WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmogony

  1. Indian cosmogonies and cosmologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajin Dušan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various ideas on how the universe appeared and develops, were in Indian tradition related to mythic, religious, or philosophical ideas and contexts, and developed during some 3.000 years - from the time of Vedas, to Puranas. Conserning its appeareance, two main ideas were presented. In one concept it appeared out of itself (auto-generated, and gods were among the first to appear in the cosmic sequences. In the other, it was a kind of divine creation, with hard work (like the dismembering of the primal Purusha, or as emanation of divine dance. Indian tradition had also various critiques of mythic and religious concepts (from the 8th c. BC, to the 6c., who favoured naturalistic and materialistic explanations, and concepts, in their cosmogony and cosmology. One the peculiarities was that indian cosmogony and cosmology includes great time spans, since they used a digit system which was later (in the 13th c. introduced to Europe by Fibonacci (Leonardo of Pisa, 1170-1240.

  2. Cosmology, cosmogony and theogony in Parmenides’ poem

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    Luis Andrés Bredlow

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to offer a fresh reconstruction of Parmenides’ system of the physical world, duly distinguishing the cosmological, cosmogonic and theogonic moments of the theory, whose confusion has been a main source of misunderstanding in earlier interpretations. In particular, the system of wreaths or bands of B 12 and A 37 does not represent the present order of the universe, but the general structure of matter, as well as the initial stage of the cosmogony (section 1, as can be substantiated also from Simplicius’ reading of the fragments (section 2. This distinction will allow a tentative reconstruction of Parmenides’ cosmogony (section 3 and cosmology, whose most striking feature is the position of the fixed stars below the sun and the moon, paralleled in Anaximander and —as I will try to show— in the cosmology of the orphic Derveni Papyrus (section 4.

  3. The Genesis Account of Creation and its Relationship to Cosmogony.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper concerns itself with the issue of the account of creation and its relationship to cosmogony. In this jet age when western education has broadened people's mind, there is a strong desire to know the true origin of man and the universe. It goes a step further to highlight various concepts of creation, pointing out their ...

  4. Theorizing Pō: Embodied Cosmogony and Polynesian National Narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Joyce Lindsay Pualani

    2017-01-01

    Polynesian epistemology and cosmogony dictate that all life and existence come from Pō, the generative, liminal darkness. Pō can be temporally expansive, producing a view of time that is spiral rather than linear. Within Pō, time and space are not necessarily discrete categories.In this dissertation, I argue that literary depictions of Pō can represent and articulate notions of political and cultural sovereignty throughout contemporary Polynesia. These forms of sovereignty are rooted in cosmo...

  5. High-redshift quasars in the Cold Dark Matter cosmogony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Rees, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between high-redshift quasars and the epoch of galaxy formation in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmogony is investigated. Luminous quasars could only form after galactic sized systems had collapsed. A constant comoving density of luminous quasars between z = 2 and z = 4 is compatible with the CDM model if quasars are short-lived and radiate at about the Eddington limit. However, according to the CDM model the abundance of high-luminosity quasars must decline exponentially at higher redshifts. Even if all protogalaxies form quasars, and about 1 per cent of the baryons within a protogalaxy collapse into a compact object, a steep fall in the density of quasars with L > 10 47 erg s -1 at redshifts z ≥ 5. The existence of a 'cut-off' in the quasar numbers at high redshift could therefore supply an important test of the CDM theory. (author)

  6. At the beginning... Cosmogony, theogony and anthropogeny in Sumerian texts of the third and second millennium BCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, Johannes Jacobus Wilhelmus (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    A diachronic survey of the Sumerian ideas about Beginnings – cosmogony, theogony and anthropogeny – is described. Third millennium Sumerian texts describe the 'marriage' of the primaeval pair an and ki – Heaven and Earth, thereafter the sky god An and the mother goddess Ninḫursaĝa – and the birth

  7. The formation of cosmic structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Andrew K.; Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Neil; Gott, Richard, III

    1992-01-01

    The growth of density fluctuations induced by global texture in an Omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) cosmogony is calculated. The resulting power spectra are in good agreement with each other, with more power on large scales than in the standard inflation plus CDM model. Calculation of related statistics (two-point correlation functions, mass variances, cosmic Mach number) indicates that the texture plus CDM model compares more favorably than standard CDM with observations of large-scale structure. Texture produces coherent velocity fields on large scales, as observed. Excessive small-scale velocity dispersions, and voids less empty than those observed may be remedied by including baryonic physics. The topology of the cosmic structure agrees well with observation. The non-Gaussian texture induced density fluctuations lead to earlier nonlinear object formation than in Gaussian models and may also be more compatible with recent evidence that the galaxy density field is non-Gaussian on large scales. On smaller scales the density field is strongly non-Gaussian, but this appears to be primarily due to nonlinear gravitational clustering. The velocity field on smaller scales is surprisingly Gaussian.

  8. Byurakan Cosmogony Concept in the Light of Modern Observational Data: Why We Need to Recall it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2017-07-01

    Some physically possible consequences of interaction between baryonic matter and dark energy are considered. We are arguing that the modern cosmogony and cosmology based on the hypothesis of Kant and Laplace and its further modifications are not adequate to the nowadays growing base of observational data. A thought experiment is conducted in the framework of generally accepted physical concepts and laws to study the most prominent consequences of interactions between various types of substances with the dark energy carrier. Such experiments allow one to arrive at a conclusion that owing to continuous exchanges of energy between the atomic nuclei and the bearer of dark energy, the binding energy of nuclei should reduce and their mass had increase over time. This process can be considered as the Universe total mass growth at the expense of dark energy. Then one would be able to explain the long standing paradox: why the Universe did not collapse immediately after the mass formation event at the very beginning of the Universe formation. On the other hand, this way of thinking leads to a physical picture of the Universe where huge amounts of embryonic baryons possessing of negligible masses can exist in the interiors of large cosmic objects to transform into the ordinary baryonic matter of vast masses in the future. As a result, clumps of matter of huge masses can be ejected from the cores of such objects.

  9. Peircean cosmogony's symbolic agapistic self-organization as an example of the influence of eastern philosophy on western thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Søren

    2017-12-01

    Charles S. Peirce developed a process philosophy featuring a non-theistic agapistic evolution from nothingness. It is an Eastern inspired alternative to the Western mechanical ontology of classical science also inspired by the American transcendentalists. Advaitism and Buddhism are the two most important Eastern philosophical traditions that encompass scientific knowledge and the idea of spontaneous evolutionary development. This article attempts to show how Peirce's non-mechanistic triadic semiotic process theory is suited better to embrace the quantum field view than mechanistic and information-based views are with regard to a theory of the emergence of consciousness. Peirce views the universe as a reasoning process developing from pure potentiality to the fully ordered rational Summon Bonum. The paper compares this with John Archibald Wheeler's "It from bit" cosmogony based on quantum information science, which leads to the info-computational view of nature, mind and culture. However, this theory lacks a phenomenological foundation. David Chalmers' double aspect interpretation of information attempts to overcome the limitations of the info-computational view. Chalmers supplements Batesonian and Wheelerian info-computationalism - both of which lack a phenomenological aspect - with a dimension that corresponds to the phenomenological aspect of reality. However, he does not manage to produce an integrated theory of the development of meaning and rationality. Alex Hankey's further work goes some way towards establishing a theory that can satisfy Husserl's criteria for consciousness - such as a sense of being and time - but Hankey's dependence on Chalmers' theory is still not able to account for what the connection between core consciousness and the physical world is. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kozmogoni Anlatılarında Dikotomik Algının Nedenselliği The Causality Of Dichotomic Perception In Cosmogony Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem BALKAYA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns that every human emphasizes is that why and how the cosmos has come into existence. Another discussion is that whether the creatures we perceived both sensual and cognitively are really exist or a counterpart of originals. From troglodyte to modern the efforts of every human intended for understanding and interpretation of the events underway around have led to different expressions and convictions. Leaving aside the philosophicaldiscussions about what, why, and how the creatures have come intoexistence, sociologists explains the fact called religion as a dependablebase found by archaic man for this problematic. On the other handcertain creation explainings considered nearly a religion have come upthough they are in the field of ethnology. Cosmogonies are theexperiences of people trying to explain this first fact. Common traits areseen when these narratives are examined carefully. Being presentedwith dichotomic foundation is another common trait of the narrativessince using contrast between two facts in narration gains certaininterestingness. In fact, when it is examined carefully, it is understoodthat such foundation has been made from necessity. To explain acreature, imposing a certain restriction or completing it from differentviewpoints, another thing is referred. In this way the principal missionsof cosmogonies which are explaining and finding logical reasons ofworld, creature and nature are come true. In this study some of thefoundations in cosmogony narrations will be analyzed to serve as amodel – analyzing all cosmogonies will go beyond the scope of the study– and the reason of using dichotomic foundation in narratives will bediscussed. Her insanın üzerinde durduğu en temel sorunlardan biri kozmosun neden ve nasıl var olduğudur. Tartışmalardan bir başkası hem duyusal hem bilişsel anlamda algıladığımız varlıkların hakikaten var veya asıl olanın bir sureti olup olmadığıdır.

  11. Věda a počátky vesmíru: Ke vztahu kosmogonie a přírodní vědy (Science and the Origins of the Universe: On the Relationship between Cosmogony and Natural Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Stodola

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the relationship between a question of the generation and the origin of the universe (a cosmogony question and science. At first, there are presented two possible answers to this question – theism and monism. There is examined the relationship between cosmogonic questions and modern natural science. There is shown several variants of this relationship and there are presented some arguments for and against them.

  12. Biosemiotic Cosmogony of the Riddle of Life!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Review of Vinicius, R. and Fernández, E. (Eds.) (2014): Peirce and Biosemiotics: A Guess at the Riddle of life, New York: Springer. Biosemiotics Books no. 11. ISBN 978-94-007-7732-3, USD $189.......Review of Vinicius, R. and Fernández, E. (Eds.) (2014): Peirce and Biosemiotics: A Guess at the Riddle of life, New York: Springer. Biosemiotics Books no. 11. ISBN 978-94-007-7732-3, USD $189....

  13. Cosmogony as an extrapolation of magnetospheric research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1984-03-01

    A theory of the origin and evolution of the Solar System (Alfven and Arrhenius, 1975: 1976) which considered electromagnetic forces and plasma effects is revised in the light of new information supplied by space research. In situ measurements in the magnetospheres and solar wind have changed our views of basic properties of cosmic plasmas. These results can be extrapolated both outwards in space, to interstellar clouds, backwards in time, to the formation of the solar system. The first extrapolation leads to a revision of some cloud properties which are essential for the early phases in the formation of stars and solar nebule. The latter extrapolation makes possible to approach the cosmogonic processes by extrapolation of (rather) well-known magnetospheric phenomena. Pioneer-Voyager observations of the Saturnian rings indicate that essential parts of their structure are fossils from cosmogonic times. By using detailed information from these space missions, it seems possible to reconstruct certain events 4-5 billion years ago with an accuracy of a few percent. This will cause a change in our views of the evolution of the solar system.(author)

  14. COBE DMR-normalized open inflation cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Ratra, Bharat; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Banday, Anthony J.

    1995-01-01

    A cut-sky orthogonal mode analysis of the 2 year COBE DMR 53 and 90 GHz sky maps (in Galactic coordinates) is used to determine the normalization of an open inflation model based on the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario. The normalized model is compared to measures of large-scale structure in the universe. Although the DMR data alone does not provide sufficient discriminative power to prefer a particular value of the mass density parameter, the open model appears to be reasonably consistent with observations when Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4 and merits further study.

  15. Cosmology and Cosmogony in a Cyclic Universe Jayant V. Narlikar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The introduction of dark energy is typical of the way the standard cosmology has developed; viz., a new assumption is introduced specifically to sustain the model against some new observation. Thus, when the amount of dark matter proved to be too high to sustain the primordial origin of deuterium, the assumption was ...

  16. The Cosmogony of Super-Massive Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J; Strittmatter, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    We summarize our recent results on the evolution of super-massive black holes in the cores of galaxies. Our models are based on the viscous, Eddington-limited evolution of self-gravitating accretion disks. We find that, within this framework, one can explain the growth time scales and the luminosities of individual objects as well as the variation of these quantities for AGN with different black hole masses.

  17. An Isocurvature Cold Dark Matter Cosmogony. I. A Worked Example of Evolution through Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1999-01-01

    I present a specific worked example of evolution through inflation to the initial conditions for an isocurvature cold dark matter (ICDM) model for structure formation. The model invokes three scalar fields: one that drives power-law inflation, one that survives to become the present-day CDM, and one that gives the CDM field a mass that slowly decreases during inflation and therefore ``tilts'' the primeval mass fluctuation spectrum of the CDM. The functional forms for the potentials and the parameter values that lead to an observationally acceptable model for structure formation do not seem to be out of line with current ideas about the physics of the very early universe. I argue in an accompanying paper that the model offers a not unacceptable fit to main observational constraints.

  18. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  19. Cold Dark Matter Cosmogony with Hydrodynamics and Galaxy Formation: Galaxy Properties at Redshift Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1993-11-01

    We have supplemented our code, which computes the evolution of the physical state of a representative piece of the universe, to include not only the dynamics of dark matter (with a standard PM code) and the hydrodynamics of the gaseous component (including detailed collisional and radiative processes), but also galaxy formation on a heuristic but plausible basis. If, within a cell, the gas is Jeans-unstable, collapsing and cooling rapidly, it is transformed to galaxy subunits, which are then followed with a collisionless code. We study two representative boxes with sizes L = (80, 8) h-1 Mpc, in both cases utilizing a mesh of 2003 cells containing 2003 dark matter particles and having nominal resolutions of (400, 40) h-1 kpc, respectively, with true resolution approximately 2.5 times worse. We adopt the standard cold dark matter (CDM) perturbation spectrum with an amplitude of σ8 ≡ = (δM/M)rms,8 = 0.77, a compromise between the COBE normalization σ8 = 1.05 and that indicated by the small-scale velocity dispersion (perhaps σ8 = 0.45). We find a mass function which is similar to that observed. There is a strong correlation between galactic age and environment. Identifying the oldest fraction with elliptical and 50 galaxies, we find a density morphology relation of the same type as is observed as well as a correlation between gas mass/total mass ratio and morphology that is similar to observations. In addition, we find that low-mass galaxies contain relatively more dark matter than giants. We present analytic fits to our derived results for "bias," the dependence of ρgal/ on ρtot/. Spatial structures resemble quantitatively those seen in redshift surveys, with galaxies concentrated in clusters and on filaments (or sheets) which surround quite empty voids. The void probability statistics indicate that this model is consistent with magnitude-limited real data. The small-scale velocity field is too large compared with the observed velocity correlation function. The distribution of proper velocities fits an exponential (not a Maxwellian) P(υ) 2 ∝ υ2e-υ/σexp with σexp = 225 km s-1. For galaxies separated by 1 h-1 Mpc we find a one-dimensional velocity dispersion of 670 km s-1 (490 km s-1 for the most massive subset) compared with 340±40 km s-1 as measured by Davis & Peebles (1983). Adoption of the COBE normalization causes the problem to become worse; the CDM prediction is then approximately (920±160) km s-1. If we look at the genus curves of all our galaxies, they fit the random-phase expectation, but a magnitude-limited sample emphasizes the older, more massive galaxies which have collected at a vertices. This explains the observed "meatball shift" of the genus curves found in observed samples.

  20. A hydrodynamic approach to cosmology - Texture-seeded cold dark matter and hot dark matter cosmogonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, R. Y.; Ostriker, J. P.; Spergel, D. N.; Turok, N.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation in a texture-seeded cosmology are presented, with attention given to Omega = 1 galaxies dominated by both hot dark matter (HDM) and cold dark matter (CDM). The simulations include both gravitational and hydrodynamical physics with a detailed treatment of collisional and radiative thermal processes, and use a cooling criterion to estimate galaxy formation. Background radiation fields and Zel'dovich-Sunyaev fluctuations are explicitly computed. The derived galaxy mass function is well fitted by the observed Schechter luminosity function for a baryonic M/L of 3 and total M/L of 60 in galaxies. In both HDM and CDM texture scenarios, the 'galaxies' and 'clusters' are significantly more strongly correlated than the dark matter due to physical bias processes. The slope of the correlation function in both cases is consistent with observations. In contrast to Gaussian models, peaks in the dark matter density distributrion are less correlated than average.

  1. THE FORMATION OF SHELL GALAXIES SIMILAR TO NGC 7600 IN THE COLD DARK MATTER COSMOGONY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Andrew P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Helly, John; Frenk, Carlos; Cole, Shaun; Crawford, Ken; Zibetti, Stefano; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Jay GaBany, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present new deep observations of 'shell' structures in the halo of the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 7600, alongside a movie of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe. The movie, based on an ab initio cosmological simulation, shows how continuous accretion of clumps of dark matter and stars creates a swath of diffuse circumgalactic structures. The disruption of a massive clump on a near-radial orbit creates a complex system of transient concentric shells which bare a striking resemblance to those of NGC 7600. With the aid of the simulation we interpret NGC 7600 in the context of the CDM model.

  2. The Formation of Shell Galaxies Similar to NGC 7600 in the Cold Dark Matter Cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew P.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Helly, John; Frenk, Carlos; Cole, Shaun; Crawford, Ken; Zibetti, Stefano; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; GaBany, R. Jay

    2011-12-01

    We present new deep observations of "shell" structures in the halo of the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 7600, alongside a movie of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe. The movie, based on an ab initio cosmological simulation, shows how continuous accretion of clumps of dark matter and stars creates a swath of diffuse circumgalactic structures. The disruption of a massive clump on a near-radial orbit creates a complex system of transient concentric shells which bare a striking resemblance to those of NGC 7600. With the aid of the simulation we interpret NGC 7600 in the context of the CDM model.

  3. The formation of galaxies and quasars in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooding, A.K.; Turok, N.; Spergel, D.N.

    1991-01-01

    The nonGaussian perturbations produced by global texture lead to the early formation of stars, quasars, and galaxies. Growth of the density fluctuation in cold dark matter induced by the unwinding of a texture 'knot' is calculated and the evolution of the mass multiplicity function in this galaxy formation model is determined. By z of about 50, about 3 percent of the mass of the universe has formed nonlinear objects of mass greater than 10 to the 6th solar masses - these objects may have reionized the universe. Most objects larger than 10 to the 12th solar masses form by z about 2-3, consistent with the observed epoch of QSO formation. Today, about 35 percent of the mass of the universe is in bound objects of mass greater than 10 to the 12th solar masses. It is found that the slope and the amplitude of the multiplicity function is consistent with the observed galaxy luminosity function. 24 refs

  4. High-z objects and cold dark matter cosmogonies - Constraints on the primordial power spectrum on small scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    Modified cold dark matter (CDM) models were recently suggested to account for large-scale optical data, which fix the power spectrum on large scales, and the COBE results, which would then fix the bias parameter, b. We point out that all such models have deficit of small-scale power where density fluctuations are presently nonlinear, and should then lead to late epochs of collapse of scales M between 10 exp 9 - 10 exp 10 solar masses and (1-5) x 10 exp 14 solar masses. We compute the probabilities and comoving space densities of various scale objects at high redshifts according to the CDM models and compare these with observations of high-z QSOs, high-z galaxies and the protocluster-size object found recently by Uson et al. (1992) at z = 3.4. We show that the modified CDM models are inconsistent with the observational data on these objects. We thus suggest that in order to account for the high-z objects, as well as the large-scale and COBE data, one needs a power spectrum with more power on small scales than CDM models allow and an open universe.

  5. Peircean Cosmogony's Symbolic Agapistic Self-organization as an Example of the Influence of Eastern Philosophy on Western Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Charles S. Peirce developed a process philosophy featuring a non-theistic agapistic evolution from nothingness. It is an Eastern inspired alternative to the Western mechanical ontology of classical science also inspired by the American transcendentalists. Advaitism and Buddhism are the two most i...

  6. Evolution of the solar system - relations to physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treder, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Kantian cosmogony 'based on Newtonian principles' is founded on celestial mechanics, statistical mechanics, and atomistical thermodynamics. However, these fundamental physical laws are working in the given cosmos. (author)

  7. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Cosmology and Cosmogony in a Cyclic Universe ... We discuss the origin of such a scalar field in the primary creation ... Does Si Play a Role in the Formation of Extrasolar Planet Systems? ... Activity Cycle of Solar Filaments.

  8. Origin of the Earth and planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.S.; Ruskol, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the Schmidt hypothesis on planets formation by combining cold solid particles and bodies in the protoplanet dust cloud is briefly outlined in a popular form. The most debatable problems of the planet cosmogony: formation of and processes in a protoplanet cloud, results of analytical evaluations and numerical simulation of origin of the Earth and planets-giants are discussed [ru

  9. Cultural modes of comprehending and healing insanity: the Yaka of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The statuettes enact a cosmogony in which the patient is intimately involved throughout. In this, the patient is led into an ontogenetic passage from a fusional and primal state towards a particular and sexualised identity, one with precise contours and situated within a social hierarchy and a historicity of generations and of ...

  10. Hindu Responses to Darwinism: Assimilation and Rejection in a Colonial and Post-Colonial Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. Mackenzie

    2010-01-01

    Hindu responses to Darwinism, like Christian, have run the gamut from outright rejection to fairly robust but limited accommodations of the Darwinian perspective. Despite certain features of Hindu thought such as the enormous time-scales of traditional cosmogonies that may suggest considerable affinity with modern notions of organic evolution,…

  11. Studies in the History of Astronomy. Issue 32 %t Istoriko-Astronomicheskie Issledovaniya. Vypusk XXXII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idlis, G. M.

    This collection contains papers covering a wide scope of problems in the history of astronomy. Its basic headlines are: Cosmology and cosmogony of the 20th century; History of observations and astronomical organizations; Scientists and their works; Astronomy and society; Publications and memoirs; Astronomy and astrology; Memory of scientists

  12. Masses for the Local Group and the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yang-Shyang; White, Simon D. M.

    2008-01-01

    We use the very large Millennium Simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony to calibrate the bias and error distribution of Timing Argument estimators of the masses of the Local Group and of the Milky Way. From a large number of isolated spiral spiral pairs similar to the Milky

  13. Cosmogonic scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.; Arrhenius, G.

    1985-05-01

    A recent analysis demonstrates that the Saturnian C ring and essential features of the B and A rings agrees with the plasma cosmogony approach with an accuracy of about 1% or even better. This starts a transition of cosmogony from speculation to real science. Based on the monographs by Alfven and Arrhenius on the evolution of the solar system a cosmogonic scenario is tentatively proposed. This outlines the evolution of an interstellar cloud and the formation of stars surrounded by solar nebulae under the combined action of gravitational and electromagnetic forces. Further, matter falling in from the solar nebula towards the sun is processed by newly clarified electromagnetic processes and a plasma-planetesimal transition (PPT) occurs. Planetesimals accrete to planets and around some of them the same process in miniature leads to the formation of satellites. Also the origin of comets is discussed. (author)

  14. White dwarfs - black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexl, R.; Sexl, H.

    1975-01-01

    The physical arguments and problems of relativistic astrophysics are presented in a correct way, but without any higher mathematics. The book is addressed to teachers, experimental physicists, and others with a basic knowledge covering an introductory lecture in physics. The issues dealt with are: fundamentals of general relativity, classical tests of general relativity, curved space-time, stars and planets, pulsars, gravitational collapse and black holes, the search for black holes, gravitational waves, cosmology, cosmogony, and the early universe. (BJ/AK) [de

  15. Conciousness and Matter, A Complex Relationship: The Case of Sa¯mkhya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Arnau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the relationships (logic, metaphoric and epistemic between consciousness and matter in the sa-mkhya philosophy, one of the oldest systems of the Brahmanical tradition. After a brief introduction to the cosmology of the sa-mkhya, it discusses cosmogony and metaphysical pluralism of this current of thought using as primary sources the Sanskrit medieval commentaries on the Sa-mkhyaka-rika- by the medieval scholastic Va-caspati Mis´ra.

  16. White dwarfs - black holes. Weisse Zwerge - schwarze Loecher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexl, R; Sexl, H

    1975-04-01

    The physical arguments and problems of relativistic astrophysics are presented in a correct way, but without any higher mathematics. The book is addressed to teachers, experimental physicists, and others with a basic knowledge covering an introductory lecture in physics. The issues dealt with are: fundamentals of general relativity, classical tests of general relativity, curved space-time, stars and planets, pulsars, gravitational collapse and black holes, the search for black holes, gravitational waves, cosmology, cosmogony, and the early universe.

  17. Islam Jawa: antara Holisme dan Individualisme

    OpenAIRE

    AG., Muhaimin

    2005-01-01

    this book is a continuation of the writer's previous work, From Cosmogony to Exorcism in a Javanese Genesis; the Spirit Seed (2000), in which he discussed how mythological beliefs regarding the origin and creation of the world pleyed an important role in the social and religious lives of the Javanese. These mythological beliefs constituted the basis of the formation of both social relations within the Javanese community, as well as the ritual practices of the Javanese in seeking fortune and s...

  18. O ‘Bem Viver’, entre as táticas de consumo e as cosmogonias ancestrais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Papalini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I expose the sources that feed the imagery of Good Life in Latin America: the American counterculture of the '60s, the New Age and the Andean sumak kawsay cosmogony. I also analyze the definition of good life as wellness disseminated by media, which is compatible with commercial interests. The methodology is based on the review of documentary sources. These materials compose a genealogy of social speeches whose meaning I explain. This analysis aims to understand lifestyles that hold on the cause of good life within advertising language as well as their synergy with conditions experienced by contemporary subjects.

  19. Principles of meteoritics

    CERN Document Server

    Krinov, E L

    1960-01-01

    Principles of Meteoritics examines the significance of meteorites in relation to cosmogony and to the origin of the planetary system. The book discusses the science of meteoritics and the sources of meteorites. Scientists study the morphology of meteorites to determine their motion in the atmosphere. The scope of such study includes all forms of meteorites, the circumstances of their fall to earth, their motion in the atmosphere, and their orbits in space. Meteoric bodies vary in sizes; in calculating their motion in interplanetary space, astronomers apply the laws of Kepler. In the region of

  20. The nuclear history of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Gy.

    1982-01-01

    A brief summary of the cosmogony of our universe following the big bang is given, including the production of the elements, the astronomical processes and the evolution of stars, the planets and life. Along with the social development the energy need of society has been growing and to meet this demand, other than chemical forms of stored energy in the universe is to be released. The nuclear power utilized today and in the future is related to the energy stored at the beginning of the universe. The cosmological and physical background of nuclear energy storage since the big bang and of the reasons of its convertibility into power is explained. (R.P.)

  1. Astronomy and Cosmology of the Guarani of Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Flávia Cristina

    The Guarani Indians in South Brazil have a sophisticated system of thought about the cosmos. Presented here are some elements of their cosmology and cosmogony and the influences of the heavenly bodies in this people's everyday life, which have been collected in ethnographic research in the first decade of the 21st century. The main themes of cosmology and the origin of the Sun, Moon, and Earth are described, approximating this anthropological research to ethnoastronomy and cultural anthropology discussions. This research seeks to analyze comparatively this cosmological concept with other indigenous cosmological systems and to compare them with the Western cosmological system, thus including it in studies of cultural astronomy.

  2. Nuclear history of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, Gy [Eoetvoes Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest (Hungary). Atomfizikai Tanszek

    1982-01-01

    A brief summary of the cosmogony of our universe following the big bang is given, including the production of the elements, the astronomical processes and the evolution of stars, the planets and life. Along with the social development the energy need of society has been growing and to meet this demand, other than chemical forms of stored energy in the universe is to be released. The nuclear power utilized today and in the future is related to the energy stored at the beginning of the universe. The cosmological and physical background of nuclear energy storage since the big bang and of the reasons of its convertibility into power is explained.

  3. Francis Bacon and the Art-Nature Distinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2007-07-01

    Commentators generally expound Bacon's position on the art-nature relationship in terms of how much it retained or departed from traditional conceptions. This paper argues that an appreciation of the Baconian meaning of the terms "art" and "nature" requires a close examination of his wider cosmogonical speculations. Bacon's cosmogonical account moves from a state of unbridled chaos to the relatively stable system for which the term "nature" is normally used. The fundamental principle lying at the heart of Baconian cosmogony is an enriched and appetitive matter: eternal, unchanging, and the plenipotentiary source of all things. Successive limitations of matter's absolute power produced a lazy and habitual nature, which Bacon labelled "nature free." To shift nature from this otiose condition, the Baconian operator recapitulates the original binding of matter. Bacon designated the systematic procedures of binding nature the science of magic. Magic is Bacon's human counterpart to the original cosmogonical process that gave rise to the current system of nature. In Bacon's cosmogony, all possible worlds unfold out of matter: the function of art is to shake out nature's hidden folds. Hence, the distinction between naturalia and artificialia maps on to the distinction between actual and potential. Nature free is without purpose, but art - nature bound - knowingly brings into being an alternative nature designed for human utility.

  4. Space research and cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-08-01

    Scientific progress depends on the development of new instruments. The change from Ptolemaic to Copernican cosmology was to a large extent caused by the introduction of telescopes. Similarly, space research has changed our possibilities to explore our large scale environment so drastically that a thorough revision of cosmic physics is now taking place. A list is given of a large number of fields in which this revision is in progress or is just starting. The new view are based on in situ measurements in the magnetospheres. By extrapolating these measurments to more distant regions, also plasma astrophysics in general has to be reconsidered. In certain important fields the basic approach has to be changed. This applies to cosmogony (origin and evolution of the solar system) and to cosmology. New results from laboratory and magnetospheric measurements extrapolated to cosmogonic conditions give an increased reliability to our treatment of the origin and evolution of the Solar system. Especially the Voyager observations of the saturnian rings give us the hope that we may transfer cosmogony from a playground for more or less crazy ideas into a respectable science. (author)

  5. The Formation and Evolution of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marov, Mikhail

    2018-05-01

    The formation and evolution of our solar system (and planetary systems around other stars) are among the most challenging and intriguing fields of modern science. As the product of a long history of cosmic matter evolution, this important branch of astrophysics is referred to as stellar-planetary cosmogony. Interdisciplinary by way of its content, it is based on fundamental theoretical concepts and available observational data on the processes of star formation. Modern observational data on stellar evolution, disc formation, and the discovery of extrasolar planets, as well as mechanical and cosmochemical properties of the solar system, place important constraints on the different scenarios developed, each supporting the basic cosmogony concept (as rooted in the Kant-Laplace hypothesis). Basically, the sequence of events includes fragmentation of an original interstellar molecular cloud, emergence of a primordial nebula, and accretion of a protoplanetary gas-dust disk around a parent star, followed by disk instability and break-up into primary solid bodies (planetesimals) and their collisional interactions, eventually forming a planet. Recent decades have seen major advances in the field, due to in-depth theoretical and experimental studies. Such advances have clarified a new scenario, which largely supports simultaneous stellar-planetary formation. Here, the collapse of a protosolar nebula's inner core gives rise to fusion ignition and star birth with an accretion disc left behind: its continuing evolution resulting ultimately in protoplanets and planetary formation. Astronomical observations have allowed us to resolve in great detail the turbulent structure of gas-dust disks and their dynamics in regard to solar system origin. Indeed radio isotope dating of chondrite meteorite samples has charted the age and the chronology of key processes in the formation of the solar system. Significant progress also has been made in the theoretical study and computer modeling

  6. ARCA DWARAPALA PADA CANDI-CANDI BUDDHA DI JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wahyu Sarjanawati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Temple as a product of the culture of Hindu-Buddhist period is the building that describes the concept of cosmogony and a replica of Mount Mahameru the place of the gods. Dwarapala statue is one of the guards in almost Javanese temple. The existence of this statue in the temple (depiction microcosm has a meaning. Problems which will be solved, namely: (1 where the statue Dwarapala placed in the temple Plaosan and the temple Sewu (2 how is the depiction of Dwarapala statues in the temple Palosan and the temple Sewu? Gana figure that became the object of the study were analyzed with hermeneutical analysis. Hermeneutical analysis of the statue Dwarapala can only be done if the information about these statues is known. From the results of research and discussion can be seen that the meaning of the statue at Buddhist temple Dwarapala not be separated from the concept of cosmogony. Portrayal system was adapted to the function of these statues at the temple. So it can be said that the statues have meaning that Dwarapala is a portrayal of religious situation in the Hindu-Buddhist and the symbol of the world above (heaven. The placement of temple statues Dwarapala complement cosmogony concept representations, thus building meaning of worship into a whole. Keywords:  Dwarapala, temple, hermeneutic   Candi sebagai produk dari budaya masa Hindu-Buddha adalah bangunan yang menggambarkan konsep kosmogoni dan replika Gunung Mahameru tempat para dewa. Patung Dwarapala adalah salah satu penjaga di kuil hampir Jawa. Keberadaan patung ini di candi (mikrokosmos penggambaran memiliki arti. Masalah yang akan dipecahkan, yaitu: (1 bagaimana patung Dwarapala ditempatkan di candi Plaosan dan candi Sewu (2 bagaimana penggambaran patung Dwarapala di candi Palosan dan candi Sewu? Gana sosok yang menjadi objek penelitian dianalisis dengan analisis hermeneutis. Analisis hermeneutis patung Dwarapala hanya dapat dilakukan jika informasi tentang patung-patung ini dikenal

  7. USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS-IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Bromund, Kenneth; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas [NASA/GSFC, Heliophysics Science Division, Space Weather Laboratory (Code 674), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hamelin, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques [LATMOS/IPSL, UPMC, Paris (France); Beghin, Christian; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre [LPC2E, CNRS/Universite d' Orleans (France); Grard, Rejean [ESA/ESTEC, Research Scientific Support Department, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Sentman, Davis [Institute of Geophysics, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Takahashi, Yukihiro [Department of Geophysics, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yair, Yoav [Department Life Natural Sciences, Open University of Israel, Raanana (Israel)

    2012-05-01

    The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  8. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  9. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G. W.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in ΛCDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain ∼1000 km s –1 by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas ΛCDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in ΛCDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  10. I sing the body dystopic: Utopia and posthuman corporeality in P.D. James’s The Children of Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Marks de Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2013n65p29 The resurgence of novels dealing with dystopian cosmogonies since the 1990s may reveal a newtrend in Utopian Studies. If classical dystopia was defined by the imposition of collective political and social structures upon the individual and out of which there was no escape (as constructed, mainly, by Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, these contemporary dystopian novels critically construct posthuman societies where the focus is on the development of the dystopian body, which questions andreinvents the very definitions of humanity. This article aims at examining theeffects of posthuman critique upon the construction of the dystopian body in P.D. James’s novel The Children of Men.

  11. Mind, Matter, and Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent; Thellefsen, Torkild; Brier, Søren

    2012-01-01

    In the program article “The Architectures of Theories” (1893), C. S. Peirce presented his trichotomies within psychology, biology, physics and philosophy, and in terms of these trichotomies, it could easily be predicted, according to Peirce, what kind of metaphysics it would be appropriate...... to construct, a cosmogonic philosophy. But, other than presenting his very brief sketch of a thoroughgoing evolutionary cosmogony, Peirce, unfortunately, did not give this important topic further treatment in the article. The question which arises then is in what way these trichotomies can be said...... to be connected Consequently, will an attempt to analyze a possible connection between the trichotomies shed light upon the evolutionary thinking of Peirce? In the following article we will give a tentative answer to this question....

  12. Habit as a Connecting Nature, Mind and Culture in CS Peirce's Semiotic Pragmaticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Peirce’s view of science and religion differs from the received view and therefore has interesting consequences for how we see the connections between the two [1]. Peirce was like Karl Popper a fallibilist opposing the logical positivist epistemology of possibility of verification of scientific...... in Newton’s theory of motion was reversible. Time had no arrow. But in Peirce’s cosmogony change is at the basis as Firstness is imbued with the tendency to take habits and time therefore has an arrow and is irreversible and therefore what the laws manifested as the universe develop. This was unthinkable...... published the book Time Reborn [6] where he accepts Peirce’s as well as Prigogine’s views on the nature of time, change and law, which was a big change in foundational conception og physics. In contrast to Smolin and Prigogine Peirce also grounds his philosophical framework in phenomenology. He is inspired...

  13. Dacic Ancient Astronomical Research in Sarmizegetuza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel George Oprea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The actual Romanian territory belongs to Carpatho-Danubian Space and to Ancient Europe. The Ancient European Society was a vast cultural entity based on a theocratic, matriarchal society, peaceful and art creating.Temples of Sarmizegetusa have given rise to several theories over time, proven by historians with the most diverse arguments. The largest complex of temples and sanctuaries was founded in Sarmizegetusa Regia, the Dacian’s main fortress and ancient capital of Dacia in the time of King Decebalus. The mysterious form of settlements has led researchers to the conclusion that the locations were astronomical observation shrines. Among the places of Dacian worship in Orastie Mountains the most impressive is the Great Circular Sanctuary, used to perform some celestial observations, and also as original solar calendar. This paper had the purpose to re-discover the Dacian Civilization and Dacian cosmogony based on the accumulated knowledge upon our country’s past.

  14. Hierofonía and cosmology in indigenous art Sibundoy Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Fernando Sánchez Suárez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the large existing indigenous cultural diversity in South America as the initial part of the study and support of research is presented. It is also a reflection from the perspective of different authors on the thinking of man in relation to nature, archetypes, cosmogony and rituals. It is also woven with the history of the peoples or ethnic communities of Kamentzá and Inga. The inhabitants of Sibundoy Valley, Putumayo Colombia show a strong influence of Eastern and other Amerindian cultures that have had a great relevance and importance on other cultures of the continent. Similarly, it treats the nature of the Indian art and aesthetics as an important aspect in the development of cosmology and the spirituality embodied in the different objects and in the aesthetics in other elements of cultural elements proper to the Kamentzá and Inga cultures.

  15. Using Schumann Resonance Measurements for Constraining the Water Abundance on the Giant Planets - Implications for the Solar System Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Hamelin, Michel; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Beghin, Christian; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bromund, Kenneth; Grard, Rejean; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; hide

    2012-01-01

    The formation and evolution of the Solar System is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the Solar System is therefore important to understand not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new, remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  16. USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS—IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simões, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Bromund, Kenneth; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas; Hamelin, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Béghin, Christian; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Grard, Rejean; Sentman, Davis; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  17. Origin of the atmospheres of the earth and the planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z M

    1978-06-01

    From a systematic analysis of the whole history of the protoplanetary cloud and the observational facts of the earth's atmosphere, new theory is proposed on the origin of the atmospheres of the earth and the planets. For the earth-like planets, there were profound primordial atmospheres originated from the protoplanetary cloud by the accretion of the embryoes of planets. These primordial atmospheres has existed in a time scale of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 7/ years and were composed of chemically reducing gases. The presence of such a reducing atmosphere may be of great significance to the theories of cosmogony and the origin of life. The contents are as follows: the escape of the nebulae and the planetary atmospheres, the blowing-off of the atmospheres and the disspiation of gases driven by the solar wind, the accretion of gases by the planetary embryoes, the primordial atmospheres.

  18. Isotrope und homogene Materie - Kosmen; On Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Isotropic Matter-Universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, H.-J.

    Die Dynamik und Thermodynamik großer kosmischer Systeme ist fast unabhängig von den besonderen Theorien über die Gravitation. Nur die Feinstruktur der Kosmologie und Kosmonogie reflektiert die speziellen Hypothesen. Diese Neutralität gegenüber den konkreten Gravodynamiken ist die Konsequenz der fundamentalen Eigenschaften der Gravitation: Der Prinzipien der Äquivalenz von Trägheit und Schwere. The dynamics and thermodynamics of great cosmical systems are nearly independent of the theory of gravitation and only the fine-structure of cosmogony and cosmology reflects the special hypotheses.The neutrality against the concret gravodynamics is a consequence of the fundamental properties of gravitation: the principlies of equivalence of gravity and inertia.

  19. Quantum gravity and taoist cosmology: Exploring the ancient origins of phenomenological string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Steven M

    2017-12-01

    This paper carries forward the author's contribution to PBMP's previous special issue on Integral Biomathics (Rosen 2015). In the earlier paper, the crisis in contemporary theoretical physics was described and it was demonstrated that the problem can be addressed effectively only by shifting the foundations of physics from objectivist Cartesian philosophy to phenomenological philosophy. To that end, a phenomenological string theory was proposed based on qualitative topology and hypercomplex numbers. The current presentation takes this further by delving into the ancient Chinese origin of phenomenological string theory. First, we discover a deep connection between the Klein bottle, which is crucial to the theory, and the Ho-t'u, an old Chinese number archetype central to Taoist cosmology. The two structures are seen to mirror each other in expressing the curious psychophysical (phenomenological) action pattern at the heart of microphysics. But tackling the question of quantum gravity requires that a whole family of topological dimensions be brought into play. What we find in engaging with these structures is a closely related family of Taoist forebears that, in concert with their successors, provide a blueprint for cosmic evolution. Whereas conventional string theory accounts for the generation of nature's fundamental forces via a notion of symmetry breaking that is essentially static and thus unable to explain cosmogony successfully, phenomenological/Taoist string theory is guided by the dialectical interplay between symmetry and asymmetry inherent in the principle of synsymmetry. This dynamic concept of cosmic change is elaborated on in the three concluding sections of the paper. Here, a detailed analysis of cosmogony is offered, first in terms of the theory of dimensional development and its Taoist (yin-yang) counterpart, then in terms of the evolution of the elemental force particles through cycles of expansion and contraction in a spiraling universe. The paper

  20. « Au fracas de la foudre, les animaux intelligents s'éveillèrent »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Bouvier

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Félix Pouchet, dans son Hétérogénie, ou Traité de la génération spontanée qu’il publie en 1859, défend, contre Pasteur et Milne-Edwards, l’idée d’une « force génésique » inhérente à la matière qui aurait présidé à la création et qui continuerait de s’exercer dans la formation et la transformation des espèces. Le livre fait partie des lectures de Flaubert pendant la période de rédaction de Salammbô. Le 5 août 1860, il écrit dans une lettre à madame Jules Sandeau : « J’entremêle mes lectures puniques (qui ne sont pas légères d’autres facéties graves. Je me livre maintenant au volumineux bouquin de mon ami le docteur Pouchet sur les générations spontanées. » C’est la nature de cet entrelacement que nous proposons d’interroger, à travers l’étude génétique d’un passage du chapitre III de Salammbô où Flaubert récrit la cosmogonie phénicienne à la lumière du spontanéisme moderne.Félix Pouchet, in Heterogeny or Spontaneous generation Treatise (1859, argues, against Pasteur and Milne-Edwards, for the existence of a « genesical force » inside matter at the beginning of the universe, still active in the formation and transformation of species. Flaubert read Pouchet’s book when he was writing Salammbô. On August 5th 1860, he wrote to madame Jules Sandeau : « I mingle my Punic readings (which are not light with other serious jokes. I now dedicate myself to my friend doctor Pouchet’s bulky book on spontaneous generations. » This interlacing of archaeology and science is precisely what I will examine in my paper, through the genetic study of a passage of Salammbô (chapter III where Flaubert rewrites the Phoenician cosmogony in the light of modern spontaneism.

  1. Rite – mythe – symbole. Les croix votives roumaines entre la tradition populaire et la création culte / Rite – Myth – Symbol. Romanian Votive Crosses between Popular Tradition and Cult Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamfira Bîrzu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rite – Myth – Symbol. Romanian Votive Crosses between Popular Tradition and Cult Creation. The Romanian Pre-Christian Pantheon is presented connected to the themes of cosmogony, having as background the mytical-magical and ritualistic-symbolical thinking, thus underlining the importance of the mythical-historical-religious dimension, and also the defining of sacred space in our Romanian perception. Moreover, the condition of artistic form, as a bearer of the spiritual message, is necessary for the identification of ancient motifs and of the way in which they influence art. These ancient motifs, of great symbolical depth, are connected to the solar cult and are preserved in decorations which can be found in the studied monuments: the cross, the column of the sky, the troiţa (a big cross made of wood or stone, adorned with paintings, sculptures, inscriptions and sometimes framed by a small construction, usually placed at crossroads, near fountains or places that are connected to an event; an icon, formed of three parts, the lateral ones are in hinges, like some shutters, connected to the one from the middle; a tryptich, the icon…

  2. New Insights into the Structure, Origin, and Evolution of Pluto and Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Spencer, J. R.; Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Buie, M. W.; Porter, S.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The July 2015 New Horizons flyby has removed a long-standing obstacle to understanding the cosmogony of the Pluto-Charon system: the uncertain radius of Pluto. Combined with precise astrometric fits to the barycenter of the Pluto-Charon binary from HST observations of the more distant, small satellites (M. Brozović et al., Icarus 246, 317-329, 2015), the densities of both Pluto and Charon are now known. At the 10% level, the densities of Pluto and Charon are rather similar, as opposed to the more divergent density estimates of years past in which Charon was thought to be substantially icier. In the context of a giant impact origin for binaries, a rock-poor Charon corresponds to an iron-poor Moon in the terrestrial case, with differentiated precursors being implied in both cases. A rock-rich Charon, however, implies that the precursor impacting bodies were at most only partially differentiated — possessing relatively thin ice shells (R.M. Canup, Astron. J. 141, 35, 2011). This suggests some combination of relatively slow and/or late accretion in the ancestral Kuiper belt. A more rock-rich Charon also implies a more vigorous geological history, all other things being equal. For Pluto, the evolution to the surface of a substantial mass of supervolatile ices increases the likelihood that internal volatiles such as ammonia and methanol have been sequestered in an internal, aqueous layer (or ocean).

  3. THE LOW FREQUENCY OF DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI VERSUS THE HIGH MERGER RATE OF GALAXIES: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingjuan; Lu Youjun; Mohayaee, Roya; Colin, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are natural byproducts of hierarchical mergers of galaxies in the ΛCDM cosmogony. Recent observations have shown that only a small fraction (∼0.1%-2.5%) of AGNs at redshift z ∼< 0.3 are dual with kpc-scale separations, which is rather low compared to the high merger rate of galaxies. Here we construct a phenomenological model to estimate the number density of dual AGNs and its evolution according to the observationally estimated major merger rates of galaxies and various scaling relations on the properties of galaxies and their central massive black holes. We show that our model reproduces the observed frequency and separation distribution of dual AGNs provided that significant nuclear activities are triggered only in gas-rich progenitor galaxies with central massive black holes and only when the nuclei of these galaxies are roughly within the half-light radii of their companion galaxies. Under these constraints, the observed low dual AGN frequency is consistent with the relatively high merger rate of galaxies and supports the hypothesis that major mergers lead to AGN/QSO activities. We also predict that the number of kpc-scale dual AGNs decreases with increasing redshift and only about 0.02%-0.06% of AGNs are dual AGNs with double-peaked narrow line features at redshifts of z ∼ 0.5-1.2. Future observations of high-redshift dual AGNs would provide a solid test for this prediction.

  4. Towards the other mythology--the offspring of darkness: Jocasta's daughters and granddaughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozica, Ivan

    2008-12-01

    "It all started with the doubt (perhaps exaggerated) that the Gods do not know how to talk". The author presents the situation and tendencies in contemporary mythological research. The article starts out from the mythos-logos antithesis and from the twofold conception of the myth as both a fabricated and a sacred story. The allopersonages as characters of different names, who function as markers for the identical element in the structure, are contrasted by the author with the isopersonages bearing names of the same characters, who simultaneously function as markers for diverse elements or semantic strata in the structure. The term sociogony is introduced in analogy to the terms theogony and cosmogony. On the basis of a review of Croatian and mainstream mythological trends, the author perceives two main orientations in mythological research: the historical reconstruction of the Proto-Slavic myth, and research into the myth, mythic consciousness and mythic language in contemporary everyday life. The author supports the idea of differentiating mythology and religion and analyses the role of the myth, and scholarship on the myth, in forming national and cultural identity. From that aspect, we can also identify the contemporary transitional scholarly myth in today's reconstructions of the unifed Proto-Slavic myth. Remythologisation is part of retraditionalisation: Proto-Slavic fellowship is the spiritual solace by which the East responds to the tearing down of the Berlin Wall.

  5. Cosmologies of the ancient Mediterranean world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Fitzgerald

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cosmology is concerned with the order of the universe and seeks to provide an account, not only of that order, but also of the mind or reason behind it. In antiquity, the cosmos was usually understood religiously, such that the cosmologies of the ancient Mediterranean world were either religious in nature or constituted a reaction to a religiously conceived understanding of the structures of the universe. The oldest form in which ancient cosmologies occur is myth, which, owing to its elasticity as a form, enabled them to be appropriated, adapted and used by different groups. In addition, different cosmologies co-existed within the same ancient culture, each having an authoritative status. This article provides an introductory overview of these cosmological myths and argues that a comparative approach is the most fruitful way to study them. Emphasis is given to certain prominent cosmological topics, including theogony (the genesis of the divine or the relationship of the divine to the cosmos, cosmogony (the genesis of the cosmos, and anthropogony (the origin of humans within the cosmos. Although these myths vary greatly in terms of content and how they envision the origin of the cosmos, many of them depict death as part of the structure of the universe.

  6. Milestones regarding the Value of Life in Pentateuch

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    Mihai Teodorescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over all the centuries, humans have constantly tried to understand the meaning of their own existence, the reason for which they were born, they were living and they had to die, the mythological projections or the philosophical currents of the time trying to propose cosmogonies or valid reasons in this way. What was understood in general, in the common way, was the acceptance of the idea that the human soul comes from the exterior of the seen world, through a creational act which was external to humans, that is (for those who benefit from the supernatural revelation to understand better the truth, from God. The biblical perspective about the creation and, implicitly about life, is summed up in the pages of the Pentateuch. This perspective is totally different from the current perspective of man belonging to the post modernistic period, and his vision must be updated for the general Christian interest to save the lives and souls of those still preoccupied with the human’s spiritual perspective, the religious ideal sown in him since creation.

  7. Echoes of a not so Mythical Past: Memories of Race in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well

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    Cornelis Martin Renes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical discussion of Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well (1986 has largely focused on issues of gender, but little has been said about the racial inscription of the novel. This lack is especially relevant when criticism, despite praising the author’s experimentation with narrative technique and genre, tends to voice dissatisfaction with the novel’s conclusion in medias res, which never solves the tension between a presumed return to the patriarchal norm and the voicing of liberating alternatives. This paper proposes a postcolonial perspective so as to come to terms with this dilemma, and argues that the text signals the impossibility of suppressing the Native from the contemporary Australian land and textscape, whose Gothic articulation in the uncanny shape of the male well-dweller haunts the novel’s engagement with female empowerment. The female protagonist may only start overcoming a crippling gender discourse in the White postcolonial pastoralist setting by inscribing herself into ‘Australianness’. Reconciling her body with the land is significantly staged in terms of an Aboriginal cosmogony, as it is a ‘walkabout’ that allows Hester to start controlling her body and story. Thus, The Well may be understood to be inconclusive because it struggles to map gender across race at a time of Aboriginal-exclusive multiculturalism. Written in the mid 1980s, it announces a point of inflection in thinking about nativenonnative relationships

  8. Voyager Saturnian ring measurements and the early history of the solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.; Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.; Lindqvist, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The mass distribution in the Saturnian ring system is investigated and compared with predictions from the plasma cosmogony. According to this theory, the matter in the rings has once been in the form of a magnetized plasma, in which the gravitation is balanced partly by the centrifugal force and partly by the electromagnetic forces. As the plasma is neutralized, the electromagnetic forces disappear and the matter can be shown to fall in to 2/3 of the original saturnocentric distance. This causes the so called ''cosmogonic shadow effect'', which has been demonstrated earlier for the asteroidal belt and in the large scale structure of the Saturnian ring system. The relevance of the cosmogonic shadow effect is investigated for parts of the Saturnian ring system. It is shown that many structures of the present ring system can be understood as shadows and antishadows of cosmogonic origin. These appear in the form of double rings centered around a position a factor 0.64(slightly less than 2/3) closer to Saturn than the causing feature. Voyager data agree with an accuracy better than 1%. (author)

  9. Introduzione. Su Dio e i suoi uomini e i nostri sacrifici - Introduction. On God and His Men and Our Sacrifices

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    Antonio Luigi Palmisano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthropology has maybe too often confined itself in an analysis of liturgies and rituals – ideal or actual behaviours which are acknowledged by the social actor as addressed to supernatural beings or agents –, providing extraordinarily precise descriptions but renouncing to comprehend and relate the discourse on Man about himself -and implicitly about God- which is nevertheless traceable in all societies. Anthropology has avoided confrontation with the theologies, although present in all societies and inscribed in cosmogonies, theogonies, anthropogonies, ethnogonies, of which amazingly rich mythologies bear much more than plain traces. Anthropology has done so because it has given way to tekhne which is rampant nowadays. It has surrendered to tekhne because tekhne allows the elision of doubt. And yet, no matter how much one technifies it, anthropology does only exist as complementary to theology and vice versa, at least since the beginning of history. This relation was very clear to scholars such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Maurice Leenhard, Marcel Mauss or Meyer Fortes. After all, has there ever been a liturgy without a theology, a ritual without a cosmology? A sacrifice without a God, no matter how small? Sacrifice is a ritual par excellence.

  10. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  11. Zero Kelvin Big Bang, an Alternative Paradigm: I. Logic and the Cosmic Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Royce

    2011-11-01

    This is the first of three papers describing an alternative paradigm of cosmogony, the beginning and evolution of the universe. The Zero Kelvin Big Bang (ZKBB) theory is compared to the prevailing Standard Big Bang (SBB) paradigm, and challenges the notion that our universe is "all there is." Logic suggests that the Big Bang was not a creation event, but that the universe did have a beginning: a "cosmic fabric" of pre- existing matter, in pre-existing space. Instead, the Zero Kelvin Big Bang was a transitional event between that "beginning" and what would become our universe. Extrapolating entropy back in time (as SBB does for matter and energy), and applying simple logic, suggests a "cosmic fabric" of the simplest, stable particles of matter, at the lowest energy state possible: singlet state, spin-oriented atomic hydrogen at zero kelvin, at a density of, at most, only a few atoms per cubic meter of space, infinite and (almost) eternal. Papers II and III describe the condensation of part of the cosmic fabric into a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as Lemaître's primeval atom, followed by an implosion- explosion Big Bang.

  12. Old and New Testament figures in Mandaean version

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    Eric Segelberg

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available The religion which is commonly called the Mandaean is certainly a most complex entity. There is no standardized doctrine. Neither anthropology, cosmogony nor soteriology have reached that stage of doctrinal clarity which in the West is regarded as desirable. In all these fields of doctrine there are a number of important differences, e.g. as regards such an essential doctrine as the kind or degree of dualism. But however great the doctrinal freedom has been, it has not been too great to prevent Mandaeism from being incorporated into the great flock of Gnostic systems. Some basic features of Mandaean history are known and we are aware to some extent of the components making up the system. Obviously there is a large proportion of biblical, especially Old Testament material, but equally obvious are the Iranian influences. The latter seem to be partly derived from the West, together with the Old Testament and Jewish traditions, and partly incorporated in the tradition when the Mandaeans or Protomandaeans had already settled east of the river Jordan and in Mesopotamia.

  13. Κατὰ τὴν τοῦ χρὁνου τἁξιν. El tiempo en las cosmogonias presocráticas

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    Alberto Bernabé

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of the different forms of the intervention of time in the cosmogonies of the Pre-Socratics, their answers to the question of what time actually is, and the ways they understood its passing in the process of world creation. After introducing some prior problems, the author emphasizes that the Pre-Socratics had six distinct notions of time: l. Time-life (as the duration of a lifetime. 2. Time-order (as regulated duration. 3. Time-events (a sequence of a ‘before’ and an ‘after’ with respect to ‘now’ formed by successive events. 4. Time-change (that of transformation, of γιγνεσθαι. 5. Time-framework or time-receptacle (in which events are inserted. 6. Time-linguistic, related to the distinction which can be expressed in Greek either through the opposition between present/pass/future or through adverbs such as «before» and «after». They also have different time-passing models. 1. Understood as duration (a limited and an illimited one are distinguished and within the latter the eternal, atemporal and embracing finite times. 2. Understood as a line (within which a rectilinear one and a cyclical one are distinguished. In the light of these assumptions the passages referring to time in Hesiod, Ferecides, the Orphics, Anaximander, the Pythagoreans, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Melissus, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Diogenes of Apollonia and Democritus are revised. The author conc1udes that the suggested parameters, together with a philological analysis of the texts and a deep semantic study, constitute a productive mean to study the subject.

  14. What We Know Now: Synthesis for Understanding the Origin of the Pluto System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Buie, M. W.; Porter, S. B.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Ennico, K.

    2015-11-01

    The July 2015 New Horizons flyby has removed a long-standing obstacle to understanding the cosmogony of the Pluto-Charon system: the uncertain radius of Pluto. Combined with precise astrometric fits to the barycenter of the Pluto-Charon binary from HST observations of the more distant, small satellites (Brozovic et al., Icarus 246, 317-329, 2015), the densities of both Pluto and Charon are now known. At the 10% level, these densities are rather similar, as opposed to the more divergent density estimates of years past in which Charon was thought to be substantially icier. In the context of a “giant impact” origin, a rock-rich Charon implies that the precursor impacting bodies were at most only partially differentiated — possessing relatively thin ice shells (Canup, Astron. J. 141, 35, 2011). This suggests some combination of relatively slow and/or late accretion in the ancestral Kuiper belt. New Horizons has also shown that Nix and Hydra possess high albedos, consistent with ice-dominated compositions. Such compositions are consistent with a giant impact origin in which one or both precursor impacting bodies were partially differentiated, so that the small satellites ultimately formed from material ejected from ice-dominated surface layers (Peale and Canup, Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Ed., chapter 10.17, 2015). We examine whether Pluto and Charon could actually possess the same bulk rock/ice ratio and whether this would allow for an alternate, non-giant-impact origin for the Pluto system.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  15. “Who Began This Art? From Whence Did It Emerge?”: A Hermetic Frame Story on the Origins of Alchemy in Pseudo-Ibn Waḥshīya’s The Book of the Ziziphus Tree of the Furthest Boundary

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    Christopher Braun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the context of a Hermetic frame story in the pseudepigraphical alchemical treatise The Book of the Ziziphus Tree of the Furthest Boundary (Kitāb Sidrat almuntahā. The treatise is attributed to a prominent figure in the Arabic occult sciences, Abū Bakr b. Waḥshīya (fl. first half of the 4th/10th century. It was written in the form of a dialogue between the protagonist, Ibn Waḥshīya, and an alchemist from the Islamic West, al-Maghribī al-Qamarī. The last section of the introductory dialogue between these two characters consists of a frame story on the origins of alchemy and a legend of discovery (Fundlegende that introduces a cosmogony and an allegorical depiction of the process of transmutation. Both the frame story and the legend of discovery abound in Hermetic motifs and topoi known from other Greek and Arabic alchemical treatises. The exposition of the different prevailing theories on the beginnings of alchemy reflects, moreover, historical phenomena, such as the Graeco-Arabic translation movement and the shu‘ūbīya controversy. Consistent with the literary tradition of the Arabic Hermetica, Ancient Egypt emerges in this treatise as the cradle of alchemy; however, I suggest that more than merely literary convention, such evocations express a genuine fascination with Ancient Egypt and its surviving material culture. In this respect, the littleknown genre of Arabic books on hidden treasure might shed new light on common Hermetic narratives and their circulation in Arabic occult literature.

  16. Metáforas de la eclosión y del cultivo. Imaginarios de la agricultura en época ibérica

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    Olmos, Ricardo

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available From a general approach various groups of Iberian images related with the signs of the vegetal world are treated in this paper: those showing an spontaneous generation and those introducing the metaphors of agriculture. We depart from a common Mediterranean thought, but our main interest will be the specificities and singularities of the Iberian examples. It is proposed to link some of these Iberian images with both the cosmogonie vision of the beginnings and the mythical invention of agriculture. In both cases images fulfill a more or less definite role within the society which demands them. The historical context could illuminate a more universal thought.Desde una lectura globalizadora analizamos varios grupos de imágenes ibéricas que se relacionan con los signos del mundo vegetal: las que muestran una generación espontánea, una eclosión, y las que introducen la metáfora del cultivo. Partimos de lo genérico mediterráneo pero buscamos lo diferencial y específico que exige cada ejemplo ibérico. Proponemos asociar estas imágenes por un lado a una visión cosmogónica —un tiempo originario—, por otro, a la invención mítica de la agricultura. En uno y otro caso las imágenes cumplen una función en mayor o menor medida definida dentro de la dialéctica social. El contexto histórico ilumina y enriquece un pensamiento más universal.

  17. Secrets of the collective memory: the Civil War, the Franco regime and oral sources in Almería | Los secretos de la memoria: Guerra Civil, franquismo y fuentes orales en Almería

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    Sofía Rodríguez López

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the particular experience of the people of Almería during the civil war and the post-war period, through the analysis of more than fifty oral testimonies. These have been collated in the course of two official research projects concerning the recovery of historical memory in Andalusia, and are the product of interviews carried out in this province. This memory, which merges with history, and has been much in the news in recent months, comes mainly from men and women from rural backgrounds, who, through the thread of their narrative, provide us with the keys to different individual experiences and a cosmogony of our collective past. | En este artículo dedicamos un espacio a la recuperación de la experiencia insólita de los almerienses en la guerra civil y la posguerra, mediante el análisis de más de cincuenta testimonios orales. Éstos se han recogido en el curso de dos proyectos oficiales de investigación para la recuperación de la memoria histórica en Andalucía, y hacen balance de las entrevistas desarrolladas en esta provincia. La memoria, confundida con la historia, y en boca de todos en los últimos meses, proviene de hombres y mujeres del campo, en su mayoría, que a través de su hilo narrativo nos vienen proporcionando las claves de distintas experiencias individuales y de una cosmogonía de nuestro pasado colectivo.

  18. LANGUAGE OF LOVE IN MARCELIJUS MARTINAITIS "ATMINTYS"

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    Kristina Bačiulienė

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion of transcendental love in the context of “the eternal return”, the motif of Eros, and the image of a woman are discussed in Marcelijus Martinaitis’s book "Atmintys: meilės lyrikos albumas" (eng. "Reminiscences: the album of love lyrics" (2008. The methods of mythopoetic thought, comparativistics, and interpretative mind have been applied. On the basis of the Bible, mythology, the notion of and relation between Eros and Love, also combining notions developed by philosophers as Nikolai Berdyaev, Erich Fromm, Vladimir Solovyev, phenomenologists as Algis Mickūnas, Mircea Eliade, Plato, and insights by popes Paul VI and Benedict XVI, a concept which might be useful in deciphering the language of love in Marcelijus Martinaitis’s book is introduced. The primary code of the album of love is the concept of memory and the notion of love as seen by Oskaras Milašius, while the secondary code relates to Dante, chivalric romance of Provence troubadours, legends of King Arthur, Celtic mythology. The genre of M. Martinaitis’s reminiscences was born when the poet was studying in Gervinės, and the first collection of Reminiscences appeared in 1986. The text of Reminiscences was seen as hermetic, intertextual, reflecting the act of cosmogony and antropogony in permanent space-time. The process of word re-creation is associated with archetypal consciousness, and the cycle of “the eternal return” prevails. Love is perceived as transcendental and existential basis, a purpose to merge with God, God’s gift to humanity, and the vision of love object. Eros (passion is ambivalent: it is earthly / heavenly, sinful / divine, creating / destructive, and driving power of creation. A woman is seen as earthly / sensual, divine / unreachable. An issue which motif (Christian or courtesan literature dominates in the album of love lyrics is discussed. Album is of great interest as an immanent text.

  19. Music from the heavens - gravitational waves from supermassive black hole mergers in the EAGLE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcido, Jaime; Bower, Richard G.; Theuns, Tom; McAlpine, Stuart; Schaller, Matthieu; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Regan, John

    2016-11-01

    We estimate the expected event rate of gravitational wave signals from mergers of supermassive black holes that could be resolved by a space-based interferometer, such as the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), utilizing the reference cosmological hydrodynamical simulation from the EAGLE suite. These simulations assume a Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony with state-of-the-art subgrid models for radiative cooling, star formation, stellar mass loss, and feedback from stars and accreting black holes. They have been shown to reproduce the observed galaxy population with unprecedented fidelity. We combine the merger rates of supermassive black holes in EAGLE with the latest phenomenological waveform models to calculate the gravitational waves signals from the intrinsic parameters of the merging black holes. The EAGLE models predict ˜2 detections per year by a gravitational wave detector such as eLISA. We find that these signals are largely dominated by mergers between seed mass black holes merging at redshifts between z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 1. In order to investigate the dependence on the assumed black hole seed mass, we introduce an additional model with a black hole seed mass an order of magnitude smaller than in our reference model. We also consider a variation of the reference model where a prescription for the expected delays in the black hole merger time-scale has been included after their host galaxies merge. We find that the merger rate is similar in all models, but that the initial black hole seed mass could be distinguished through their detected gravitational waveforms. Hence, the characteristic gravitational wave signals detected by eLISA will provide profound insight into the origin of supermassive black holes and the initial mass distribution of black hole seeds.

  20. Delineation of separate brain regions used for scientific versus engineering modes of thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Clair C.

    1994-08-01

    Powerful, latent abilities for extreme sophistication in abstract rationalization as potential biological adaptive behavioral responses were installed entirely through accident and inadvertence by biological evolution in the Homo sapiens sapiens species of brain. These potentials were never used, either in precursor species as factors in evolutionary increase in hominid brain mass, nor in less sophisticated forms within social environments characterized by Hss tribal brain population densities. Those latent abilities for unnatural biological adaptive behavior were forced to become manifest in various ways by growths in sophistication of communication interactions engendered by large growths in brain population densities brought on by developments in agriculture at the onset of the Holocene. It is proposed that differences probably exist between regions of the Hss brain involved in utilitarian, engineering types of problem conceptualization-solving versus regions of the brain involved in nonutilitarian, artistic-scientific types of problem conceptualization-solving. Populations isolated on separate continents from diffusive contact and influence on cultural developments, and selected for comparison of developments during equivalent stages of technological and social sophistication in matching 4000 year periods, show, at the ends of those periods, marked differences in aesthetic attributes expressed in cosmogonies, music, and writing (nonutilitarian thinking related to science and art). On the other hand the two cultures show virtually identical developments in three major stages of metallurgical technologies (utilitarian thinking related to engineering). Such archaeological data suggest that utilitarian modes of thought may utilize combinations of neuronal circuits in brain regions that are conserved among tribal populations territorially separated from each other for tens of thousands of years. Such conservation may not be true for neuronal circuits involved in

  1. Cosmologies of the ancient Mediterranean world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Fitzgerald

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cosmology is concerned with the order of the universe and seeks to provide an account, not only of that order, but also of the mind or reason behind it. In antiquity, the cosmos was usually understood religiously, such that the cosmologies of the ancient Mediterranean world were either religious in nature or constituted a reaction to a religiously conceived understanding of the structures of the universe. The oldest form in which ancient cosmologies occur is myth, which, owing to its elasticity as a form, enabled them to be appropriated, adapted and used by different groups. In addition, different cosmologies co-existed within the same ancient culture, each having an authoritative status. This article provides an introductory overview of these cosmological myths and argues that a comparative approach is the most fruitful way to study them. Emphasis is given to certain prominent cosmological topics, including theogony (the genesis of the divine or the relationship of the divine to the cosmos, cosmogony (the genesis of the cosmos, and anthropogony (the origin of humans within the cosmos. Although these myths vary greatly in terms of content and how they envision the origin of the cosmos, many of them depict death as part of the structure of the universe. Kosmologie het te doen met die orde van die heelal en wil rekenskap gee van hierdie orde en ook van die bewussyn daaragter. In die antieke tyd is die kosmos gewoonlik godsdienstig verstaan, met die gevolg dat die kosmologieë van die antieke Mediterreense wêreld óf ’n godsdienstige aard gehad het óf bestaan het uit ’n reaksie op ’n godsdienstig-geskepte begrip van die strukture van die heelal. Mites was die oudste vorm waarin antieke kosmologieë voorkom wat vanweë hulle plooibaarheid dit bewerk het dat hierdie kosmologieë deur verskillende groepe toegeëien, aangepas en gebruik kon word. Hierbenewens het verskillende kosmologieë in die antieke kultuur langs mekaar bestaan – elkeen

  2. CLOUDS IN THE COLDEST BROWN DWARFS: FIRE SPECTROSCOPY OF ROSS 458C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Bochanski, John J.; Saumon, Didier; Mamajek, Eric E.; McMurtry, Craig; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.; Cushing, Michael C.; Marley, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Condensate clouds are a salient feature of L dwarf atmospheres, but have been assumed to play little role in shaping the spectra of the coldest T-type brown dwarfs. Here we report evidence of condensate opacity in the near-infrared spectrum of the brown dwarf candidate Ross 458C, obtained with the Folded-Port Infrared Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at the Magellan Telescopes. These data verify the low-temperature nature of this source, indicating a T8 spectral classification, log 10 L bol /L sun = -5.62 ± 0.03, T eff = 650 ± 25 K, and a mass at or below the deuterium burning limit. The data also reveal enhanced emission at the K band associated with youth (low surface gravity) and supersolar metallicity, reflecting the properties of the Ross 458 system (age = 150-800 Myr, [Fe/H] = +0.2 to +0.3). We present fits of FIRE data for Ross 458C, the T9 dwarf ULAS J133553.45+113005.2, and the blue T7.5 dwarf SDSS J141624.08+134826.7B, to cloudless and cloudy spectral models from Saumon and Marley. For Ross 458C, we confirm a low surface gravity and supersolar metallicity, while the temperature differs depending on the presence (635 +25 -35 K) or absence (760 +70 -45 K) of cloud extinction. ULAS J1335+1130 and SDSS J1416+1348B have similar temperatures (595 +25 -45 K), but distinct surface gravities (log g = 4.0-4.5 cgs versus 5.0-5.5 cgs) and metallicities ([M/H] ∼ +0.2 versus -0.2). In all three cases, cloudy models provide better fits to the spectral data, significantly so for Ross 458C. These results indicate that clouds are an important opacity source in the spectra of young cold T dwarfs and should be considered when characterizing planetary-mass objects in young clusters and directly imaged exoplanets. The characteristics of Ross 458C suggest that it could itself be regarded as a planet, albeit one whose cosmogony does not conform with current planet formation theories.

  3. Monolithic View of Galaxy Formation and Evolution

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    Cesare Chiosi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We review and critically discuss the current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution limited to Early Type Galaxies (ETGs as inferred from the observational data and briefly contrast the hierarchical and quasi-monolithic paradigms of formation and evolution. Since in Cold Dark Matter (CDM cosmogony small scale structures typically collapse early and form low-mass haloes that subsequently can merge to assembly larger haloes, galaxies formed in the gravitational potential well of a halo are also expected to merge thus assembling their mass hierarchically. Mergers should occur all over the Hubble time and large mass galaxies should be in place only recently. However, recent observations of high redshift galaxies tell a different story: massive ETGs are already in place at high redshift. To this aim, we propose here a revision of the quasi-monolithic scenario as an alternative to the hierarchical one, in which mass assembling should occur in early stages of a galaxy lifetime and present recent models of ETGs made of Dark and Baryonic Matter in a Λ-CDM Universe that obey the latter scheme. The galaxies are followed from the detachment from the linear regime and Hubble flow at z ≥ 20 down to the stage of nearly complete assembly of the stellar content (z ∼ 2 − 1 and beyond.  It is found that the total mass (Mh = MDM + MBM and/or initial over-density of the proto-galaxy drive the subsequent star formation histories (SFH. Massive galaxies (Mh ~ _1012M⊙ experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates ≥ 103M⊙/yr at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a weak dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate mass haloes (Mh~_ 1010 − 1011M⊙ have star formation histories that strongly depend on their initial over-density; finally, low mass haloes (Mh ~_ 109M⊙ always have erratic, burst-like star forming histories. The present-day properties (morphology, structure, chemistry and photometry of the

  4. NEW TYPE OF ELASTIC ROTATIONAL WAVES IN GEO-MEDIUM AND VORTEX GEODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Vikulin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural-science concepts of rotational movements and the ‘lumpy’ structure of medium are reviewed with a focus on key aspects. Through using torsional traps for hunting and «implementing» mechanical torque for ignition, Homo sapiens developed to man. Vortex movements «impregnated» in spiral structures of shells and torsional movements of toothy whales and fish were intuitively perceived by man as major stable movements of the environment. Based on the above, the ancient philosophy established the concept of the uniform world represented by atomic («noncuttable» structure of medium and vortex movements of ether. Based on conclusive arguments stated by R. Dekart, H. Helmgolz, Lord Kelvin and others within the framework of classical physics and in the first half of the 20th century by scientists in quantum physics and cosmogony, both «quantum structure» («lumpiness» and rotation («vorticity» are integral features of matter – space – time throughout the whole range from elementary particles to galaxies and galactic clusters.Nowadays researchers in natural sciences, particularly in the Earth sciences, call attention again to the problem of structure of matter and its movements. In the 1920s, Chinese geologist Li Siguang established fundamentals of vortex geodynamics. In the second half of the 20th century, Li Siguan’s concepts were developed by geologists O.I. Slenzak and I.V. Melekestsev. Geologist A.V. Peive, mechanic L.I. Sedov and physicist M.A. Sadovsky put forward a concept of block structure of the geo-medium (geological and geophysical medium and proposed a justified assumption that such blocks can move by own torque. This method of movement is confirmed by results of geological and tectonophysical studies, as well as instrumental geophysical measurements obtained from a variety of stations and focal zones of strong earthquakes. Many researchers, including W. Elsasser and V.N. Nikolaevsky, develop fundamentals of

  5. On the universal stellar law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Alexander

    stars. In this connection, comparison with estimations of temperatures using of the regression dependences for multi-planet extrasolar systems [8] testifies the obtained results entirely. References 1. Krot, A.M.:2009, A statistical approach to investigate the formation of the solar system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals41(3), 1481-1500. 2. Krot, A.M.:2012, A models of forming planets and distribution of planetary distances and orbits in the solar system based on the statistical theory of spheroidal bodies. In:Solar System: Structure, Formation and Exploration, ch.9 (Ed. by Matteo de Rossi). New York, Nova Science Publishers, pp. 201-264. - ISBN: 978-1-62100-057-0. 3. Krot, A. M.:2012, A statistical theory of formation of gravitating cosmogonicbodies. Minsk,Bel. Navuka, 4. 448 p. - ISBN 978-985-08-1442-5 [monograph in Russian]. 5. Eddington, A.S.: 1916,On the radiative equilibrium of the stars.Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc.84 (7), 525-528. 6. Jeans, J.: 1929, Astronomy and cosmogony. Cambridge, University Press. 7. Chandrasekhar, S.:1939, An introduction to the study of stellar structure.Cambridge, University Press. 8. Pintr, P., Peřinová, V., Lukš, A., Pathak, A.:2013, Statistical and regression analyses of detected extrasolar systems. Planetary and Space Science, 75(1), 37-45.

  6. Simulating the interaction of galaxies and the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carin, Robert A.

    2008-11-01

    The co-evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium as a function of environment is studied using hydrodynamic simulations of the ΛCDM cosmogony. It is demonstrated with non-radiative calculations that, in the absence of non-gravitational mechanisms, dark matter haloes accrete a near-universal fraction (˜ 0.9Ω_{b}/&Omega_;{m}) of baryons. The absence of a mass or redshift dependence of this fraction augurs well for parameter tests that use X-ray clusters as cosmological probes. Moreover, this result indicates that non-gravitational processes must efficiently regulate the formation of stars in dark matter haloes if the halo mass function is to be reconciled with the observed galaxy luminosity function. Simulations featuring stellar evolution and non-gravitational feedback mechanisms (photo-heating by the ultraviolet background, and thermal and kinetic supernovae feedback) are used to follow the evolution of star formation, and the thermo- and chemo-dynamical evolution of baryons. The observed star formation history of the Universe is reproduced, except at low redshift where it is overestimated by a factor of a few, possibly indicating the need for feedback from active galactic nuclei to quench cooling flows around massive galaxies. The simulations more accurately reproduce the observed abundance of galaxies with late-type morphologies than has been reported elsewhere. The unique initial conditions of these simulations, based on the Millennium Simulation, allow an unprecedented study of the role of large-scale environment to be conducted. The cosmic star formation rate density is found to vary by an order of magnitude across the extremes of environment expected in the local Universe. The mass fraction of baryons in the observationally elusive warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), and the volume filling factor that this gas occupies, is also shown to vary by a factor of a few across such environments. This variation is attributed to differences in the halo

  7. Obituary: Chushiro Hayashi (1920-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshitsugu

    2011-12-01

    planetary cosmogony, which includes formation of solar nebula, solid particle settling, planetesimal formation due to gravitational instability, coalescence of planetesimals, formation of terrestrial and Jovian planets, and, finally, nebula dissipation. It is called the "Kyoto model" and is now considered as a standard model of solar system formation. In his tenure at Kyoto University was 30 years long, Hayashi had many graduate students and thoroughly drummed physics into them. Every Saturday afternoon, Hayashi held a colloquium in his office, but presenting in front of him was the most fearful training for his students. His disciplined methods of education and training, however, resulted in many of his students becoming university professors. Hayashi was honored with many prizes; Eddington Medal from RAS (1970), Imperial Prize of the Japan Academy (1971), Order of Culture (1986), Order of the Sacred Treasure, the first class (1994), the Kyoto Prize of Inamori Foundation (1995), the Bruce Medal for outstanding lifetime contributions from ASP (2004), etc. In 1984 Hayashi retired from Kyoto University. Even after that, Hayashi kept a small private seminar with his former students S. Narita and M. Kiguchi at a guest room of the university once a week and later at his home less frequently, and enjoyed discussion on astrophysics. The seminar lasted for 25 years until he was hospitalized for old age, i.e., a few months before his death.

  8. Different Cultures in Astronomy Education and Their Meanings in the Classroom. (Spanish Title: Las Diferentes Culturas en la Educación en Astronomía y Sus Significados EN EL Aula. ) As Diferentes Culturas na Educação em Astronomia E Seus Significados em Sala de Aula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira de Barros, Vicente; Bovolenta Ovigli, Daniel Fernando

    2014-12-01

    This paper is a reflection about the use of History of Science in the curriculum of formal education, through the discussion concerning cultural elements of several ethnic groups in Brazil, in actions related to astronomy education. The work was developed in the framework of an extension course and the analysis undertaken here refers to a meeting that discussed didactic sequences relating to that theme, based on the Brazilian law 11.645/2008, which states the obligation to present the subject "African-brazilian and indigenous History and Culture" in the official curriculum. The extension action was developed with teachers who teach Natural Sciences, in São Paulo state, discussing issues related to the use of History of Science and the relationship with cosmogonies from Iorubá and Tupi peoples, highlighting how they can enhance the work with Astronomy(ies) in the classroom. It was observed that the participants had not yet presented these themes in their classes and also did not participate in training courses that discussed these subjects. Este artículo presenta una reflexión sobre el uso de la historia de la ciencia en el currículo de la educación formal, a través de la discusión sobre el uso de los elementos culturales de los grupos étnicos en Brasil, en acciones relacionadas con la educación en astronomía. El trabajo se desarrolló en el marco de un curso de extensión y el análisis realizado aquí se refiere a un encuentro en el cual se abordaron secuencias didácticas relacionadas con ese tema, sobre la base de la ley brasilera 11.645/2008 que dispone la obligatoriedad del tema "Historia y Cultura africana e indígena en el Brasil" en el currículo oficial. La acción de extensión se desarrolló con los profesores de ciencias naturales en el interior del estado de São Paulo, discutiendo temas relacionados con el uso de la historia de la ciencia y la relación con las cosmogonías de los pueblos Iorubá y Tupi, que muestra cómo se puede mejorar

  9. International Conference on Gravitation Cosmology and Continuum Mechanics (dedicated to the centenary of Kirill Petrovich Staniukovich)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    of the Tunguska phenomenon), description of air shock waves system during the flight of large bolides and others. Independently and in co-authorship with V.V. Fedynskiy, F.A. Baum, G.I. Pokrovskiy, S.K. Vsekhsvyatskiy, V.A. Bronshten, A. K.Mukhamedzhanov, V.P. Shalimov and others) he worked on some problems of cosmogony, using higher mathematics and gas dynamics methods. In 1952 he was awarded the title of professor. In 1958, in co-authorship with F.A. Baum and S.A. Kaplan he published the monograph 'Introduction to the cosmic gas dynamics”. Among K.P. Stanyukovich's fundamental works in the field of physical gas dynamics and physics of explosion we should mention the monograph 'Unsteady motion of a continuous medium (1955, 1960, 1971) and' Physics of Explosion '(1959, 1975, 2002, co-authored), that withstood several editions. His active lecture and popularization activity in the field of astronomy, cosmology, rocket and space technology are widely known. Back in the late 1950s K.P. Stanyukovich became interested in the universe structure and evolution problems and this came to reality in the monograph 'The gravitational field and elementary particles” (1965). Since 1967 until his death K.P. Stanyukovich scientific activity took place mainly in the system of the State Standard of the USSR, where he formed a unique team of theoretical physicists specializing in astrophysics, cosmology and gravitation fields. In the years 1969-1972 K.P. Stanyukovich was a chairman of the Moscow branch of the All-Union Astronomical and Geodetic Society. In 1974 he was awarded the honorary title 'Honored Worker of Science and Technology of the RSFSR' and in 1981 for his work on special subjects he was awarded the State Prize of the USSR. In 1983 he co-authored with V.N. Melnikov published a monograph 'Hydrodynamics, Fields and Constants in the Theory of Gravitation”. This publication contains selected papers presented at the conference. (paper)