passing of acceptance and qualification tests; and (4) achievement of a cost effective module.

  20. Lithography-free sub-100nm nanocone array antireflection layer for low-cost silicon solar cell

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    High density and uniformity sub-100nm surface oxidized silicon nanocone forest structure is created and integrated onto the existing texturization microstructures on photovoltaic device surface by a one-step high throughput plasma enhanced texturization method. We suppressed the broadband optical reflection on chemically textured grade-B silicon solar cells for up to 70.25% through this nanomanufacturing method. The performance of the solar cell is improved with the short circuit current increased by 7.1%, fill factor increased by 7.0%, conversion efficiency increased by 14.66%. Our method demonstrates the potential to improve the photovoltaic device performance with low cost high and throughput nanomanufacturing technology.

  1. Development of a low cost integrated 15 kW A.C. solar tracking sub-array for grid connected PV power system applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G.

    1997-02-01

    Utility Power Group has achieved a significant reduction in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems. The two part technical approach focused on 1) The utilization of a large area factory assembled PV panel, and 2) The integration and packaging of all sub-array power conversion and control functions within a single factory produced enclosure. Eight engineering prototype 15kW ac single axis solar tracking sub-arrays were designed, fabricated, and installed at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's Hedge Substation site in 1996 and are being evaluated for performance and reliability. A number of design enhancements will be implemented in 1997 and demonstrated by the field deployment and operation of over twenty advanced sub-array PV power systems.

  2. Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost solar array project. First annual report, October 1, 1977-October 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1978-11-16

    A process sequence has been proposed and tested for the fabrication of dendritic web silicon into solar modules. This sequence has been analyzed as to yield and cost and these data suggest that the price goals of 1986 are attainable. A number of the processes that make up this sequence have been further developed and studied as to cost reduction. Specifically, it has been shown that a low cost POCl/sub 3/ is a suitable replacement for the semiconductor grade, and that a suitable CVD oxide (either doped or undoped) can be deposited from a silane/air mixture using a Silox reactor. A dip coating method has been developed for depositing an antireflection coating from a metal-organic precursor. Application of photoresist to define contact grids has been made cost effective through use of a dip coating technique. Electroplating of both Ag and Cu has been shown feasible and cost effective for producing the conductive metal grids on the solar cells. Laser scribing has been used to separate the cells from the dendrites without degradation. Ultrasonic welding methods have been shown to be feasible for interconnecting the cells. A study of suitable low cost materials for encapsulation suggest that soda lime glass and phenolic filled board are preferred.

  3. NASA Solar Array Demonstrates Commercial Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Gray

    2006-01-01

    A state-of-the-art solar-panel array demonstration site at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center provides a unique opportunity for studying the latest in high-efficiency solar photovoltaic cells. This five-kilowatt solar-array site (see Figure 1) is a technology-transfer and commercialization success for NASA. Among the solar cells at this site are cells of a type that was developed in Dryden Flight Research Center s Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program for use in NASA s Helios solar-powered airplane. This cell type, now denoted as A-300, has since been transferred to SunPower Corporation of Sunnyvale, California, enabling mass production of the cells for the commercial market. High efficiency separates these advanced cells from typical previously commercially available solar cells: Whereas typical previously commercially available cells are 12 to 15 percent efficient at converting sunlight to electricity, these advanced cells exhibit efficiencies approaching 23 percent. The increase in efficiency is due largely to the routing of electrical connections behind the cells (see Figure 2). This approach to increasing efficiency originated as a solution to the problem of maximizing the degree of utilization of the limited space available atop the wing of the Helios airplane. In retrospect, the solar cells in use at this site could be used on Helios, but the best cells otherwise commercially available could not be so used, because of their lower efficiencies. Historically, solar cells have been fabricated by use of methods that are common in the semiconductor industry. One of these methods includes the use of photolithography to define the rear electrical-contact features - diffusions, contact openings, and fingers. SunPower uses these methods to produce the advanced cells. To reduce fabrication costs, SunPower continues to explore new methods to define the rear electrical-contact features. The equipment at the demonstration site includes

  4. Flexible solar-array mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    One of the key elements of the flexible rolled-up solar array system is a mechanism to deploy, retract, and store the flexible solar-cell arrays. The selection of components, the design of the mechanism assembly, and the tests that were performed are discussed. During 6 months in orbit, all mission objectives were satisfied, and inflight performance has shown good correlation with preflight analyses and tests.

  5. Automated Solar-Array Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffa, A.; Bycer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Large arrays are rapidly assembled from individual solar cells by automated production line developed for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Apparatus positions cells within array, attaches interconnection tabs, applies solder flux, and solders interconnections. Cells are placed in either straight or staggered configurations and may be connected either in series or in parallel. Are attached at rate of one every 5 seconds.

  6. Cassegrainian concentrator solar array exploratory development module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Crabtree, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator solar array concept is under development to reduce the cost of multi-kW spacecraft solar arrays. A primary parabolic reflector directs incoming solar energy to a secondary, centrally mounted inverted hyperbolic reflector and down onto a solar cell mounted on an Mo heat spreader on a 0.25 mm thick Al heat fin. Each unit is 12.7 mm thick, which makes the concentrator assembly roughly as thick as a conventional panel. The output is 100 W/sq and 20 W/kg, considering 20% efficient Si cells at 100 suns. A tertiary light catcher is mounted around the cell to ameliorate optic errors. The primary reflector is electroformed Ni with protective and reflective coatings. The cells have back surface reflectors and a SiO antireflective coating. An optical efficiency of 80% is projected, and GaAs cells are being considered in an attempt to raise cell efficiencies to over 30%.

  7. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  8. Hierarchical construction of self-standing anodized titania nanotube arrays and nanoparticles for efficient and cost-effective front-illuminated dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Kang, Hosung; Yun, Jongju; Lee, Jiyong; Park, Jong Hyeok; Baik, Seunghyun

    2011-06-28

    We report on the influence of hierarchical structures, constructed via layer-by-layer assembly of self-standing titania nanotube arrays and nanoparticles, upon charge recombination and photoelectric performance of front-illuminated dye-sensitized solar cells. Both nanotubes and nanoparticles were produced by anodization rather than additionally employing other methods, providing low cost and great simplicity. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy under AM 1.5 illumination indicates the construction of hybrid morphology has superior recombination characteristics and a longer electron lifetime than nanoparticulate systems. This enhancement with the incorporation of anodized titania nanoparticles with 1D architectures is unprecedented for solar cells. Owing to the better light harvesting efficiency, extended electron lifetime and desirable electron extraction, the short-circuit photocurrent density of solar cell is 18.89 mA cm(-2) with an overall power conversion efficiency of 8.80% and an incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 84.6% providing a very promising candidate for sustainable energy production with a high performance/cost ratio.

  9. The Stardust solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasner, S.; Sharmit, K.; Stella, P. M.; Craig, C.; Mumaw, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Stardust program, part of NASA's Discovery Missions was launched on February 7. 1999. It's seven-year mission is to gather interstellar dust and material from the comet Wild-2 and return the material to earth in January 2006. In order to accomplish this mission, the satellite will orbit the sun a total of three times, traversing distances from a little under 1 AU to 2.7 AU. On April 18 2002 , the Stardust spacecraft reached its furthest distance and broke the record for being the farthest spacecraft from the sun powered by solar energy, The Stardust solar panels were built with standard off the shelf 10 Ohm-cm high efficiency silicon solar cells. These solar cells are relatively inexpensive and have shown excellent characteristics under LILT conditions. In order to accommodate the varying temperature and intensity conditions on the electrical power subsystem, an electronic switch box was designed to reconfigure the string length and number of swings depending on the mission phase. This box allowed the use of an inexpensive direct energy transfer system for the electrical power system architecture. The solar panels and electrical power system have met all requirements. Telemetry data from the solar panels at 2.7 AU are in excellent agreement with flight predictions.

  10. Analysis and evaluation in the production process and equipment area of the low-cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, H.; Wolf, M.

    1979-01-01

    Analyses of slicing processes and junction formation processes are presented. A simple method for evaluation of the relative economic merits of competing process options with respect to the cost of energy produced by the system is described. An energy consumption analysis was developed and applied to determine the energy consumption in the solar module fabrication process sequence, from the mining of the SiO2 to shipping. The analysis shows that, in current technology practice, inordinate energy use in the purification step, and large wastage of the invested energy through losses, particularly poor conversion in slicing, as well as inadequate yields throughout. The cell process energy expenditures already show a downward trend based on increased throughput rates. The large improvement, however, depends on the introduction of a more efficient purification process and of acceptable ribbon growing techniques.

  11. Crossed BiOI flake array solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kewei; Jia, Falong; Zhang, Lizhi [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Zheng, Zhi [Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report a new kind of solar cell based on crossed flake-like BiOI arrays for the first time. The BiOI flake arrays were fabricated on an FTO glass with a TiO{sub 2} block layer at room temperature by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The resulting BiOI flake array solar cell exhibited enhanced photovoltaic performance under solar illumination. This work provides an attractive and new solar cell system and a facile route to fabricate low cost and non-toxic solar cell. (author)

  12. TiO2 nanorod arrays functionalized with In2S3 shell layer by a low-cost route for solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaomin; Gao, Xiangdong; Qiu, Jijun; Zhuge, Fuwei

    2011-07-29

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a TiO(2)-In(2)S(3) core-shell nanorod array structure for application of semiconductor-sensitized solar cells. Hydrothermally synthesized TiO(2) nanorod arrays on FTO glass substrates are functionalized with a uniform In(2)S(3) shell layer by using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. This low-cost technique promotes a uniform deposition of In(2)S(3) nanoshells on the surface of TiO(2) nanorods, thus forming an intact interface between the In(2)S(3) shell and TiO(2) core. Results show that the thickness of In(2)S(3) shell layers as well as the visible light absorption threshold can be effectively controlled by varying the coating cycles during the SILAR process. The best reproducible performance of the sandwich solar cell using the TiO(2)-In(2)S(3) core-shell nanorod arrays as photoelectrodes was obtained after 30 SILAR cycles, exhibiting a short-circuit current (I(sc)) of 2.40 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 0.56 V, a fill factor (ff) of 0.40 and a conversion efficiency (η) of 0.54%, respectively. These results demonstrate a feasible and controllable route towards In(2)S(3) coating on a highly structured substrate and a proof of concept that such TiO(2)-In(2)S(3) core-shell architectures are novel and promising photoelectrodes in nanostructured solar cells.

  13. Cost effective solar Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarathna M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy the most efficient, eco-friendly and abundantly available energy source in the nature. It can be converted into electrical energy in cost effective manner. In recent years, the interest in solar energy has risen due to surging oil prices and environmental concern. In many remote or underdeveloped areas, direct access to an electric grid is impossible and a photovoltaic inverter system would make life much simpler and more convenient. With this in mind, it is aimed to design, build, and test a solar panel inverter. This inverter system could be used as backup power during outages, battery charging, or for typical household applications. The main components of this solar system are solar cell, dc to dc boost converters, and inverter. Sine wave push pull inverter topology is used for inverter. In this topology only two MOSFETs are used and isolation requirement between control circuit and power circuit is also less which helps to decrease the cost of solar inverter.

  14. Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the Low Cost Solar Array Project. Final report, October 1, 1978-October 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R. B.; Davis, J. R.; Ostroski, J. W.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Rohatgi, A.; Seman, E. J.; Stapleton, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The process sequence for the fabrication of dendritic web silicon into solar panels has been modified to include aluminum back surface field formation. Sputtering is the preferred method for depositing the aluminum. Plasma etching has been shown to be a feasible technique for pre-diffusion cleaning of the web. This would replace wet chemical cleaning. Several contacting systems have been studied. The total plated Pd-Ni system (Motorola Process) is not compatible with our process sequence; however, the evaporated TiPd-electroplated Cu system has been shown stable under life testing. Ultrasonic bonding parameters have been determined for various interconnect and contact metals but the yield of the process is not sufficiently high to use for module fabrication at this time. Over 400 solar cells, about 11 cm/sup 2/ in area have been fabricated according to the modified sequence. No sub-process incompatibility was seen. These cells have been used to fabricate four demonstration modules. A cost analysis (SAMICS) of the modified process sequence resulted in a selling price of $0.75/peak watt (1980$ in 1986).

  15. Silicon materials task of the low-cost solar-array project. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Hanes, M.H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

    1982-02-01

    The object of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants, and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study has encompassed topics such as thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base-doping concentration, base-doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction in polycrystalline devices, and long-term effects of impurities and impurity impacts on high-efficiency cells, as well as a preliminary evaluation of some potential low-cost silicon materials. The effects have been studied of various metallic impurities, introduced singly or in combination into Czochralski, float zone, and polycrystalline silicon ingots and into silicon ribbons grown by the dendritic web process. The solar cell data indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is caused primarily by a reduction in base diffusion length. An analytical model based on this observation has been developed and verified experimentally for both n- and p-base material. Studies of polycrystalline ingots containing impurities indicate that solar cell behavior is species sensitive and that a fraction of the impurities are segregated to the grain boundaries. HCl and POCl gettering improve the performance of single-crystal solar cells containing Fe, Cr, and Ti. In contrast Mo-doped material is barely affected. The efficiencies of solar cells fabricated on impurity-doped wafers is lower when the front junction is formed by ion implantation than when conventional diffusion techniques are used. For most impurity-doped solar cells stability is expected for projected times beyond 20 years. Feedstock impurity concentrations below one part per million for elements like V, or 100 parts per million for more benign impurities like Cu or Ni, will be required.

  16. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  17. Low cost Czochralski crystal growing technology. Near implementation of the flat plate photovoltaic cost reduction of the low cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E. G.

    1980-01-01

    Equipment developed for the manufacture of over 100 kg of silicon ingot from one crucible by rechanging from another crucible is described. Attempts were made to eliminate the cost of raising the furnace temperature to 250 C above the melting point of silicon by using an RF coil to melt polycrystalline silicon rod as a means of rechanging the crucible. Microprocessor control of the straight growth process was developed and domonstrated for both 4 inch and 6 inch diameter. Both meltdown and melt stabilization processes were achieved using operator prompting through the microprocessor. The use of the RF work coil in poly rod melting as a heat sink in the accelerated growth process was unsuccessful. The total design concept for fabrication and interfacing of the total cold crucible system was completed.

  18. Very Large Ultra-Lightweight Affordable Smart Solar Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft for NASA, DoD and commercial missions need higher power, higher voltage, and much lower cost solar arrays to enable a variety of very high power missions....

  19. International ultraviolet explorer solar array power degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic electrical performance of each International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) solar array panel is evaluated as a function of several prevailing variables (namely, solar illumination, array temperature and solar cell radiation damage). Based on degradation in the current-voltage characteristics of the array due to solar cell damage accumulated over time by space charged particle radiations, the available IUE solar array power is determined for life goals up to 10 years. Best and worst case calculations are normalized to actual IUE flight data (available solar array power versus observatory position) to accurately predict the future IUE solar array output. It is shown that the IUE solar array can continue to produce more power than is required at most observatory positions for at least 5 more years.

  20. Low Cost Solar Array Project. Feasibility of the silane process for producing semiconductor-grade silicon. Final report, October 1975-March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The commercial production of low-cost semiconductor-grade silicon is an essential requirement of the JPL/DOE (Department of Energy) Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. A 1000-metric-ton-per-year commercial facility using the Union Carbide Silane Process will produce molten silicon for an estimated price of $7.56/kg (1975 dollars, private financing), meeting the DOE goal of less than $10/kg. Conclusions and technology status are reported for both contract phases, which had the following objectives: (1) establish the feasibility of Union Carbide's Silane Process for commercial application, and (2) develop an integrated process design for an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) and a commercial facility, and estimate the corresponding commercial plant economic performance. To assemble the facility design, the following work was performed: (a) collection of Union Carbide's applicable background technology; (b) design, assembly, and operation of a small integrated silane-producing Process Development Unit (PDU); (c) analysis, testing, and comparison of two high-temperature methods for converting pure silane to silicon metal; and (d) determination of chemical reaction equilibria and kinetics, and vapor-liquid equilibria for chlorosilanes.

  1. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  2. Cost-Effective ISS Space-Environment Technology Validation of Advanced Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DSS proposes to systematically mature, mitigate risk for; and perform hardware-based ground validations / demonstrations of a low-cost, high technology payoff,...

  3. Cost-Effective ISS Space-Environment Technology Validation of Advanced Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Effort proposed is for detailed planning, configuration and hardware definition of a low-cost, but high technology payoff, ISS-based flight experiment that will...

  4. Sentinel-3 Solar Array Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combet, Y.; Reutenauer, X.; Mouret, G.; Guerrere, S.; Ergan, A.; Ferrando, E.; Riva, S.; Hodgetts, P.; Levesque, D.; D'Accolti, G.

    2011-10-01

    Sentinel-3 is primarily a mission to support services relating to the marine environment, with capability to serve numerous land-, atmospheric- and cryospheric- based application areas. The mission's main objective is to determine parameters, such as sea-surface topography, sea- and land-surface temperatures, as well as ocean- and land-surface colours with high-end accuracy and reliability. For this mission, Thales Alenia Space has been selected as the spacecraft prime contractor and is also responsible for the solar array. In this frame, TAS leads a European industrial team, comprising Selex Galileo for the photovoltaic assembly and Patria for the panel substrate.

  5. Analysis of Flat-Plate Solar Array and Solar Lantern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. N. V. Aashrith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A very detailed theortical analysis of a solar array has been carried out based on established values of solar radiation data to predict the performance of solar lamp . The analysis is based on established theory about flat-plate collectors. Top heat loss coefficient (Ut, Bottom heat loss coefficient (Ub, Overall heat loss coefficient (Ul, Useful energy (Qu, efficiency (hp of the flat-plate solar array and efficiency (hl of the solar lantern has been calculated.

  6. Space solar array reliability: A study and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Rodiek, Julie A.

    2008-12-01

    Providing reliable power over the anticipated mission life is critical to all satellites; therefore solar arrays are one of the most vital links to satellite mission success. Furthermore, solar arrays are exposed to the harshest environment of virtually any satellite component. In the past 10 years 117 satellite solar array anomalies have been recorded with 12 resulting in total satellite failure. Through an in-depth analysis of satellite anomalies listed in the Airclaim's Ascend SpaceTrak database, it is clear that solar array reliability is a serious, industry-wide issue. Solar array reliability directly affects the cost of future satellites through increased insurance premiums and a lack of confidence by investors. Recommendations for improving reliability through careful ground testing, standardization of testing procedures such as the emerging AIAA standards, and data sharing across the industry will be discussed. The benefits of creating a certified module and array testing facility that would certify in-space reliability will also be briefly examined. Solar array reliability is an issue that must be addressed to both reduce costs and ensure continued viability of the commercial and government assets on orbit.

  7. The revised solar array synthesis computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    The Revised Solar Array Synthesis Computer Program is described. It is a general-purpose program which computes solar array output characteristics while accounting for the effects of temperature, incidence angle, charged-particle irradiation, and other degradation effects on various solar array configurations in either circular or elliptical orbits. Array configurations may consist of up to 75 solar cell panels arranged in any series-parallel combination not exceeding three series-connected panels in a parallel string and no more than 25 parallel strings in an array. Up to 100 separate solar array current-voltage characteristics, corresponding to 100 equal-time increments during the sunlight illuminated portion of an orbit or any 100 user-specified combinations of incidence angle and temperature, can be computed and printed out during one complete computer execution. Individual panel incidence angles may be computed and printed out at the user's option.

  8. Low Cost Phased Array Antenna System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JEM Engineering proved the technical feasibility of the FlexScan array?a very low-cost, highly-efficient, wideband phased array antenna?in Phase I, and stands ready...

  9. Low cost solar array project production process and equipment task: A Module Experimental Process System Development Unit (MEPSDU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Several major modifications were made to the design presented at the PDR. The frame was deleted in favor of a "frameless" design which will provide a substantially improved cell packing factor. Potential shaded cell damage resulting from operation into a short circuit can be eliminated by a change in the cell series/parallel electrical interconnect configuration. The baseline process sequence defined for the MEPSON was refined and equipment design and specification work was completed. SAMICS cost analysis work accelerated, format A's were prepared and computer simulations completed. Design work on the automated cell interconnect station was focused on bond technique selection experiments.

  10. Silicon-on-ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, A. B.; Zook, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F.; Schuldt, S. B.; Chapman, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon to meet the DOE 1986 cost goal of 70 cents/watt was investigated. The silicon on ceramic approach is to coat a low cost ceramic substrate with large grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. Results and accomplishments are summarized.

  11. Low-Concentration-Ratio Solar-Cell Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biss, M. S.; Reed, David A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Paper presents design concept for mass-producible arrays of solar electric batteries and concentrators tailored to individual requirements. Arrays intended primarily for space stations needing about 100 kW of power. However, modular, lightweight, compact, and relatively low-cost design also fulfill requirements of some terrestrial applications. Arrays built with currently available materials. Pultrusions, injectionmolded parts, and composite materials used extensively to keep weight low. For added flexibility in design and construction, silicon and gallium arsenide solar-cell panels interchangeable.

  12. Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (Phase II). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase II. Summary and eleventh quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Hanes, M.H.; McCormick, J.R.

    1978-07-01

    The effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells were investigated. A variety of aspects including thermal treatments, crystal growth rate, base doping concentration (low resistivity), base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary structure, and carbon/oxygen-metal interactions (float zone vs Czochralski growth) were studied. The effects of various metallic impurities were studied, introduced singly or in combination into Czochralski, float zone and polycrystalline silicon ingots and into silicon ribbons grown by the dendritic web process. The totality of the solar cell data (comprising over 4000 cells) indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is primarily due to reduction in base diffusion length. Based on this assumption an analytical model has been developed which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity content. The model has now been verified for p-base material by correlating the projected and measured performance of solar cells made on 19 ingots bearing multiple impurities.

  13. The impact of solar cell technology on planar solar array performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael W.; Kurland, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study into the potential impact of advanced solar cell technologies on the characteristics (weight, cost, area) of typical planar solar arrays designed for low, medium and geosynchronous altitude earth orbits are discussed. The study considered planar solar array substrate designs of lightweight, rigid-panel graphite epoxy and ultra-lightweight Kapton. The study proposed to answer the following questions: Do improved cell characteristics translate into array-level weight, size and cost improvements; What is the relative importance of cell efficiency, weight and cost with respect to array-level performance; How does mission orbital environment affect array-level performance. Comparisons were made at the array level including all mechanisms, hinges, booms, and harnesses. Array designs were sized to provide 5kW of array power (not spacecraft bus power, which is system dependent but can be scaled from given values). The study used important grass roots issues such as use of the GaAs radiation damage coefficients as determined by Anspaugh. Detailed costing was prepared, including cell and cover costs, and manufacturing attrition rates for the various cell types.

  14. Analysis and evalaution in the production process and equipment area of the low-cost solar array project. [including modifying gaseous diffusion and using ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, H.; Wolf, M.

    1979-01-01

    The manufacturing methods for photovoltaic solar energy utilization are assessed. Economic and technical data on the current front junction formation processes of gaseous diffusion and ion implantation are presented. Future proposals, including modifying gaseous diffusion and using ion implantation, to decrease the cost of junction formation are studied. Technology developments in current processes and an economic evaluation of the processes are included.

  15. Development of Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    Certain missions require Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panels to establish a favorable environment for the operation of sensitive scientific instruments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ECSA panel that minimizes panel surface potential below 100mV in LEO and GEO charged particle environments, prevents exposure of solar cell voltage and panel insulating surfaces to the ambient environment, and provides an equipotential, grounded structure surrounding the entire panel. An ECSA panel design was developed that uses a Front Side Aperture-Shield (FSA) that covers all inter-cell areas with a single graphite composite laminate, composite edge clips for connecting the FSA to the panel substrate, and built-in tabs that interconnect the FSA to conductive coated coverglasses using a conductive adhesive. Analysis indicated the ability of the design to meet the ECSA requirements. Qualification coupons and a 0.5m x 0.5m prototype panel were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic performance and electrical grounding before and after exposure to acoustic and thermal cycling environments. The results show the feasibility of achieving electrostatic cleanliness with a small penalty in mass, photovoltaic performance and cost, with a design is structurally robust and compatible with a wide range of current solar panel technologies.

  16. Thin Flexible IMM Solar Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thin, flexible, and highly efficient solar arrays are needed that package compactly for launch and deploy into large, structurally stable high power generators....

  17. Multijunction Ultralight Solar Cells and Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a continuing need within NASA for solar cells and arrays with very high specific power densities (1000-5000 kW/kg) for generating power in a new generation...

  18. Telescoping Solar Array Concept for Achieving High Packaging Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulas, Martin; Pappa, Richard; Warren, Jay; Rose, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight, high-efficiency solar arrays are required for future deep space missions using high-power Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP). Structural performance metrics for state-of-the art 30-50 kW flexible blanket arrays recently demonstrated in ground tests are approximately 40 kW/cu m packaging efficiency, 150 W/kg specific power, 0.1 Hz deployed stiffness, and 0.2 g deployed strength. Much larger arrays with up to a megawatt or more of power and improved packaging and specific power are of interest to mission planners for minimizing launch and life cycle costs of Mars exploration. A new concept referred to as the Compact Telescoping Array (CTA) with 60 kW/cu m packaging efficiency at 1 MW of power is described herein. Performance metrics as a function of array size and corresponding power level are derived analytically and validated by finite element analysis. Feasible CTA packaging and deployment approaches are also described. The CTA was developed, in part, to serve as a NASA reference solar array concept against which other proposed designs of 50-1000 kW arrays for future high-power SEP missions could be compared.

  19. The ADM-AEOLUS Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, S.; Ferrando, E.; Contini, R.; Blok, R.; Heijden, R. vd; Caon, A.; Labruyere, G.; Strobl, G.; Koestler, W.; Zimmermann, W.

    2008-09-01

    ADM Aeolus is an Earth Explorer Core Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). The satellite is provided with a deployable solar array fully equipped with European state of the art Triple Junction (TJ) GaAs solar cells.The structural part and mechanisms of the ADM Aeolus Solar Array (SA) is a derivate of the Dutch Space FRED solar array concept. This FRED type solar array has already been used on Jules Verne (Automated Transfer Vehicle) and Giove-A. Both satellites has been successfully launched and the Solar Arrays are working nominally.The ADM Aeolus spacecraft (S/C) is powered by two deployable wings. Each of them composed by three panels and with a panel size of 1.1×2.2 m2, so that the total area is about 14.5 m2;. European TJ solar cells (27% efficiency class) embodying an integral protection diode were selected to meet the power budget, necessary for the installed payload. The principal one is an Atmospheric LAser Doppler INstrument (ALADIN), a novel system whose development is a strategic goal for ESA.This SA program is a challenging development in terms of solar cell qualification because of the extensive characterisation and qualification campaign performed for the cell and the integral diode components. Especially for protection diode a long duration high temperature test was performed in order to simulate and cover all lifetime stresses.Main drivers for PVA design are the power requirement at the end of life and the requested protection against atomic oxygen erosion.This paper describes : The results achieved during the qualification phase, from bare cell level to the coupon level, The design activity, mainly focused on the prediction of EOL performances, The acceptance phase at panel levels, which has verified the suitability of the design assumption and manufacturing workmanship.

  20. Mass properties survey of solar array technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Robert

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technologies, electrical performance, and mass characteristics of many of the presently available and the more advanced developmental space solar array technologies is presented. Qualitative trends and quantitative mass estimates as total array output power is increased from 1 kW to 5 kW at End of Life (EOL) from a single wing are shown. The array technologies are part of a database supporting an ongoing solar power subsystem model development for top level subsystem and technology analyses. The model is used to estimate the overall electrical and thermal performance of the complete subsystem, and then calculate the mass and volume of the array, batteries, power management, and thermal control elements as an initial sizing. The array types considered here include planar rigid panel designs, flexible and rigid fold-out planar arrays, and two concentrator designs, one with one critical axis and the other with two critical axes. Solar cell technologies of Si, GaAs, and InP were included in the analyses. Comparisons were made at the array level; hinges, booms, harnesses, support structures, power transfer, and launch retention mountings were included. It is important to note that the results presented are approximations, and in some cases revised or modified performance and mass estimates of specific designs.

  1. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods, Study 4 of Task 3 (encapsulation) of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Eighth quarterly progress report, January--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolyer, J.M.

    1978-04-03

    To meet the goals of the LSSA program, solar cell encapsulants must provide protection for 20 years. Consequently, the objective of the present program is to develop methodology for making confident predictions of encapsulant performance at any exposure site in the U.S.A. During the first year of the program, inherent weatherability was studied. Inherent weatherability is controlled by the three weather factors common to all exposure sites: insolation, temperature, and humidity. Emphasis was focused on the transparent encapsulant portion of miniature solar cell arrays by eliminating weathering effects on the substrate and circuitry (which are also parts of the encapsulant system). The most extensive data were for yellowing, which was measured conviently and precisely. Considerable data also were obtained on tensile strength. Changes in these two properties after outdoor exposure were predicted very well from accelerated exposure data. Although more outdoor exposure data will be received, mathematical modeling studies are continuing. This first part of the program can be said to be successfully concluded. In continuation of the inherent weatherability study, the power output of solar cells was monitored under accelerated test conditions and is being followed for outdoor exposures. For this purpose, Universal Test Specimens (UTS's) with nine different substrate/transparent encapsulant combinations were prepared. Again, the objective is to predict outdoor performance from accelerated exposure data with photochemical stresses of about 8 times normal. Continuous accelerated exposure under 8 key combinations of ultraviolet (UV) light intensity, temperature, and humidity was continued for 2 months. Then the same UTS's were exposed to 100% relative humidity at 100/sup 0/C for one month. Degradation effects are discussed and illustrated.

  2. Demonstration of transparent solar array module design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the design, development, fabrication and testing of IR transparent solar array modules. Three modules, consisting of a baseline design using back surface reflector cells, and two modules using gridded back contact, IR transparent cells, were subjected to vacuum thermal balance testing to verify analytical predictions of lower operating emperature and increased efficiency. As a result of this test program, LMSC has verified that a significant degree of IR transparency can be designed into a flexible solar array. Test data correlates with both steady state and transient thermal analysis.

  3. Automated solar-cell-array assembly machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costogue, E. N.; Mueller, R. L.; Person, J. K.; Yasui, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Continuous-feeding machine automatically bonds solar cells to printed-circuit substrate. In completed machine, cells move to test station where electrical characteristics could be checked. If performance of cell is below specifications, that cell is marked and removed. All machine functions are synchronized by electronics located within unit. It may help to lower costs in future solar-cell production.

  4. Analysis and evaluation in the production process and equipment area of the low-cost solar-array project. Quarterly report, July-October, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, M.; Goldman, H.

    1981-01-01

    The attributes of the various metallization processes have been investigated which express themselves in economic results. It has been shown that several metallization process sequences will lead to adequate metallization for large area, high performance solar cells at a metallization add-on price in the range of $6.- to 12.-/m/sup 2/, or 4 to 8 cents/W(peak), assuming 15% efficiency. Conduction layer formation by thick film silver or by tin or tin/lead solder leads to metallization add-on prices significantly above the $6.- to 12.-/m/sup 2/ range. The wet chemical processes of electroless and electrolytic plating for strike/barrier layer and conduction layer formation, respectively, seem to be most cost-effective. Vacuum deposition of the strike/barrier layer can be competitive with electroless plating.

  5. Dip-coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Gutter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The past quarter demonstrated significant progress in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L sub n from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which we believe to be due to an unidentified source of impurities.

  6. Silicon-on ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F. M.; Schuldt, S. B.; Zook, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) 1986 overall price goal of $0.70/watt was investigated. With the silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) approach, a low-cost ceramic substrate is coated with large-grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. This effort was divided into several areas of investigation in order to most efficiently meet the goals of the program. These areas include: (1) dip-coating; (2) continuous coating designated SCIM-coating, and acronym for Silicon Coating by an Inverted Meniscus (SCIM); (3) material characterization; (4) cell fabrication and evaluation; and (5) theoretical analysis. Both coating approaches were successful in producing thin layers of large grain, solar-cell-quality silicon. The dip-coating approach was initially investigated and considerable effort was given to this technique. The SCIM technique was adopted because of its scale-up potential and its capability to produce more conventiently large areas of SOC.

  7. TiO{sub 2} nanorod arrays functionalized with In{sub 2}S{sub 3} shell layer by a low-cost route for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan Xiaoyan; Li Xiaomin; Gao Xiangdong; Qiu Jijun; Zhuge Fuwei, E-mail: ganxiaoyan@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding Xi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-07-29

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a TiO{sub 2}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} core-shell nanorod array structure for application of semiconductor-sensitized solar cells. Hydrothermally synthesized TiO{sub 2} nanorod arrays on FTO glass substrates are functionalized with a uniform In{sub 2}S{sub 3} shell layer by using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. This low-cost technique promotes a uniform deposition of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoshells on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanorods, thus forming an intact interface between the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} shell and TiO{sub 2} core. Results show that the thickness of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} shell layers as well as the visible light absorption threshold can be effectively controlled by varying the coating cycles during the SILAR process. The best reproducible performance of the sandwich solar cell using the TiO{sub 2}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} core-shell nanorod arrays as photoelectrodes was obtained after 30 SILAR cycles, exhibiting a short-circuit current (I{sub sc}) of 2.40 mA cm{sup -2}, an open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.56 V, a fill factor (ff) of 0.40 and a conversion efficiency ({eta}) of 0.54%, respectively. These results demonstrate a feasible and controllable route towards In{sub 2}S{sub 3} coating on a highly structured substrate and a proof of concept that such TiO{sub 2}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} core-shell architectures are novel and promising photoelectrodes in nanostructured solar cells.

  8. Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Long, KIenwyn J.; Curtis, Henry B.; Gardner, Barbara; Davis, Victoria; Messenger, Scott; Walters, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Modeling solar cell performance for a specific radiation environment to obtain the end-of-life photovoltaic array performance has become both increasingly important and, with the rapid advent of new types of cell technology, more difficult. For large constellations of satellites, a few percent difference in the lifetime prediction can have an enormous economic impact. The tool described here automates the assessment of solar array on-orbit end-of-life performance and assists in the development and design of ground test protocols for different solar cell designs. Once established, these protocols can be used to calculate on-orbit end-of-life performance from ground test results. The Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) utilizes the radiation environment from the Environment Work Bench (EWB) model developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center s Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch in conjunction with Maxwell Technologies. It then modifies and combines this information with the displacement damage model proposed by Summers et al. (ref. 1) of the Naval Research Laboratory to determine solar cell performance during the course of a given mission. The resulting predictions can then be compared with flight data. The Environment WorkBench (ref. 2) uses the NASA AE8 (electron) and AP8 (proton) models of the radiation belts to calculate the trapped radiation flux. These fluxes are integrated over the defined spacecraft orbit for the duration of the mission to obtain the total omnidirectional fluence spectra. Components such as the solar cell coverglass, adhesive, and antireflective coatings can slow and attenuate the particle fluence reaching the solar cell. In SAVANT, a continuous slowing down approximation is used to model this effect.

  9. Continuous Czochralski growth: Silicon sheet growth development of the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The primary objective of this contract is to develop equipment and methods for the economic production of single crystal ingot material by the continuous Czochralski (CZ) process. Continuous CZ is defined for the purpose of this work as the growth of at least 100 kilograms of ingot from only one melt container. During the reporting period (October, 1977 - September, 1978), a modified grower was made fully functional and several recharge runs were performed. The largest run lasted 44 hours and over 42 kg of ingot was produced. Little, if any, degradation in efficiency was observed as a result of pulling multiple crystals from one crucible. Solar efficiencies observed were between 9.3 and 10.4% AMO (13.0 and 14.6% AMI) compared to 10.5% (14.7% AMI) for optimum CZ material control samples. Using the SAMICS/IPEG format, economic analysis of continuous CZ suggests that 1986 DoE cost goals can only be met by the growth of large diameter, large mass crystals.

  10. Solar panels offer array of hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The installation of what is believed to be the largest array of solar thermal panels currently in use at a UK NHS hospital has taken place at an ideal time for the facility in question, Harlow's Princess Alexandra Hospital, with the hospital's gas bill alone having risen by 153% over the past nine months thanks to soaring energy prices, and the estates department keen to mitigate the effects in any way possible. Jonathan Baillie reports.

  11. Solar Array Mast Imagery Discussion for ISIW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgo, Gary

    2017-01-01

    SAW Mast inspection background: In 2012, NASA's Flight Safety Office requested the Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) office determine the probability of damage to the Solar Array Wing (SAW) mast based on the exposure over the life time of the ISS program. As part of the risk mitigation of the potential MMOD strikes. ISS Program office along with the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) began developing methods for imaging the structural components of the Mast.

  12. Planetary and Deep Space Requirements for Photovoltaic Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, C. P.; Bennett, R. B.; Stella, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    In the past 25 years, the majority of interplanetary spacecraft have been powered by nuclear sources. However, as the emphasis on smaller, low cost missions gains momentum, more deep space missions now being planned have baselined photovoltaic solar arrays due to the low power requirements (usually significantly less than 100 W) needed for engineering and science payloads. This will present challenges to the solar array builders, inasmuch as planetary requirements usually differ from earth orbital requirements. In addition, these requirements often differ greatly, depending on the specific mission; for example, inner planets vs. outer planets, orbiters vs. flybys, spacecraft vs. landers, and so on. Also, the likelihood of electric propulsion missions will influence the requirements placed on solar array developers. This paper will discuss representative requirements for a range of planetary and deep space science missions now in the planning stages. We have divided the requirements into three categories: Inner planets and the sun; outer planets (greater than 3 AU); and Mars, cometary, and asteroid landers and probes. Requirements for Mercury and Ganymede landers will be covered in the Inner and Outer Planets sections with their respective orbiters. We will also discuss special requirements associated with solar electric propulsion (SEP). New technology developments will be needed to meet the demanding environments presented by these future applications as many of the technologies envisioned have not yet been demonstrated. In addition, new technologies that will be needed reside not only in the photovoltaic solar array, but also in other spacecraft systems that are key to operating the spacecraft reliably with the photovoltaics.

  13. Optical absorption enhancement in silicon nanohole arrays for solar photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Eon; Chen, Gang

    2010-03-10

    We investigate silicon nanohole arrays as light absorbing structures for solar photovoltaics via simulation. To obtain the same ultimate efficiency as a standard 300 microm crystalline silicon wafer, we find that nanohole arrays require twelve times less silicon by mass. Moreover, our calculations show that nanohole arrays have an efficiency superior to nanorod arrays for practical thicknesses. With well-established fabrication techniques, nanohole arrays have great potential for efficient solar photovoltaics.

  14. Computer Modelling and Simulation of Solar PV Array Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Nalin Kumar

    2003-02-01

    The main objective of my PhD research work was to study the behaviour of inter-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The approach involved the construction of mathematical models to investigate different types of research problems related to the energy yield, fault tolerance, efficiency and optimal sizing of inter-connected solar PV array systems. My research work can be divided into four different types of research problems: 1. Modeling of inter-connected solar PV array systems to investigate their electrical behavior, 2. Modeling of different inter-connected solar PV array networks to predict their expected operational lifetimes, 3. Modeling solar radiation estimation and its variability, and 4. Modeling of a coupled system to estimate the size of PV array and battery-bank in the stand-alone inter-connected solar PV system where the solar PV system depends on a system providing solar radiant energy. The successful application of mathematics to the above-m entioned problems entailed three phases: 1. The formulation of the problem in a mathematical form using numerical, optimization, probabilistic and statistical methods / techniques, 2. The translation of mathematical models using C++ to simulate them on a computer, and 3. The interpretation of the results to see how closely they correlated with the real data. Array is the most cost-intensive component of the solar PV system. Since the electrical performances as well as life properties of an array are highly sensitive to field conditions, different characteristics of the arrays, such as energy yield, operational lifetime, collector orientation, and optimal sizing were investigated in order to improve their efficiency, fault-tolerance and reliability. Three solar cell interconnection configurations in the array - series-parallel, total-cross-tied, and bridge-linked, were considered. The electrical characteristics of these configurations were investigated to find out one that is comparatively less susceptible to

  15. Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project (Phase IV). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Nineteenth quarterly report, April 1980-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Hanes, M.H.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Nine 4 ohm-cm p type silicon ingots were grown and evaluated in support of the experimental program this quarter. Of these, three were polycrystalline ingots doped with Cr, Mo, and V, respectively, produced under conditions which successfully eliminated the metal-rich inclusions formed when growth of these heavily-doped specimens was attempted during the last quarter. Evaluation of polycrystalline ingots doped to the mid 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ range with Ti or V showed little evidence for grain boundary segregation. Deep level spectroscopy on both as-grown wafers and solar cells showed little variation in impurity concentration from place to place across the ingot regardless of the presence of grain boundaries or other structural features. Deep level spectroscopy was also used to monitor the electrically active impurity concentrations in ingots to be used for process studies, aging experiments, and high efficiency cells. The basic aspects of a model to describe efficiency behavior in high efficiency cells have been formulated and a computer routine is being implemented for back field type devices to analyze the functional relationships between impurity concentrations and cell performance.

  16. Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project: Phase IV. Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Twenty-first quarterly report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Hanes, M.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

    1981-01-30

    The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Cr is highly mobile in silicon even at temperatures as low as 600/sup 0/C. Contrasting with earlier data for Mo, Ti, and V, Cr concentrations vary from place to place in polycrystalline silicon wafers and the electrically-active Cr concentration in the polysilicon is more than an order of magnitude smaller than would be projected from single crystal impurity data. We hypothesize that Cr diffuses during ingot cooldown after groth, preferentially segregates to grain boundaries and becomes electrically deactivated. Both Al and Au introduce deep levels when grown into silicon crystals. Accelerated aging data from Ni-contaminated silicon imply that no significant impurity-induced cell performance reduction should be expected over a twenty-year device lifetime. Combined electrical bias and thermal stressing of silicon solar cells containing Nb, Fe, Cu, Ti, Cr, and Ag, respectively produces no performance loss after 100 hour exposures up to 225/sup 0/C. Ti and V, but not Mo, can be gettered from polycrystalline silicon by POCl/sub 3/ or HCl at temperatures of 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C.

  17. Design, performance investigation and delivery of a miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator (MCC) solar array concept is being developed with the objective of significantly reducing the recurring cost of multikilowatt solar arrays. The desired cost reduction is obtained as a result of using very small high efficiency solar cells in conjunction with low-cost optics. In the MCC single element concept and panel concept, incident solar radiation is reflected from a primary parabolic reflector to a secondary hyperbolic reflector and finally to a 4-millimetr diameter solar cell. A light catcher cone is used to improve off-axis performance. An element is approximately 13-millimeters thick which permits efficient launch stowage of the concentrator system panels without complex optical component deployments or retractions. The MCC elements are packed in bays within graphite epoxy frames and are electrically connected into appropriate series-parallel circuits. A MCC single element with a 21 sq cm entrance aperture and a 20 percent efficient, 0.25 sq cm gallium arsenide solar cell has the same power output as 30-sq cm of 11-percent efficiency (at 68 C) silicon solar cells. The MCC concept provides the potential for a significant reduction in array cost due to a 99 percent reduction in required cell area and a 30 percent reduction in array area relative to planar array of equivalent power.

  18. Modeling and reconfiguration of solar photovoltaic arrays under non-uniform shadow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dung Duc

    Mass production and use of electricity generated from solar energy has become very common recently because of the environmental threats arising from the production of electricity from fossil fuels and nuclear power. The obvious benefits of solar energy are clean energy production and infinite supply of daylight. The main disadvantage is the high cost. In these photovoltaic systems, semiconductor materials convert the solar light into electrical energy. Current versus voltage characteristics of the solar cells are nonlinear, thus leading to technical control challenges. In the first order approximation, output power of a solar array is proportional to the irradiance of sunlight. However, in many applications, such as solar power plants, building integrated photovoltaic or solar tents, the solar photovoltaic arrays might be illuminated non-uniformly. The cause of non-uniform illumination may be the shadow of clouds, the trees, booms, neighbor's houses, or the shadow of one solar array on the other, etc. This further leads to nonlinearities in characteristics. Because of the nature of the electrical characteristics of solar cells, the maximum power losses are not proportional to the shadow, but magnify nonlinearly [1]. Further, shadows of solar PV array can cause other undesired effects: (1) The power actually generated from the solar PV array is much less than designed. At some systems, the annual losses because of the shadow effects can be reached 10%. Thus, the probability for "loss of load" increases [2]. (2) The local hot spot in the shaded part of the solar PV array can damage the solar cells. The shaded solar cells may be work on the negative voltage region and become a resistive load and absorb power. Bypass diodes are sometimes connected parallel to solar cells to protect them from damage. However, in most cases, just one diode is connected in parallel to group of solar cells [3], and this hidden the potential power output of the array. This proposed research

  19. Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (Phase II). Eighth quarterly report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Blais, P.D.; Davis, J.R.; Hanes, M.H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Rohatgi, A.; McCormick, J.R.

    1977-12-01

    The objective of Phase II of this program is to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants, and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells so that purity requirements for a solar grade silicon can be delineated. The program approach consists in (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap, (2) assessment of these crystals by a battery of chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests, (3) correlation of the impurity kind and level with crystal quality and device performance, (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance, and (5) determination of the combined effects of impurities and growth rate on the crystal quality and cell performance of silicon produced by both the dendritic web and Czochralski methods. The central thrust of activities this quarter was in three areas: the crystal growth of impurity-bearing ingots with different base doping types and concentrations; evaluation of the solar cell performance of n-base and p-base devices; and refinement of techniques for the analysis of solar cells subjected to various contaminants and process variations.

  20. Optimally sizing of solar array and battery in a standalone photovoltaic system in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.X. [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, 46150 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2009-01-15

    Size optimization of solar array and battery in a standalone photovoltaic (SPV) system is investigated. Based on the energy efficiency model, the loss of power supply probability (LPSP) of the SPV system is calculated for different size combinations of solar array and battery. For the desired LPSP at the given load demand, the optimal size combination is obtained at the minimum system cost. One case study is given to show the application of the method in Malaysian weather conditions. (author)

  1. Design, Build, and Testing of TacSat Thin Film Solar Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Zuckermandel, J William; Enger, Scott; Gupta, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    MicroSat Systems, Inc. (MSI) has developed a low cost, lightweight, solar array system using thinfilm photovoltaic (TFPV) material to meet power generation needs for future responsive space missions. The Fold Integrated Thin Film Stiffener (FITS) is the deployment portion of the system. FITS is an integrated, passively deployed solar array structure designed specifically for TFPV, however a variety of photovoltaic (PV) options can be utilized by using the FITS deployment technology. FITS exte...

  2. Promising Results from Three NASA SBIR Solar Array Technology Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskenazi, Mike; White, Steve; Spence, Brian; Douglas, Mark; Glick, Mike; Pavlick, Ariel; Murphy, David; O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A. J.; Piszczor, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Results from three NASA SBIR solar array technology programs are presented. The programs discussed are: 1) Thin Film Photovoltaic UltraFlex Solar Array; 2) Low Cost/Mass Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ESCA); and 3) Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). The purpose of the Thin Film UltraFlex (TFUF) Program is to mature and validate the use of advanced flexible thin film photovoltaics blankets as the electrical subsystem element within an UltraFlex solar array structural system. In this program operational prototype flexible array segments, using United Solar amorphous silicon cells, are being manufactured and tested for the flight qualified UltraFlex structure. In addition, large size (e.g. 10 kW GEO) TFUF wing systems are being designed and analyzed. Thermal cycle and electrical test and analysis results from the TFUF program are presented. The purpose of the second program entitled, Low Cost/Mass Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ESCA) System, is to develop an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array meeting NASA s design requirements and ready this technology for commercialization and use on the NASA MMS and GED missions. The ESCA designs developed use flight proven materials and processes to create a ESCA system that yields low cost, low mass, high reliability, high power density, and is adaptable to any cell type and coverglass thickness. All program objectives, which included developing specifications, creating ESCA concepts, concept analysis and trade studies, producing detailed designs of the most promising ESCA treatments, manufacturing ESCA demonstration panels, and LEO (2,000 cycles) and GEO (1,350 cycles) thermal cycling testing of the down-selected designs were successfully achieved. The purpose of the third program entitled, "High Power Platform for the Stretched Lens Array," is to develop an extremely lightweight, high efficiency, high power, high voltage, and low stowed volume solar array suitable for very high power (multi-kW to MW

  3. Affordable High Performance Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an Electromagnetically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) with enhanced performance, in Watts/kg and Watts/m2, using flight proven, high efficiency solar cells. For...

  4. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Harrison, W. B.; Wolner, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The research program to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon is reported. The initial effort concentrated on the design and construction of the experimental dip-coating facility. The design was completed and its experimental features are discussed. Current status of the program is reported, including progress toward solar cell junction diffusion and miscellaneous ceramic substrate procurement.

  5. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Butter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon was investigated. The sheets were made by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in all areas of the program.

  6. The Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. L.; MacDowall, R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M.; Reiner, M.; Demaio, L.; Weiler, K.; Kasper, J.; Bale, S.; Howard, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Solar Imaging Radio Array will be proposed to NASA as a Medium Explorer (MIDEX) mission by a team of investigators at GSFC, JPL, NRL, MIT, and UC Berkeley. The main science goal of the mission is imaging and tracking of solar radio bursts, particularly those associated with coronal mass ejections, and understanding their evolution and influence on Earth's magnetosphere. Related goals are mapping the 3-dimensional morphology of the interplanetary magnetic field and improving the prediction of geomagnetic storms. A number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astrophysics will also be addressed by SIRA. The mission concept is a free-flying array of about 16 small, inexpensive satellites forming an aperture synthesis interferometer in space. By observing from above the ionosphere, and far from terrestrial radio interference, SIRA will cover frequencies between a few tens of kHz up to 15 MHz. This wide spectral window is essentially unexplored with high angular resolution. Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Low concentration ratio solar array structural configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The design and structural properties of a low concentration ratio solar array are discussed. The assembled module consists of six interconnected containers which are compactly stowed in a volume of 3.24 m(3) for delivery to orbit by the shuttle. The containers deploy in accordian fashion into a rectangular area of 19.4 x 68 meters and can be attached to the user spacecraft along the longitudinal centerline of the end container housing. Five rotary incremental actuators requiring about 8 watts each will execute the 180-degree rotation at each joint. Deployable masts (three per side) are used to extend endcaps from the housing in both directions. Each direction is extended by three masts requiring about 780 watts for about 27 minutes. Concentrator elements are extended by the endcaps and are supported by cable systems that are connected between the housings and endcaps. These power generating elements contain reflector panels which concentrate light onto the solar panels consisting of an aluminum radiator with solar cells positioned within the element base formed by the reflectors. A flat wire harness collects the power output of individual elements for transfer to the module container housing harnesses.

  8. Silicon-on-ceramic solar cell development. Solar cell development for the cell development task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 1, February 15--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P W; Grung, B L; Zook, J D

    1978-07-30

    The objective of this program is to investigate unique cell processing/design approaches to the successful fabrication of high-performance solar cells on silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) material. The work in the cell development area consists of two broad categories of activities: (1) the development of standard cell processing techniques, and (2) the investigation of novel device design approaches. The first area of activity has to do with the development of processing techniques for use with silicon dipped on ''slotted'' ceramic substrates. This embodiment allows us to make contact to the back surface of the silicon, thereby minimizing the front surface contact area. The second activity area is initially concerned with producing a ''stripe'' geometry cell on an unslotted ceramic substrate. The idea here is to expose the base layer for electrical contact on the top surface of the substrate and make up for the lost cell area by using an optical collector. Progress is reported.

  9. Low-cost solar electric power

    CERN Document Server

    Fraas, Lewis M

    2014-01-01

    ?This book describes recent breakthroughs that promise major cost reductions in solar energy production in a clear and highly accessible manner. The author addresses the three key areas that have commonly resulted in criticism of solar energy in the past: cost, availability, and variability. Coverage includes cutting-edge information on recently developed 40? efficient solar cells, which can produce double the power of currently available commercial cells. The discussion also highlights the potentially transformative emergence of opportunities for integration of solar energy storage and natura

  10. Research on battery array based on solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhong

    2017-03-01

    Almost all of the energy of solar power supply system comes from solar energy, which is a kind of pollution-free green energy, using independent photovoltaic system as base station power supply. In this paper, taking the solar power system as the research object, we made MATLAB simulation analysis of the independent solar photovoltaic system battery array. The simulation results showed that the output voltage and the output current of the solar array based on solar power system are affected by the illumination intensity and temperature change. In addition, it also showed that at any temperature and illumination intensity, there will a largest output power.

  11. JPL Energy Consumption Program (ECP) documentation: A computer model simulating heating, cooling and energy loads in buildings. [low cost solar array efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, F. L.; Chai, V. W.; Lascu, D.; Urbenajo, R.; Wong, P.

    1978-01-01

    The engineering manual provides a complete companion documentation about the structure of the main program and subroutines, the preparation of input data, the interpretation of output results, access and use of the program, and the detailed description of all the analytic, logical expressions and flow charts used in computations and program structure. A numerical example is provided and solved completely to show the sequence of computations followed. The program is carefully structured to reduce both user's time and costs without sacrificing accuracy. The user would expect a cost of CPU time of approximately $5.00 per building zone excluding printing costs. The accuracy, on the other hand, measured by deviation of simulated consumption from watt-hour meter readings, was found by many simulation tests not to exceed + or - 10 percent margin.

  12. Slicing of Silicon into Sheet Material. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J. R.; Holden, S. C.; Wolfson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The use of multiblade slurry sawing to produce silicon wafers from ingots was investigated. The commercially available state of the art process was improved by 20% in terms of area of silicon wafers produced from an ingot. The process was improved 34% on an experimental basis. Economic analyses presented show that further improvements are necessary to approach the desired wafer costs, mostly reduction in expendable materials costs. Tests which indicate that such reduction is possible are included, although demonstration of such reduction was not completed. A new, large capacity saw was designed and tested. Performance comparable with current equipment (in terms of number of wafers/cm) was demonstrated.

  13. LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF SOLAR PONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat ÖZTÜRK

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar ponds are the systems which collect solar energy and store it for long periods of time. For effective and efficient use of these systems in the country, concepts relating economy of solar ponds which generated hot water from the sun must be known besides their physical properties. Life cycle cost analysis is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes. In order to quantify the costs, resource consumption, and energy use, material and energy balances are performed in a cradle-to-grave manner on the operations required to transform raw materials into useful products. In this study; life cycle cost analysis of reflecting covered and non covered solar ponds are calculated for a volume of 3.5x3.5x2 cubic meters and presented. Also the energies extractable for these solar ponds in Goller Region climatic conditions are given.

  14. Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Cataloging Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, P.J.; Rodriguez, M.C.; Calaway, M.C.; Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis solar wind array collectors were fractured upon landing hard in Utah in 2004. The fragments were retrieved from the damaged canister, imaged, repackaged and shipped to the Johnson Space Center curatorial facility [1]. As of January 2009, the collection consists of 3460 samples. Of these, 442 are comprised into "multiple" sample groupings, either affixed to adhesive paper (177) or collected in jars (17), culture trays (87), or sets of polystyrene vials (161). A focused characterization task was initiated in May 2008 to document the largest samples in the collection. The task consisted of two goals: to document sapphire based fragments greater than 2 cm in one dimension, and to document silicon based fragments greater than 1 cm in one direction.

  15. Alignment method for solar collector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Jr., Richard B

    2012-10-23

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

  16. A Practical Guide To Solar Array Simulation And PCDU Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Noah; Carroll, Greg; Clegg, Russell

    2011-10-01

    Solar arrays consisting of multiple photovoltaic segments provide power to satellites and charge internal batteries for use during eclipse. Solar arrays have unique I-V characteristics and output power which vary with environmental and operational conditions such as temperature, irradiance, spin, and eclipse. Therefore, specialty power solutions are needed to properly test the satellite on the ground, especially the Power Control and Distribution Unit (PCDU) and the Array Power Regulator (APR.) This paper explores some practical and theoretical considerations that should be taken into account when choosing a commercial, off-the-shelf solar array simulator (SAS) for verification of the satellite PCDU. An SAS is a unique power supply with I-V output characteristics that emulate the solar arrays used to power a satellite. It is important to think about the strengths and the limitations of this emulation capability, how closely the SAS approximates a real solar panel, and how best to design a system using SAS as components.

  17. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) solar array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneiderman, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The SWAS (Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite) solar array system is described. It is an innovative approach to meet the missions requirements. The SWAS satellite provides a three axis stabilized platform to survey a variety of galactic cloud structures. This system includes highly reliable, lightweight launch latch, deployment, and lock mechanisms, and solar array panels that provide the maximum solar cell area. The design of the solar arrays are the result of system trades that included instrument and spacecraft thermal constraints, attitude control system maneuvering rates and pointing accuracies, the power system, and the spacecraft structure.

  18. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesh, R.; Mena, M.; Plichta, M.; Smith, J. M.; Sellani, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred ninety-three silicon sheet samples, approximately 880 square centimeters, were analyzed for twin boundary density, dislocation pit density, and grain boundary length. One hundred fifteen of these samples were manufactured by a heat exchanger method, thirty-eight by edge defined film fed growth, twenty-three by the silicon on ceramics process, and ten by the dendritic web process. Seven solar cells were also step-etched to determine the internal defect distribution on these samples. Procedures were developed or the quantitative characterization of structural defects such as dislocation pits, precipitates, twin & grain boundaries using a QTM 720 quantitative image analyzing system interfaced with a PDP 11/03 mini computer. Characterization of the grain boundary length per unit area for polycrystalline samples was done by using the intercept method on an Olympus HBM Microscope.

  19. Continuous Czochralski Growth. Silicon Sheet Growth Development of the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, F.

    1979-01-01

    During the reporting period, a successful 100 kilogram run was performed. Six ingots of 13 cm diameter were grown, ranging in size from 15.5 kg to 17.7 kg. Melt replenishment methods included both poly rod and lump feed material. Samples from each ingot were prepared for solar cell fabrication and analyses, impurity analysis, and structural studies. The furnace was converted to the 14-inch hot zone and preliminary heat runs were performed. Two sucessful runs were demonstrated, by growing 25 kg ingots from 30 kg melts. Also, a 100 kg run was attempted, utilizing the 14 inch crucible hot zone, but was prematurely terminated due to excessive monoxide which accumulated on the viewports and a seed failure.

  20. Analysis and evaluation in the production process and equipment area of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report, January-April 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, H.; Wolf, M.

    1979-06-01

    Significant economic and technical data on the current front junction formation processes of Spectrolab's gaseous diffusion, and of involving the Varian-Extrion 200 to 1000 implanter were tabulated, and were used to judge the feasibility of diffusion proposals by Motorola and RCA and ion implantation proposals by Lockheed, Motorola, RCA, and Spire to meet future LSA-JPL guidelines. Cost calculations, consistent with the SAMICS methodology, were performed for the junction formation processes studied.

  1. Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

  2. Maximum power point tracking of partially shaded solar photovoltaic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhajit; Saha, Hiranmay [IC Design and Fabrication Centre, Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University (India)

    2010-09-15

    The paper presents the simulation and hardware implementation of maximum power point (MPP) tracking of a partially shaded solar photovoltaic (PV) array using a variant of Particle Swarm Optimization known as Adaptive Perceptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APPSO). Under partially shaded conditions, the photovoltaic (PV) array characteristics get more complex with multiple maxima in the power-voltage characteristic. The paper presents an algorithmic technique to accurately track the maximum power point (MPP) of a PV array using an APPSO. The APPSO algorithm has also been validated in the current work. The proposed technique uses only one pair of sensors to control multiple PV arrays. This result in lower cost and higher accuracy of 97.7% compared to earlier obtained accuracy of 96.41% using Particle Swarm Optimization. The proposed tracking technique has been mapped onto a MSP430FG4618 microcontroller for tracking and control purposes. The whole system based on the proposed has been realized on a standard two stage power electronic system configuration. (author)

  3. Distributed Wind Cost Reduction: Learning from Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-02-23

    The distributed wind energy industry can learn several lessons from the solar industry regarding reducing soft costs. Suzanne Tegen presented this overview at the 2016 Distributed Wind Energy Association Business Conference in Washington, D.C., on February 23, 2016.

  4. Organic solar array with transparent contacts by spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jason; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2010-03-01

    Organic solar cells (OSC) based on pi-conjugated polymers (e.g., poly-3-hexylthiophene, P3HT) and fullerene derivatives (e.g.,6,6 -phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, PCBM) have attracted attention over the past decades because they may provide a cost-effective route to wide use of solar energy for electrical power generation.These organic semiconductors have the advantage of being chemically flexible for material modifications, as well as mechanically flexible for the prospective of low-cost, large scale processing such as solution-cast on flexible substrates. However, one of the major challenges preventing the realization of complete solution-processable manufacturing of OSC is the metal cathode depostion invoving high vacuum. Althrough there have been several reports about apraying a thick layer of PEDOT:PSS as a replacement, the sacrifice of transparency will be problematic in certain appliactions such as window technology. Furthermore, fabrication of organic solar array (OSA) using spray method is still in its early stage. We have developed a novel procedure to fabricate transparent-contacts OSA using layer-by-layer spray technique, with a balance between conductivity and transparency for the spray-on contacts. Spray-on OSA performance will be compared side by side with OSA fabricated by conventional spin-coating and metal desposition procedure.

  5. Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver. [Improving Electrical Power and Communication Capabilities in Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) project will leverage several existing and on-going efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the design, development, fabrication, and test of a launch stowed, orbit deployed structure on which thin-film photovoltaics for power generation and antenna elements for communication, are embedded. Photovoltaics is a method for converting solar energy into electricity using semiconductor materials. The system will provide higher power generation with a lower mass, smaller stowage volume, and lower cost than the state of the art solar arrays, while simultaneously enabling deployable antenna concepts.

  6. Alphabus Solar Array- Versatile and Powerful Solar Arrays for Tomorrow's Commercial Telecom Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, T.; Oxynos, C.; Greff, P.; Gerlach, L.

    2008-09-01

    After the successful series of Eurostar 3000 and Spacebus 4000 satellites and due to the demand of satellite operators for even larger and more powerful satellites, ESA decided to co-fund the development of a new satellite platform which covers the market segment beyond the upper limits of both satellite families.The new satellite bus family Alphabus is developed in the frame of ARTES 8 project by a joint project team of ASTRIUM and TAS, whereas the solar array is developed by ASTRIUM GmbH.The main approaches in this design phase for the Alphabus solar array were to find a standardized and scaleable design to production and to use qualification heritage from former projects, especially Eurostar 3000, as far as possible. The main challenges for the solar array design and test philosophy were the usage of lateral deployment and related sequential deployment and the bus voltage of 102,5V and related ESD precautions.This paper provides an overview of the different configurations, their main design features and performance parameters. In addition it summarizes the development and verification approach and shows the actual qualification status.

  7. Simulated Space Environmental Effects on Thin Film Solar Array Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria; Carr, John; SanSoucie, Michael; Boyd, Darren; Phillips, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) experiment consists of thin-film, low mass, low volume solar panels. Given the variety of thin solar cells and cover materials and the lack of environmental protection typically afforded by thick coverglasses, a series of tests were conducted in Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Environmental Effects Facility to evaluate the performance of these materials. Candidate thin polymeric films and nitinol wires used for deployment were also exposed. Simulated space environment exposures were selected based on SSP 30425 rev. B, "Space Station Program Natural Environment Definition for Design" or AIAA Standard S-111A-2014, "Qualification and Quality Requirements for Space Solar Cells." One set of candidate materials were exposed to 5 eV atomic oxygen and concurrent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for low Earth orbit simulation. A second set of materials were exposed to 1 MeV electrons. A third set of samples were exposed to 50, 100, 500, and 700 keV energy protons, and a fourth set were exposed to >2,000 hours of near ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. A final set was rapidly thermal cycled between -55 and +125degC. This test series provides data on enhanced power generation, particularly for small satellites with reduced mass and volume resources. Performance versus mass and cost per Watt is discussed.

  8. SAVANT: Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chock, Ricaurte

    2000-01-01

    The photovoltaics (PV) industry is now being held to strict specifications, such as end-oflife power requirements, that force them to overengineer their products to avoid contractual penalties. Such overengineering has been the only reliable way to meet such specifications. Unfortunately, it also results in a more costly process than is probably necessary. In our conversations with the PV industry, the issue of cost has been raised again and again. Consequently, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Effects branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has been developing a software tool to address this problem. SAVANT, Glenn's tool for solar array verification and analysis is in the technology demonstration phase. Ongoing work has proven that more efficient and less costly PV designs should be possible by using SAVANT to predict the on-orbit life-cycle performance. The ultimate goal of the SAVANT project is to provide a user-friendly computer tool to predict PV on-orbit life-cycle performance. This should greatly simplify the tasks of scaling and designing the PV power component of any given flight or mission. By being able to predict how a particular PV article will perform, designers will be able to balance mission power requirements (both beginning-of-life and end-of-life) with survivability concerns such as power degradation due to radiation and/or contamination. Recent comparisons with actual flight data from the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) mission validate this approach.

  9. Slicing of Silicon into Sheet Material. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Tests on mineral oil slurries show that the potential for workability and low cost is present. However, slurries tested to date which had sufficient lubricity exhibited wafer breakage problems near the end of the run for as-yet unknown reasons. The first test of the large prototype saw under cutting force control was largely successful in that the controller worked perfectly. Unfortunately a technique error (excessive stroke shortening) caused blade breakage and low yield. The latest run of the large saw pointed up the fact that an indication of end-of-stoke vertical motion, or bounce, is necessary. A circuit to provide such indication was fabricated and installed. Preliminary tests show it to be excessively noise sensitive; therefore, work on grounding and shielding to reduce this sensitivity is in progress.

  10. Slicing of Silicon into Sheet Material: Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Testing of low cost low suspension power slurry vehicles is presented. Cutting oils are unlikely to work, but a mineral oil with additives should be workable. Two different abrasives were tested. A cheaper silicon carbide from Norton gave excellent results except for excessive kerf loss: the particles were too big. An abrasive treated for lubricity showed no lubricity improvement in mineral oil vehicle. The bounce fixture was tested for the first time under constant cut rate conditions (rather than constant force). Although the cut was not completed before the blades broke, the blade lifetime of thin (100 micrometer) blades was 120 times the lifetime without the fixture. The large prototype saw completed a successful run, producing 90% cutting yield (849 wafers) at 20 wafers/cm. Although inexperience with large numbers of wafers caused cleaning breakage to reduce this yield to 74%, the yield was high enough that the concept of the large saw is proven workable.

  11. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, Senpo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

  12. Low Cost Solar Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Bostic

    2005-12-16

    This project was directed by NREL to pursue development of an all polymer solar thermal collector. The proposed design utilized a dual sheet thermoform process to coincidentally form the absorber as well as the containment structure to support the glazing. It utilized ventilation to overcome stagnation degradation of the polymer materials.

  13. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon, RTR, process silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtler, R. W.; Baghdadi, A.

    1977-01-01

    A ribbon-to-ribbon process was used for routine growth of samples for analysis and fabrication into solar cells. One lot of solar cells was completely evaluated: ribbon solar cell efficiencies averaged 9.23% with a highest efficiency of 11.7%. Spherical reflectors have demonstrated significant improvements in laser silicon coupling efficiencies. Material analyses were performed including silicon photovoltage and open circuit photovoltage diffusion length measurements, crystal morphology studies, modulus of rupture measurements, and annealing/gettering studies. An initial economic analysis was performed indicating that ribbon-to-ribbon add-on costs of $.10/watt might be expected in the early 1980's.

  14. Beam-Forming Concentrating Solar Thermal Array Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Thomas A. (Inventor); Dimotakis, Paul E. (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to concentrating solar-power systems and, more particularly, beam-forming concentrating solar thermal array power systems. A solar thermal array power system is provided, including a plurality of solar concentrators arranged in pods. Each solar concentrator includes a solar collector, one or more beam-forming elements, and one or more beam-steering elements. The solar collector is dimensioned to collect and divert incoming rays of sunlight. The beam-forming elements intercept the diverted rays of sunlight, and are shaped to concentrate the rays of sunlight into a beam. The steering elements are shaped, dimensioned, positioned, and/or oriented to deflect the beam toward a beam output path. The beams from the concentrators are converted to heat at a receiver, and the heat may be temporarily stored or directly used to generate electricity.

  15. High efficiency micro solar cells integrated with lens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidaner, Onur; Suarez, Ferran A.; Wiemer, Michael; Sabnis, Vijit A.; Asano, Tetsuya; Itou, Akihiro; Inoue, Daijiro; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Arase, Hidekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Nakagawa, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate high efficiency triple junction solar cells with submillimeter dimensions in an all-back-contact architecture. 550 × 550 μm2 cells flash at 41.3% efficiency under the air mass 1.5 direct normal spectrum at 50 W/cm2 at 25 °C. Compared to standard size production cells, the micro cells have reduced performance at 1-sun due to perimeter recombination, but the performance gap closes at higher concentrations. Micro cells integrated with lens arrays were tested on-sun with an efficiency of 34.7%. All-back-contact architecture and submillimeter dimensions are advantageous for module integration and heat dissipation, allowing for high-performance, compact, lightweight, and cost-effective concentrated photovoltaic modules.

  16. Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Based on Vertical ZnO Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flexible dye-sensitized solar cells are fabricated using vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays that are transferred onto ITO-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate substrates using a simple peel-off process. The solar cells demonstrate an energy conversion efficiency of 0.44% with good bending tolerance. This technique paves a new route for building large-scale cost-effective flexible photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Design and Analysis Tools for Deployable Solar Array Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large, lightweight, deployable solar array structures have been identified as a key enabling technology for NASA with analysis and design of these structures being...

  18. Modular Ultra-High Power Solar Array Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) will focus the proposed SBIR program on the development of a new highly-modularized and extremely-scalable solar array that...

  19. Tensioned Rollable Ultra-light Solar array System (TRUSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TRUSS is a structurally efficient solar array concept that utilizes a TRAC rollable boom and tension-stiffened structure to exceed the program requirements for very...

  20. Solar array deployment qualification for the LMX of buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy

    2005-07-01

    The solar array deployment system for the LMX line of buses deploys rigid Solar Array Wing Assemblies (SAWAs). Each SAWA has a set of Solar Array Deployment Mechanisms (SADM), which consists of two hinges, a strut, and two Hold Down Release Mechanisms (HDRMs). To qualify the SADM for flight, each mechanism component was qualified individually, then assembled to a qualification SAWA on Special Test Equipment (STE) and deployed in a thermal vacuum chamber at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures. These mechanisms were designed, built, and tested by the Power and Mechanisms part of the Power, Thermal, Structures & Mechanisms Product Center, which develops products for both internal and external customers. This paper will discuss the qualification effort for the LMX Solar Array deployment, including qualification hardware and STE. It will focus on unique challenges presented by each aspect of the qualification, and lessons learned from the hardware integration and the qualification testing.

  1. Locking Corners Speed Solar-Array Frame Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, S.; Sampson, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Mitered corners of solar-array frames joined together by single angle brace and two springs. Locking corner braces and mating frame members pushed together by hand or assembled automatically. Fastening system used to assemble window screens and picture frames.

  2. Susceptibility of Solar Arrays to Micrometeoroid and Space Debris Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerohn, Martin; Rott, Martin; Gerhard, Andreas; Schafer, Frank; D'Accolti, Gianfelice

    2014-08-01

    The susceptibility of solar arrays to micrometeoroid and space debris impact was studied in a comprehensive study to clarify 1) whether, 2) in which manner and 3) under which conditions GEO telecom satellite solar arrays are affected by hypervelocity impact events. Impact induced discharges have been generated in highly instrumented impact experiments using a two- staged light gas guns and a plasma dynamic accelerator. The discharges were found to be temporary and without consequences for the functioning of the power generating network of state-of-the-art solar arrays designs. Permanently sustained destructive discharges have been generated for current-voltage characteristics that are significantly exceeding current ESD safe levels. The highest risk of impact induced failure of GEO solar arrays is posed by micrometeoroids and space debris hitting transfer harness cable bundles on its rear side.

  3. Deployable Structural Booms for Large Deployable Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a new generation of large, high power deployable solar arrays has been identified as the most significant challenge facing the development of...

  4. High-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobrem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A study conducted on high-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules is discussed. Serious consideration is being given to the use of high-concentration ratio solar array modules or applications such as space stations. These concentrator solar array designs offer the potential of reduced cost, reduced electrical complexity, higher power per unit area, and improved survivability. Arrays of concentrators, such as the miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator modules, present a serious challenge to the structural design because their mass per unit area (5.7 kg/square meters) is higher than that of flexible solar array blankets, and the requirement for accurate orientation towards the Sun (plus or minus 0.5 degree) requires structures with improved accuracy potentials. In addition, use on a space station requires relatively high structural natural frequencies to avoid deleterious interactions with control systems and other large structural components. The objective here is to identify and evaluate conceptual designs of structures suitable for deploying and accurately supporting high-concentration ratio solar array modules.

  5. Efficient Cells Cut the Cost of Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    If you visit Glenn Research Center, you might encounter a photovoltaic (PV) array that looks unlike anything you've ever seen. In fact, what one would normally identify as the panel is actually a series of curved mirrors called solar concentrators, engineered to reflect sunlight rather than absorb it. These concentrators gather, intensify, and focus sun beams upward, aiming at a fixture containing specialized silicon concentrated PV chips the actual solar cells. If you stay by the array for a while, you'll notice that the solar concentrators follow the path of the sun throughout the day, changing position to best capture and utilize the sunlight. The specialized chips that make the technology possible are the brainchild of Bernard Sater, an engineer who had worked at Glenn since the early 1960s before retiring to pursue his unique ideas for harnessing solar power. Sater contributed to multiple PV projects in the latter part of his career at the Center, including research and development on the International Space Station s solar arrays. In his spare time, he enjoyed tinkering with new approaches to solar power, experiments that resulted in the system installed at Glenn today. Sater s basic idea had two components. First, he wanted to create a silicon cell that was smaller, more efficient, and much lower cost than those available at the time. To ensure that the potential of such a chip could be realized, he also planned on pairing it with a system that could concentrate sunlight and focus it directly on the cell. When he retired from Glenn in 1994 to focus on researching and developing the technology full time, Sater found that NASA was interested in the concept and ready to provide funding, facilities, and expertise in order to assist in its development.

  6. Simulation Application for Optimization of Solar Collector Array

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Shesho*,; Done Tashevsk

    2014-01-01

    Solar systems offer a comparatively low output density , so increasing the output always means a corresponding increase in the size of the collector area. Thus collector arrays are occasionally constructed (i.e. with different azimuth angles and/or slopes, which be imposed by the location and structure available to mount the collector. In this paper is developed simulation application for optimization for the solar collector array position and number of collectors in regard of...

  7. Combined photovoltaic/thermal solar array dc electrical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krikorian, J.S. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    An electrical model of a combined photovoltaic/thermal solar array has been developed to predict the steady state behavior of the line currents, power output and array voltage. The effects of temperature on the solar cell characteristics is included in the analysis. The model includes line isolation diodes and ''open cell'' bypass diodes. A numerical procedure based on the Contraction Mapping Fixed Point Theorem is used to solve the associated nonlinear equations. 6 refs.

  8. Dust Accumulation and Cleaning of the MER Spirit Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J. A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Johnson, J. R.; Cantor, B. A.; Stella, P. M.; Chin, K. B.; Wood, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    The solar array of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit was expected to accumulate so much dust after ninety Martian days (sols) that it could no longer provide enough energy to guarantee continued surface operations. Instead, due in part to low dust accumulation rates and numerous dust cleaning events, Spirit carried out surface operations for over 2200 sols (over three Mars years). During this time period, the rover experienced four Martian winters and several dust storms. Because the sources of solar energy loss are known, the solar array energy output offers a tool to quantitatively estimate the loading and aeolian removal of dust from the solar array each sol. We will discuss the accumulation of dust on the solar panels as a proxy for dust movement at Gusev Crater over the course of the entire mission.

  9. Dust Accumulation and Cleaning of the MER Opportunity Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The solar array of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity was expected to accumulate a sufficient quantity of dust after ninety Martian days (sols) such that it could no longer provide enough energy to guarantee continued surface operations. Instead, due in part to low dust accumulation rates and numerous dust cleaning events, Opportunity continues to operate on the Martian surface for over 4000 sols (over six Mars years). During this time period, the rover experienced six Martian winters and several dust storms. Because the sources of solar energy loss are known, the solar array energy output offers a method to scientifically estimate the loading and aeolian removal of dust from the solar array each sol. We will discuss the accumulation of dust on the solar panels as a proxy for dust movement at Meridiani Planum over the course of the entire mission to date.

  10. Current Approach in Surface Plasmons for Thin Film and Wire Array Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmons, which exist along the interface of a metal and a dielectric, have been proposed as an efficient alternative method for light trapping in solar cells during the past ten years. With unique properties such as superior light scattering, optical trapping, guide mode coupling, near field concentration, and hot-electron generation, metallic nanoparticles or nanostructures can be tailored to a certain geometric design to enhance solar cell conversion efficiency and to reduce the material costs. In this article, we review current approaches on different kinds of solar cells, such as crystalline silicon (c-Si and amorphous silicon (a-Si thin film solar cells, organic solar cells, nanowire array solar cells, and single nanowire solar cells.

  11. Current Approach in Surface Plasmons for Thin Film and Wire Array Solar Cell Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Keya; Guo, Zhongyi; Liu, Shutian; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2015-07-22

    Surface plasmons, which exist along the interface of a metal and a dielectric, have been proposed as an efficient alternative method for light trapping in solar cells during the past ten years. With unique properties such as superior light scattering, optical trapping, guide mode coupling, near field concentration, and hot-electron generation, metallic nanoparticles or nanostructures can be tailored to a certain geometric design to enhance solar cell conversion efficiency and to reduce the material costs. In this article, we review current approaches on different kinds of solar cells, such as crystalline silicon (c-Si) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film solar cells, organic solar cells, nanowire array solar cells, and single nanowire solar cells.

  12. Arrays of ultrathin silicon solar microcells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Rockett, Angus A.; Nuzzo, Ralph; Yoon, Jongseung; Baca, Alfred

    2015-08-11

    Provided are solar cells, photovoltaics and related methods for making solar cells, wherein the solar cell is made of ultrathin solar grade or low quality silicon. In an aspect, the invention is a method of making a solar cell by providing a solar cell substrate having a receiving surface and assembling a printable semiconductor element on the receiving surface of the substrate via contact printing. The semiconductor element has a thickness that is less than or equal to 100 .mu.m and, for example, is made from low grade Si.

  13. Arrays of ultrathin silicon solar microcells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A; Rockett, Angus A; Nuzzo, Ralph; Yoon, Jongseung; Baca, Alfred

    2014-03-25

    Provided are solar cells, photovoltaics and related methods for making solar cells, wherein the solar cell is made of ultrathin solar grade or low quality silicon. In an aspect, the invention is a method of making a solar cell by providing a solar cell substrate having a receiving surface and assembling a printable semiconductor element on the receiving surface of the substrate via contact printing. The semiconductor element has a thickness that is less than or equal to 100 .mu.m and, for example, is made from low grade Si.

  14. Low Cost Phased Array Antenna System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A program is proposed to research the applicability of a unique phased array technology, dubbed FlexScan, to S-band and Ku-band communications links between...

  15. Novel Deployment Mechanism for Conventional Solar Array Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgetts Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mechanism is described, by which flexible blankets could be deployed from existing solar panel designs. These blankets could be covered with flexible cells, or they could be reflective films to form a concentrator array. Either way, the performance of an existing array design could be enhanced.

  16. Multifrequency Arrays: Design and Cost Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-08

    Alverson, W. K., Pippin, J. E., Simon, J. W., "A Reciprocal TEM Latching Ferrite Phase Shifter," 1966 IEEE-GMTT International Symposium Digest, p 241...of Reciprocal Latching Ferrite Phase Shifters to Lightweight Electronic Scanner Phased Arrays," Proc. IEEE, vol 56, p 1931-1939, Nov 1968. 14...8 Switched -line phase shifter for a two-frequency ratio ... 9 Dual frequency array concept... 10 Phase error effects on side-lobe level... 16

  17. Costs of solar and wind power variability for reducing CO2 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Colleen; Cohen, Gilbert E; Apt, Jay

    2012-09-04

    We compare the power output from a year of electricity generation data from one solar thermal plant, two solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and twenty Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) wind farms. The analysis shows that solar PV electricity generation is approximately one hundred times more variable at frequencies on the order of 10(-3) Hz than solar thermal electricity generation, and the variability of wind generation lies between that of solar PV and solar thermal. We calculate the cost of variability of the different solar power sources and wind by using the costs of ancillary services and the energy required to compensate for its variability and intermittency, and the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. We show the costs of variability are highly dependent on both technology type and capacity factor. California emissions data were used to calculate the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. Variability cost is greatest for solar PV generation at $8-11 per MWh. The cost of variability for solar thermal generation is $5 per MWh, while that of wind generation in ERCOT was found to be on average $4 per MWh. Variability adds ~$15/tonne CO(2) to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV.

  18. Space Station Freedom solar array panels plasma interaction test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald F.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Power System will make extensive use of photovoltaic (PV) power generation. The phase 1 power system consists of two PV power modules each capable of delivering 37.5 KW of conditioned power to the user. Each PV module consists of two solar arrays. Each solar array is made up of two solar blankets. Each solar blanket contains 82 PV panels. The PV power modules provide a 160 V nominal operating voltage. Previous research has shown that there are electrical interactions between a plasma environment and a photovoltaic power source. The interactions take two forms: parasitic current loss (occurs when the currect produced by the PV panel leaves at a high potential point and travels through the plasma to a lower potential point, effectively shorting that portion of the PV panel); and arcing (occurs when the PV panel electrically discharges into the plasma). The PV solar array panel plasma interaction test was conceived to evaluate the effects of these interactions on the Space Station Freedom type PV panels as well as to conduct further research. The test article consists of two active solar array panels in series. Each panel consists of two hundred 8 cm x 8 cm silicon solar cells. The test requirements dictated specifications in the following areas: plasma environment/plasma sheath; outgassing; thermal requirements; solar simulation; and data collection requirements.

  19. A High-Efficiency Si Nanowire Array/Perovskite Hybrid Solar Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Jiamin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    A low-cost Si nanowire array/perovskite hybrid solar cell is proposed and simulated. The solar cell consists of a Si p-i-n nanowire array filled with CH3NH3PbI3, in which both the nanowires and perovskite absorb the incident light while the nanowires act as the channels for transporting photo-generated electrons and holes. The hybrid structure has a high absorption efficiency in a broad wavelength range of 300~800 nm. A large short-circuit current density of 28.8 mA/cm2 and remarkable convers...

  20. Optimized low-cost-array field designs for photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    As manager of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic Systems Definition Project, Sandia National Laboratories is engaged in a comprehensive program to define and develop array field subsystems which can achieve the lowest possible lifecycle costs. The major activity of this program is described, namely, the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. As part of this activity, design criteria and performance requirements for specific array subsystems including support structures, foundations, intermodule connections, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control have been defined and evaluated. Similarly, fully integrated flat-panel array field designs, optimized for lowest lifecycle costs, have been developed for system sizes ranging from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs for these array field designs are presented and discussed.

  1. Solar Orbiter- Solar Array- Thermal Design for an Extreme Temperature Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jens; Paarmann, Carola; Lindner, Anton; Kreutz, Martin; Oberhuttinger, Carola; Costello, Ian; Icardi, Lidia

    2014-08-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission is an interdisciplinary mission to the sun, carried out by ESA in collaboration with NASA. The spacecraft will approach the sun close to 0.28 AU. At this distance, the solar array has to be operated under high solar array inclination angles to limit the temperatures to a maximum qualification temperature of 200°C for the photo voltaic assembly (PVA). Nevertheless, extreme temperatures appear at specific locations of the solar array which require purpose-built temperature protection measures. A very specific thermal protection is needed to keep the PVA and its supporting structures within the qualified temperature range and simultaneously minimize the thermal flux into the spacecraft.This paper describes the Solar Orbiter solar array design in general and its specific thermal design in particular. It describes the interdisciplinary steps between thermal- and mechanical analysis as well as design engineering necessary to result to the different shielding methods.

  2. A Novel Robot of Manufacturing Space Solar Cell Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuexin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel robot employed to manufacture space solar cell arrays. First of all including the mechanical configuration and control system, the architecture of the robot is described. Then the flow velocity field of adhesive in the dispensing needles is acquired based on hydrodynamics. The accurate section form model of adhesive dispensed on the solar cells is obtained, which is essential for the robot to control the uniformity of dispensing adhesive. Finally the experiment validates the feasibility and reliability of the robot system. The application of robots instead of manual work in manufacturing space solar cell arrays will enhance the development of space industry.

  3. A Novel Robot of Manufacturing Space Solar Cell Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuexin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel robot employed to manufacture space solar cell arrays. First of all including the mechanical configuration and control system, the architecture of the robot is described. Then the flow velocity field of adhesive in the dispensing needles is acquired based on hydrodynamics. The accurate section form model of adhesive dispensed on the solar cells is obtained, which is essential for the robot to control the uniformity of dispensing adhesive. Finally the experiment validates the feasibility and reliability of the robot system. The application of robots instead of manual work in manufacturing space solar cell arrays will enhance the development of space industry.

  4. Integrated Solar-Panel Antenna Array for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baktur, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Integrated Solar-Panel Antenna Array for CubeSats (ISAAC) project is to design and demonstrate an effective and efficien toptically transparent, high-gain, lightweight, conformal X-band antenna array that is integrated with the solar panels of a CubeSat. The targeted demonstration is for a Near Earth Network (NEN)radio at X-band, but the design can be easilyscaled to other network radios for higher frequencies. ISAAC is a less expensive and more flexible design for communication systemscompared to a deployed dish antenna or the existing integrated solar panel antenna design.

  5. Design of a Solar Motor Drive System Fed by a Direct-Connected Photovoltaic Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYDOGMUS, O.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A solar motor pump drive system is modeled and simulated. The proposed drive system does not require any kind of energy storage system and dc-dc converter. The system is connected directly to a photovoltaic (PV array. Thus, a low cost solar system can be achieved. A vector controlled Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM is used as a solar motor to increase the efficiency of system. The motor is designed for a low rated voltage level about 24V. The hill climbing MPPT method is used for balanced the motor power and PV power to obtain a high efficiency. The results are performed by using MATLAB/SimPowerSystem blocks. In addition, the PV array is modeled to allow for the possibility of running as on-line adjustable in simulation environment without using lookup table. The performances of motor, MPPT and drive system are analyzed in different conditions as temperature and irradiation of PV array.

  6. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project(Phase III): effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Thirteenth quarterly report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes and any impurity--process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. Gettering experiments with phosphorus oxychloride gas phase treatments at 950/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/C, and 1150/sup 0/C have been completed for two Ti-doped ingots (3 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and 2.1 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ Ti doping levels, respectively), two molybdenum doped ingots (8 x 10/sup 11/ and 4.2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ Mo) and one iron-doped ingot (3 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ Fe). First generation Co and W-doped ingots were grown and processed to solar cells. Miniature solar cells and diodes were used to map the characteristics of wafers from a 3 inch diameter ingot doped with Mn or Ti. A model has been developed to describe the behavior of solar cells bearing non-uniform distributions of impurities or defects.

  7. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wensheng, E-mail: yws118@gmail.com; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Tao, Zhikuo [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ong, Thiam Min Brian [Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  8. Flat-plate solar array project of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaics Program: Ten years of progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Elmer

    1985-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, a Government-sponsored photovoltaics project, was initiated in January 1975 (previously named the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project) to stimulate the development of PV systems for widespread use. Its goal then was to develop PV modules with 10% efficiency, a 20-year lifetime, and a selling price of $0.50 per peak watt of generating capacity (1975 dollars). It was recognized that cost reduction of PV solar-cell and module manufacturing was the key achievement needed if PV power systems were to be economically competitive for large-scale terrestrial use.

  9. High-performance and low-cost dye-sensitized solar cells based on kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoplate arrays on a flexible carbon cloth cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shan-Long; Tao, Jie; Tao, Hai-Jun; Shen, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Tao; Pan, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) wide application is hindered by poor electrical conductivity, although it is a promising counter electrode (CE) material for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), due to its excellent catalytic activity, hierarchical microstructure, and natural abundance. Inspired by the advantages of flexible carbon cloth, with high conductivity and expanded surface area, we designed and fabricated single-crystal CZTS nanoplate arrays (NPLAr) on flexible carbon cloth as DSSCs cathode directly, demonstrating a power conversion efficiency of 7.53% and a long-operation life performance. The outstanding performance was ascribed from the high catalytic activity, good conductive framework, effective photo-generated electron migration, and high iodide species diffusion rate of the composite CE. Our present results demonstrate that the novel and flexible CZTS/Carbon Cloth composite structure is an alternative and high-efficiency Pt-free counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  10. Mars Array Technology Experiment Developed to Test Solar Arrays on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Solar arrays will be the power supply for future missions to the planet Mars, including landers, rovers, and eventually human missions to explore the Martian surface. Until Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997, no solar array had been used on the surface. The MATE package is intended to measure the solar energy reaching the surface, characterize the Martian environment to gather the baseline information required for designing power systems for long-duration missions, and to quantify the performance and degradation of advanced solar cells on the Martian surface. To measure the properties of sunlight reaching the Martian surface, MATE incorporates two radiometers and a visible/NIR spectrometer. The radiometers consist of multiple thermocouple junctions using thin-film technology. These devices generate a voltage proportional to the solar intensity. One radiometer measures the global broadband solar intensity, including both the direct and scattered sunlight, with a field of view of approximately 130. The second radiometer incorporates a slit to measure the direct (unscattered) intensity radiation. The direct radiometer can only be read once per day, with the Sun passing over the slit. The spectrometer measures the global solar spectrum with two 256-element photodiode arrays, one Si sensitive in the visible range (300 to 1100 nm), and a second InGaAs sensitive to the near infrared (900 to 1700 nm). This range covers 86 percent of the total energy from the Sun, with approximately 5-nm resolution. Each photodiode array has its own fiber-optic feed and grating. Although the purpose of the MATE is to gather data useful in designing solar arrays for Mars surface power systems, the radiometer and spectrometer measurements are expected to also provide important scientific data for characterizing the properties of suspended atmospheric dust. In addition to measuring the solar environment of Mars, MATE will measure the performance of five different individual solar cell types

  11. Silicon-on-ceramic process: silicon sheet growth and device development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 11, January 1-March 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.W.; Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Grung, B.L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1979-04-30

    The purpose of the research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 12 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A dip-coating method for putting silicon on ceramic (SOC) has been shown to produce solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. This method and a continuous coating process also being investigated have excellent scale-up potential which offers an outstanding, cost-effective way to manufacture large-area solar cells. Results and accomplishments are described.

  12. Thermal Cycling of Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) Test Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint US/Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA is currently being used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station (ISS), which will use arrays based on the same solar cells used in the MCSA. The US supplied the photovoltaic power modules (PPMs) and provided technical and programmatic oversight while Russia provided the array support structures and deployment mechanism and built and tested the array. In order to ensure that there would be no problems with the interface between US and Russian hardware, an accelerated thermal life cycle test was performed at NASA Lewis Research Center on two representative samples of the MCSA. Over an eight-month period (August 1994 - March 1995), two 15-cell MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles (+80 C to -100 C), equivalent to four years on-orbit. The test objectives, facility, procedure and results are described in this paper. Post-test inspection and evaluation revealed no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early as an artifact of the test and removed from consideration. The interesting nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell, which only occurred at elevated temperatures, is discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the US solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit).

  13. Solar Array Structures for 300 kW-Class Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard; Rose, Geoff; Mann, Troy O.; Warren, Jerry E.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Kerslake, Tom; Kraft, Tom; Banik, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar arrays for spacecraft provide on the order of 20 kW of electrical power, and they usually consist of 3J solar cells bonded to hinged rigid panels about 1 inch in thickness. This structural construction allows specific mass and packaging volumes of up to approximately 70 W/kg and 15 kW/m3 to be achieved. Significant advances in solar array structures are required for future very-high-power spacecraft (300+ kW), such as those proposed for pre-positioning heavy cargo on or near the Moon, Mars, or asteroids using solar electric propulsion. These applications will require considerable increases in both W/kg and kW/m3, and will undoubtedly require the use of flexible-substrate designs. This presentation summarizes work sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program since Oct. 2011 to address the challenge of developing 300+ kW solar arrays. The work is primarily being done at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, and two contractor teams (ATK and DSS), with technical collaboration from AFRL/Kirtland. The near-tem objective of the project is design, analysis, and testing of 30-50 kW solar array designs that are extensible to the far-term objective of 300+ kW. The work is currently focused on three designs: the MegaFlex concept by ATK, the Mega-ROSA concept by DSS, and an in-house 300-kW Government Reference Array concept. Each of these designs will be described in the presentation. Results obtained to date by the team, as well as future work plans, for the design, analysis, and testing of these large solar array structures will be summarized.

  14. Lightweight, low-cost solar energy collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Costen, Michael K. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A lightweight solar concentrator of the reflecting parabolic or trough type is realized via a thin reflecting film, an inflatable structural housing and tensioned fibers. The reflector element itself is a thin, flexible, specularly-reflecting sheet or film. The film is maintained in the parabolic trough shape by means of a plurality of identical tensioned fibers arranged to be parallel to the longitudinal axis of the parabola. Fiber ends are terminated in two identical spaced anchorplates, each containing a plurality of holes which lie on the desired parabolic contour. In a preferred embodiment, these fibers are arrayed in pairs with one fiber contacting the front side of the reflecting film and the other contacting the back side of the reflecting film. The reflective surface is thereby slidably captured between arrays of fibers which control the shape and position of the reflective film. Gas pressure in the inflatable housing generates fiber tension to achieve a truer parabolic shape.

  15. Thin Flexible IMM Solar Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Inverted Metamorphic (IMM) solar cells have achieved high efficiency at very low mass, but integration of the thin crystalline photovoltaic device into a flexible...

  16. Silicon-on-ceramic coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 8, December 28, 1977--March 28, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.W. Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J D; Maclolek, R B; Koepke, B; Butter, C D; Schult, S B

    1978-04-20

    A research program to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is described. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 12 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A dip-coating method for putting silicon on ceramic (SOC) has been shown to produce solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. This method and a continuous coating process also being investigated have excellent scale-up potential which offers an outstanding cost-effective way to manufacture large-area solar cells. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip-coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material withas-grown surface. Recently, an antireflection (AR) coating has been applied to SOC cells. Conversion efficiencies greater than 9% have been achieved without optimizing series resistance characteristics. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltages and short-circuit current densities of 0.51 V and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  17. Development of an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; Krumweide, Duane; Gaddy, Edward; Katz, Ira

    2000-01-01

    The results of design, analysis, and qualification of an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panel are described. The objective of the ECSA design is to provide an electrostatic environment that does not interfere with sensitive instruments on scientific spacecraft. The ECSA design uses large, ITO-coated coverglasses that cover multiple solar cells, an aperture grid that covers the intercell areas, stress-relieved interconnects for connecting the aperture grid to the coverglasses, and edge clips to provides an electromagnetically shielded enclosure for the solar array active circuitry. Qualification coupons were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic response, conductivity, and survivability to launch acoustic and thermal cycling environments simulating LEO and GEO missions. The benefits of reducing solar panel interaction with the space environment are also discussed.

  18. Active Control of Solar Array Dynamics During Spacecraft Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Brant A.; Woo, Nelson; Kraft, Thomas G.; Blandino, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent NASA mission plans require spacecraft to undergo potentially significant maneuvers (or dynamic loading events) with large solar arrays deployed. Therefore there is an increased need to understand and possibly control the nonlinear dynamics in the spacecraft system during such maneuvers. The development of a nonlinear controller is described. The utility of using a nonlinear controller to reduce forces and motion in a solar array wing during a loading event is demonstrated. The result is dramatic reductions in system forces and motion during a 10 second loading event. A motion curve derived from the simulation with the closed loop controller is used to obtain similar benefits with a simpler motion control approach.

  19. Cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrators: performance boosts by geometric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Jose J H; Bilotti, Emiliano; Chatten, Amanda J

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents an investigation of the geometric effects within a cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Photon concentration of a cylindrical LSC increases linearly with cylinder length up to 2 metres. Raytrace modelling on the shading effects of circles on their neighbours demonstrates effective incident light trapping in a cylindrical LSC array at angles of incidence between 60-70 degrees. Raytrace modelling with real-world lighting conditions shows optical efficiency boosts when the suns angle of incidence is within this angle range. On certain days, 2 separate times of peak optical efficiency can be attained over the course of sunrise-solar noon.

  20. Optoelectronic analysis of multijunction wire array solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Wire arrays have demonstrated promising photovoltaic performance as single junction solar cells and are well suited to defect mitigation in heteroepitaxy. These attributes can combine in tandem wire array solar cells, potentially leading to high efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate initial growths of GaAs on Si_(0.9)Ge_(0.1) structures and investigate III-V on Si_(1-x)Ge_x device design with an analytical model and optoelectronic simulations. We consider Si_(0.1)Ge_(0.9) wires coated with a GaA...

  1. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  2. Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silocon. (Phases I and II. ) Final report, October 9, 1975--July 9, 1978. Silicon Material Task, Low-Cost Solar Array Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Browning, M.F.

    1978-07-09

    The zinc reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles to yield a granular product was studied along with several modifications of the thermal decomposition or hydrogen reduction of silicon tetraiodide. Although all contenders were believed to be capable of meeting the quality requirements of the LSA Project, it was concluded that only the zinc reduction of the chloride could be made economically feasible at a cost below $10/kg silicon (1975 dollars). Accordingly, subsequent effort was limited to evaluating that process. A miniplant, consisting of a 5-cm-diameter fluidized-bed reactor and associated equipment was used to study the deposition parameters, temperature, reactant composition, seed particle size, bed depth, reactant throughput, and methods of reactant introduction. It was confirmed that the permissible range of fluidized-bed temperature was limited at the lower end by zinc condensation (918 C) and at higher temperatures by rapidly decreasing conversion efficiency (by 0.1 percent per degree C from 72 percent (thermodynamic) at 927 for a stoichiometric mixture). Use of a graded bed temperature was shown to increase the conversion efficiency over that obtained in an isothermal bed. Other aspects of the process such as the condensation and fused-salt electrolysis of the ZnCl/sub 2/ by-product for recycle of zinc and chlorine were studied to provide information required for design of a 50 MT/year experimental facility, visualized as the next stage in the development. Projected silicon costs of $7.35 and $8.71 per kg (1975 dollars) for a 1000 MT/year facilitywere obtained, depending upon the number and size of the fluidized-bed reactors and ZnCl/sub 2/ electrolytic cells used. An energy payback time of 5.9 months was calculated for the product silicon.

  3. Science with the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Chen, Bin; White, Stephen M.; Hurford, Gordon J.; McTiernan, James; Hickish, Jack; Yu, Sijie; Nelin, Kjell B.

    2017-08-01

    The Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) is a solar-dedicated radio array that makes images and spectra of the full Sun on a daily basis. Our main science goals are to understand the basic physics of solar activity, such as how the Sun releases stored magnetic energy on timescales of seconds, and how that solar activity, in the form of solar flares and coronal mass ejections, influences the Earth and near-Earth space environment, through disruptions of communication and navigation systems, and effects on satellites and systems on the ground. The array, which is composed out of thirteen 2.1 m dishes and two 27 m dishes (used only for calibration), has a footprint of 1.1 km EW x 1.2 km NS and it is capable of producing, every second, microwave images at two polarizations and 500 science channels spanning the 1-18 GHz frequency range. Such ability to make multi-frequency images of the Sun in this broad range of frequencies, with a frequency dependent resolution ranging from ˜53” at 1 GHz to ˜3”at 18 GHz, is unique in the world. Here we present an overview of the EOVSA instrument and a first set of science-quality active region and solar flare images produced from data taken during April 2017.This research is supported by NSF grant AST-1615807 and NASA grant NNX14AK66G to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  4. Simulation Application for Optimization of Solar Collector Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shesho*,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar systems offer a comparatively low output density , so increasing the output always means a corresponding increase in the size of the collector area. Thus collector arrays are occasionally constructed (i.e. with different azimuth angles and/or slopes, which be imposed by the location and structure available to mount the collector. In this paper is developed simulation application for optimization for the solar collector array position and number of collectors in regard of maximum annual energy gain and thermal efficiency. It is analyzed solar collector array which has parallel and serial connected solar collectors with different tilt, orientation and thermal characteristics. Measurements are performed for determine the thermal performance of the system. Using the programming language INSEL it is developed simulation program for the analyzed system where optimization is done through parametric runs in the simulation program. Accent is given on the SE orientated collectors regarding their tilt and number, comparing two solutions-scenarios and the current system set situation of the in means of efficiency and total annual energy gain. The first scenario envisages a change of angle from 35 to 25 solar panels on the SE orientation, while the second scenario envisages retaining the existing angle of 35 and adding additional solar collector. Scenario 1 accounts for more than 13% energy gain on annual basis while Scenario 2 has 2% bigger thermal efficiency.

  5. Terrestrial solar cell module automated array assembly, task 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A cost effective design and manufacturing process which would produce solar cell modules capable of meeting qualification test criteria was developed. Emphasis was placed on the development of an aluminum paste back contact process.

  6. Solar Cell and Array Technology Development for NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael; McNatt, Jeremiah; Mercer, Carolyn; Kerslake, Tom; Pappa, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced solar cell and solar array technologies to support future exploration activities. These advanced photovoltaic technology development efforts are needed to enable very large (multi-hundred kilowatt) power systems that must be compatible with solar electric propulsion (SEP) missions. The technology being developed must address a wide variety of requirements and cover the necessary advances in solar cell, blanket integration, and large solar array structures that are needed for this class of missions. Th is paper will summarize NASA's plans for high power SEP missions, initi al mission studies and power system requirements, plans for advanced photovoltaic technology development, and the status of specific cell and array technology development and testing that have already been conducted.

  7. Plasma Interaction with International Space Station High Voltage Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, John W.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is presently being assembled in low-earth orbit (LEO) operating high voltage solar arrays (-160 V max, -140 V typical with respect to the ambient atmosphere). At the station's present altitude, there exists substantial ambient plasma that can interact with the solar arrays. The biasing of an object to an electric potential immersed in plasma creates a plasma "sheath" or non-equilibrium plasma around the object to mask out the electric fields. A positively biased object can collect electrons from the plasma sheath and the sheath will draw a current from the surrounding plasma. This parasitic current can enter the solar cells and effectively "short out" the potential across the cells, reducing the power that can be generated by the panels. Predictions of collected current based on previous high voltage experiments (SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment), PASP+ (Photovoltaic Array Space Power) were on the order of amperes of current. However, present measurements of parasitic current are on the order of several milliamperes, and the current collection mainly occurs during an "eclipse exit" event, i.e., when the space station comes out of darkness. This collection also has a time scale, t approx. 1000 s, that is much slower than any known plasma interaction time scales. The reason for the discrepancy between predictions and present electron collection is not understood and is under investigation by the PCU (Plasma Contactor Unit) "Tiger" team. This paper will examine the potential structure within and around the solar arrays, and the possible causes and reasons for the electron collection of the array.

  8. A High-Efficiency Si Nanowire Array/Perovskite Hybrid Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Jiamin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-12-01

    A low-cost Si nanowire array/perovskite hybrid solar cell is proposed and simulated. The solar cell consists of a Si p-i-n nanowire array filled with CH3NH3PbI3, in which both the nanowires and perovskite absorb the incident light while the nanowires act as the channels for transporting photo-generated electrons and holes. The hybrid structure has a high absorption efficiency in a broad wavelength range of 300~800 nm. A large short-circuit current density of 28.8 mA/cm(2) and remarkable conversion efficiency of 13.3% are obtained at a thin absorber thickness of 1.6 μm, which are comparable to the best results of III-V nanowire solar cells.

  9. Mechanical design of a low concentration ratio solar array for a space station application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biss, M. S.; Hsu, L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study and conceptual design of a low concentration ratio solar array for a space station application with approximately a 100 kW power requirement. The baseline design calls for a multiple series of inverted, truncated, pyramidal optical elements with a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of 6. It also calls for low life cycle cost, simple on-orbit maintainability, 1984 technology readiness date, and gallium arsenide (GaAs) of silicon (Si) solar cell interchangeability. Due to the large area needed to produce the amount of power required for the baseline space station, a symmetrical wing design, making maximum use of the commonality of parts approach, was taken. This paper will describe the mechanical and structural design of a mass-producible solar array that is very easy to tailor to the needs of the individual user requirement.

  10. A High-Efficiency Si Nanowire Array/Perovskite Hybrid Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Jiamin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    A low-cost Si nanowire array/perovskite hybrid solar cell is proposed and simulated. The solar cell consists of a Si p-i-n nanowire array filled with CH3NH3PbI3, in which both the nanowires and perovskite absorb the incident light while the nanowires act as the channels for transporting photo-generated electrons and holes. The hybrid structure has a high absorption efficiency in a broad wavelength range of 300 800 nm. A large short-circuit current density of 28.8 mA/cm2 and remarkable conversion efficiency of 13.3% are obtained at a thin absorber thickness of 1.6 μm, which are comparable to the best results of III-V nanowire solar cells.

  11. Hiding Solar-Array Bus Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    End terminals mounted under cells, maximizing usable illuminated area. Reconfigured solar panel bus bars placed under cells, reducing portion of module area not occupied by active silicon. Underside of last cell in string of cells serves as contact for positive bus. Negative tab of last cell in string is wrapped around from top of cell. Tabs are connected to output boards mounted under cells.

  12. A Unique test for Hubble's new Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    In mid-October, a team from the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA will perform a difficult, never-before-done test on one of the Hubble Space Telescope's new solar array panels. Two of these panels, or arrays, will be installed by astronauts in November 2001, when the Space Shuttle Columbia visits Hubble on a routine service mission. The test will ensure that the new arrays are solid and vibration free before they are installed on orbit. The test will be conducted at ESA's European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Because of the array's size, the facility's special features, and ESA's longstanding experience with Hubble's solar arrays, ESTEC is the only place in the world the test can be performed. This test is the latest chapter in a longstanding partnership between ESA and NASA on the Hubble Space Telescope. The Large Space Simulator at ESTEC, ESA's world-class test facility, features a huge vacuum chamber containing a bank of extremely bright lights that simulate the Sun's intensity - including sunrise and sunset. By exposing the solar wing to the light and temperature extremes of Hubble's orbit, engineers can verify how the new set of arrays will act in space. Hubble orbits the Earth once every 90 minutes. During each orbit, the telescope experiences 45 minutes of searing sunlight and 45 minutes of frigid darkness. This test will detect any tiny vibrations, or jitters, caused by these dramatic, repeated changes. Even a small amount of jitter can affect Hubble's sensitive instruments and interfere with observations. Hubble's first set of solar arrays experienced mild jitter and was replaced in 1993 with a much more stable pair. Since that time, advances in solar cell technology have led to the development of even more efficient arrays. In 2001, NASA will take advantage of these improvements, by fitting Hubble with a third-generation set of arrays. Though smaller, this new set generates more power than the previous

  13. Inorganic/organic hybrid solar cells: optimal carrier transport in vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Keisuke; Dutta, Mrinal; Fukata, Naoki

    2014-06-07

    Inorganic/organic hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells that combine vertically-aligned n-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) have great potential for replacing commercial Si solar cells. The chief advantage of such solar cells is that they exhibit higher absorbance for a given thickness than commercial Si solar cells, due to incident light-trapping within the NW arrays, thus enabling lower-cost solar cell production. We report herein on the effects of NW length, annealing and surface electrode on the device performance of SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the obtained SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells can be optimized by tuning the thickness of the surface electrode, and the etching conditions during NW formation and post-annealing. The PCE of 9.3% is obtained by forming efficient transport pathways for photogenerated charge carriers to electrodes. Our approach is a significant contribution to design of high-performance and low-cost inorganic/organic hybrid heterojunction solar cells.

  14. Flight performance of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, L. J.; Powe, J. S.; Smith, Marcie

    1987-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) solar panel power output capability has degraded much more severely than has the power output capability of solar panels that have operated in earth-orbiting spacecraft for comparable periods of time. The incidence of solar proton events recorded by the spacecraft's scientific instruments accounts for this phenomenon only in part. It cannot explain two specific forms of anomalous behavior observed: 1) a variation of output per spin with roll angle, and 2) a gradual degradation of the maximum output. Analysis indicates that the most probable cause of the first anomaly is that the solar cells underneath the spacecraft's magnetometer boom have been damaged by a reverse biasing of the cells that occurs during pulsed shadowing of the cells by the boom as the spacecraft rotates. The second anomaly might be caused by the effects on the solar array of substances from the upper atmosphere of Venus.

  15. Flight performance of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter solar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, L. J.; Powe, J. S.; Smith, Marcie

    1987-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) solar panel power output capability has degraded much more severely than has the power output capability of solar panels that have operated in earth-orbiting spacecraft for comparable periods of time. The incidence of solar proton events recorded by the spacecraft's scientific instruments accounts for this phenomenon only in part. It cannot explain two specific forms of anomalous behavior observed: 1) a variation of output per spin with roll angle, and 2) a gradual degradation of the maximum output. Analysis indicates that the most probable cause of the first anomaly is that the solar cells underneath the spacecraft's magnetometer boom have been damaged by a reverse biasing of the cells that occurs during pulsed shadowing of the cells by the boom as the spacecraft rotates. The second anomaly might be caused by the effects on the solar array of substances from the upper atmosphere of Venus.

  16. Transparent, Conductive Coatings Developed for Arc-Proof Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Transparent, conductive thin-film coatings have many potential applications where a surface must be able to dissipate electrical charges without sacrificing its optical properties. Such applications include automotive and aircraft windows, heat mirrors, optoelectronic devices, gas sensors, and solar cell array surfaces for space applications. Many spacecraft missions require that solar cell array surfaces dissipate charges in order to avoid damage such as electronic upsets, formation of pinholes in the protective coatings on solar array blankets, and contamination due to deposition of sputtered products. In tests at the NASA Lewis Research Center, mixed thin-films of sputter-deposited indium tin oxide (ITO) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2) that could be tailored to the desired sheet resistivity, showed transmittance values of greater than 90 percent. The samples evaluated were composed of mixed, thin-film ITO/MgF2 coatings, with a nominal thickness of 650 angstroms, deposited onto glass substrates. Preliminary results indicated that these coatings were durable to vacuum ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen. These coatings show promise for use on solar array surfaces in polar low-Earth-orbit environments, where a sheet resistivity of less than 10(exp 8)/square is required, and in geosynchronous orbit environments, where a resistivity of less than 10(exp 9)/square is required.

  17. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  18. Thermally-Induced Structural Disturbances of Rigid Panel Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John D.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a significant number of spacecraft has been impacted negatively by attitude disturbances resulting from thermally-induced motions of flexible structures. Recent examples of spacecraft affected by these disturbances include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Thermally-induced structural disturbances occur as the result of rapid changes in thermal loading typically initiated as a satellite exits or enters the Earth's shadow. Temperature differences in flexible appendages give rise to structural deformations, which in turn result in disturbance torques reacting back on the spacecraft. Structures which have proven susceptible to these disturbances include deployable booms and solar arrays. This paper investigates disturbances resulting from thermally-induced deformations of rigid panel solar arrays. An analytical model for the thermal-structural response of the solar array and the corresponding disturbance torque are presented. The effect of these disturbances on the attitude dynamics of a simple spacecraft is then investigated using a coupled system of governing equations which includes the effects of thermally-induced deformations. Numerical results demonstrate the effect of varying solar array geometry on the dynamic response of the system.

  19. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  20. Cleaning of solar cell arrays; Rausgeputzt fuer die Sonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Katrin

    2010-07-01

    The degree of soiling of solar cell arrays depends on the installation site, which may involve, e.g., animal shelter air, bird droppings or desert sand. Heavy rain has a cleaning effect, or else professional cleaning with osmotic water will be necessary. (orig.)

  1. Arrangement of Multirow Solar Collector Array on Limited Roof Width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Shaoxuan; XIA Chaofeng

    2010-01-01

    At the limited roof north-south(N-S)width of a building,for the array with multirow collectors based on no shading at winter solstice noon and sloped at latitude,this paper studied the shading and the radiant energy striking on solar collector array.Based on Kunming solar radiation data,the annual and monthly solar radiant energy striking on multi-array collectors was analyzed and estimated,from no shading to partial shading by adding 1-3 collector row,at the slopes of 10°,15°,20°,25°,30°,35° and 40°,respectively.The results showed that properly increasing the row number by reducing the slope of collectors was reasonable in order to get more annual radiant energy.Adding 1 row at 10° of slope was economical for Kunming,based on the 5-row array at 25°.And adding collector row by 20% at 10° of slope could increase the radiant energy striking on the array by 19%.

  2. On Possible Arc Inception on Low Voltage Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Recent analysis of spacecraft failures during the period of 1990-2013 demonstrated clearly that electrostatic discharges caused more than 8 percent of all registered failures and anomalies, and comprised the most costly losses (25 percent) for operating companies and agencies. The electrostatic discharges on spacecraft surfaces are the results of differential charging above some critical (threshold) voltages. The mechanisms of differential charging are well known, and various methods have been developed to prevent a generation of significant electric fields in areas of triple junctions. For example, low bus voltages in Low Earth Orbit plasma environment and slightly conducting layer over cover-glass (ITO) in Geosynchronous Orbit surroundings are believed to be quite reliable measures to prevent discharges on respective surfaces. In most cases, the vulnerable elements of spacecraft (solar arrays, diode boards, etc.) go through comprehensive ground tests in vacuum chambers. However, tests articles contain the miniscule fragments of spacecraft components such as 10-30 solar cells of many thousands deployed on spacecraft in orbit. This is one reason why manufacturing defects may not be revealed in ground tests but expose themselves in arcing on array surface in space. The other reason for ineffectiveness of discharge preventive measures is aging of all materials in harsh orbital environments. The expected life time of modern spacecraft varies within the range of five-fifteen years, and thermal cycling, radiation damages, and mechanical stresses can result in surface erosion on conductive layers and microscopic cracks in cover-glass sheets and adhesive films. These possible damages may cause significant increases in local electric field strengths and subsequent discharges. The primary discharges may or may not be detrimental to spacecraft operation, but they can produce the necessary conditions for sustained arcs initiation. Multiple measures were developed to prevent

  3. Impact of Solar Array Designs on High Voltage Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Ferguson, Dale; Piszczor, Mike; ONeill, Mark

    2006-01-01

    As power levels of advanced spacecraft climb above 25 kW, higher solar array operating voltages become attractive. Even in today s satellites, operating spacecraft buses at 100 V and above has led to arcing in GEO communications satellites, so the issue of spacecraft charging and solar array arcing remains a design problem. In addition, micrometeoroid impacts on all of these arrays can also lead to arcing if the spacecraft is at an elevated potential. For example, tests on space station hardware disclosed arcing at 75V on anodized A1 structures that were struck with hypervelocity particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) plasmas. Thus an understanding of these effects is necessary to design reliable high voltage solar arrays of the future, especially in light of the Vision for Space Exploration of NASA. In the future, large GEO communication satellites, lunar bases, solar electric propulsion missions, high power communication systems around Mars can lead to power levels well above 100 kW. As noted above, it will be essential to increase operating voltages of the solar arrays well above 80 V to keep the mass of cabling needed to carry the high currents to an acceptable level. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to discuss various solar array approaches, to discuss the results of testing them at high voltages, in the presence of simulated space plasma and under hypervelocity impact. Three different types of arrays will be considered. One will be a planar array using thin film cells, the second will use planar single or multijunction cells and the last will use the Stretched Lens Array (SLA - 8-fold concentration). Each of these has different approaches for protection from the space environment. The thin film cell based arrays have minimal covering due to their inherent radiation tolerance, conventional GaAs and multijunction cells have the traditional cerium-doped microsheet glasses (of appropriate thickness) that are usually attached with Dow Corning DC 93-500 silicone

  4. ATM solar array in-flight performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J. P.; Crabtree, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The physical and electrical characteristics of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) solar array are described and in-flight performance data are analyzed and compared with predicted results. Two solar cell module configurations were used. Type I module consists of 228 2 x 6 cm solar cells with two cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. Type II modules contain 684 2 x 2 cm cells with six cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. A different interconnection scheme was used for each type. Panels using type II modules with mesh interconnect system performed marginally better than those using type I module with loop interconnect system. The average degradation rate for the ATM array was 8.2% for a 271-day mission.

  5. Solar Array at Very High Temperatures: Ground Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Solar array design for any spacecraft is determined by the orbit parameters. For example, operational voltage for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is limited by significant differential charging due to interactions with low temperature plasma. In order to avoid arcing in LEO, solar array is designed to generate electrical power at comparatively low voltages (below 100 volts) or to operate at higher voltages with encapsulation of all suspected discharge locations. In Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) differential charging is caused by energetic electrons that produce differential potential between the coverglass and the conductive spacecraft body in a kilovolt range. In such a case, the weakly conductive layer over coverglass, indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the possible measures to eliminate dangerous discharges on array surface. Temperature variations for solar arrays in both orbits are measured and documented within the range of minus150 degrees Centigrade to plus 1100 degrees Centigrade. This wide interval of operational temperatures is regularly reproduced in ground tests with radiative heating and cooling inside a shroud with flowing liquid nitrogen. The requirements to solar array design and tests turn out to be more complicated when planned trajectory crosses these two orbits and goes closer to the Sun. The conductive layer over coverglass causes a sharp increase in parasitic current collected from LEO plasma, high temperature may cause cracks in encapsulating (Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) material; radiative heating of a coupon in vacuum chamber becomes practically impossible above 1500 degrees Centigrade; conductivities of glass and adhesive go up with temperature that decrease array efficiency; and mechanical stresses grow up to critical magnitudes. A few test arrangements and respective results are presented in current paper. Coupons were tested against arcing in simulated LEO and GEO environments under elevated temperatures up to 2000 degrees

  6. Space satellite power system. [conversion of solar energy by photovoltaic solar cell arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    The concept of a satellite solar power station was studied. It is shown that it offers the potential to meet a significant portion of future energy needs, is pollution free, and is sparing of irreplaceable earth resources. Solar energy is converted by photovoltaic solar cell arrays to dc energy which in turn is converted into microwave energy in a large active phased array. The microwave energy is beamed to earth with little attenuation and is converted back to dc energy on the earth. Economic factors are considered.

  7. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device developmentt for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B

    1980-02-15

    Research on the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is reported. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 11 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Crystal length is limited by the length of the substrate. The thickness of the coating and the size of the crystalline grains are controlled by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is withdrawn from the melt. The solar-cell potential of this SOC sheet silicon is promising. To date, solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material with an as-grown surface. Conversion efficiencies of about 10 percent with antireflection (AR) coating have been achieved. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current densities of 0.55V and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  8. Product pricing in the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry - An executive summary of SAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Capabilities, methodology, and a description of input data to the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS) are presented. SAMICS were developed to provide a standardized procedure and data base for comparing manufacturing processes of Low-cost Solar Array (LSA) subcontractors, guide the setting of research priorities, and assess the progress of LSA toward its hundred-fold cost reduction goal. SAMICS can be used to estimate the manufacturing costs and product prices and determine the impact of inflation, taxes, and interest rates, but it is limited by its ignoring the effects of the market supply and demand and an assumption that all factories operate in a production line mode. The SAMICS methodology defines the industry structure, hypothetical supplier companies, and manufacturing processes and maintains a body of standardized data which is used to compute the final product price. The input data includes the product description, the process characteristics, the equipment cost factors, and production data for the preparation of detailed cost estimates. Activities validating that SAMICS produced realistic price estimates and cost breakdowns are described.

  9. Signal processing for solar array monitoring, fault detection, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Henry; Spanias, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Although the solar energy industry has experienced rapid growth recently, high-level management of photovoltaic (PV) arrays has remained an open problem. As sensing and monitoring technology continues to improve, there is an opportunity to deploy sensors in PV arrays in order to improve their management. In this book, we examine the potential role of sensing and monitoring technology in a PV context, focusing on the areas of fault detection, topology optimization, and performance evaluation/data visualization. First, several types of commonly occurring PV array faults are considered and detection algorithms are described. Next, the potential for dynamic optimization of an array's topology is discussed, with a focus on mitigation of fault conditions and optimization of power output under non-fault conditions. Finally, monitoring system design considerations such as type and accuracy of measurements, sampling rate, and communication protocols are considered. It is our hope that the benefits of monitoring presen...

  10. Advanced Solar Cell and Array Technology for NASA Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael; Benson, Scott; Scheiman, David; Finacannon, Homer; Oleson, Steve; Landis, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by the NASA Glenn Research Center assessed the feasibility of using photovoltaics (PV) to power spacecraft for outer planetary, deep space missions. While the majority of spacecraft have relied on photovoltaics for primary power, the drastic reduction in solar intensity as the spacecraft moves farther from the sun has either limited the power available (severely curtailing scientific operations) or necessitated the use of nuclear systems. A desire by NASA and the scientific community to explore various bodies in the outer solar system and conduct "long-term" operations using using smaller, "lower-cost" spacecraft has renewed interest in exploring the feasibility of using photovoltaics for to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond. With recent advances in solar cell performance and continuing development in lightweight, high power solar array technology, the study determined that photovoltaics is indeed a viable option for many of these missions.

  11. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. [making ion implanted and furnace annealed solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    The large scale production of silicon solar cell array panels is discussed. The cost and performance of three manufacturing sequences designed to convert silicon sheet and wafers into solar panels is analyzed. The production of ion implanted and furnace annealed solar cells made using solar grade n- and p-type wafers is examined. The performance of production size lots is examined with regard to the relationship between the ion implant and furnace anneal parameters and the ability to form consistently good thick film screen printed contacts. The spray on antireflection coating process is evaluated. The performance of several lots of cells before and after coating is measured. The structure and refractive index of the RCA I (TiO2) coating is compared with commercial solutions. Sensitivity of coated, screen printed cells to the post heat treatment required to cure the films is assessed.

  12. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-01-01

    Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

  13. Optoelectronic analysis of multijunction wire array solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Chen, Christopher T.; Emmer, Hal; McMahon, William E.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2013-07-01

    Wire arrays have demonstrated promising photovoltaic performance as single junction solar cells and are well suited to defect mitigation in heteroepitaxy. These attributes can combine in tandem wire array solar cells, potentially leading to high efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate initial growths of GaAs on Si0.9Ge0.1 structures and investigate III-V on Si1-xGex device design with an analytical model and optoelectronic simulations. We consider Si0.1Ge0.9 wires coated with a GaAs0.9P0.1 shell in three different geometries: conformal, hemispherical, and spherical. The analytical model indicates that efficiencies approaching 34% are achievable with high quality materials. Full field electromagnetic simulations serve to elucidate the optical loss mechanisms and demonstrate light guiding into the wire core. Simulated current-voltage curves under solar illumination reveal the impact of a varying GaAs0.9P0.1 minority carrier lifetime. Finally, defective regions at the hetero-interface are shown to have a negligible effect on device performance if highly doped so as to serve as a back surface field. Overall, the growths and the model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed geometries and can be used to guide tandem wire array solar cell designs.

  14. The Solar Radio Imaging Array (SIRA) microsatellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M.

    2003-04-01

    SIRA, the Solar Imaging Radio Array, will be a constellation of about 16 microsats designed to image radio sources in the solar corona and heliosphere using aperture synthesis techniques. These images will permit the mapping and tracking of CME-driven shocks (type II radio bursts) and solar flare electrons (type III radio bursts) as a function of time from near the sun to 1 AU. Two dimensional imaging of the CME-driven shock front is important for determination of space weather effects of CMEs, whereas imaging of the ubiquitous type III bursts will permit the derivation of density maps in the outer corona and solar wind. This will be the first mission to image the heliosphere (and the celestial sphere) with good angular resolution at frequencies below the ionospheric cutoff (~10 MHz). In this presentation, we highlight the ways in which SIRA is complementary to LOFAR and FASR.

  15. States reducing solar's soft costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, Chris

    2012-07-01

    In 2012 the costs of modules will drop below the balance of system costs or 'soft costs' of solar in the US. Federal policy that nationalizes permitting processes could reduce some of the soft costs, but is unlikely. That's why states like California, Colorado, Connecticut and Vermont passed own laws to reduce soft costs by speeding solar permitting and reducing fees. (orig.)

  16. Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanlon, B.

    2012-04-01

    Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is

  17. Low Frequency Solar Imaging Using the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, M.; Oberoi, D.; Lonsdale, C.; Benkevitch, L. V.; Kozarev, K. A.; Morgan, J.; McCauley, P.; Cairns, I.

    2016-12-01

    Low radio frequency solar emissions show well defined and diverse structures in their dynamic spectra (frequency-time plane) during periods of solar activity. In fact, the different dynamic spectrum morphologies of these emissions led to the original classifications for solar radio emission. Though they have served as a work horse through the decades and have provided the basis for much of our current understanding, conventional dynamic spectra show the sum of all solar emissions, and do not contain information on the spatial location of the emission. Simultaneously tracking the often rapid evolution of solar emissions along the four dimensions of frequency, time and the two spatial dimensions has been a difficult challenge for radio interferometers. However, the imaging characteristics and system architecture of modern instruments, like the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), are well suited for solar radio imaging. The MWA provides a spectroscopic imaging capability - the ability to make an independent image for every time and frequency pixel in the dynamic spectrum - with high angular, time and frequency resolutions of a few arcmin, 0.5 s and 40 kHz, respectively. The resulting 4D data cube allows us to extract the dynamic spectra corresponding to any specific resolution element on the solar disc and hence to disentangle the emissions coming from different parts of the Sun. Here we present the first examples of these spatially resolved dynamic spectra from the MWA and an exploration of this novel analysis tool.

  18. Lightweight Innovative Solar Array (LISA): Providing Higher Power to Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John; Fabisinski, Leo; Russell,Tiffany; Smith, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Affordable and convenient access to electrical power is essential for all spacecraft and is a critical design driver for the next generation of smallsats, including cubesats, which are currently extremely power limited. The Lightweight Innovative Solar Array (LISA), a concept designed, prototyped, and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provides an affordable, lightweight, scalable, and easily manufactured approach for power generation in space. This flexible technology has many wide-ranging applications from serving small satellites to providing abundant power to large spacecraft in GEO and beyond. By using very thin, ultra-flexible solar arrays adhered to an inflatable structure, a large area (and thus large amount of power) can be folded and packaged into a relatively small volume. The LISA array comprises a launch-stowed, orbit-deployed structure on which lightweight photovoltaic devices and, potentially, transceiver elements are embedded. The system will provide a 2.5 to 5 fold increase in specific power generation (Watts/kilogram) coupled with a >2x enhancement of stowed volume (Watts/cubic-meter) and a decrease in cost (dollars/Watt) when compared to state-of-the-art solar arrays.

  19. Development of a Solar Array Drive Assembly for CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaretti, Mike; Hayes, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Small satellites and in particular CubeSats, have increasingly become more viable as platforms for payloads typically requiring much larger bus structures. As advances in technology make payloads and instruments for space missions smaller, lighter and more power efficient, a niche market is emerging from the university community to perform rapidly developed, low-cost missions on very small spacecraft - micro, nano, and picosatellites. In just the last few years, imaging, biological and new technology demonstration missions have been either proposed or have flown using variations of the CubeSat structure as a basis. As these missions have become more complex, and the CubeSat standard has increased in both size (number of cubes) and mass, available power has become an issue. Body-mounted solar cells provide a minimal amount of power; deployable arrays improve on that baseline but are still limited. To truly achieve maximum power, deployed tracked arrays are necessary. To this end, Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corporation, along with MMA of Nederland Colorado, has developed a solar array drive assembly (SADA) and deployable solar arrays specifically for CubeSat missions. In this paper, we discuss the development of the SADA.

  20. A Nitinol-Based Solar Array Deployment Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shin John; Lu, Chia-Ao; Feland, John

    1996-01-01

    This document describes a simple, light weight, and scalable mechanism capable of deploying flexible or rigid substrate solar arrays that have been configured in an accordion-like folding scheme. This mechanism is unique in that it incorporates a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator made of Nitinol. This paper documents the design of the mechanism in full detail while offering to designers a foundation of knowledge by which they can develop future applications with SMA's.

  1. Next Generation Solar Array Technologies for Small Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Fosness, E.; Guerrero, J.; Mayberry, C.; Carpenter, B.; Goldstein, D.

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in Shape Memory Alloy (SMA), Elastic Memory Composites (EMC), and ultra- light composites along with thin-film Copper-Indium- Diselinide (CIS) photovoltaics have offered the potential to provide solar array systems for small satellites that are significantly lighter than the current state of the practice. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and Lockheed Martin...

  2. Influence of mass moment of inertia on normal modes of preloaded solar array mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Lin, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Earth-orbiting spacecraft often contain solar arrays or antennas supported by a preloaded mast. Because of weight and cost considerations, the structures supporting the spacecraft appendages are extremely light and flexible; therefore, it is vital to investigate the influence of all physical and structural parameters that may influence the dynamic behavior of the overall structure. The study primarily focuses on the mast for the space station solar arrays, but the formulations and the techniques developed in this study apply to any large and flexible mast in zero gravity. Furthermore, to determine the influence on the circular frequencies, the mass moment of inertia of the mast was incorporated into the governing equation of motion for bending. A finite element technique (MSC/NASTRAN) was used to verify the formulation. Results indicate that when the mast is relatively flexible and long, the mass moment inertia influences the circular frequencies.

  3. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  4. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  5. Study of the interaction between space plasma and high voltage solar array

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, Minoru; TANAKA, KOJI; Sasaki, Susumu; ODAWARA, OSAMU; 岩佐 稔; 田中 孝治; 佐々木 進; 小田原 修

    2006-01-01

    We are studying the problems associated with high voltage power systems in space. Especially we are interested in the potential distribution of the solar array that is resistant to the electrical discharge. We have carried out experiment on the interaction between the space plasma and the high voltage solar array. An array of electrodes distributed on a dielectric material was used to simulate the inter-connectors of the solar array panel in space environment. One of major concerns in the usa...

  6. Structural design and analysis of a solar array substrate for a GEO satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Safak, Omer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the design of solar array substrate for a geostationary satellite. The design of deployable solar array substrate is realized based on the requirements which are provided by BILUZAY (Bilkent University Space Technologies Research Centre). This array is going to empower a telecommunication satellite which will be operating in a geostationary orbit during 15 years. The main work presented in this thesis consists of two principal directions: solar cell array area dimens...

  7. Structural design and analysis of a solar array substrate for a GEO satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Safak, Omer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the design of solar array substrate for a geostationary satellite. The design of deployable solar array substrate is realized based on the requirements which are provided by BILUZAY (Bilkent University Space Technologies Research Centre). This array is going to empower a telecommunication satellite which will be operating in a geostationary orbit during 15 years. The main work presented in this thesis consists of two principal directions: solar cell array area dimens...

  8. Brazilian Decimetre Array (Phase-1): Initial solar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.; Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.; Faria, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Kathiravan, C.; Suryanarayana, G. S.

    An East-West one-dimensional radio interferometer array consisting of 5 parabolic dish antennas has been set-up at Cachoeira Paulista, Brazil (Longitude: 45°0'20″W, Latitude: 22°41'19″S) for observations of Sun and some of the strong sidereal sources by the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Brazil. This is Phase-1 of the proposed Brazilian Decimetre Array (BDA) and can be operated at any frequency in the range 1.2-1.7 GHz. The instrument is functional since November 2004 onwards at 1.6 GHz. The angular and temporal resolution at the above frequency range are ˜3' and 100 ms, respectively. We present here the initial solar observations carried out with this array.

  9. Full process for integrating silicon nanowire arrays into solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perraud, Simon; Poncet, Severine; Noel, Sebastien; Levis, Michel; Faucherand, Pascal; Rouviere, Emmanuelle [CEA, LITEN, Laboratoire des Composants pour la Recuperation d' Energie, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Thony, Philippe; Jaussaud, Claude; Delsol, Regis [CEA, LITEN, Laboratoire des Composants Solaires, INES-RDI, Savoie Technolac, 50 avenue du Lac Leman, 73377 Le-Bourget-du-Lac (France)

    2009-09-15

    A novel process was developed for integrating silicon nanowire arrays into solar cells. n-Type silicon nanowires were grown by chemical-vapour deposition via the gold-catalysed vapour-liquid-solid method, on a p-type silicon substrate. After the growth, the nanowire array was planarized, by embedding the nanowires in a spin-on glass matrix and subsequent chemical-mechanical polishing of the front surface. This planarization step allows to deposit a continuous and uniform conductive film on top of the nanowire array, and thus to form a high-quality front electrical contact. For an illumination intensity of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, our devices exhibit an energy conversion efficiency of 1.9%. The main performance limiting factor is a high pn junction reverse current, due to contamination by the growth catalyst or to a lack of passivation of surface electronic defects. (author)

  10. SKYLAB 1 SOLAR CELL ARRAY INSTALLATION IN VAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    One of Skylab 1's solar cell arrays installed on the orbital space station in High Bay 2 of the Vehicle Assembly Building today. Skylab 2 in High Bay 1 in visible in the background. Each of the two solar cell arrays on the space station that will be deployed in orbit, is designed to provide 10,500 watts of power at 55 degrees centigrade while in the sunlight portion of each orbit. All power needed to operate the station and the Apollo Telescope mount will be taken from the arrays. The remainder of the power generated will be diverted to battery chargers which will keep the batteries at full charge and ready for use while the orbiting spacecraft cluster is in the Earth's shadow. Each array will have almost 1,177 square feet of surface area to turn sunlight into electrical power. Skylab 1 is schedule for launch April 30, 1973 and Skylab 2, carrying the astronauts Conrad, Kerwin and Weitz to dock with the space station and enter it to live and work for 28 days, will be launched a day later.

  11. A Cost- Effective Design of Reversible Programmable Logic Array

    CERN Document Server

    Singla, Pradeep; 10.5120/5619-7911

    2012-01-01

    In the recent era, Reversible computing is a growing field having applications in nanotechnology, optical information processing, quantum networks etc. In this paper, the authors show the design of a cost effective reversible programmable logic array using VHDL. It is simulated on xilinx ISE 8.2i and results are shown. The proposed reversible Programming logic array called RPLA is designed by MUX gate [10] & Feynman gate for 3- inputs, which is able to perform any reversible 3- input logic function or Boolean function. Furthermore the quantized analysis with camparitive finding is shown for the realized RPLA against the existing one. The result shows improvement in the quantum cost and total logical caculation in proposed RPLA.

  12. Bepi Colombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter Solar Array Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takanobu; Kukita, Akio; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Hajime; Maejima, Hironori; Tajima, Michio; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Watabe, Hirokazu; Nozaki, Yukishige; Okamoto, Akira; Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Shimada, Keiji; Nakamura, Kazuyo; Takamoto, Tatsuya

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports the development process of the solar array for the Mercury probe called the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter. Because the spacecraft is going be exposed to intense sunlight up to 11 suns, the temperature of the solar array is expected to reach as high as 230oC. We evaluated the degradation in the electrical output of the solar cells by using high intensity and high temperature (HIHT) tests, and found out that a decrease in the transmittance of the DC93-500 adhesive caused by UV irradiation at high temperature led to decreased current output. By using coverglasses, which effectively cut the UV light, we could successfully minimize the decrease in the electrical output. We subjected coupon panels to a thermal vacuum test. We found an unusually large number of solar cells detaching from the substrate, which would lead to increased temperature, and cracked cells. We assumed that this problem was caused by interconnects whose stress reliefs were buried in adhesive due to a requirement of the scientific instruments. We increased the gap between adjacent cells to allow the stress reliefs to work effectively. We also conducted a proton irradiation test at 180oC to evaluate radiation damage at high temperature. The damage was confirmed to be identical to that at room temperature.

  13. Solar opacity calculations using the super-transition-array method

    CERN Document Server

    Krief, M; Gazit, D

    2016-01-01

    An opacity model based on the Super-Transition-Array (STA) method for the calculation of monochromatic opacities of local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas was developed. The model is described and used to calculate spectral opacities for a solar model implementing the recent AGSS09 composition. Calculations are carried throughout the solar radiative zone. The relative contributions of different chemical elements and photon-matter processes to the total Rosseland mean opacity are analyzed in detail. Monochromatic opacities and charge state distributions were compared with the widely used Opacity-Project (OP) code, for several elements near the radiation-convection interface. STA Rosseland opacities for the solar mixture show a very good agreement with OP and the OPAL opacity code, throughout the radiation zone. Finally, an explicit STA calculation of the full AGSS09 photospheric mixture, including all heavy metals was performed. It was shown that due to their extremely low abundance, and despite being very go...

  14. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the Design of Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Arrays for Central Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Flat Plate Solar Array Project, focuses on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt level central station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat plate central station or other large scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost effective configurations. Design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory reserch activities are investigated. Technical issues are examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect/engineer and laboratory researcher. Topics on optimum source circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements, and array operation and maintenance are discussed.

  15. A Cost Roadmap for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375268456; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628526; Schropp, Ruud; Faaij, A.

    Research and development of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells has seen a marked increase since the recent expiry of core patents describing SHJ technology. SHJ solar cells are expected to offer various cost benefits compared to conventional crystalline silicon solar cells. This paper analyses

  16. A Cost Roadmap for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, A.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628526; Schropp, Ruud; Faaij, A.

    2016-01-01

    Research and development of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells has seen a marked increase since the recent expiry of core patents describing SHJ technology. SHJ solar cells are expected to offer various cost benefits compared to conventional crystalline silicon solar cells. This paper analyses

  17. A Cost Roadmap for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, A.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Schropp, Ruud; Faaij, A.

    2016-01-01

    Research and development of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells has seen a marked increase since the recent expiry of core patents describing SHJ technology. SHJ solar cells are expected to offer various cost benefits compared to conventional crystalline silicon solar cells. This paper analyses

  18. Dip coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 5, December 18, 1976--March 21, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-03-31

    Ceramic substrates can be coated with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon by a dip-coating process. The silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) material appears to be quite promising as a low-cost cell material but requires somewhat special fabrication procedure since the contacts to both the n- and p-layers are now made on the front surface. Solar cells have been made on SOC material and on single-crystal control samples. Photodiodes 0.01 to 0.1 cm/sup 2/ made on substrates coated with vitreous carbon prior to dip coating with silicon showed the best efficiency of SOC material to date, namely over 6 percent uncorrected and about 12 percent inherent efficiency. Etching procedures have indicated that the dislocation density varies from almost 10/sup 7/ cm/sup -2/ to almost dislocation-free material, assuming that all etch pits are due to dislocations. EBIC measurements procedures were also improved, and it was found that diodes appear to be fairly uniform in EBIC response. A new SOC coating facility is being designed which will coat larger substrates in a continuous manner. The purpose is to minimize the contamination problem by reducing the contact area of the substrate with molten silicon. By having much larger throughput, it will also demonstrate the scale-up potential of the silicon-on-ceramic process. Portions of the new facility are under construction. An attempt has been made to model the economics of a large-scale facility for coating ceramic panels with silicon. A first iteration based on available parameters estimates showed that major cost items were poly Si ($2.90 per square meter), labor and burden ($2.50 per square meter), and the ceramic substrate ($2.50 per square meter), for a total price of about $11 per square meter.

  19. Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. First quarterly report, January 9, 1976--March 21, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, S.C.

    1976-03-29

    Slurry sawing is a difficult to control abrasive wear process. In order to achieve the broad program goal of low cost slicing of silicon into solar cell wafers, the process must first be clearly understood and then techniques developed to allow more controllability and higher productivity. The theory of abrasive wear is presented to judge the efficiency of the slurry process relative to other documented forms of abrasive wear. The cutting rate of slurry sawing is related to load, kerf area, work material hardness and reciprocation speed. An explanation for the high efficiency of slurry sawing is offered in terms of binding forces on abrasive particles and the abrasive wear of brittle materials. Results of five cutting tests are given in which kerf length is 3.88 inches and .984 inch, and cutting loads are varied from two ounces to eight ounces per blade. Reduction of cutting rate to the normalized cutting efficiency, anti epsilon, shows the accuracy of the theory. The efficiency ranged from 1.13 to .86. The lower efficiencies occurred at high loads and short kerf length. Thickness measurements show a decrease in wafer accuracy with increasing cutting load and speed. Plans for the next three months of activity are given.

  20. Silicon-on ceramic process: silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report NO. 15, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, A B; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B; Chapman, P W

    1980-07-31

    The objective of this research is to investigate the technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon which could meet the DOE cost goals. The Honeywell approach is to coat one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Results and accomplishments which occurred during the quarter can be summarized as follows: (1) two major problems associated with SCIM-coating wide (10-cm) substrates were identified and solved; (2) the longitudinal temperature profile in SCIM-II has been improved to prevent substrate warping, buckling, and cracking; (3) the transverse temperature profile in SCIM II has been improved to produce more uniform coatings; (4) a strategy to eliminate effects of thermal stress has been developed; (5) the best SOC cell has a total-area conversion efficiency of 10.5% (AM1, AR), for a cell area of 5 cm/sup 2/; (6) a number of experiments are being investigated for improving cell efficiency; (7) for the slow-cooldown experiment, the average efficiency of 29 AR-coated cells was 9.9%, with a standard deviation of 0.3%; (8) encouraging results were obtained on SOC material that had been treated in a hydrogen plasma at Sandia; and (9) thermal modeling has proven to be beneficial in designing modifications of SCIM II.

  1. Dip-coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly report No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-12-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. During the past quarter, significant progress was demonstrated in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite received from Coors were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L/sub n/, from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which is believed to be due to an unidentified source of impurities. Also, operation of the new coating system fell behind schedule but is expected to improve in the coming quarter, since construction has now been completed.

  2. Solar and Heliospheric Science with the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, L. D.; Benkevitch, L.; Cairns, I. H.; Kasper, J. C.; Coster, A. J.; MWA Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    Low radio frequencies (powerful diagnostics of the Sun and heliosphere. Multiple reasons, however, conspire to make wide-band high-fidelity low radio frequency solar imaging challenging, including the dynamic and spectrally complex nature of solar emission, the large fields of view associated with low radio frequencies, and ionospheric distortion of incident radiation. Till recently this has limited the exploitation of low radio frequencies for solar and heliospheric studies. The recent and continuing advances in capacity and affordability of digital signal processing have enabled a new generation of instruments whose capabilities are well matched to the challenge of low radio frequency imaging. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is amongst the first of these instruments and is currently under construction in the radio quiet Western Australian outback. The MWA will observe in the 80-300 MHz band and will comprise 512 elements, each with 16 dual polarization dipoles arranged in a 4x4 grid, distributed in a centrally condensed manner over a 1.5 km diameter with a small number of outliers extending the baselines to 3 km. Its compact footprint and 130,816 physical baselines provide an unprecedented high-fidelity snap-shot imaging capability for every spectral channel, with 0.5-8 s time resolution and 40 kHz frequency resolution. Solar and heliospheric science is amongst the key science objectives of the MWA. In addition to solar imaging, the MWA will exploit propagation effects like interplanetary scintillation and Faraday rotation to study the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. Here we present a brief overview of the MWA solar and heliospheric science capabilities and some early results from a 32 element engineering prototype currently operating on site. The MWA collaboration includes US, Australian and Indian institutions and the US part of the collaboration is funded by the National Science Foundation.

  3. New Low Cost Structure for Dual Axis Mount Solar Tracking System Using Adaptive Solar Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argeseanu, Alin; Ritchie, Ewen; Leban, Krisztina Monika

    2010-01-01

    A solar tracking system is designed to optimize the operation of solar energy receivers. The objective of this paper is proposing a new tracking system structure with two axis. The success strategy of this new project focuses on the economical analysis of solar energy. Therefore it is important...... to determine the most cost effective design, to consider the costs of production and maintenance, and operating. The proposed tracking system uses a new solar sensor position with an adaptive feature....

  4. Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA): a multispacecraft mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Bale, S. D.; Demaio, L.; Gopalswamy, N.; Jones, D. L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Reiner, M. J.; Weiler, K. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA) is a mission to perform aperture synthesis imaging of low frequency solar, magnetospheric, and astrophysical radio bursts. The primary science targets are coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which drive shock waves that may produce radio emission. A space-based interferometer is required, because the frequencies of observation (SIRA will require a 12 to 16 microsatellite constellation to establish a sufficient number of baselines with separations on the order of kilometers. The microsats will be located quasi-randomly on a spherical shell, initially of diameter 10 km or less. The baseline microsat, as presented here, is 3-axis stabilized with a body-mounted, earth-directed high gain antenna and an articulated solar array; this design was developed by the Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). A retrograde orbit at a distance of ~500,000 km from Earth was selected as the preferred orbit because the 8 Mbps downlink requirement is easy to meet, while keeping the constellation sufficiently distant from terrestrial radio interference. Also, the retrograde orbit permits imaging of terrestrial magnetospheric radio sources from varied perspectives. The SIRA mission serves as a pathfinder for space-based satellite constellations and for spacecraft interferometry at shorter wavelengths. It will be proposed to the NASA MIDEX proposal opportunity in mid-2005.

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells with hexagonal silver arrays made with nanosphere lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Guney, D. O.; Pearce, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) provides an opportunity for a low-cost and scalable method to optically engineer solar photovoltaic (PV) cells. For PV applications, NSL is widely used in rear contact scenarios to excite surface plasmon polariton and/or high order diffractions, however, the top contact scenarios using NSL are rare. In this paper a systematic simulation study is conducted to determine the capability of achieving efficiency enhancement in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells using NSL as a top contact plasmonic optical enhancer. The study focuses on triangular prism and sphere arrays as they are the most commonly and easily acquired through direct deposition or low-temperature annealing, respectively. For optical enhancement, a characteristic absorption profile is generated and analyzed to determine the effects of size, shape and spacing of plasmonic structures compared to an un-enhanced reference cell. The factors affecting NSL-enhanced PV performance include absorption, shielding effects, diffraction, and scattering. In the triangular prism array, parasitic absorption of the silver particles proves to be problematic, and although it can be alleviated by increasing the particle spacing, no useful enhancement was observed in the triangular prism arrays that were simulated. Sphere arrays, on the other hand, have broad scattering cross-sections that create useful scattering fields at several sizes and spacing intervals. For the simulated sphere arrays the highest enhancement found was 7.4%, which was fabricated with a 250 nm radius nanosphere and a 50 nm silver thickness, followed by annealing in inert gas. These results are promising and provide a path towards the commercialization of plasmonic a-Si:H solar cells using NSL fabrication techniques.

  6. A deployable structure and solar array controls experiment for STEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A candidate configuration for a controls experiment on the Space Technology Experiments Platform (STEP) is described. The elements of the experiment are the mast, the solar array, and an articulation module between the two. The characteristic dimensions are very compatible for integration on a pallet such a STEP's proposed configuration. The controls' objective would be the measurement of orbiter interaction as well as the system identification of the appendages. The flight experiment configuration would also provide a test bed for various active vibration controls concepts. The instrumentation being considered would measure accelerations, strains, displacements, and temperatures. The deployable mast has eight elements defining a structural bay. Uniaxial measurements would be required to define loads at a cross section of the structure. Displacements due to thermal distortion of the mast and the local state of the solar concentrator may be measured by an optical ranging technique from the orbiter aft flight deck.

  7. Early Mission Power Assessment of the Dawn Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; DiStefano, Salvatore; Rayman, Marc D.; Ulloa-Severino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Discovery Mission Dawn was launched in September 2007. Dawn will be the first to orbit two asteroids on a single voyage. The solar array for the Dawn mission will provide power under greatly varying illumination and temperature conditions. Dawn's ion propulsion system (IPS) will provide the spacecraft with enough thrust to reach Vesta and Ceres and orbit both. The demanding mission would be impossible without ion propulsion -- a mission only to the asteroid Vesta (and not including Ceres) would require a much more massive spacecraft and, a much larger launch vehicle.

  8. Technology for Solar Array Production on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon, aluminum, and glass are the primary raw materials that will be required for production of solar arrays on the moon. A process sequence is proposed for producing these materials from lunar regolith is proposed, consisting of separating the required materials from lunar rock with fluorine. Fluorosilane produced by this process is reduced to silicon; the fluorine salts are reduced to metals by reaction with metallic potassium. Fluorine is recovered from residual MgF and CaF2 by reaction with K2O. Aluminum, calcium oxide, and magnesium oxide are recovered to manufacture structural materials and glass.

  9. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  10. Early Mission Power Assessment of the Dawn Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; DiStefano, Salvatore; Rayman, Marc D.; Ulloa-Severino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Discovery Mission Dawn was launched in September 2007. Dawn will be the first to orbit two asteroids on a single voyage. The solar array for the Dawn mission will provide power under greatly varying illumination and temperature conditions. Dawn's ion propulsion system (IPS) will provide the spacecraft with enough thrust to reach Vesta and Ceres and orbit both. The demanding mission would be impossible without ion propulsion -- a mission only to the asteroid Vesta (and not including Ceres) would require a much more massive spacecraft and, a much larger launch vehicle.

  11. Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA): Radio Aperture Synthesis from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R.; Kaiser, M.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2003-05-01

    SIRA, the Solar Imaging Radio Array, will be a constellation of about 16 microsats designed to image radio sources in the solar corona and heliosphere using aperture synthesis techniques. These images will permit the mapping and tracking of CME-driven shocks (type II radio bursts) and solar flare electrons (type III radio bursts) as a function of time from near the sun to 1 AU. Two dimensional imaging of the CME-driven shock front is important for determination of space weather effects of CMEs, whereas imaging of the ubiquitous type III bursts will permit the derivation of density maps in the outer corona and solar wind. This will be the first mission to image the heliosphere (and the celestial sphere) with good angular resolution at frequencies below the ionospheric cutoff ( 10 MHz). The radio images are intrinsically complementary to white-light coronograph data, such as those of SDO, and can play a valuable role in the NASA Living with a Star program.

  12. Lightweight, Space and Power Efficient Solar Array Drive Design Implemented within Remote Interface Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivikyto, Tatu; Laaksoen, Jyrki

    2014-08-01

    PATRIA has implemented highly educated Remote Interface Units in various ESA missions. For the Sentinel-2 and EarthCARE it was constructed also to include Solar Array Drive Electronics. The same control design as for Solar Array Drive function was also piggybacked in Magneto Torque control drives and other mission specific stepper motor drives. The purpose of this paper is to summarise and present the PATRIA Solar Array Drive Electronics design advantages.

  13. Environmental Assessment for the Solar Photovoltaic Array, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-24

    systems. ● Sequence construction activities to limit the soil exposure for long periods of time. 5 Water Resources ● Do not alter natural flow...construction activities to limit the soil exposure for long periods of time. Management Practices Management Actions January 2014 Solar Photovoltaic Array...ENVIRONMENTAL !ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAY AT EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE- OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. I USAF - DEA, SOLAR PHOTOVOL TAlC ARRAY AT EGLIN

  14. Performance Measurements of the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) Solar Array Deployment System

    OpenAIRE

    Sneiderman, Gary

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses some unique features of the solar array deployment system used on the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). The mechanism system is highly optimized, incorporates no single-use components, and is fully testable in a one-"g" environment. A single High Output Paraffin (HOP) linear actuator drives the mechanisms used to deploy and lock each wing of solar array panels. The solar arrays open slowly, requiring only enough force to overcome inefficiencies and friction. ...

  15. An analytical comparison of the efficiency of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    An analytical comparison of the efficiency of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds is reported. A FORTRAN computer program was written for the computation of the thermal performance of solar thermal collector arrays with and without external manifolds. Arrays constructed from two example solar thermal collectors are computated. Typical external manifold sizes and thermal insulations are presented graphically and are compared with the thermal performance of the collector alone.

  16. ParaSol - A Novel Deployable Approach for Very Large Ultra-lightweight Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High power solar arrays with capabilities of >100kW are needed for projected NASA missions. Photovoltaic arrays using deployable membranes with thin cells have...

  17. SPS-ALPHA: The First Practical Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large PHased Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SPS-ALPHA (Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large Phased Array) is a novel, bio-mimetic approach to the challenge of space solar power. If successful, this...

  18. Design of a 7kw power transfer solar array drive mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, J.G.

    1982-05-01

    With the availability of the Shuttle and the European launcher, Ariane, there will be a continuing trend towards large payload satellite missions requiring high-power, high-inertia, flexible solar arrays. The need arises for a solar array drive with a large power transfer capability which can rotate these solar arrays without disturbing the satellite body pointing. The modular design of such a Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) which is capable of transferring 7kW of power or more is described. Total design flexibility has been achieved, enabling different spacecraft power requirements to be accommodated within the SADM design.

  19. Active Parasitic Arrays for Low Cost Compact MIMO Transmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Barousis, V; Kalis, A

    2011-01-01

    Recently, electronically steerable passive array radiator antennas have been considered for beam-forming and spatial multiplexing, in order to reduce the size, cost and power consumption of smart antenna systems. However, the re-configurability of such antenna is limited, since parasitic elements...... were constrained to use only passive loads. If we are to integrate such systems to cost-sensitive devices (as for example in wireless sensor nodes for structural or urban microclimate monitoring), we should be able to fully emulate traditional smart antenna systems, using a single RF feed. This paper...... presents a method for generating parasitic loads with a negative real part using active circuit blocks. The proposed method could be used for increasing the modulation order of the aforementioned systems, decrease the required number of parasitic elements or even optimize the antenna efficiency in energy...

  20. Active Parasitic Arrays for Low Cost Compact MIMO Transmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Bo; Barousis, V; Kalis, A

    2011-01-01

    Recently, electronically steerable passive array radiator antennas have been considered for beam-forming and spatial multiplexing, in order to reduce the size, cost and power consumption of smart antenna systems. However, the re-configurability of such antenna is limited, since parasitic elements...... were constrained to use only passive loads. If we are to integrate such systems to cost-sensitive devices (as for example in wireless sensor nodes for structural or urban microclimate monitoring), we should be able to fully emulate traditional smart antenna systems, using a single RF feed. This paper...... presents a method for generating parasitic loads with a negative real part using active circuit blocks. The proposed method could be used for increasing the modulation order of the aforementioned systems, decrease the required number of parasitic elements or even optimize the antenna efficiency in energy...

  1. Fabrication of Si/SiO2 Superlattice Microwire Array Solar Cells Using Microsphere Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Yamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fabrication process for silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2 superlattice microwire array solar cells was developed. The Si/SiO2 superlattice microwire array was fabricated using a microsphere lithography process with polystyrene particles. The solar cell shows a photovoltaic effect and an open-circuit voltage of 128 mV was obtained. The limiting factors of the solar cell performance were investigated from the careful observations of the solar cell structures. We also investigated the influence of the microwire array structure on light trapping in the solar cells.

  2. Cost effective manufacturing of the SEA 10X concentrator array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminar, N.; McEntee, J.; Curchod, D. (Solar Engineering Applications Corp., San Jose, CA (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a low-cost, mass-producible 10X concentrator system that has been claimed to produce electricity at $0.04/kWh. It details changes in manufacturing techniques that could produce a concentrator system at a selling price of $0.71/W. (A simple design and a minimum number of parts and manufacturing steps reduced production costs.) Present production techniques, changes to improve these techniques, impediments to changes, and solutions to the impediments are described. This 10X concentrator system uses available components and manufacturing processes and one-sun solar cells in conjunction with inexpensive plastic lenses to generate about eight times the amount of electricity normally produced by these cells.

  3. Neural Network for Positioning Space Station Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ronald E.; Lin, Paul P.

    1994-01-01

    As a shuttle approaches the Space Station Freedom for a rendezvous, the shuttle's reaction control jet firings pose a risk of excessive plume impingement loads on Freedom solar arrays. The current solution to this problem, in which the arrays are locked in a feathered position prior to the approach, may be neither accurate nor robust, and is also expensive. An alternative solution is proposed here: the active control of Freedom's beta gimbals during the approach, positioning the arrays dynamically in such a way that they remain feathered relative to the shuttle jet most likely to cause an impingement load. An artificial neural network is proposed as a means of determining the gimbal angles that would drive plume angle of attack to zero. Such a network would be both accurate and robust, and could be less expensive to implement than the current solution. A network was trained via backpropagation, and results, which compare favorably to the current solution as well as to some other alternatives, are presented. Other training options are currently being evaluated.

  4. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 5. [Cost analysis and factory design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiello, R.V.

    1977-10-01

    During this quarter, an interim 1982 factory was designed for the large-scale production of silicon solar cell array modules. The boundary conditions for this design are the use of Czochralski silicon crystals and $25/kg polycrystalline silicon. The objective is a large-scale production facility to meet an intermediate ERDA cost goal of $2.00/W in 1982. The approach was to first consider a panel design which could be expected to have a 20-year life and would also meet the JPL specification on mechanical, electrical, and environmental stability. Attention was then directed to a cost analysis of the production of the elements comprising this panel. Since it was expected that wafer production would comprise a major fraction of the cost, several cost reduction schemes were considered for the Czochralski pulling and sawing of the wafers. A solar-cell processing sequence was selected on the basis of our previous cost studies and the projected availability of production equipment by 1982. These criteria resulted in the selection of POCl/sub 3/ gaseous diffusion for junction formation, thick-film Ag screen-printed metallization, spray-on antireflection (AR) coating, and solder reflow interconnect technology. The economic study was made by computer analysis of the cost elements of these process sequences at production levels ranging from 3 to 100 MW/yr. With the results of this study, a 30-MW/yr factory was designed, and a preliminary floor plan layout is given. A manufacturing cost of $2.01/W is projected and, including factory overhead and profit, a selling price of $2.27/W is projected.

  5. A Low-Cost Electronic Solar Energy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blade, Richard A.; Small, Charles T.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the design of a low-cost electronic circuit to serve as a differential thermostat, to control the operation of a solar heating system. It uses inexpensive diodes for sensoring temperature, and a mechanical relay for a switch. (GA)

  6. Three-dimensional nanopillar-array photovoltaics on low-cost and flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiyong; Razavi, Haleh; Do, Jae-won; Moriwaki, Aimee; Ergen, Onur; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Leu, Paul W; Ho, Johnny C; Takahashi, Toshitake; Reichertz, Lothar A; Neale, Steven; Yu, Kyoungsik; Wu, Ming; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2009-08-01

    Solar energy represents one of the most abundant and yet least harvested sources of renewable energy. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in developing photovoltaics that can be potentially mass deployed. Of particular interest to cost-effective solar cells is to use novel device structures and materials processing for enabling acceptable efficiencies. In this regard, here, we report the direct growth of highly regular, single-crystalline nanopillar arrays of optically active semiconductors on aluminium substrates that are then configured as solar-cell modules. As an example, we demonstrate a photovoltaic structure that incorporates three-dimensional, single-crystalline n-CdS nanopillars, embedded in polycrystalline thin films of p-CdTe, to enable high absorption of light and efficient collection of the carriers. Through experiments and modelling, we demonstrate the potency of this approach for enabling highly versatile solar modules on both rigid and flexible substrates with enhanced carrier collection efficiency arising from the geometric configuration of the nanopillars.

  7. Solar Opacity Calculations Using the Super-transition-array Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new opacity model has been developed based on the Super-Transition-Array (STA) method for the calculation of monochromatic opacities of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atomic code, named STAR (STA-Revised), is described and used to calculate spectral opacities for a solar model implementing the recent AGSS09 composition. Calculations are carried out throughout the solar radiative zone. The relative contributions of different chemical elements and atomic processes to the total Rosseland mean opacity are analyzed in detail. Monochromatic opacities and charge-state distributions are compared with the widely used Opacity Project (OP) code, for several elements near the radiation-convection interface. STAR Rosseland opacities for the solar mixture show a very good agreement with OP and the OPAL opacity code throughout the radiation zone. Finally, an explicit STA calculation was performed of the full AGSS09 photospheric mixture, including all heavy metals. It was shown that, due to their extremely low abundance, and despite being very good photon absorbers, the heavy elements do not affect the Rosseland opacity.

  8. Solar Array Panels With Dust-Removal Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Stephen; Mardesich, Nick; Spence, Brian; White, Steve

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed to incorporate piezoelectric vibrational actuators into the structural supports of solar photovoltaic panels, for the purpose of occasionally inducing vibrations in the panels in order to loosen accumulated dust. Provided that the panels were tilted, the loosened dust would slide off under its own weight. Originally aimed at preventing obscuration of photovoltaic cells by dust accumulating in the Martian environment, the proposal may also offer an option for the design of solar photovoltaic panels for unattended operation at remote locations on Earth. The figure depicts a typical lightweight solar photovoltaic panel comprising a backside grid of structural spars that support a thin face sheet that, in turn, supports an array of photovoltaic cells on the front side. The backside structure includes node points where several spars intersect. According to the proposal, piezoelectric buzzers would be attached to the node points. The process of designing the panel would be an iterative one that would include computational simulation of the vibrations by use of finite- element analysis to guide the selection of the vibrational frequency of the actuators and the cross sections of the spars to maximize the agitation of dust.

  9. An array of directable mirrors as a photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittner, W. B., III

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of the optics of heliostats for use in large thermal power towers have been carried out in considerable detail, chiefly by Vant-Hull et al. This paper describes a simplified method for calculating the images generated by a special type of concentrator, i.e. an array of independently steered mirrors on a single frame, intended to direct the solar image onto a flat photovoltaic solar cell target. The case of interest is one in which the field of illumination on the target is as uniform as possible, and the emphasis is thus on small 'rim angle' geometries (a configuration which also minimizes mirror interference effects). Calculations are presented for constructing the individual mirror target images in terms of three angles: (1) the angle between the photovoltaic target normal and the reflecting mirror (called here the mirror position angle), (2) the angle between the target center and the sun as measured from the center of the reflecting mirror, and (3) the angle at which the plane defined by the center of the sun, the mirror center and the target center intersects the plane of the target. The overall system efficiency for various mirror configurations, characterized by such parameters as the maximum mirror angle (i.e. 'rim angle'), target-mirror plane separation, and mirror aiming accuracy is discussed in terms of the specifications desirable in an optical concentrator designed specifically to illuminate uniformly a photovoltaic solar cell target.

  10. SOLAR OPACITY CALCULATIONS USING THE SUPER-TRANSITION-ARRAY METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D., E-mail: menahem.krief@mail.huji.ac.il [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-04-10

    A new opacity model has been developed based on the Super-Transition-Array (STA) method for the calculation of monochromatic opacities of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atomic code, named STAR (STA-Revised), is described and used to calculate spectral opacities for a solar model implementing the recent AGSS09 composition. Calculations are carried out throughout the solar radiative zone. The relative contributions of different chemical elements and atomic processes to the total Rosseland mean opacity are analyzed in detail. Monochromatic opacities and charge-state distributions are compared with the widely used Opacity Project (OP) code, for several elements near the radiation–convection interface. STAR Rosseland opacities for the solar mixture show a very good agreement with OP and the OPAL opacity code throughout the radiation zone. Finally, an explicit STA calculation was performed of the full AGSS09 photospheric mixture, including all heavy metals. It was shown that, due to their extremely low abundance, and despite being very good photon absorbers, the heavy elements do not affect the Rosseland opacity.

  11. Multiple oligo nucleotide arrays: Methods to reduce manufacture time and cost

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, Kang

    2010-01-01

    The customized multiple arrays are becoming vastly used in microarray experiments for varies purposes, mainly for its ability to handle a large quantity of data and output high quality results. However, experimenters who use customized multiple arrays still face many problems, such as the cost and time to manufacture the masks, and the cost for production of the multiple arrays by costly machines. Although there is some research on the multiple arrays, there is little concern on the manufacture time and cost, which is actually important to experimenters. In this paper, we have proposed methods to reduce the time and cost for the manufacture of the customized multiple arrays. We have first introduced a heuristic algorithm for the mask decomposition problem for multiple arrays. Then a streamline method is proposed for the integration of different steps of manufacture on a higher level. Experiments show that our methods are very effective in reduction of the time and cost of manufacture of multiple arrays.

  12. Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption in GaAs Nanowire Array Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Yan, Xin; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a plasmon-enhanced solar cell structure based on a GaAs nanowire array decorated with metal nanoparticles. The results show that by engineering the metallic nanoparticles, localized surface plasmon could be excited, which can concentrate the incident light and propagate the energy to nanowires. The surface plasmon can dramatically enhance the absorbance of near-bandgap light, and the enhancement is influenced by the size and material of nanoparticles. By optimizing the particle parameters, a large absorbance enhancement of 50 % at 760 nm and a high conversion efficiency of 14.5 % can be obtained at a low diameter and period ratio ( D/ P ratio) of 0.3. The structure is promising for low-cost high-performance nanoscale solar cells.

  13. Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA): Imaging solar, magnetospheric, and astrophysical sources at < 15 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R.; MacDowall, R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Reiner, M. J.; Bale, S.; Jones, D.; Kasper, J.; Weiler, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA) is a mission to perform aperture synthesis imaging of low frequency solar, magnetospheric, and astrophysical radio bursts. The primary science targets are coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which drive radio emission producing shock waves. A space-based interferometer is required, because the frequencies of observation (SIRA mission serves as a lower frequency counterpart to LWA, LOFAR, and similar ground-based radio imaging arrays. SIRA will require 12 to 16 microsatellites to establish a sufficient number of baselines with separations on the order of kilometers. The microsat constellation consists of microsats located quasi-randomly on a spherical shell, initially of radius 5 km or less. The baseline microsat is 3-axis stabilized with body-mounted solar arrays and an articulated, earth pointing high gain antenna. A retrograde orbit at 500,000 km from Earth was selected as the preferred orbit because it reduces the downlink requirement while keeping the microsats sufficiently distant from terrestrial radio interference. Also, the retrograde orbit permits imaging of terrestrial magnetospheric radio sources from varied perspectives. The SIRA mission serves as a pathfinder for space-based satellite constellations and for spacecraft interferometry at shorter wavelengths. It will be proposed to the NASA MIDEX proposal opportunity in mid-2005.

  14. Cost Effective Polymer Solar Cells Research and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing [Norfolk State Univ, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The technical or research objective of this project is to investigate and develop new polymers and polymer based optoelectronic devices for potentially cost effective (or cost competitive), durable, lightweight, flexible, and high efficiency solar energy conversion applications. The educational objective of this project includes training of future generation scientists, particularly young, under-represented minority scientists, working in the areas related to the emerging organic/polymer based solar energy technologies and related optoelectronic devices. Graduate and undergraduate students will be directly involved in scientific research addressing issues related to the development of polymer based solar cell technology.

  15. TiO2 nanotube arrays and TiO2-nanotube-array based dye-sensitized solar Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YanBiao; ZHOU BaoXue; XIONG BiTao; BAI Jing; LI LongHai

    2007-01-01

    To substitute the non-regular nano-crystalline semiconductor for a novel kind of ordered microstructure is a very important aspect in the domain of dye-sensitized solar cell.One of the researching hotspots is the highly-ordered TiO2 nanotube architecture.As a new type of titania nano-material,titania nanotube arrays have drawn extraordinary attention due to its distinctive morphology,notable photoelectrical and hydro-sensitive performance.At 100% sun the new kind of TiO2 nanotube arrays solar cell exhibits an overall conversion efficiency of 5.44%.This paper introduces the preparation methods of titania nanotube arrays,the existing problems and recent progress in titania nanotube arrays solar cell.

  16. Summary of flat-plate solar array project documentation: Abstracts of published documents, 1975-1986, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of final reports, or the latest quarterly or annual, of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Contractor of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in-house activities are presented. Also presented is a list of proceedings and publications, by author, of work connected with the project. The aim of the program has been to stimulate the development of technology that will enable the private sector to manufacture and widely use photovoltaic systems for the generation of electricity in residential, commercial, industrial, and Government applications at a cost per watt that is competitive with utility generated power. FSA Project activities have included the sponsoring of research and development efforts in silicon refinement processes, advanced silicon sheet growth techniques, higher efficiency solar cells, solar cell/module fabrication processes, encapsulation, module/array engineering and reliability, and economic analyses.

  17. By-Pass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    By-Pass diodes are a key design feature of solar arrays and system design must be robust against local heating, especially with implementation of larger solar cells. By-Pass diode testing was performed to aid thermal model development for use in future array designs that utilize larger cell sizes that result in higher string currents. Testing was performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon provided by SSL. Test conditions were vacuum with cold array backside using discrete by-pass diode current steps of 0.25 A ranging from 0 A to 2.0 A.

  18. High Efficient Universal Buck Boost Solar Array Regulator SAR Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelmann, Stefan; Knorr, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    The high efficient universal Buck Boost Solar Array Regulator (SAR) module concept is applicable for a wide range of input and output voltages. The single point failure tolerant SAR module contains 3 power converters for the transfer of the SAR power to the battery dominated power bus. The converters are operating parallel in a 2 out of 3 redundancy and are driven by two different controllers. The output power of one module can be adjusted up to 1KW depending on the requirements. The maximum power point tracker (MPPT) is placed on a separate small printed circuit board and can be used if no external tracker signal is delivered. Depending on the mode and load conditions an efficiency of more than 97% is achievable. The stable control performance is achieved by implementing the magnetic current sense detection. The sensed power coil current is used in Buck and Boost control mode.

  19. Materials Refining for Solar Array Production on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon, aluminum, and glass are the primary raw materials that will be required for production of solar arrays on the moon. A process sequence is proposed for producing these materials from lunar regolith, consisting of separating the required materials from lunar rock with fluorine. The fluorine is brought to the moon in the form of potassium fluoride, and is liberated from the salt by electrolysis in a eutectic salt melt. Tetrafluorosilane produced by this process is reduced to silicon by a plasma reduction stage; the fluorine salts are reduced to metals by reaction with metallic potassium. Fluorine is recovered from residual MgF and CaF2 by reaction with K2O.

  20. Electronic system for high power load control. [solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Parallel current paths are divided into two groups, with control devices in the current paths of one group each having a current limiting resistor, and the control devices in the other group each having no limiting resistor, so that when the control devices of the second group are turned fully on, a short circuit is achieved by the arrangement of parallel current paths. Separate but coordinated control signals are provided to turn on the control devices of the first group and increase their conduction toward saturation as a function of control input, and when fully on, or shortly before, to turn on the control devices of the second group and increase their conduction toward saturation as a function of the control input as that input continues to increase. Electronic means may be used to generate signals. The system may be used for 1-V characteristic measurements of solar arrays as well as for other load control purposes.

  1. Nonlinear Compensation of Solar Array Simulators with Dual Power Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrah, E. A.; Tkachev, S. B.; Poymanov, D. N.; Fedchenko, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    During the tests of the spacecraft electrical systems there is a need for simulators of individual parts of the spacecrafts, in particular, solar array simulators (SAS). One of the topologies of medium and high power SAS simulators has dual control of consumed power and contains series or parallel connected linear and switching regulators. This topology allows to provide wide bandwidth and high efficiency, but the range of the resistance change of periodically switched SAS load is limited to the value of the stabilized attribute. Nonlinear compensator (NC) allows to reduce the average feedback voltage of the switching regulator in case of periodic load switching, which, in turn, allows to increase the average value of the stabilized attribute. The describing function method provides a mathematical description of the NC electrical circuit, which allows to select parameters of NC that eliminate the excitation of self-oscillation based on the SAS load switching frequency range and to study the switching regulator stability.

  2. Stability Analysis of the Buck-Boost Type Solar Array Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong-Hwan; Yoon, Seok-Teak; Park, Hee-Sung; Park, Sung-Woo; Koo, Ja-Chun; Jang, Jin-Baek; Lee, Sang-Kon

    2014-08-01

    The SAR (Solar Array Regulator) is different from a general DC-DC Converter. The input of the SAR is connected to the solar array and the output is connected to the battery. So, the output voltage of the SAR is constant and the input voltage of the SAR is variable. And the solar array current which is the SAR input current is variable according to the solar array voltage. Therefore, the SAR is influenced by the electrical characteristic of the solar array. For these reasons, a small signal model for a general DC-DC converter cannot be applied to the SAR for the stability analysis. In this paper, the small signal model of the BUCK-BOOST type SAR (BBSAR) is introduced and its transfer functions are induced. Using small signal transfer functions, the stability analysis is performed and its results are compared to the simulation result.

  3. Options Studied for Managing Space Station Solar Array Electrical Hazards for Sequential Shunt Unit Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Levy, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. solar array strings on the International Space Station are connected to a sequential shunt unit (SSU). The job of the SSU is to shunt, or short, the excess current from the solar array, such that just enough current is provided downstream to maintain the 160-V bus voltage while meeting the power load demand and recharging the batteries. Should an SSU fail on-orbit, it would be removed and replaced with the on-orbit spare during an astronaut space walk or extravehicular activity (EVA) (see the photograph). However, removing an SSU during an orbit Sun period with input solar array power connectors fully energized could result in substantial hardware damage and/or safety risk to the EVA astronaut. The open-circuit voltage of cold solar-array strings can exceed 320 V, and warm solar-array strings could feed a short circuit with a total current level exceeding 240 A.

  4. High-Efficiency Solar Cells on Low-Cost Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency solar cells made in thin epitaxial films grown on low-cost commercial silicon substrates. Cost of cells is much less than if high-quality single-crystal silicon were used for substrates and performance of cells is almost as good.

  5. Key aspects of cost effective collector and solar field design

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reeken, Finn; Nicodemo, Dario; Keck, Thomas; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Balz, Markus

    2016-05-01

    A study has been performed where different key parameters influencing solar field cost are varied. By using levelised cost of energy as figure of merit it is shown that parameters like GoToStow wind speed, heliostat stiffness or tower height should be adapted to respective site conditions from an economical point of view. The benchmark site Redstone (Northern Cape Province, South Africa) has been compared to an alternate site close to Phoenix (AZ, USA) regarding site conditions and their effect on cost-effective collector and solar field design.

  6. Intelsat solar array coupon atomic oxygen flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, S.; King, G.; Dunnet, A.; Kirkendahl, T.; Linton, R.; Vaughn, J.

    1994-05-01

    A Hughes communications satellite (INTELSAT series) belonging to the INTELSAT Organization was marooned in low-Earth orbit (LEO) on March 14, 1990, following failure of the Titan launch vehicle third stage to separate properly. The satellite, INTELSAT 6, was designed for service in geosynchronous orbit and contains several materials that are potentially susceptible to attack by atomic oxygen. Analysis showed that direct exposure of the silver interconnects in the satellite photovoltaic array to atomic oxygen in LEO was the key materials issue. Available data on atomic oxygen degradation of silver are limited and show high variance, so solar array configurations of the INTELSAT 6 type and individual interconnects were tested in ground-based facilities and during STS-41 (Space Shuttle Discovery, October 1990) as part of the ISAC flight experiment. Several materials for which little or no flight data exist were also tested for atomic oxygen reactivity. Dry lubricants, elastomers, and polymeric and inorganic materials were exposed to an oxygen atom fluence of 1.1 x 10(exp 20) atoms cm(exp 2). Many of the samples were selected to support Space Station Freedom design and decision making. This paper provides an overview of the ISAC flight experiment and a brief summary of results. In addition to new data on materials not before flown, ISAC provided data supporting the decision to rescue INTELSAT 6, which was successfully undertaken in May 1992.

  7. Silicon on Ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Pickering, C.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon was investigated. It was hoped this could be done by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Work was directed towards the solution of unique cell processing/design problems encountered with the silicon-ceramic (SOC) material due to its intimate contact with the ceramic substrate. Significant progress was demonstrated in the following areas; (1) the continuous coater succeeded in producing small-area coatings exhibiting unidirectional solidification and substatial grain size; (2) dip coater succeeded in producing thick (more than 500 micron) dendritic layers at coating speeds of 0.2-0.3 cm/sec; and (3) a standard for producing total area SOC solar cells using slotted ceramic substrates was developed.

  8. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 2, September 17, 1976--September 19, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-09-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. In the past year significant progress was made in all areas of the program. The physical and chemical properties of the standard mullite refractory used for the majority of the coating runs (McDanel MV20 and Coors S1SI) have been characterized. A number of experimental compositions have been identified and procured from Coors. Characterization of the standard compositions revealed that the thermal expansion of mullite depends on both relative amounts of glass phase and on the impurity level in the glass. Since the thermal expansion in mullite exceeds that of silicon, the silicon coating should be in a state of compression. This was confirmed by x-ray measurements. After modifying and cleaning the dip-coating facility, silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cells were fabricated which demonstrate that the SOC process can produce silicon of solar cell quality. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open-ciruit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short-circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. Results of an economic analysis of the SOC process are presented.

  9. A computer program to determine geometric parameters for the AFM solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program has been written to aid in the design of the A. E. M.-1 solar array and to determine the power that will finally be available from the array. The program will plot the array output as a function of the satellite's position in a given orbit and will calculate the average output over the orbit.

  10. Dye-sensitized solar cells with vertically aligned TiO2 nanowire arrays grown on carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Hongwei; Hou, Shaocong; Peng, Ming; Yu, Xiao; Zou, Dechun

    2014-02-01

    One-dimensional semiconductor TiO2 nanowires (TNWs) have received widespread attention from solar cell and related optoelectronics scientists. The controllable synthesis of ordered TNW arrays on arbitrary substrates would benefit both fundamental research and practical applications. Herein, vertically aligned TNW arrays in situ grown on carbon fiber (CF) substrates through a facile, controllable, and seed-assisted thermal process is presented. Also, hierarchical TiO2 -nanoparticle/TNW arrays were prepared that favor both the dye loading and depressed charge recombination of the CF/TNW photoanode. An impressive conversion efficiency of 2.48 % (under air mass 1.5 global illumination) and an apparent efficiency of 4.18 % (with a diffuse board) due to the 3D light harvesting of the wire solar cell were achieved. Moreover, efficient and inexpensive wire solar cells made from all-CF electrodes and completely flexible CF-based wire solar cells were demonstrated, taking into account actual application requirements. This work may provide an intriguing avenue for the pursuit of lightweight, cost-effective, and high-performance flexible/wearable solar cells.

  11. Dip coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly report No. 6, March 22, 1977--June 24, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1977-06-30

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cell performance. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open circuit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. It is significant that single-crystal comparison cells, also measured without benefit of an AR coating, had efficiencies in the 8.5 percent range with typical V/sub oc/'s and J/sub sc/'s of 0.54 volt and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Therefore, improvement in cell design and junction diffusion techniques should increase the efficiency of both the SOC and single-crystal cells. During this quarter the dip coating facility was inadvertently contaminated, but has since been restored to a purity level exceeding its original state. With this facility, silicon coatings were grown with a single-crystal seed attached to the substrate. Single-crystal silicon was not forthcoming, but the results were nonetheless encouraging. Several of the carbon coating types tried appear promising, including one which has high purity and can be applied uniformly by swab or airbrush.

  12. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth for Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 4, September 29, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Heaps, J D; Koepke, B; Grung, B L; Schuldt, S B

    1979-10-31

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The effort is divided into several areas of investigation in order to most efficiently meet the goals of the program. These areas include: (1) dip-coating; (2) continuous coating; (3) material characterization; (4) cell fabrication; and (5) theoretical analysis. Progress in all areas of the program is reported in detail. (WHK)

  13. Silicon-on Ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell-quality silicon was investigated. This was done by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress in the following areas was demonstrated: (1) fabricating a 10 sq cm cell having 9.9 percent conversion efficiency; (2) producing a 225 sq cm layer of sheet silicon; and (3) obtaining 100 microns thick coatings at pull speed of 0.15 cm/sec, although approximately 50 percent of the layer exhibited dendritic growth.

  14. Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process, phase 1: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1977-01-01

    A controlled growth, heat-flow and cool-down process is described that yielded silicon with a high degree of single crystallinity. Even when the seed melted out, very large grains formed. Solar cell samples made from cast material yielded conversion efficiency of over 9%. Representative characterizations of grown silicon demonstrated a dislocation density of less than 100/sq cm and a minority carrier diffusion length of 31 micron. The source of silicon carbide in silicon ingots was identified to be from graphite retainers in contact with silica crucibles. Higher growth rates were achieved with the use of a graphite plug at the bottom of the silica crucible.

  15. Development of a low-cost integrated 20-kW ac solar tracking sub- array for grid-connected PV power system applications. Phase 1, Annual technical report, 11 July 1995--31 July 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G. [Utility Power Group, Chatsworth, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the installed cost of utility scale grid connected photovoltaic power systems. The focus of the effort is on ``BOS`` (Balance-Of-System) component manufacturing technology, which essentially involves all PV power system engineering, manufacturing, assembly and construction tasks from the receipt of a PV module to the deliver of grid connected electricity.

  16. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  17. Experimental study on high-voltage solar array sustained arc discharge induced by high charging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kai; XIE ErQing; WANG Li; LIU YanXia; YANG Yang; SUN YanZheng; CUI XinYu; MAI ShengLi

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that sustained arc discharge induced by electrostatic discharge (ESD) could cause permanent damage to high-power and high-voltage solar array of spacecrafts. The paper focuses on ESD simulating experiments on Si and GaAs samples, and induces sustained arc discharge. The physical mechanism of sustained arc discharge is discussed by comparing the charging/discharging phenomena between Si and GaAs samples. The experiments show that sustained arc discharge can produce a permanent short-circuit channel between solar cell strings through which the solar array's photovoltaic power may flow out sustainedly. The analyses show that sustained arc discharge strongly depends on solar array structure, solar array operating voltage, ESD characteristics and cell materials.

  18. Low cost bare-plate solar air collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maag, W.L.; Wenzler, C.J.; Rom, F.E.; VanArsdale, D.R.

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a low cost, bare-plate collector, determine its performance for a variety of climatic conditions, analyze the economics of this type of solar collector and evaluate specific applications. Two prototype collectors were designed, fabricated and installed into an instrumented test system. Tests were conducted for a period of five months. Results of the tests showed consistent operating efficiencies of 60% or greater with air preheat temperature uses up to 20/sup 0/F for one of the prototypes. The economic analyses indicated that an installed cost of between $5 and $10 per square foot would make this type of solar system economically viable. For the materials of construction and the type of fabrication and installation perceived, these costs for the bare-plate solar collector are believed to be attainable. Specific applications for preheating ventilation air for schools were evaluated and judged to be economically viable.

  19. Cost Effective System Modeling of Active Micro- Module Solar Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Faisal Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interests in using renewable energies are coming from solar thermal energy and solar photovoltaic systems to the micro production of electricity. Usually we already have considered the solar tracking topology in large scale applications like power plants and satellite but most of small scale applications don’t have any solar tracker system, mainly because of its high cost and complex circuit design. From that aspect, this paper confab microcontroller based one dimensional active micro-module solar tracking system, in which inexpensive LDR is used to generate reference voltage to operate microcontroller for functioning the tracking system. This system provides a fast response of tracking system to the parameters like change of light intensity as well as temperature variations. This micro-module model of tracking system can be used for small scale applications like portable electronic devices and running vehicles.

  20. 600 Volt Stretched Lens Array for Solar Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ENTECH, Auburn, NASA, and others have recently developed a new space photovoltaic array called the Stretched Lens Array (SLA), offering unprecedented performance...

  1. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Characterization of SEMIX material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesh, R.; Stringfellow, G. B.; Virkar, A. V.; Dunn, J.; Guyer, T.

    1983-01-01

    Statistically significant quantitative structural imperfection measurements were made on samples from ubiquitous crystalline process (UCP) Ingot 5848 - 13C. Important correlation was obtained between defect densities, cell efficiency, and diffusion length. Grain boundary substructure displayed a strong influence on the conversion efficiency of solar cells from Semix material. Quantitative microscopy measurements gave statistically significant information compared to other microanalytical techniques. A surface preparation technique to obtain proper contrast of structural defects suitable for quantimet quantitative image analyzer (QTM) analysis was perfected and is used routinely. The relationships between hole mobility and grain boundary density was determined. Mobility was measured using the van der Pauw technique, and grain boundary density was measured using quantitative microscopy technique. Mobility was found to decrease with increasing grain boundary density.

  2. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet and cell development tasks of the low-cost solar array project. Quarterly report No. 12, April 2, 1979-June 29, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P.W.; Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Grung, B.L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S.B.

    1979-07-31

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. We plan to do this by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. During the quarter, significant progress was demonstrated in several areas: (1) a 10-cm/sup 2/ cell having 9.9 percent conversion efficiency (AM1, AR) was fabricated; (2) the Honeywall-sponsored SCIM coating development succeeded in producing a 225-cm/sup 2/ layer of sheet silicon (18 inches x 2 inches); and (3) 100 ..mu..m-thick coatings at pull speed of 0.15 cm/sec wer$obta9ned, although apoproximately 50 percent of the layer exhibited dendritic growth. Other results and accomplishments during the quarter are reported in detail. (WHK)

  3. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project. Heat Exchanger Method - Ingot Casting Fixed Abrasive Method - Multi-Wire Slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells fabricated from HEM cast silicon yielded up to 15% conversion efficiencies. This was achieved in spite of using unpurified graphite parts in the HEM furnace and without optimization of material or cell processing parameters. Molybdenum retainers prevented SiC formation and reduced carbon content by 50%. The oxygen content of vacuum cast HEM silicon is lower than typical Czochralski grown silicon. Impregnation of 45 micrometers diamonds into 7.5 micrometers copper sheath showed distortion of the copper layer. However, 12.5 micrometers and 15 micrometers copper sheath can be impregnated with 45 micrometers diamonds to a high concentration. Electroless nickel plating of wires impregnated only in the cutting edge showed nickel concentration around the diamonds. This has the possibility of reducing kerf. The high speed slicer fabricated can achieve higher speed and longer stroke with vibration isolation.

  4. Silicon-on-ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Significant progress is reported in fabricating a 4 sq cm cell having a 10.1 percent conversion efficiency and a 10 sq cm cell having a 9.2 percent conversion efficiency. The continuous (SCIM) coater succeeded in producing a 16 sq cm coating exhibiting unidirectional solidification and large grain size. A layer was grown at 0.2 cm/sec in the experimental coater which was partially dendritic but also contained a large smooth area approximately 100 micron m thick. The dark characteristic measurements of a typical SCC solar cell yield shunt resistance values of 10K ohms and series resistance values and 0.4 ohm. The production dip-coater is operating at over 50 percent yield in terms of good cell quality material. The most recent run yielded 13 good substrates out of 15.

  5. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon (RTR) process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, A.; Gurtler, R. W.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Ellis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A new calculation of the effects of thermal stresses during growth on silicon ribbon quality is reported. Thermal stress distributions are computed for ribbon growth under a variety of temperature profiles. A growth rate of 55 cu cm/min with a single ribbon was achieved. The growth of RTR ribbon with a fairly uniform parallel dendritic structure was demonstrated. Results with two approaches were obtained for reducing the Mo impurity level in polycrystalline feedstock. Coating the Mo substrate with Si3N4 does not effect thermal shear separation of the polyribbon; this process shows promise of improving cell efficiency and also increasing the useful life of the molybdenum substrate. A number of solar cells were fabricated on RTR silicon grown from CVD feedstock.

  6. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon (RTR) process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtler, R. W.; Baghdadi, A.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Ellis, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Ribbon-to-Ribbon (RTR) approach to silicon ribbon growth is investigated. An existing RTR apparatus is to be upgraded to its full capabilities and operated routinely to investigate and optimize the effects of various growth parameters on growth results. A new RTR apparatus was constructed to incorporate increased capabilities and improvements over the first apparatus and to be capable of continuous growth. New high power lasers were implemented and this led to major improvements in growth velocity -- 4 inch/min. growth has been demonstrated. A major step in demonstration of the full feasibility of the RTR process is reported in the demonstration of RTR growth from CVD polyribbon rather than sliced polyribbon ingots. Average solar cell efficiencies of greater than 9% and a best cell efficiency of 11.7% are reported. Processing was shown to provide a substantial improvement in material minority carrier diffusion length. An economic analysis is reported which treats both the polyribbon fabrication and RTR processes.

  7. Continuous Czochralski growth: silicon sheet growth development of the large area silicon sheets task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Ninth quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, R.L.; Roberts, E.

    1979-01-01

    During this reporting period, four more 100 kg continuous runs were completed to satisfy the six required by the project extension. One of the four (2*) was performed using a new standard CG2000 RC grower, using accessory equipment and process techniques developed under this project. The sixth and final 100 kg continuous run was performed with purified carbon parts and resulted in the best results to date. Run No. 62 resulted in 103.0 kg being pulled from 104.5 kg total charge weight (98.6% pulled yield). Of this 103 kg grown, 89.3 kg were monocrystalline. Moreover, 72.2 kg was OD material. Another encouraging result was that 85% of the eighth crystal was monocrystalline and 67% of the ninth and last crystal was monocrystaline after ninety seven hours of continuous growth. Impurity analysis data indicate that impurity build-up in grown crystals during 100 kg continuous runs is insignificant. However, the results indicate that impurities tend to accumulate in the crucible. Moreover, impurity analysis performed on new crucibles indicates that these new crucibles may not be as pure as the manufacturer's literature states. Solar cell efficiency data from two 100 kg continuous runs were received this quarter with very encouraging results. The average efficiencies of all cells tested was 16.35% AM1, which is considerably higher than our 14% AM1 goal. Moreover, the efficiencies remained at or near the same levels throughout the entire 100 kg continuous run. We expect to receive solar cell efficiency results from three more of the 100 kg continuous runs in the next quarter.

  8. Silicon Ingot Casting - Heat Exchanger Method (HEM). Multi-Wire Slicing - Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (Fast). Phase 4 Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.

    1981-01-01

    The crystallinity of large HEM silicon ingots as a function of heat flow conditions is investigated. A balanced heat flow at the bottom of the ingot restricts spurious nucleation to the edge of the melted-back seed in contact with the crucible. Homogeneous resistivity distribution over all the ingot has been achieved. The positioning of diamonds electroplated on wirepacks used to slice silicon crystals is considered. The electroplating of diamonds on only the cutting edge is described and the improved slicing performance of these wires evaluated. An economic analysis of value added costs of HEM ingot casting and band saw sectioning indicates the projected add on cost of HEM is well below the 1986 allocation.

  9. Relaxing USOS Solar Array Constraints for Russian Vehicle Undocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkin, Evgeny; Schrock, Mariusz; Schrock, Rita; Zaczek, Mariusz; Gomez, Susan; Lee, Roscoe; Bennet, George

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of Space Shuttle cargo delivery capability and the ten year life extension of the International Space Station (ISS) more emphasis is being put on preservation of the service life of ISS critical components. Current restrictions on the United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Solar Array (SA) positioning during Russian Vehicle (RV) departure from ISS nadir and zenith ports cause SA to be positioned in the plume field of Service Module thrusters and lead to degradation of SAs as well as potential damage to Sun tracking Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA). These restrictions are imposed because of the single fault tolerant RV Motion Control System (MCS), which does not meet ISS Safety requirements for catastrophic hazards and dictates 16 degree Solar Array Rotary Joint position, which ensures that ISS and RV relative motion post separation, does lead to collision. The purpose of this paper is to describe a methodology and the analysis that was performed to determine relative motion trajectories of the ISS and separating RV for nominal and contingency cases. Analysis was performed in three phases that included ISS free drift prior to Visiting Vehicle separation, ISS and Visiting Vehicle relative motion analysis and clearance analysis. First, the ISS free drift analysis determined the worst case attitude and attitude rate excursions prior to RV separation based on a series of different configurations and mass properties. Next, the relative motion analysis calculated the separation trajectories while varying the initial conditions, such as docking mechanism performance, Visiting Vehicle MCS failure, departure port location, ISS attitude and attitude rates at the time of separation, etc. The analysis employed both orbital mechanics and rigid body rotation calculations while accounting for various atmospheric conditions and gravity gradient effects. The resulting relative motion trajectories were then used to determine the worst case separation envelopes during

  10. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays. Phase 1, 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L. R.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Structural concepts for deploying and supporting lightweight solar-array blankets for geosynchronous electrical power are evaluated. It is recommended that the STACBEAM solar-array system should be the object of further study and detailed evaluation. The STACBEAM system provides high stiffness at low mass, and with the use of a low mass deployment mechanism, full structural properties can be maintained throughout deployment. The stowed volume of the STACBEAM is acceptably small, and its linear deployment characteristic allows periodic attachments to the solar-array blanket to be established in the stowed configuration and maintained during deployment.

  11. Silicon Ingot Casting - Heat Exchanger Method Multi-wire Slicing - Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique. Phase 3 Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Sheet Task of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    Several 20 cm diameter silicon ingots, up to 6.3 kg. were cast with good crystallinity. The graphite heat zone can be purified by heating it to high temperatures in vacuum. This is important in reducing costs and purification of large parts. Electroplated wires with 45 um synthetic diamonds and 30 um natural diamonds showed good cutting efficiency and lifetime. During slicing of a 10 cm x 10 cm workpiece, jerky motion occurred in the feed and rocking mechanisms. This problem is corrected and modifications were made to reduce the weight of the bladeheat by 50%.

  12. Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Asif; Philip, Lee; Thouppuarachchi, Chirath

    2012-08-01

    This is a Final Technical Report on the Research and Development completed towards the development of a Low Cost Solar Collector conducted under the DOE cost-sharing award EE-0003591. The objective of this project was to develop a new class of solar concentrators with geometries and manufacturability that could significantly reduce the fully installed cost of the solar collector field for concentrated solar thermal power plants. The goal of the project was to achieve an aggressive cost target of $170/m2, a reduction of up to 50% in the total installed cost of a solar collector field as measured against the current industry benchmark of a conventional parabolic trough. The project plan, and the detailed activities conducted under the scope of the DOE Award project addressed all major drivers that affect solar collector costs. In addition to costs, the study also focused on evaluating technical performance of new collector architectures and compared them to the performance of the industry benchmark parabolic trough. The most notable accomplishment of this DOE award was the delivery of a full-scale integrated design, manufacturing and field installation solution for a new class of solar collector architecture which has been classified as the Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector (BPFC) and may be considered as a viable alternative to the conventional parabolic trough, as well as the conventional Fresnel collectors. This was in part accomplished through the design and development, all the way through fabrication and test validation of a new class of Linear Planar Fresnel Collector architecture. This architecture offers a number of key differentiating features which include a planar light-weight frame geometry with small mass-manufacturable elements utilizing flat mirror sections. The designs shows significant promise in reducing the material costs, fabrication costs, shipping costs, and on-site field installation costs compared to the benchmark parabolic trough, as well as the

  13. Laser-zone growth in a ribbon-to-ribbon (RTR) process silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project. Technical quarterly report No. 10, January 1-March 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghdadi, A.; Gurtler, R.W.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Rice, M.J.; Ellis, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    This quarter has witnessed appreciable progress in achieving high efficiency on RTR solar cells, with an average efficiency of 9.1% on the most recent lot. The best cell to date has a measured efficiency of 11.3%. A new technique for growing limited-length ribbons continually has been demonstrated. This Rigid Edge technique can be used to recrystallize about 95% of the polyribbon feedstock. A major advantage of this method is that only a single, constant length silicon ribbon is handled throughout the entire process sequence; this may be accomplished using cassettes similar to those presently in use for processing Czochralski wafers. Thus a transition from Cz to ribbon technology can be smoothly affected. The maximum size being considered, 3'' x 24'', is half a square foot and will generate 6 watts for 12% efficiency at 1 sun. Silicon dioxide has been demonstrated as an effective, practical diffusion barrier for use during the polyribbon formation. Two different approaches for using the silicon dioxide are being pursued.

  14. Low cost, efficient hybrid solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Malinkiewicz, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Actualmente, existen diversas estrategias para producir energía limpia mediante fuentes renovables, pero es la explotación directa de la energía del Sol la que se presenta como una solución ideal, siendo la mayor fuente de energía verde en la Tierra. La potencia de la energía solar que llega a la Tierra cada año es del orden de 86000 TW (Terawatt, 1012 Watt). Esto representa 4800 veces la demanda energética anual del mundo, estimada en 18 TW. Además, todos los depósitos de energía fósil recon...

  15. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  16. TRUSSELATOR - On-Orbit Fabrication of High Performance Support Structures for Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Trusselator technology will enable on-orbit fabrication of support structures for high-power solar arrays and large antennas, achieving order-of-magnitude...

  17. FDM-HAWK, A High Performance Compact Modular Solar Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Developing a next generation high performance solar array with significant reduction in size and weight will result in improved NASA mission capabilities at lower...

  18. High-Performance Elastically Self-Deployed Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an ultra-lightweight elastically self-deployable roll-out solar array (ROSA) structural platform that when combined with...

  19. Next Generation Extremely Large Solar Array System for NASA Exploration Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed technology is a revolutionary solar array advancement that relies on a structurally optimized platform to provide unparalleled specific-performance and...

  20. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  1. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the design of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, has focused on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt-level central-station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat-plate central-station or other large-scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost-effective configurations. The Central Station Research Forum addressed design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central-station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory research activities. Technical issues were examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect-engineer and laboratory researcher. The forum included presentations on optimum source-circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements and array operation and maintenance. The Research Forum focused on current capabilities as well as design difficulties requiring additional technological thrusts and/or continued research emphasis. Session topic summaries highlighting major points during group discussions, identifying promising technical approaches or areas of future research, are presented.

  2. Degradation of Solar Array Components in a Combined UV/VUV High Temperature Test Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nömayr Christel

    2017-01-01

    A design verification test under UV/VUV conditions of sun exposed materials and technologies on component level is presented which forms part of the overall verification and qualification of the solar array design of the MTM and MPO. The test concentrates on the self-contamination aspects and the resulting performance losses of the solar array under high intensity and elevated temperature environment representative for the photovoltaic assembly (PVA.

  3. Singular formalism and admissible control of spacecraft with rotating flexible solar array

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Dongning; Liu Yiwu

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the attitude control of a three-axis-stabilized spacecraft which consists of a central rigid body and a flexible sun-tracking solar array driven by a solar array drive assembly. Based on the linearization of the dynamics of the spacecraft and the modal identities about the flexible and rigid coupling matrices, the spacecraft attitude dynamics is reduced to a formally singular system with periodically varying parameters, which is quite different from a spacecraft w...

  4. Electromagnetic resonances of solar-selective absorbers with nanoparticle arrays embedded in a dielectric layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Atsushi; Kawamata, Tomoaki

    2016-11-01

    We numerically investigate a solar-selective absorber with tungsten core-shell nanoparticle arrays embedded in an SiO2 layer. The 3D full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations are performed to investigate the geometric effects of different types of solar-selective absorbers. Consequently, broadband light absorption was achieved with either a tungsten nanoparticle array or a tungsten core-shell nanoparticle array because of the strong electric field enhancement in the gap between the core nanoparticles. The solar performance of the proposed structure is shown for high-efficiency solar light absorption. This study enhances understanding of the light absorption mechanism of metallic nanoparticle/dielectric composite and facilitates the design of high-efficiency solar-selective absorbers.

  5. Experimental study on high-voltage solar array sustained arc discharge induced by high charging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that sustained arc discharge induced by electrostatic discharge (ESD) could cause permanent damage to high-power and high-voltage solar array of spacecrafts. The paper focuses on ESD simulating experiments on Si and GaAs samples, and induces sustained arc discharge. The physical mechanism of sustained arc discharge is discussed by comparing the charging/discharging phenomena between Si and GaAs samples. The experiments show that sustained arc discharge can produce a permanent short-circuit channel between solar cell strings through which the solar array’s photovoltaic power may flow out sustainedly. The analyses show that sustained arc discharge strongly depends on solar array structure, solar array operating voltage, ESD characteristics and cell materials.

  6. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  7. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  8. One step lithography-less silicon nanomanufacturing for low cost high-efficiency solar cell production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Logan

    2014-03-01

    To improve light absorption, previously various antireflection material layers were created on solar wafer surface including multilayer dielectric film, nanoparticle sludges, microtextures, noble metal plasmonic nanoparticles and 3D silicon nanostructure arrays. All of these approaches involve nanoscale prepatterning, surface-area-sensitive assembly processes or extreme fabrication conditions; therefore, they are often limited by the associated high cost and low yield as well as the consequent industry incompatibility. In comparison, our nanomanufacturing, an unique synchronized and simultaneous top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication approach called simultaneous plasma enhanced reactive ion synthesis and etching (SPERISE), offers a better antireflection solution along with the potential to increase p-n junction surface area. High density and high aspect ratio anechoic nanocone arrays are repeatedly and reliably created on the entire surface of single and poly crystalline silicon wafers as well as amorphous silicon thin films within 5 minutes under room temperature. The nanocone surface had lower than 5% reflection over the entire solar spectrum and a desirable omnidirectional absorption property. Using the nanotextured solar wafer, a 156mm × 156mm 18.1%-efficient black silicon solar cell was fabricated, which was an 18.3% enhancement over the cell fabricated by standard industrial processes. This process also reduces silicon loss during the texturing step and enables tighter process control by creating more uniform surface structures. Considering all the above advantages, the demonstrated nanomanufacturing process can be readily translated into current industrial silicon solar cell fabrication lines to replace the costly and ineffective wet chemical texturing and antireflective coatings.

  9. 600 Volt Stretched Lens Array for Solar Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past six years, ENTECH, Auburn, NASA, and other organizations have developed a new space photovoltaic array called the Stretched Lens Array (SLA), which...

  10. Technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., CdTe module and array at NREL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, B.; Strand, T.; Hansen, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Powell, R.; Sasala, R. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Engineering and Technology Validation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules and arrays. This paper focuses on the technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., (SCI) cadmium telluride (CdTe) module and array performance by attempting to correlate individual module and array performance. This is done by examining the performance and stability of the modules and array over a period of more than one year. Temperature coefficients for module and array parameters (P{sub max}, V{sub oc}, V{sub max}, I{sub sc}, I{sub max}) are also calculated.

  11. Influence of flexible solar arrays on vibration isolation platform of control moment gyroscopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhang; Jing-Rui Zhang; Shi-Jie Xu

    2012-01-01

    A high-performance vibration isolation platform (VIP) has been developed for a cluster of control moment gyroscopes (CMGs).CMGs have long been used for satellite attitude control.In this paper,the influence of flexible solar arrays on a passive multi-strut VIP of CMGs for a satellite is analyzed.The reasonable parameters design of flexible solar arrays is discussed.Firstly,the dynamic model of the integrated satellite with flexible solar arrays,the VIP and CMGs is conducted by Newton-Euler method.Then based on reasonable assumptions,the transmissibility matrix of the VIP is derived.Secondly,the influences of the flexible solar arrays on both the performance of the VIP and the stability of closed-loop control systems are analyzed in detail.The parameter design limitation of these solar arrays is discussed.At last,by selecting reasonable parameters for both the VIP and flexible solar arrays,the attitude stabilization performance with vibration isolation system is predicted via simulation.

  12. Development of a low cost, portable solar hydrogen generation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kyle; Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, Ashok; Wingo, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen is a clean energy source that is environmentally friendly and safe. It is well known that electrolysis is a common method used to produce hydrogen. Other high cost methods for hydrogen production can be countered by the development of this low cost pulse width modulated circuit, using direct current provided by naturally existing solar energy as a power source. Efforts are being made in the scientific community to produce a low cost, portable, solar hydrogen generating device for a number of clean energy applications such as fuel cells and energy storage. Proof of concept has already been tested in the laboratory and a small prototype system is being designed and fabricated in the workshop at Alabama A&M University. Our results of this study and details of the electronic circuit and the prototype are presented.

  13. The Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Solar Array Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Edward M.; Kichak, Robert; Niemeyer, Lee; Stegeman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The XTE was launched December 30, 1995. Shortly after launch, it become apparent that the solar array was not performing as expected. On leaving shadow, the array exhibited many discontinuous drops in current output. The size of each of these drops was consistent with the loss of a part of a sell. The current decreases could not be caused by the loss of an entire circuit. This meant that the array may have had numerous cracked solar cells that opened as array got warmer. Studies performed on the array's qualification panel suggest that the cell cracks may have been cased by extensive tap testing performed on the array and that these cracks were undetectable at room temperature using usual inspection method.

  14. Low-cost evacuated-tube solar collector appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, D.T.

    1980-05-31

    A low cost solar heat energy collector module and array has been designed using the evacuated tube, selective absorber, air cooled concept. Glass tubing as used in fluorescent lamps with automatic sealing methods is a key feature of the evacuated tube design. A molded fiber glass concentrating reflector panel and sheet metal header assembly are proposed. Major design problems involved included the cost of materials and labor, thermal expansion and distortion problems, high stagnation and operating temperatures, isolation, thermal efficiency, sealing, joining, air pressure drop, and weight of the preassembled module. A cost of less than $5 per active square foot of collecting surface has been estimated for materials and labor of the module and its mounting frame.

  15. Solar central receiver hybrid - A cost effective future power alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshore, D. G.; Bolton, C. N.; Montague, J. E.

    1980-05-01

    System analyses and conceptual designs of solar central receiver hybrid concepts using molten salt (60% NaNO3, 40% KNO3 by weight) and fossil fired nonsolar energy sources (coal, oil, or gas) have been performed. Analyses have developed plant configurations with various solar energy storage capacities and fossil fuels. Economic analyses support the final configuration selection based on minimization of the cost of energy produced from the plant. A 500 MWe commercial plant size installed for a 1990 initial year of operation is competitive with new coal, oil, and nuclear power generation sources. This hybrid plant will save an estimated 5 million barrels of oil per year.

  16. Low-cost electrodes for stable perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, João P.; Manghooli, Sara; Jaysankar, Manoj; Tait, Jeffrey G.; Qiu, Weiming; Gehlhaar, Robert; De Volder, Michael; Uytterhoeven, Griet; Poortmans, Jef; Paetzold, Ulrich W.

    2017-06-01

    Cost-effective production of perovskite solar cells on an industrial scale requires the utilization of exclusively inexpensive materials. However, to date, highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells rely on expensive gold electrodes since other metal electrodes are known to cause degradation of the devices. Finding a low-cost electrode that can replace gold and ensure both efficiency and long-term stability is essential for the success of the perovskite-based solar cell technology. In this work, we systematically compare three types of electrode materials: multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), alternative metals (silver, aluminum, and copper), and transparent oxides [indium tin oxide (ITO)] in terms of efficiency, stability, and cost. We show that multi-walled carbon nanotubes are the only electrode that is both more cost-effective and stable than gold. Devices with multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes present remarkable shelf-life stability, with no decrease in the efficiency even after 180 h of storage in 77% relative humidity (RH). Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of devices with multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes to achieve high efficiencies. These developments are an important step forward to mass produce perovskite photovoltaics in a commercially viable way.

  17. Si/PEDOT:PSS core/shell nanowire arrays for efficient hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenhui; Wang, Chengwei; Yue, Wei; Chen, Liwei

    2011-09-01

    A solution filling and drying method has been demonstrated to fabricate Si/PEDOT:PSS core/shell nanowire arrays for hybrid solar cells. The hybrid core/shell nanowire arrays show excellent broadband anti-reflection, and resulting hybrid solar cells absorb about 88% of AM 1.5G photons in the 300-1100 nm range. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the hybrid solar cell reaches 6.35%, and is primarily limited by direct and indirect interfacial recombination of charge carriers.

  18. Electricity from photovoltaic solar cells: Flat-Plate Solar Array Project final report. Volume V: Process development

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, B.; P. Alexander; D.Burger

    1986-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, funded by the U.S. Government and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was formed in 1975 to develop the module/array technology needed to attain widespread terrestrial use of photovoltaics by 1985. To accomplish this, the FSA Project established and managed an Industry, University, and Federal Government Team to perform the needed research and development. The goal of the Process Development Area, as part of the FSA Project, was to develop ...

  19. The effects of anodization parameters on titania nanotube arrays and dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z. B.; Adams, S.; Blackwood, D. J.; Wang, J.

    2008-10-01

    Ordered, closely packed, and vertically oriented titania nanotube arrays with lengths exceeding 10 µm were fabricated by anodization of titanium foils. The effects of anodization voltage and time on the microstructural morphology and the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cells based on the titania nanotube arrays were investigated. On increasing the anodization voltage or time, the increase in active surface area leads to enhanced photovoltaic currents and thereby an overall higher performance of the dye sensitized solar cells. The efficiency enhancement with rising anodization voltage exceeds the increase in the outer surface area of the nanotubes, indicating that the active surface area is further enlarged by a more accessible inner surface of the nanotube arrays grown with a higher anodization voltage. A promising efficiency of 3.67% for dye sensitized solar cells based on anodized titania nanotube arrays was achieved under AM1.5, 100 mW cm-2 illumination.

  20. The effects of anodization parameters on titania nanotube arrays and dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z B; Adams, S; Blackwood, D J; Wang, J [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)], E-mail: msexz@nus.edu.sg

    2008-10-08

    Ordered, closely packed, and vertically oriented titania nanotube arrays with lengths exceeding 10 {mu}m were fabricated by anodization of titanium foils. The effects of anodization voltage and time on the microstructural morphology and the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cells based on the titania nanotube arrays were investigated. On increasing the anodization voltage or time, the increase in active surface area leads to enhanced photovoltaic currents and thereby an overall higher performance of the dye sensitized solar cells. The efficiency enhancement with rising anodization voltage exceeds the increase in the outer surface area of the nanotubes, indicating that the active surface area is further enlarged by a more accessible inner surface of the nanotube arrays grown with a higher anodization voltage. A promising efficiency of 3.67% for dye sensitized solar cells based on anodized titania nanotube arrays was achieved under AM1.5, 100 mW cm{sup -2} illumination.

  1. Self-Assembled Wire Arrays and ITO Contacts for Silicon Nanowire Solar Cell Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Cheng; ZHANG Gang; LEE Dae-Young; LI Hua-Min; LIM Young-Dae; Y00 Won Jong; PARK Young-Jun; KIM Jong-Min

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of silicon nanowire(SiNW)arrays is studied using SF6/02 plasma treatment. The self-assembly method can be applied to single- and poly-crystalline Si substrates. Plasma conditions can control the length and diameter of the SiNW arrays. Lower reflectance of the wire arrays over the wavelength range 200-1100nm is obtained. The conducting transparent indium-tin-oxide(ITO) electrode can be fully coated on the self-assembled SiNW arrays by sputtering. The ITO-coated SiNW solar cells show the same low surface light reflectance and a higher carrier collection efficiency than SiNW solar cells without ITO coating. An efficiency enhancement of around 3 times for ITO coated SiNW solar cells is demonstrated via experiments.

  2. Simple, Fast, and Cost-Effective Fabrication of Wafer-Scale Nanohole Arrays on Silicon for Antireflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, fast, and cost-effective method was developed in this paper for the high-throughput fabrication of nanohole arrays on silicon (Si, which is utilized for antireflection. Wafer-scale polystyrene (PS monolayer colloidal crystal was developed as templates by spin-coating method. Metallic shadow mask was prepared by lifting off the oxygen etched PS beads from the deposited chromium film. Nanohole arrays were fabricated by Si dry etching. A series of nanohole arrays were fabricated with the similar diameter but with different depth. It is found that the maximum depth of the Si-hole was determined by the diameter of the Cr-mask. The antireflection ability of these Si-hole arrays was investigated. The results show that the reflection decreases with the depth of the Si-hole. The deepest Si-hole arrays show the best antireflection ability (reflection 600 nm, which was about 28 percent of the nonpatterned silicon wafer’s reflection. The proposed method has the potential for high-throughput fabrication of patterned Si wafer, and the low reflectivity allows the application of these wafers in crystalline silicon solar cells.

  3. Impact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.; Bird, L.; Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.

    2012-03-01

    To stimulate investment in renewable energy generation projects, the federal government developed a series of support structures that reduce taxes for eligible investors--the investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial arrangement to allocate risk and reward among the parties. These financial arrangements are generally categorized as 'advanced financial structures.' Among renewable energy technologies, advanced financial structures were first widely deployed by the wind industry and are now being explored by the solar industry to support significant scale-up in project development. This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on energy costs for utility-scale solar projects that use photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.

  4. Evaluation end-of-life power generation of a satellite solar array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taherbaneh, Mohsen, E-mail: taherbaneh@aut.ac.i [Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15916-34311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafooifard, H.; Rezaie, A.H. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15916-34311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, K. [Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We present detailed design description and necessary considerations for solar panels utilized in a specific space mission. {yields} All sources of losses and degradation of the solar panels are fully taken into account. {yields} We introduce a comprehensive novel approach to investigate the electrical behavior of the solar panels. {yields} We use a simple model to calculate the operating temperature range of the solar panels. {yields} We also calculate Mission End-of-Life electrone fluence using SPENVIS. -- Abstract: Knowing the power generated by of solar arrays in a space missions shall satisfy mission requirements; prediction of the power generated by a solar array used in a space mission is very important and necessary. In this research, a detailed design description and necessary considerations for solar panels utilized in a specific space mission is presented. All sources of losses and degradation of solar panels are fully taken into account. This research emphasizes on investigation, analysis and verification of a manufactured solar assembly for a satellite before launch. Solar panels' generated power should be estimated at the end of the mission. For this purpose, radiation values and temperature operating range are specified for the mission. Panels' temperature operating rate is determined through considering a simple model and different spins for the satellite. Mission end-of-life 1 MeV equivalent dose is calculated by SPENVIS suite software. Finally, a comprehensive novel approach is introduced to investigate the electrical behavior of the solar panels. This approach can be implemented in MATLAB environment to obtain output power characteristics of the solar panels for each specific mission. The results are in full accordance with the mission requirements either in beginning-of-life or end-of-life. Therefore, the power prediction of the designed solar array for the mentioned satellite completely satisfies its

  5. GaN nano-pyramid arrays as an efficient photoelectrode for solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y.; Yu, X.; Syed, Z. Ahmed; Shen, S.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2016-11-01

    A prototype photoelectrode has been fabricated using a GaN nano-pyramid array structure grown on a cost-effective Si (111) substrate, demonstrating a significant improvement in performance of solar-powered water splitting compared with any planar GaN photoelectrode. Such a nano-pyramid structure leads to enhanced optical absorption as a result of a multi-scattering process which can effectively produce a reduction in reflectance. A simulation based on a finite-difference time-domain approach indicates that the nano-pyramid architecture enables incident light to be concentrated within the nano-pyramids as a result of micro-cavity effects, further enhancing optical absorption. Furthermore, the shape of the nano-pyramid further facilitates the photo-generated carrier transportation by enhancing a hole-transfer efficiency. All these features as a result of the nano-pyramid configuration lead to a large photocurrent of 1 mA cm-2 under an illumination density of 200 mW cm-2, with a peak incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 46.5% at ˜365 nm, around the band edge emission wavelength of GaN. The results presented are expected to pave the way for the fabrication of GaN based photoelectrodes with a high energy conversion efficiency of solar powered water splitting.

  6. Ultrathin Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells with Inverted Nanopyramid Arrays for Efficient Light Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Alexandre; Cattoni, Andrea; Dupuis, Christophe; Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Lalouat, Loı̈c; Drouard, Emmanuel; Seassal, Christian; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere; Collin, Stéphane

    2016-09-14

    Ultrathin c-Si solar cells have the potential to drastically reduce costs by saving raw material while maintaining good efficiencies thanks to the excellent quality of monocrystalline silicon. However, efficient light trapping strategies must be implemented to achieve high short-circuit currents. We report on the fabrication of both planar and patterned ultrathin c-Si solar cells on glass using low temperature (T anodic bonding and mechanical cleavage. A silver back mirror is combined with a front texturation based on an inverted nanopyramid array fabricated by nanoimprint lithography and wet etching. We demonstrate a short-circuit current density of 25.3 mA/cm(2) for an equivalent thickness of only 2.75 μm. External quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements are in very good agreement with FDTD simulations. We infer an optical path enhancement of 10 in the long wavelength range. A simple propagation model reveals that the low photon escape probability of 25% is the key factor in the light trapping mechanism. The main limitations of our current technology and the potential efficiencies achievable with contact optimization are discussed.

  7. Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudon, K.; Merrigan, T.; Burch, J.; Maguire, J.

    2012-08-01

    The market environment for solar water heating technology has changed substantially with the successful introduction of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs). The addition of this energy-efficient technology to the market increases direct competition with solar water heaters (SWHs) for available energy savings. It is therefore essential to understand which segment of the market is best suited for HPWHs and focus the development of innovative, low-cost SWHs in the market segment where the largest opportunities exist. To evaluate cost and performance tradeoffs between high performance hot water heating systems, annual energy simulations were run using the program, TRNSYS, and analysis was performed to compare the energy savings associated with HPWH and SWH technologies to conventional methods of water heating.

  8. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Sark W.G.J.H.M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs are being developed as a potentially low cost-per-Wp photovoltaic device, suited for applications especially in the built environment. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species, either organic dye molecules or semiconductor nanocrystals. Direct and diffuse incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted at redshifted wavelengths with high quantum efficiency. Optimum design ensures that a large fraction of emitted light is trapped in the sheet, which travels to the edges where it can be collected by one or more mono- or bifacial solar cells, with minimum losses due to absorption in the sheet and re-absorption by the luminescent species. Today’s record efficieny is 7%, however, 10-15% is within reach. Optimized luminescent solar concentrators potentially offer lower cost per unit of power compared to conventional solar cells. Moreover, LSCs have an increased conversion efficiency for overcast and cloudy sky conditions, having a large fraction of diffuse irradiation, which is blueshifted compared to clear sky conditions. As diffuse irradiation conditions are omnipresent throughout mid- and northern-European countries, annual performance of LSCs is expected to be better in terms of kWh/Wp compared to conventional PV.

  9. A Low Cost Weather Balloon Borne Solar Cell Calibration Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David B.; Wolford, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Calibration of standard sets of solar cell sub-cells is an important step to laboratory verification of on-orbit performance of new solar cell technologies. This paper, looks at the potential capabilities of a lightweight weather balloon payload for solar cell calibration. A 1500 gr latex weather balloon can lift a 2.7 kg payload to over 100,000 ft altitude, above 99% of the atmosphere. Data taken between atmospheric pressures of about 30 to 15 mbar may be extrapolated via the Langley Plot method to 0 mbar, i.e. AMO. This extrapolation, in principle, can have better than 0.1 % error. The launch costs of such a payload arc significantly less than the much larger, higher altitude balloons, or the manned flight facility. The low cost enables a risk tolerant approach to payload development. Demonstration of 1% standard deviation flight-to-flight variation is the goal of this project. This paper describes the initial concept of solar cell calibration payload, and reports initial test flight results. .

  10. Communications, Navigation, and Timing Constraints for the Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. A.; Byler, E. A.; Aschwanden, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    The Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA) is a proposed NASA mission to measure solar radio emissions in the 30kHz to 30MHz region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The baseline design consists of 16 separated spacecraft in an irregular pattern several kilometers across. Each spacecraft is equipped with a pair of crossed dipole antennas that together form a 16-element radio interferometer for Fourier-type image reconstruction (120 baselines in the UV-plane). The required close coordination between this formation of spacecraft places many unique constraints on the SIRA communications, navigation, control, and timing architectures. Current specifications call for knowledge of the relative locations of the spacecraft to approximately meter-level accuracy in order to maintain primary instrument resolution. Knowledge of the relative timing differences between the clocks on the spacecraft must likewise be maintained to tens of nanoseconds or better. This in turn sets a minimum bound on the regularity of communications updates between spacecraft. Although the actual positions of the spacecraft are not tightly constrained, enough control authority and system autonomy must be present to keep the spacecraft from colliding due to orbital perturbations. Each of these constraints has an important effect on the design of the architecture for the entire array. This paper examines the engineering requirements and design tradeoffs for the communications, navigation, and timing architectures for SIRA. Topics include the choice of navigation sensor, communications methodology and modulation schemes, and clock type to meet the overall system performance goals while overcoming issues such as communications dynamic range, bandwidth limitations, power constraints, available antenna beam patterns, and processing limitations. In addition, this paper discusses how the projected use of smaller spacecraft buses with their corresponding payload and cost limits has important consequences for the

  11. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-01-01

    Federal buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water.[2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514.

  12. Silicon solar cells with low-cost substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotval, P.S.; Strock, H.B.

    1978-11-07

    Epitaxial and diffusion-type planar diodes and solar cells utilize low-cost refined metallurgical silicon substrates having a substantially higher impurity content than conventional high-cost, high purity semiconductor grade silicon. The epitaxial type products have an n-on-p-on-p substrate configuration, while the diffusion-type products have pentavalent impurities diffused therein to form a p-n junction in the low cost silicon substrate. One embodiment employs a multigrained refined metallurgical silicon (RMS) prepared by precipitating essentially iron-free silicon platelets from a solution of metallurgical grade silicon in molten aluminum, melting said refined platelets, in contact with a silica slag and pulling silicon boules from a melt of said refined metallurgical silicon (RMS). By directionally solidifying the refined silicon--slag melt, a multigrained, directionally solidified refined metallurgical silicon (DS/RMS) is obtained, with boules being pulled from a melt thereof for use as said low-cost substrate. The DS/RMS may also be re-melted and directionally solidified a second time with the boules being pulled from said twice directionally solidified material being a desirable, low-cost, single crystal material suitable for use as said substrate for planar diode and solar cell applications.

  13. A Low Cost, Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) Antenna Technology for Aviation Hazard Detection and Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will investigate the feasibility of utilizing ThinKom's low cost electronically scanned array (ESA) antenna concepts to enable affordable...

  14. Solar and Heliospheric Physics with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Nakariakov, Valery M; Browning, Philippa K; Maia, Dalmiro; Kontar, Eduard P; Oberoi, Divya; Gallagher, Peter T; Cairns, Iver H; Ratcliffe, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The fields of solar radiophysics and solar system radio physics, or radio heliophysics, will benefit immensely from an instrument with the capabilities projected for SKA. Potential applications include interplanetary scintillation (IPS), radio-burst tracking, and solar spectral radio imaging with a superior sensitivity. These will provide breakthrough new insights and results in topics of fundamental importance, such as the physics of impulsive energy releases, magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and turbulence, the dynamics of post-eruptive processes, energetic particle acceleration, the structure of the solar wind and the development and evolution of solar wind transients at distances up to and beyond the orbit of the Earth. The combination of the high spectral, time and spatial resolution and the unprecedented sensitivity of the SKA will radically advance our understanding of basic physical processes operating in solar and heliospheric plasmas and provide a solid foundation for the forecasting of space weathe...

  15. Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Asif; Philip, Lee; Thouppuarachchi, Chirath

    2012-08-01

    This is a Final Technical Report on the Research and Development completed towards the development of a Low Cost Solar Collector conducted under the DOE cost-sharing award EE-0003591. The objective of this project was to develop a new class of solar concentrators with geometries and manufacturability that could significantly reduce the fully installed cost of the solar collector field for concentrated solar thermal power plants. The goal of the project was to achieve an aggressive cost target of $170/m2, a reduction of up to 50% in the total installed cost of a solar collector field as measured against the current industry benchmark of a conventional parabolic trough. The project plan, and the detailed activities conducted under the scope of the DOE Award project addressed all major drivers that affect solar collector costs. In addition to costs, the study also focused on evaluating technical performance of new collector architectures and compared them to the performance of the industry benchmark parabolic trough. The most notable accomplishment of this DOE award was the delivery of a full-scale integrated design, manufacturing and field installation solution for a new class of solar collector architecture which has been classified as the Bi-Planar Fresnel Collector (BPFC) and may be considered as a viable alternative to the conventional parabolic trough, as well as the conventional Fresnel collectors. This was in part accomplished through the design and development, all the way through fabrication and test validation of a new class of Linear Planar Fresnel Collector architecture. This architecture offers a number of key differentiating features which include a planar light-weight frame geometry with small mass-manufacturable elements utilizing flat mirror sections. The designs shows significant promise in reducing the material costs, fabrication costs, shipping costs, and on-site field installation costs compared to the benchmark parabolic trough, as well as the

  16. Reverse bias protected solar array with integrated bypass battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for protecting the photovoltaic cells in a photovoltaic (PV) array from reverse bias damage by utilizing a rechargeable battery for bypassing current from a shaded photovoltaic cell or group of cells, avoiding the need for a bypass diode. Further, the method mitigates the voltage degradation of a PV array caused by shaded cells.

  17. Membrane Material-Based Rigid Solar Array Design and Thermal Simulation for Stratospheric Airships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangwen Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve effective utilization of rigid solar array used in stratospheric airships here, the flexible connection design and light laminated design were introduced to rigid solar array. Based on the analysis of the design scheme, firstly, the equivalent coefficient of thermal conductivity was calculated by the theoretical formula. Subsequently, the temperature variation characteristics of the solar cell module were accurately modeled and simulated by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Compared to the results of test samples, the solar cell module described here guaranteed effective output as well as good heat insulating ability, effectively improving the feasibility of the stratospheric airship design. In addition, the simulation model can effectively simulate the temperature variation characteristics of the solar cell, which, therefore, provides technical support for the engineering application.

  18. Large Absorption Enhancement in Ultrathin Solar Cells Patterned by Metallic Nanocavity Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jiasen; Che, Xiaozhou; Qin, Guogang

    2016-01-01

    A new type of light trapping structure utilizing ring-shaped metallic nanocavity arrays is proposed for the absorption enhancement in ultrathin solar cells with few photonic waveguide modes. Dozens of times of broadband absorption enhancement in the spectral range of 700 to 1100 nm is demonstrated in an ultrathin Si3N4/c-Si/Ag prototype solar cell by means of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and this dramatic absorption enhancement can be attributed to the excitation of plasmonic cavity modes in these nanocavity arrays. The cavity modes optimally compensate for the lack of resonances in the longer wavelength range for ultrathin solar cells, and eventually a maximum Jsc enhancement factor of 2.15 is achieved under AM 1.5G solar illumination. This study opens a new perspective for light management in thin film solar cells and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:27703176

  19. Dust Accumulation and Solar Panel Array Performance on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Eren H.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most fundamental design considerations for any space vehicle is its power supply system. Many options exist, including batteries, fuel cells, nuclear reactors, radioisotopic thermal generators (RTGs), and solar panel arrays. Solar arrays have many advantages over other types of power generation. They are lightweight and relatively inexpensive, allowing more mass and funding to be allocated for other important devices, such as scientific instruments. For Mars applications, solar power is an excellent option, especially for long missions. One might think that dust storms would be a problem; however, while dust blocks some solar energy, it also scatters it, making it diffuse rather than beamed. Solar cells are still able to capture this diffuse energy and convert it into substantial electrical power. For these reasons, solar power was chosen to be used on the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission. The success of this mission set a precedent, as NASA engineers have selected solar power as the energy system of choice for all future Mars missions, including the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project. Solar sells have their drawbacks, however. They are difficult to manufacture and are relatively fragile. In addition, solar cells are highly sensitive to different parts of the solar spectrum, and finding the correct balance is crucial to the success of space missions. Another drawback is that the power generated is not a constant with respect to time, but rather changes with the relative angle to the sun. On Mars, dust accumulation also becomes a factor. Over time, dust settles out of the atmosphere and onto solar panels. This dust blocks and shifts the frequency of the incoming light, degrading solar cell performance. My goal is to analyze solar panel telemetry data from the two MERs (Spirit and Opportunity) in an effort to accurately model the effect of dust accumulation on solar panels. This is no easy process due to the large number of factors involved. Changing solar

  20. Dust Accumulation and Solar Panel Array Performance on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Eren H.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most fundamental design considerations for any space vehicle is its power supply system. Many options exist, including batteries, fuel cells, nuclear reactors, radioisotopic thermal generators (RTGs), and solar panel arrays. Solar arrays have many advantages over other types of power generation. They are lightweight and relatively inexpensive, allowing more mass and funding to be allocated for other important devices, such as scientific instruments. For Mars applications, solar power is an excellent option, especially for long missions. One might think that dust storms would be a problem; however, while dust blocks some solar energy, it also scatters it, making it diffuse rather than beamed. Solar cells are still able to capture this diffuse energy and convert it into substantial electrical power. For these reasons, solar power was chosen to be used on the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission. The success of this mission set a precedent, as NASA engineers have selected solar power as the energy system of choice for all future Mars missions, including the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project. Solar sells have their drawbacks, however. They are difficult to manufacture and are relatively fragile. In addition, solar cells are highly sensitive to different parts of the solar spectrum, and finding the correct balance is crucial to the success of space missions. Another drawback is that the power generated is not a constant with respect to time, but rather changes with the relative angle to the sun. On Mars, dust accumulation also becomes a factor. Over time, dust settles out of the atmosphere and onto solar panels. This dust blocks and shifts the frequency of the incoming light, degrading solar cell performance. My goal is to analyze solar panel telemetry data from the two MERs (Spirit and Opportunity) in an effort to accurately model the effect of dust accumulation on solar panels. This is no easy process due to the large number of factors involved. Changing solar

  1. Absorption efficiency enhancement in inorganic and organic thin film solar cells via plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, Rüştü Umut; Sendur, Kürşat

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate theoretically that by embedding plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays into the active layers of inorganic (c-Si) and organic (P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS) thin film solar cells, absorption efficiency can be improved. To obtain the solar cell absorption spectrum that conforms to the solar radiation, spectral broadening is achieved by breaking the symmetry within the Wigner-Seitz unit cell on a uniform hexagonal grid. For optimized honeycomb designs, absorption efficiency enhancements of 106.2% and 20.8% are achieved for c-Si and P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS thin film solar cells, respectively. We have demonstrated that the transverse modes are responsible for the enhancement in c-Si solar cells, whereas both the longitudinal and transverse modes, albeit weaker, are the main enhancement mechanisms for P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. For both inorganic and organic solar cells, the absorption enhancement is independent of polarization.

  2. Electrostatic Discharge Test of Multi-Junction Solar Array Coupons After Combined Space Environmental Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Hoang, Bao; Funderburk, Victor V.; Wong, Frankie; Gardiner, George

    2010-01-01

    A set of multi-junction GaAs/Ge solar array test coupons were subjected to a sequence of 5-year increments of combined environmental exposure tests. The test coupons capture an integrated design intended for use in a geosynchronous (GEO) space environment. A key component of this test campaign is conducting electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests in the inverted gradient mode. The protocol of the ESD tests is based on the ISO/CD 11221, the ISO standard for ESD testing on solar array panels. This standard is currently in its final review with expected approval in 2010. The test schematic in the ISO reference has been modified with Space System/Loral designed circuitry to better simulate the on-orbit operational conditions of its solar array design. Part of the modified circuitry is to simulate a solar array panel coverglass flashover discharge. All solar array coupons used in the test campaign consist of 4 cells. The ESD tests are performed at the beginning of life (BOL) and at each 5-year environment exposure point. The environmental exposure sequence consists of UV radiation, electron/proton particle radiation, thermal cycling, and ion thruster plume. This paper discusses the coverglass flashover simulation, ESD test setup, and the importance of the electrical test design in simulating the on-orbit operational conditions. Results from 5th-year testing are compared to the baseline ESD characteristics determined at the BOL condition.

  3. Solar central receiver prototype heliostat. Volume III. Cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The Boeing heliostat design can be produced and installed for a Capital Cost of $42 per square meter at high commercial plant quantities and rates. This is 14% less than the DOE cost target. Even at a low commercial plant production rate of 25,000 heliostats per year the Capital Cost of $48 per square meter is 2% less than the cost goal established by the DOE. Projected capital costs and 30 year maintenance costs for three scenarios of production and installation are presented: (1) commercial rate production of 25,000, 250,000, and 1,000,000 heliostats per year; (2) a one-time only production quantity of 2500 heliostats; and (3) commercial rate production of 25,000 heliostats per year with each plant (25,000 heliostats) installed at widely dispersed sites throughout the Southwestern United States. These three scenarios for solar plant locations and the manufacturing/installation processes are fully described, and detailed cost breakdowns for the three scenarios are provided.

  4. Feasibility study of a 110 watt per kilogram lightweight solar array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, N. F.; Stahle, C. V.; Schneider, A.; Hanson, K. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the feasibility of a solar array panel subsystem which will produce 10,000 watts of electrical output at 1 A.U. with an overall beginning-of-life power-to-weight ratio of at least 110 watt/kg is reported. A description of the current baseline configuration which meets these requirements is presented. A parametric analysis of the single boom, two blanket planar solar array system was performed to arrive at the optimum system aspect ratio. A novel concept for the stiffening of a lightweight solar array by canting the solar cell blankets at a small angle to take advantage of the inherent in-plane stiffness to increase the symmetric out-of-plane frequency is introduced along with a preliminary analysis of the stiffening effect. A comparison of welded and soldered solar cell interconnections leads to the conclusion that welding is required on this ultralightweight solar array. The use of a boron/aluminum composite material in a BI-STEM type deployable boom is investigated as a possible advancement in the state-of-the-art.

  5. Hubble Space telescope thermal cycle test report for large solar array samples with BSFR cells (Sample numbers 703 and 704)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble space telescope (HST) solar array was designed to meet specific output power requirements after 2 years in low-Earth orbit, and to remain operational for 5 years. The array, therefore, had to withstand 30,000 thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. The ability of the array to meet this requirement was evaluated by thermal cycle testing, in vacuum, two 128-cell solar cell modules that exactly duplicated the flight HST solar array design. Also, the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit was evaluated by performing a cold-roll test using one module.

  6. Solar array design based on shadow analysis for increasing net energy collection in a competition vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Gómez, Gilberto; Mejía-Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Suárez-Castañeda, Nicolás; Gil-Herrera, Ana; Barrera-Velásquez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) applications such as in the architectural, automotive, and aerospace industries face design contradictions because they are expected to produce a lot of energy but are constrained by available area, surface shape, incident irradiance, shadows, and other aspects that have a negative influence on the energy produced by the solar panel. Solar competition vehicles are some of these challenging PV applications. The design of such solar arrays needs to consider efficiency evaluation in order to optimize space; it is difficult not to install solar modules in areas impacted by shadows. A design procedure for a solar array configuration based on shadow analysis for competition vehicles is presented. The principle is that shadows in moving objects can be simulated, since the vehicle, the earth and the sun are are moving in semipredictable patterns, thus net energy collection can be forecast. The case study presented is the solar array design of a vehicle that participated in the World Solar Challenge 2013. The obtained results illustrate how the employment of the procedure gives insights on important aspects to consider and also delivers qualitative and quantitative information for decision making. In addition, the experience in competition highlights some issues to be considered, modified, or improved in further vehicle designs.

  7. Cost and efficiency optimisation of the fluorescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bende, E.E.; Burgers, A.R.; Slooff, L.H. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kennedy, M. [Dublin Institute of Technology, Dubln (Ireland)

    2008-02-15

    The Fluorescent Solar Concentrator (FSC) is a polymer plate that contains a fluorescent species and that has photovoltaic (PV) cells attached to its small sides. Light that impinges on the plate is absorbed and subsequently emitted by the fluorescent material. Part of the emitted light is subject to total internal reflection and eventually strikes on the PV cells. When a (square) FSC gets longer, both its efficiency and cost decrease. The efficiency decrease can be ascribed to increasing losses due to self-absorption and back-ground absorption. The cost decrease can be attributed to an increasing ratio of the area of the relatively cheap polymer plate to that of the expensive PV cells. These two trends combined lead to a minimum in the cost-per-unit-of-power at a certain size. In this work, we compute both cost [euro/m{sup 2}] and power per unit area [W/m{sup 2}] as well as the cost-per-unit-of-power [euro/W] on the basis of a simple cost model and by simulations using a ray-tracing program. We perform a parameter study and find the optimal FSC. Adopting from another study, a cost-per-unit-area ratio of the polymer plate-to-PV of 1:15, we calculate a cost-per-unit-of-power that is only 35% of that of conventional PV. We identify enhancement possibilities of the device and present the corresponding cost-per-unit-of-power reductions. Moreover, we present results of an FSC with an optimized Cholesteric Top Mirror (CTM) and show that a relative gain in efficiency of 14% is possible.

  8. Modeling and Flight Data Analysis of Spacecraft Dynamics with a Large Solar Array Paddle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takanori; Maeda, Ken; Hoshino, Hiroki

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24 2006 and has been operated successfully since then. This satellite has the attitude dynamics characterized by three large flexible structures, four large moving components, and stringent attitude/pointing stability requirements. In particular, it has one of the largest solar array paddles. Presented in this paper are flight data analyses and modeling of spacecraft attitude motion induced by the large solar array paddle. On orbit attitude dynamics was first characterized and summarized. These characteristic motions associated with the solar array paddle were identified and assessed. These motions are thermally induced motion, the pitch excitation by the paddle drive, and the role excitation. The thermally induced motion and the pitch excitation by the paddle drive were modeled and simulated to verify the mechanics of the motions. The control law updates implemented to mitigate the attitude vibrations are also reported.

  9. Development of solar-blind AlGaN 128x128 Ultraviolet Focal Plane Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the development of solar-blind aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) 128×128 UV Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs). The back-illuminated hybrid FPA archi- tecture consists of an 128x128 back-illuminated AlGaN PIN detector array that is bump-mounted to a matching 128x128 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The 128×128 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wave-lengths of 233 and 258 nm, with a sharp reduction in response to UVB (280―320 nm) light. Several examples of solar-blind images are provided. This solar-blind band FPA has much better application prospect.

  10. Development of solar-blind AIGaN 128×128 Ultraviolet Focal Plane Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN YongGang; ZHANG Yan; CHU KaiHui; LI XiangYang; ZHAO DeGang; YANG Hui

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the development of solar-blind aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) 128×128 UV Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs). The back-illuminated hybrid FPA archi-tecture consists of an 128×128 back-illuminated AIGaN PIN detector array that is bump-mounted to a matching 128×128 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The 128×128 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wave-lengths of 233 and 258 nm, with a sharp reduction in response to UVB (280-320 nm) light. Several examples of solar-blind images are provided. This solar-blind band FPA has much better application prospect.

  11. Performance of solar photovoltaic array fed water pumping system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    This paper discusses the design and performance analysis of a solar ... utilizing a special class of highly rugged machine with simple drive system called ..... Introduction to Fluid Power, Science &Technology, Delmar Cengage Learning.

  12. Performance analysis of solar cell arrays in concentrating light intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yongfeng; Li Ming; Wang Liuling; Lin Wenxian; Xiang Ming; Zhang Xinghua; Wang Yunfeng; Wei Shengxian

    2009-01-01

    tage in concentrating light intensity. The output power has a -20 W/V coefficient and so cooling fluid must be used. Both heat energy and electrical power are then obtained with a solar trough concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system.

  13. Periodically Aligned Si Nanopillar Arrays as Efficient Antireflection Layers for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaocheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Periodically aligned Si nanopillar (PASiNP arrays were fabricated on Si substrate via a silver-catalyzed chemical etching process using the diameter-reduced polystyrene spheres as mask. The typical sub-wavelength structure of PASiNP arrays had excellent antireflection property with a low reflection loss of 2.84% for incident light within the wavelength range of 200–1,000 nm. The solar cell incorporated with the PASiNP arrays exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE of ~9.24% with a short circuit current density (JSC of ~29.5 mA/cm2 without using any extra surface passivation technique. The high PCE of PASiNP array-based solar cell was attributed to the excellent antireflection property of the special periodical Si nanostructure.

  14. Integrated Antenna/Solar Array Cell (IA/SAC) System for Flexible Access Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ricard Q.; Clark, Eric B.; Pal, Anna Maria T.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.

    2004-01-01

    Present satellite communications systems normally use separate solar cells and antennas. Since solar cells generally account for the largest surface area of the spacecraft, co-locating the antenna and solar cells on the same substrate opens the possibility for a number of data-rate-enhancing communications link architecture that would have minimal impact on spacecraft weight and size. The idea of integrating printed planar antenna and solar array cells on the same surface has been reported in the literature. The early work merely attempted to demonstrate the feasibility by placing commercial solar cells besides a patch antenna. Recently, Integrating multiple antenna elements and solar cell arrays on the same surface was reported for both space and terrestrial applications. The application of photovoltaic solar cell in a planar antenna structure where the radiating patch antenna is replaced by a Si solar cell has been demonstrated in wireless communication systems (C. Bendel, J. Kirchhof and N. Henze, 3rd Would Photovotaic Congress, Osaka, Japan, May 2003). Based on a hybrid approach, a 6x1 slot array with circularly polarized crossdipole elements co-located on the same surface of the solar cells array has been demonstrated (S. Vaccaro, J. R. Mosig and P. de Maagt, IEEE Trans. Ant. and Propag., Vol. 5 1, No. 8, Aug. 2003). Amorphous silicon solar cells with about 5-10% efficiency were used in these demonstrations. This paper describes recent effort to integrate advanced solar cells with printed planar antennas. Compared to prior art, the proposed WSAC concept is unique in the following ways: 1) Active antenna element will be used to achieve dynamic beam steering; 2) High efficiency (30%) GaAs multi-junction solar cells will be used instead of Si, which has an efficiency of about 15%; 3) Antenna and solar cells are integrated on a common GaAs substrate; and 4) Higher data rate capability. The IA/SAC is designed to operate at X-band (8-12 GH) and higher frequencies

  15. NEW HIGHER PERFORMANCE LOW COST SELECTIVE SOLAR RADIATION CONTROL COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Ellison; Buddie Dotter; David Tsu

    2003-10-28

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., ECD, has developed a new high-speed low-cost process for depositing high quality dielectric optical coatings--Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD). This process can deposit SiO{sub x} about 10 times faster than the state-of-the-art conventional technology, magnetron sputtering, at about 1/10th the cost. This process is also being optimized for depositing higher refractive index materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and TiO{sub 2}. In this program ECD, in collaboration with Southwall Technologies, Inc. (STI), demonstrated that this process can be used to fabricate high performance low cost Selective Solar Radiation Control (SSRC) films for use in the automotive industry. These coatings were produced on thin (2 mil thick) PET substrates in ECD's pilot roll-to-roll pilot MPECVD deposition machine. Such film can be laminated with PVB in a vehicle's windows. This process can also be used to deposit the films directly onto the glass. Such highly selective films, with a visible transmission (T{sub vis}) of > 70% and a shading coefficient of < 60% can significantly reduce the heat entering a car from solar radiation. Consequently, passenger comfort is increased and the energy needed to operate air conditioning (a/c) systems is reduced; consequently smaller a/c systems can be employed resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency.

  16. Numerical analysis of ALADIN optics contamination due to outgassing of solar array materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markelov, G [Advanced Operations and Engineering Services (AOES) Group BV, Postbus 342, 2300 AH Leiden (Netherlands); Endemann, M [ESA-ESTEC/EOP-PAS, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Wernham, D [ESA-ESTEC/EOP-PAQ, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands)], E-mail: Gennady.Markelov@aoes.com

    2008-03-01

    ALADIN is the very first space-based lidar that will provide global wind profile and a special attention has been paid to contamination of ALADIN optics. The paper presents a numerical approach, which is based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The method allows one to accurately compute collisions between various species, in the case under consideration, free-stream flow and outgassing from solar array materials. The collisions create a contamination flux onto the optics despite there is no line-of-sight from the solar arrays to the optics. Comparison of obtained results with a simple analytical model prediction shows that the analytical model underpredicts mass fluxes.

  17. ACTS Battery and Solar Array Assembly On-Orbit Measured Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilderman, Don R.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a NASA experimental communications satellite system designed to demonstrate on-orbit Ka-band communications and switching technologies that will be used by NASA and the commercial sector in the 21st century. The ACTS was launched on September 12, 1993, and has performed over 10 years of successful experimental operations. The purpose of this report is to describe the ACTS power subsystem and the ACTS solar array and battery assemblies located within the power subsystem and then to document on-orbit measured performance from launch to mission end on April 28, 2004. Solar array and battery performance data is presented, and respective conclusions are drawn. The total solar array power available to the spacecraft was measured each year at the same time, and battery voltage performance was measured twice per year at the same times during peak solar eclipse. At the highest spacecraft power demand, the ACTS uses approximately 1113 W of electrical power during the low-burstrate experiment to operate all six satellite subsystems. After 10 years of on-orbit operation, solar array available output power normal to the Sun measured 1508 W, which represents 395 W of excess margin. The ACTS batteries have successfully supported the ACTS experiment program for over 10 years and operated in excess of 900 charge and discharge cycles through 21 eclipse seasons.

  18. Development and validation of a mechatronic solar array drive assembly for mini/micro-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Guo, Feng; Yu, Chunxu; He, Yu; Ye, Zhuang; Yuan, Shuai

    2017-05-01

    Starting from the 1990s, the mini/micro-satellites around 50-200 kg become one of the research focuses of space industry. Different from the mini-satellites developed at early ages, modern mini/micro-satellites widely incorporate micro-electronics and micro-mechanisms, emphasizing multi-functionality and system integration. As a result, they have relatively high power/volume ratio. Also, to reduce the fuel consumption, the application of micro-electrical propulsion systems on mini/micro-satellites is increasing, which pushes the requirement for electrical power even higher. It is hard for the surface mounted solar cells and stationary solar arrays which were widely used by micro-satellites at early ages to satisfy these elevating power requirements of modern mini/micro-satellites. In response to these requirements, Solar Array Drive Assemblies (SADA) which used to be standard equipments of large spacecrafts have gradually been incorporated in the mini/micro-satellites to rotate the solar arrays for maximum sunlight acquisition, and tremendously reduce the size and mass of the solar arrays.

  19. Cost Efficient Design Approach for Reversible Programmable Logic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. RiazurRahman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible programmable logicarrays (PLA are at the heart of designing of efficient low power computers. This paper presents anefficient approach to design Reversible PLAs that maximizes the usability of garbage outputs and also reduces the number of ancilla inputs generated. The designfor proposed essentialcomponents and the architecture of reversible grid network for designing AND and EX-OR planes are also presented. Several algorithms have been proposed and presented to describe the programming interfaces in context of Reversible PLAs construction. Lastly, recent result on the trade-off between cost factors of standard benchmarkcircuits shows that the proposed design clearly outperforms the existing ones in terms various cost factors.

  20. Simulations of solar cell absorption enhancement using resonant modes of a nanosphere array

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We propose an approach for enhancing the absorption of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells using periodic arrangements of resonant dielectric nanospheres deposited as a continuous film on top of a thin planar cell. We numerically demonstrate this enhancement using three dimensional (3D) full field, finite difference time domain simulations and 3D finite element device physics simulations of a nanosphere array above a thin-film amorphous silicon solar cell structure featuring back reflecto...

  1. Effect of Solar Array Capacitance on the Performance of Switching Shunt Voltage Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anil R; Suresh, MS; Nagaraju, J

    2006-01-01

    Due to high power demand photovoltaic regulators are being switched at high frequency. The solar cell capacitance increases the ripple voltage of the switching regulators at higher switching frequencies. Increased ripple due to array capacitance is calculated and its effect in limiting the maximum design switching frequency is studied. An experimental switching regulator is designed and used to confirm the theoretical considerations. This study has identified a method of solar cell capacitanc...

  2. ZnO nanosheet arrays constructed on weaved titanium wire for CdS-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cuncun; Wei, Lin; Li, Yitan; Liu, Chang; Jiao, Jun; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo

    2014-03-01

    Ordered ZnO nanosheet arrays were grown on weaved titanium wires by a low-temperature hydrothermal method. CdS nanoparticles were deposited onto the ZnO nanosheet arrays using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method to make a photoanode. Nanoparticle-sensitized solar cells were assembled using these CdS/ZnO nanostructured photoanodes, and their photovoltaic performance was studied systematically. The best light-to-electricity conversion efficiency was obtained to be 2.17% under 100 mW/cm2 illumination, and a remarkable short-circuit photocurrent density of approximately 20.1 mA/cm2 was recorded, which could attribute to the relatively direct pathways for transportation of electrons provided by ZnO nanosheet arrays as well as the direct contact between ZnO and weaved titanium wires. These results indicate that CdS/ZnO nanostructures on weaved titanium wires would open a novel possibility for applications of low-cost solar cells.

  3. Excimer laser annealing to fabricate low cost solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to show whether or not pulsed excimer laser annealing (PELA) of ion-implanted junctions is a cost effective replacement for diffused junctions in fabricating crystalline silicon solar cells. The preliminary economic analysis completed shows that the use of PELA to fabricate both the front junction and back surface field (BSF) would cost approximately 35 cents per peak watt (Wp), compared to a cost of 15 cents/Wp for diffusion, aluminum BSF and an extra cleaning step in the baseline process. The cost advantage of the PELA process depends on improving the average cell efficiency from 14% to 16%, which would lower the overall cost of the module by about 15 cents/Wp. An optimized PELA process compatible with commercial production is to be developed, and increased cell efficiency with sufficient product for adequate statistical analysis demonstrated. An excimer laser annealing station was set-up and made operational. The first experiment used 248 nm radiation to anneal phosphorus implants in polished and texture-etched silicon.

  4. Solar Powered Aircraft, Photovoltaic Array/Battery System Tabletop Demonstration: Design and Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Scheiman, David A.; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A system was constructed to demonstrate the power system operation of a solar powered aircraft. The system consists of a photovoltaic (PV) array, a charge controller, a battery, an electric motor and propeller. The system collects energy from the PV array and either utilizes this energy to operate an electric motor or stores it in a rechargeable battery for future use. The system has a control panel which displays the output of the array and battery as well as the total current going to the electric motor. The control panel also has a means for adjusting the output to the motor to control its speed. The entire system is regulated around 12 VDC.

  5. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  6. A summary report on the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Workshop on Transparent Conducting Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachare, R.; Moacanin, J.

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings and technical discussions of a workshop on Transparent Conducting Polymers (TCP) for solar cell applications are reported. This is in support of the Device Research Task of the Flat-Flate Solar Array Project. The workshop took place on January 11 and 12, 1985, in Santa Barbara, California. Participants included university and industry researchers. The discussions focused on the electronic and optical properties of TCP, and on experimental issues and problems that should be addressed for high-efficiency solar cell application.

  7. Calibration of the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array multilayer mirrors and XUV filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Maxwell J.; Willis, Thomas D.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Deforest, Craig E.; Jackson, Lisa; Lindblom, Joakim; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA), a rocket-borne solar observatory, was successfully flown in May, 1991, obtaining solar images in eight XUV and FUV bands with 12 compact multilayer telescopes. Extensive measurements have recently been carried out on the multilayer telescopes and thin film filters at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. These measurements are the first high spectral resolution calibrations of the MSSTA instruments. Previous measurements and/or calculations of telescope throughputs have been confirmed with greater accuracy. Results are presented on Mo/Si multilayer bandpass changes with time and experimental potassium bromide and tellurium filters.

  8. Supervisor Circuit Decides When Solar Array Can Power A Load

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Sun powered electronic devices may suffer in twilight conditions. In particular microprocessors (widely used to perform solar power conditioning, such MPPTs) do not like unstable power or smooth edges on power on. The proposed circuit offers some nice supervision performance at the price of 3 transistors.

  9. Reliability models applicable to space telescope solar array assembly system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A complex system may consist of a number of subsystems with several components in series, parallel, or combination of both series and parallel. In order to predict how well the system will perform, it is necessary to know the reliabilities of the subsystems and the reliability of the whole system. The objective of the present study is to develop mathematical models of the reliability which are applicable to complex systems. The models are determined by assuming k failures out of n components in a subsystem. By taking k = 1 and k = n, these models reduce to parallel and series models; hence, the models can be specialized to parallel, series combination systems. The models are developed by assuming the failure rates of the components as functions of time and as such, can be applied to processes with or without aging effects. The reliability models are further specialized to Space Telescope Solar Arrray (STSA) System. The STSA consists of 20 identical solar panel assemblies (SPA's). The reliabilities of the SPA's are determined by the reliabilities of solar cell strings, interconnects, and diodes. The estimates of the reliability of the system for one to five years are calculated by using the reliability estimates of solar cells and interconnects given n ESA documents. Aging effects in relation to breaks in interconnects are discussed.

  10. Solar cell submodule design facilitates assembly of lightweight arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, R. K.

    1966-01-01

    Solar cell submodules with bus bars that leave tabs along one end of the submodule and wires with raised portions along the other end are assembled by interlocking the tabs and wires of adjacent submodules. This structural design is lightweight and reliable and requires no metallic substructure.

  11. A DP based scheme for real-time reconfiguration of solar cell arrays exposed to dynamic changing inhomogeneous illuminations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Liping; Brehm, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The overall energy conversion efficiency of solar cell arrays is highly effected by partial shading effects. Especially for solar panel arrays installed in environments which are exposed to inhomogeneous dynamic changing illuminations such as on roof tops of electrical vehicles the overall system...... efficiency is drastically reduced. Dynamic real-time reconfiguration of the solar panel array can reduce effects on the output efficiency due to partial shading. This results in a maximized power output of the panel array when exposed to dynamic changing illuminations. The optimal array configuration...... with respect to shading patterns can be stated as a combinatorial optimization problem and this paper proposes a dynamic programming (DP) based algorithm which finds the optimal feasible solution to reconfigure the solar panel array for maximum efficiency in real-time with linear time complexity. It is shown...

  12. Steerable Space Fed Lens Array for Low-Cost Adaptive Ground Station Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Popovic, Zoya; Rondineau, Sebastien; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Fed Lens Array (SFLA) is an alternative to a phased array antenna that replaces large numbers of expensive solid-state phase shifters with a single spatial feed network. SFLA can be used for multi-beam application where multiple independent beams can be generated simultaneously with a single antenna aperture. Unlike phased array antennas where feed loss increases with array size, feed loss in a lens array with more than 50 elements is nearly independent of the number of elements, a desirable feature for large apertures. In addition, SFLA has lower cost as compared to a phased array at the expense of total volume and complete beam continuity. For ground station applications, both of these tradeoff parameters are not important and can thus be exploited in order to lower the cost of the ground station. In this paper, we report the development and demonstration of a 952-element beam-steerable SFLA intended for use as a low cost ground station for communicating and tracking of a low Earth orbiting satellite. The dynamic beam steering is achieved through switching to different feed-positions of the SFLA via a beam controller.

  13. The Solar Umbrella: A Low-cost Demonstration of Scalable Space Based Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Michael T.; Trease, Brian P.; Sherwood, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Within the past decade, the Space Solar Power (SSP) community has seen an influx of stakeholders willing to entertain the SSP prospect of potentially boundless, base-load solar energy. Interested parties affiliated with the Department of Defense (DoD), the private sector, and various international entities have all agreed that while the benefits of SSP are tremendous and potentially profitable, the risk associated with developing an efficient end to end SSP harvesting system is still very high. In an effort to reduce the implementation risk for future SSP architectures, this study proposes a system level design that is both low-cost and seeks to demonstrate the furthest transmission of wireless power to date. The overall concept is presented and each subsystem is explained in detail with best estimates of current implementable technologies. Basic cost models were constructed based on input from JPL subject matter experts and assume that the technology demonstration would be carried out by a federally funded entity. The main thrust of the architecture is to demonstrate that a usable amount of solar power can be safely and reliably transmitted from space to the Earth's surface; however, maximum power scalability limits and their cost implications are discussed.

  14. LEO resistant PI-B-PDMS block copolymer films for solar array applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonkhuyzen, H. van; Bongers, E.; Fischer, H.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Semprimoschnig, C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low atomic oxygen erosion yields PI-b-PDMS block copolymer films have considerable potential for application onto space exposed surfaces of satellites in low earth orbit. On solar arrays these materials might be used as electrical electrical insulation film, flexprint outer layer, elect

  15. LEO resistant PI-B-PDMS block copolymer films for solar array applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonkhuyzen, H. van; Bongers, E.; Fischer, H.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Semprimoschnig, C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low atomic oxygen erosion yields PI-b-PDMS block copolymer films have considerable potential for application onto space exposed surfaces of satellites in low earth orbit. On solar arrays these materials might be used as electrical electrical insulation film, flexprint outer layer,

  16. Intelligent Monitoring and Predicting Output Power Losses of Solar Arrays Based on Particle Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzheng Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar arrays are the main source of energy to the on-orbit satellite, whose output power largely determines the life cycle of on-orbit satellites. Monitoring and further forecasting the output power of solar arrays by using the real-time observational data are very important for the study of satellite design and on-orbit satellite control. In this paper, we firstly describe the dynamical model of output power with summarizing the influencing factors of attenuation for solar arrays and elaborating the evolution trend of influencing factors which change with time. Based on the empirical model, a particle filtering algorithm is formulated to predict the output power of solar arrays and update the model parameters, simultaneously. Finally, using eight-year observational data of voltage and current from a synchronous on-orbit satellite, an experiment is carried out to illustrate the reliability and accuracy of the particle filtering method. Comparative results with classical curve fitting also are presented with statistical root mean square error and mean relative error analysis.

  17. Clearance Analysis of Node 3 Aft CBM to the Stowed FGB Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Donn

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, the ISS Vehicle Configuration Office began considering the relocation of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) to the aft facing Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) on Node 3 to open a berthing location for visiting vehicles on the Node 1 nadir CBM. In this position, computer-aided design (CAD) models indicated that the aft end of the PMM would be only a few inches from the stowed Functional Cargo Block (FGB) port solar array. To validate the CAD model clearance analysis, in the late summer of 2011 the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) was asked to determine the true geometric relationship between the on-orbit aft facing Node 3 CBM and the FGB port solar array. The desired measurements could be computed easily by photogrammetric analysis if current imagery of the ISS hardware were obtained. Beginning in the fall of 2011, ISAG used the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) program to design a way to acquire imagery of the aft face of Node 3, the aft end-cone of Node 1, the port side of pressurized mating adapter 1 (PMA1), and the port side of the FGB out to the tip of the port solar array using cameras on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). This was complicated by the need to thread the SSRMS under the truss, past Node 3 and the Cupola, and into the space between the aft side of Node 3 and the FGB solar array to acquire more than 100 images from multiple positions. To minimize the number of SSRMS movements, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) would be attached to the SSRMS. This would make it possible to park the SPDM in one position and acquire multiple images by changing the viewing orientation of the SPDM body cameras using the pan/tilt units on which the cameras are mounted. Using this implementation concept, ISAG identified four SSRMS/SPDM positions from which all of the needed imagery could be acquired. Based on a photogrammetric simulation, it was estimated that the location of the FGB solar array could be

  18. LEO resistant PI-B-PDMS block copolymer films for solar array applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonkhuyzen, H. van; Bongers, E.; Fischer, H.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Semprimoschnig, C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low atomic oxygen erosion yields PI-b-PDMS block copolymer films have considerable potential for application onto space exposed surfaces of satellites in low earth orbit. On solar arrays these materials might be used as electrical electrical insulation film, flexprint outer layer, elect

  19. Solid-state retrodirective phased array concepts for microwave power transmission from Solar Power Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, K. G.; Petroff, I. K.

    1980-01-01

    Two prototype solid-state phased array systems concepts for potential use in the Solar Power Satellite are described. In both concepts, the beam is centered on the rectenna by means of phase conjugation of a pilot signal emanating from the ground. Also discussed is on-going solid-state amplifier development.

  20. Optical meta-films of alumina nanowire arrays for solar evaporation and optoelectronic devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungsik; Bae, Kyuyoung; Kang, Gumin; Baek, Seunghwa

    2017-05-01

    Nanowires with metallic or dielectric materials have received considerable interest in many research fields for optical and optoelectronic devices. Metal nanowires have been extensively studied due to the high optical and electrical properties and dielectric nanowires are also investigated owing to the multiple scattering of light. In this research, we report optical meta-films of alumina nanowire arrays with nanometer scale diameters by fabrication method of self-aggregate process. The aluminum oxide nanowires are transparent from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelength regions and array structures have strong diffusive light scattering. We integrate those optical properties from the material and structure, and produce efficient an optical haze meta-film which has high transparency and transmission haze at the same time. The film enhances efficiencies of optical devices by applying on complete products, such as organic solar cells and LEDs, because of an expanded optical path length and light trapping in active layers maintaining high transparency. On the other hands, the meta-film also produces solar steam by sputtering metal on the aluminum oxide nanowire arrays. The nanowire array film with metal coating exhibits ultrabroadband light absorption from ultraviolet to mid-infrared range which is caused by nanofocusing of plasmons. The meta-film efficiently produces water steam under the solar light by metal-coated alumina arrays which have high light-to-heat conversion efficiency. The design, fabrication, and evaluation of our light management platforms and their applications of the meta-films will be introduced.

  1. Investigation Results on Solar Array Thermal & Electrical Imbalance Phenomenon on Power Systems Equipped with MPPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, F.; Samaniego, B.; Soriano, T.; Beaufils, G.; Fernandez Lisbona, E.; Dettlaff, K.; Jensen, H.

    2014-08-01

    The thermal / electrical imbalance phenomenon on the satellite solar arrays is a common issue inherent to the negative thermal voltage coefficient of the triple junction cells, which is usually already taken into account with basic precautions on the solar panel layout.In the frame of the ESA TRP study "Investigation on Solar Array thermal and electrical imbalance phenomenon on power systems equipped with Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT)" performed by Airbus Defence & Space (former Astrium Toulouse and Ottobrunn) and TERMA, in-depth analyses were conducted for the first time to better understand and characterize the secondary maximum power point phenomenon for various representative mission cases, whether in Earth vicinity or not. With the help of a newly developed detailed thermo-electrical coupled solver and a wide range of solar cell characterizations in flux and temperature, multiple sets of simulations were run to simulate realistic solar panel characteristics.The study showed that no secondary false maximum power point can be created on the solar panel characteristic IV curve for missions around Earth vicinity, at the sole exception of critical shadowing cases. Furthermore, the same conclusions apply for missions up to Mars orbit. The only potential threats come from the missions further than Mars (typically Jupiter missions) where various very high heterogeneities could lead to multiple maxima. This is deeply linked to the LILT (low illumination low temperature) conditions applied to the current solar cell triple junction characteristics and shape. Moreover, thermo-electrical imbalances that do not create secondary power point can still seriously grieve the solar array power output performances. This power loss can however be accurately assessed by the newly developed solver in support of in-development missions like Juice.

  2. Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells Depending on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Dai, Si-Min; Zhu, Pei; Deng, Lin-Long; Xie, Su-Yuan; Cui, Qian; Chen, Hong; Wang, Ning; Lin, Hong

    2016-08-24

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with TiO2 materials have attracted much attention due to their high photovoltaic performance. Aligned TiO2 nanorods have long been used for potential application in highly efficient perovskite solar cells, but the previously reported efficiencies of perovskite solar cells based on TiO2 nanorod arrays were underrated. Here we show a solvothermal method based on a modified ketone-HCl system with the addition of organic acids suitable for modulation of the TiO2 nanorod array films to fabricate highly efficient perovskite solar cells. Photovoltaic measurements indicated that efficient nanorod-structured perovskite solar cells can be achieved with the length of the nanorods as long as approximately 200 nm. A record efficiency of 18.22% under the reverse scan direction has been optimized by avoiding direct contact between the TiO2 nanorods and the hole transport materials, eliminating the organic residues on the nanorod surfaces using UV-ozone treatment and tuning the nanorod array morphologies through addition of different organic acids in the solvothermal process.

  3. A Comprehensive Review and Analysis of Solar Photovoltaic Array Configurations under Partial Shaded Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramaprabha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of partial shading on energy output of different Solar Photovoltaic Array (SPVA configurations and to mitigate the losses faced in Solar Photovoltaic (SPV systems by incorporating bypass diodes. Owing to the practical difficulty of conducting experiments on varied array sizes, a generalized MATLAB M-code has been developed for any required array size, configuration, shading patterns, and number of bypass diodes. The proposed model which also includes the insolation-dependent shunt resistance can provide sufficient degree of precision without increasing the computational effort. All the configurations have been analyzed and comparative study is made for different random shading patterns to determine the configuration less susceptible to power losses under partial shading. Inferences have been drawn by testing several shading scenarios.

  4. Submicrometer-scale ZnO Composite Aggregate Arrays Photoanodes for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jia; Suihu Dang; Hairui Liu; Zhuxia Zhang; Tianbao Li; Xuguang Liu; Bingshe Xu

    2013-01-01

    Submicrometer-scale ZnO composite aggregate arrays of nanorods and nanoparticles were prepared by simple wet-chemical route and studied as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) photoanodes.The ZnO composite aggregate arrays significantly improved the efficiency of DSSCs due to their relatively high surface area,fast electron transport,and enhanced light-scattering capability.A short current density (Jsc) of 11.7 mA/cm2 and an overall solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency (η) of 3.17% were achieved for the ZnO composite aggregate DSSCs,which were much higher than those obtained for the monodisperse aggregate DSSCs (Jsc=6.9mA/cm2,η=1.51 %) and ZnO nanorod array DSSCs (Jsc =4.2 mA/cm2,η=0.61%).

  5. Analysis of leakage current in GaAs micro-solar cell arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The output characteristics of micro-solar cell arrays are analyzed on the basis of a modified model in which the shunt resistance between cell lines results in current leakage.The modification mainly consists of adding a shunt resistor network to the traditional model.The obtained results agree well with the reported experimental results.The calculation results demonstrate that leakage current in substrate affects seriously the performance of GaAs micro-solar cell arrays.The performance of arrays can be improved by reducing the number of cells per line.In addition,at a certain level of integration,an appropriate space occupancy rate of the single cell is recommended for ensuring high open circuit voltages,and it is more appropriate to set the rates at 80%-90% through the calculation.

  6. Large area solar power heliostat array for OSETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covault, Corbin E.

    2001-08-01

    Current OSETI programs make use of optical telescopes with light collection areas on the order of 10 square meters or less. The small collection area limits the ultimate sensitivity achievable to low-intensity signals. However, solar power facilities such as the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) provide the potential for a much larger collecting area. The NSTTF is operated at by the Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories for research in solar power development and testing. The NSTTF site includes over 200 fully steerable mirrors (called heliostats) each providing 37 square meters of collecting area. This facility is currently being used at night for gamma-ray astronomy. The STACEE experiment makes use of 64 heliostats to detect nanosecond flashes of optical Cherenkov light associated with gamma-ray air showers from the top of the atmosphere. The STACEE experiment has been in operation since 1998 and has already detected gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula. In principle, the STACEE experiment can be operated with minor modifications to detect OSETI signals on the ground at a photon density of less than two optical photons per square meter per pulse. We summarize performance results from the STACEE experiment, and we discuss the sensitivity of a hypothetical future STACEE-OSETI experiment with particular attention to potential sources of background.

  7. Age Induced Effects on ESD Characteristics of Solar Array Coupons After Combined Space Environmental Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Funderburk, Victor V.; Wong, Frankie; Gardiner, George

    2012-01-01

    A set of multi-junction GaAs/Ge solar array test coupons provided by Space Systems/Loral were subjected to a sequence of 5-year increments of combined space environment exposure tests. The test coupons capture an integrated design intended for use in a geosynchronous (GEO) space environment. A key component of this test campaign is performing electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests in the inverted gradient mode. The protocol of the ESD tests is based on the ISO standard for ESD testing on solar array panels [ISO-11221]. The test schematic in the ISO reference has been modified with Space System/Loral designed circuitry to better simulate the on-orbit operational conditions of its solar array design. Part of the modified circuitry is to simulate a solar array panel coverglass flashover discharge. All solar array coupons used in the test campaign consist of four cells constructed to form two strings. The ESD tests were performed at the beginning-of-life (BOL) and at each 5-year environment exposure point until end-of-life (EOL) at 15 years. The space environmental exposure sequence consisted of ultra-violet radiation, electron/proton particle radiation, thermal cycling, and Xenon ion thruster plume erosion. This paper describes the ESD test setup and the importance of the electrical test design in simulating the on-orbit operational conditions. Arc inception voltage results along with ESD test behavior from the BOL condition through the 15th year age condition are discussed. In addition, results from a Xenon plasma plume exposure test with an EOL coupon under the full ESD test condition will be discussed.

  8. High Efficiency Solar Cell on Low Cost Metal Foil Substrate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future space missions will require Solar cell arrays having specific power ratings in excess of 1000 W/kg. Conventional crystalline photovoltaic technology comprised...

  9. Performance Analysis of a Cost-Effective Electret Condenser Microphone Directional Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Gerhold, Carl H.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Herring, Gregory C.; Bartram, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    Microphone directional array technology continues to be a critical part of the overall instrumentation suite for experimental aeroacoustics. Unfortunately, high sensor cost remains one of the limiting factors in the construction of very high-density arrays (i.e., arrays containing several hundred channels or more) which could be used to implement advanced beamforming algorithms. In an effort to reduce the implementation cost of such arrays, the authors have undertaken a systematic performance analysis of a prototype 35-microphone array populated with commercial electret condenser microphones. An ensemble of microphones coupling commercially available electret cartridges with passive signal conditioning circuitry was fabricated for use with the Langley Large Aperture Directional Array (LADA). A performance analysis consisting of three phases was then performed: (1) characterize the acoustic response of the microphones via laboratory testing and calibration, (2) evaluate the beamforming capability of the electret-based LADA using a series of independently controlled point sources in an anechoic environment, and (3) demonstrate the utility of an electret-based directional array in a real-world application, in this case a cold flow jet operating at high subsonic velocities. The results of the investigation revealed a microphone frequency response suitable for directional array use over a range of 250 Hz - 40 kHz, a successful beamforming evaluation using the electret-populated LADA to measure simple point sources at frequencies up to 20 kHz, and a successful demonstration using the array to measure noise generated by the cold flow jet. This paper presents an overview of the tests conducted along with sample data obtained from those tests.

  10. Mechanical design of a low cost parabolic solar dish concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Hijazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design a low cost parabolic solar dish concentrator with small-to moderate size for direct electricity generation. Such model can be installed in rural areas which are not connected to governmental grid. Three diameters of the dish; 5, 10 and 20 m are investigated and the focal point to dish diameter ratio is set to be 0.3 in all studied cases. Special attention is given to the selection of the appropriate dimensions of the reflecting surfaces to be cut from the available sheets in the market aiming to reduce both cutting cost and sheets cost. The dimensions of the ribs and rings which support the reflecting surface are optimized in order to minimize the entire weight of the dish while providing the minimum possible total deflection and stresses in the beams. The study applies full stress analysis of the frame of the dish using Autodesk Inventor. The study recommends to use landscape orientation for the reflective facets and increase the ribs angle and the distance between the connecting rings. The methodology presented is robust and can be extended to larger dish diameters.

  11. Development and Trend of Space Solar Array Technology%空间太阳电池阵的发展现状及趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志全; 杨淑利; 濮海玲

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the development of space solar arrays from four aspects respective ly, including the development of array configuration of body-mounted, solar-paddle, one-panel and multi-panel deployable, and flexible, modular and multidimensional deployable array; the development of material and performdnce of space solar cells such as Si, GaAs, thin-film solar cell; the development and application of rigid, half-rigid and flexible substrate structure, and the cha- racteristic and space application of the five types of deployable mechanism. The factors restricting the development of space solar array are discussed. A flexible solar array with concentrator is proposed as the future trend for development of space solar array. The purpose of this paper is promoting the development of space solar array with larger size, higher power, modularization, lower cost and lighter weight, which will meet to the requirements of high power spacecraft.%从四方面分析了空间太阳电池阵的发展现状,包括体装式、带桨展开式、单板展开式、多板展开式、柔性多模块多维展开式等总体构型的发展历程,常用太阳电池片如硅电池片、砷化镓电池片、柔性薄膜电池片的材料与性能的发展现状,刚性基板结构、半刚性基板结构、柔性基板结构的发展与应用及五种展开机构的特点与空间应用分析,论述了空间太阳电池阵发展的制约因素,指出了聚光型柔性太阳电池阵是未来空间太阳电池阵发展的趋势,旨在促进空间太阳电池阵向着大尺寸、大功率、模块化、低成本和轻质量的方向发展,以适应大功率航天器的发展需求。

  12. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 1: characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The object of Phase III of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed a variety of tasks including: (1) a detailed examination of thermal processing effects, such as HCl and POCl/sub 3/ gettering on impurity behavior, (2) completion of the data base and modeling for impurities in n-base silicon, (3) extension of the data base on p-type material to include elements likely to be introduced during the production, refining, or crystal growth of silicon, (4) effects on cell performance on anisotropic impurity distributions in large CZ crystals and silicon webs, and (5) a preliminary assessment of the permanence of the impurity effects. Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. For example, discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, and conventional solar cell I-V techniques, as well as descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are included. Considerable data are tabulated on the composition, electrical, and solar cell characteristics of impurity-doped silicon.

  13. Solar power. [comparison of costs to wind, nuclear, coal, oil and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, A. L.; Hall, Darwin C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes categories of solar technologies and identifies those that are economic. It compares the private costs of power from solar, wind, nuclear, coal, oil, and gas generators. In the southern United States, the private costs of building and generating electricity from new solar and wind power plants are less than the private cost of electricity from a new nuclear power plant. Solar power is more valuable than nuclear power since all solar power is available during peak and midpeak periods. Half of the power from nuclear generators is off-peak power and therefore is less valuable. Reliability is important in determining the value of wind and nuclear power. Damage from air pollution, when factored into the cost of power from fossil fuels, alters the cost comparison in favor of solar and wind power. Some policies are more effective at encouraging alternative energy technologies that pollute less and improve national security.

  14. High resolution, low cost solar cell contact development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.

    1981-01-01

    The MIDFILM cell fabrication and encapsulation processes were demonstrated as a means of applying low-cost solar cell collector metallization. The average cell efficiency of 12.0 percent (AM1, 28 C) was achieved with fritted silver metallization with a demonstration run of 500 starting wafers. A 98 percent mechanical yield and 80 percent electrical yield were achieved through the MIDFILM process. High series resistance was responsible for over 90 percent of the electrical failures and was the major factor causing the low average cell efficiency. Environmental evaluations suggest that the MIDFILM cells do not degrade. A slight degradation in power was experienced in the MIDFILM minimodules when the AMP Solarlok connector delaminated during the environmental testing.

  15. Interspace modification of titania-nanorod arrays for efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Jin, Zhixin; Wang, Yinglin; Wang, Meiqi; Chen, Shixin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Xintong; Liu, Yichun

    2017-04-01

    Morphology of electron transport layers (ETLs) has an important influence on the device architecture and electronic processes of mesostructured solar cells. In this work, we thoroughly investigated the effect of the interspace of TiO2 nanorod (NR) arrays on the photovoltaic performance of the perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Along with the interspace in TiO2-NR arrays increasing, the thickness as well as the crystal size of perovskite capping layer are reduced accordingly, and the filling of perovskite in the channel becomes incomplete. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that this variation of perovskite absorber layer, induced by interspace of TiO2 NR arrays, causes the change of charge recombination process at the TiO2/perovskite interface, suggesting that a balance between capping layer and the perovskite filling is critical to obtain high charge collection efficiency of PSCs. A power conversion efficiency of 10.3% could be achieved through careful optimization of interspace in TiO2-NR arrays. Our research will shed light on the morphology control of ETLs with 1D structure for heterojunction solar cells fabricated by solution-deposited method.

  16. Cost-effective wavelength selectable light source using DFB fiber laser array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fenghai; Xueyan, Zheng; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    2000-01-01

    A cost-effective wavelength selectable light source comprising a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser array is proposed. A large number of wavelengths can be selected via optical space switches using only one shared pump laser. The structure is a good candidate for use as a wavelength selectabl...

  17. LOFAR tied-array imaging of Type III solar radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Morosan, D E; Zucca, P; Fallows, R; Carley, E P; Mann, G; Bisi, M M; Kerdraon, A; Konovalenko, A A; MacKinnon, A L; Rucker, H O; Thidé, B; Magdalenić, J; Vocks, C; Reid, H; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pietka, G; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Stewart, A; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2014-01-01

    The Sun is an active source of radio emission which is often associated with energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), the Sun has not been imaged extensively because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Here, the combined high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) was used to study solar Type III radio bursts at 30-90 MHz and their association with CMEs. The Sun was imaged with 126 simultaneous tied-array beams within 5 solar radii of the solar centre. This method offers benefits over standard interferometric imaging since each beam produces high temporal (83 ms) and spectral resolution (12.5 kHz) dynamic spectra at an array of spatial locations centred on the Sun. LOFAR's standard interferometric output is currently limited to one image per second. Over a period of 30 minutes, multiple Type III radio bursts were observed, a number of which were found to be located at high...

  18. STS-31 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array (SA) mockup at MSFC, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up shot shows an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)-suited astronaut inspecting a solar array (SA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. MSFC managed the design and development of the telescope. The weightlessness simulator was used to practice SA contingency procedures that might be used in space. Astronauts also practiced SA servicing missions in the simulator which they will perform on the telescope in space. The solar arrays which supply electrical power to the space telescope were developed and contributed by the European Space Agency (ESA). ESA's two prime contractors were British Aerospace in England and AEG in West Germany. The two wing-like solar arrays contain 48,000 solar cells. They convert the sun's energy to electricity during that portion of an orbit when they are exposed to sunlight. The power is stored in six batteries to support the telescope during

  19. Design of a GaAs/Ge Solar Array for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiman, David A.; Brinker, David J.; Bents, David J.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    1995-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being proposed for many applications including surveillance, mapping and atmospheric studies. These applications require a lightweight, low speed, medium to long duration airplane. Due to the weight, speed, and altitude constraints imposed on such aircraft, solar array generated electric power is a viable alternative to air-breathing engines. Development of such aircraft is currently being funded under the Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is currently building a Solar Electric Airplane to demonstrate UAV technology. This aircraft utilizes high efficiency Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) GaAs/Ge space solar cells. The cells have been provided by the Air Force through the ManTech Office. Expected completion of the plane is early 1995, with the airplane currently undergoing flight testing using battery power.

  20. LEO high voltage solar array arcing response model. Interim report, February 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, R.N.

    1987-02-01

    A series of mathematical models were developed that describe the electrical behavior of a large solar cell array floating electrically in the low Earth orbit (LEO) space plasma and struck by an arc at a point of negative bias. There are now three models in this series: ARCII, which is a fully analytical, linearized model; ARCIII, which is an extension of ARCIII that includes solar cell inductance as well as load reactance; Nonlinear ARC, which is a numerical model able to treat effects such as non-linearized, i.e., logarithmic solar cell I/V characteristics, conductance switching as a solar cell crosses plasma ground on a voltage excursion and non-ohmic plasma leakage current collection.

  1. Design and test hardware for a solar array switching unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, A. R.; Cho, B. H.; Sable, D.; Lee, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the control of a pulse width modulated (PWM) type sequential shunt switching unit (SSU) for spacecraft applications. It is found that the solar cell output capacitance has a significant impact on SSU design. Shorting of this cell capacitance by the PWM switch causes input current surges. These surges are minimized by the use of a series filter inductor. The system with a filter is analyzed for ripple and the control to output-voltage transfer function. Stable closed loop design considerations are discussed. The results are supported by modeling and measurements of loop gain and of closed-loop bus impedance on test hardware for NASA's 120 V Earth Observation System (EOS). The analysis and modeling are also applicable to NASA's 160 V Space Station power system.

  2. Recent progress in all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingyao, E-mail: wangqingyao0532@163.com [Ludong University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Chen, Chao; Liu, Wei [Tongji University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Gao, Shanmin [Ludong University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yang, Xiuchun, E-mail: yangxc@tongji.edu.cn [Tongji University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-01-15

    All-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells have been drawing great attention to solar energy conversion, which break through restrictions in traditional solar cells, such as the high recombination at interfaces of porous TiO{sub 2} films/sensitizers/hole conductors/counter electrodes, instability of dyes, and leakage of solution electrolyte, and so the novel solar cells exhibit promising applications in the future. In this Minireview article, the assembling of solar cells including the preparation of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dot preparation and sensitization on photoanodes, filling of hole conductors in TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, and selection of counter electrodes are overviewed, and the development course of all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells in recent years are summarized in detail. Moreover, the influences of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dots, solid electrolyte, and counter electrodes on photon-to-current efficiencies of solar cells are summarized. In addition, current problems of solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells are analyzed, and the corresponding improvements, such as multisensitizers and passivation layers, are proposed to improve the photoelectric conversion efficiency. Finally, this Minireview provides a perspective for the future development of this novel solar cell.

  3. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100 kW application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbandian, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    An ongoing preliminary design effort directed toward a low-concentration-ratio photovoltaic array system based on 1984 technology and capable of delivering multi-hundred kilowatts (300 kW to 1000 kW range) in low earth orbit is described. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 80 kW to 172 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pryamidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of 0.5 meters x 0.5 meters. The structural analysis and design trades leading to the baseline design are discussed. The configuration, as well as optical, thermal and electrical performance analyses that support the design and overall performance estimates for the array are described.

  4. Thermal efficiency of low cost solar collectors - CSBC; Eficiencia termica de coletores solares de baixo custo - CSBC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Renato C.; Shiota, Robson T.; Mello, Samuel F.; Assis Junior, Valdir; Bartoli, Julio R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica. Dept. de Tecnologia de Polimeros

    2006-07-01

    The thermal performance of a low cost flat panel solar collector was measured. This Low Cost Solar Collector is a novel concept for water heating using only thermoplastics materials, used on building: ceiling and tubes made of unplasticized PVC, but without transparent cover. The top side of the UPVC panel was black painted to be the solar radiation absorber surface. Prototypes were installed on two charity houses around Campinas and at the FEQ campus, being used without any trouble for one year. The thermal efficiency analysis followed ABNT NBR 10184 standard at the Green-Solar Laboratory, Brazilian Centre for Development of Solar Thermal Energy, PUC-Minas. It was measured a thermal efficiency of 67%, compared to the 75% usually found on conventional solar collectors made of copper tubes and with glass cover. (author)

  5. Effect of the pn junction engineering on Si microwire-array solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmau Mallorqui, Anna; Epple, F. M.; Fan, D.; Demichel, O.; Morral, A. Fontcuberta I.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the impact of the doping concentration design on the performance of silicon microwire arrays as photovoltaic devices. We have fabricated arrays with different p- and n-doping profiles and thicknesses, obtaining mean efficiencies as high as 9.7% under AM 1.5G solar illumination. The results reveal the importance of scaling the microwire diameter with the depletion width resulting from doping concentrations. The doping of the core should be kept low in order to reduce bulk recombin...

  6. Diode-array UV solar spectroradiometer implementing a digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A.; Burnitt, T.; Porrovecchio, G.; Smid, M.; Egli, L.; Gröbner, J.; Nield, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar ultraviolet spectrum captured by commercially available diode-array spectroradiometers is dominated by stray light from longer wavelengths with higher intensity. The implementation of a digital micromirror device in an array spectroradiometer has the potential to enable the precise selection of desired wavelengths as well as the ability to reduce spectral intensity of some wavelengths via selective mirror modulation, both reducing long wavelength stray light. A prototype consisting of off-the-shelf components has been assembled to verify the validity of the base concept, and initial measurements have been performed to confirm the throughput and image qualities such as spectral resolution and astigmatism.

  7. Distributed solar photovoltaic array location and extent dataset for remote sensing object identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Kyle; Saboo, Raghav; L. Johnson, Timothy; Malof, Jordan M.; Devarajan, Arjun; Zhang, Wuming; M. Collins, Leslie; G. Newell, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Earth-observing remote sensing data, including aerial photography and satellite imagery, offer a snapshot of the world from which we can learn about the state of natural resources and the built environment. The components of energy systems that are visible from above can be automatically assessed with these remote sensing data when processed with machine learning methods. Here, we focus on the information gap in distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, of which there is limited public data on solar PV deployments at small geographic scales. We created a dataset of solar PV arrays to initiate and develop the process of automatically identifying solar PV locations using remote sensing imagery. This dataset contains the geospatial coordinates and border vertices for over 19,000 solar panels across 601 high-resolution images from four cities in California. Dataset applications include training object detection and other machine learning algorithms that use remote sensing imagery, developing specific algorithms for predictive detection of distributed PV systems, estimating installed PV capacity, and analysis of the socioeconomic correlates of PV deployment.

  8. Distributed solar photovoltaic array location and extent dataset for remote sensing object identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Kyle; Saboo, Raghav; L Johnson, Timothy; Malof, Jordan M; Devarajan, Arjun; Zhang, Wuming; M Collins, Leslie; G Newell, Richard

    2016-12-06

    Earth-observing remote sensing data, including aerial photography and satellite imagery, offer a snapshot of the world from which we can learn about the state of natural resources and the built environment. The components of energy systems that are visible from above can be automatically assessed with these remote sensing data when processed with machine learning methods. Here, we focus on the information gap in distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, of which there is limited public data on solar PV deployments at small geographic scales. We created a dataset of solar PV arrays to initiate and develop the process of automatically identifying solar PV locations using remote sensing imagery. This dataset contains the geospatial coordinates and border vertices for over 19,000 solar panels across 601 high-resolution images from four cities in California. Dataset applications include training object detection and other machine learning algorithms that use remote sensing imagery, developing specific algorithms for predictive detection of distributed PV systems, estimating installed PV capacity, and analysis of the socioeconomic correlates of PV deployment.

  9. Enhanced electron photoemission by collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle-array photodetectors and solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays to enhance photoelectron emission in Schottky-barrier photodetectors and solar cells. We show that the interaction of lattice resonances (the Rayleigh anomaly) and individual particle excitations (localized surface plasmon resonances) leads to stronger local field enhancement and significant increase of the photocurrent compared to the case when only individual particle excitations are present. The results can be used to design new photodetectors with highly selective, tunable spectral response, able to detect photons with the energy below the semiconductor bandgap, and to develop solar cells with increased efficiency.

  10. Design, development, manufacture, testing, and delivery of devices for connection of solar cell panel circuitry to flat conductor cable solar cell array harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, P. A.; Waddington, D.

    1971-01-01

    The technology status and problem areas which exist for the application of flat conductor cabling to solar cell arrays are summarized. Details covering the design, connector manufacture, and prototype test results are also summarized.

  11. Towards a Low-Cost Modelling System for Optimising the Layout of Tidal Turbine Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Nash

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the long-term, tidal turbines will most likely be deployed in farms/arrays where energy extraction by one turbine may significantly affect the energy available to another turbine. Given the prohibitive cost of experimental and/or field investigations of such turbine interactions, numerical models can play a significant role in determining the optimum layout of tidal turbine arrays with respect to energy capture. In the present research, a low-cost modelling solution for optimising turbine array layouts is presented and assessed. Nesting is used in a far-field model to telescope spatial resolution down to the scale of the turbines within the turbine array, allowing simulation of the interactions between adjacent turbines as well as the hydrodynamic impacts of individual turbines. The turbines are incorporated as momentum sinks. The results show that the model can compute turbine wakes with similar far-field spatial extents and velocity deficits to those measured in published experimental studies. The results show that optimum spacings for multi-row arrays with regard to power yield are 3–4 rotor diameters (RD across-stream and 1–4 RD along-stream, and that turbines in downstream rows should be staggered to avoid wake effects of upstream turbines and to make use of the accelerated flows induced by adjacent upstream turbines.

  12. Space solar cells - tradeoff analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.R. [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Power Systems Group

    2003-05-15

    This paper summarizes the study that had the objective to tradeoff space solar cells and solar array designs to determine the best choice of solar cell and array technology that would be more beneficial in terms of mass, area and cost for different types of space missions. Space solar cells, which are commercially now available in the market and to be available in the near future, were considered for this trade study. Four solar array designs: rigid, flexible, thin film flexible and concentrator solar arrays were considered for assessment. Performance of the solar cells along with solar array designs were studied for two types of space missions:geo synchronous orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The Solar array designs assumed were to provide 15 kW power for 15 years mission life in GEO and 5 kW power for 5 years mission life in LEO altitudes. To perform tradeoff analysis a spread sheet model was developed that calculates the size, mass and estimates the cost of solar arrays based on different solar cell and array technologies for given set of mission requirements. Comparative performance metrics (W/kg, W/m{sup 2}, kg/m{sup 2}, and $/W) were calculated for all solar arrays studied and compared, at the solar array subsystem level and also at the spacecraft system level. The trade analysis results show that high-efficiency multijunction solar cells bring lot of cost advantages for both types of missions. The trade study also shows that thin film solar cells with moderate efficiency with ultra lightweight flexible array design may become competitive with well-established single crystalline solar cell technologies in the future. (author)

  13. Space solar cells. Tradeoff analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M. Raja [Power Systems Group, Solar Panels Division, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2003-05-15

    This paper summarizes the study that had the objective to tradeoff space solar cells and solar array designs to determine the best choice of solar cell and array technology that would be more beneficial in terms of mass, area and cost for different types of space missions. Space solar cells, which are commercially now available in the market and to be available in the near future, were considered for this trade study. Four solar array designs: rigid, flexible, thin film flexible and concentrator solar arrays were considered for assessment. Performance of the solar cells along with solar array designs were studied for two types of space missions: geo synchronous orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The Solar array designs assumed were to provide 15kW power for 15 years mission life in GEO and 5kW power for 5 years mission life in LEO altitudes. To perform tradeoff analysis a spread sheet model was developed that calculates the size, mass and estimates the cost of solar arrays based on different solar cell and array technologies for given set of mission requirements. Comparative performance metrics (W/kg, W/m{sup 2}, kg/m{sup 2}, and $/W) were calculated for all solar arrays studied and compared, at the solar array subsystem level and also at the spacecraft system level. The trade analysis results show that high-efficiency multijunction solar cells bring lot of cost advantages for both types of missions. The trade study also show that thin film solar cells with moderate efficiency with ultra lightweight flexible array design may become competitive with well-established single crystalline solar cell technologies in the future.

  14. Lightweight Integrated Solar Array (LISA): Providing Higher Power to Small Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John; Fabisinski, Leo; Lockett, Tiffany Russell

    2015-01-01

    Affordable and convenient access to electrical power is essential for all spacecraft and is a critical design driver for the next generation of smallsats, including CubeSats, which are currently extremely power limited. The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array (LISA), a concept designed, prototyped, and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provides an affordable, lightweight, scalable, and easily manufactured approach for power generation in space. This flexible technology has many wide-ranging applications from serving small satellites to providing abundant power to large spacecraft in GEO and beyond. By using very thin, ultraflexible solar arrays adhered to an inflatable or deployable structure, a large area (and thus large amount of power) can be folded and packaged into a relatively small volume.

  15. The design and development of a constant-speed solar array drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H. M.; Roger, N.

    1985-01-01

    The design and development of a constant-speed solar array drive system for use in high power communications satellites is described. The relationship between continuity of motion in the solar array drive and spacecraft attitude disturbance is investigated. The selection of the system design based on the design requirements including spacecraft disturbance is discussed. The system comprises two main parts: the drive mechanism including small angle stepper motor and reduction gearing and the control electronics including ministepping drive circuits, such that a very small output step size is achieved. Factors contributing to discontinuities in motion are identified and discussed. Test methods for measurement of very small amplitudes of discontinuity at low rotational rates are described to assist in the testing of similar mechanisms.

  16. Closed Loop solar array-ion thruster system with power control circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, R. P. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A power control circuit connected between a solar array and an ion thruster receives voltage and current signals from the solar array. The control circuit multiplies the voltage and current signals together to produce a power signal which is differentiated with respect to time. The differentiator output is detected by a zero crossing detector and, after suitable shaping, the detector output is phase compared with a clock in a phase demodulator. An integrator receives no output from the phase demodulator when the operating point is at the maximum power but is driven toward the maximum power point for non-optimum operation. A ramp generator provides minor variations in the beam current reference signal produced by the integrator in order to obtain the first derivative of power.

  17. Singular formalism and admissible control of spacecraft with rotating flexible solar array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Dongning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the attitude control of a three-axis-stabilized spacecraft which consists of a central rigid body and a flexible sun-tracking solar array driven by a solar array drive assembly. Based on the linearization of the dynamics of the spacecraft and the modal identities about the flexible and rigid coupling matrices, the spacecraft attitude dynamics is reduced to a formally singular system with periodically varying parameters, which is quite different from a spacecraft with fixed appendages. In the framework of the singular control theory, the regularity and impulse-freeness of the singular system is analyzed and then admissible attitude controllers are designed by Lyapunov’s method. To improve the robustness against system uncertainties, an H∞ optimal control is designed by optimizing the H∞ norm of the system transfer function matrix. Comparative numerical experiments are performed to verify the theoretical results.

  18. Singular formalism and admissible control of spacecraft with rotating flexible solar array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Dongning; Liu Yiwu

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the attitude control of a three-axis-stabilized spacecraft which consists of a central rigid body and a flexible sun-tracking solar array driven by a solar array drive assembly. Based on the linearization of the dynamics of the spacecraft and the modal identi-ties about the flexible and rigid coupling matrices, the spacecraft attitude dynamics is reduced to a formally singular system with periodically varying parameters, which is quite different from a space-craft with fixed appendages. In the framework of the singular control theory, the regularity and impulse-freeness of the singular system is analyzed and then admissible attitude controllers are designed by Lyapunov’s method. To improve the robustness against system uncertainties, an H1 optimal control is designed by optimizing the H1 norm of the system transfer function matrix. Comparative numerical experiments are performed to verify the theoretical results.

  19. Development of imaging arrays for solar UV observations based on wide band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuehle, Udo H.; Hochedez, Jean-Francois E.; Pau, Jose Luis; Rivera, Carlos; Munoz, Elias; Alvarez, Jose; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Lemaire, Philippe; Appourchaux, Thierry; Fleck, Bernhard; Peacock, Anthony; Richter, Mathias; Kroth, Udo; Gottwald, Alexander; Castex, Marie-Claude; Deneuville, Alain; Muret, Pierre; Nesladek, Milos; Omnes, Franck; John, Joachim; Van Hoof, Chris

    2004-02-01

    Solar ultraviolet imaging instruments in space pose most demanding requirements on their detectors in terms of dynamic range, low noise, high speed, and high resolution. Yet UV detectors used on missions presently in space have major drawbacks limiting their performance and stability. In view of future solar space missions we have started the development of new imaging array devices based on wide band gap materials (WBGM), for which the expected benefits of the new sensors - primarily visible blindness and radiation hardness - will be highly valuable. Within this initiative, called "Blind to Optical Light Detectors (BOLD)", we have investigated devices made of AlGa-nitrides and diamond. We present results of the responsivity measurements extending from the visible down to extreme UV wavelengths. We discuss the possible benefits of these new devices and point out ways to build new imaging arrays for future space missions.

  20. Observation of Reconstructable Radio Waveforms from Solar Flares with the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Askaryan Radio Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultra-high energy (>1017 eV) neutrino detector in phased construction at the South Pole. The full detector will consist of 37 autonomous stations of antennas which search for the radio pulses produced by neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice. Three of the proposed detectors have been installed at up to 200m depth, with an additional two slated for deployment in Austral summer 2017. A prototype of the detector was deployed in January 2011, in time to serendipitously observe the relatively active solar month of February. In this talk, we will present preliminary results from an analysis of radio waveforms associated with an X-class solar flare observed in this prototype station. These are the first reconstructable events of natural origin seen by ARA, and could potentially be a powerful calibration source for the array.

  1. Optimal sun-alignment techniques of large solar arrays in electric propulsion spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissinger, H. F.; Dailey, C. L.; Valgora, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Optimum sun-alignment of large solar arrays in electric propulsion spacecraft operating in earth orbit requires periodic roll motions around the thrust axis, synchronized with the apparent conical motion of the sun line. This oscillation is sustained effectively with the aid of gravity gradient torques while only a small share of the total torque is being contributed by the attitude control system. Tuning the system for resonance requires an appropriate choice of moment-of-inertia characteristics. To minimize atmospheric drag at low orbital altitudes the solar array is oriented parallel, or nearly parallel, to the flight direction. This can increase the thrust-to-drag ratio by as much as an order of magnitude. Coupled with optimal roll orientation, this feathering technique will permit use of electric propulsion effectively at low altitudes in support of space shuttle or space station activities and in spiral ascent missions.

  2. Design of cascaded low cost solar cell with CuO substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Mil'shtein; Anup, Pillai; Shiv, Sharma; Garo, Yessayan

    2013-12-01

    For many years the main focus of R&D in solar cells was the development of high-efficiency solar convertors. However with solar technology beginning to be a part of national grids and stand-alone power supplies for variety of individual customers, the emphasis has changed, namely, the cost per kilowatt- hour (kW-hr) started to be an important figure of merit. Although Si does dominate the market of solar convertors, this material has total cost of kilowatt-hour much higher than what the power grid is providing presently to customers. It is well known that the cost of raw semiconductor material is a major factor in formulation of the final cost of a solar cell. That motivated us to search and design a novel solar cell using cheap materials. The new p-i-n solar cell consists of hetero-structure cascade of materials with step by step decreasing energy gap. Since the lattice constant of these three materials do differ not more than 2%, the more expensive epitaxial fabrication methods can be used as well. It should be emphasized that designed solar cell is not a cascade of three solar cells connected in series. Our market study shows that Si solar panel which costs 250-400 / m2 leads to a cost of 0.12-0.30 / kW-hr. To the contrary, CuO based solar cells with Cadmium compounds on top, would cost 100 / m2. This will allow the novel solar cell to produce electricity at a cost of 0.06-0.08 / kW-hr.

  3. NASA-STD-4005 and NASA-HDBK-4006, LEO Spacecraft Solar Array Charging Design Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2007-01-01

    Two new NASA Standards are now official. They are the NASA LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard (NASA-STD-4005) and the NASA LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Handbook (NASA-HDBK-4006). They give the background and techniques for controlling solar array-induced charging and arcing in LEO. In this paper, a brief overview of the new standards is given, along with where they can be obtained and who should be using them.

  4. Proceedings of the flat-plate solar array project research forum on photovoltaic metallization systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-11-15

    A Photovoltaic Metallization Research Forum, under the sponsorship of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and the US Department of Energy, was held March 16-18, 1983 at Pine Mountain, Georgia. The Forum consisted of five sessions, covering (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques and (5) future metallization challenges. Twenty-three papers were presented.

  5. Prototype Tests for the CELESTE Solar Array $\\gamma$-Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Giebels, B; Bergeret, H; Cordier, A; Debiais, G; De Naurois, Mathieu; Dezalay, J P; Dumora, D; Eschstruth, P T; Espigat, P; Fabre, B; Fleury, P; Ghesquière, C; Herault, N; Malet, I; Merkel, B; Meynadier, C; Palatka, M; Paré, E; Procureur, J; Punch, M; Québert, J; Ragan, K; Rob, L; Schovanek, P; Smith, D A; Vrana, J

    1998-01-01

    The CELESTE experiment will be an Atmospheric Cherenkov detector designed to bridge the gap in energy sensitivity between current satellite and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, 20 to 300 GeV. We present test results made at the former solar power plant, Themis, in the French Pyrenees. The tests confirm the viability of using a central tower heliostat array for Cherenkov wavefront sampling.

  6. Design of coated standing nanowire array solar cell performing beyond the planar efficiency limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yang; Ye, Qinghao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-05-01

    The single standing nanowire (SNW) solar cells have been proven to perform beyond the planar efficiency limits in both open-circuit voltage and internal quantum efficiency due to the built-in concentration and the shifting of the absorption front. However, the expandability of these nano-scale units to a macro-scale photovoltaic device remains unsolved. The main difficulty lies in the simultaneous preservation of an effective built-in concentration in each unit cell and a broadband high absorption capability of their array. Here, we have provided a detailed theoretical guideline for realizing a macro-scale solar cell that performs furthest beyond the planar limits. The key lies in a complementary design between the light-trapping of the single SNWs and that of the photonic crystal slab formed by the array. By tuning the hybrid HE modes of the SNWs through the thickness of a coaxial dielectric coating, the optimized coated SNW array can sustain an absorption rate over 97.5% for a period as large as 425 nm, which, together with the inherited carrier extraction advantage, leads to a cell efficiency increment of 30% over the planar limit. This work has demonstrated the viability of a large-size solar cell that performs beyond the planar limits.

  7. Design and Test Analysis of a Solar Array Root Hinge Drive Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xilun; LI Xin

    2014-01-01

    A root hinge drive assembly is preferred in place of the classical viscous damper in a large solar array system. It has advantages including better deployment control and higher reliability. But the traditional single degree of freedom model should be improved. A multiple degrees of freedom dynamics model is presented for the solar arrays deployment to guide the drive assembly design. The established model includes the functions of the torsion springs, the synchronization mechanism and the lock-up impact. A numerical computation method is proposed to solve the dynamics coupling problem. Then considering the drive torque requirement calculated by the proposed model, a root hinge drive assembly is developed based on the reliability engineering design methods, and dual actuators are used as a redundancy design. Pseudo-efficiency is introduced and the major factors influencing the (pseudo-) efficiency of the gear mechanism designed with high reduction ratio are studied for further test data analysis. A ground prototype deployment test is conducted to verify the capacity of the drive assembly. The test device consists of a large-area solar array system and a root hinge drive assembly. The RHDA development time is about 43 s. The theoretical drive torque is compared with the test values which are obtained according to the current data and the reduction efficiency analysis, and the results show that the presented model and the calibration methods are proper enough.

  8. Study on the Behavior of Solar Array Deployment with Root Hinge Drive Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xilun; LI Xin; XU Kun; YANG Qiaolong; PU Hailing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a method of using a root hinge drive assembly (RHDA) to control the solar array deployment is provided and a multi-DOF mechanism dynamic model of the system is established.In this way,the root hinge torque can be calculated iteratively.Then taking the predicted torque as a reference,a RHDA is designed for a large multiple-stage packaging and deployable solar array system.The control effect of the drive assembly is validated by ground tests.The test results indicate that the solar arrays can be deployed smoothly,and the deployment velocities are restricted by the drive assembly as expected.During the tests,the RHDA output speed and output torque are obtained.In order to examine the impact force when the yoke is lock-up with a hard stop,dynamics simulations are performed according to the actual behavior.The simulation result indicates that the designed RHDA reduces the impact force significantly and improves the lock-up reliability effectively.

  9. Design and test analysis of a solar array root hinge drive assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xilun; Li, Xin

    2014-09-01

    A root hinge drive assembly is preferred in place of the classical viscous damper in a large solar array system. It has advantages including better deployment control and higher reliability. But the traditional single degree of freedom model should be improved. A multiple degrees of freedom dynamics model is presented for the solar arrays deployment to guide the drive assembly design. The established model includes the functions of the torsion springs, the synchronization mechanism and the lock-up impact. A numerical computation method is proposed to solve the dynamics coupling problem. Then considering the drive torque requirement calculated by the proposed model, a root hinge drive assembly is developed based on the reliability engineering design methods, and dual actuators are used as a redundancy design. Pseudo-efficiency is introduced and the major factors influencing the (pseudo-) efficiency of the gear mechanism designed with high reduction ratio are studied for further test data analysis. A ground prototype deployment test is conducted to verify the capacity of the drive assembly. The test device consists of a large-area solar array system and a root hinge drive assembly. The RHDA development time is about 43 s. The theoretical drive torque is compared with the test values which are obtained according to the current data and the reduction efficiency analysis, and the results show that the presented model and the calibration methods are proper enough.

  10. Fabrication of nanowire arrays over micropyramids for efficient Si solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Namrata; Singh, Prashant; Srivastava, Sanjay Kumar; Shukla, Vivek Kumar

    2016-05-01

    To improve the efficiency of solar cell, trapping the sunlight and using it to its maximum limit has been the area of research for past several decades. In the present work, texturisation of silicon surface has been done to make nanowire arrays over micropyramids. Micropyramids on Si surface increases the surface area, reduce the reflectivity and hence help to enhance the solar cell performance. Additionally, with the aim to further reduce the reflectance of Si surface, nanowire arrays over micro pyramids were fabricated. For this, samples with variation in their nanotexturisation time (etching time) were prepared. Measurements like SEM and UV-Vis reflectance spectroscopy were performed on the samples to investigate the changes with etching time. It was observed that the reflectance of planar Si in the spectral range 400 to 1000 nm is ˜35%. The reflectance of microtextured (micropyramid) Si surface is significantly reduced to ˜11%. A further decrease in reflectivity was observed when nanowire arrays were grown over the micropyramids. This may be attributed to the effective light trapping caused by multiple scattering of the incident light from the nanowires over micropyramids. Hence, it may improve silicon solar cell efficiency.

  11. Dynamic responses of space solar arrays considering joint clearance and structural flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article numerically investigates the effects of revolute joint clearance and structural flexibility on the overall dynamic characteristics of a deployable solar array system. Considering torque spring, close cable loop configuration, and lock mechanism, a typical mechanism composed of a main body with a yoke and two panels is used as a demonstration case to study the effects of clearance and flexibility on the dynamic response of the deployable solar array system in the deployment and lock process. The normal contact force model and tangential friction model in clearance joint are established using Lankarani Nikravesh model and modified Coulomb friction model, respectively. The numerical simulation results reveal that the coupling of clearance and flexibility makes different effects on the dynamic characteristics of the deployable space solar arrays for different operation stages. Besides, the clearance and flexibility of a mechanical system play crucial roles in predicting accurately the dynamic response of the system, which is the foundation of mechanism design, precision analysis, and control system design.

  12. Experiences of a grid connected solar array energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymássy, Zoltán; Vántus, András

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy possibilities of Hungary are higher than in Central Europe generally. The Institute for Land Utilisation, Technology and Regional Development of the University of Debrecen installed a photovoltaic (PV) system. The PV system is structured into 3 subsystems (fields). The first subsystem has 24 pieces of Kyocera KC 120 W type modules, the second subsystem has 72 pieces of Siemens ST 40W, and the remaining has 72 pieces of Dunasolar DS 40W In order to be operable independently of each other three inverter modules (SB 2500) had been installed. The recorder can be connected directly to a desktop PC. Operating and meteorological dates are recorded by MS Excel every 15 minutes. The power plant is connected to a weather station, which contents a PT 100 type temperature and humidity combined measuring instrument, a CM 11 pyranometer, and a wind speed measuring instrument. The produced DC, and AC power, together with the produced energy are as well, and the efficiency can be determined for each used PV technology. The measured operating and meteorological dates are collected by Sunny Boy Control, produced by the SMA. The energy productions of the subsystems are measured continually and the subsystems are measured separately. As an expected, the produced energy of polycrystalline -Si PV module and monocrystalline -Si PV was higher than amorphous-Si PV module. It is well known that energy analysis is more suitable for energy balance when we design a system. The air temperature and the temperature of the panels and the global irradiation conditions were measured. In summertime the panel temperature reaches 60-80 degrees in a sunny day. The panel temperatures are in a spring sunny day approximately 30-40 degrees. It can be concluded that the global irradiation is a major impact feature to influence the amount of energy produced. The efficiency depends on several parameters (spectral distribution of the incoming light, temperature values, etc.). The energy efficiency

  13. LOFAR tied-array imaging and spectroscopy of solar S bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Morosan, D E; Zucca, P; O'Flannagain, A; Fallows, R; Reid, H; Magdalenic, J; Mann, G; Bisi, M M; Kerdraon, A; Konovalenko, A A; MacKinnon, A L; Rucker, H O; Thide, B; Vocks, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brouw, W N; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; Eisloffel, J; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission that is often associated with energetic phenomena ranging from nanoflares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), numerous millisecond duration radio bursts have been reported, such as radio spikes or solar S bursts (where S stands for short). To date, these have neither been studied extensively nor imaged because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Aims. Here, Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations were used to study the spectral and spatial characteristics of a multitude of S bursts, as well as their origin and possible emission mechanisms. Methods. We used 170 simultaneous tied-array beams for spectroscopy and imaging of S bursts. Since S bursts have short timescales and fine frequency structures, high cadence (~50 ms) tied-array images were used instead of standard interferometric imaging, that is currently limited to one image per second. Results. On 9 July 2013, over 3000 S bursts were ob...

  14. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals are

  15. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals

  16. Portable, X-Y translating, infrared microscope for remote inspection of photovoltaic solar arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalent physical defect found in terrestrial photovoltaic modules during manufacture and field exposure has been the cracked solar cell. Cells can become cracked during handling, because of thermal mismatch in their encapsulation packages, or due to environmental phenomena such as hail. A device is described which can be used remotely to locate cracked silicon solar cells in photovoltaic modules. This solar-cell inspection device can be used either in the laboratory for quality assurance and failure analysis evaluation or at array fields to monitor cracked-cell occurrence. It consists of: (a) an infrared microscope that operates at 1.0 micron, uses darkfield illumination, has a relatively large field of view (3.0 in.), has low system magnification (5X to 15X), and has a video display output; (b) a portable X-Y translator that is capable of moving the microscope over an 8 ft. x 8 ft. area; and (c) a console that allows remote instrument control and visual inspection of modules or arrays (up to 500 ft). This system presently is undergoing laboratory and field testing as part of the DOE-sponsored MIT Lincoln Laboratory Solar Photovoltiac Residential Project.

  17. Design of DSP-based high-power digital solar array simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhilong; Tong, Weichao; Feng, Jian; Ji, Yibo

    2013-12-01

    To satisfy rigid performance specifications, a feedback control was presented for zoom optical lens plants. With the increasing of global energy consumption, research of the photovoltaic(PV) systems get more and more attention. Research of the digital high-power solar array simulator provides technical support for high-power grid-connected PV systems research.This paper introduces a design scheme of the high-power digital solar array simulator based on TMS320F28335. A DC-DC full-bridge topology was used in the system's main circuit. The switching frequency of IGBT is 25kHz.Maximum output voltage is 900V. Maximum output current is 20A. Simulator can be pre-stored solar panel IV curves.The curve is composed of 128 discrete points .When the system was running, the main circuit voltage and current values was feedback to the DSP by the voltage and current sensors in real-time. Through incremental PI,DSP control the simulator in the closed-loop control system. Experimental data show that Simulator output voltage and current follow a preset solar panels IV curve. In connection with the formation of high-power inverter, the system becomes gridconnected PV system. The inverter can find the simulator's maximum power point and the output power can be stabilized at the maximum power point (MPP).

  18. Flat plate vs. concentrator solar photovoltaic cells - A manufacturing cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    The choice of which photovoltaic system (flat plate or concentrator) to use for utilizing solar cells to generate electricity depends mainly on the cost. A detailed, comparative manufacturing cost analysis of the two types of systems is presented. Several common assumptions, i.e., cell thickness, interest rate, power rate, factory production life, polysilicon cost, and direct labor rate are utilized in this analysis. Process sequences, cost variables, and sensitivity analyses have been studied, and results of the latter show that the most important parameters which determine manufacturing costs are concentration ratio, manufacturing volume, and cell efficiency. The total cost per watt of the flat plate solar cell is $1.45, and that of the concentrator solar cell is $1.85, the higher cost being due to the increased process complexity and material costs.

  19. Printable polythiophene gas sensor array for low-cost electronic noses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Josephine B.; Liu, Vincent; Subramanian, Vivek; Sivula, Kevin; Luscombe, Christine; Murphy, Amanda; Liu, Jinsong; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2006-07-01

    A route for generating arrays of printable polythiophene-based gas sensor materials suitable for low-cost manufacturing is demonstrated. Materials with complementary sensor responses are synthesized by incorporating functional groups into the molecule, either along the polymer backbone or as end-capping groups. Using these materials as printable sensor inks, a functional, integrated gas sensor array chip is fabricated using additive deposition techniques. The sensor array shows sensitivity to a range of volatile organic compounds down to concentrations of 10ppm. A three-terminal thin film transistor structure is used, allowing the extraction of multiple parameters that help to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for sensor response and the role of the functional groups in this response.

  20. Array Automated Assembly Task for the Low Cost Solar Array Project, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Seman, E. J.; Rohatgi, A.; Davis, J. R.; Ostroski, J.; Stapleton, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using silk screened evaporated and sputtered Al as the metal source, the formation of Al back surface fields was studied. The most satisfactory results were those obtained with the sputtered A1 and in which open circuit voltages (V sub oc) of 0.585 v (12 ohm cm FZ silicon) were achieved. The ultrasonic interconnect process is discussed. The process is shown to be satisfactory, but increased pull-strength may be obtained if some form of sintering is carried out on the metallized contacts. Plasma etching is shown to be feasible as a replacement for wet chemical cleaning prior to diffusion. Initial results on cells prepared by using electroless Pd/Ni plus either electroplated Ag or Cu show slightly poor performance than cells with the baseline evaporated Ti/Pd/Ag system. A mask designed for the 1.6 x 7.0 cm and 2.0 x 7.0 cm cells is described. This mask has a lower area coverage and total lower resistive loss than the previous mask design. It is also shown that the cell width should not exceed 2.0 - 3.0 cm for optimum efficiency.

  1. Performance measurement of low concentration ratio solar array for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The measured performance of a silicon and a gallium arsenide low concentration ratio solar array (LCRSA) element is presented. The element characteristics measured in natural sunlight are off pointing performance and response to mechanical distortions. Laboratory measurements of individual silicon and gallium-arsenide solar cell assemblies are also made. The characteristics measured in the laboratory involved responses to temperature and intensity variations as well as to the application of reverse bias potentials. The element design details covered include the materials, the solar cells, and the rationale for selecting these specific characteristics. The measured performance characteristics are contrasted with the predicted values for both laboratory testing and high altitude natural sunlight testing. Excellent agreement between analytical predictions and measured performance is observed.

  2. Enhanced P3HT/ZnO Nanowire Array Solar Cells by Pyro-phototronic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2016-11-22

    The pyro-phototronic effect is based on the coupling among photoexcitation, pyroelectricity, and semiconductor charge transport in pyroelectric materials, which can be utilized to modulate photoexcited carriers to enhance the output performance of solar cells. Herein, we have demonstrated the largely enhanced output performance of a P3HT/ZnO nanowire array photovoltaic cell (PVC) by using the pyro-phototronic effect under weak light illuminations. By applying an external cooling temperature variation, the output current and voltage of the PVC can be dramatically enhanced by 18% and 152% under indoor light illumination, respectively. This study realizes the performance enhancement of pyroelectric semiconductor materials-based solar cells via a temperature-variation-induced pyro-phototronic effect, which may have potential applications in solar energy scavenging and self-powered sensor systems.

  3. Microprocessor control of multiple peak power tracking DC/DC converters for use with solar cell arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Martin E. (Inventor); Jermakian, Joel (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method and an apparatus is provided for efficiently controlling the power output of a solar cell array string or a plurality of solar cell array strings to achieve a maximum amount of output power from the strings under varying conditions of use. Maximum power output from a solar array string is achieved through control of a pulse width modulated DC/DC buck converter which transfers power from a solar array to a load or battery bus. The input voltage from the solar array to the converter is controlled by a pulse width modulation duty cycle, which in turn is controlled by a differential signal controller. By periodically adjusting the control voltage up or down by a small amount and comparing the power on the load or bus with that generated at different voltage values a maximum power output voltage may be obtained. The system is totally modular and additional solar array strings may be added to the system simply by adding converter boards to the system and changing some constants in the controller's control routines.

  4. Low-cost scalable quartz crystal microbalance array for environmental sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazagasty, Cristain [University of Puerto Rico; Hianik, Tibor [Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation of environmental sensors for internet of things (IoT) applications has increased the need for low-cost platforms capable of accommodating multiple sensors. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) crystals coated with nanometer-thin sensor films are suitable for use in high-resolution (~1 ng) selective gas sensor applications. We demonstrate a scalable array for measuring frequency response of six QCM sensors controlled by low-cost Arduino microcontrollers and a USB multiplexer. Gas pulses and data acquisition were controlled by a LabVIEW user interface. We test the sensor array by measuring the frequency shift of crystals coated with different compositions of polymer composites based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) while films are exposed to water vapor and oxygen inside a controlled environmental chamber. Our sensor array exhibits comparable performance to that of a commercial QCM system, while enabling high-throughput 6 QCM testing for under $1,000. We use deep neural network structures to process sensor response and demonstrate that the QCM array is suitable for gas sensing, environmental monitoring, and electronic-nose applications.

  5. Low-cost scalable quartz crystal microbalance array for environmental sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckley, Eric S.; Anazagasty, Cristain; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Hianik, Tibor; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-09-01

    Proliferation of environmental sensors for internet of things (IoT) applications has increased the need for low-cost platforms capable of accommodating multiple sensors. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) crystals coated with nanometer-thin sensor films are suitable for use in high-resolution ( 1 ng) selective gas sensor applications. We demonstrate a scalable array for measuring frequency response of six QCM sensors controlled by low-cost Arduino microcontrollers and a USB multiplexer. Gas pulses and data acquisition were controlled by a LabVIEW user interface. We test the sensor array by measuring the frequency shift of crystals coated with different compositions of polymer composites based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) while films are exposed to water vapor and oxygen inside a controlled environmental chamber. Our sensor array exhibits comparable performance to that of a commercial QCM system, while enabling high-throughput 6 QCM testing for under $1,000. We use deep neural network structures to process sensor response and demonstrate that the QCM array is suitable for gas sensing, environmental monitoring, and electronic-nose applications.

  6. Solar cost reduction through technical improvements: the concepts of learning and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Flaim, T.

    1979-10-01

    The concepts of learning and experience are reviewed and their usefulness for predicting the future costs of solar technologies are evaluated. The literature review indicated that the cost estimates for solar energy technologies are typically made assuming a fixed production process, characterized by standard capacity factors, overhead, and labor costs. The learning curve is suggested as a generalization of the costs of potential solar energy systems. The concept of experience is too ambiguous to be useful for cost estimation. There is no logical reason to believe that costs will decline purely as a function of cumulative production, and experience curves do not allow the analyst to identify logical sources of cost reduction directly. The procedures for using learning and aggregated cost curves to estimate the costs of solar technologies are outlined. It is recommended that production histories of analogous products and processes are analyzed and the learning and cost curves for these surrogates are estimated. These curves, if judged applicable, can be used to predict the cost reductions in manufacturing solar energy technologies.

  7. Ag nanoparticle-deposited TiO2 nanotube arrays for electrodes of Dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Go; Ohmi, Hayato; Tan, Wai Kian; Lockman, Zainovia; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2015-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells composed of a photoanode of Ag nanoparticle (NP)-deposited TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays were fabricated. The TNT arrays were prepared by anodizing Ti films on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates. Efficient charge transportation through the ordered nanostructure of TNT arrays should be carried out compared to conventional particulate TiO2 electrodes. However, it has been a big challenge to grow TNT arrays on FTO glass substrates with the lengths needed for sufficient light-harvesting (tens of micrometers). In this work, we deposited Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the wall of TNT arrays to enhance light-harvesting property. Dye-sensitized solar cells with these Ag NP-deposited TNT arrays yielded a higher power conversion efficiency (2.03 %) than those without Ag NPs (1.39 %).

  8. Three-dimensional electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells: synthesis of indium-tin-oxide nanowire arrays and ITO/TiO2 core-shell nanowire arrays by electrophoretic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wen; Ting, Chi-Feng; Hung, Miao-Ken; Chiou, Chwei-Huann; Liu, Ying-Ling; Liu, Zongwen; Ratinac, Kyle R; Ringer, Simon P

    2009-02-04

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) show promise as a cheaper alternative to silicon-based photovoltaics for specialized applications, provided conversion efficiency can be maximized and production costs minimized. This study demonstrates that arrays of nanowires can be formed by wet-chemical methods for use as three-dimensional (3D) electrodes in DSSCs, thereby improving photoelectric conversion efficiency. Two approaches were employed to create the arrays of ITO (indium-tin-oxide) nanowires or arrays of ITO/TiO(2) core-shell nanowires; both methods were based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD) within a polycarbonate template. The 3D electrodes for solar cells were constructed by using a doctor-blade for coating TiO(2) layers onto the ITO or ITO/TiO(2) nanowire arrays. A photoelectric conversion efficiency as high as 4.3% was achieved in the DSSCs made from ITO nanowires; this performance was better than that of ITO/TiO(2) core-shell nanowires or pristine TiO(2) films. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed that the reaction current was significantly enhanced when a 3D ITO-nanowire electrode was used. Better separation of charge carriers and improved charge transport, due to the enlarged interfacial area, are thought to be the major advantages of using 3D nanowire electrodes for the optimization of DSSCs.

  9. Cost effective all-optical fractional OFDM receiver using an arrayed waveguide grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, T.; Cincotti, G.; Murakawa, T.; Shimizu, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Okuno, M.; Mino, S.; Himeno, A.; Wada, N.; Uenohara, H.; Konishi, T.

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a cost effective all-optical fractional orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (AO-FrOFDM) receiver using an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG). The all-optical fractional Fourier transform at the receiver is implemented by modifying the second slab coupler from a conventional all-optical discrete Fourier transform AWG. The open eye diagrams obtained from the experimental results indicate that 12 × 10 Gbit/s DBPSK AO-FrOFDM signals were successfully demultiplexed.

  10. Low-cost photovoltaics: Luminescent solar concentrators and colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Shin Woei

    Solar energy has long been lauded as an inexhaustible fuel source with more energy reaching the earth's surface in one hour than the global consumption for a year. Although capable of satisfying the world's energy requirements, solar energy remains an expensive technology that has yet to attain grid parity. Another drawback is that existing solar farms require large quantities of land in order to generate power at useful rates. In this work, we look to luminescent solar concentrator systems and quantum dot technology as viable solutions to lowering the cost of solar electricity production with the flexibility to integrate such technologies into buildings to achieve dual land use. Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) windows with front-facing photovoltaic (PV) cells were built and their gain and power efficiency were investigated. Conventional LSCs employ a photovoltaic (PV) cell that is placed on the edge of the LSC, facing inward. This work describes a new design with the PV cells on the front-face allowing them to receive both direct solar irradiation and wave-guided photons emitted from a dye embedded in an acrylic sheet, which is optically coupled to the PV cells. Parameters investigated include the thickness of the waveguide, edge treatment of the window, cell width, and cell placement. The data allowed us to make projections that aided in designing windows for maximized overall efficiency. A gain in power of 2.2x over the PV cells alone was obtained with PV cell coverage of 5%, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 6.8% was obtained with a PV cell coverage of 31%. Balancing the trade-offs between gain and efficiency, the design with the lowest cost per watt attained a power efficiency of 3.8% and a gain of 1.6x. With the viability of the LSC demonstrated, a weighted Monte-Carlo Ray Tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in the LSC to aid in design optimization. The program imports measured absorption

  11. Optimizing the size of a solar cell array; Optimiser la taille d'un panneau solaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, J. [Linear Technology, 94 - Rungis (France)

    2006-06-15

    The electronic power conversion system is a strategic part of solar power supply systems. An ideal diode controller combined to a compensated switching regulator allows to optimize the operation of the battery and to optimize the dimensioning of the solar cells array. The ideal diode controller limits the discharge of the battery inside the non-exposed solar cells and limits the related direct voltage drop and loss of power. The switching regulator charger lowers the solar cells voltage to charge the battery and ensures the optimum operation of the solar elements. (J.S.)

  12. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  13. Combined Space Environmental Exposure Tests of Multi-Junction GaAs/Ge Solar Array Coupons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Corey, Ron; Gardiner, George; Funderburk, Victor V.; Gahart, Richard; Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A set of multi-junction GaAs/Ge solar array test coupons were subjected to a sequence of 5-year increments of combined environmental exposure tests. The purpose of this test program is to understand the changes and degradation of the solar array panel components, including its ESD mitigation design features in their integrated form, after multiple years (up to 15) of simulated geosynchronous space environment. These tests consist of: UV radiation, electrostatic discharge (ESD), electron/proton particle radiation, thermal cycling, and ion thruster plume exposures. The solar radiation was produced using a Mercury-Xenon lamp with wavelengths in the UV spectrum ranging from 230 to 400 nm. The ESD test was performed in the inverted-gradient mode using a low-energy electron (2.6 - 6 keV) beam exposure. The ESD test also included a simulated panel coverglass flashover for the primary arc event. The electron/proton radiation exposure included both 1.0 MeV and 100 keV electron beams simultaneous with a 40 keV proton beam. The thermal cycling included simulated transient earth eclipse for satellites in geosynchronous orbit. With the increasing use of ion thruster engines on many satellites, the combined environmental test also included ion thruster exposure to determine whether solar array surface erosion had any impact on its performance. Before and after each increment of environmental exposures, the coupons underwent visual inspection under high power magnification and electrical tests that included characterization by LAPSS, Dark I-V, and electroluminescence. This paper discusses the test objective, test methodologies, and preliminary results after 5 years of simulated exposure.

  14. Review of thin film solar cell technology and applications for ultra-light spacecraft solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in thin-film amorphous and polycrystalline photovoltaic cells are reviewed and discussed with a view to potential applications in space. Two important figures of merit are discussed: efficiency (i.e., what fraction of the incident solar energy is converted to electricity), and specific power (power to weight ratio).

  15. Optimization and performance of Space Station Freedom solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemthong, S.; Hansen, N.; Bower, M.

    1991-01-01

    High efficiency, large area and low cost solar cells are the drivers for Space Station solar array designs. The manufacturing throughput, process complexity, yield of the cells, and array manufacturing technique determine the economics of the solar array design. The cell efficiency optimization of large area (8 x 8 m), dielectric wrapthrough contact solar cells are described. The results of the optimization are reported and the solar cell performance of limited production runs is reported.

  16. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I: preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost, commercial plant cost and performance. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    Cost estimates are presented for the Solar Pilot Plant by cost breakdown structure element, with a commitment schedule and an expenditure schedule. Cost estimates are given for a Commercial Plant, including several point costs for plants with various solar multiples and storage times. Specific questions (ERDA) pertaining to commercial plant design and performance data are addressed. The cost estimates are supplemented by two books of vendor and subcontractor cost data.

  17. Grid-connected polymer solar panels: initial considerations of cost, lifetime, and practicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Lilliedal, Mathilde Raad; Jørgensen, Mikkel;

    2010-01-01

    Large solar panels were constructed from polymer solar cell modules prepared using full roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacture based on the previously published ProcessOne. The individual flexible polymer solar modules comprising multiple serially connected single cell stripes were joined electrically...... station and their output was grid connected between testing. Several generations of polymer solar cells and panel constructions were tested in this context to optimize the production of polymer solar panels. Cells lacking a R2R barrier layer were found to degrade due to diffusion of oxygen after less than...... that the inclusion of a thin protective foil between the cell and the barrier foil is critical. The findings provide a preliminary foundation for the production and optimization of large-area polymer solar panels and also enabled a cost analysis of solar panels based on polymer solar cells....

  18. Integrating Low-Cost Mems Accelerometer Mini-Arrays (mama) in Earthquake Early Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nof, R. N.; Chung, A. I.; Rademacher, H.; Allen, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Current operational Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) acquire data with networks of single seismic stations, and compute source parameters assuming earthquakes to be point sources. For large events, the point-source assumption leads to an underestimation of magnitude, and the use of single stations leads to large uncertainties in the locations of events outside the network. We propose the use of mini-arrays to improve EEWS. Mini-arrays have the potential to: (a) estimate reliable hypocentral locations by beam forming (FK-analysis) techniques; (b) characterize the rupture dimensions and account for finite-source effects, leading to more reliable estimates for large magnitudes. Previously, the high price of multiple seismometers has made creating arrays cost-prohibitive. However, we propose setting up mini-arrays of a new seismometer based on low-cost (<$150), high-performance MEMS accelerometer around conventional seismic stations. The expected benefits of such an approach include decreasing alert-times, improving real-time shaking predictions and mitigating false alarms. We use low-resolution 14-bit Quake Catcher Network (QCN) data collected during Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP) in Christchurch, NZ following the M7.1 Darfield earthquake in September 2010. As the QCN network was so dense, we were able to use small sub-array of up to ten sensors spread along a maximum area of 1.7x2.2 km2 to demonstrate our approach and to solve for the BAZ of two events (Mw4.7 and Mw5.1) with less than ±10° error. We will also present the new 24-bit device details, benchmarks, and real-time measurements.

  19. When are solar refrigerators less costly than on-grid refrigerators: A simulation modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Leila A; Brown, Shawn T; Wedlock, Patrick; Connor, Diana L; Spiker, Marie; Lee, Bruce Y

    2017-04-19

    Gavi recommends solar refrigerators for vaccine storage in areas with less than eight hours of electricity per day, and WHO guidelines are more conservative. The question remains: Can solar refrigerators provide value where electrical outages are less frequent? Using a HERMES-generated computational model of the Mozambique routine immunization supply chain, we simulated the use of solar versus electric mains-powered refrigerators (hereafter referred to as "electric refrigerators") at different locations in the supply chain under various circumstances. At their current price premium, the annual cost of each solar refrigerator is 132% more than each electric refrigerator at the district level and 241% more at health facilities. Solar refrigerators provided savings over electric refrigerators when one-day electrical outages occurred more than five times per year at either the district level or the health facilities, even when the electric refrigerator holdover time exceeded the duration of the outage. Two-day outages occurring more than three times per year at the district level or more than twice per year at the health facilities also caused solar refrigerators to be cost saving. Lowering the annual cost of a solar refrigerator to 75% more than an electric refrigerator allowed solar refrigerators to be cost saving at either level when one-day outages occurred more than once per year, or when two-day outages occurred more than once per year at the district level or even once per year at the health facilities. Our study supports WHO and Gavi guidelines. In fact, solar refrigerators may provide savings in total cost per dose administered over electrical refrigerators when electrical outages are less frequent. Our study identified the frequency and duration at which electrical outages need to occur for solar refrigerators to provide savings in total cost per dose administered over electric refrigerators at different solar refrigerator prices. Copyright © 2017. Published

  20. When are solar refrigerators less costly than on-grid refrigerators: A simulation modeling study☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Leila A.; Brown, Shawn T.; Wedlock, Patrick; Connor, Diana L.; Spiker, Marie; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background Gavi recommends solar refrigerators for vaccine storage in areas with less than eight hours of electricity per day, and WHO guidelines are more conservative. The question remains: Can solar refrigerators provide value where electrical outages are less frequent? Methods Using a HERMES-generated computational model of the Mozambique routine immunization supply chain, we simulated the use of solar versus electric mains-powered refrigerators (hereafter referred to as “electric refrigerators”) at different locations in the supply chain under various circumstances. Results At their current price premium, the annual cost of each solar refrigerator is 132% more than each electric refrigerator at the district level and 241% more at health facilities. Solar refrigerators provided savings over electric refrigerators when one-day electrical outages occurred more than five times per year at either the district level or the health facilities, even when the electric refrigerator holdover time exceeded the duration of the outage. Two-day outages occurring more than three times per year at the district level or more than twice per year at the health facilities also caused solar refrigerators to be cost saving. Lowering the annual cost of a solar refrigerator to 75% more than an electric refrigerator allowed solar refrigerators to be cost saving at either level when one-day outages occurred more than once per year, or when two-day outages occurred more than once per year at the district level or even once per year at the health facilities. Conclusion Our study supports WHO and Gavi guidelines. In fact, solar refrigerators may provide savings in total cost per dose administered over electrical refrigerators when electrical outages are less frequent. Our study identified the frequency and duration at which electrical outages need to occur for solar refrigerators to provide savings in total cost per dose administered over electric refrigerators at different solar

  1. Concept of Bee-Eyes Array of Fresnel Lenses as a Solar Photovoltaic Concentrator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Liman Chiromawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposal of a new configuration of an optical concentrator for photovoltaic application which may enhance the efficiency of solar cells. Bee-eyes array Fresnel lenses concentrator proposed here provide high concentration factor which is greater than1000x at the 20th zone. In addition, the system also provides room for increasing the number of zones to achieve the high concentration factor if needs arise. The transmission efficiency greater than 90% has been achieved with f-number of ≥1.25. Mathematical relations derived to obtain flux distribution at the absorber plane and the transmission efficiency as well as the position of the solar cell were used in the ray tracing simulations for 6, 18, 36, 60, 90, 126, 168, 216, 270, and 330 suns concentration systems. A transmission efficiency is linearly decreasing with the increase in the number of arrays in which the transmission efficiency of 94.42% was recorded at the array of 6 suns and 74.98% at 330 suns.

  2. Highly Transparent Dual-Sensitized Titanium Dioxide Nanotube Arrays for Spontaneous Solar Water Splitting Tandem Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kahee; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2015-08-26

    Vertically aligned one-dimensional (1D) titanium dioxide (TiO2) arrays on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates, which can act as host electron transport materials for low bandgap materials, were synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction combined with a controlled chemical etching process. By controlling the chemical etching conditions, we can maximize the light transmission properties of the 1D TiO2 arrays, which is beneficial for the front electrode in photoelectrochemical (PEC) tandem configurations. As a result, dual sensitization to form 1D TiO2@CdS@CdSe (CdS and CdSe coated 1D TiO2) results in excellent photocurrent density, as well as transparency, and the resulting material is able to pass unabsorbed photons through the front electrode into the rear bias solar cell. Owing to the improved light transmission in combination with the increased specific surface area of the obtained 1D TiO2 arrays from the controlled etching process, a high-efficiency PEC tandem device with ∼2.1% was successfully fabricated for unassisted hydrogen evolution. Efficient PEC tandem device was fabricated for unassisted solar hydrogen generation using highly transparent composite electrode composed of dual sensitization to form 1D TiO2@CdS@CdSe.

  3. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  4. Optimizing laser beam profiles using micro-lens arrays for efficient material processing: applications to solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Dirk; Homburg, Oliver; Mitra, Thomas; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Jarczynski, Manfred; Meinschien, Jens; Bayer, Andreas; Lissotschenko, Vitalij

    2009-02-01

    High power laser sources are used in various production tools for microelectronic products and solar cells, including the applications annealing, lithography, edge isolation as well as dicing and patterning. Besides the right choice of the laser source suitable high performance optics for generating the appropriate beam profile and intensity distribution are of high importance for the right processing speed, quality and yield. For industrial applications equally important is an adequate understanding of the physics of the light-matter interaction behind the process. In advance simulations of the tool performance can minimize technical and financial risk as well as lead times for prototyping and introduction into series production. LIMO has developed its own software founded on the Maxwell equations taking into account all important physical aspects of the laser based process: the light source, the beam shaping optical system and the light-matter interaction. Based on this knowledge together with a unique free-form micro-lens array production technology and patented micro-optics beam shaping designs a number of novel solar cell production tool sub-systems have been built. The basic functionalities, design principles and performance results are presented with a special emphasis on resilience, cost reduction and process reliability.

  5. Solar thermal electric power plants - Their performance characteristics and total social costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, R. S.; Truscello, V. C.

    1976-01-01

    The central receiver (power tower) concept as a thermal conversion approach to the conversion of solar energy into electricity is compared to other solar power plant designs which feature distributed solar collection and use other types of solar collector configurations. A variety of solar thermal storage concepts are discussed and their impacts on system performance are assessed. Although a good deal of quantification is possible in a comparative study, the subjective judgments carry enormous weight in a socio-economic decision, the ultimate choice of central power plant being more a social than an economic or technical decision. Major elements of the total social cost of each type of central plant are identified as utility economic costs, R&D funds, health costs, and other relevant social impacts.

  6. SunShot solar power reduces costs and uncertainty in future low-carbon electricity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileva, Ana; Nelson, James H; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel M

    2013-08-20

    The United States Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative has set cost-reduction targets of $1/watt for central-station solar technologies. We use SWITCH, a high-resolution electricity system planning model, to study the implications of achieving these targets for technology deployment and electricity costs in western North America, focusing on scenarios limiting carbon emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. We find that achieving the SunShot target for solar photovoltaics would allow this technology to provide more than a third of electric power in the region, displacing natural gas in the medium term and reducing the need for nuclear and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, which face technological and cost uncertainties, by 2050. We demonstrate that a diverse portfolio of technological options can help integrate high levels of solar generation successfully and cost-effectively. The deployment of GW-scale storage plays a central role in facilitating solar deployment and the availability of flexible loads could increase the solar penetration level further. In the scenarios investigated, achieving the SunShot target can substantially mitigate the cost of implementing a carbon cap, decreasing power costs by up to 14% and saving up to $20 billion ($2010) annually by 2050 relative to scenarios with Reference solar costs.

  7. Paraboloidal solar cooker: simple construction and low cost; Fogao solar paraboloide: construcao simples e de baixo custo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.M. dos; Venanzi, D. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Almeida, S.J. de [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil)

    1984-12-31

    In this paper was developed four methods to constructions of solar cooker, relatively easy to make and low in cost. This parabolic concentrating cooker is basically a solar furnace. The thermal of the prototype have been studied and comparative study with the gas cooker is also included. The materials used for cooker and reflector surfaces have been discussed. (author). 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Costs of Residential Solar PV Plants in Distribution Grid Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Søren Bækhøj; Yang, Guangya; Ipsen, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we investigate the impact of residential solar PV plants on energy losses in distribution networks and their impact on distribution transformers lifetime. Current guidelines in Denmark states that distribution transformers should not be loaded with more than 67% solar PV power...... to avoid accelerated loss of life. If a solar PV plant causes this limit to be exceeded, the particular owner has to pay for upgrading the transformer. Distribution Network Operators also charge an annual tariff from the solar PV plants to cover the expenses to keep the grid capacity available, the so...... called “Availability Tariff”. According to the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority, the Availability Tariff must cover the exact expenses, with energy savings etc. from the solar PV plants taken into consideration. Our conclusion is that a distribution network, which represents a typical residential...

  9. Costs of Residential Solar PV Plants in Distribution Grid Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Søren Bækhøj; Yang, Guangya; Ipsen, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we investigate the impact of residential solar PV plants on energy losses in distribution networks and their impact on distribution transformers lifetime. Current guidelines in Denmark states that distribution transformers should not be loaded with more than 67% solar PV power...... called “Availability Tariff”. According to the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority, the Availability Tariff must cover the exact expenses, with energy savings etc. from the solar PV plants taken into consideration. Our conclusion is that a distribution network, which represents a typical residential...... to avoid accelerated loss of life. If a solar PV plant causes this limit to be exceeded, the particular owner has to pay for upgrading the transformer. Distribution Network Operators also charge an annual tariff from the solar PV plants to cover the expenses to keep the grid capacity available, the so...

  10. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  11. Native Vegetation Performance under a Solar PV Array at the National Wind Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Brenda [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCall, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Braus, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buckner, David [ESCO Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-05-16

    Construction activities at most large-scale ground installations of photovoltaic (PV) arrays are preceded by land clearing and re-grading to uniform slope and smooth surface conditions to facilitate convenient construction access and facility operations. The impact to original vegetation is usually total eradication followed by installation of a gravel cover kept clear of vegetation by use of herbicides. The degree to which that total loss can be mitigated by some form of revegetation is a subject in its infancy, and most vegetation studies at PV development sites only address weed control and the impact of tall plants on the efficiency of the solar collectors from shading.This study seeks to address this void, advancing the state of knowledge of how constructed PV arrays affect ground-level environments, and to what degree plant cover, having acceptable characteristics within engineering constraints, can be re-established.

  12. Investigation on the Tunable-Length Zinc Oxide Nanowire Arrays for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Yi Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We had successfully fabricated ZnO-based nanowires by vapor transport method in the furnace tube. ZnO nanowire arrays grown in 600°C for 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes had applied to the dye-sensitized solar cells. The dye loading is proportional to the total equivalent surface area of ZnO nanowire arrays in the cells and plays an important role in improving power conversion efficiency. The highest efficiency was observed in DSSC sample with ZnO nanowires grown for 90 minutes, which had the largest equivalent surface area and also the highest dye loading. According to our experimental results, the enhancement in power conversion efficiency is attributed to the higher light harvesting and reduction of carrier recombination. In addition, ZnO nanowires also contribute to the photocurrent in the UV region.

  13. Absorption and transmission of light in III-V nanowire arrays for tandem solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttu, Nicklas; Dagytė, Vilgailė; Zeng, Xulu; Otnes, Gaute; Borgström, Magnus

    2017-05-01

    III-V semiconductor nanowires are a platform for next-generation photovoltaics. An interesting research direction is to embed a nanowire array in a transparent polymer, either to act as a stand-alone flexible solar cell, or to be stacked on top of a conventional Si bottom cell to create a tandem structure. To optimize the tandem cell performance, high energy photons should be absorbed in the nanowires whereas low energy photons should be transmitted to and absorbed in the Si cell. Here, through optical measurements on 1.95 eV bandgap GaInP nanowire arrays embedded in a polymer membrane, we identify two mechanisms that could be detrimental for the performance of the tandem cell. First, the Au particles used in the nanowire synthesis can absorb >50% of the low-energy photons, leading to a 80%. Second, after the removal of the Au particles, a 40% reflectance peak shows up due to resonant back-scattering of light from in-plane waveguide modes. To avoid the excitation of these optical modes in the nanowire array, we propose to limit the pitch of the nanowire array.

  14. Cost Reduction of IMM Solar Cells by Recycling Substrates using Wet Chemical Etching Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program focuses on reducing the cost of substrate reclaim for high-efficiency solar cells fabricated via an epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process, while increasing...

  15. Cost Reduction of IMM Solar Cells by Recycling Substrates Using Wet Chemical Etching Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the program is to reduce the cost of substrate reclaim for high-efficiency solar cells fabricated by an epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process, and to increase...

  16. Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays for solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxue; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Guanghua; Jiao, Jun

    2012-09-20

    Open structure ZnO/CdSe core/shell nanoneedle arrays were prepared on a conducting glass (SnO2:F) substrate by solution deposition and electrochemical techniques. A uniform CdSe shell layer with a grain size of approximately several tens of nanometers was formed on the surface of ZnO nanoneedle cores after annealing at 400°C for 1.5 h. Fabricated solar cells based on these nanostructures exhibited a high short-circuit current density of about 10.5 mA/cm2 and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.07% with solar illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Incident photo-to-current conversion efficiencies higher than 75% were also obtained.

  17. Bypass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon Under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon whose purpose was to determine margin available for bypass diodes integrated with new, large multi-junction solar cells that are manufactured from a 4-inch wafer. The tests were performed under high vacuum with coupon back side thermal conditions of both cold and ambient. The bypass diodes were subjected to a sequence of increasing discrete current steps from 0 Amp to 2.0 Amp in steps of 0.25 Amp. At each current step, a temperature measurement was obtained via remote viewing by an infrared camera. This paper discusses the experimental methodology, experiment results, and the thermal model.

  18. Frequency sweep for a beam system with local unilateral contact modeling satellite solar arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Hazim, Hamad

    2009-01-01

    In order to save mass of satellite solar arrays, the flexibility of the panels becomes not negligible and they may strike each other; this may damage the structure. To prevent this, rubber snubbers are mounted at well chosen points of the structure and they act as one sided linear spring; as a negative consequence, the dynamic of these panels becomes nonlinear. The finite element approximation is used to solve partial differential equations governing the structural dynamic. Frequency sweep has been performed numerically to study the dynamic behavior. Non linear normal modes are under study

  19. Numerical and Experimental Study for a Beam System with Local Unilateral Contact Modeling Satellite Solar Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Hazim, Hamad; Ferguson, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The mass reduction of satellite solar arrays results in significant panel flexibility, so possibly striking one another dynamically leading ultimately to structural damage. To prevent this, rubber snubbers are mounted at well chosen points of the structure and they act as one sided linear spring; as a negative consequence, the dynamic of these panels becomes nonlinear. The finite element approximation is used to solve partial differential equations governing the structural dynamic. The models are validated and adjusted with experiments done in the ISVR laboratory, Southampton university.

  20. Enhanced optical properties in inclined GaAs nanowire arrays for high-efficiency solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yile; Zhang, Xu; Sun, Xiaohong; Qi, Yongle; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    The inclined Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) nanowire arrays (NWAs) as light absorbing structures for solar photovoltaics are proposed. The influence of geometric parameters on the optical absorption properties is systematically investigated, and the optimal geometric parameters of the proposed structure are determined by using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) and the finite element method. It is found that the absorption efficiency of the optimized structure can be improved significantly compared with vertical NWAs and thin film layer structure. The optimized structure yields a photocurrent of 30.3 mA/cm2, which is much higher than that of vertical NWAs and thin film layer with the same geometric configurations.