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Sample records for cosmogenic 10be dating

  1. Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Early and Latest Holocene Moraines on Nevado Salcantay in the Southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the southwest flank of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m; ~13°S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of southern Peru. The field area is situated 25 km due south of the archaeological site of Machu Picchu. Outer and inner moraines in the sequence were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated ~5 km and ~3 km, respectively, from their headwall on the Salcantay summit massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of granitic boulders sampled on the Salcantay moraines is underway and has provided the first numerical ages for these deposits. Initial results indicate ages of 8.1 ± 0.1 10Be ka for the outer moraine and 200 ± 20 10Be years for the sharp-crested inner moraine. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator (version 2.0) and expressed with respect to the Lal- Stone production rate scaling scheme using the standard atmosphere. The outer and inner moraine ages correspond to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene, respectively. Further 10Be dating of the mapped moraines and similar deposits observed in adjacent drainages on Nevado Salcantay is anticipated to yield a high-resolution chronology of valley glaciation in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes. The new results bridge an important gap between existing Andean glacier records to the north and south, and complement available ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby expanding spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of Holocene climate change in the tropical Andes. Notably, the inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined in northern mid- and high latitude glacier records, and suggests considerable expansion of valley glaciers in the southern Peruvian Andes during this climatic minimum. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the initial results also demonstrate

  2. Unraveling the Quaternary river incision in the Moselle valley (Rhenish Massif, Germany): new insights from cosmogenic nuclide dating (10Be/26Al) of the Main Terrace complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; Harmand, Dominique; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Brückner, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Throughout the whole river network of the Rhenish Massif, the terrace complex of the so-called Main Terrace forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley (plateau valley) and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this Main Terrace complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature in the terrace flight; it is often used as a reference level to identify the start of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). The latter probably reflects the major tectonic pulse that affected the whole Massif and was related to an acceleration of the uplift rates (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). The Main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley and are characterized by a constant absolute elevation of their base along a 150 km-long reach. Despite that various hypotheses have been proposed to explain this horizontality (updoming, faulting...), all studies assumed an age of ca. 800 ka for the YMT, mainly based on the questionable extrapolation of palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. Therefore, a reliable chronological framework is still required to unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the Moselle valley. In this study, we apply cosmogenic nuclide dating (10Be/26Al) to fluvial sediments pertaining to the Main Terrace complex or to the upper Middle Terraces. Several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct sampling strategies: (i) depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-)surface is well preserved and did not experience much postdepositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and (ii) the isochron technique where the sediment thickness exceeds 3 m. Cosmogenic nuclide ages recently obtained for three rivers in the Meuse catchment in the western Rhenish Massif demonstrated that the Main Terraces were younger than expected and their abandonment was diachronic along the

  3. Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Northern Quebec-Labrador Glacial Lake Shorelines and Drainage Deposits: Implications for the Final Meltwater Discharges of the Last Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M.; Dube-Loubert, H.; Schaefer, J. M.; Hébert, S.

    2017-12-01

    The decay of the Laurentide ice sheet played an important role in the climate variability of the last deglaciation, notably through large discharges of meltwater from glacial lakes that disturbed the Atlantic meridional overturning oceanic circulation (AMOC). These former climate-forcing events are now under focus due to growing evidence showing that the present-day increase in freshwater releases from Greenland and other Arctic glaciers may potentially lead to a slowdown of the AMOC and cause important climate feedbacks. In northern Quebec and Labrador, the end of the deglaciation led to the formation of at least 10 important glacial lakes that drained into the nearby Labrador Sea where repeated meltwater discharges could have destabilized the ocean surface conditions in this key sector of the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the drainage of these ice-dammed lakes may form a good analogue for modern processes, the lack of direct constraints on the physiographic configuration and temporal evolution of these lakes limits our understanding of the timing and climate impact of these final meltwater pulses. Here we applied cosmogenic 10Be dating to raised boulder shorelines belonging to Lake Naskaupi, one of the largest glacial lakes in northern Quebec and Labrador. We reconstructed the lake extent and meltwater volume, as well as its lake-level history by systematic mapping of geomorphic features. We sampled a total of 16 boulders at 4 sites along the valley. In addition, we dated five boulders belonging to a large-scale outburst flood deposit recording the abrupt drainage of the lake. The distribution of the 21 ages shows a remarkable consistency, yielding a mean age of 7.8 ± 0.4 ka (1 outlier excluded). The ages from the shorelines are indistinguishable from those of the outburst flood deposit, suggesting that Lake Naskaupi existed for a relatively short time span. These new chronological data constrain the timing of the lake development and attendant drainage

  4. Study of the geochemistry of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be and the stable isotope 9Be in oceanic environment. Application to marine sediment dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourles, D.

    1988-01-01

    The radioisotope 10 Be is formed by spallation reactions in the atmosphere. It is transferred to the oceans in soluble form by precipitation and dry deposition. The stable isotope 9 Be comes from erosion of soils and rocks in the Earth's crust. It is transported by wind and rivers and introduced to the oceans probably in both soluble and insoluble form. 9 Be was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry and 10 Be by A.M.S. The distribution of 10 Be and 9 Be between each phase extracted and the 10 Be/ 9 Be ratios associated were studied in recent marine sediments from Atlantic, Pacific, Indian oceans and Mediterranean sea. The results show that for beryllium the two essential constituent phases of marine sediments are: - the authigenic phase incorporates the soluble beryllium and the detritic phase. The 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio associated with the authigenic fraction varies with location. This suggests that the residence time of beryllium in the soluble phase is lower or comparable to the mixing time of the oceans. The evolution with time of the authigenic 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio is discussed [fr

  5. Constraining processes of landscape change with combined in situ cosmogenic 14C-10Be analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Reconstructing Quaternary landscape evolution today frequently builds upon cosmogenic-nuclide surface exposure dating. However, the study of complex surface exposure chronologies on the 102-104 years' timescale remains challenging with the commonly used long-lived radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl). In glacial settings, key points are the inheritance of nuclides accumulated in a rock surface during a previous exposure episode and (partial) shielding of a rock surface after the main deglaciation event, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance. Combining the short-lived in situ cosmogenic 14C isotope with 10Be dating provides a valuable approach to resolve and quantify complex exposure histories and burial episodes within Lateglacial and Holocene timescales. The first studies applying the in situ14C-10Be pair have demonstrated the great benefit from in situ14C analysis for unravelling complex glacier chronologies in various glacial environments worldwide. Moreover, emerging research on in situ14C in sedimentary systems highlights the capacity of combined in situ14C-10Be analysis to quantify sediment transfer times in fluvial catchments or to constrain changes in surface erosion rates. Nevertheless, further methodological advances are needed to obtain truly routine and widely available in situ14C analysis. Future development in analytical techniques has to focus on improving the analytical reproducibility, reducing the background level and determining more accurate muonic production rates. These improvements should allow extending the field of applications for combined in situ14C-10Be analysis in Earth surface sciences and open up a number of promising applications for dating young sedimentary deposits and the quantification of recent changes in surface erosion dynamics.

  6. Calibration of cosmogenic 3He and 10Be production rates in the High Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Martin, Léo; Lavé, Jérôme; Charreau, Julien; Condom, Thomas; Lupker, Maarten; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier

    2014-05-01

    It is critical to refine both the accuracy and the precision of the in situ cosmogenic dating tool, especially for establishing reliable glacial chronologies that can be compared to other paleoclimatic records. Recent cross-calibrations of cosmogenic 3He in pyroxene and 10Be in quartz [1, 2] showed that, both at low (1300 m) and high elevation (4850 m), the 3He/10Be production ratio was probably ~40% higher than the value of ~23 initially defined in the 90's. This recent update is consistent with the last independent determinations of the sea level high latitude production rates of 10Be and 3He, that are about 4 and 125 at.g-1.yr-1, respectively [e.g. 3, 4]. However, major questions remain about these production rates at high elevation, notably because existing calibration sites for both 3He and 10Be are scarce above 2000 m. It is thus crucial to produce new high precision calibration data at high elevation. Here we report cosmogenic 10Be data from boulders sampled on a glacial fan located at 3800 m in the Central Altiplano (Bolivia), whose age is independently constrained by stratigraphic correlations and radiocarbon dating at ca. 16 ka. These data can be used to calibrate the production rate of 10Be at high elevation, in the Tropics. After scaling to sea level and high latitude, these data yield a sea level high latitude P10 ranging from 3.8 to 4.2 at.g-1.yr-1, depending on the used scaling scheme. These new calibration data are in good agreement with recent absolute and cross-calibration of 3He in pyroxenes and 10Be in quartz, from dacitic moraines located at 4850 m in the Southern Altiplano (22° S, Tropical Andes) [2,5]. The so-obtained 3He/10Be production ratio of 33.3±0.9 (1σ) combined with an absolute 3He production rate locally calibrated in the Central Altiplano, at 3800 m, indeed yielded a sea level high latitude P10 ranging from 3.7±0.2 to 4.1±0.2 at.g-1.yr-1, depending on the scaling scheme [2,5]. These values are also consistent with the 10Be

  7. Evidence for an increase in cosmogenic 10Be during a geomagnetic reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.; Bourles, D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report evidence in marine sediments for an increase in cosmogenic 10 Be production in the Earth's atmosphere during the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal 730,000 yr ago. In addition to confirming an increase in cosmogenic isotope production, the results provide information on the magnitude and duration of the geomagnetic intensity decrease during such an event, and the depth at which remanent magnetism is acquired in marine sediments. (author)

  8. A 30000 yr record of erosion rates from cosmogenic 10Be in middle European river terraces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaller, M.; Blanckenburg, von F.; Veldkamp, A.; Tebbens, L.A.; Hovius, N.; Kubik, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be in river-borne quartz sand records a time-integrated erosion rate representative of an entire drainage basin. When sequestered in a terrace of known age, paleo-erosion rates may be recovered from the nuclide content of the terrace material. Paleo-erosion rates between 30 and 80

  9. Study of the geochemistry of the cosmogenic isotope {sup 10}Be and the stable isotope {sup 9}Be in oceanic environment. Application to marine sediment dating; Etude de la geochimie de l`isotope cosmogenique {sup 10}Be et de son isotope stable {sup 9}Be en milieu oceanique. Application a la datation des sediments marins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourles, D

    1988-01-01

    The radioisotope {sup 10}Be is formed by spallation reactions in the atmosphere. It is transferred to the oceans in soluble form by precipitation and dry deposition. The stable isotope {sup 9}Be comes from erosion of soils and rocks in the Earth`s crust. It is transported by wind and rivers and introduced to the oceans probably in both soluble and insoluble form. {sup 9}Be was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry and {sup 10}Be by A.M.S. The distribution of {sup 10}Be and {sup 9}Be between each phase extracted and the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios associated were studied in recent marine sediments from Atlantic, Pacific, Indian oceans and Mediterranean sea. The results show that for beryllium the two essential constituent phases of marine sediments are: - the authigenic phase incorporates the soluble beryllium and the detritic phase. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio associated with the authigenic fraction varies with location. This suggests that the residence time of beryllium in the soluble phase is lower or comparable to the mixing time of the oceans. The evolution with time of the authigenic {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio is discussed.

  10. Constraining Quaternary ice covers and erosion rates using cosmogenic 26Al/10Be nuclide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Egholm, David Lundbek

    2018-02-01

    Paired cosmogenic nuclides are often used to constrain the exposure/burial history of landforms repeatedly covered by ice during the Quaternary, including tors, high-elevation surfaces, and steep alpine summits in the circum-Arctic regions. The approach generally exploits the different production rates and half-lives of 10Be and 26Al to infer past exposure/burial histories. However, the two-stage minimum-limiting exposure and burial model regularly used to interpret the nuclides ignores the effect of variable erosion rates, which potentially may bias the interpretation. In this study, we use a Monte Carlo model approach to investigate systematically how the exposure/burial and erosion history, including variable erosion and the timing of erosion events, influence concentrations of 10Be and 26Al. The results show that low 26Al/10Be ratios are not uniquely associated with prolonged burial under ice, but may as well reflect ice covers that were limited to the coldest part of the late Pleistocene combined with recent exhumation of the sample, e.g. due to glacial plucking during the last glacial period. As an example, we simulate published 26Al/10Be data from Svalbard and show that it is possible that the steep alpine summits experienced ice-free conditions during large parts of the late Pleistocene and varying amounts of glacial erosion. This scenario, which contrasts with the original interpretation of more-or-less continuous burial under non-erosive ice over the last ∼1 Myr, thus challenge the conventional interpretation of such data. On the other hand, high 26Al/10Be ratios do not necessarily reflect limited burial under ice, which is the common interpretation of high ratios. In fact, high 26Al/10Be ratios may also reflect extensive burial under ice, combined with a change from burial under erosive ice, which brought the sample close to the surface, to burial under non-erosive ice at some point during the mid-Pleistocene. Importantly, by allowing for variable

  11. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.

    1999-01-01

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, 10 Be (T 1/2 =1.5Ma), 26 Al (0.7Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth's crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of 10 Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka

  12. Evaluating steady-state soil thickness by coupling uranium series and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Veerle; Schoonejans, Jerome; Opfergelt, Sophie; Granet, Matthieu; Christl, Marcus; Chabaux, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Within the Critical Zone, the development of the regolith mantle is controlled by the downwards propagation of the weathering front into the bedrock and denudation at the surface of the regolith by mass movements, water and wind erosion. When the removal of surface material is approximately balanced by the soil production, the soil system is assumed to be in steady-state. The steady state soil thickness (or so-called SSST) can be considered as a dynamic equilibrium of the system, where the thickness of the soil mantle stays relatively constant over time. In this study, we present and compare analytical data from two independent isotopic techniques: in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides and U-series disequilibria to constrain soil development under semi-arid climatic conditions. The Spanish Betic Cordillera (Southeast Spain) was selected for this study, as it offers us a unique opportunity to analyze soil thickness steady-state conditions for thin soils of semiarid environments. Three soil profiles were sampled across the Betic Ranges, at the ridge crest of zero-order catchments with distinct topographic relief, hillslope gradient and 10Be-derived denudation rate. The magnitude of soil production rates determined based on U-series isotopes (238U, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) is in the same order of magnitude as the 10Be-derived denudation rates, suggesting steady state soil thickness in two out of three sampling sites. The results suggest that coupling U-series isotopes with in-situ produced radionuclides can provide new insights in the rates of soil development; and also illustrate the potential frontiers in applying U-series disequilibria to track soil production in rapidly eroding landscapes characterized by thin weathering depths.

  13. Cosmogenic 10Be signature of geomagnetic dipole moment variations over the last 2 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourlès, D. L.; Valet, J. P.; Bassinot, F. C.; Savranskaia, T.; Duvivier, A.; Choy, S.; Gacem, L.; Villedieu, A.

    2017-12-01

    Long-term variations of the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) during periods of stable polarity and in transitional states (reversals and excursions) provide key information for understanding the geodynamo regime. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (Be-ratio, proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) from marine sedimentary cores give independent and additional insights on the evolution of the geomagnetic intensity, completing information from absolute and relative paleointensity (RPI) records. Here we present new Be-ratio results obtained on several marine cores from the North Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans which permit to extent into the Matuyama chron our previous 10Be-derived GDM reconstructions (Simon et al., 2016 JGR 121). Stratigraphic offsets measured between Be-ratio peaks and the corresponding RPI minima in each studied cores are assigned to (post-) detrital remanent magnetization (pDRM) effects leading to magnetization locking-in delays varying from 0 to 16 cm (up to 12 ka). All these results were compiled in order to obtain a continuous Be-ratio record covering the last 2 Ma. 10Be overproduction episodes triggered by geomagnetic dipole moment lows (GDL) linked to polarity reversals and excursions confirm the global control exerted by the GDM on cosmogenic radionuclides production. A dipole moment reconstruction derived from the Be-ratio stack (BeDiMo2Ma) was calibrated using absolute paleointensity data. This independent record completes the available paleomagnetic RPI records and permits: 1) to confront and increase the robustness and precision of GDM reconstructions; and, 2) to better constrain geomagnetic field instabilities during the mid- to late- Matuyama chron. Our new 10Be derived inventory is fully compatible with the GDL series linked to polarity reversals (Matuyama-Brunhes transition, Jaramillo and Olduvai boundaries), geomagnetic events (Cobb Mountain, Réunion) and Brunhes' excursions (e.g. Laschamp, Blake, Iceland-Basin, Big Lost). It further

  14. Do cosmogenic nuclides (10Be, 14C , 21Ne, 26Al) track late Quaternary climate changes on the Altiplano?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, K.; Kober, F.; Zeilinger, G.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kubik, P.; Maden, C.; Wieler, R.

    2010-12-01

    The high Altiplano plateau is the most prominent element of the Central Andes, separating the Andean Cordilleras between 15° to 22° S. It represents a tectonically quiet, intramontane basin with arid to semi-arid climate, low relief and internal drainage. Throughout the late Quaternary regional climate on the Altiplano repeatedly changed between wet and dry conditions [1]. The influence of climate on the plateau evolution during the Pleistocene/Holocene is unclear, however, as data on erosion processes and rates on the Altiplano are sparse. Here, we present a multiple-nuclide study investigating surface denudation at the eastern Altiplano of Bolivia (16°-17° S) on millennial and longer timescales. The aim is a better understanding of the complex feedback between climate, tectonics and geomorphology on the topographic evolution of the Andes. Catchment-wide denudation (CWD) rates are provided for a 150 km NW-SE transect along the Altiplano edge based on the analyses of cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, 21Ne and in-situ 14C in river-borne sediment. Single nuclide CWD rates obtained for 10Be, 26Al and 21Ne are similar for all three nuclides and on the order of 3-37 mm/ka. Thus, the calculated denudation rates provide an averaged denudation history dating back at least to the middle Pleistocene. Denudation rates correlate positively with the mean basin hillslope, which is mainly controlled by basin lithology. For most catchments both, the 26Al/10Be ratios and the 21Ne/10Be ratios indicate a complex erosion/exposure history with probably several periods of sediment storage and burial/shielding totalling ~0.5 - 1.2 Ma. Local geomorphology featuring low slopes and low relief, small terraces and local floodplains also suggests that sediment transport might have been periodically ineffective. Concentrations of in-situ produced short-lived 14C are significantly lower than expected from the concentrations of the long-lived and stable cosmogenic nuclides. This would indicate a 30

  15. Neogene basin infilling from cosmogenic nuclides (10Be and 21Ne) in Atacama, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Caroline; Regard, Vincent; Carretier, Sébastien; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Campos, Eduardo; Brichau, Stéphanie; Lupker, Marteen; Hérail, Gérard

    2017-04-01

    In the hyperarid Atacama Desert, northern Chile, Neogene sediments host copper rich layers (exotic supergene mineralization). Current mines are excavated into relatively thin (production (quickly decreasing with depth) and disintegration (not for 21Ne). Sampling depths are at ˜100 m and at ˜50 m below the desert surface. First, 21Ne gives lower boundaries for upstream erosion rates or local sedimentation rate. These bounds are between 2 and 10 m/Ma, which is quite important for the area. The ratio between the two cosmogenic nuclides indicate a maximum burial age of 12 Ma (minimal erosion rate of 15 m/Ma) and is surprisingly similar from bottom to top, indicating a probable rapid infilling. We finally processed a Monte-Carlo inversion. This inversion helps taking into account the post-deposition muonic production of cosmogenic nuclides. Inversion results is dependent on the muonic production scheme. Interestingly, the similarity in concentrations from bottom to top pleads for quite low production at depth. Our data finally indicates a quick infilling between 12.5 and 10 Ma BP accounting for ˜100 m of deposition (minimum sedimentation rate of 40 m/Ma).

  16. Cosmogenic 10Be production rate calibrated against 3He in the high Tropical Andes (3800-4900 m, 20-22° S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blard, P.-H.; Braucher, R.; Lavé, J.; Bourlès, D.

    2013-11-01

    Many geomorphologic applications, notably glacier chronologies, require improvements in both the precision and the accuracy of the cosmogenic dating tool. Of particular importance is the need to better constrain the spatial variability of the cosmogenic nuclides production rates at high elevation and low latitudes. One strategy that can be adopted for this is to couple absolute calibrations, from independently dated surfaces, with cross-calibration studies, performed by measuring several cosmogenic nuclides in the same rock. In the present study, we report the highest-elevation (>4800 m) cross-calibration published to date, comprising measurements of cosmogenic 3He and 10Be in cogenetic pyroxene and quartz. The samples were collected from six dacitic moraine boulders, exposed from 32 to 65 ka at 4820 m on the flanks of the Uturuncu volcano (22° S, 67° W), Southern Lipez (Bolivia). The samples yield a remarkably tight cluster of 3He-10Be production ratios, with a weighted mean of 33.3±0.9 (1σ). This production ratio is undistinguishable, within uncertainties, from the 3He-10Be production ratio of 32.3±0.9 determined in the same mineral pair at low elevation (1333 m) by Amidon et al. (2009). These results agree at the 1σ level and suggest that any hypothetical increase of the 3He-10Be production ratio in pyroxene and quartz is likely to be lower than 5% over this elevation range (1000-5000 m). Moreover, the production ratio is almost insensitive to the Li content of the pyroxene (20 to 50 ppm Li), suggesting that the cosmogenic thermal neutron production of 3He is very low in this setting. The high-elevation 3He-10Be production ratio is used in combination with a local determination of the 3He production rate in the high Central Altiplano (3800 m) (Blard et al., 2013) to establish a local 10Be production rate of 30.0±1.4 at g yr at 3800 m and 20° S. After scaling to sea-level high latitude with the time-dependent Lal/Stone model, this yields a 10Be production

  17. Long-term background denudation rates of southern and southeastern Brazilian watersheds estimated with cosmogenic 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Gonzalez, Veronica; Bierman, Paul R.; Fernandes, Nelson F.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-09-01

    In comparison to humid temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, less is known about the long-term (millennial scale) background rates of erosion in Southern Hemisphere tropical watersheds. In order to better understand the rate at which watersheds in southern and southeastern Brazil erode, and the relationship of that erosion to climate and landscape characteristics, we made new measurements of in situ produced 10Be in river sediments and we compiled all extant measurements from this part of the country. New data from 14 watersheds in the states of Santa Catarina (n = 7) and Rio de Janeiro (n = 7) show that erosion rates vary there from 13 to 90 m/My (mean = 32 m/My; median = 23 m/My) and that the difference between erosion rates of basins we sampled in the two states is not significant. Sampled basin area ranges between 3 and 14,987 km2, mean basin elevation between 235 and 1606 m, and mean basin slope between 11 and 29°. Basins sampled in Rio de Janeiro, including three that drain the Serra do Mar escarpment, have an average basin slope of 19°, whereas the average slope for the Santa Catarina basins is 14°. Mean basin slope (R2 = 0.73) and annual precipitation (R2 = 0.57) are most strongly correlated with erosion in the basins we studied. At three sites where we sampled river sand and cobbles, the 10Be concentration in river sand was greater than in the cobbles, suggesting that these grain sizes are sourced from different parts of the landscape. Compiling all cosmogenic 10Be-derived erosion rates previously published for southern and southeastern Brazil watersheds to date (n = 76) with our 14 sampled basins, we find that regional erosion rates (though low) are higher than those of watersheds also located on other passive margins including Namibia and the southeastern North America. Brazilian basins erode at a pace similar to escarpments in southeastern North America. Erosion rates in southern and southeastern Brazil are directly and positively related to

  18. /sup 36/Cl and /sup 10/Be profiles in Greenland ice: Dating and production rate variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, D; Conard, N J; Kubik, P W; Gove, H E; Wahlen, M; Beer, J; Suter, M

    1987-11-01

    Concentrations of the cosmogenic radioistopes /sup 36/Cl and /sup 10/Be have been measured in the top portion of the 1966 Camp Century deep ice core using tandem accelerator mass spectrometry. The primary motivations were to look for correlations with solar activity and to test the possibility that the ratio of /sup 10/Be to /sup 36/Cl would provide a means for dating old ice. An increase in each radioisotope is seen during the Maunder sunspot minimum (1650 to 1715 A.D.), as expected, but there are fluctuations of a factor of 2 or more over short time periods and a possible correlation with solar activity is apparent only when the data is mathematically smoothed. Variations of the /sup 10/Be//sup 36/Cl ratio by about a factor of five are observed which means that dating of ice by single /sup 10/Be//sup 36/Cl measurements covering the precipitation of only a few years will not be possible.

  19. The cosmogenic radionuclides 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl in precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knies, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Two-thirds of atmospheric 7 Be (t 1/2 =53 d), 10 Be(t 1/2 = 1.5 My), and 36 Cl(t 1/2 =0.3 My) is produced in the stratosphere and one-third in the troposphere. The residence time of these radionuclides in the stratosphere is a few years and in the troposphere is a few weeks. Since 7 Be's half-life is short compared to its residence time in the stratosphere and similar to its residence time in the troposphere, the 7 Be/ 10 Be and 7 Be/ 36 Cl ratios should have distinct tropospheric and stratospheric values. Consequently, these isotopes can be used to study processes that involve mixing of air from the troposphere and stratosphere. Relationships between the radionuclide concentrations and air mass history, event type, season, and the major cation and anion concentrations will be presented. Evidence and mechanisms for the fractionation of the 36 Cl and 10 Be concentrations as a function of event type will be presented. Evidence and mechanisms for the fractionation of the 36 Cl and 10 Be concentrations as a function of event type will be presented. A departure from the theoretical 10 Be/ 36 Cl production rate ratio of ∼40 is seen only in one direction with an apparent limit right at the calculated ratio. For this reason, a new theoretical calculation of the 10 Be/ 36 Cl production rate ratio was undertaken. The new calculated value is ∼9.3. This value is in good agreement with the measured mean values in both the Greenland ice sheet and West Lafayette, IN wet precipitation of 8.1 and 9.1 respectively

  20. Accuracy of 9Be-data and its influence on 10Be cosmogenic nuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchel, S.; Schaefer, U.; Bremser, W.; Recknagel, S.; Bourles, D.L.; Leanni, L.; Czeslik, U.; Erzinger, J.; Kummer, N.A.; Merkel, B.

    2013-01-01

    A 9 Be-solution has been chemically prepared from phenakite (Be 2 SiO 4 ) mineral grains as commercial 9 Be-solutions are too high in long-lived 10 Be. The solution is intended to be used as a carrier for radiochemical separation of 10 Be to be measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Thus, accurate data of the 9 Be-concentration of this solution is essential to guarantee for high-accuracy 10 Be data in the future. After devastating preliminary results (∼8 % standard deviation), eight laboratories finally produced twelve individual results by four different analytical methods. A certain lab and method bias might be identified by sophisticated statistical evaluation. Some laboratories also (grossly) underestimate their uncertainties. Thus, the simple weighted mean of this round-robin exercise needed to be corrected by introducing additional allowances (Paule-Mandel-approach). The final result has been calculated to (2,246 ± 11) μg 9 Be/(g solution) with a reasonably low weighted standard deviation of 0.49 %. The maximum deviation of a single lab value from the weighted mean is 2.4 % when removing one Grubbs outlier (11 % off from the mean) from the data set. As 10 Be-data, which is usually calculated from measured 10 Be/ 9 Be by AMS and stable 9 Be, cannot be more accurate than the determined 9 Be-concentration, it seems highly advisable to establish or improve quality assurance by having self-made carrier-solutions analysed at more than a single lab and regularly taking part in round-robin exercises. (author)

  1. Age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus determined with (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guanjun; Gao, Xing; Gao, Bin; Granger, Darryl E

    2009-03-12

    The age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus, commonly known as 'Peking Man', has long been pursued, but has remained problematic owing to the lack of suitable dating methods. Here we report cosmogenic (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating of quartz sediments and artefacts from the lower strata of Locality 1 in the southwestern suburb of Beijing, China, where early representatives of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus were discovered. This study marks the first radioisotopic dating of any early hominin site in China beyond the range of mass spectrometric U-series dating. The weighted mean of six meaningful age measurements, 0.77 +/- 0.08 million years (Myr, mean +/- s.e.m.), provides the best age estimate for lower cultural layers 7-10. Together with previously reported U-series dating of speleothem calcite and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy, as well as sedimentological considerations, these layers may be further correlated to S6-S7 in Chinese loess stratigraphy or marine isotope stages (MIS) 17-19, in the range of approximately 0.68 to 0.78 Myr ago. These ages are substantially older than previously supposed and may imply early hominin's presence at the site in northern China through a relatively mild glacial period corresponding to MIS 18.

  2. Catchment-wide weathering and erosion rates of mafic, ultramafic, and granitic rock from cosmogenic meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhaus, N.; Wittmann, H.; Krám, P.; Christl, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2018-02-01

    and dissolved loss. These amount to 50% of denudation rates from 10Be/9Be in the mafic and ultramafic catchments, the remainder being mass loss in the dissolved form by weathering. In contrast, erosion comprises most of the mass loss in the granitic catchment. These first results are encouraging, given that we find overall good agreement between in situ and meteoric cosmogenic methods, that our denudation rates are in the range of those published for middle European river catchments, and that degrees of weathering are as expected for these diverse lithologies. This method allows quantifying rates of erosion and weathering in mafic rock over the time scale of weathering that are, unlike in situ cosmogenic 10Be, independent from the presence of quartz. 10Be/9Be therefore offers to quantify Earth surface processes in a wide range of landscapes underlain by mafic rock - rates that are of high importance for exploring climate-weathering feedbacks but that have been inaccessible to date.

  3. Tracking paraglacial sediment with cosmogenic 10Be using an example from the northwest Scottish Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fame, Michelle L.; Owen, Lewis A.; Spotila, James A.; Dortch, Jason M.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2018-02-01

    Beryllium-10 concentrations in samples of sediment and bedrock from five study sites across the Scottish Highlands trace paraglacial sediment sources and define the nature of glacial erosion for the late Quaternary. Exposure ages derived from 10Be concentrations in ridge and lower elevation bedrock range from 10 to 33 ka, which suggest that polythermal ice and warm based ice were primarily responsible for producing glacial sediment. Comparisons of 10Be concentrations between catchment-wide sediment (2.06 ± 0.34 × 104 to 11.24 ± 1.54 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 33), near surface deposits (2.71 ± 0.33 × 104 to 3.48 ± 0.49 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 6), 4-m-thick deep till (0.68 × 10410Be atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 1), ridge bedrock (8.93 ± 0.47 × 104 to 34.05 ± 1.66 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2; n = 20), and lower elevation polished bedrock (6.74 ± 0.67 × 104 to 12.65 ± 0.7 × 104 atoms g-1 SiO2, n = 5) indicate that most sand fluxing through catchments in the Scottish Highlands is sourced from the remobilization and vertical mixing of near surface deposits. These findings indicate that glaciogenic material continues to dominate paraglacial sediment budgets more than 11 ka after deglaciation.

  4. Cosmogenic production of 7Be and 10Be in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.

    1979-01-01

    Collisions of cosmic-ray particles with nuclei of the air result in the production of energetic secondary nucleons and mesons that in turn collide with other air nuclei to generate a cascade of hadrons through the atmosphere. After its collision with an energetic hadron, the nucleus will be in one or more fragments. Each of these collisions is called a star. About 1.4% of the time, one of the fragments associated with the star will be a 10 Be nucleus, and about 3% of the time, one of the fragments will be 7 Be. The energy spectrum incident on the earth was calculated in the electric field approximation. Ehmert potentials were varied from zero to 1000 MV to encompass the maximum range of solar activity. The geomagnetic field strength was allowed to range from 0.5 to 5 times the current value. The production rates of 7 Be and 10 Be were obtained by calculating the star density as a function of altitude and geomagnetic latitude in the atmosphere. The combined effect of solar modulation and geomagnetic field variation on world-wide star production is shown. The results are in good agreement at each modulation level with the prediction that isotope production should go as Q varies as M - 52 , where M is the geomagnetic field strength given as multiples of the current value. The inventories of these isotopes can be obtained by averaging out the fluctuations produced in the production rate by variations in the solar activity level and the geomagnetic field intensity. This yields 3.5 MCi of Be 10 and 7.7 MCi of Be 7 . 1 figure

  5. In-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl studies in the earth sciences at the ANTARES AMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Elliott, G.; Child, D.; Misfud, C.

    1998-01-01

    In parallel with a successful 14 C AMS program, routine measurements of 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.5 Ma), 26 Al (0.7Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3Ma) have been demonstrated at the ANTARES AMS facility. With this capability, ANSTO is coordinating and funding a comprehensive program in the application of in-situ cosmogenic radioisotopes for Southern Hemisphere Quaternary climate change. The sub-projects within the program are based on strong university collaboration in the Earth Sciences and with the Australian Antarctic Division. A fully equipped geochemistry laboratory for chemically processing rock samples for AMS studies has been completed and is fully operational. In addition a variety of analytical techniques such as NAA, ICP-MS, XRF, XRD, etc are available through the Environment Division at ANSTO. A brief description of the research projects in glacial chronology and those related to landscape geomorphology is given

  6. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of tors and erratics, Cairngorm Mountains, Scotland: Timescales for the development of a classic landscape of selective linear glacial erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W.M.; Hall, A.M.; Mottram, R.; Fifield, L.K.; Sugden, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of tors within glaciated regions has been widely cited as evidence for the preservation of relic pre-Quaternary landscapes beneath protective covers of non-erosive dry-based ice. Here, we test for the preservation of pre-Quaternary landscapes with cosmogenic surface exposure dating of tors. Numerous granite tors are present on summit plateaus in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland where they were covered by local ice caps many times during the Pleistocene. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al data together with geomorphic relationships reveal that these landforms are more dynamic and younger than previously suspected. Many Cairngorm tors have been bulldozed and toppled along horizontal joints by ice motion, leaving event surfaces on tor remnants and erratics that can be dated with cosmogenic nuclides. As the surfaces have been subject to episodic burial by ice, an exposure model based upon ice and marine sediment core proxies for local glacial cover is necessary to interpret the cosmogenic nuclide data. Exposure ages and weathering characteristics of tors are closely correlated. Glacially modified tors and boulder erratics with slightly weathered surfaces have 10Be exposure ages of about 15 to 43 ka. Nuclide inheritance is present in many of these surfaces. Correction for inheritance indicates that the eastern Cairngorms were deglaciated at 15.6 ?? 0.9 ka. Glacially modified tors with moderate to advanced weathering features have 10Be exposure ages of 19 to 92 ka. These surfaces were only slightly modified during the last glacial cycle and gained much of their exposure during the interstadial of marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 5 or earlier. Tors lacking evidence of glacial modification and exhibiting advanced weathering have 10Be exposure ages between 52 and 297 ka. Nuclide concentrations in these surfaces are probably controlled by bedrock erosion rates instead of discrete glacial events. Maximum erosion rates estimated from 10Be range from 2.8 to 12.0 mm/ka, with

  7. 10Be systematics in the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra catchment: the cosmogenic nuclide legacy of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lupker

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Tsangpo-Brahmaputra River drains the eastern part of the Himalayan range and flows from the Tibetan Plateau through the eastern Himalayan syntaxis downstream to the Indo-Gangetic floodplain and the Bay of Bengal. As such, it is a unique natural laboratory to study how denudation and sediment production processes are transferred to river detrital signals. In this study, we present a new 10Be data set to constrain denudation rates across the catchment and to quantify the impact of rapid erosion within the syntaxis region on cosmogenic nuclide budgets and signals. The measured 10Be denudation rates span around 2 orders of magnitude across individual catchments (ranging from 0.03 to > 4 mm yr−1 and sharply increase as the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra flows across the eastern Himalaya. The increase in denudation rates, however, occurs  ∼  150 km downstream of the Namche Barwa–Gyala Peri massif (NBGPm, an area which has been previously characterized by extremely high erosion and exhumation rates. We suggest that this downstream lag is mainly due to the physical abrasion of coarse-grained, low 10Be concentration, landslide material produced within the syntaxis that dilutes the upstream high-concentration 10Be flux from the Tibetan Plateau only after abrasion has transferred sediment to the studied sand fraction. A simple abrasion model produces typical lag distances of 50 to 150 km compatible with our observations. Abrasion effects reduce the spatial resolution over which denudation can be constrained in the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. In addition, we also highlight that denudation rate estimates are dependent on the sediment connectivity, storage, and quartz content of the upstream Tibetan Plateau part of the catchment, which tends to lead to an overestimation of downstream denudation rates. While no direct 10Be denudation measurements were made in the syntaxis, the dilution of the upstream 10Be signal, measured in Tsangpo

  8. Cosmogenic 10Be Depth Profile in top 560 m of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Woodruff, T. E.; Caffee, M. W.; Edwards, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2009-12-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be in polar ice samples are a function of variations in solar activity, geomagnetic field strength, atmospheric mixing and annual snow accumulation rates. The 10Be depth profile in ice cores also provides independent chronological markers to tie Antarctic to Greenland ice cores and to tie Holocene ice cores to the 14C dendrochronology record. We measured 10Be concentrations in 187 samples from depths of 0-560 m of the main WAIS Divide core, WDC06A. The ice samples are typically 1-2 kg and represent 2-4 m of ice, equivalent to an average temporal resolution of ~12 years, based on the preliminary age-depth scale proposed for the WDC core, (McConnell et al., in prep). Be, Al and Cl were separated using ion exchange chromatography techniques and the 10Be concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at PRIME lab. The 10Be concentrations range from 8.1 to 19.1 x 10^3 at/g, yielding an average of (13.1±2.1) x 10^3 at/g. Adopting an average snow accumulation rate of 20.9 cm weq/yr, as derived from the age-depth scale, this value corresponds to an average 10Be flux of (2.7±0.5) x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2. This flux is similar to that of the Holocene part of the Siple Dome (Nishiizumi and Finkel, 2007) and Dome Fuji (Horiuchi et al. 2008) ice cores, but ~30% lower than the value of 4.0 x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2 for GISP2 (Finkel and Nishiizumi, 1997). The periods of low solar activity, known as Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, show ~20% higher 10Be concentrations/fluxes than the periods of average solar activity in the last millennium. The maximum 10Be fluxes during some of these periods of low solar activity are up to ~50% higher than average 10Be fluxes, as seen in other polar ice cores, which makes these peaks suitable as chronologic markers. We will compare the 10Be record in the WAIS Divide ice core with that in other Antarctic as well as Greenland ice cores and with the 14C treering record. Acknowledgment. This

  9. Late Pleistocene - Holocene development of the Tista megafan (West Bengal, India): 10Be cosmogenic and IRSL age constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahami, Rachel; Huyghe, Pascale; van der Beek, Peter; Lowick, Sally; Carcaillet, Julien; Chakraborty, Tapan

    2018-04-01

    The Himalayan proximal foreland is characterized by Quaternary megafans, of which the formational mechanisms remain debated. The Tista megafan spreads over more than 16,000 km2 from the mountain front, where it is strongly incised, to the confluence of the Tista River with the Jamuna/Brahmaputra River, and stores sediments produced in the Sikkim Himalaya. We propose a scenario for the late Pleistocene - Holocene development of the Tista megafan based on new 10Be cosmogenic and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL) age constraints, and discuss the main potential controls on its evolution. We suggest that two distal lobes developed successively downstream from a common proximal lobe. Deposition in the proximal lobe took place since at least ∼135 ka and incision began at 3.7-0.7+1.0 ka. The western distal lobe of the megafan was deposited early in the history of the megafan, when the Sikkim Himalaya catchment was drained by a tributary of the Ganga River, and was abandoned in the early Holocene (10-11 ka). The eastern, recent (active. Approximately synchronous incision between terraces in the hinterland and megafan surfaces suggests that incision propagated rapidly through the system. Our data do not evidence a direct link between incicion and tectonic processes. Aggradation and incision episodes appear more compatible with a climatic control, through changes in monsoon intensity and associated sediment flux. Depositional episodes in the Tista megafan, as elsewhere in the Himalaya and its foreland, appear to correlate with periods of strong monsoon precipitation and associated high sediment flux toward the foreland. Abandonment and incision of megafan surfaces and hinterland terraces appear associated to both the onset and the ending of phases of strong monsoon precipitation, during which the balance between water and sediment discharge changes rapidly.

  10. Erosion rates and landscape evolution of the lowlands of the Upper Paraguay river basin (Brazil) from cosmogenic 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupim, Fabiano do Nascimento; Bierman, Paul R.; Assine, Mario Luis; Rood, Dylan H.; Silva, Aguinaldo; Merino, Eder Renato

    2015-04-01

    The importance of Earth's low sloping areas in regard to global erosion and sediment fluxes has been widely and vigorously debated. It is a crucial area of research to elucidate geologically meaningful rates of land-surface change and thus the speed of element cycling on Earth. However, there are large portions of Earth where erosion rates have not been well or extensively measured, for example, the tropical lowlands. The Cuiabana lowlands are an extensive low-altitude and low-relief dissected metamorphic terrain situated in the Upper Paraguay river basin, central-west Brazil. Besides exposures of highly variable dissected metamorphic rocks, flat residual lateritic caps related to a Late Cenozoic planation surface dominate interfluves of the Cuiabana lowlands. The timescale over which the lowlands evolved and the planation surface developed, and the rate at which they have been modified by erosion, are poorly known. Here, we present measurements of in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be in outcropping metamorphic bedrock and clastic-lateritic caps to quantify rates of erosion of the surface and associated landforms in order to better understand the Quaternary landscape evolution of these lowlands. Overall, slow erosion rates (mean 10 m/Ma) suggest a stable tectonic environment in these lowlands. Erosion rates vary widely between different lithologies (range 0.57 to 28.3 m/Ma) consistent with differential erosion driving regional landform evolution. The lowest erosion rates are associated with the low-relief area (irregular plains), where clastic-laterite (mean 0.67 m/Ma) and quartzite (mean 2.6 m/Ma) crop out, whereas the highest erosion rates are associated with dissection of residual hills, dominated by metasandstone (mean 11.6 m/Ma) and phyllite (mean 27.6 m/Ma). These data imply that the Cuiabana lowland is comprised of two dominant landform sets with distinct and different dynamics. Because the planation surface (mostly lowlands) is lowering and losing mass more

  11. 10Be and 26Al dating of river terraces and quaternary incision rates in the Ardenne massif (eastern Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, G.; Braucher, R.; Siame, L.; Bourlès, D.; Demoulin, A.

    2009-04-01

    Because of the lack of reliable chronological data, the Quaternary evolution of the hydrographic network of the Ardennes (western continuation of the Rhenish shield, western Europe) remains still poorly known. Therefore, we measured the cosmogenic nuclides content (10Be and 26Al) of terrace sediments of Ardennian rivers (Meuse, Ourthe & Amblève) in order to date several terrace levels and to better constrain the Quaternary incision of the network. Though these dating methods are successfully used to determine ages of superficial (e.g., glacial) deposits, dating of fluvial terraces remains difficult. Possible predepositional exposures of the sampled material (inherited 10Be and 26Al) may indeed bias the measurements towards higher nuclide concentrations while several postdepositional processes (burial, erosion) may cause a lowering of the 10Be and 26Al concentrations. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, the selected fluvial deposits (six locations) were sampled using a profiling technique on as thick as possible sections (more than 3 m). While previous studies assigned an early middle Pleistocene age (around 800 ka) to the main terrace level in the Rhine-Meuse system, our 10Be dates for the same terrace level (according to geometrical correlation) in the Amblève River, a Meuse subtributary, are much younger (upper Pleistocene). To explain this age discrepancy, we suggest that the incision was strongly diachronous from the Meuse valley towards its Ardennian headwaters, as a result of a delayed upstream propagation of the incision wave when it passes tributary junctions.

  12. Last Glacial Maximum Dated by Means of 10Be in the Maritime Alps (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, D. E.; Spagnolo, M.; Federici, P.; Pappalardo, M.; Ribolini, A.; Cyr, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Relatively few exposure dates of LGM moraines boulders are available for the European Alps, and none on the southern flank. Ponte Murato (PM) is a frontal moraine at 860 m asl in the Gesso Basin (Maritime Alps, SW European Alps). The PM moraine dams the 157 km2 Gesso della Barra Valley and it represents the lowermost frontal moraine of the entire Gesso Valley, near the outlet of the valley in the Po Plain. Its ELA, determined from the paleo- shape of the supposed Gesso della Barra glacier, is 1746 m asl. Tetti Bandito (TB) is a small and badly preserved glacial deposit, tentatively attributed to a lateral-frontal moraine, that is positioned 5 km downvalley from the PM deposit at 800 m asl. There are no other glacial deposits downvalley from the TB moraine in the Gesso Basin or farther NE in the piedmont region of the upper Po Plain. Boulders sampled on the PM and on the TB moraine crests gave a 10Be cosmogenic age of respectively 16300 ± 880 ka (average value) and 18798 ± 973 ka. This result constrains the PM frontal moraine within the LGM interval but also suggests that the maximum expansion of the Gesso Basin glacier was more downvalley at some point during the last glaciation. If the TB is a lateral-frontal moraine as supposed, the two TB and PM moraines would represent the outer and inner moraine crests of the same LGM stadial, with the outer moraine much less pronounced than the inner moraine, similarly to the maximalstand and the hochstand described in the Eastern Alps (Van Husen, 1997). Within this perspective, the PM and TB dates are consistent with a European Alps LGM corresponding to MIS 2 (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004). This study of the Maritime Alps moraines is also in agreement with the Upper Würm climatic theory (Florineth and Schlüchter, 2000) of a stronger influence of the W and SW incoming humid airflows in the European Alps, differently from the nearby Vosges and Pyrenees mountain chains where more dry conditions were probably responsible for a very

  13. Cosmogenic 10Be ages from the Meirs and Garwood Valleys, Denton Hills, West Antarctica, suggest an absence in LGM Ice Sheet expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, David; Joy, Kurt; Storey, Bryan

    2014-05-01

    It has been hypothesised that during interglacials, thinning of the Ross Ice Shelf allowed a more open water environment with increased local precipitation. This resulted in outlet glaciers, which drain the Transantarctic Mountains and fed by the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, advancing during moist warmer periods, apparently out of phase with colder arid dry periods. Significantly the ice core record during these warm periods also shows increased accumulation continent wide The geomorphology of the Denton Hills in the Royal Society Range, West Antarctica, is a result of Miocene fluvial incision reworked by subsequent glacial advances throughout the Quaternary. The Garwood and Miers glacial valleys drain ice across the Denton Hills into the Shelf, and should thus show maximum extent during interstadials. To understand the chronology of late Quaternary glaciations, 15 granitic boulders from terminal moraines were sampled for 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic dating. Obtaining reliable exposure ages of erratics within moraines that represent timing of deposition (i.e. glacial advances) is problematic in polar regions, where glacial activity is principally controlled by ice sheet dynamics. Recycling of previously exposed debris, uncertainty in provenance of glacially transported boulders and a lack of a post-depositional hydrologic process to remove previously exposed material from a valley system, leads to ambiguities in multiple exposure ages from a single coeval glacial landform. More importantly, cold-based ice advance can leave a landform unmodified resulting in young erratics deposited on bedrock that shows weathering and/or inconsistent age-altitude relationships. Primarily, inheritance becomes a difficulty in qualifying exposure ages from polar regions. Preliminary results from the Garwood and Miers Valleys indicate that glaciers in the Denton Hills had begun to retreat from their last maximum positions no later than 23-37 ka, and thus the local last glacial maximum

  14. 10Be dating of late-glacial moraines near the Cordillera Vilcanota and the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. A.; Thompson, L. G.

    2004-12-01

    The surface exposure method, based on the measurement of cosmogenic 10Be produced in quartz, is applied to determine the age of deposition of glacial moraines near the Cordillera Vilcanota and the Quelccaya Ice Cap (about 13° S, 70° W) in southeastern Peru. These data are useful for examining the timing of past glaciation in the tropical Andes and for comparison with chronologies of glaciation at higher latitudes. The preliminary data set consists of more than ten surface exposure ages. Samples used for dating are from the surfaces of boulders on a set of prominent moraines about four kilometers away from the present ice margins. The age of the moraine set was previously bracketed by radiocarbon dating of peat associated with the glacial deposits. Based on radiocarbon ages, these moraines were formed during the late-glacial period, just prior to the last glacial-interglacial transition. The surface exposure dating method enables the direct dating of the moraines. Surface exposure dates are cross-checked with the previously existing radiocarbon dates and provide a means to improve the chronology of past glaciation in the tropical Andes.

  15. 10Be surface exposure dating of raised marine terraces and glacial moraines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Zondervan, A.

    2004-01-01

    Geological processes at the Earth's surface have a profound effect on human activity. Interactions between various elements of the landscape influence the harshness of floods, the danger of earthquakes, the severity of landslides, the potential of soil erosion of croplands, and the reliability of water supplies. Landscape constantly evolves through the forces of tectonics, climate, weathering and hydrology, and analysis of its evolution provides insight into the controls on processes. Of prime importance is an understanding of the timing of events, allowing determination of cause and effect, and rates of change. The time period most relevant to this is the last two million years, the Quaternary Period. Geological surfaces and deposits are, however, difficult to date by conventional methods within this time period. Surface exposure-age dating (SED) using cosmogenic isotopes (i.e. nuclides produced by cosmic rays) can help solve this problem. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Early Acheulean technology in the Rietputs Formation, South Africa, dated with cosmogenic nuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Ryan J; Granger, Darryl E; Kuman, Kathleen; Partridge, Timothy C

    2009-02-01

    An absolute dating technique based on the build-up and decay of (26)Al and (10)Be in the mineral quartz provides crucial evidence regarding early Acheulean hominid distribution in South Africa. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of an ancient alluvial deposit of the Vaal River (Rietputs Formation) in the western interior of South Africa shows that coarse gravel and sand aggradation there occurred ca 1.57+/-0.22Ma, with individual ages of samples ranging from 1.89+/-0.19 to 1.34+/-0.22Ma. This was followed by aggradation of laminated and cross-bedded fine alluvium at ca 1.26+/-0.10Ma. The Rietputs Formation provides an ideal situation for the use of the cosmogenic nuclide burial dating method, as samples could be obtained from deep mining pits at depths ranging from 7 to 16 meters. Individual dates provide only a minimum age for the stone tool technology preserved within the deposits. Each assemblage represents a time averaged collection. Bifacial tools distributed throughout the coarse gravel and sand unit can be assigned to an early phase of the Acheulean. This is the first absolute radiometric dated evidence for early Acheulean artefacts in South Africa that have been found outside of the early hominid sites of the Gauteng Province. These absolute dates also indicate that handaxe-using hominids inhabited southern Africa as early as their counterparts in East Africa. The simultaneous appearance of the Acheulean in different parts of the continent implies relatively rapid technology development and the widespread use of large cutting tools in the African continent by ca 1.6Ma.

  17. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  18. Quaternary river incision in the uplifted Rhenish massif (Ardennes, Belgium) - Insights from 10Be/26Al dating of river terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Régis; Siame, Lionel; Bovy, Benoît.; Demoulin, Alain

    2010-05-01

    Although it constitutes the main tool to unravel the regional recent tectonics, the chronology of the Pleistocene river incision is still poorly constrained within the uplifted Rhenish-Ardennes massif (Belgium, western Europe). Here, we measure cosmogenic nuclides concentrations (10Be and 26Al) in terrace quartz or quartzite sediments of several Ardennian rivers (Meuse, Ourthe and Amblève) in order to date the so-called Younger Main Terrace (YMT), a key-level in the network evolution. Though these dating methods are successfully used to determine ages of superficial (e.g., glacial) deposits, dating of fluvial terraces remains difficult. Possible predepositional exposures of the sampled material (inherited 10Be and 26Al) may indeed bias the measurements towards higher nuclide concentrations while several postdepositional processes (burial, erosion) may cause a lowering of the 10Be and 26Al concentrations. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, the selected fluvial deposits (five locations) were sampled using a profiling technique on as thick as possible sections (more than 3 m). We present the first absolute dating of the YMT in the lower Meuse valley (nearby the Dutch boundary), where we obtained an age of 630 ka for a terrace deposit buried beneath 3 m of Weichselian loess. This age is consistent with some previously published estimates based on paleomagnetic data and MIS correlations. However, our ages for the same terrace level within the Ardennes are significantly younger: >400 ka in the lower Ourthe, and only ~220 ka still farther upstream, in the lower Amblève. We thus demonstrate that the post-YMT incision occurred diachronically in NE Ardennes. The ~0.5 Ma timespan needed by the erosion wave to propagate from the lower Meuse towards the Ardennian headwaters contradicts the long-held statement of a climatically driven incision that would have been synchronous throughout the catchment.

  19. 10Be exposure dating of the timing of Neoglacial glacier advances in the Ecrins-Pelvoux massif, southern French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Deline, Philip; Carcaillet, Julien; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Ermini, Magali; Aster Team

    2017-12-01

    Alpine glacier variations are known to be reliable proxies of Holocene climate. Here, we present a terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN)-based glacier chronology relying on 24 new 10Be exposure ages, which constrain maximum Neoglacial positions of four small to mid-sized glaciers (Rateau, Lautaret, Bonnepierre and Etages) in the Ecrins-Pelvoux massif, southern French Alps. Glacier advances, marked by (mainly lateral) moraine ridges that are located slightly outboard of the Little Ice Age (LIA, c. 1250-1860 AD) maximum positions, were dated to 4.25 ± 0.44 ka, 3.66 ± 0.09 ka, 2.09 ± 0.10 ka, c. 1.31 ± 0.17 ka and to 0.92 ± 0.02 ka. The '4.2 ka advance', albeit constrained by rather scattered dates, is to our knowledge exposure-dated here for the first time in the Alps. It is considered as one of the first major Neoglacial advance in the western Alps, in agreement with other regional paleoclimatological proxies. We further review Alpine and Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude evidence for climate change and glacier activity concomitant with the '4.2 ka event'. The '2.1 ka advance' was not extensively dated in the Alps and is thought to represent a prominent advance in early Roman times. Other Neoglacial advances dated here match the timing of previously described Alpine Neoglacial events. Our results also suggest that a Neoglacial maximum occurred at Etages Glacier 0.9 ka ago, i.e. during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, c. 850-1250 AD). At Rateau Glacier, discordant results are thought to reflect exhumation and snow cover of the shortest moraine boulders. Overall, this study highlights the need to combine several sites to develop robust Neoglacial glacier chronologies in order to take into account the variability in moraine deposition pattern and landform obliteration and conservation.

  20. Reconstruction of the Exposure Histories of 20 Allan Hills Ordinary Chondrites on the Basis of Cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, Noble Gases, and Cosmic Ray Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, U.; Knauer, M.; Michel, R.; Loeken, Th.; Schultz, L.; Dittrich-Hannen, B.; Suter, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Metzler, K.; Romstedt, J.

    1995-09-01

    Twenty ordinary chondrites from the 1988/89 meteorite search (ALH 88004, 88008, 88010, 88011, 88013, 88016 to 88021, 88026 to 88031, 88033, 88039, 88042) [1,2] were investigated for 10Be and 26Al, and for He, Ne and Ar by accelerator and rare gas mass spectrometry, respectively. Cosmic ray tracks were measured in samples of ALH 88019. Using theoretical production rates calculated by a physical model [3] the experimental data are interpreted with respect to the reconstruction of the preatmospheric exposure conditions and exposure histories of the meteoroids. Ordinary chondrites are particularly well suited to exemplify the capabilities of an interpretation of many cosmogenic nuclides measured in one sample. Model calculations of GCR production rates were performed for 10Be, 26Al, 3He, 21Ne, 22Ne and 38Ar as reported elsewhere [4,5]. For all meteorites, except for ALH 88019, the cosmogenic nuclide data can be explained by simple one stage exposure histories between 3 Ma and 44 Ma in meteoroids with radii between 5 cm and 85 cm. Exposure ages were derived from cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 38Ar on the basis of the theoretical production rates as function of3He/21Ne and 22Ne/21Ne as well as on the empirical ones proposed by Eugster [6]. The average ratios of exposure ages determined from theoretical production rates to those calculated according to Eugster [6] were 1.08+/-0.11, 1.11+/-0.25 and 1.12+/-0.17 in case of 3He, 21Ne and 38Ar, respectively. Repeated measurements of 10Be and 26Al in ALH 88019 resulted in 10.4+/-1.3 dpm/kg and 5.6+/-0.5 dpm/kg, respectively. But, the cosmogenic rare gas concentrations point to a (single stage) exposure age of 39 Ma in a meteoroid. This is in accordance with a measured cosmic ray track density in olivine of 2.8 * 10^6 cm^-2. The samples are from depths betwen 3 cm and 8 cm. Based on the track data we obtain a minimum meteoroid radius of 8 cm. The low 10Be and 26Al cannot be explained by a one stage exposure history and a long

  1. Testing the Nunatak Refugia Hypothesis in the Eastern Canadian Arctic with Cosmogenic Nuclides 14C, 10Be, and 26Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. H.; Briner, J. P.; Lifton, N.; Kaplan, M. R.; Refsnider, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    For more than a century the processes by which plants rapidly colonized vast regions formerly covered by Late Quaternary continental ice sheets has been vigorously debated. It has been postulated that refugial plant communities survived on nunataks above ice-sheet surfaces, and that these relict populations facilitated rapid colonization. While glacial mapping confirms that some highlands in the Eastern Canadian Arctic remained above the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) throughout the last glacial maximum (LGM), whether they remained free of local ice carapaces is uncertain. To test the nunatak refugia hypothesis we sampled quartz-rich bedrock from rolling uplands of Broughton Is. (67.5 N; 63.5 E; 600 m asl), one of the most distal high islands bordering the eastern margin of the LIS. At the peak of the LGM, outlet glaciers of the LIS impinged on the island, but did not reach above 100 m asl. Close to the summit, flat-lying quartz-rich veins crop out extensively with 2 to 10 cm of weathering relief. Two samples have 10Be and 26Al exposure ages in excess of 200 ka, but 26Al/10Be of only 3.8. Two tors 150 m lower have 10Be and 26Al exposure ages in excess of 100 ka, and similarly low 26Al/10Be (3.5). The time elapsed to acquire these values exceeds 1 Ma without erosion for the higher samples, and only slightly less for the lower samples, confirming that these sites have not been inundated by actively eroding continental ice since at least the early Quaternary. To evaluate whether a protective ice cap mantled the island during the LGM we measured in situ 14C inventories in the two summit samples for which 10Be and 26Al were also measured. If the summit had been free of ice during the LGM and served as a plant refugium, then the 14C inventories should be at their maximum levels. If, however, the summit was mantled by a thick (>30 m) snowfield or cold-based ice carapace, then 14C inventories should reflect only Holocene surface exposure. Both samples contained in situ 14C

  2. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 ( 10 Be) production rates. Authigenic 10 Be/ 9 Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10 Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and MD05-2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05-2920, MD05-2930 and MD90-0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest 10 Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 10 22  Am 2 ) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant 10 Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The 10 Be-derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes-Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial-scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities.

  3. Toward detection of supernova event near the earth based on high-resolution analysis of cosmogenic nuclide 10Be in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, S.; Suganuma, Y.; Kataoka, R.; Yamaguchi, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    Cosmic rays react with substances in the Earth's atmosphere and form cosmogenic nuclides. The flux would abruptly increase with nearby supernova or terrestrial magnetic events such as reversal or excursion of terrestrial magnetism. The Earth must have been exposed to cosmic ray radiation for as long as 10 Ma, if any, by nearby supernova activities (Kataoka et al., 2014). Increased and prolonged activity of cosmic rays would affect Earth's climate through forming greenhouse gases and biosphere through damaging DNA. Therefore, interests have been growing as to whether and how past supernova events have ever left any fingerprints on them. However, detection of nearby supernova is still under debate (e.g., Knie et al., 2004) To detect long-term record of past supernova activities, we utilize cosmogenic nuclide 10Be because of its short residence time (1-2yr) in the atmosphere, simple transport process, and adequate half-life (1.36 kyr) which is nearly equivalent to the duration of present-day deep water circulation. Sediment samples collected from the equatorial western Pacific (706-825 kyr in age) were finely powdered and decomposed by mixed acids (HNO3, HF, and HClO4). Authigenic phase was also separated from bulk powders by leaching with a weak acid. Because quantitative separation of Be from samples is essential toward high-quality 10Be analysis, both Be-bearing fractions were applied to optimized anion exchange chromatography for Be separation, and Be abundance was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The 10Be abundance (10Be/9Be ratios) were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. The authigenic phase showed temporal curve that is similar to that of bulk samples (Suganuma et al., 2012), reflecting the influence of relative paleo-intensity and utility of authigenic method. Increased data set in terms of sampling interval (density) and total age range would allow us to judge whether it could detect past supernova activities and how it appears when

  4. Validation of cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling factors through direct measurement. Part 2, Production of 7Be and 10Be in water targets deployed in the Southern Hemisphere, 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Barry, B.J.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Zondervan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Sealed containers of de-ionised water were exposed to cosmic-rays at seven sites in Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica, covering a range of altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes, over time periods of six months to three years (1997-2001). After isotopic analysis by gamma counting (for 7 Be) and accelerator mass spectrometry (for 10 Be), the data obtained were corrected to obtain relative production factors (i.e., 'k' values). This report presents a full description of the target design, isotope extraction, and measurement procedures employed. It thus provides the raw data from which cosmogenic nuclide production rates for the Southern Hemisphere can be calculated, and scaling factors used in surface exposure dating can be independently validated. (author). 35 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  5. A Chronology of Late-Glacial and Holocene Advances of Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru, Based on 10Be and Radiocarbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Quelccaya Ice Cap region in the southeastern Peruvian Andes (~13-14°S latitude) is a key location for the development of late-glacial and Holocene terrestrial paleoclimate records in the tropics. We present a chronology of past extents of Quelccaya Ice Cap based on ~thirty internally consistent 10Be dates of boulders on moraines and bedrock as well as twenty radiocarbon dates of organic material associated with moraines. Based on results from both dating methods, we suggest that significant advances of Quelccaya Ice Cap occurred during late-glacial time, at ~12,700-11,400 yr BP, and during Late Holocene time ~400-300 yr BP. Radiocarbon dating of organic material associated with moraines provides maximum and minimum ages for ice advances and recessions, respectively, thus providing an independent check on 10Be dates of boulders on moraines. The opportunity to use both 10Be and radiocarbon dating makes the Quelccaya Ice Cap region a potentially important low-latitude calibration site for production rates of cosmogenic nuclides. Our radiocarbon chronology provides a tighter constraint on maximum ages of late-glacial and Late Holocene ice advances. Upcoming field research will obtain organic material for radiocarbon dating to improve minimum age constrains for late-glacial and Late Holocene ice recessions.

  6. Uplift rates of the marine terraces in the south coast of Japan deduced from in situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Nagano, G.; Nakamura, A.; Maemoku, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine terraces are low-relief platforms located along coastal areas. They are formed by waves action with the changes in the relative sea level (RSL) that is affected by combined effects of the eustatic sea level (ESL) and the tectonic movements (e.g. uplift, subsidence and isostatic effect). Therefore, determining the ages and the elevations of the marine terraces allows us to reconstruct the ESL and/or the tectonic history of the study area. The Kii Peninsula and the southern coast of the Shikoku Island are located along the Nankai Trough where the Philippine Sea Plate is subducting under the Eurasian plate. There exist relatively well-preserved marine terraces along the coastal line with the elevation of ca. 50 -100 m. Because of this unique tectonic setting, the terraces are regarded as the suitable counterparts to reconstruct uplift history of the south coast of Japan. However, the ages of these terraces are poorly understood due to the lack of the ash layers that is suitable for the tephrochronology. In this study, we determine the age of the marine terraces using terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic radionuclides (TCN), 10Be and 26Al. This is the first age estimation of the marine terraces in Japan using TCN, allowing us to determine the uplift rates and the seismic history of the region.

  7. Applications of cosmogenic radio-isotopes, 10Be, 26Al and 36CI in the Earth Sciences using AMS at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Elliot, G.

    1997-01-01

    Production of long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides (CRN) is dominated by cosmic ray interaction in the upper atmosphere. Through atmospheric transport and precipitation, they become distributed over the Earth's surface, and participate in various geochemical and geophysical global processes. An alternate production mode of CRNs is in the Earth's lithosphere, particularly in exposed rocks and surfaces. The production rate of these in-situ produced CRNs depends primarily on the reaction mode and type of target material. Although production is small - a few tens of atoms per gram per year - the built-up in concentration even after a few thousand years of exposure can be measured using the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Concentrations of in situ nuclides in the near-surface zone allows a 'surface exposure history' to be estimated resulting in a measure of exposure ages and erosion rates. With a range in half-lives from 0.3-1.5 Ma, in-situ produced CRNs are ideally suited as geochronometers and tracers in Quaternary geomorphology related to paleoclimate change. This paper will briefly outline principles and techniques of 10 Be, 26 AI and 36 CI in-situ methods and describe Some of the above projects related to the unique geomorphology of the Australian and Antarctic continents

  8. Fluvial terrace dating using in situ cosmogenic {sup 21}Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Caffee, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Through the analysis of cosmic-ray produced radio-genic and stable nuclide concentrations, specifically {sup 21}Ne, we hope to date certain geomorphic features located along the tributaries of the Colorado River in the Eastern Grand Canyon and the Rainbow Plateau located in Utah. During the Quaternary, the Colorado River system was fed by glacial melting and run-off from the Wind River and Colorado Mountain Ranges. Past periods of aggradation allowed the emplacement of terrace features from debris flow activity. By dating such features we can further constrain the timing of key events such as river down cutting, terrace genesis/exposure age, and rates of surface erosion. Knowing the age and elevation of each terrace we can determine an average rate of down cutting of this river system. This, in turn, will offer information regarding alpine glaciation which is a sensitive indicator of global climate change. Studying the relative concentrations of these isotopic species in surface rocks can be useful in researching glacial periodicity and the relationship between solar activity and climate.

  9. Dating Antarctic soils using atmosphere-derived 10Be and nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Claridge, G.G.C.; Whitehead, N.E.; Zondervan, A.; Sheppard, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    Because they are slow forming, Antarctic soils have the potential to yield considerable climatic information from the past c.20 m.y. However, these soils have proved difficult to date absolutely by conventional means. Here we present a novel approach to the problem, based on atmosphere-derived 10 Be and nitrate contents. In situations where medium to long term deposition rates can be reasonably estimated from ice core data, the total nitrate inventory in an Antarctic soil can place constraints on its formation age. 10 Be radioactive decay may then be used, assuming steady state equilibrium, to further refine the age profile. We have applied such models to a complex soil from the Taylor Valley region in South Victoria Land, deriving an overall nitrate inventory age of c. 18 Ma, and 10 Be decay ages for the upper and middle layers of c.15 and c.17 Ma, respectively. These results are consistent with the >10 Ma age of the soil deduced from stratigraphic and geomorphological information. (author). 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Estimation of production rates for in-situ cosmogenic isotopes and application to surface exposure dating: certitudes and uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides, produced in-situ in rocks by the action of cosmic rays on target nuclei, are increasingly being employed by earth scientists in a wide variety of applications. For example, surface exposure dating is used to determine erosion rates, the age of debris flows, alluvial fans, volcanic eruptions, meteoritic impact craters, and glacial deposits, and the timing of recent movement along faults and tectonic uplift. The technique can thus play a vital role in the study of potential hazards from geological processes, by establishing recurrence intervals between them, and establish chronologies and periodicities for major paleoclimatic events. Before surface exposure dating methods using cosmogenic isotopes can be applied even more widely, production rates of the main nuclides of interest must be better known, and their temporal and spatial variabilities determined. This paper summarises the present state of knowledge on production rates of the currently most useful nuclides ( 10 Be, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 14 C, 3 He and 21 Ne), discusses the main areas of concern, and makes suggestions for future improvement. (author). 83 refs., 7 tabs., 11 figs

  11. 26Al/10Be burial dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin, northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tu

    Full Text Available The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years. This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ. The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site's lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL dating at 160-220 ka.

  12. Determining timing of Alaska Range exhumation and glaciation through cosmogenic nuclide burial dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sortor, R. N.; Goehring, B. M.; Bemis, S. P.; Ruleman, C.; Nichols, K. A.; Ward, D. J.; Frothingham, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Alaska Range is a transpressional orogen with modern exhumation initiating 6 Ma. The stratigraphic record of unroofing and uplift of the foreland basin is largely preserved along the northern flank of the Alaska Range in the Pliocene-Pleistocene aged Nenana Gravel, an extensive alluvial fan and braidplain deposit. Chronometric control on the Nenana Gravel is largely lacking, with the limited available age control based on a single Ar-Ar tephra date in an underlying unit and via stratigraphic inferences for the upper portions. Higher-resolution dating of the Nenana Gravel unit is imperative in order to quantify deposition rates and the timing of uplift and deformation of the foreland basin. Furthermore, a glacial unit has been found to lie unconformably on top of the unit at Suntrana Creek and may represent the initiation of glacial advances in the Alaska Range. We present a suite of 26Al/10Be cosmogenic nuclide burial ages collected from the lower, middle, and upper sections of the Nenana Gravel at Suntrana Creek, as well as the overlying glacial unit. Three samples from the lower Nenana Gravel yield an isochron burial age of 4.42+0.67/-0.13 Ma, which represents initiation of Nenana Gravel deposition and may equate to early unroofing of the Alaska Range. Two samples collected from the middle of the Nenana Gravel unit produced an average simple burial age of 2.25+/-0.45 Ma, with a single sample stratigraphically above dating to 0.99 +/-1.60. Two samples from the upper-most portion of the Nenana Gravel yielded an average simple burial age of 1.27+/-0.22 Ma, and one sample from the glacial unit overlying the Nenana Gravel was dated to 0.97+/-0.06 Ma, representing one of the earliest glacial advances in the region. In addition, the age of the glacial unit provides a minimum age for inception of foreland basin uplift and abandonment of the Nenana Gravel in this region.

  13. Coupling erosion and topographic development in the rainiest place on Earth: Reconstructing the Shillong Plateau uplift history with in-situ cosmogenic 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Ruben; Schildgen, Taylor; Wittmann, Hella; Spiegel, Cornelia

    2018-02-01

    The uplift of the Shillong Plateau, in northeast India between the Bengal floodplain and the Himalaya Mountains, has had a significant impact on regional precipitation patterns, strain partitioning, and the path of the Brahmaputra River. Today, the plateau receives the highest measured yearly rainfall in the world and is tectonically active, having hosted one of the strongest intra-plate earthquakes ever recorded. Despite the unique tectonic and climatic setting of this prominent landscape feature, its exhumation and surface uplift history are poorly constrained. We collected 14 detrital river sand and 3 bedrock samples from the southern margin of the Shillong Plateau to measure erosion rates using the terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide 10Be. The calculated bedrock erosion rates range from 2.0 to 5.6 m My-1, whereas catchment average erosion rates from detrital river sands range from 48 to 214 m My-1. These rates are surprisingly low in the context of steep, tectonically active slopes and extreme rainfall. Moreover, the highest among these rates, which occur on the low-relief plateau surface, appear to have been affected by anthropogenic land-use change. To determine the onset of surface uplift, we coupled the catchment averaged erosion rates with topographic analyses of the plateau's southern margin. We interpolated an inclined, pre-incision surface from minimally eroded remnants along the valley interfluves and calculated the eroded volume of the valleys carved beneath the surface. The missing volume was then divided by the volume flux derived from the erosion rates to obtain the onset of uplift. The results of this calculation, ranging from 3.0 to 5.0 Ma for individual valleys, are in agreement with several lines of stratigraphic evidence from the Brahmaputra and Bengal basin that constrain the onset of topographic uplift, specifically the onset of flexural loading and the transgression from deltaic to marine deposition. Ultimately, our data corroborate the

  14. Cosmic ray exposure dating of geo-morphic surface features using in situ-produced 10Be: tectonic and climatic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siame, L.; Bellier, O.; Sebrier, M.; Braucher, R.; Bourles, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of continental landforms is mainly modulated by the impact of climatic and tectonic processes. Because of their distinctive morphology and the periodicity of their deposition, climatically induced landforms such as alluvial fans or terraces are well suited to infer rates of tectonic and continental climatic processes. Within tectonically active regions, an important step consists in dating displaced geomorphic features to calculate slip rates on active faults. Dating is probably the most critical tool because it is generally much more simpler to measure deformation resulting from tectonic activity than it is to accurately date when that deformation occurred. Recent advances in analytical chemistry and nuclear physics (accelerator mass spectrometry) now allow quantitative abundance measurements of the extremely rare isotopes produced by the interaction of cosmic rays with surface rocks and soils, the so-called in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides ( 3 He, 10 Be, 21 Ne, 26 Al, 36 Cl), and allow to directly date the duration that a landform has been exposed to cosmic rays at the Earth's surface (Lal, 1991; Nishiizumi et al., 1993; Cerling and Craig, 1994; Clark et al., 1995]. In fact, the abundance of these cosmo-nuclides is proportional to landscape stability and, under favorable circumstances, their abundance within surface rocks can be used as a proxy for erosion rate or exposure age. These cosmo-nuclides thus provide geomorphologists with the opportunity to constrain rates of landscape evolution. This paper presents a new approach that combines cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating using in situ-produced 10 Be and geomorphic as well as structural analyse. This approach has been applied on two active strike-slip and reverse faults located in the Andean fore-land of western Argentina. These two case studies illustrate how CRE dating using in situ-produced 10 Be is particularly well suited for geomorphic studies that aim to estimate the respective control of

  15. LGM and Late Glacial glacier advances in the Cordillera Real and Cochabamba (Bolivia deduced from 10Be surface exposure dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Veit

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface exposure dating (SED is an innovative tool already being widely applied for moraine dating and for Late Quaternary glacier and climate reconstruction. Here we present exposure ages of 28 boulders from the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, Bolivia. Our results indicate that the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM in the Eastern Cordilleras occurred at ~22–25 ka and was thus synchronous to the global temperature minimum. We were also able to date several Late Glacial moraines to ~11–13 ka, which likely document lower temperatures and increased precipitation ("Coipasa" humid phase. Additionally, we recognize the existence of older Late Glacial moraines re-calculated to ~15 ka from published cosmogenic nuclide data. Those may coincide with the cold Heinrich 1 event in the North Atlantic region and the pronounced "Tauca" humid phase. We conclude that (i exposure ages in the tropical Andes may have been overestimated so far due to methodological uncertainties, and (ii although precipitation plays an important role for glacier mass balances in the tropical Andes, it becomes the dominant forcing for glaciation only in the drier and thus more precipitation-sensitive regions farther west and south.

  16. New Hydrological Age-Dating Techniques Using Cosmogenic Radionuclides Beryllium-7 and Sodium-22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, S.; Kuells, C. [Institute of Hydrology, Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg (Germany); Schlosser, C. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Since atmospheric tritium levels have nearly reached the natural background, there is a need for further development of existing or additional methods for the age dating of young water. Non-gaseous age dating tracers are especially needed for hydrological applications in lakes, rivers and springs and for surface-groundwater interaction studies. Cosmogenically produced isotopes of sodium and beryllium ({sup 22}Na, {sup 7}Be, half-lives of 2.602 years and 53.29 days respectively) have been investigated as potential environmental tracers for residence time analysis of surface water. A simple chemical separation scheme for both radionuclides was established and {sup 7}Be was detected in both surface and groundwater samples. The ions were extracted from 500 L water using an ion exchange resin. The water samples were dated to ages of about 165 and 323 days for riverine samples and 475 days for a groundwater sample. Measurement was performed using a lead covered HPGe detector. These ages match ages previously reported using stable isotopes and tritium. (author)

  17. The dating of rock surfaces using in situ produced 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl, with examples from Antarctica and the Swiss Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivy Ochs, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    A primary concern today in ice age research is to elucidate the worldwide timing of glacial fluctuations. This information is needed to define the mechanisms by which signals are initiated, and then transferred throughout the various global systems. Because of the importance of integrating the terrestrial records of the former extent of both ice sheets and alpine glaciers, the direct dating of rock surfaces with in situ produced cosmogenic isotopes is an essential tool. These isotopes (e.g. 10 Be, 26 Al and 36 Cl) are produced in the surfaces of rocks due to interactions with cosmic rays. In order to be able to reliably determine exposure ages from rock surfaces with both long and short exposure times, our goal at the onset of this project was to set-up the extraction procedure for Be, Al, Cl from rock samples. 73 separate rock or mineral dissolutions, involving 52 different rock samples, were performed to 1) make sure that meteoric 10 Be was being removed, 2) verify the reproducibility of the procedure, and 3) eventually, address several questions on the timing of glacier fluctuations in two specific geographic areas: Antarctica and the Swiss Alps. Exposure dates we have determined from erratic boulders in the Sirius Group sediments at Mount Fleming proved conclusively that this outcrop of the Sirius Group is more than 5.8 million years old. Minimum ages for Sirius Group deposits at Table Mountain and Mount Feather are 2.9 and 2.3 Ma, respectively. Our results have provided support for the idea that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, a crucial variable in projections of greenhouse scenarios, is a stable feature of Antarctica. We have investigated three key sites in Switzerland related to the timing of glaciations of the Alps. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. In situ dating on Mars: A new approach to the K-Ar method utilizing cosmogenic argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassata, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmogenic argon isotopes are produced in feldspars via nuclear reactions between cosmic rays and Ca and K atoms within the lattice. These cosmogenic isotopes can be used as proxies for K and Ca, much like nuclear reactor-derived 39Ar and 37Ar are used as proxies for K and Ca, respectively, in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. If Ca and K are uniformly distributed, then the ratio of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) to cosmogenic 38Ar or 36Ar (38Arcos or 36Arcos) is proportional to the difference between the radioisotopic and exposure ages, as well as the K/Ca ratio of the degassing phase. Thus cosmogenic, radiogenic, and trapped Ar isotopes, all of which can be measured remotely and are stable over geologic time, are sufficient to generate an isochron-like diagram from which the isotopic composition of the trapped component may be inferred. Such data also provide a means to assess the extent to which the system has remained closed with respect to 40Ar*, thereby mitigating otherwise unquantifiable uncertainties that complicate the conventional K-Ar dating method.

  19. Cosmic-ray interactions and dating of meteorite stranding surfaces with cosmogenic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A wide variety of products from cosmic-ray interactions have been measured in terrestrial or extraterrestrial samples. These ''cosmogenic'' products include radiation damage tracks and rare nuclides that are made by nuclear reactions. They often have been used to determine the fluxes and composition of cosmic-ray particles in the past, but they are usually used to study the history of the ''target'' (such as the time period that it was exposed to cosmic-ray particles). Products made by both the high-energy galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles emitted irregularly from the Sun have been extensively studied. Some of these cosmogenic products, especially nuclides, have been or can be applied to studies of Antarctic meteorite stranding surfaces, the ice surfaces in Antarctica where meteorites have been found. Cosmogenic nuclides studied in samples from Antarctica and reported by others elsewhere in this volume include those in meteorites, especially radionuclides used to determine terrestrial ages, and those made in situ in terrestrial rocks. Cosmogenic nuclides made in the Earth's atmosphere or brought in with cosmic dust have also been studied in polar ice, and it should also be possible to measure nuclides made in situ in ice. As an introduction to cosmogenic nuclides and their applications, cosmic rays and their interactions will be presented below and production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in these various media will be discussed later. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Cosmic-ray interactions and dating of meteorite stranding surfaces with cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A wide variety of products from cosmic-ray interactions have been measured in terrestrial or extraterrestrial samples. These ''cosmogenic'' products include radiation damage tracks and rare nuclides that are made by nuclear reactions. They often have been used to determine the fluxes and composition of cosmic-ray particles in the past, but they are usually used to study the history of the ''target'' (such as the time period that it was exposed to cosmic-ray particles). Products made by both the high-energy galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles emitted irregularly from the Sun have been extensively studied. Some of these cosmogenic products, especially nuclides, have been or can be applied to studies of Antarctic meteorite stranding surfaces, the ice surfaces in Antarctica where meteorites have been found. Cosmogenic nuclides studied in samples from Antarctica and reported by others elsewhere in this volume include those in meteorites, especially radionuclides used to determine terrestrial ages, and those made in situ in terrestrial rocks. Cosmogenic nuclides made in the Earth's atmosphere or brought in with cosmic dust have also been studied in polar ice, and it should also be possible to measure nuclides made in situ in ice. As an introduction to cosmogenic nuclides and their applications, cosmic rays and their interactions will be presented below and production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides in these various media will be discussed later. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Terrestrial Cosmogenic-Nuclide Dating of Alluvial Fans in Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machette, Michael N.; Slate, Janet L.; Phillips, Fred M.

    2008-01-01

    We have used terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) to establish the age of some of the most extensive Quaternary alluvial fans in Death Valley, California. These intermediate-age alluvial fans are most extensive on the western side of the valley, where tectonic deformation is considerably less pronounced than on the eastern side of the valley. These fans are characterized by a relatively smooth, densely packed desert pavement formed by well-varnished (blackened) clasts. These surfaces have been mapped as the Q2 gravel by previous workers and as unit Qai (intermediate age) by us. However, the intermediate-age gravels probably contain multiple subunits, as evidenced by slight differences in morphologic expression, soil formation, and inset geomorphic relations. The TCN technique used herein sums the cosmogenic 36Cl in approximately 2.5-meter-deep profiles through soil and host alluvium, thus avoiding some of the problems associated with the more typical surface-exposure dating of boulders or smaller clasts. Our TCN 36Cl dating of 12 depth profiles indicates that these intermediate-age (Qai) alluvial fans range from about 100 to 40 kilo-annum (ka), with a mean age of about 70 ka. An alternative interpretation is that alluvial unit Qai was deposited in two discrete episodes from 90 to 80 ka and from 60 to 50 ka, before and after MIS (marine oxygen-isotope stage) 4 (respectively). Without an intermediate-age unit, such as MIS 4 lake deposits, we can neither disprove nor prove that Qai was deposited in two discrete intervals or over a longer range of time. Thus, in Death Valley, alluvial unit Qai largely brackets MIS 4, which is not associated with a deep phase of Lake Manly. These Qai fans extend to elevations of about -46 meters (150 feet below sea level) and have not been transgressed by Lake Manly, suggesting that MIS 4 or MIS 2 lakes were rather shallow in Death Valley, perhaps because they lacked inflow from surface runoff of the Sierra Nevada drainages through

  2. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  3. Cosmogenic Nuclide Exposure Dating of the Tiltill Rock Avalanche, Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K. R.; Pluhar, C. J.; Stone, J. O.; Stock, G. M.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Yosemite National Park serves as an excellent natural laboratory for studying rock falls and rock avalanches because these are the main processes modifying the nearly vertical slopes of this recently glaciated landscape. Mass wasting represents a significant hazard in the region and the database of previous rock falls and other mass wasting events in Yosemite is extensive, dating back to the mid-1800s. However, this record is too short to capture the recurrence characteristics and triggering mechanisms of the very largest events, necessitating studies of the geologic record of mass wasting. Rock falls and rock avalanches are readily dated by cosmogenic nuclide methods due to their instantaneous formation, and results can be tied to triggering events such as seismic activity (e.g. Stock et al., 2009). Here, we apply exposure dating to the Holocene Tiltill rock avalanche north of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. The deposit comprises what appear to be two separate lobes of rock and debris, yielding a total volume of ~3.1 x 106 m3. Assuming an erosion rate of 0.0006 cm/yr and neglecting snowpack shielding, preliminary data suggest a mean exposure age of 11,000 + 600 year B.P. for both deposits, indicating that they were emplaced in a single event. The age of the Tiltill 'slide' is similar to earthquakes on the Owens Valley Fault between 10,800 + 600 and 10,200 + 200 cal year B.P. (Bacon, 2007) and the White Mountain Fault, ~10,000 cal year B.P. (Reheis, 1996; DePolo, 1989). Given that movement on the Owens Valley fault in 1872 caused a number of rock falls in Yosemite and the coincidence of ages between the Tiltill 'slide' and paleoseismic events, a large earthquake in Eastern Sierra Nevada may have triggered this event. Other trigger events are also possibilities, but only through compilation of a database of large rock avalanches can statistically significant groupings of events begin to demonstrate whether seismic triggering is a dominant process.

  4. Accessing the application of in situ cosmogenic 14C to surface exposure dating of amorphous SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesta, J. M.; Goehring, B. M.; Ward, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    We assess the feasibility and utility of in situ cosmogenic 14C as a geochronometer for landforms composed of amorphous SiO2 through the comparison of 14C surface exposure ages to independently determined eruption ages on Obsidian Dome, California. Landforms composed of amorphous SiO2 phases are difficult to date by conventional cosmogenic nuclide methods due to several complications that may arise (e.g., inability to remove meteoric contamination). The onset of an increased understanding of production rates and analytical measurement of in situ 14C in SiO2 provides an opportunity to address this limitation. Obsidian Dome is a 600-year-old phreatomagmatic dome of the Mono-Inyo Craters located in Inyo County, California, and consists of vesicular pumice, obsidian, and rhyolite. Exposure ages from eight obsidian and banded pumice and obsidian surface samples range from 3947 ± 678 to 914 ± 134 years, all significantly older than the accepted radiocarbon age of 650-550 years. δ13C values for the samples range between +2.65‰ and +1.34‰ and show a negative correlation with CO2 yield. The `too old' exposure ages coupled with this negative correlation between δ13C and CO2 yield suggests the incorporation of an atmospheric component of 14C. Measurement of 14C concentrations in shielded, subsurface samples will assist in isolating the atmospheric 14C component and aid in correcting the surface exposure ages.

  5. 10Be accumulation in a soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavich, M.J.; Brown, L.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the concentration of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be in soil samples from various horizons at six sites, including three independently dated Rappahannock River terraces and a previously undated Piedmont soil to which we have assigned an age. All of the incident 10Be can be accounted for in one of these soils and a second is within a factor of two. In three soils, whose concentrations vary widely with depth, a significant fraction of the incident 10Be cannot be accounted for. Incomplete sampling, and enhanced Be mobility caused by organic components, are the probable reasons for the low inventory of Be from these three soils. Overall, the data from these six sites indicate that 10Be accumulation could be used to assign ages to soils if Be is not mobilized and lost from the soil profile. ?? 1984.

  6. Deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica from glacial geomorphology and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Shanks, R.; Xu, S.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.

    2017-02-01

    The retreat history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is important for understanding rapid deglaciation, as well as to constrain numerical ice sheet models and ice loading models required for glacial isostatic adjustment modelling. There is particular debate about the extent of grounded ice in the Weddell Sea embayment at the Last Glacial Maximum, and its subsequent deglacial history. Here we provide a new dataset of geomorphological observations and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages of erratic samples that constrain the deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, adjacent to the present day Foundation Ice Stream and Academy Glacier in the southern Weddell Sea embayment. We show there is evidence of at least two glaciations, the first of which was relatively old and warm-based, and a more recent cold-based glaciation. During the most recent glaciation ice thickened by at least 450 m in the Williams Hills and at least 380 m on Mt Bragg. Progressive thinning from these sites was well underway by 10 ka BP and ice reached present levels by 2.5 ka BP, and is broadly similar to the relatively modest thinning histories in the southern Ellsworth Mountains. The thinning history is consistent with, but does not mandate, a Late Holocene retreat of the grounding line to a smaller-than-present configuration, as has been recently hypothesized based on ice sheet and glacial isostatic modelling. The data also show that clasts with complex exposure histories are pervasive and that clast recycling is highly site-dependent. These new data provide constraints on a reconstruction of the retreat history of the formerly-expanded Foundation Ice Stream, derived using a numerical flowband model.

  7. Cosmic ray exposure dating with in situ produced cosmogenic 3He: results from young Hawaiian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M.D.; Colodner, D.; Trull, T.W.; Moore, R.B.; O'Brien, K.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to determine the in situ production rate of spallation-produced cosmogenic 3He, and evaluate its use as a surface exposure chronometer, we have measured cosmogenic helium contents in a suite of Hawaiian radiocarbon-dated lava flows. The lava flows, ranging in age from 600 to 13,000 years, were collected from Hualalai and Mauna Loa volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Because cosmic ray surface-exposure dating requires the complete absence of erosion or soil cover, these lava flows were selected specifically for this purpose. The 3He production rate, measured within olivine phenocrysts, was found to vary significantly, ranging from 47 to 150 atoms g-1 yr-1 (normalized to sea level). Although there is considerable scatter in the data, the samples younger than 10,000 years are well-preserved and exposed, and the production rate variations are therefore not related to erosion or soil cover. Data averaged over the past 2000 years indicate a sea-level 3He production rate of 125 ?? 30 atoms g-1 yr-1, which agrees well with previous estimates. The longer record suggests a minimum in sea level normalized 3He production rate between 2000 and 7000 years (55 ?? 15 atoms g-1 yr-1), as compared to samples younger than 2000 years (125 ?? 30 atoms g-1 yr-1), and those between 7000 and 10,000 years (127 ?? 19 atoms g-1 yr-1). The minimum in production rate is similar in age to that which would be produced by variations in geomagnetic field strength, as indicated by archeomagnetic data. However, the production rate variations (a factor of 2.3 ?? 0.8) are poorly determined due to the large uncertainties in the youngest samples and questions of surface preservation for the older samples. Calculations using the atmospheric production model of O'Brien (1979) [35], and the method of Lal and Peters (1967) [11], predict smaller production rate variations for similar variation in dipole moment (a factor of 1.15-1.65). Because the production rate variations, archeomagnetic data

  8. A re-evaluation of the 0-10 ka 10Be production rate for exposure dating obtained from the Koefels (Austria) landslide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, Peter W.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The sea level, high latitude 10 Be production rate for exposure dating obtained from the giant 9.8 ka landslide of Koefels (Austria) has been calculated based on a re-assessment of the contribution of the muonic cosmic ray component. The 0-10 ka production rate value is 5.44 ± 0.19 10 Be atoms/y g quartz

  9. New constraints on slip rates of the Fodongmiao-Hongyazi fault in the Northern Qilian Shan, NE Tibet, from the 10Be exposure dating of offset terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Yang, Xiaoping; Huang, Xiongnan; Li, An; Huang, Weiliang; Zhang, Ling

    2018-01-01

    The Fodongmo-Hongyazi fault (FHF) is a major thrust of Northeastern Tibet, bounding the Qilian Shan. It accommodates crustal shortening across this region and has produced a strong historical earthquake. Until now the slip rate has been poorly constrained, limiting our understanding of its role in the accommodation of deformation across this region. In this paper, faulted terraces at two sites on the western and middle segments of the FHF were mapped with satellite imagery and field observations. Chronological constraints are placed on the ages of displaced river terraces at these sites using terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) exposure dating. These ages combined with offsets measured from SPOT 6 DEM's yield average vertical slip rates of 1.3 ± 0.1 mm/yr for the western segment since ∼207 ka and 0.9 ± 0.1 mm/yr since ∼46 ka for the middle segment. These data suggest that the FHF accommodates ∼15-20% of the total shortening across the Qilian Shan (5.5-7 mm/yr). In addition, comparisons of our data with published slip rates along the Northern Qilian Thrust Fault Zone show that the fastest tectonic uplift occurs along the western portion of the Northern Qilian Shan. This is consistent with estimates deduced from geomorphology. The western portion of the Qilian Shan is mainly controlled by compressional deformation produced by the northward movement of the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, while the eastern Qilian Shan is mainly controlled by the eastward extrusion of material along the left-lateral Haiyuan strike-slip Fault.

  10. Tectonic-magmatic interplay during the early stages of oceanic rifting: temporal constraints from cosmogenic 3He dating in the Dabbahu rift segment, Afar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Medynski, S.; Yirgu, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Afar Rift in Ethiopia is one of the only subaerial locations in the world where the transition from continental break-up to oceanic-spreading can be observed. Extension and volcanism in the Afar is concentrated in tectono-magmatic segments (TMS), similar in size and morphology to those that characterize mid-ocean ridge systems. However, unlike their submarine equivalents, the Afar TMS contain large silicic central volcanoes, implying that magma differentiation plays an important role in the early evolution of the oceanic rifts. The Dabbahu TMS at the south of the western Afar rift system has recently been the site of significant activity. A massive seismic event in late 2005, triggered by dyke injection, heralded the onset of new rifting period. Volcanism associated with the periods of magma-driven extension has been both silicic (explosive) and basaltic (fissural). The most recent activity in the Afar thus testifies to the close interplay of tectonics and magmatism in rifting environments. In an effort to decipher the long-term structural and volcanic evolution of Dabbahu TMS, we combine cosmogenic 3He dating with geological interpretation of ASTER images and major and trace element analyses of the main volcanic units present. The cosmogenic dating method has advantages over other geochronological tools in that we can target both volcanic and tectonic surfaces of a few Kyr to several Myr age. At Baddi Volcano, an off-axis stratovolcano located west of the Dabbahu rift-axis, basaltic lava flows overlie an acidic base, previously dated at 290 ka using the K-Ar technique (Lahitte et al., 2003). Following preliminary sampling in 2007, we determined cosmogenic 3He ages of 57 ka and 45 ka for two basaltic flows on the flanks of Baddi. We now investigate whether this presumed replenishment of the Baddi magma chamber represents a replenishment of the entire sub-rift plumbing system, and how this in turn relates to the onset and maintenance of surface deformation

  11. Timing of last deglaciation in the Cantabrian Mountains (Iberian Peninsula; North Atlantic Region) based on in situ-produced 10Be exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier L.; Keddadouche, Karim; Aster Team

    2017-09-01

    The Last Glacial Termination led to major changes in ice sheet coverage that disrupted global patterns of atmosphere and ocean circulation. Paleoclimate records from Iberia suggest that westerly episodes played a key role in driving heterogeneous climate in the North Atlantic Region. We used 10Be Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating to explore the glacier response of small mountain glaciers (ca. 5 km2) that developed on the northern slope of the Cantabrian Mountains (Iberian Peninsula), an area directly under the influence of the Atlantic westerly winds. We analyzed twenty boulders from three moraines and one rock glacier arranged as a recessional sequence preserved between 1150 and 1540 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the Monasterio valley (Redes Natural Park). Results complement previous chronologic data based on radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence from the Monasterio valley, which suggest a local Glacial Maximum (local GM) prior to 33 ka BP and a long-standing glacier advance at 24 ka coeval to the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Resultant 10Be CRE ages suggest a progressive retreat and thinning of the Monasterio glacier over the time interval 18.1-16.7 ka. This response is coeval with the Heinrich Stadial 1, an extremely cold and dry climate episode initiated by a weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Glacier recession continued through the Bølling/Allerød period as indicate the minimum exposure ages obtained from a cirque moraine and a rock glacier nested within this moraine, which yielded ages of 14.0 and 13.0 ka, respectively. Together, they suggest that the Monasterio glacier experienced a gradual transition from glacier to rock glacier activity as the AMOC started to strengthen again. Glacial evidence ascribable to the Younger Dryas cooling was not dated in the Monasterio valley, but might have occurred at higher elevations than evidence dated in this work. The evolution of former glaciers documented in the

  12. Increased production of cosmogenic 10Be recorded in oceanic sediment sequences: Information on the age, duration, and amplitude of the geomagnetic dipole moment minimum over the Matuyama-Brunhes transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Bassinot, Franck; Savranskaia, Tatiana; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Aster Team

    2018-05-01

    New high-resolution authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio (Be-ratio) records covering the last geomagnetic reversal, i.e. the Matuyama-Brunhes transition (MBT), have been obtained and set on a time scale using benthic δ18O (Cibicides wuellerstorfi) records. The geographic distribution of the four studied sites allows global comparison between the North Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. All Be-ratio records contain a two-fold increase triggered by the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) collapse associated with the MBT. The stratigraphic position of the Be-ratio spike, relative to marine isotope stages, allows establishment of a robust astrochronological framework for the MBT, anchoring its age between 778 and 766 ka (average mid-peaks at 772 ka), which is consistent with all other available 10Be-proxy records from marine, ice and loess archives. The global 10Be atmospheric production doubling represents an increase of more than 300 atoms m-2 s-1 that is compatible with the increased magnitude of atmospheric 10Be production obtained by simulations between the present GDM and a null-GDM. The minimum 10Be-derived GDM average computed for the 776-771 ka interval is 1.7 ± 0.4 ×1022 Am2, in agreement with model simulations and absolute paleointensities of transitional lava flows.

  13. Methodological study on exposure date of Tiankeng by AMS measurement of in situ produced cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Kejun [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Li Shizhuo [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); CNNC China North Nuclear Fuel Company Ltd., Baotou 014035 (China); He Ming [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Sasa, Kimikazu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University (Japan); Huang Baojian [Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Guilin 541004 (China); Ruan Xiangdong; Guan Yongjing [College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Takahashi, Tsutomu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sueki, Keisuke [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Li Chaoli; Wu Shaoyong [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Wang Xianggao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Guilin 541004 (China); Shen Hongtao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); College of Physics and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Nagashima, Yasuo [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Jiang Shan, E-mail: jiangs@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Tiankeng is a typical Karst relief of the late Quaternary Period. Studies on the exposure ages of Tiankeng are very important in geographical research to elucidate the formation condition, the developing process, and the features of biological species. {sup 36}Cl on the surface layer of the rupture cross-section of Tiankeng is largely produced by cosmogenic high-energy neutron induced reactions {sup 40}Ca(n, {alpha}p) and {sup 39}K(n, {alpha}), and has accumulated since the formation of the Tiankeng. Low-energy neutron reaction {sup 35}Cl(n, {gamma}) contributes a small portion of {sup 36}Cl. In this work, the concentration of the cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in rock samples taken from Dashiwei Tiankeng, Leye County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, was measured jointly by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratories of CIAE and University of Tsukuba in an effort to estimate the formation time (or exposure age) of the Tiankeng. The results show that the exposure time of Da Shiwei Tiankeng is about 26 {+-} 9.6 ka (without erosion correction). The sampling strategy and procedures, experimental set-up, and preliminary results will be presented in detail.

  14. Glacial evolution in King George and Livingston Islands (Antarctica) since the Last Glacial Maximum based on cosmogenic nuclide dating and glacier surface reconstruction - CRONOANTAR project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; Fernández Menéndez, Susana del Carmen; García Hernández, Cristina; Menéndez Duarte, Rosa Ana; Pellitero Ondicol, Ramón; Pérez Alberti, Augusto; Schimmelpfennig, Irene

    2017-04-01

    CRONOANTAR brings together researchers from Spain, Portugal, France and United Kingdom with the objective of spatially and temporally reconstruct the deglaciation process at the two largest islands in the South Shetlands Archipelago (Maritime Antarctica), since the Global Last Glacial Maximum. Glacier retreat in polar areas has major implications at a local, regional and even planetary scale. Global average sea level rise is the most obvious and socio-economically relevant, but there are others such as the arrival of new fauna to deglaciated areas, plant colonisation or permafrost formation and degradation. This project will study the ice-free areas in Byers and Hurd peninsulas (Livingston Island) and Fildes and Potter peninsulas (King George Island). Ice-cap glacier retreat chronology will be revealed by the use of cosmogenic isotopes (mainly 36Cl) on glacially originated sedimentary and erosive records. Cosmogenic dating will be complemented by other dating methods (C14 and OSL), which will permit the validation of these methods in regions with cold-based glaciers. Given the geomorphological evidences and the obtained ages, a deglaciation calendar will be proposed and we will use a GIS methodology to reconstruct the glacier extent and the ice thickness. The results emerging from this project will allow to assess whether the high glacier retreat rates observed during the last decades were registered in the past, or if they are conversely the consequence (and evidence) of the Global Change in Antarctica. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (Reference: CTM2016-77878-P).

  15. 10Be dating of the Main Terrace level in the Amblève valley (Ardennes, Belgium): new age constraint on the archaeological and palaeontological filling of the Belle-Roche palaeokarst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Bourlès, Didier L.; Braucher, Régis; Siame, Lionel; Cordy, Jean-Marie; Demoulin, Alain

    2014-05-01

    It is still disputed whether very old archaeological and palaeontological remains found in the Belle-Roche palaeocave (eastern Belgium) pertain to the Early (˜1 Ma) or Middle (˜0.5 Ma) Pleistocene. Here, in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations from a depth profile in nearby sediments of the Belle-Roche terrace (Amblève Main Terrace level) are used as an indirect solution of this chronological issue. The distribution of 10Be concentrations in the upper 3 m of this profile displays the theoretically expected exponential decrease with depth. Assuming a single exposure episode, we obtain a best fit age of 222.5±31 ka for the time of terrace abandonment. However, below 3 m, the 10Be concentrations show a marked progressive increase with depth. This distinctive cosmogenic signal is interpreted as the result of slow aggradation of the fluvial deposits over a lengthy interval. Modelling of the whole profile thus suggests that the onset of the terrace formation occurred at around 550 ka, with a sediment accumulation rate of ˜20 mm/ka. Based on two slightly different reconstructions of the geomorphic evolution of the area and a discussion of the temporal link between the cave and Main Terrace levels, we conclude that the fossil-bearing layers in the palaeokarst pertain most probably to MIS 14-13 (or possibly MIS 12-11) and the artifact-bearing layer to MIS 13 (or possibly MIS 11). This age estimate for the large mammal association identified in the Belle-Roche palaeokarst and the attribution to MIS 14-13 of a similar fauna found in the lowermost fossiliferous layers of the Caune de l'Arago (Tautavel) are in mutual support. Our results therefore confirm the status of the Belle-Roche site as a reference site for the Cromerian mammal association and the Early Palaeolithic industry in NW Europe.

  16. The timing and cause of glacial activity during the last glacial in central Tibet based on 10Be surface exposure dating east of Mount Jaggang, the Xainza range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guocheng; Zhou, Weijian; Yi, Chaolu; Fu, Yunchong; Zhang, Li; Li, Ming

    2018-04-01

    Mountain glaciers are sensitive to climate change, and can provide valuable information for inferring former climates on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). The increasing glacial chronologies indicate that the timing of the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) recorded across the TP is asynchronous, implying different local influences of the mid-latitude westerlies and Asian Summer Monsoon in triggering glacier advances. However, the well-dated sites are still too few, especially in the transition zone between regions controlled by the two climate systems. Here we present detailed last glacial chronologies for the Mount Jaggang area, in the Xainza range, central Tibet, with forty-three apparent 10Be exposure-ages ranging from 12.4 ± 0.8 ka to 61.9 ± 3.8 ka. These exposure-ages indicate that at least seven glacial episodes occurred during the last glacial cycle east of Mount Jaggang. These include: a local LGM that occurred at ∼61.9 ± 3.8 ka, possibly corresponding to Marine Isotope Stage 4 (MIS 4); subsequent glacial advances at ∼43.2 ± 2.6 ka and ∼35.1 ± 2.1 ka during MIS 3; one glacial re-advance/standstill at MIS3/2 transition (∼29.8 ± 1.8 ka); and three glacial re-advances/standstills that occurred following MIS 3 at ∼27.9 ± 1.7 ka, ∼21.8 ± 1.3 ka, and ∼15.1 ± 0.9 ka. The timing of these glacial activities is roughly in agreement with North Atlantic millennial-scale climate oscillations (Heinrich events), suggesting the potential correlations between these abrupt climate changes and glacial fluctuations in the Mount Jaggang area. The successively reduced glacial extent might have resulted from an overall decrease in Asian Summer Monsoon intensity over this timeframe.

  17. Cosmogenic radionuclides as a synchronisation tool - present status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Mekhaldi, Florian; Mellström, Anette; Svensson, Anders; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Changes in the flux of galactic cosmic rays into Earth's atmosphere produce variations in the production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides. The resulting globally synchronous signal in cosmogenic radionuclide records can be used to compare time scales and synchronise climate records. The most prominent example is the 14C wiggle match dating approach where variations in the atmospheric 14C concentration are used to match climate records and the tree-ring based part of the 14C calibration record. This approach can be extended to other cosmogenic radionuclide records such as 10Be time series provided that the different geochemical behaviour of 10Be and 14C is taken into account. Here we will present some recent results that illustrate the potential of using cosmogenic radionuclide records for comparing and synchronising different time scales. The focus will be on the last 50000 years where we will show examples how geomagnetic field, solar activity and unusual short-term cosmic ray changes can be used for comparing ice core, tree ring and sediment time scales. We will discuss some unexpected offsets between Greenland ice core and 14C time scale and we will examine how far back in time solar induced 10Be and 14C variations presently can be used to reliably synchronise ice core and 14C time scales.

  18. Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial in the Polish High Tatra Mountains - Revised deglaciation chronology based on the 10Be exposure age dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makos, Michał; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Braucher, Régis; Tołoczko-Pasek, Anna; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aster Team

    2018-05-01

    Deglaciation chronology of the Polish High Tatra Mountains has been reconstructed based on 10Be exposure age dating. Fifty-seven rock samples were collected from boulders located on the terminal and lateral moraines that limit the horizontal extent of the LGM and the Lateglacial glaciers in the Biała Woda and Sucha Woda catchments. The uncertainty-weighted mean age of 21.5 ± 2.5 ka obtained for the maximum terminal moraine in the Sucha Woda Valley indicates that the oldest preserved moraines were formed during the global LGM. The age population ranges between 15.1 ± 1.0 and 28.3 ± 2.0 ka, and suggests that glaciers reached their maximum position (LGM I) as early as 28-25 ka and the final stabilization of the form occurred much later possibly after melting of buried dead ice. The younger glacial oscillation (LGM II) occurred no later than 20.5 ka and is represented by well-preserved termino-lateral moraine systems in the Pańszczyca Valley. The first Lateglacial stage (LG1) in the study area is documented in the Rybi Potok Valley at the RP1 moraine (1300 m a.s.l.), which was stable at around 16.6 ± 0.3 ka. The younger LG2 stage has no defined absolute age, however, it is constrained between 16.5 and 15.5 ka by the timing of the LG3 stage. This cold event is represented by well-formed moraines in the Roztoka/Pięć Stawów Polskich, Rybi Potok and Pańszczyca valleys of which exposure age indicates their deposition between 15.0 ± 0.5 and 15.6 ± 0.1 ka. The LG1, LG2 and LG3 stages likely occurred during the Oldest Dryas cold stage (Greenland Stadial 2.1a) related to the North Atlantic cooling Heinrich Event 1. The youngest glacial oscillation is evidenced by moraines in the Pusta and Pańszczyca valleys. These moraines are composed of very large granitic blocks of which exposure ages often exhibit isotope inheritance. This is reflected by the youngest P3 moraine in the Pańszczyca Valley with a mean age of deposition close to the LGM. The R4 moraine system in

  19. Seismic Supercycles of Normal Faults in Central Italy over Various Time Scales Revealed by 36Cl Cosmogenic Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, L. C.; Tesson, J.; Perouse, E.; Puliti, I.; Fleury, J.; Rizza, M.; Billant, J.; Pace, B.

    2017-12-01

    The use of 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide as a paleoseismological tool for normal faults in the Mediterranean has revolutionized our understanding of their seismic cycle (Gran Mitchell et al. 2001, Benedetti et al. 2002). Here we synthetized results obtained on 13 faults in Central Italy. Those records cover a period of 8 to 45 ka. The mean recurrence time of retrieved seismic events is 5.5 ±6 ka, with a mean slip per event of 2.5 ± 1.8 m and a mean slip-rate from 0.1 to 2.4 mm/yr. Most retrieved events correspond to single events according to scaling relationships. This is also supported by the 2 m-high co-seismic slip observed on the Mt Vettore fault after the October 30, 2016 M6.5 earthquake in Central Italy (EMERGEO working group). Our results suggest that all faults have experienced one or several periods of slip acceleration with bursts of seismic activity, associated with very high slip-rate of 1.7-9 mm/yr, corresponding to 2-20 times their long-term slip-rate. The duration of those bursts is variable from a fault to another (from recurrence time. This might suggest that the seismic activity of those faults could be controlled by their intrinsic properties (e.g. long-term slip-rate, fault-length, state of structural maturity). Our results also show events clustering with several faults rupturing in less than 500 yrs on adjacent or distant faults within the studied area. The Norcia-Amatrice seismic sequence, ≈ 50 km north of our study area, also evidenced this clustering behaviour, with over the last 20 yrs several successive events of Mw 5 to 6.5 (from north to south: Colfiorito 1997 Mw6.0, Norcia 2016 Mw6.5, L'Aquila 2009 Mw6.3), rupturing various fault systems, over a total length of ≈100 km. This sequence will allow to better understand earthquake kinematics and spatiotemporal slip distribution during those seismic bursts.

  20. Glacial and volcanic evolution on Nevado Coropuna (Tropical Andes) based on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, J.; Palacios, D.; Vázquez-Selém, L.

    2012-04-01

    We have reconstructed the evolution of the paleo-glaciers of the volcanic complex Nevado Coropuna (15°S, 72°W; 6377 m asl) through the interpretation and dating of geomorphological evidences. Surface exposure dating (SED) based on the accumulation of 36Cl on the surface of moraine boulders, polished bedrock and lava flows allowed: 1) to confirm that the presence of ice masses in the region dates back to >80ka; 2) to produce chronologies of glacial and volcanic phases for the last ~21 ka; and 3) to obtain evidences of the reactivation of volcanic activity after the Last Glacial Maximum. Bromley et al. (2009) presented 3He SED ages of 21 ka for moraine boulders on the Mapa Mayo valley, to the North of Nevado Coropuna. Our 36Cl SED SED for moraine boulders from the valleys on the NE sector of the volcanic complex suggest a maximum initial advance between 20 and 16 ka, followed by another expansion of similar extent at 12-11 ka. On the Southern slope of Nevado Coropuna, the 36Cl ages show a maximum initial advance that reaches to the level of the Altiplano at 14 ka, and a re-advance at ~10-9 ka BP. Other data show minor re-advances at 9 ka on the Northern slope and at 6 ka to the South of the volcanic complex. These minor positive pulses interrupted a fast deglaciation process during the Holocene as shown by two series of 36Cl SED from polished rock surfaces on successively higher altitudes along the valleys of rivers Blanco and Cospanja, to the SW and SE. Despite the global warming occuring since 20 ka, deduced from the record of sea surface paleo-temperature of the Galapago Islands (Lea et al, 2006), the evolution of the fresh-water plankton from Lake Titicaca (Fritz et al, 2007) is consistent with sustained glacial conditions until 10-9 ka as suggested by the present work. Exposure ages of three lava flows indicate a reactivation of the magmatic system as the paleo-glaciers abandonned the slopes. The eruptive activity migrated from the West, where we found a lava

  1. Constraining local subglacial bedrock erosion rates with cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsig, Christian; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Christl, Marcus; Reitner, Jürgen; Reindl, Martin; Bichler, Mathias; Vockenhuber, Christof; Akcar, Naki; Schlüchter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The constant buildup of cosmogenic nuclides, most prominently 10Be, in exposed rock surfaces is routinely employed for dating various landforms such as landslides or glacial moraines. One fundamental assumption is that no cosmogenic nuclides were initially present in the rock, before the event to be dated. In the context of glacially formed landscapes it is commonly assumed that subglacial erosion of at least a few meters of bedrock during the period of ice coverage is sufficient to remove any previously accumulated nuclides, since the production of 10Be ceases at a depth of 2-3 m. Insufficient subglacial erosion leads to overestimation of surface exposure ages. If the time since the retreat of the glacier is known, however, a discordant concentration of cosmogenic nuclides delivers information about the depth of subglacial erosion. Here we present data from proglacial bedrock at two sites in the Alps. Goldbergkees in the Hohe Tauern National Park in Austria and Gruebengletscher in the Grimsel Pass area in Switzerland. Samples were taken inside as well as outside of the glaciers' Little Ice Age extent. Measured nuclide concentrations are analyzed with the help of a MATLAB model simulating periods of exposure or glacial cover of user-definable length and erosion rates.

  2. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Giant landslides are recognized to be remarkably abundant on the Western Andean front of southern Peru and northern Chile, especially in the Arica Bend region (e.g. Crosta et al., 2014a). This area is characterized by strong topographic gradients and subsequent incision of deep canyons, due to the evolution of the Andean range that provide suitable conditions for the development of such instabilities. The climate is hyper-arid (Atacama Desert), although rare but highly impulsive wet events have been evidenced since the Pleistocene. In parallel, this region is submitted to strong (Mw 8-9) and recurrent (~100 yrs) subduction earthquakes. Previous studies suggest that large landslides represent the main agent of erosion of the Western Cordillera, providing soft material for subsequent fluvial remobilization. However the lack of time constrains on the numerous fossil landslides identified away from major canyons still hamper to assess a real mass balance of sliding material versus the known fluvial erosion and tectonic uplift rates. Finally the role of landslides in the long-term erosion rates of the Andean range on its arid flank remains quantitatively unknown. Recently, two studies gave divergent opinions about the main factor supposed to control the slope failures in that region. Based on cosmogenic nuclides derived erosion rates, McPhillips et al. (2014) argue that the last Holocene climate variation did not have had any effect on the rate of landsliding, suggesting that here landslides are mainly triggered by earthquake. On the other hand, Margirier et al. (2014) have showed a temporal correlation between a failure episode of the giant Chuquibamba landslide and the Ouki wet climatic event identified on the Altiplano ~100 ka ago. In this study we focus on dating the Cerro Caquilluco rock avalanche complex described by Crosta et al. (2014). With a total volume of about 15 km3, a length of 43 km and an internal structure characterized by various depositional lobes

  3. 10Be in manganese nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Parker, P.; Mangini, A.; Cochran, K.; Turekian, K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sharma, P.

    1981-01-01

    10 Be (t/sub 1/2) = 1.5 MY) is(formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation on nitrogen and oxygen. It is transported to the earth's surface via precipitation. In the oceans it is eventually associated with solid phases depositing on the ocean floor such as manganese nodules and deep-sea sediments. One of the assumptions that is normally made in analysis of such processes is that 10 Be has been produced at a relatively uniform rate over the pat several million years. If we assume, in addition, that the initial specific concentration of 10 Be as it precipitates with a solid phase is invariant with time, then we would expect that the decrease of the 10 Be concentration as a function of depth in a deep-sea core or in a manganese nodule would provide a record of sediment accumulation rate in the former and of growth rate in the latter. The possibility of using cosmic-ray produced 10 Be for the dating of marine deposits had been proposed 25 years ago by Arnold and Goel et al. The method of analysis used by these investigators, and those subsequently pursuing the problem, was low-level β counting. Though the potential of using 10 Be for dating manganese nodules was explored more than a decade ago, only a few measurements of 10 Be in nodules exist in date. This is largely because of the 10 Be measurements in environmental samples have gained considerable momentum during the past 3 to 4 years, after the development of accelerator mass spectrometry for its determination

  4. Application of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method to Late Miocene-Pliocene sequences in the northern Danube Basin (Pannonian Basin System): Confirmation of heterochronous evolution of sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šujan, Michal; Braucher, Régis; Kováč, Michal; Bourlès, Didier L.; Rybár, Samuel; Guillou, Valéry; Hudáčková, Natália

    2016-02-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method was applied to lacustrine, deltaic and alluvial sequences of the northern Danube Basin (Pannonian Basin System), to bridge the insufficiency of geochronological data for the Late Miocene to Pliocene period. The measurements of 51 samples (both lacustrine and floodplain), ranging from 11.6 to 0.95 Ma are consistent with the existing magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data standing mainly on the evolution degree of endemic mollusk fauna, mammals and dinocysts. This agreement confirms our assumption that the incoming beryllium fluxes remained constant over the studied time period and thus that the two initial 10Be/9Be ratios determined in actual Holocene/Late Pleistocene sediments (lacustrine and floodplain) are valid for these environments. The obtained ages indicate gradual progradation of the deltaic depositional systems across the Danube Basin with a clear time-transgressional character, replacing basin floor and shelfal environments. Deltaic sedimentation occurred firstly in the north at foothills of the Western Carpathians from 11.0 Ma, and changed to the alluvial environment after 10.5 Ma. At the same time (~ 10.5 Ma), the paleo-Danube deltaic system draining the Eastern Alps entered the study area from the Vienna Basin situated on the West. Later, the deltaic systems were merged in the central part of the basin and reached its southeastern margin at ~ 9.4 Ma. Regression of the Lake Pannon from the southernmost part of the study area is evidenced after 8.7 Ma. Alluvial deposition of meandering rivers lasting until 6.0-5.0 Ma followed and was interrupted by the early Pliocene basin inversion. Sedimentation of braided streams took place during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene, reflecting uplift of mountains surrounding the basin margins. This study documents the powerful potential of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method and its reliability in a basin with complicated tectonic and sedimentary history. It demonstrates that

  5. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in the Atmosphere: Origin and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Monem, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    conditions can be used to date groundwater and study circulation of water in the ocean. The cosmogenic noble gases nuclides 37 Ar, 39 Ar, 81 Kr and 85 Kr have long residence time in the atmosphere. The other cosmogenic ones, 10 Be, 26 AI and 32 Si, rapidly removed from the atmosphere by precipitation are deposited in marine or lacustrine sediments and in the polar ice sheets, where they are used to measure the rate of deposition of marine sediments. The group 10 Be, 26 AI and 36 CI are suitable for glaciological studies together with 14 C, 31 CI and 81 Kr which occur in air bubbles trapped in glacial ice. Also, the cosmogenic 10 Be, 26 AI and 36 CI accumulate in rocks exposed to cosmic rays at the surface of the Earth, which makes them useful to measure erosion rates and exposure ages. The existence of 10 Be in young volcanic rocks in island arcs and subduction zones has been attributed to the melting of deep sea sediments in the down going slab of oceanic crust. Similarly, the presence of 10 Be in tektites from Indochina and Australia can be attributed to melting of continental sediments containing 10 Be produced in the atmosphere. The use of these radionuclides for the study of geologic phenomena has been enhanced by ultra-sensitive mass spectrometers. This equipment may enable to detect time-dependent variations in the production rates of certain radionuclides that could be attributed to past fluctuations of the solar activity or of the geomagnetic field.

  6. No surface breaking on the Ecemiş Fault, central Turkey, since Late Pleistocene (~ 64.5 ka); new geomorphic and geochronologic data from cosmogenic dating of offset alluvial fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıkaya, M. A.; Yıldırım, C.; Çiner, A.

    2015-05-01

    The Ecemiş Fault Zone (EF) has been recognized as a major left lateral strike-slip fault in the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ) of Turkey. However, its Quaternary slip-rate has been challenging to determine due to the difficulty of dating offset markers. Using high-precision offset measurements and 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating, we present the first geochronologically determined Late Quaternary slip-rate for the EF. Our study focuses on the excellent exposures of offset alluvial fan surfaces, originating from the Aladağlar, a Late Quaternary glaciated mountain. Analysis of airborne orthophotogrametry and GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) surveys indicates 168 ± 2 m left lateral and 31 ± 1 m vertical displacements. In-situ terrestrial cosmogenic 36Cl geochronology obtained from eleven surface boulders provides a minimum abandonment/incision age of 104.2 ± 16.5 ka for the oldest offset alluvial fan surface. Our geomorphic observations together with Self-potential geophysical surveys revealed the presence of an unfaulted alluvial fan terrace, which allows us to constrain the timing of deformation. The abandonment/incision age of this fan is 64.5 ± 5.6 ka based on thirteen 36Cl depth profile samples. Accordingly, we obtained a geologic fault slip-rate of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm a- 1 horizontally and 0.8 ± 0.3 mm a- 1 vertically for the time frame between 104.2 ± 16.5 ka and 64.5 ± 5.6 ka. Our analysis indicates that the EF has not been producing a major surface breaking earthquake on the main strand at least since 64.5 ± 5.6 ka (mid-Late Pleistocene). This could be the result of abandonment of the main strand and accommodation of deformation by other faults within the EF. Nevertheless, a recently occurred (30 September 2011) low magnitude (ML: 4.3) left lateral strike-slip earthquake indicates recent seismic activity of the EF. Comparison of the recent GPS velocity field with the longer slip history along the CAFZ indicates a constant but low strain

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry for analysis of 10Be. Applications in marine geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segl, M.

    1985-01-01

    Using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry the behaviour of long-lived (half time 1.5 Million years) cosmogenic isotopes 10 Be in a marine environment was examined. The geochemical behaviour of 10 Be in oceans was examined in a water profile of the eastern Atlantic and on sediment cores from the eastern Atlantic and the Antarctica. The retention period in oceans was calculated from the water profile to be 700-1000 years. The examination of sedimentary cores showed, that the 10 Be flow into the sediment in areas of high bioproductivity surpasses the production rate. Comparison of 10 Be flow with 230 Th flow into the examined sedimentary cores showed a period of retention of 10 Be in the ocean of only about 400 years. Changes in the sedimentation rate and changes in the mineralogical composition correlate with paleooceanographic events, the start of the Antarctica icing 14 million years ago, changes in the deep water circulation 6.5 million years ago and the icing over of the northern hemisphere 3 million years ago. The same paleooceanographic events find correlation with the inside structure of a total of 16 manganese nodes and crusts from diverse parts of the ocean which were also dated with 10 Be. (orig./DG) [de

  8. Determination of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, S.; Herpers [Koeln Univ. (Germany); Neumann, S.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany); Kubik, P.W.; Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides were determined in stony ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al) and iron ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl) meteorites using AMS after radiochemical separation. A selection of these data is briefly discussed with respect to exposure histories of the meteorites and is compared to model calculations. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  9. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Susana

    2017-10-01

    Experiments looking for rare events like the direct detection of dark matter particles, neutrino interactions or the nuclear double beta decay are operated deep underground to suppress the effect of cosmic rays. But, the production of radioactive isotopes in materials due to previous exposure to cosmic rays is a hazard when ultra-low background conditions are required. In this context, the generation of long-lived products by cosmic nucleons has been studied for many detector media and for other materials commonly used. Here, the main results obtained on the quantification of activation yields on the Earth’s surface will be summarized, considering both measurements and calculations following different approaches. The isotope production cross-sections and the cosmic ray spectrum are the two main ingredients when calculating this cosmogenic activation; the different alternatives for implementing them will be discussed. Activation that can take place deep underground mainly due to cosmic muons will be briefly commented too. Presently, the experimental results for the cosmogenic production of radioisotopes are scarce and discrepancies between different calculations are important in many cases, but the increasing interest on this background source which is becoming more and more relevant can help to change this situation.

  10. A study based on cosmogenic 10Be, Be and Al in marine calcite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan, Krishtel eMaging Solutions

    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Geosciences Research Division, La Jolla, CA 92093. 1Lawrence Livermore ... We therefore investigated the feasibility of extending the measurements of ..... large time gaps between points. As a result, the.

  11. Estimation of groundwater residence time and evaluation of geomorphological processes using cosmogenic and terrigenic radionuclides and isotopes of noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Yasunori; Ohta, Tomoko; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the estimation of groundwater residence time and geomorphological changing processes are discussed by focusing on isotopes of noble gases and radionuclides with a long half-life as an environmental tracer. Noble gases and radionuclides are produced in the atmospheric air and terrestrial rocks by spallation and various muon reactions during cosmic rays irradiation. Groundwater dating and geomorphological changing are estimated from changes in the number of atoms of cosmogenic and terrigenic nuclides in groundwater and terrestrial rock. The main tools of groundwater dating are combination of the dissolved helium and tritium (half-life T 1/2 =12.3 y) for younger groundwater less than 60 years of residence time, and of the dissolved helium and 36 Cl (T 1/2 =3.01 x 10 5 y) for older groundwater over million years. On the other hand, the main tools on the geomorphological changes are the estimation of exposure time using cosmogenic radionuclides ( 10 Be(half-life T 1/2 =1.6 x 10 6 y), 14 C (T 1/2 =5730 y), 26 Al (T 1/2 =7.16 x 10 5 y) and 36 Cl) and cosmogenic stable noble gases ( 3 He and 21 Ne) produced in rock. (author)

  12. Climatic influence in NRM and 10 Be-derived geomagnetic paleointensity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1999-01-01

    One can determine geomagnetic paleointensities from natural remanent magnetizations (NRM) and by inverting production rates of cosmogenic isotopes such as 10 Be and 14 C. Recently, two independently derived 200-kyr stacks [Y. Guyodo, J.-P. Valet, Relative variations in geomagnetic intensity from

  13. 10Be in the environment: some recent results and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.; Lieuvin, M.; Ravel, J.C.; Fruneau, M.; Loiseaux, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Using the Grenoble cyclotron, cosmogenic 10 Be has been measured in more than 100 environmental samples, including stratospheric and tropospheric air, precipitation, river water, ocean water, Antarctic ice, and lacustrine, inland sea, and deep sea, sediments. A summary of the results is given and some of their applications briefly mentioned

  14. Terrestrial cosmogenic 3He: where are we 30 years after its discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Pik, Raphaël; Farley, Kenneth A.; Lavé, Jérôme; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-04-01

    It is now 30 years since cosmogenic 3He has been detected for the first time in a terrestrial sample (Kurz, 1986). 3He is now a widely used geochemical tool in many fields of Earth sciences: volcanology, tectonics, paleoclimatology. 3He has the advantage to have a high "production rate" to "detection limit" ratio, allowing surfaces as young as hundred of years to be dated. Although its nuclear stability implies several limitations, it moreover represents a useful alternative to 10Be in mafic environments. This contribution is a review of the progresses that have been accomplished since this discovery, and discuss strategies to improve both the accuracy and the precision of this geochronometer. 1) Measurement of cosmogenic 3He Correction of magmatic 3He. To estimate the non-cosmogenic magmatic 3He, Kurz (1986) invented a two steps method involving crushing of phenocrysts (to analyze the isotopic ratio of the magmatic component), followed by a subsequent melting of the sample, to extract the remaining components, including the cosmogenic 3He: 3Hec = 3Hemelt -4Hemelt x (3He/4He)magmatic (1) Several studies suggested that the preliminary crushing may induce a loss of cosmogenic 3He (Hilton et al., 1993; Yokochi et al., 2005; Blard et al., 2006), implying an underestimate of the cosmogenic 3He measurement. However, subsequent work did not replicate these observations (Blard et al., 2008; Goerhing et al., 2010), suggesting an influence of the used apparatus. An isochron method (by directly melting several phenocrysts aliquots) is an alternative to avoid the preliminary crushing step (Blard and Pik, 2008). Atmospheric contamination. Protin et al. (in press) provides robust evidences for a large and irreversible contamination of atmospheric helium on silicate surfaces. This unexpected behavior may reconcile the contrasted observations about the amplitude of crushing loss. This undesirable atmospheric contamination is negligible if grain fractions smaller than 150 mm are

  15. Using Multiple Cosmogenic Nuclides to Investigate Ice Elevation Changes in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Shasta; Hein, Andy; Sugden, David; Woodward, John; Dunning, Stuart; Freeman, Stewart; Shanks, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Well-dated geologic data points provide important indicators that can be used for the reconstruction of ice sheet dynamics and as constraints in ice sheet models predicting future change. Cosmogenic nuclides, which accumulate in rocks exposed at the earth's surface, can be used to directly date the exposure age of the rock surfaces that have been created through glacial erosion or deposition. The technique requires a detailed understanding of the local geomorphology as well as awareness of the post-depositional processes that may affect the interpretation of exposure ages. Surface exposure ages (10Be, 26Al, 21Ne, and 36Cl) from local limestone bedrock and other glacially deposited exotic lithologies provide a history spanning from 0 to more than 1 million years in the Patriot, Independence, and Marble Hills in the southern Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. Using the new surface exposure ages combined with geomorphological mapping, we will discuss the implications for the glacial history of the southern Ellsworth Mountains.

  16. Ice Elevation Changes in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica Using Multiple Cosmogenic Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, S.; Hein, A.; Sugden, D.; Woodward, J.; Dunning, S.; Reid, K.

    2014-12-01

    Well-dated geologic data points provide important indicators that can be used for the reconstruction of ice sheet dynamics and as constraints in ice sheet models predicting future change. Cosmogenic nuclides, which accumulate in rocks exposed at the earth's surface, can be used to directly date the exposure age of the rock surfaces that have been created through glacial erosion or deposition. The technique requires a detailed understanding of the local geomorphology as well as awareness of the post-depositional processes that may affect the interpretation of exposure ages. Initial surface exposure ages (10Be, 26Al, 21Ne, and 36Cl ) from local limestone bedrock and other glacially deposited exotic lithologies provide a history spanning from 0 to 1.1 Ma in the Patriot, Independence, and Marble Hills in the southern Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. Using the new surface exposure ages combined with geomorphological mapping, we will discuss the implications for the glacial history of the southern Ellsworth Mountains.

  17. 10Be in marine sediments: applications in geophysics and palaeo-oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henken-Mellies, W.U.

    1990-01-01

    Two problems are investigated in this study: 1. Cosmogenic isotopes (such as 10 Be) are produced by nuclear reactions of cosmic rays with atoms of the earth's atmosphere and uppermost lithosphere. Due to the shielding effect of the earth's magnetic field against cosmic rays the production of cosmogenic nuclides is inversely related to the geomagnetic field intensity. During geomagnetic reversals, when the field intensity is strongly reduced, the production of cosmogenic isotopes should increase. There is no unambiguous evidence yet, whether this increase is reflected in higher concentrations of 10 Be at reversal horizons in deep sea sediments. This relationship is analysed in detail across four magnetic reversals. 2. The influence of climatic and paleographic factors on the distribution of 10 Be in the ocean is as yet only poorly known. 10 Be profiles in deep sea sediments spanning several climatic cycles are used to evaluate the influence of the Quaternary climatic cycles on the distribution of 10 Be in oceanic sediments. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. Timing of Expansions of the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru, and Implications for Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rate Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, T. V.; Kelly, M. A.; Applegate, P. J.; Smith, C. A.; Phillips, F. M.; Hudson, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    We calibrate the production rate of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 (10Be) at a low-latitude, high-elevation site, using nuclide concentrations measured in moraine boulders and an independent chronology determined with bracketing radiocarbon dates. The measurement of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) concentrations in earth surface materials has been an important development for understanding a host of earth surface processes. Uncertainty in cosmogenic nuclide production rates has hampered application of this method. Here, we contribute to the estimation of 10Be production rates by reporting both preliminary 10Be concentrations and independent radiocarbon dates from a low latitude, high elevation site. Our study site in the southeastern Peruvian Andes (~13.9°S, 70.9°W, 4850 m asl) is centered on a moraine set, known as the Huancané II moraines, that represents a ~4 km expansion of Quelccaya Ice Cap during late glacial time. At this location, organic material situated both stratigraphically below and above moraines in two adjacent valleys provide material for radiocarbon dating. Based on geomorphic arguments, we correlate results from the two valleys. The timing of ice cap margin advance is bracketed by 13 radiocarbon ages on organic material within the outermost Huancané II moraines that range from 13.6 to 12.5 ka. Two stratigraphic sections upvalley from the moraines yield 6 radiocarbon ages from 11.3 to 12.4 ka, indicating the time of retreat . We computed the probability density function that lies between these two sets of dates, and assign an age of 12.4 ka (+/-???) for the formation of the Huancané II moraines. Calculating beryllium-10 exposure dates from the measured concentrations yield exposure dates that significantly underestimate the independently determined age of the moraine (~8-30%), if existing production rate estimates are used. We suggest that the radiocarbon age for the moraines can be used as a robust independent calibration for 10Be

  19. PRODUCTION AND RECOIL LOSS OF COSMOGENIC NUCLIDES IN PRESOLAR GRAINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3 He, 6,7 Li, and 21,22 Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3 He and 21 Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2 σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  20. Estimating cumulative soil accumulation rates with in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclide depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical model relating spatially averaged rates of cumulative soil accumulation and hillslope erosion to cosmogenic nuclide distribution in depth profiles is presented. Model predictions are compared with cosmogenic 21 Ne and AMS radiocarbon data from soils of the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico. Rates of soil accumulation and hillslope erosion estimated by cosmogenic 21 Ne are significantly lower than rates indicated by radiocarbon and regional soil-geomorphic studies. The low apparent cosmogenic erosion rates are artifacts of high nuclide inheritance in cumulative soil parent material produced from erosion of old soils on hillslopes. In addition, 21 Ne profiles produced under conditions of rapid accumulation (>0.1 cm/a) are difficult to distinguish from bioturbated soil profiles. Modeling indicates that while 10 Be profiles will share this problem, both bioturbation and anomalous inheritance can be identified with measurement of in situ-produced 14 C

  1. Cosmogenic nuclide production within the atmosphere and long period comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Andrew C.

    The Earth is constantly bombarded by cosmic rays. These high energy particles collide with target nuclei, producing a shower of secondary particles. These secondaries contribute significantly to the radiation background at sea level and in the atmosphere, as well as producing rare cosmogenic nuclides. This contribution is variable over long time scales as astrophysical events change the cosmic ray flux incident on the Earth. Our work re-examines a previously proposed climate effect of increased cosmic ray flux due to galactic location. Although our work does not support this effect, cosmic ray secondaries remain a threat to terrestrial biota. We calculate the cosmogenic neutron flux within the atmosphere as a function of primary spectrum. This work is pivotal in determining the radiation dose due to any arbitrary astrophysical event where the primary spectrum is known. Additionally, this work can be used to determine the cosmogenic nuclide production from such an event. These neutrons are the fundamental source of cosmogenic nuclides within our atmosphere and extraterrestrial matter. We explore the idea that excursions in 14C and 10Be abundances in the atmosphere may arise from direct deposition by long-period comet impacts, and those in 26Al from any bolide. We find that the amount of nuclide mass on large long-period comets entering the Earth's atmosphere may be sufficient for creating anomalies in the records of 14C and 10Be from past impacts. In particular, the estimated mass of the proposed Younger Dryas comet is consistent with its having deposited sufficient isotopes to account for recorded nuclide increases at that time. The 26Al/10Be ratio is much larger in extraterrestrial objects than in the atmosphere, and so, we note that measuring this ratio in ice cores is a suitable further test for the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis. This portion of our work may be used to find possible impact events in the geologic record as well as determination of a large

  2. Interlaboratory comparison of {sup 10}Be concentrations in two ice cores from Central West Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, Thomas E., E-mail: woodruft@purdue.edu [PRIME Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Welten, Kees C. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Caffee, Marc W. [PRIME Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Nishiizumi, Kunihiko [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    To improve sample processing efficiency for cosmogenic radionuclide measurements in samples from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide core, two chemical lines, one at Purdue University and one at University of California, Berkeley, are being used. Sections from two shallow ice cores from West Antarctica were processed at each lab, while all {sup 10}Be accelerator mass spectrometry measurements were performed at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Duplicate samples gave {sup 10}Be results that are identical to within the AMS measurement uncertainties of 2-3%.

  3. Numerical dating of a Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex at the northern end of Silver Lake playa, Mojave Desert, California: A comparison of the applicability of radiocarbon, luminescence, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide, electron spin resonance, U-series and amino acid racemization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, L.A.; Bright, Jordon; Finkel, R.C.; Jaiswal, M.K.; Kaufman, D.S.; Mahan, S.; Radtke, U.; Schneider, J.S.; Sharp, W.; Singhvi, A.K.; Warren, C.N.

    2007-01-01

    A Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex on the northern shore of Pleistocene Lake Mojave of southeastern California, USA was studied with the goal of comparing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon, luminescence, electron spin resonance (ESR), terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide (TCN) surface exposure, amino acid racemization (AAR) and U-series dating methods. The pattern of ages obtained by the different methods illustrates the complexity of processes acting in the lakeshore environment and highlights the utility of a multi-method approach. TCN surface exposure ages (mostly ???20-30 ka) record the initial erosion of shoreline benches, whereas radiocarbon ages on shells (determined in this and previous studies) within the spit, supported by AAR data, record its construction at fluctuating lake levels from ???16 to 10 ka. Luminescence ages on spit sediment (???6-7 ka) and ESR ages on spit shells (???4 ka) are anomalously young relative to radiocarbon ages of shells within the same deposits. The significance of the surprisingly young luminescence ages is not clear. The younger ESR ages could be a consequence of post-mortem enrichment of U in the shells. High concentrations of detrital thorium in tufa coating spit gravels inhibited the use of single-sample U-series dating. Detailed comparisons such as this provide one of the few means of assessing the accuracy of Quaternary dating techniques. More such comparisons are needed. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  4. Reconciling radiocarbon and ice core timescales over the Holocene - Cosmogenic radionuclides as synchronization tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, R.; Adolphi, F.; Mekhaldi, F.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 14C and 10Be, vary globally due to external processes, namely the solar and geomagnetic modulation of the galactic cosmic ray flux as well as solar proton events. This signature is recorded in various archives such as ice cores (10Be) and tree-rings (14C). Hence, cosmogenic radionuclides offer a means to continuously assess timescale differences between two of the most widely used timescales in paleoclimatology - the radiocarbon and the ice core timescales. Short lived solar proton events additionally provide distinct marker horizons that allow synchronization of discrete horizons at annual precision. We will present a cosmogenic radionuclide based synchronization of the Greenland ice core timescale (GICC05, Svensson et al., 2008) and the radiocarbon timescale (IntCal13, Reimer et al., 2013) over the Holocene. This synchronization allows radiocarbon dated and ice core paleoclimate records to be compared on a common timescale at down to sub-decadal precision. We will compare these results to independent discrete isochrones obtained from tephrochronology and solar proton events. In addition, we will discuss implications for the accuracy and uncertainty estimates of GICC05 over the Holocene. Reimer, P. J., Bard, E., Bayliss, A., Beck, J. W., Blackwell, P. G., Bronk Ramsey, C., Buck, C. E., Cheng, H., Edwards, R. L., Friedrich, M., Grootes, P. M., Guilderson, T. P., Haflidason, H., Hajdas, I., Hatté, C., Heaton, T. J., Hoffmann, D. L., Hogg, A. G., Hughen, K. A., Kaiser, K. F., Kromer, B., Manning, S. W., Niu, M., Reimer, R. W., Richards, D. A., Scott, E. M., Southon, J. R., Staff, R. A., Turney, C. S. M., and van der Plicht, J.: IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0-50,000 Years cal BP, Radiocarbon, 55, 1869-1887, 10.2458/azu_js_rc.55.16947, 2013. Svensson, A., Andersen, K. K., Bigler, M., Clausen, H. B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Davies, S. M., Johnsen, S. J., Muscheler, R., Parrenin

  5. 10Be in desert sands, falling dust and loess in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.D.; Beer, J.; Kubik, P.W.; Sun, W.D.; Liu, T.S.; Liu, K.X.

    2010-01-01

    Cosmogenic 10 Be is produced in the atmosphere, and deposits onto the surface of the earth mainly through wet precipitation and dust. Based on the analysis of 10 Be in Chinese loess, we believe that 10 Be in loess is composed of two components: locally precipitated atmospheric 10 Be, and windblown 10 Be adsorbed on the surface of silt grains. On the Loess Plateau, 10 Be concentrations in loess and paleosol range from (1.4 to 2.8) x 10 8 atoms/g and (2.7 to 4.5) x 10 8 atoms/g, respectively. To investigate the sources of 10 Be in loess, we measured 10 Be in sand grains from deserts in western China and falling dust from the deposition regions. The results show that the 10 Be concentrations in sand and dust are (1.1-5.1) x 10 7 atoms/g and (1.3-2.8) x 10 8 atoms/g, respectively. Loess and paleosol on the Loess Plateau both contain inherited 10 Be adsorbed on silt grains from dust; most of the windblown deposited loess materials do not directly come from the Gobi and other sand deserts, but mainly from the loess-desert transitional zones, which are characterized by silt and dust holding areas.

  6. Influence of solar activity and environment on 10Be in recent natural archives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggren, Ann-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the link between the Sun and climate is vital in the current incidence of global climate change, and 10 Be in natural archives constitutes an excellent tracer for this purpose. As cosmic rays enter the atmosphere, cosmogenic isotopes like 10 Be and 14 C are formed. Variations in solar activity modulate the amount of incoming cosmic rays, and thereby cosmogenic isotope production. Atmospherically produced 10 Be enters natural archives such as sediments and glaciers by wet and dry deposition within about a year of production. 10 Be from natural archives therefore provides information on past solar activity, and because these archives also contain climate information, solar activity and climate can be linked. One remaining question is to what degree 10 Be in natural archives reflects production, and to what extent the local and regional environment overprints the production signal. To explore this, 10 Be was measured at annual resolution over the last 600 years in a Greenland ice core. Measurement potentials for these samples benefited from the development of a new laboratory method of co-precipitating 10 Be with niobium. To diversify geographic location and archive media type, a pioneer study of measuring 10 Be with annual resolution in varved lake sediments from Finland was conducted, with samples from the entire 20th century. Pathways of 10 Be into lake sediments are more complex than into glacial ice, inferring that contemporary atmospheric conditions may not be recorded. Here, it is shown for the first time that tracing the 11-year solar cycle through lake sediment 10 Be variations is possible. Results also show that on an annual basis, 10 Be deposition in ice and sediment archives is affected by local environmental conditions. On a slightly longer timescale, however, diverse 10 Be records exhibit similar trends and a negative correlation with solar activity. Cyclic variability of 10 Be deposition persisted throughout past grand solar minima, when

  7. History of Alibek Glacier based on Earth remote sensing images, bioindication and cosmogenic isopotes (14С and 10Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Bushueva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the reconstruction of fluctuations of Alibek valley glacier situated in the Teberda valley, Western Caucasus. The former positions of glacier of the past 120 years were reconstructed basing on the old photographs of 1904, 1921, remote sensing data of 1955, 1987, 2007, 2008 and 2012, plans created in 20th century. Since the middle of 20th century Alibek Glacier decreased by 650 m in length and by 0,67 km2 in area and its tongue has risen by 110 m.

  8. Landscape preservation under ice? In-situ 10Be and 26Al from summit surfaces along Sognefjord, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    then be used to determine the total Quaternary bedrock erosion between the summits. However, the amount of Quaternary erosion of these summit flats remains debated (e.g. Steer, 2012) Here, we present an extensive new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from high...... and flat summits along a 200 km long transect from the coast to the inner parts of Sognefjorden. Our results indicate substantial glacial modification of the summits within the last 50 ka. Close to the coast, at an elevation of around 700 meters, the cosmogenic nuclide signal was reset around the Younger...... et al. Landscape preservation under Fennoscandian ice sheets determined from in situ produced 10 Be and 26 Al. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 201(2), 397-406, 2002. Gjermundsen et al. Minimal erosion of Arctic alpine topography during late Quaternary glaciation. Nature Geoscience 8(10), 789...

  9. New approaches investigating production rates of in-situ produced terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); FZD, Dresden (Germany); Braucher, Regis; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourles, Didier [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2010-07-01

    In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides have proved to be valuable tools for environmental and Earth sciences. However, accurate application of this method is only possible, if terrestrial production rates in a certain environment over a certain time period and their depth-dependence within the exposed material are exactly known. Unfortunately, the existing data and models differ up to several tens of percent. Thus, one of the European project CRONUS-EU goals is the high quality calibration of the {sup 36}Cl production rate by spallation at independently dated surfaces. As part of fulfilling this task we have investigated calcite-rich samples from four medieval landslide areas in the Alps: Mont Granier, Le Claps, Dobratsch, and Veliki Vrh (330-1620 m, 1248-1442 AD). For investigating the depth-dependence of the different nuclear reactions, especially, the muon- and thermal neutron-induced contributions, we have analysed mixtures of carbonates and siliceous conglomerate samples - for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl - exposed at different shielding depths and taken from a core drilled in 2005 at La Ciotat, France (from surface to 11 m shielding). AMS of {sup 36}Cl was performed at LLNL and ETH, {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al at ASTER.

  10. Age evaluation and causation of rock-slope failures along the western margin of the Antrim Lava Group (ALG), Northern Ireland, based on cosmogenic isotope (36Cl) surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, David W.; Wilson, Peter; Dunlop, Paul; Schnabel, Christoph; Rodés, Ángel; Gulliver, Pauline; Xu, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    The temporal pattern of postglacial rock-slope failure in a glaciated upland area of Ireland (the western margin of the Antrim Lava Group) was evaluated using both 36Cl exposure dating of surface boulders on run-out debris and 14C dating of basal organic soils from depressions on the debris. The majority of the 36Cl ages ( 21-15 ka) indicate that major failures occurred during or immediately following local deglaciation ( 18-17 ka). Other ages ( 14-9 ka) suggest some later, smaller-scale failures during the Lateglacial and/or early Holocene. The 14C ages (2.36-0.15 cal ka BP) indicate the very late onset of organic accumulation and do not provide close limiting age constraints. Rock-slope failure during or immediately following local deglaciation was probably in response to some combination of glacial debuttressing, slope steepening and paraglacial stress release. Later failures may have been triggered by seismic activity associated with glacio-isostatic crustal uplift and/or permafrost degradation consequent upon climate change. The 36Cl ages support the findings of previous studies that show the deglacial - Lateglacial period in northwest Ireland and Scotland to have been one of enhanced rock-slope failure. Table S2 Concentrations of main elements (as oxides) etc.

  11. Holocene glacial history of the west Greenland Ice Sheet inferred from cosmogenic exposure ages and threshold lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Kjaer, K. H.; Colding, Sune Oluf

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use a combination of 10Be exposure ages and threshold lakes to constrain the ice sheet history in Godthåbs- and Buksefjorden, west Greenland (63-64°N) during the Holocene. The 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages have been used to quantify both the ice retreat and thinning of the west...

  12. On scaling cosmogenic nuclide production rates for altitude and latitude using cosmic-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desilets, Darin; Zreda, Marek

    2001-11-01

    The wide use of cosmogenic nuclides for dating terrestrial landforms has prompted a renewed interest in characterizing the spatial distribution of terrestrial cosmic rays. Cosmic-ray measurements from neutron monitors, nuclear emulsions and cloud chambers have played an important role in developing new models for scaling cosmic-ray neutron intensities and, indirectly, cosmogenic production rates. Unfortunately, current scaling models overlook or misinterpret many of these data. In this paper, we describe factors that must be considered when using neutron measurements to determine scaling formulations for production rates of cosmogenic nuclides. Over the past 50 years, the overwhelming majority of nucleon flux measurements have been taken with neutron monitors. However, in order to use these data for scaling spallation reactions, the following factors must be considered: (1) sensitivity of instruments to muons and to background, (2) instrumental biases in energy sensitivity, (3) solar activity, and (4) the way of ordering cosmic-ray data in the geomagnetic field. Failure to account for these factors can result in discrepancies of as much as 7% in neutron attenuation lengths measured at the same location. This magnitude of deviation can result in an error on the order of 20% in cosmogenic production rates scaled from 4300 m to sea level. The shapes of latitude curves of nucleon flux also depend on these factors to a measurable extent, thereby causing additional uncertainties in cosmogenic production rates. The corrections proposed herein significantly improve our ability to transfer scaling formulations based on neutron measurements to scaling formulations applicable to spallation reactions, and, therefore, constitute an important advance in cosmogenic dating methodology.

  13. Cosmogenic radionuclides. Theory and applications in the terrestrial and space environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, Juerg; Steiger, Rudolf von; McCracken, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. The book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any field of modern science, and how these tools may assist in the solution of many present and future problems that we face here on Earth. The book provides a comprehensive discussion of the basic principles behind the applications of cosmogenic (and other) radionuclides as environmental tracers and dating tools. The second section of the book discusses in some detail the production of radionuclides by cosmic radiation, their transport and distribution in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, their storage in natural archives, and how they are measured. The third section of the book presents a number of examples selected to illustrate typical tracer and dating applications in a number of different spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere, solar physics and astronomy). At the same time the authors have outlined the limitations of the use of cosmogenic radionuclides. Written on a level understandable by graduate students without specialist skills in physics or mathematics, the book addresses a wide audience, ranging from archaeology, biophysics, and geophysics, to atmospheric physics, hydrology, astrophysics and space science.

  14. Cosmogenic radionuclides. Theory and applications in the terrestrial and space environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Juerg [Eidgenoessische Anstalt fuer Wasserversorgung, Abwasserreinigung und Gewaesserschutz, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Steiger, Rudolf von [International Space Science Insitute, Bern (Switzerland); McCracken, Ken [Maryland Univ., College Park (United States). IPST

    2012-07-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. The book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any field of modern science, and how these tools may assist in the solution of many present and future problems that we face here on Earth. The book provides a comprehensive discussion of the basic principles behind the applications of cosmogenic (and other) radionuclides as environmental tracers and dating tools. The second section of the book discusses in some detail the production of radionuclides by cosmic radiation, their transport and distribution in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, their storage in natural archives, and how they are measured. The third section of the book presents a number of examples selected to illustrate typical tracer and dating applications in a number of different spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere, solar physics and astronomy). At the same time the authors have outlined the limitations of the use of cosmogenic radionuclides. Written on a level understandable by graduate students without specialist skills in physics or mathematics, the book addresses a wide audience, ranging from archaeology, biophysics, and geophysics, to atmospheric physics, hydrology, astrophysics and space science.

  15. Cosmogenic radioberyllium and background radiation dose to the general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeschl, M.; Ohera, M.

    2008-01-01

    To discover the causes of the presence of abnormal Be concentrations (anthropogenic or natural or cosmogenic source) in the area of the Kralicky Sneznik mountain massive (in the northeast of the Czech Republic, altitude of about 800 m), concentrations of 7 Be and 10 Be were also assayed in selected environmental components in the years of 2005 - 2007. The 10 Be concentrations in soils (80.39x10 6 - 210.45x10 6 atom g -1 ) and activity concentrations of 7 Be in soils and wet deposition were very low (1.3 - 5.3 Bq kg -1 and 0.6 - 4.5 Bq l -1 , resp.). However, activities of 7 Be in birch leaves and grass (dry matter) reached relatively high values (up to 1000 Bq kg -1 ) and, in addition, showed out their significant seasonal growth. In the work the probable contribution of the cosmogenic 7 Be activities to background radiation dose to the general public is discussed. (authors)

  16. Recent progress of {sup 10}Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weijian, E-mail: weijian@loess.llqg.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061 (China); Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Application, Xi’an AMS Center, Xi' an 710061 (China); Joint Center for Global Change Studies, Beijing 100875 (China); Xie, Xingjun [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061 (China); Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Application, Xi’an AMS Center, Xi' an 710061 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Beck, Warren [NSF-Arizona AMS Facility, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061 (China); Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Application, Xi’an AMS Center, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Studies of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of {sup 10}Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make {sup 10}Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as {sup 10}Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes {sup 10}Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of {sup 10}Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes–Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 ± 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using {sup 10}Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  17. Measurement of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Arnold, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Meteorites are rocks and pieces of iron-nickel alloy which fall to earth from time to time. They were formed about 4.6 billion years ago when our solar system was started. Thus it has been said that meteorites are the Rosetta stones of our solar system. We use the long-lived radioactive nuclides produced by cosmic ray bombardment, to study the history of the meteorites and also the history of the cosmic rays. When we have these historical facts in our hads, we hope we will be able to understand better how the solar system works, and how it got started. We can also learn more about the nature and origin of the cosmic rays. The accelerator mass spectrometry method helps not only reduce sample size, in most cases by two or three orders of magnitude, but opens another set of cosmogenic nuclides which have not been measured yet. Already 10 Be (t/sub 1/2 = 1.6 x 10 6 y), 36 Cl (3.0 x 10 5 y) and 129 I (1.6 x 10 7 y) in meteorites have been measured by accelerator mass spectrometry [3, 4, 7, 10]. Possible new candidates for measurement in extraterrestrial materials are 26 Al (7.2 x 10 5 y), 41 Ca (1.3 x 10 5 y), 60 Fe (approx. 10 5 y) and 59 Ni (7.6 x 10 4 y). We hope also to measure 146 Sm (1.0 x 10 8 y) and 92 Nb

  18. Study of stratosphere-troposphere exchange via 10Be/7Be isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priller, A.; Berger, M.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Steier, P.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wild, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The present study is part of the European project STACCATO (influence of stratosphere-troposphere exchange in a changing climate on atmospheric transport and oxidation capacity). Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) is one of the key factors controlling the budgets of ozone, water vapor and other substances in both the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. However, its contribution to their ozone budget relative to photo-chemical ozone formation from natural and anthropogenic precursor emissions is still uncertain. An international effort is made to estimate the strength of STE and its impact on tropospheric chemistry. The two cosmogenic radioisotopes of beryllium, 10 Be and 7 Be have very different half-lives of 1.51 Ma and 53.4 d, respectively. The combination of production rates, half-lives and different residence times in the stratosphere and troposphere, respectively, results in 10 Be/ 7 Be isotope ratios which can be used as fingerprints for STE. This ratio helps to give a much improved estimate of STE. However, only few 10 Be measurements exist, because its detection requires the rather elaborate method of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). At the AMS facility VERA we are now measuring the 10 Be content of air filters from the high-alpine stations 'Hoher Sonnblick', Austria, and 'Zugspitze', Germany. The TBe content is measured separately by decay counting. In this presentation, we want to describe the method of measuring 10 Be with AMS, and to discuss the results of first 10 Be/ 7 Be ratios. (author)

  19. Identification and synchronization of the common cosmic-ray signal in the IntCal13 14C calibration and the Greenland ice-core 10Be records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Rasmussen, Sune; Hughen, Konrad; Cooper, Alan; Turney, Chris

    2017-04-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides (such as 10Be and 14C) are modulated by the solar and geomagnetic shielding of galactic cosmic rays. In addition, 14C and 10Be are influenced by the carbon cycle and the atmospheric transport and deposition, respectively. Isolating and identifying the common production signal allows us to synchronize ice core 10Be and tree ring 14C records during the Holocene (Adolphi and Muscheler, 2016), thereby connecting ice core climate records with 14C-dated records. Extending this comparison further back in time is challenging due to deteriorating quality of the 14C calibration record, IntCal13, (Reimer et al., 2013) and possible unidentified climate influences on the ice-core 10Be records. Nevertheless, by focusing on the most prominent production-rate features this comparison can be extended far back into the last glacial where, for example, the linkage of tree-ring based Kauri 14C data and the Greenland ice-core time scale (GICC05) suggested unresolved data and/or time scale differences around the period of the Laschamp geomagnetic field minimum at about 42000 yrs BP (Muscheler et al., 2014). Here we show that the data underlying the IntCal13 14C record and the ice-core 10Be records exhibit common variability that allows us to tentatively link the ice core GICC05 time scale to the radiocarbon time scale for almost the complete radiocarbon dating range. The observed time scale differences could be related to uncertainties in both the U/Th-based dating of the IntCal13 calibration data set and the GICC05 time scale, and we show that the two can be reconciled within the uncertainties of the ice-core layer counting. This direct comparison between IntCal13 and 10Be also suggests that the 14C differences shown in (Muscheler et al., 2014) around the Laschamp geomagnetic field minimum can be reduced by moderate adjustments to the GICC05 time scale. References: Adolphi, F., and Muscheler, R., 2016, Synchronizing the Greenland ice

  20. Rates of surface lowering and landscape development in southern South Africa: a cosmogenic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Janet; Vanacker, Veerle; Lang, Andreas; Hodgson, David

    2016-04-01

    The landscape of southern South Africa is characterised by large-scale erosion surfaces, including extensive pediments and multiple strath terraces, which document discordant river evolution through resistant quarzitic lithologies of the Cape Fold Belt (CFB). The timing and rate of erosion is poorly constrained. New cosmogenic ages from surfaces in South Africa are presented using in situ produced 10Be. Strath terraces in deeply incised rivers at two sites within the CFB indicate slow rates of erosion (1.54 - 11.79 m/Ma), which are some of the lowest rates recorded globally. Four pediment surfaces and a depth profile of the thickest pediment were also dated, and the results indicate that there are low rates of surface lowering on the pediments (0.44 - 1.24 m/Ma). The pediments are long-lived features (minimum exposure ages of 0.47 - 1.09 Ma), and are now deeply dissected. Given the minimum exposure ages, calculated river incision rates (42- 203 m/Ma) suggest that after a long period of geomorphic stability during pediment formation there was a discrete phase of increased geomorphic activity. The calculated minimum exposure ages are considered dubious because: 1) known rates of surrounding river incision (published and ours); 2) the climate conditions and time necessary for ferricrete formation on the pediment surfaces and; 3) the deeply incised catchments in the CFB on which the pediments sit, which all point to the pediments being much older. The pediments are fossilised remnants of a much larger geomorphic surface that formed after the main phase of exhumation in southern Africa. They form a store of sediment that currently sit above the surrounding rivers that have some of the lowest erosion rates in the world. These results indicate that steep topography can prevail even in areas of low erosion and tectonic quiescence, and that whilst cosmogenic dating of landscapes is an exciting development in earth sciences, care is needed especially in ancient settings. We

  1. A proposal of comparative Maunder minimum cosmogenic isotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attolini, M.R.; Nanni, T.; Galli, M.; Povinec, P.

    1989-01-01

    There are at present contraddictory conclusions about solar activity and cosmogenic isotope production variation during Maunder Minimum. The interaction of solar wind with galactic cosmic rays, the dynamic behaviour of the Sun either as a system having an internal clock, and/or as a forced non linear system, are important aspects that can shed new light on solar physics, the Earth-Sun relationship and the climatic variation. An essential progress in the matter might be made by clarifying the cosmogenic isotope production during the mentioned interval. As it seems that during Maunder Minimum the Be10 production oscillates of about a factor of two, the authors have also to expect short scale enhanced variations in tree rings radiocarbon concentrations for the same interval. It is therefore highly desirable that for the same interval, that the authors would identify with 1640-1720 AD, detailed concentration measurements both of Be10 (in dated polar ice in addition to those of Beer et al.) and of tree ring radiocarbon, be made with cross-checking, in samples of different latitudes, longitudes and within short and large distance of the sea. The samples could be taken, as for example in samples from the central Mediterranean region, in the Baltic region and in other sites from central Europe and Asia

  2. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Bunburra Rockhole Achondrite Fall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Welten, K.C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Meier, M.M.M.; Bland, P.A.; Spurný, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, Supplement (2009), A216-A216 ISSN 1086-9379. [Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society /72./. Nancy, 13.06.2009-18.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Bunburra Rockhole * cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.253, year: 2009

  3. Cosmogenic nuclides principles, concepts and applications in the earth surface sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Dunai, Tibor J

    2010-01-01

    This is the first book to provide a comprehensive and state-of-the-art introduction to the novel and fast-evolving topic of in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides. It presents an accessible introduction to the theoretical foundations, with explanations of relevant concepts starting at a basic level and building in sophistication. It incorporates, and draws on, methodological discussions and advances achieved within the international CRONUS (Cosmic-Ray Produced Nuclide Systematics) networks. Practical aspects such as sampling, analytical methods and data-interpretation are discussed in detail and an essential sampling checklist is provided. The full range of cosmogenic isotopes is covered and a wide spectrum of in-situ applications are described and illustrated with specific and generic examples of exposure dating, burial dating, erosion and uplift rates and process model verification. Graduate students and experienced practitioners will find this book a vital source of information on the background concepts and...

  4. Glacial erosion of high-elevation low-relief summits on passive continental margins constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    We present a new, extensive in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al dataset from high-elevation low-relief summits along Sognefjorden in Norway. Contrary to previous studies of high-elevation low-relief summits in cold regions, we find only limited cosmogenic nuclide inheritance in bedrock surfaces......, indicating that warm-based ice eroded the summits during the last glacial period. From the isotope concentrations we model denudation histories using a recently developed Monte Carlo Markov Chain inversion model (Knudsen et al, 2015). The model relies on the benthic d18O curve (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005...

  5. Cosmogenic 3He in detrital gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Finlay; Yakubovich, Olga; Caracedo, Ana; Nesterenok, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Since the measurement of cosmogenic He in an alluvial diamond by McConville and Reynolds (1996) the application of cosmogenic noble gases to individual detrital grains to quantify surface processes has not been vigorously pursued. The likely low rate of diffusion of cosmogenic He in native metals, and their resistance to weathering and disintegration during erosion and transport, makes them a potential record of long-term Earth surface processes. In an effort to assess the extent that detrital refractory metals record the exposure history during transport and storage we have undertaken a reconnaissance study of the He isotope composition in 18 grains (2-200 mg) of native gold, copper, silver, and PtPd, Pt3Fe and OsIr alloys from alluvial placer deposits from around the world. 4He is dominantly the result of U and Th decay within the grains, or decay of 190Pt in the Pt-rich alloys. 3He is measurable in 13 grains, concentrations range up to 2.7E+6 atoms/g. 3He/4He are always in excess of the crustal radiogenic ratio, up to 306 Ra. Although nucleogenic 3He produced by (n,α) reactions on 6Li, and 3He from trapped hydrothermal fluids, are present, the majority of the 3He is cosmogenic in origin. Using newly calculated cosmogenic 3He production rates in heavy metals, and a determination of the effect of implantation based on the stopping distances of spallogenic 3He and 3H, the grains have 3Hecos concentrations that are equivalent to 0.35 to 1.5 Ma exposure at Earth's surface. In a study of detrital gold grains from several sites in Scotland we have found that 10 % have 3He concentrations that are significantly in excess of that generated since the Last Glacial Maximum. These studies demonstrate that, with refinement, cosmogenic 3He in refractory detrital minerals can be used to quantify sediment transport and storage on the 1-10 Ma timescale. P. McConville & J.H. Reynolds (1989). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 2365-75.

  6. An introduction to in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, K.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides are produced through interactions between cosmic rays and target nuclei in Earth's atmosphere and surface materials. Those which are produced in Earth's atmosphere are termed 'meteoric' while the nuclides produced in surface material are known as in-situ cosmogenic nuclides. The past two decades have seen a proliferation of applications for cosmogenic nuclides. This is primarily due to a revolution in accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS, measurement techniques which has allowed the measurement of very small amounts of nuclides. The following is a brief introduction to the theory and application of in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclide methods. (author). 17 refs., figs., 1 tab.

  7. Tracking the 10Be-26Al source-area signal in sediment-routing systems of arid central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Fujioka, Toshiyuki; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David; Fülöp, Réka-Hajnalka; Wilcken, Klaus M.; Price, David M.; Kotevski, Steven; Fifield, L. Keith; Chappell, John

    2018-05-01

    Sediment-routing systems continuously transfer information and mass from eroding source areas to depositional sinks. Understanding how these systems alter environmental signals is critical when it comes to inferring source-area properties from the sedimentary record. We measure cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al along three large sediment-routing systems ( ˜ 100 000 km2) in central Australia with the aim of tracking downstream variations in 10Be-26Al inventories and identifying the factors responsible for these variations. By comparing 56 new cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al measurements in stream sediments with matching data (n = 55) from source areas, we show that 10Be-26Al inventories in hillslope bedrock and soils set the benchmark for relative downstream modifications. Lithology is the primary determinant of erosion-rate variations in source areas and despite sediment mixing over hundreds of kilometres downstream, a distinct lithological signal is retained. Post-orogenic ranges yield catchment erosion rates of ˜ 6-11 m Myr-1 and silcrete-dominant areas erode as slow as ˜ 0.2 m Myr-1. 10Be-26Al inventories in stream sediments indicate that cumulative-burial terms increase downstream to mostly ˜ 400-800 kyr and up to ˜ 1.1 Myr. The magnitude of the burial signal correlates with increasing sediment cover downstream and reflects assimilation from storages with long exposure histories, such as alluvial fans, desert pavements, alluvial plains, and aeolian dunes. We propose that the tendency for large alluvial rivers to mask their 10Be-26Al source-area signal differs according to geomorphic setting. Signal preservation is favoured by (i) high sediment supply rates, (ii) high mean runoff, and (iii) a thick sedimentary basin pile. Conversely, signal masking prevails in landscapes of (i) low sediment supply and (ii) juxtaposition of sediment storages with notably different exposure histories.

  8. Atmospheric concentrations of 7Be, 10Be and 210Pb in northeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, T.; Tada, W.; T saito; Nagai, H.; Murayama, M.; Momoshima, N.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2005-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides 7 Be (T 1/2 = 53.3 d) and 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.5 X 10 6 y) are very useful tracer for the aerosols originated in the upper atmosphere, In the case of 10 Be in surface air, however, two components from upper troposphere and from re-suspended dust from soil are mixed. We try to divide these sources, in order to know an interpretation of aerosol drives. To try to separate the two different source of 10 Be, we use 210 Pb (T 1/2 = 22.3y), progeny of 222 Rn, as continental component. In this study, the distribution of these nuclides in aerosols collected in the Northwest pacific and adjacent seas by employing the research Vessels as cut off the re-suspended dusts from soil are reported. Since research expeditions are mostly short term, continuous observation is very difficult. So we observed at Tokyo and Hachijo-Island, remote island located 300 km south from Tokyo, in 2002-2004. Seasonal variations for 7 Be, 10 Be and 210 Pb concentration were similar pattern at Tokyo and Hachijo-Island. The concentrations were high in April and October to November and low in July to August. Although 210 Pb concentration showed the seasonal variation similar to 7 Be concentration, the average 210 Pb concentration of Tokyo showed the value high about 35% as compared with Hachijo-Island, while the average 7 Be concentration having been mostly in agreement at both points. For the distribution of these nuclide, 7 Be and 10 Be concentrations in ocean air showed strong latitude dependence but 210 Pb concentration depend on distance from continent.

  9. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  10. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  11. Measurements of 14C in ancient ice from Taylor Glacier, Antarctica constrain in situ cosmogenic 14CH4 and 14CO production rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Schaefer, Hinrich; Smith, Andrew M.; Kuhl, Tanner; Baggenstos, Daniel; Hua, Quan; Brook, Edward J.; Rose, Paul; Kulin, Robb; Bauska, Thomas; Harth, Christina; Buizert, Christo; Orsi, Anais; Emanuele, Guy; Lee, James E.; Brailsford, Gordon; Keeling, Ralph; Weiss, Ray F.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-14 (14C) is incorporated into glacial ice by trapping of atmospheric gases as well as direct near-surface in situ cosmogenic production. 14C of trapped methane (14CH4) is a powerful tracer for past CH4 emissions from ;old; carbon sources such as permafrost and marine CH4 clathrates. 14C in trapped carbon dioxide (14CO2) can be used for absolute dating of ice cores. In situ produced cosmogenic 14C in carbon monoxide (14CO) can potentially be used to reconstruct the past cosmic ray flux and past solar activity. Unfortunately, the trapped atmospheric and in situ cosmogenic components of 14C in glacial ice are difficult to disentangle and a thorough understanding of the in situ cosmogenic component is needed in order to extract useful information from ice core 14C. We analyzed very large (≈1000 kg) ice samples in the 2.26-19.53 m depth range from the ablation zone of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, to study in situ cosmogenic production of 14CH4 and 14CO. All sampled ice is >50 ka in age, allowing for the assumption that most of the measured 14C originates from recent in situ cosmogenic production as ancient ice is brought to the surface via ablation. Our results place the first constraints on cosmogenic 14CH4 production rates and improve on prior estimates of 14CO production rates in ice. We find a constant 14CH4/14CO production ratio (0.0076 ± 0.0003) for samples deeper than 3 m, which allows the use of 14CO for correcting the 14CH4 signals for the in situ cosmogenic component. Our results also provide the first unambiguous confirmation of 14C production by fast muons in a natural setting (ice or rock) and suggest that the 14C production rates in ice commonly used in the literature may be too high.

  12. WebCN: A web-based computation tool for in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Xiuzeng [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)]. E-mail: hongju@purdue.edu; Li Yingkui [Department of Geography, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Bourgeois, Mike [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Caffee, Marc [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Elmore, David [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Granger, Darryl [Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Muzikar, Paul [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Smith, Preston [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cosmogenic nuclide techniques are increasingly being utilized in geoscience research. For this it is critical to establish an effective, easily accessible and well defined tool for cosmogenic nuclide computations. We have been developing a web-based tool (WebCN) to calculate surface exposure ages and erosion rates based on the nuclide concentrations measured by the accelerator mass spectrometry. WebCN for {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al has been finished and published at http://www.physics.purdue.edu/primelab/for{sub u}sers/rockage.html. WebCN for {sup 36}Cl is under construction. WebCN is designed as a three-tier client/server model and uses the open source PostgreSQL for the database management and PHP for the interface design and calculations. On the client side, an internet browser and Microsoft Access are used as application interfaces to access the system. Open Database Connectivity is used to link PostgreSQL and Microsoft Access. WebCN accounts for both spatial and temporal distributions of the cosmic ray flux to calculate the production rates of in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides at the Earth's surface.

  13. New cosmogenic burial ages for Sterkfontein Member 2 Australopithecus and Member 5 Oldowan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Darryl E.; Gibbon, Ryan J.; Kuman, Kathleen; Clarke, Ronald J.; Bruxelles, Laurent; Caffee, Marc W.

    2015-06-01

    The cave infills at Sterkfontein contain one of the richest assemblages of Australopithecus fossils in the world, including the nearly complete skeleton StW 573 (`Little Foot') in its lower section, as well as early stone tools in higher sections. However, the chronology of the site remains controversial owing to the complex history of cave infilling. Much of the existing chronology based on uranium-lead dating and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy has recently been called into question by the recognition that dated flowstones fill cavities formed within previously cemented breccias and therefore do not form a stratigraphic sequence. Earlier dating with cosmogenic nuclides suffered a high degree of uncertainty and has been questioned on grounds of sediment reworking. Here we use isochron burial dating with cosmogenic aluminium-26 and beryllium-10 to show that the breccia containing StW 573 did not undergo significant reworking, and that it was deposited 3.67 +/- 0.16 million years ago, far earlier than the 2.2 million year flowstones found within it. The skeleton is thus coeval with early Australopithecus afarensis in eastern Africa. We also date the earliest stone tools at Sterkfontein to 2.18 +/- 0.21 million years ago, placing them in the Oldowan at a time similar to that found elsewhere in South Africa at Swartkans and Wonderwerk.

  14. Using cosmogenic isotopes to measure basin-scale rates of erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, P.R.; Steig, E.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a new and different approach to interpreting the abundance of in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides such as 36 Cl, 26 Al, and 10 Be. Unlike most existing models, which are appropriate for evaluating isotope concentrations on bedrock surfaces, this model can be used to interpret isotope concentration in fluvial sediment. Because sediment is a mixture of material derived from the entire drainage basin, measured isotope abundances can be used to estimate spatially-averaged rates of erosion and sediment transport. Their approach has the potential to provide geomorphologists with a relatively simple but powerful means by which to constrain rates of landscape evolution. The model considers the flux of cosmogenic isotopes into and out of various reservoirs. Implicit in model development are the assumptions that a geomorphic steady-state has been reached and that sampled sediment is spatially and temporally representative of all sediment leaving the basin. Each year, the impinging cosmic-ray flux produces a certain quantity of cosmogenic isotopes in the rock and soil of a drainage basin. For a basin in steady state, the outgoing isotope flux is also constant. They solve for the rate of mass loss as a function of isotope abundance in the sediment, the cosmic ray attenuation length, the isotope half life, and the effective isotope production rate. There are only a few published measurements of cosmogenic isotope abundance in sediment. They calculated model denudation rates for sediment samples from Zaire and central Texas. The denudation rates they calculated appear reasonable and are similar to those they have measured directly on granite landforms in Georgia and southeastern California and those calculated for the Appalachian Piedmont

  15. What can the annual 10Be solar activity reconstructions tell us about historic space weather?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Luke; McCracken, Ken G.; Owens, Mat J.; Lockwood, Mike

    2018-04-01

    Context: Cosmogenic isotopes provide useful estimates of past solar magnetic activity, constraining past space climate with reasonable uncertainty. Much less is known about past space weather conditions. Recent advances in the analysis of 10Be by McCracken & Beer (2015, Sol Phys 290: 305-3069) (MB15) suggest that annually resolved 10Be can be significantly affected by solar energetic particle (SEP) fluxes. This poses a problem, and presents an opportunity, as the accurate quantification of past solar magnetic activity requires the SEP effects to be determined and isolated, whilst doing so might provide a valuable record of past SEP fluxes. Aims: We compare the MB15 reconstruction of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), with two independent estimates of the HMF derived from sunspot records and geomagnetic variability. We aim to quantify the differences between the HMF reconstructions, and speculate on the origin of these differences. We test whether the differences between the reconstructions appear to depend on known significant space weather events. Methods: We analyse the distributions of the differences between the HMF reconstructions. We consider how the differences vary as a function of solar cycle phase, and, using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we compare the distributions under the two conditions of whether or not large space weather events were known to have occurred. Results: We find that the MB15 reconstructions are generally marginally smaller in magnitude than the sunspot and geomagnetic HMF reconstructions. This bias varies as a function of solar cycle phase, and is largest in the declining phase of the solar cycle. We find that MB15's excision of the years with very large ground level enhancement (GLE) improves the agreement of the 10Be HMF estimate with the sunspot and geomagnetic reconstructions. We find no statistical evidence that GLEs, in general, affect the MB15 reconstruction, but this analysis is limited by having too few samples. We do find

  16. Deciphering the Glacial-Interglacial Landscape History in Greenland Based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo Inversion of Existing 10Be-26Al Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strunk, Astrid; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Larsen, Nicolaj Krog

    the landscape history in previously glaciated terrains may be difficult, however, due to unknown erosion rates and the presence of inherited nuclides. The potential use of cosmogenic nuclides in landscapes with a complex history of exposure and erosion is therefore often quite limited. In this study, we...... investigate the landscape history in eastern and western Greenland by applying a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion approach to the existing 10Be-26Al data from these regions. The new MCMC approach allows us to constrain the most likely landscape history based on comparisons between simulated...... and measured cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. It is a fundamental assumption of the model approach that the exposure history at the site/location can be divided into two distinct regimes: i) interglacial periods characterized by zero shielding due to overlying ice and a uniform interglacial erosion rate...

  17. Solar Spectral Irradiance Reconstruction over 9 Millennia from a Composite 14C and 10Be Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. J.; Usoskin, I. G.; Krivova, N.; Kovaltsov, G.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Sun is the main external energy source to the Earth and thus the knowledge of solar variability on different time scales is important for understanding the solar influence on the terrestrial atmosphere and climate. The overall energy input and its spectral distribution are described by the total (TSI) and spectral (SSI) solar irradiance, respectively. Direct measurements of the solar irradiance provide information on solar variability on the decadal and shorter time scales, while the sunspot number record covers four centuries. On yet longer time scales only indirect proxies can be used, such as the concentrations of the cosmogenic isotopes 10Be and 14C in terrestrial archives. These isotopes are produced in the terrestrial atmosphere by impinging cosmic rays, whose flux is modulated by solar activity. Therefore the isotope data retrieved from various natural archives around the globe show a very high degree of similarity reflecting changes in the solar activity. Nevertheless, significant short-term deviations can be observed due to the different geochemical production processes and local climatic conditions. We will present the newest TSI/SSI reconstruction over the last 9000 years based on a new consistent composite multi-isotope proxy series. The solar irradiance reconstruction reveals the global and robust pattern of solar variability in the past.

  18. Synchronizing Greenland ice-core records and the Meerfelder maar sediment record via the global cosmogenic radionuclide signature and insights on climate around 11,230 years BP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhaldi, F.; Czymzik, M.; Brauer, A.; Martin-Puertas, C.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Muscheler, R.

    2017-12-01

    The causal investigation of multiple paleoclimate records relies on the accuracy of their respective chronostratigraphy. To achieve relative synchronization, cosmogenic radionuclides are an excellent tool because their common signature is global and can be retrieved and measured in different paleoclimate archives. For instance, 10Be can be measured in both ice cores and lake sediments (Berggren et al., 2013; Czymzik et al., 2016) which allows for both archives to be anchored onto radiocarbon timescales by synchronizing 10Be with 14C. We investigate the period 11,500-11,000 years BP when a short cold climate spell is known, from ice-core proxy records, to have occurred in Greenland shortly after the onset of the Holocene - the Preboreal Oscillation (PBO). This period also coincides with one of the largest and longest-lived increase in 14C production rate during the Holocene, which most likely corresponds to a grand solar minimum (around 11,230-11,000 years BP). In consequence, this period ideally illustrates the potential of using a known and clear signal in the production rate of cosmogenic radionuclides as a synchronizing tool, such as caused by large variations in solar activity. Here we measure 10Be in Meerfelder Maar (a well-dated and widely used sediment record from Germany) around 11,230 years BP which allows us to align the 10Be signal in both the Meerfelder Maar (MFM) sediment record and the GRIP ice core to IntCal13. Doing so, we report that i) the structure of the grand solar minimum is well-preserved in the 10Be signal of MFM sediments, ii) the PBO in Greenland occurs during high levels of solar activity and is not clearly observed in MFM, and iii) the PBO in Greenland ends precisely at the onset of the grand solar minimum at 11,230 years BP which also corresponds to a depositional change in MFM sediments (Martin-Puertas et al., 2017). These results thus suggest that changes in solar activity could have been a forcing at play eventually resulting in the

  19. 10Be and 14C in the Earth system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeschger, H.; Beer, J.; Andree, M.

    1987-01-01

    In a very short period of time, 10 Be data have significantly improved our knowledge in various fields of Earth and planetary sciences. Examples are solar modulation of isotope production, revealed in 10 Be ice-core profiles; geomagnetic modulation of isotope production, revealed in 10 Be ice-core (from the past 10 ka) and ocean-sediment profiles (geomagnetic reversals); climatic effects reflected in 10 Be profiles in loess and polar ice cores ( 10 Be behaviour in atmosphere); comparison of 10 Be and 14 C variations (tree rings) from carbon-cycle models and information on ocean circulation history from 14 C measurements on benthic and planktonic Foraminifera in ocean sediments. An overview on work in collaboration with the Zurich AMS (accelerator mass spectroscopy) facility is given. (author)

  20. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed open-quotes lithogenicclose quotes solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing open-quotes cosmogenicclose quotes nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing open-quotes thermonuclearclose quotes nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing open-quotes in-situclose quotes lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading open-quotes cosmogenic nuclidesclose quotes, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system

  1. Meridional transport and deposition of atmospheric 10Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Feichter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 10Be concentrations measured in ice cores exhibit larger temporal variability than expected based on theoretical production calculations. To investigate whether this is due to atmospheric transport a general circulation model study is performed with the 10Be production divided into stratospheric, tropospheric tropical, tropospheric subtropical and tropospheric polar sources. A control run with present day 10Be production rate is compared with a run during a geomagnetic minimum. The present 10Be production rate is 4–5 times higher at high latitudes than in the tropics whereas during a period of no geomagnetic dipole field it is constant at all latitudes. The 10Be deposition fluxes, however, show a very similar latitudinal distribution in both the present day and the geomagnetic minimum run indicating that 10Be is well mixed in the atmosphere before its deposition. This is also confirmed by the fact that the contribution of 10Be produced in the stratosphere is dominant (55%–70% and relatively constant at all latitudes. The contribution of stratospheric 10Be is approximately 70% in Greenland and 60% in Antarctica reflecting the weaker stratosphere-troposphere air exchange in the Southern Hemisphere.

  2. Geomagnetic modulation of the late Pleistocene cosmic-ray flux as determined by 10Be from Blake Outer Ridge marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, L.R.; Donahue, D.; Damon, P.E.; Sonett, C.P.; Biddulph, D.; Burr, G.

    2000-01-01

    The cosmic-ray flux incident upon the Earth during the late Pleistocene, 20-60 kyr B.P., was studied by measuring the cosmogenic radionuclide 10 Be from a marine sediment core at site CH88-10P on the Blake Outer Ridge. The paleointensity of the geomagnetic field for this core was determined by various methods. The variance in the concentration of 10 Be in the authigenic fraction of the sediments from Blake Ridge closely correlates with the inverse of the variance in the paleointensity of the geomagnetic field. The 10 Be signal lags, up to 1000 years of sedimentation, the measured paleointensity of the sediments. In contrast, the data from several other elements, some climatically sensitive, and from beryllium show relationship neither to 10 Be nor to the paleomagnetic data. The relationship between 10 Be concentration and the dipole field intensity (M/M o ) as measured in the sediments is consistent with theoretical models

  3. Tectonics, climate and mountain building in the forearc of southern Peru recorded in the 10Be chronology of low-relief surface abandonment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Regional low-relief surfaces have long been recognized as key features to understanding the response of landscapes to surface uplift. The canonical models of low-relief surface formation involve an extended period of tectonic quiescence during which, the fluvial systems bevel the landscape to a uniform elevation. This quiescent period is punctuated by a period(s) of surface uplift, which causes fluvial incision thereby abandoning the low-relief landscape. Over time, as rivers continue to incise in response to changes in sediment supply, river discharge, and base level fall, pieces of the relict low-relief landscape are left as abandoned remnants stranded above active channels. By determining the age of abandoned surfaces, previous workers have identified the onset of a change in the tectonic or climatic setting. One key assumption of this model is that the low-relief surfaces are truly abandoned with no current processes further acting on the surface. To improve our understanding of the underlying assumptions and problems of low-relief surface formation, we have used detailed mapping and absolute dating with cosmogenic 10Be to investigate surfaces in the hyperarid forearc region of southern Peru between ~14° and 18°S. Within this region, marine terraces and strath terraces reflect Plio-Pleistocene surface uplift, and together with the hyperarid climate, ongoing surface uplift provides a perfect natural laboratory to examine the processes affecting low-relief surface abandonment and preservation. With our new chronology we address: 1) the space and time correlations of surfaces, 2) incision rates of streams in response to base-level fall, and 3) surface erosion rates. Multiple surfaces have yielded 10Be surface abandonment ages that span >2 Ma - ~35 ka. While most of the surfaces we have dated are considerably less than 1 Ma, we have located two surfaces which are likely older than 2 Ma and constrain regional erosion rates to be chronology of Pleistocene surface

  4. Quantifying Quaternary Deformation in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes Using Cosmogenic Nuclide Geochronology and Fluvial Geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalman, E.; Taylor, M. H.; Veloza-fajardo, G.; Mora, A.

    2014-12-01

    Northwest South America is actively deforming through the interaction between the Nazca, South American, and Caribbean plates. Though the Colombian Andes are well studied, much uncertainty remains in the rate of Quaternary deformation along the east directed frontal thrust faults hundreds of kilometers in board from the subduction zones. The eastern foothills of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) preserve deformed landforms, allowing us to quantify incision rates. Using 10Be in-situ terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) geochronology, we dated 2 deformed fluvial terraces in the hanging wall of the Guaicaramo thrust fault. From the 10Be concentration and terrace profile relative to local base level, we calculated incision rates. We present a reconstructed slip history of the Guaicaramo thrust fault and its Quaternary slip rate. Furthermore, to quantify the regional Quaternary deformation, we look at the fluvial response to tectonic uplift. Approximately 20 streams along the eastern foothills of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) were studied using a digital elevation model (DEM). From the DEM, longitudinal profiles were created and normalized channel steepness (Ksn) values calculated from plots of drainage area vs. slope. Knickpoints in the longitudinal profiles can record transient perturbations or differential uplift. Calculated Ksn values indicate that the EC is experiencing high rates of uplift, with the highest mean Ksn values occurring in the Cocuy region. Mean channel steepness values along strike of the foothills are related to increasing uplift rates from south to north. In contrast, we suggest that high channel steepness values in the south appear to be controlled by high rates of annual precipitation.

  5. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Kish, Alexander; Piastra, Francesco [University of Zuerich, Department of Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schumann, Marc [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470 m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of {sup 7}Be, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 126}I and {sup 127}Xe in xenon, out of which only {sup 125}Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only existing dedicated activation measurement, while we observe lower rates for the remaining ones. The specific saturation activities for both samples are also compared to predictions obtained with commonly used software packages, where we observe some underpredictions, especially for xenon activation. (orig.)

  6. Cosmogenic helium and volatile-rich fluid in Sierra leone alluvial diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConville, P.; Reynolds, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Pursuant to the discovery elsewhere of cosmogenic 10 Be in alluvial diamond fragments from Zaire, noble gas measurements were made on two identical splits of a finely powdered, harshly acid-washed sample derived from selected (for clarity) fragments of a single alluvial diamond from Sierra Leone (sample LJA → L4 and L5). Essentially identical results were obtained for both splits. Isotopic ratios for Ar, Kr, and Xe were atmospheric and their elemental abundances were high relative to published data, owing to shock implantation in the crushing as verified in a supplementary experiment. No neon was detected above blank level. 3 He was exceptionally abundant, 4 He exceptionally depleted, possibly from the acid wash, and the ratio 3 He/ 4 He almost unprecedentedly high at an R/R a value of 246 ± 16. The results support the hypothesis that excess 3 He in diamonds is cosmogenic, although a cosmic-ray exposure of 5, 35, or (impossibly) 152 Ma for cyclic gardening of the sample to a maximum depth of 0, 4.6 m, or 20 m, respectively, is required. Troublesome for the cosmogenic hypothesis is a sample from very deep in the Finsch mine, South Africa, found by Zadnik et al (1987) to have an R/R a value of 1,000. This paper includes histograms of noble gas data published prior to mid-1988 for diamonds of known provenance. The Sierra Leone diamond studied in the supplementary experiment belongs to a distinct population of 40* Ar-rich diamonds consisting mostly of cubic diamonds for Zaire

  7. Tropical Andean and African glacier extent through the Holocene assessed with proglacial in situ 14C and 10Be measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, A. C.; Shakun, J. D.; Goehring, B. M.; Kelly, M. A.; Jackson, M. S.; Jomelli, V.

    2017-12-01

    We present measurements of the in situ cosmogenic radionuclides 14C and 10Be from recently exposed proglacial bedrock samples at the margin of the Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru (n=5) and the Rwenzori mountains in Africa (n=3) to calculate cumulative exposure, burial, and erosion histories at these sites over the Holocene. The Holocene history (11 ka - present) of tropical glaciers gives important context to their observed retreat over the last century, insight into their sensitivity to climate forcing, and constraints on past climate change. Paired in situ 14C/10Be methods are used to exploit the multiple controls on nuclide concentrations and their differing half-lives (5730 years vs 1.38 Myr). In particular, the concentrations of both 14C and 10Be increase with exposure and decrease with glacial erosion; however,14C decreases not only due to glacial erosion, but also in appreciable amounts due to radio-decay during periods of burial as short as 800 years. Our results show similarities at both sites, with moderately high 10Be concentrations but 14C/10Be ratios approximately one-third of the production value, suggesting that both sites experienced several thousand years of exposure followed by burial during the mid-to-late Holocene. Our results are consistent with recently exposed subfossil plant remains at the Quelccaya margin that imply ice extended beyond its current position since 5.2 ka We will also present 10Be ages of several boulders from probable Little Ice Age moraines of the Charquini Sur Glacier in Bolivia (n=2) and Ritacuba Negro Glacier in Colombia (n=4) to better understand the timing of Little Ice Age advances in the tropical Andes.

  8. 6He+α clustering in 10Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Fazinic, S.; Lattuada, M.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Rendic, D.; Spitaleri, C.; Tadic, T.; Zadro, M.

    1996-01-01

    In a kinematically complete measurement of the 7 Li( 7 Li,α 6 He) 4 He reaction at E i = 8 MeV it was observed that the 10 Be excited states at 9.6 and 10.2 MeV decay by 6 He emission. The state at 10.2 MeV may be a member of a rotational band based on the 6.18 MeV 0 + state. (orig.)

  9. Analytical methods for measuring 10Be in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Sparks, R.J.; Whitehead, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    A suite of marine sediments from the Wanganui Basin (Graham et al. 1995) has provided excellent material to further develop methods for 10 Be analysis at the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences AMS facility. Chemical methods for Be extraction have been streamlined and there has been some reduction of backgrounds and contamination peaks for 1 0Be isotopic analysis. (authors) 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. Atmospheric radiocarbon calibration to 45,000 yr B.P.: late glacial fluctuations and cosmogenic isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa; van der Plicht J

    1998-02-20

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present). The results confirm the (recently revised) floating German pine chronology and are consistent with data from European and marine varved sediments, and combined uranium-thorium and carbon-14 dating of corals up to the Last Glacial Maximum. The data during the Glacial show large fluctuations in the atmospheric carbon-14 content, related to changes in global environment and in cosmogenic isotope production.

  11. Muon and cosmogenic neutron detection in Borexino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, G; Bonetti, S; Avanzini, M Buizza; Caccianiga, B; D'Angelo, D; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Chavarria, A; Galbiati, C; Carraro, C; Davini, S; Chepurnov, A; Derbin, A; Etenko, A; Feilitzsch, F von; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Gazzana, S

    2011-01-01

    Borexino, a liquid scintillator detector at LNGS, is designed for the detection of neutrinos and antineutrinos from the Sun, supernovae, nuclear reactors, and the Earth. The feeble nature of these signals requires a strong suppression of backgrounds below a few MeV. Very low intrinsic radiogenic contamination of all detector components needs to be accompanied by the efficient identification of muons and of muon-induced backgrounds. Muons produce unstable nuclei by spallation processes along their trajectory through the detector whose decays can mimic the expected signals; for isotopes with half-lives longer than a few seconds, the dead time induced by a muon-related veto becomes unacceptably long, unless its application can be restricted to a sub-volume along the muon track. Consequently, not only the identification of muons with very high efficiency but also a precise reconstruction of their tracks is of primary importance for the physics program of the experiment. The Borexino inner detector is surrounded by an outer water-Cherenkov detector that plays a fundamental role in accomplishing this task. The detector design principles and their implementation are described. The strategies adopted to identify muons are reviewed and their efficiency is evaluated. The overall muon veto efficiency is found to be 99.992 % or better. Ad-hoc track reconstruction algorithms developed are presented. Their performance is tested against muon events of known direction such as those from the CNGS neutrino beam, test tracks available from a dedicated External Muon Tracker and cosmic muons whose angular distribution reflects the local overburden profile. The achieved angular resolution is ∼ 3 0 -5 0 and the lateral resolution is ∼ 35-50 cm, depending on the impact parameter of the crossing muon. The methods implemented to efficiently tag cosmogenic neutrons are also presented.

  12. An update on in situ cosmogenic {sup 14}C analysis at ETH Zuerich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippe, K., E-mail: hippe@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Kober, F. [Institute of Geology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Wacker, L. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Fahrni, S.M. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern CH-3012 (Switzerland); Ivy-Ochs, S. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Akcar, N.; Schluechter, C. [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern CH-3012 (Switzerland); Wieler, R. [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8092 (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    We present the improved performance of the modified in situ cosmogenic {sup 14}C extraction system at ETH Zuerich. Samples are now processed faster (2 days in total) and are measured with a high analytical precision of usually <2% using the gas ion source of the MICADAS AMS facility. Measurements of the PP-4 standard sample show a good reproducibility and consistency with published values. Procedural blanks are very low at currently {approx}4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 414}C atoms. Analyses of samples from a {approx}300 year old rock avalanche prove that we can successfully apply in situ{sup 14}C exposure dating to very young surfaces. Additionally, we present a modified calculation scheme for in situ{sup 14}C concentrations which differs from that used for conventional radiocarbon dating. This new approach explicitly accounts for the characteristics of in situ{sup 14}C production.

  13. Analysis of longitudinal momentum distribution of 10Be in 9Be(11Be, 10Be)X reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Monika; Kharab, Rajesh; Singh, Ram Mehar

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the longitudinal momentum distribution of 10 Be fragment coming from one neutron stripping from 11 Be on 9 Be target at 60AMeV beam energy within the framework of zero and first order eikonal approximation. It has been found that the inclusion of first order correction term in the eikonal approximation results in a substantial improvement in the matching between the predicted and experimental results especially in tail region of the spectrum. (author)

  14. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Allan, G L; Stone, J O.H.; Evans, J M; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  15. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth's surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes 10 Be (t 1/2 = 1.5Ma), 26 Al (0.7Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on 36 Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic 36 Cl in calcite (CaCO 3 ) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of 36 Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of 36 Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of 36 Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs

  16. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  17. Constraints on Water Reservoir Lifetimes From Catchment-Wide 10Be Erosion Rates—A Case Study From Western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt; Christl, Marcus

    2017-11-01

    The functionality and retention capacity of water reservoirs is generally impaired by upstream erosion and reservoir sedimentation, making a reliable assessment of erosion indispensable to estimate reservoir lifetimes. Widely used river gauging methods may underestimate sediment yield, because they do not record rare, high-magnitude events and may underestimate bed load transport. Hence, reservoir lifetimes calculated from short-term erosion rates should be regarded as maximum values. We propose that erosion rates from cosmogenic 10Be, which commonly integrate over hundreds to thousands of years, are useful to complement short-term sediment yield estimates and should be employed to estimate minimum reservoir lifetimes. Here we present 10Be erosion rates for the drainage basins of six water reservoirs in Western Turkey, which are located in a tectonically active region with easily erodible bedrock. Our 10Be erosion rates for these catchments are high, ranging from ˜170 to ˜1,040 t/km2/yr. When linked to reservoir volumes, they yield minimum reservoir lifetimes between 25 ± 5 and 1,650 ± 360 years until complete filling, with four reservoirs having minimum lifespans of ≤110 years. In a neighboring region with more resistant bedrock and less tectonic activity, we obtain much lower catchment-wide 10Be erosion rates of ˜33 to ˜95 t/km2/yr, illustrating that differences in lithology and tectonic boundary conditions can cause substantial variations in erosion even at a spatial scale of only ˜50 km. In conclusion, we suggest that both short-term sediment yield estimates and 10Be erosion rates should be employed to predict the lifetimes of reservoirs.

  18. AMS exposure dating : a case study from Himalaya and Tibet and its application potentials in earth science studies in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has made possible low level (10 -6 atoms/gm) measurements of 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 129 I isotopes in geological materials. Early studies investigated 10 Be atoms of cosmogenic nuclides produced mainly in the atmosphere (called garden variety), which subsequently admixed with the geological material from land surfaces get transported into the ocean waters and fixed in the ocean sediments. Subsequently, focus shifted to in-situ produced long-lived isotopes in quartz and their measurement in the terrestrial samples. This opened a new field of exposure dating and its potential applications in earth sciences and their role to study the time controlled processes resulting in diverse geomorphic landforms

  19. 10Be and δ2H in polar ice cores as a probe of the solar variability's influence on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.; Jouzel, J.; Domaine Univ., 38 - St-Martin-d'Heres; Petit, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    By using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry, it is now possible to measure detailed profiles of cosmogenic (cosmic ray produced) 10 Be in polar ice cores. Recent work has demonstrated that these profiles contain information on solar activity, via its influence on the intensity of galactic cosmic rays arriving in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been known for some time that, as a result of temperature-dependent fractionation effects, the stable isotope profiles δ 2 O and δ 2 H in polar ice cores contain palaeoclimate information. Thus by comparing the 10 Be and stable isotope profiles in the same ice core, one can test the influence of solar variability on climate, and this independent of possible uncertainties in the absolute chronology of the records. We present here the results of such a comparison for two Antarctic ice cores; one from the South Pole, covering the past ca. 1000 years, and one from Dome C, covering the past ca. 3000 years. (author)

  20. Cosmogenic Radionuclides as an Extension of the Neutron Monitor Era into the Past: Potential and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, J.; McCracken, K. G.; Abreu, J.; Heikkilä, U.; Steinhilber, F.

    2013-06-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclides, 10Be, 14C and others, provide a record of the paleo-cosmic radiation that extends >10,000 years into the past. They are the only quantitative means at our disposal to study the heliosphere prior to the commencement of routine sunspot observations in the 17th century. The cosmogenic radionuclides are primarily produced by secondary neutrons generated by the galactic cosmic radiation, and can be regarded, in a sense, as providing an extrapolation of the neutron monitor era into the past. However, their characteristics are quite different from the man-made neutron monitor in several important respects: (1) they are sensitive to somewhat lower cosmic ray energies; (2) their temporal resolution is ˜1 to 2 years, being determined by the rapidity with which they are sequestered in ice, biological, or other archives; (3) the statistical precision for annual data is very poor (˜19%); however it is quite adequate (˜5% for 22-year averages) to study the large variations (±40%) that have occurred in the paleo-cosmic ray record in the past between grand solar minima and maxima. The data contains "noise" caused by local meteorological effects, and longer-term climate effects, and the use of principal component analysis to separate these "system" effects from production effects is outlined. The concentrations of 10Be decreased by a factor of two at the commencement of Holocene, the present-day "interglacial", due to a 100% increase in the ice accumulation rates in polar regions. The use of the 10Be flux to study heliospheric properties during the last glacial is discussed briefly.

  1. Contrasting Modern and 10Be- derived erosion rates for the Southern Betic Cordillera, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, N.; Vanacker, V.; Kubik, P.

    2012-04-01

    In Europe, Southeast Spain was identified as one of the regions with major treat of desertification in the context of future land use and climate change. During the last years, significant progress has been made to understand spatial patterns of modern erosion rates in these semi-arid degraded environments. Numerous European projects have contributed to the collection of modern erosion data at different spatial scales for Southeast Spain. However, these data are rarely analysed in the context of long-term changes in vegetation, climate and human occupation. In this paper, we present Modern and Holocene denudation rates for small river basins (1 to 10 km2) located in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. Long-term erosion data were derived from cosmogenic nuclide analyses of river-borne sediment. Modern erosion data were quantified through analysis of sediment deposition volumes behind check dams, and represent average erosion rates over the last 10 to 40 years. Modern erosion rates are surprisingly low (mean erosion rate = 0.048 mm y-1; n=36). They indicate that the steep, sparsely vegetated hillslopes in the Betic Cordillera cannot directly be associated with high erosion rates. 10Be -derived erosion rates integrate over the last 37500 to 3500 years, and are roughly of the same magnitude. They range from 0.013 to 0.243 mm y-1 (mean denudation rate = 0.062 mm y-1 ± 0.054; n=20). Our data suggest that the modern erosion rates are similar to the long-term erosion rates in this area. This result is in contrast with the numerous reports on human-accelerated modern erosion rates for Southeast Spain. Interestingly, our new data on long-term erosion rates show a clear spatial pattern, with higher erosion rates in the Sierra Cabrera and lower erosion rates in Sierra de las Estancias, and Sierra Torrecilla. Preliminary geomorphometric analyses suggest that the spatial variation that we observe in long-term erosion rates is related to the gradient in uplift rates of the Betic

  2. Timing of Pleistocene glaciations in the High Atlas, Morocco: New 10Be and 36Cl exposure ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Philip D.; Fink, David; Rodés, Ángel; Fenton, Cassandra R.; Fujioka, Toshiyuki

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents data from 42 new samples yielding Late Pleistocene cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure ages of moraine boulders across a series of glaciated valleys in the Toubkal Massif (4167 m a.s.l.), High Atlas, Morocco. This represents the first comprehensive Pleistocene glacial chronology in North Africa and one of the largest datasets from the Mediterranean region. The timing of these glacier advances has major implications for understanding the influence of Atlantic depressions on moisture supply to North Africa and the Mediterranean basin during the Pleistocene. The oldest and lowest moraines which span elevations from ∼1900 to 2400 m a.s.l. indicate that the maximum glacier advance occurred from MIS 5 to 3 with a combined mean 10Be and 36Cl age of 50.2 ± 19.5 ka (1 SD; n = 12, 7 outliers). The next moraine units up-valley at higher elevations (∼2200-2600 m a.s.l.) yielded exposure ages close to the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with a combined mean 10Be and 36Cl age of 22.0 ± 4.9 ka (1 SD; n = 9, 7 outliers). The youngest exposure ages are from moraines that were emplaced during the Younger Dryas with a combined mean 10Be and 36Cl age of 12.3 ± 0.9 ka (1 SD; n = 7, no outliers) and are found in cirques at the highest elevations ranging from ∼2900 to 3300 m a.s.l. From moraines predating the Younger Dryas, a large number of young outliers are spread evenly between 6 and 13 ka suggesting a continuing process of exhumation or repositioning of boulders during the early to mid-Holocene. This attests to active seismic processes and possibly intense erosion during this period.

  3. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  4. 14 C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    The different aspects concerning the 14 C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of 14 C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  5. 10Be and 230Th: A two-tracer study of marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhauer, A.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of the radionuclides 10 Be and 230 Th were determined with high resolution in each two sediment cores from the Atlantic Ocean (M23235-2, 1170-3) and from the Pacific Ocean (DSDP site 580, 186P). Partial sedimentation rates for the different core ranges could be derived from the isotopic profiles by comparing the results of the 230 Th excess dating method with those of other dating methods such as biostratigraphy and δ 18 O-stratigraphy. On the basis of these sedimentation data it was possible to establish differentiated absolute age scales and to calculate partial 10 Be- and 230 Th flux densities. The comparison of the calculated flux densities with data from the known isotope generation shows that the sediment cores Site 580, M23235-2 and 1170-3 in core ranges, assigned to the interglacial stages of the palaeoclimate, possess 10 Be- and 230 Th flux densities higher than expected owing to natural generation. (orig.) [de

  6. Determination of long-lived radionuclide (10Be, 41Ca, 129I) concentrations in nuclear waste by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bertaux, Maite; Bourles, Didier; Arnold, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Bethe-Block law (1). (1) dE/dx=(k * Z 2 )/v 2 . The use of a particle accelerator in conjunction with a selective ion source, mass and energy filters and a high-performance detector thus allow unambiguously identifying and measuring analyte concentration against much more abundant interfering isobars. The development of AMS and of related applications have recently been extensively reviewed. Up to now, the potentialities of the accelerator mass spectrometry technique were explored for the measurement of cosmogenic radionuclides produced in the Earth's environment either in the atmosphere or in the Earth's crust (in situ-production). Many applications aiming to date and/or quantify Earth surface processes have been developed in the fields of geology, geomorphology and planetary sciences as well as archaeology paleo-anthropology and biomedicine. The present study extends the scope of AMS to nuclear industry. Because AMS facilities are not widely accessible and difficult to handle, LLRN concentrations in nuclear waste are usually determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radiometric techniques. However for the measurement of very low LLRN concentrations, AMS becomes the most effective measurement method with detection limits of 10 5 -10 6 atoms per sample. In this study, AMS measurements were performed using the French AMS national facility ASTER located at the Centre Europeen de Recherche et d'Enseignement des Geosciences de l'Environnement (CEREGE). The challenge was to define a chemical treatment procedure allowing the measurement of the three nuclides, 10 Be, 41 Ca and 129 I, by AMS. Each method selection was based on three main requirements: 1) a quantitative recovery in solution of Be, Ca, I and key radionuclides after resin mineralization, 2) a selective extraction from the sample matrix and the separation from β-γ emitters ( 3 H, 14 C, 55 Fe, 59 Ni, 60 Co, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 125 Sb, 134 Cs, 137 Cs) and isobars, 3

  7. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Deloule, Etienne; Trappitsch, Reto

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of 'water' in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. Here, we re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. These in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides (3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17 ± 0.11) ×10-12 mol(g rock)-1 Ma-1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios have been severely overestimated.

  8. U-Th and 10Be constraints on sediment recycling in proglacial settings, Lago Buenos Aires, Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogez, Antoine; Herman, Frédéric; Pelt, Éric; Reuschlé, Thierry; Morvan, Gilles; Darvill, Christopher M.; Norton, Kevin P.; Christl, Marcus; Märki, Lena; Chabaux, François

    2018-03-01

    The estimation of sediment transfer times remains a challenge to our understanding of sediment budgets and the relationships between erosion and climate. Uranium (U) and thorium (Th) isotope disequilibria offer a means of more robustly constraining sediment transfer times. Here, we present new uranium and thorium disequilibrium data for a series of nested moraines around Lago Buenos Aires in Argentine Patagonia. The glacial chronology for the area is constrained using in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis of glacial outwash. Sediment transfer times within the periglacial domain were estimated by comparing the deposition ages of moraines to the theoretical age of sediment production, i.e., the comminution age inferred from U disequilibrium data and recoil loss factor estimates. Our data show first that the classical comminution age approach must include weathering processes accounted for by measuring Th disequilibrium. Second, our combined data suggest that the pre-deposition history of the moraine sediments is not negligible, as evidenced by the large disequilibrium of the youngest moraines despite the equilibrium of the corresponding glacial flour. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that weathering was more intense before the deposition of the moraines and that the transfer time of the fine sediments to the moraines was on the order of 100-200 kyr. Long transfer times could result from a combination of long sediment residence times in the proglacial lake (recurrence time of a glacial cycle) and the remobilization of sediments from moraines deposited during previous glacial cycles. 10Be data suggest that some glacial cycles are absent from the preserved moraine record (seemingly every second cycle), supporting a model of reworking moraines and/or fluctuations in the extent of glacial advances. The chronological pattern is consistent with the U-Th disequilibrium data and the 100-200 kyr transfer time. This long transfer time raises the question of the proportion of freshly

  9. Studies in earth sciences using in-situ produced cosmogenic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.

    1998-01-01

    The geological processes of glaciation and surface weathering which have moulded and continue to shape our landscape, are inextricably related to the dynamics of climate change. Earth Scientists have long sought an analytical technique based on radiometric methods that would quantify both temporally and spatially, the chronology of glacial cycles and erosion rates. Such a technique is now developing based on the in-situ production by cosmic rays of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides 10 Be (T 1 / 2 =1.5 Ma), 26 Al (0.7 Ma) and 36 Cl (0.3a) in exposed rocks, surfaces and within the first meter or so of the Earth's crust. Although only a million atoms of 10 Be are produced during a 100 ka exposure period per gram of rock, AMS can be applied to measure this telltale signal. Their build-up over time can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces. Alternatively, if exposure has been sufficiently long for the in-situ signal to reach equilibrium, an average erosion rate can be determined. The applicability of the technique depends on the radioisotope half-life - in simple terms it works best over exposure periods of 5ka to 5 Ma (for 10 Be) and can identify erosion rates from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka

  10. Cosmogenic radioisotopes in Gebel Kamil meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taricco, C.; Colombetti, P.; Bhandari, N.; Sinha, N.; Di Martino, M.; Vivaldo, G.

    2012-04-01

    Recently a small (45 m in diameter) and very young (radioisotope activity generated by cosmic rays in the meteoroids as they travel through the interplanetary space before falling on the Earth. From the 26Al activity measurement and its depth production profiles, we infer (i) that the radius of the meteoroid should be about 1 m, constraining to 30-40 ton the range of pre-atmospheric mass previously proposed and (ii) that the fragment should have been located deeply inside the meteoroid, at a depth > 0.7 m. The 44Ti activity is under the detection threshold of the apparatus; using the depth production profiles of this radioisotope and its half-life T1/2 = 59.2 y, we deduce an upper limit to the date of fall.

  11. Cosmogenic nuclide shielding corrections determined via MCNPX radiation transport and spallation cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Stone, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    Cosmogenic Nuclides (CNs) are a critical new tool for geomorphology, allowing researchers to date Earth surface events and measure process rates [1]. Prior to CNs, many of these events and processes had no absolute method for measurement and relied entirely on relative methods. Reliable absolute measurement methods impact research constraining ice age extents and provide important climatic data via well constrained erosion rates, etc. [2]. Continuing to improve CN methods is critical for these sciences. Significant progress has been made in the last two decades in refining the method and reducing analytic uncertainties [1,3]. CRONUS-Earth, a collaboration of cosmogenic nuclide researchers, has been developing calibration data and scaling methods to provide a self-consistent platform for use in interpreting nuclide concentration values into geologic data. However, several aspects of the radiation cascade have been exceedingly difficult to measure empirically with either accuracy or spatial extent. One such aspect is the angular distribution of secondary cosmic rays that are energetic enough to produce cosmogenic nuclides via spallation. Researchers studying the angular distribution of such cosmic rays have usually described the distribution as (cos(Θ))^m. Currently, the standard corrections, assume an m of 2.3, which is based on very sparse data sets with very limited spatial and altitude variation [1,4,5]. Researchers using CNs must know the production rate at the sample location, and then make corrections for the portion of the sky that is blocked by nearby topography. If the shielding correction model currently used is too simplistic, this introduces error into the final results. In this study, a Monte Carlo method radiation transport code, MCNPX is used to model the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) radiation impinging on the upper atmosphere and tracks the resulting secondary particles through a model of the Earth's atmosphere. Angle and energy distributions are

  12. Determination of Cross-Sections of Fast-Muon-Induced Reactions to Cosmogenic Radionuclides

    CERN Multimedia

    Hagner, T; Heisinger, B; Niedermayer, M; Nolte, E; Oberauer, L; Schonert, S; Kubik, P W

    2002-01-01

    %NA54 %title\\\\ \\\\We propose to measure cross-sections for fast muon-induced production of radionuclides. Firstly to study the contribution of fast-muon-induced reactions to the in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in the lithosphere. Concrete is used to simulate the rock and to generate a secondary particle shower. The reaction channels to be measured are: C to $^{10}$Be, O to $^{10}$Be and $^{14}$C, Si to $^{26}$Al, S to $^{26}$Al, Ca to $^{36}$Cl, Fe to $^{53}$Mn and $^{205}$Tl to $^{205}$Pb. The energy dependent cross-section can be described by one single parameter $\\sigma_0$ and the energy dependence $\\rm\\overline{E}^{0.7}$ on the mean energy $\\rm\\overline{E}$. The irradiations of the targets is done at CERN. The produced radionuclides are measured by accelerator mass spectrometry in Munich and Zurich.\\\\ \\\\Secondly, muon induced signals can be a major source of background in experiments with low event rates located deep underground. We intent to study the produced radioactivity by fast-muon-ind...

  13. What we know about Oslo meteorite from cosmogenic isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymiński, Z.; Stolarz, M.; Kubalczak, T.; Zaręba, P.; Burski, M.; Bilet, M.; Miśta, E.; Tymińska, K.; Kołakowska, E.; Burakowska, A.; Żołądek, P.; Olech, A.; Wiśniewski, M.; Listkowska, A.; Saganowski, P.

    2015-10-01

    The fragments of an asteroid that had crashed over Norway were found in a few locations in Oslo at the beginning of March 2012. Later on some pieces of meteorite from the most South area were collected by the Meteoritical Section members of Comet and Meteor Workshop (PKiM) with the help of local meteoritical authorities. One meteorite fragment of 32g was used to measure cosmogenic radionuclides using non-destructive high-resolution gamma spectrometry technique. Five radioisotopes such as Al-26, Na-22, Mn-54, Co-57 and Co-60 were detected

  14. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray fluxes and cosmogenic neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2013-04-15

    We discuss the possible origin of the two neutrino shower events reported by the IceCube Collaboration at the Neutrino 2012 conference in Kyoto, Japan. The suspicion early on was that these two events are due to cosmogenic neutrinos and possibly by electron antineutrinos generating the Glashow resonance. The difference of the energy of the W{sup −} in the resonance and the energy estimates of the detected cascade events makes this assumption unlikely. The conclusion then may be that these high energy neutrinos are produced at sources of high energy cosmic rays such as Active Galactic Nuclei.

  15. On the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides in cometary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, G.F.; Englert, P.A.J.; Reedy, R.C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Kohl, C.P.; Arnold, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Determinations of the cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in cometary material will help to define the recent surface history of the comet and its exposure to cosmic rays. In particular, the rates for the removal or mixing of surface material could be studied, and any variations in cosmic-ray intensity implied by the data could be used to infer orbital changes during the last few million years. The measurement of the shorter-lived isotopes poses technical challenges that should be addressed now. The measurement of longer-lived isotopes will be straightforward provided that rates of mass loss are not too high. 46 refs., 2 figs

  16. Precise determination of cosmogenic Ne in CREU-1 quartz standard, using the Helix-MC Plus mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D.; Honda, M.; Zhang, X.; Phillips, D.; Matchan, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Helix-MC Plus multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometer at the Australian National University is uniquely equipped with three high mass resolution collectors on H2, Axial and L2 positions. Their mass resolution and mass resolving power are as high as 1,800 and 8,000, respectively. The Helix-MC Plus can totally separate 20Ne+ from 40Ar++ isobaric interference and also partially separate 21Ne+ from 20NeH+ and 22Ne+ from 12C16O2++. By adjusting collector positions, we are able to measure interference-free Ne isotope intensities and have re-determined the 21Ne abundance in air [1]. Analyses by Honda et al. [1] demonstrated that 20Ne1H contributes approximately 2% to previously determined atmospheric 21Ne values [2], and a new atmospheric 21Ne/20Ne ratio of 0.002906 was calculated. Using the Helix-MC Plus mass spectrometer, we measured Ne abundances in the CREU-1 quartz standard [3] and determined cosmogenic concentrations by subtraction of atmospheric Ne with the new atmospheric 21Ne/20Ne value. The average concentration of cosmogenic 21Ne determined from four repeated analyses is 338 ± 12 × 106 atom/g (2σ). This compares with the average concentration of 348 ± 10 × 106 atom/g (2σ) from 45 analyses determined by several laboratories [3], where Ne isotope analyses were undertaken by conventional low resolution mass spectrometers and atmospheric Ne was subtracted using the conventional atmospheric 21Ne/20Ne [2]. On this basis, for a sample with abundant cosmogenic Ne, like CREU-1 quartz, previously measured by low mass resolution mass spectrometers are likely valid and their geological implications are unaffected. However, for low 21Ne concentration samples, combining new generation of mass spectrometers as well as the new atmospheric ratio may have significance for cosmogenic 21Ne surface exposure dating. References: [1] Honda M., et. al., International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, 387, 1 (2015). [2] Eberhardt P., et. al., Zeitschrift fur Naturforschung, 20

  17. Cosmogenic production of tritium in dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaré, J.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Coarasa, I.; Cuesta, C.; Dafni, T.; Galán, J.; García, E.; Garza, J. G.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Mirallas, H.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Puimedón, J.; Ruiz-Chóliz, E.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2018-01-01

    The direct detection of dark matter particles requires ultra-low background conditions at energies below a few tens of keV. Radioactive isotopes are produced via cosmogenic activation in detectors and other materials and those isotopes constitute a background source which has to be under control. In particular, tritium is specially relevant due to its decay properties (very low endpoint energy and long half-life) when induced in the detector medium, and because it can be generated in any material as a spallation product. Quantification of cosmogenic production of tritium is not straightforward, neither experimentally nor by calculations. In this work, a method for the calculation of production rates at sea level has been developed and applied to some of the materials typically used as targets in dark matter detectors (germanium, sodium iodide, argon and neon); it is based on a selected description of tritium production cross sections over the entire energy range of cosmic nucleons. Results have been compared to available data in the literature, either based on other calculations or from measurements. The obtained tritium production rates, ranging from a few tens to a few hundreds of nuclei per kg and per day at sea level, point to a significant contribution to the background in dark matter experiments, requiring the application of specific protocols for target material purification, material storing underground and limiting the time the detector is on surface during the building process in order to minimize the exposure to the most dangerous cosmic ray components.

  18. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  19. U–Th and 10Be constraints on sediment recycling in proglacial settings, Lago Buenos Aires, Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cogez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of sediment transfer times remains a challenge to our understanding of sediment budgets and the relationships between erosion and climate. Uranium (U and thorium (Th isotope disequilibria offer a means of more robustly constraining sediment transfer times. Here, we present new uranium and thorium disequilibrium data for a series of nested moraines around Lago Buenos Aires in Argentine Patagonia. The glacial chronology for the area is constrained using in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis of glacial outwash. Sediment transfer times within the periglacial domain were estimated by comparing the deposition ages of moraines to the theoretical age of sediment production, i.e., the comminution age inferred from U disequilibrium data and recoil loss factor estimates. Our data show first that the classical comminution age approach must include weathering processes accounted for by measuring Th disequilibrium. Second, our combined data suggest that the pre-deposition history of the moraine sediments is not negligible, as evidenced by the large disequilibrium of the youngest moraines despite the equilibrium of the corresponding glacial flour. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that weathering was more intense before the deposition of the moraines and that the transfer time of the fine sediments to the moraines was on the order of 100–200 kyr. Long transfer times could result from a combination of long sediment residence times in the proglacial lake (recurrence time of a glacial cycle and the remobilization of sediments from moraines deposited during previous glacial cycles. 10Be data suggest that some glacial cycles are absent from the preserved moraine record (seemingly every second cycle, supporting a model of reworking moraines and/or fluctuations in the extent of glacial advances. The chronological pattern is consistent with the U–Th disequilibrium data and the 100–200 kyr transfer time. This long transfer time raises the

  20. Experimental Determination of the Cosmogenic Ar Production Rate From Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, S.; Schäfer, J. M.; Wieler, R.; Naumann, R.

    2005-12-01

    Cosmogenic 38Ar is produced in terrestrial surface rocks by spallation of target nuclides, in particular K and Ca. Though the presence of cosmogenic Ar in Ca-rich minerals has been demonstrated earlier [1], is has proven difficult to establish its production rate. To circumvent problems connected to 36Ar production by 35Cl neutron capture and different production rates from K and Ca, we have analyzed the noble gases in seven pyroxene separates (px) from the Antarctic Dry Valleys which are essentially free of Cl and K. The px were obtained from dolerite rocks, for which 3He and 21Ne exposure ages from 1.5 to 6.5 Ma have been reported [2]. The noble gases were extracted in two or three heating steps at GFZ Potsdam, yielding 38Ar/36Ar ratios up to 0.2283 ± 0.0008 (air: 0.1880). Ca (3.7-11.2 wt. %) is expected to be the only relevant target element for Ar production in the five pure px (ratio of 1.5 ± 0.2, we obtain cosmogenic 38Ar concentrations between 130 and 530x106 atoms/g. The 38Ar production rate was calculated based on 21Ne exposure ages [2], corrected for elevated nuclide production in Antarctica due to prevailing low air pressure and for the revised 21Ne production rate from Si. We obtain values between 188 ± 17 and 243 +110/-24 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1 at sea level and high (northern) latitudes for four out of the five pure px, while one yields a very high value of 348 ± 70 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1. Values above 250 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1 are also obtained from two less pure px containing 0.3 and 0.9% K and from one feldspar/quartz accumulate, indicating that the production rate from K may be higher than that from Ca. The weighted mean (excluding the outlier) of ~200 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1 is in excellent agreement with Lal's [3] theoretical estimate. [1] Renne et al., EPSL 188 (2001) 435. [2] Schäfer et al., EPSL 167 (1999) 215. [3] Lal, EPSL 104 (1991) 424.

  1. Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Teens / Dating Violence Bulletins for Teens: Dating Violence What is it? If you are a victim ... often. If You Are a Victim of Dating Violence, You Might… Think it's your fault. Feel angry, ...

  2. Erosion of mountain plateaus along Sognefjord, Norway, constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    –climate–erosion) hypothesis. Journal of Geodynamics 47(2), 72-95, 2009. Steer et al. Bimodal Plio-Quaternary glacial erosion of fjords and low-relief surfaces in Scandinavia. Na- ture Geoscience 5(9), 635-639, 2012. Egholm et al. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 2: Modelling large-scale landscape evolu- tion......Norway is famous for its deeply incised, steep-sided fjords, carved out by glacial erosion. The high relief of the fjords stands in contrast to the extensive areas of relatively low relief found between the fjords. The origin and development of these low-relief areas remain debated. The classical...... instead to a significant impact of glacial and periglacial erosion processes on the long-term development of the low-relief surfaces (Egholm et al. 2015). Here, we present a large new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from the high, flat summit surfaces along...

  3. Natural climate variability inferred from cosmogenic isotopes and other geophysical data and its impact on human activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creer, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    The way how natural climate changes may have influenced anthropological development is discussed. The main characteristics of solar variability are reviewed: (1) as measured in detail over recent decades by instruments on-board artificial satellites; (2) as recorded in historical documents on the time-scale of centuries; and (3) as inferred on millennial time-scales from archived records of the cosmogenically generated isotopes 14 C and 10 Be. The older, proxy data comprise temperature changes reconstructed from tree ring studies and environmental changes deduced from multi-disciplinary studies of lake sediments. The effects of changes in ocean circulation and the sporadic influence of volcanic activity are also considered briefly. (author)

  4. Distribution of cosmogenic 7Be in environmental matrices around Kudankulam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, B.S.; George, Thomas; Vijayakumar, B.; Ravi, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    7 Be is a naturally occurring cosmogenic radionuclide produced in the atmosphere through the spallation of nitrogen and oxygen nuclei by cosmic ray produced neutrons and protons. Due to its continuous production in the atmosphere, its relatively short half-life (53.3 days), and its ease of measurement by gamma spectrometry, 7 Be has proven to be a useful tool for tracing and quantifying environmental processes such as atmospheric deposition, atmospheric transport and soil erosion etc. Therefore a systematic study is undertaken to estimate the concentration of 7 Be in different environmental compartments around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site. This study discusses the results of the concentration of 7 Be obtained in surface air, dry deposition, rain water and some plant species around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant

  5. Surface Uplift Rate Constrained by Multiple Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclides: Theory and Application from the Central Andean Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, D. F.; Hoke, G. D.; Niedermann, S.; Wittmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    There is widespread interest in quantifying the growth and decay of topography. However, prominent methods for quantitative determinations of paleoelevation rely on assumptions that are often difficult to test. For example, stable isotope paleoaltimetry relies on the knowledge of past lapse rates and moisture sources. Here, we demonstrate how cosmogenic 10Be - 21Ne and/or 10Be - 26Al sample pairs can be applied to provide independent estimates of surface uplift rate using both published data and new data from the Atacama Desert. Our approach requires a priori knowledge of the maximum age of exposure of the sampled surface. Ignimbrite surfaces provide practical sampling targets. When erosion is very slow (roughly, ≤1 m/Ma), it is often possible to constrain paleo surface uplift rate with precision comparable to that of stable isotopic methods (approximately ±50%). The likelihood of a successful measurement is increased by taking n samples from a landscape surface and solving for one regional paleo surface uplift rate and n local erosion rates. In northern Chile, we solve for surface uplift and erosion rates using three sample groups from the literature (Kober et al., 2007). In the two lower elevation groups, we calculate surface uplift rates of 110 (+60/-12) m/Myr and 160 (+120/-6) m/Myr and estimate uncertainties with a bootstrap approach. The rates agree with independent estimates derived from stream profile analyses nearby (Hoke et al., 2007). Our calculated uplift rates correspond to total uplift of 1200 and 850 m, respectively, when integrated over appropriate timescales. Erosion rates were too high to reliably calculate the uplift rate in the third, high elevation group. New cosmogenic nuclide analyses from the Atacama Desert are in progress, and preliminary results are encouraging. In particular, a replicate sample in the vicinity of the first Kober et al. (2007) group independently yields a surface uplift rate of 110 m/Myr. Compared to stable isotope

  6. Landscape Evolution Mechanisms in Gale Crater from In-Situ Measurement of Cosmogenic Noble Gas Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Farley, K. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Vasconcelos, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover can measure the noble gas isotopes contained in drilled rock samples on Mars by heating these samples to 930°C. In combination with bulk chemistry measured by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), cosmogenic nuclide production rates can be determined and an exposure age may be calculated. Three cosmogenic nuclides are measured: 3He, and 21Ne, which are produced via spallation of mainly O, Mg, Si, and Al (held mostly in detrital grains); and 36Ar, which is produced from neutron capture of 35Cl (held mostly in secondary materials). To date, three samples have been measured: Cumberland (CB), Windjana (WJ), and Mojave 2 (MJ2). CB yielded 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar ages of 72 ± 15, 84 ± 28, and 79 ± 24 Ma, respectively [Farley et al., 2014]. Two aliquots of WJ gave error-weighted mean ages of 30 ± 27 Ma (3He), 54 ± 19 Ma (21Ne), and 63 ± 84 Ma (36Ar) [Vasconcelos et al., 2016]. These relatively young ages were interpreted to suggest that a scarp-retreat mechanism is responsible for erosion at both the CB and WJ localities. The most recent measurements on MJ2 do not include the 21Ne isotope because of an instrument issue at this mass. 3He observed in MJ2 is the highest of any sample yet measured, suggesting an exposure age of approximately 1 Ga. In contrast, the calculated exposure age from 36Ar appears to be less than 100 Ma (despite a high uncertainty due to isobaric H35Cl). This discrepancy could be explained by 1) a contribution of extraterrestrial 3He from interplanetary dust or meteoritic fragments, or 2) approximately 1 Ga of prior exposure to the detrital grains. In the latter case 36Ar accumulates only after the Cl-bearing secondary minerals are formed and exposed at the surface. In either scenario the 36Ar measurement provides the better estimate of the recent exposure history. The young upper limit for 36Ar at MJ2 is consistent with the scarp-retreat mechanism observed at CB and

  7. Tectonic-Volcanic Interplay in the Dabbahu Segment of the Afar Rift from Cosmogenic 3He Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Lahitte, P.; Yirgu, G.; Adem, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Afar Rift in Ethiopia is one of the only subaerial locations in the world where the transition from continental break-up to oceanic-spreading can be observed. Extension and volcanism in the Afar is concentrated in tectono-magmatic segments (TMS), similar in size and morphology to those that characterise spreading ridges. The Dabbahu TMS is the southernmost of the western Afar and has recently been the site of significant activity. A massive seismic event in late 2005, triggered by the injection of an 8-m wide dyke, heralded the onset of a new rifting period in the Dabbahu TMS. Volcanic activity associated with the periods of magma-driven extension, which have recurred at 4-8 mth intervals, has been both silicic (explosive) and basaltic (fissural). The most recent activity in the Afar thus testifies to the close interplay of tectonics and magmatism in rifting environments. In an effort to decipher the long-term structural and volcanic evolution of Dabbahu TMS we have employed the cosmogenic nuclide dating technique to provide chronological data for the segment. This method has advantages over other geochronological tools in that we can target both volcanic and tectonic surfaces of a few Kyr to several Myr age. Baddi Volcano, located off-axis on the western margin of the TMS, is a bimodal central stratovolcano typical of the Afar TMS. Late-stage basaltic lava flows cap an acidic base, which has been dated at 290 ± 4 ka using the K-Ar technique (Lahitte et al., 2003). Following preliminary sampling in 2007, we have determined a cosmogenic 3He age of 53.4 ± 3.7 ka from multiple samples from one of the basaltic flows on the NW flank of Baddi. These data show a significant time gap (240 Kyr) between the final phase of acidic volcanism and the onset of basaltic activity at the central volcanoes, presumably related to the rate of magma chamber replenishment. To test whether the spectacular shift to basaltic activity at 53 ka represents replenishment of the entire sub

  8. Meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in marine sedimentary records: Deciphering the mixing between their marine and terrestrial sources and influence of costal trace metal fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Mohtadi, M.; Christl, M.; Bernhardt, A.

    2017-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be to stable 9Be ratios combine a cosmogenic nuclide produced in the atmosphere at a rate known from reconstructions of magnetic field strength with a stable isotope that records the present and past continental weathering and erosion flux. In seawater, the 10Be/9Be ratio provides important information on metal release from bottom sediments, called boundary exchange, and the oceanic mixing of reactive trace metals due to the inherently different sources of the two isotopes. When measured in the authigenic phase of marine sediments, the 10Be/9Be ratio allows deriving the feedbacks between erosion, weathering, and climate in the geologic past. At an ocean margin site 37°S offshore Chile, we use the 10Be/9Be ratio to trace changes in terrestrial particulate composition due to exchange with seawater. We analyzed the reactive (sequentially extracted) phase of marine surface sediments along a coast-perpendicular transect, and compared to samples from their riverine source. We find evidence for growth of authigenic rims through co-precipitation, not via reversible adsorption, that incorporate an open ocean 10Be/9Be signature from a deep water source only 30 km from the coast, thereby overprinting terrestrial riverine 10Be/9Be signatures. We show that the measured 10Be/9Be ratios in marine sediments comprise a mixture between seawater-derived and riverine-sourced phases. As 10Be/9Be ratios increase due to exchange with seawater, particulate-bound Fe concentrations increase, which we attribute to release of Fe-rich pore waters during boundary exchange in the sediment. The implications for the use of 10Be/9Be in sedimentary records for paleo-denudation flux reconstructions are that in coast-proximal sites that are neither affected by deeper water nor by narrow boundary currents, the authigenic record will be a direct recorder of terrigenous denudation of the adjacent river catchments. Hence archive location and past oceanic circulation have to be accounted for

  9. Using 10Be erosion rates and fluvial channel morphology to constrain fault throw rates in the southwestern Sacramento River Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, is a critical region for California water resources, agriculture, and threatened or endangered species. This landscape is affected by an extensive set of levees that enclose artificial islands created for agricultural use. In addition to their importance for sustaining agriculture, this levee system also supports extensive transport and power transmission infrastructure and urban/suburban development. These levees are susceptible to damage from even moderate ground shaking by either a large earthquake on one of the high-activity faults in the nearby San Francisco Bay region, or even a moderate earthquake on one of the low-activity faults in the Delta region itself. However, despite this danger the earthquake hazards in this region are poorly constrained due to our lack of understanding of faults in and near the Delta region. As part of an effort to better constrain the seismic hazard associated with known, but poorly constrained, faults in the region, a geomorphic analysis of the Dunnigan Hills, northwest of Woodland, CA, is being combined with cosmogenic 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates. The Dunnigan Hills are a low-relief (maximum elevation 87 m) landscape generated by fault-bend folding above the west-vergent Sweitzer reverse fault that soles into a blind east-vergent reverse fault. These faults have been imaged by seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity indicates that this system is actively propagating to the east. However, the throw rates on the faults in this system remain unconstrained, despite the potential for significant shaking such as that experienced in the nearby April, 1892 earthquake sequence between Winters and Vacaville, Ca, ~25 km to the south, which has been estimated at magnitude 6.0 or greater. Geomorphic and cosmogenic 10Be analyses from 12 catchments draining the eastern flank of the Dunnigan Hills will be used to infer vertical rock uplift rates to better constrain

  10. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  11. 10Be in late deglacial climate simulated by ECHAM5-HAM - Part 2: Isolating the solar signal from 10Be deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, U.; Shi, X.; Phipps, S. J.; Smith, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of deglacial climate on the deposition of the solar proxy 10Be globally, and at two specific locations, the GRIP site at Summit, Central Greenland, and the Law Dome site in coastal Antarctica. The deglacial climate is represented by three 30 year time slice simulations of 10 000 BP (years before present = 1950 CE), 11 000 and 12 000 BP, compared with a preindustrial control simulation. The model used is the ECHAM5-HAM atmospheric aerosol-climate model, driven with sea-surface temperatures and sea ice cover simulated using the CSIRO Mk3L coupled climate system model. The focus is on isolating the 10Be production signal, driven by solar variability, from the weather- or climate-driven noise in the 10Be deposition flux during different stages of climate. The production signal varies at lower frequencies, dominated by the 11 year solar cycle within the 30 year timescale of these experiments. The climatic noise is of higher frequencies than 11 years during the 30 year period studied. We first apply empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to global 10Be deposition on the annual scale and find that the first principal component, consisting of the spatial pattern of mean 10Be deposition and the temporally varying solar signal, explains 64% of the variability. The following principal components are closely related to those of precipitation. Then, we apply ensemble empirical decomposition (EEMD) analysis to the time series of 10Be deposition at GRIP and at Law Dome, which is an effective method for adaptively decomposing the time series into different frequency components. The low-frequency components and the long-term trend represent production and have reduced noise compared to the entire frequency spectrum of the deposition. The high-frequency components represent climate-driven noise related to the seasonal cycle of e.g. precipitation and are closely connected to high frequencies of precipitation. These results firstly show that

  12. Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  13. Cosmogenic nuclide age estimate for Laurentide Ice Sheet recession from the terminal moraine, New Jersey, USA, and constraints on latest Pleistocene ice sheet history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Stone, Byron D.; Caffee, Marc W.; Larsen, Patrick L.

    2017-01-01

    The time at which the Laurentide Ice Sheet reached its maximum extent and subsequently retreated from its terminal moraine in New Jersey has been constrained by bracketing radiocarbon ages on preglacial and postglacial sediments. Here, we present measurements of in situ produced 10Be and 26Al in 16 quartz-bearing samples collected from bedrock outcrops and glacial erratics just north of the terminal moraine in north-central New Jersey; as such, our ages represent a minimum limit on the timing of ice recession from the moraine. The data set includes field and laboratory replicates, as well as replication of the entire data set five years after initial measurement. We find that recession of the Laurentide Ice Sheet from the terminal moraine in New Jersey began before 25.2±2.1 ka (10Be, n=16, average, 1 standard deviation). This cosmogenic nuclide exposure age is consistent with existing limiting radiocarbon ages in the study area and cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages from the terminal moraine on Martha’s Vineyard ~300 km to the northeast. The age we propose for Laurentide Ice Sheet retreat from the New Jersey terminal position is broadly consistent with regional and global climate records of the last glacial maximum termination and records of fluvial incision.

  14. Cosmogenic isotope beryllium-7 in the atmosphere: Production versus transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Alessandra; Usoskin, Ilya; Evangelista, Heitor; Echer, Ezequiel; Mursula, Kalevi; Leppanen, Ari-Pekka

    Cosmogenic isotope 7 Be measured near the ground can provide information about its produc-tion (that occurs in the atmosphere due to the interaction of cosmic rays and atmospheric constituents) and its deposition processes (that involves air mass dynamics, stratosphere-troposphere coupling and local climatic conditions). We present the results of an investigation of the atmospheric 7 Be temporal variations at different geographic locations (Finland and Brazil). This study was based on an analysis of three time series of 7 Be concentration measured in near-surface air samples from Rovaniemi and Loviisa (Finland) and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) for the last decades. We made use of the wavelet spectral method to identify the frequency-temporal features of the 7 Be temporal variations that allowed us to determine the relative importance of production and deposition process for the observed data. By comparing these time series with climatic indices and the values of 7 Be concentration expected from the model for the same period, we found that the climate system is the main driver of the surface isotopic modulation, while the imprints of the production variations are geographically dependent. Thus,7 Be can be considered a good tool to monitor the large-scale air mass dynamics.

  15. Possible cosmogenic neutrino constraints on Planck-scale Lorentz violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, David M.; Maccione, Luca; Galaverni, Matteo; Liberati, Stefano; Sigl, Günter

    2010-01-01

    We study, within an effective field theory framework, O(E 2 M Pl 2 ) Planck-scale suppressed Lorentz invariance violation (LV) effects in the neutrino sector, whose size we parameterize by a dimensionless parameter η ν . We find deviations from predictions of Lorentz invariant physics in the cosmogenic neutrino spectrum. For positive O(1) coefficients no neutrino will survive above 10 19 eV. The existence of this cutoff generates a bump in the neutrino spectrum at energies of 10 17 eV. Although at present no constraint can be cast, as current experiments do not have enough sensitivity to detect ultra-high-energy neutrinos, we show that experiments in construction or being planned have the potential to cast limits as strong as η ν ∼ −4 on the neutrino LV parameter, depending on how LV is distributed among neutrino mass states. Constraints on η ν < 0 can in principle be obtained with this strategy, but they require a more detailed modeling of how LV affects the neutrino sector

  16. Enhanced cosmological GRB rates and implications for cosmogenic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueksel, Hasan; Kistler, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, which are among the most violent events in the Universe, are one of the few viable candidates to produce ultra high-energy cosmic rays. Recently, observations have revealed that GRBs generally originate from metal-poor, low-luminosity galaxies and do not directly trace cosmic star formation, as might have been assumed from their association with core-collapse supernovae. Several implications follow from these findings. The redshift distribution of observed GRBs is expected to peak at higher redshift (compared to cosmic star formation), which is supported by the mean redshift of the Swift GRB sample, ∼3. If GRBs are, in fact, the source of the observed UHECR, then cosmic-ray production would evolve with redshift in a stronger fashion than has been previously suggested. This necessarily leads, through the GZK process, to an enhancement in the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos, providing a near-term approach for testing the gamma-ray burst-cosmic-ray connection with ongoing and proposed UHE neutrino experiments

  17. Possible cosmogenic neutrino constraints on Planck-scale Lorentz violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, David M. [New Hamshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States); Maccione, Luca [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Galaverni, Matteo [INAF-IASF Bologna (Italy); Liberati, Stefano [INFN, Trieste (Italy); SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2009-11-15

    We study, within an effective field theory framework, O(E{sup 2}/M{sup 2}{sub Pl}) Planck-scale suppressed Lorentz invariance violation (LV) effects in the neutrino sector, whose size we parameterize by a dimensionless parameter {eta}{sub {nu}}. We find deviations from predictions of Lorentz invariant physics in the cosmogenic neutrino spectrum. For positive O(1) coefficients no neutrino will survive above 10{sup 19} eV. The existence of this cutoff generates a bump in the neutrino spectrum at energies of 10{sup 17} eV. Although at present no constraint can be cast, as current experiments do not have enough sensitivity to detect ultra-high-energy neutrinos, we show that experiments in construction or being planned have the potential to cast limits as strong as {eta}{sub {nu}}

  18. Tectonics and Unroofing of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California, from Low-Temperature Thermochronology and Catchment-Averaged 10Be-Derived Denudation Rates (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, G. E.; Burgmann, R.; Dumitru, T. A.; Ebert, Y.; Fosdick, J. C.; Le, K.; Levine, N. M.; Wilson, A.; Gudmundsdottir, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present eleven Apatite Fission Track (AFT) and Apatite (U-Th)/He (A-He) analyses and eighteen catchment-averaged cosmogenic 10Be denudation rates from the Santa Cruz Mountains (SCM) that resolve the unroofing history of this range over the past several Myr. This range lies within a restraining bend in the San Andreas Fault (SAF), which appears to be fixed to the crust on the northeast side of the fault based on previous work. In this view, the topographic asymmetry of the SCM reflects the advection of material southwest of the right-lateral SAF through a zone of uplift centered on the restraining bend, while material northwest of the fault remains trapped this zone. Northeast of the fault bend in the Sierra Azul block of the SCM, AFT ages adjacent to the SAF appear completely reset during the Pliocene, and show partial resetting at the periphery of the block. This suggests that total exhumation exceeded 3-4 km within the heart of the block and was SCM are near mass flux steady state over the timescales captured by the CRN (~1.5-6.5 ka). Nonetheless, the extent of topography in areas far from the bend suggests that there may be some component of regional fault-normal contraction and/or that this steady state has not been fully attained because of geomorphic lags and isostatic adjustments.

  19. Influence of ground level enhancements on the terrestrial production of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Konstantin; Heber, Bernd [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Beer, Juerg [Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, EAWAG (Switzerland); Tylka, Allan J. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Dietrich, William F. [Praxis, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are a product of the interaction of primary cosmic rays, in particular galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), with the Earth's atmosphere. But only primary particles with energies above several 100 MeV can trigger the necessary reaction chains. Because GCRs are modulated by the solar activity on their way through the interplanetary medium the GCR-induced cosmogenic radionuclide production is anti-correlated to the solar cycle. During phases of strong solar activity also solar energetic particle (SEP) events occur frequently. In particular SEP events which can be detected by ground-based instruments, so-called ground level enhancements (GLEs), may strongly contribute to the cosmogenic radionuclide production. Beside the variation due to the modulation of GCRs we investigate the influence of 58 GLEs, which occurred within the past five solar cycles and discuss the possibility to detect such events in present ice-core and tree-ring records. In addition, an estimate for the probability to find such events over the past 10'000 years, also known as Holocene, during different modulation conditions are given.

  20. SOLAR WIND IMPLANTATION MODEL FOR 10Be IN CALCIUM-ALUMINUM INCLUSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model for the incorporation of 10 Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, 10 Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This 10 Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting 10 Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of 10 Be at the surface of the Sun is ∼0.1 10 Be cm -2 s -1 . Scaling up the contemporary 10 Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 10 5 would increase the production rate to 10 410 Be cm -2 s -1 . Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model 10 Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted 10 Be would have been of the order of 10 1210 Be g -1 in CAIs, consistent with initial 10 Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  1. A Numerical Model to Assess Soil Fluxes from Meteoric 10Be Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, B.; Govers, G.; Vanacker, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Smolders, E.; Baken, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be may be mobile in the soil system. The latter hampers a direct translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into spatial variations in erosion and deposition rates. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows us to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system. The Be2D model is then used to analyse the potential impact of human-accelerated soil fluxes on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile including particle migration, chemical leaching and bioturbation, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes from creep, water and tillage erosion. Model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can indeed be related to erosion and deposition, across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. However, quantification of the effects of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed spatial patterns in 10Be data. Moreover, our simulations suggest that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to unravel human impact on soil fluxes when soils have a high retention capacity for meteoric meteoric 10Be. Application of the Be2D model to existing data sets shows that model parameters can reliably be constrained, resulting in a good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories. This confirms the suitability of the Be2D model as a robust tool to underpin quantitative interpretations of spatial variability in meteoric 10Be data for eroding landscapes.

  2. Survey on Cosmogenic 26Al in Lewis Cliff Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Alderliesten, C.; Lindner, L.

    1992-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have embarked upon a ^26Al gamma-ray survey of meteorites selected from about 2000 samples recently recovered from the Lewis Cliff Ice Fields (84 degrees 18'S/161 degrees 20'E). Due to its 705-ka half-life ^26Al can be used for estimating terrestrial ages and thus contribute to further characterization of Antarctic meteorites in addition to their classification and thermoluminescence (TL) properties. The ^26Al survey is also useful for identifying meteorites with unusual exposure histories, which merit additional measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides (by AMS) and noble gases. In addition, it provides clues on possible pairings. METHOD: Low-level gamma-ray spectroscopy is well suited for ^26Al survey work, since bulk meteorite samples can be measured routinely and nondestructively without any previous sample preparation. The required size of the samples (30-500 g) makes the method relatively independent of depth effects and compositional inhomogeneities. The use of a high-resolution GeLi detector also allows the determination of the natural ^40K activity and thus the K content of the samples, which can be used as an additional pairing criterion for ordinary chondrites. Also ^137Cs, a fall-out surface contamination [1], is simultaneously measured; low values may be characteristic for meteorites recently fallen or released from the ablating ice. For the detector an efficiency calibration curve has been made that adequately accounts for differences in size and shape of the meteorite samples. RESULTS and DISCUSSION: TERRESTRIAL AGES: So far, we have measured over 30 Lewis Cliff equilibrated H and L chondrites, collected from widely differing locations. Normalized to L-chondrite composition, the ^26Al contents range from 27 to 110 dpm/kg with peaks around 43 and 53 dpm/kg. This bimodal ^26Al distribution is reminiscent of that observed for Allan Hills ordinary chondrites [2]. Tentative terrestrial ages, calculated on the basis of ^26Al saturation

  3. 10Be application to soil development on Marion Island, southern Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussmann, N.; Aldahan, A.; Boelhouwers, J.; Possnert, G.

    2010-01-01

    Marion Island, located in the southern Indian Ocean, constitutes the summit of an active shield volcano. It is a small terrestrial environment where glacially abraded bedrock became exposed c x 10 kyr ago. These conditions provide an interesting possibility for the assessment of 10 Be accumulation rates and their application to soil erosion studies on the island. 10 Be concentrations were measured in precipitation, soil profiles and an Azorella selago cushion plant. The data reveal a 10 Be precipitation flux several times higher than model prediction. Estimation of the 10 Be accumulation based on the soil inventory suggests a span between 2000 and 7000 yr. This time span is not in accordance with the accepted notion that the island was covered with ice about 10,000 yr ago and suggests either removal of 10 Be from the soil profile, an overestimated Holocene 10 Be-flux or a delayed soil development history. Our results provide new data on 10 Be concentrations from the sub-Antarctic islands and contribute towards enlarging the southern-hemisphere 10 Be database.

  4. High resolution 10Be and 230Th profiles in DSDP site 580

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhauer, A.; Mangini, A.; Segl, M.; Beer, J.; Bonani, G.; Suter, M.; Woelfli, W.

    1987-01-01

    10 Be and 230 Th profiles were measured at Site 580 at a depth of 20 m ( 230 Th and 10 Be) and 80 m ( 10 Be), corresponding to 360 ka and 1.5 Ma, respectively, with a resolution of approx. 5000 a. The radiometric sediment accumulation rates of 6.2 cm/ka (±25%) agree well with the average for the last 730 ka (via paleomagnetic stratigraphy). Age corrected concentrations of 10 Be range from 2 to 7x10 9 atoms/g (average 3.5±1). The variations of the 10 Be concentrations can be explained by changes in the sediment supply during different climatic conditions. The maxima and the minima of 10 Be follow the fluctuations of excess 230 Th in the core section during the last 360 ka. Fluxes of both 10 Be and 230 Th exceed production and vary remarkably throughout time suggesting enhanced scavenging by bioproductivity. At the Brunhess-Matuyama boundary we observe a maximum of 10 Be (6.0±0.3x10 9 atoms/g, corresponding to 2.5 σ deviation from the average value). However, the observed large fluctuations of Be-10 throughout the core profile make it difficult to interprete this particular maximum. (orig.)

  5. Cosmogenic 45Sc in Gibeon iron meteorite by radioanalytical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oura, Y.; Honda, M.; Ebihara, M.; Bajo, K.; Nagao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides in many fragments of Gibeon iron meteorite have been studied by Honda and coworkers. They observed that their concentrations varied by 5 orders and found that Gibeon gives two different exposure ages using pair of stable noble gas isotopes and radinuclide. To assess one possible cause for the difference, namely loss of partial noble gases due to atmospheric heating of the incoming meteoroid, concentrations of non-volatile and stable cosmogenic 45 Sc of Gibeon were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). For RNAA, a radiochemical procedure using extraction chromatography was developed to separate Sc from an iron meteorite. Concentrations of 45 Sc in 7 fragments ranged from 0.0064 to 0.11 ppb and correlated with cosmogenic 4 He concentrations. This correlation suggests that noble gases in Gibeon were not lost during the fall to the earth. (orig.)

  6. Cosmogenic activation of germanium used for tonne-scale rare event search experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.-Z.; Mei, D.-M.; Zhang, C.

    2017-11-01

    We report a comprehensive study of cosmogenic activation of germanium used for tonne-scale rare event search experiments. The germanium exposure to cosmic rays on the Earth's surface are simulated with and without a shielding container using Geant4 for a given cosmic muon, neutron, and proton energy spectrum. The production rates of various radioactive isotopes are obtained for different sources separately. We find that fast neutron induced interactions dominate the production rate of cosmogenic activation. Geant4-based simulation results are compared with the calculation of ACTIVIA and the available experimental data. A reasonable agreement between Geant4 simulations and several experimental data sets is presented. We predict that cosmogenic activation of germanium can set limits to the sensitivity of the next generation of tonne-scale experiments.

  7. Timing of maximum glacial extent and deglaciation from HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru), obtained with cosmogenic 36Cl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Vazquez, Lorenzo; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Andean glacial deposits are key records of climate fluctuations in the southern hemisphere. During the last decades, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have provided fresh and significant dates to determine past glacier behavior in this region. But still there are many important discrepancies such as the impact of Last Glacial Maximum or the influence of Late Glacial climatic events on glacial mass balances. Furthermore, glacial chronologies from many sites are still missing, such as HualcaHualca (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a high volcano of the Peruvian Andes located 70 km northwest of Arequipa. The goal of this study is to establish the age of the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) and deglaciation at HualcaHualca volcano. To achieve this objetive, we focused in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) characterized by a well-preserved sequence of moraines and roches moutonnées. The method is based on geomorphological analysis supported by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. 36Cl ages have been estimated with the CHLOE calculator and were compared with other central Andean glacial chronologies as well as paleoclimatological proxies. In Huayuray valley, exposure ages indicates that MGE occurred ~ 18 - 16 ka. Later, the ice mass gradually retreated but this process was interrupted by at least two readvances; the last one has been dated at ~ 12 ka. In the other hand, 36Cl result reflects a MGE age of ~ 13 ka in Mollebaya valley. Also, two samples obtained in Pujro-Huayjo and Mucurca valleys associated with MGE have an exposure age of 10-9 ka, but likely are moraine boulders affected by exhumation or erosion processes. Deglaciation in HualcaHualca volcano began abruptly ~ 11.5 ka ago according to a 36Cl age from a polished and striated bedrock in Pujro Huayjo valley, presumably as a result of reduced precipitation as well as a global increase of temperatures. The glacier evolution at HualcaHualca volcano presents a high correlation with

  8. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  10. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2012-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  12. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Further improvement for {sup 10}Be measurement on an upgraded compact AMS radiocarbon facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Dongpo; Ding, Xingfang [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871,China (China); Liu, Kexin, E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871,China (China); Müller, Arnold Milenko; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Zhou, Liping [Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Synal, Hans-Arno [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    The Peking University 500 kV NEC compact AMS radiocarbon facility (PKU-CAMS) has been modified in order to have additionally the possibility to measure {sup 10}Be. In the preliminary experiment a silicon nitride foil was mounted in front of the electrostatic deflector as passive boron degrader, and the original Si detector for radiocarbon detection was replaced by an ETHZ-designed high-resolution ΔE − E{sub res} gas ionization chamber (GIC) for {sup 10}Be identification. This simple arrangement has yielded an overall {sup 10}Be transmission of 2.2% and a {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be background level of 3.5 × 10{sup −14}. To further reduce the background and increase the transmission by re-focusing the {sup 10}Be ions, an additional 90° bending magnet with 350 mm radius was installed after the electrostatic deflector. The silicon detector was shifted slightly relative to its position of original NEC system setup in opposite direction of beam and can be lifted up manually without breaking vacuum when {sup 10}Be measurements are carried out. In this way the system can be easily and fast set up for {sup 10}Be without affecting any parameters for radiocarbon measurement. The gas detector for {sup 10}Be was mounted at the end of the beam line after the additional magnet. The lay-out of the upgraded spectrometer is very compact and does not require more space than the original instrument. Using this compact setup, the overall transmission for {sup 10}Be was doubled to 5–6% and the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be background level was reduced to radios as low as 2.4 × 10{sup −15}.

  14. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  15. Radiometric dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdon, B.

    2003-01-01

    The general principle of isotope dating methods is based on the presence of radioactive isotopes in the geologic or archaeological object to be dated. The decay with time of these isotopes is used to determine the 'zero' time corresponding to the event to be dated. This paper recalls the general principle of isotope dating methods (bases, analytical methods, validation of results and uncertainties) and presents the methods based on natural radioactivity (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, Re-Os, K-Ar (Ar-Ar), U-Th-Ra- 210 Pb, U-Pa, 14 C, 36 Cl, 10 Be) and the methods based on artificial radioactivity with their applications. Finally, the methods based on irradiation damages (thermoluminescence, fission tracks, electron spin resonance) are briefly evoked. (J.S.)

  16. Applications of in situ cosmogenic nuclides in the geologic site characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosse, J.C.; Harrington, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The gradual buildup of rare isotopes from interactions between cosmic rays and atoms in an exposed rock provides a new method of directly determining the exposure age of rock surfaces. The cosmogenic nuclide method can also provide constraints on erosion rates and the length of time surface exposure was interrupted by burial. Numerous successful applications of the technique have been imperative to the complete surface geologic characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high level nuclear waste repository. In this short paper, we summarize the cosmogenic nuclide method and describe with examples some the utility of the technique in geologic site characterization. We report preliminary results from our ongoing work at Yucca Mountain

  17. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: 32Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of 36Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric 36Cl production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrat, Y.

    1997-06-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 32 Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of 32 Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured 32 Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 μBql -1 . These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured 32 Si/Si tot ratios ranged from 2.5.10 -17 to 2.3.10 -15 and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10 -14 , showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of 32 Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction 40 Ar(p,X) 36 Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X) 7 Be and N(p,X) 10 Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction 40 Ar(p,X) 36 Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,αn)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. A 10Be profile in mid-pleistocene sediments of the Wanganui Basin, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Sparks, R.J.; Whitehead, N.E.; Turner, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    A 10 Be study of marine sediments from the Wanganui Basin (Castlecliff Section) has yielded some interesting, though not immediately explainable results. A 5-6 fold increase in 10 Be has been identified immediately above the Brunhes-Matuyama paleomagnetic reversal within the sedimentary sequence, ca. 780 ka. The increase in 10 Be cannot be attributed entirely to the paleomagnetic reversal, and probably reflects the major global climatic change at that time resulting in an influx of 1 0Be during post-glacial melting. (authors) 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. 10Be and relative paleointensity signals across the last geomagnetic reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savranskaia, T.; Valet, J. P.; Bassinot, F. C.; Meynadier, L.; Simon, Q.; Bourles, D. L.; Thouveny, N.; Thevarasan, A.; Villedieu, A.; Choy, S.; Gacem, L.

    2017-12-01

    Two techniques can be used to determine the evolution of the geomagnetic field intensity in the past. The first one relies on records of relative paleointensity (RPI) in sediments. Although they remain relatively sparse detailed records of 10Be production (expressed in terms of 10Be/9Be) provide an alternative approach. However integration of 10Be within the sediment is not better understood than the magnetization process, and therefore paleofield studies should greatly benefit from the integration of both datasets. In order to achieve this goal, it is crucial to compare and analyze the signals over a common time period. We selected five sedimentary cores from the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and focused on the last reversal which is characterized by the largest intensity changes. Since 10Be is homogenized in the atmosphere, the same amount of 10Be should be recorded everywhere. We found different amounts of 10Be at each site during the last reversal which appear roughly correlated with accumulation rate. In contrast the 10Be amplitude is similar at all locations while higher amplitude signals are expected for low deposition rates. Taking advantage of the distribution of tektites layers, the beryllium signals have been deconvolved, but this procedure did not strikingly change the results. Despite atmospheric mixing we wonder whether 10Be production was slightly different at each location in presence of a multipolar transitional field. The comparison between the 10Be and RPI signals reveals large similarities but also puzzling differences. In particular, the relationship between the two signals is not the same during periods of stable polarity as during the transitional interval. A precursor with low intensity is present in several RPI records but not clearly marked on the beryllium records. We also addressed the question of a possible offset between the two signals that would be indicative of a delayed magnetization acquisition. After correlating and

  20. 10Be/230Th ratios as proxy for particle flux in the equatorial Pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.F.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Kubik, P.W.; Suter, M.

    1997-01-01

    Particulate 10 Be/ 230 Th ratios collected by sediment traps in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean exhibit a positive correlation with particle flux, but little or no correlation with particle composition. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs

  1. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  2. One Isotope, Two Tales: using plant and cosmogenic 14C to constrain Holocene glacier activity on Baffin Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, S.; Miller, G. H.; Lifton, N. A.; Young, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    As the cryosphere continues to undergo rapid and accelerating change, it is more important than ever to understand past glacier activity to predict the future of the cryosphere. However, continuous Holocene glacier records are notoriously difficult to reconstruct because an advancing glacier will re-incorporate previous deposits so that moraines typically only record the farthest downvalley glacier expansion. Here we combine dates of ice margin advance from in situ dead vegetation with in situ cosmogenic 14C (in situ 14C) from preserved bedrock surfaces at the same locations to further constrain the timing of ice-free episodes during the Holocene following deglaciation on southern Baffin Island. Radiocarbon ages from recently exposed in situ plants suggest that ice last advanced over sample locations at 9.4, 9.2, 9.0, and 3.7 ka and that they remained ice covered until modern times. Associated in situ 14C inventories are variable, but well above background levels, suggesting some amount of Holocene in situ 14C production. Using plant 14C ages representing the beginning of ice coverage and in situ 14C inventories representative of exposure prior to ice coverage, a simple model of cosmogenic in situ 14C production (accounting for muon production through ice) provides constraints timing and duration of ice-free times at sample locations prior to their most recent burial. Using conservative Holocene ice thicknesses, the locations buried at 9.4, 9.2, and 9.0 ka require, at minimum, 1000 years of pre-burial exposure to match the observed in situ 14C inventory. This suggests these locations were ice free by at least 10 ka and likely earlier. The in situ 14C inventory at the location buried at 3.7 ka limits prior exposure to 2000 years, suggesting that this location experienced more complex Holocene ice cover/burial history. These pilot data show that valuable information regarding periods of exposure is contained within in situ 14C inventories. Additional paired plant and

  3. New experimental investigation of cluster structures in 10 Be and 16 C neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aquila, L.; Acosta, D.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; De Luca, S.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N. S.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2017-11-01

    The existence of cluster structures in ^{10} Be and ^{16} C neutron-rich isotopes is investigated via projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH _2 target. We used a fragmentation beam constituted by 55MeV/u ^{10} Be and 49MeV/u ^{16} C beams provided by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS. Invariant mass spectra of 4{He}+ 6 He and 6{He} + ^{10} Be breakup fragments are reconstructed by means of the CHIMERA 4π detector to investigate the presence of excited states of projectile nuclei characterized by cluster structure. In the first case, we suggest the presence of a new state in ^{10} Be at 13.5MeV. A non-vanishing yield corresponding to 20.6MeV excitation energy of ^{16} C was observed in the 6{He} + ^{10} Be cluster decay channel. To improve the results of the present analysis, a new experiment has been performed recently, taking advantage of the coupling of CHIMERA and FARCOS. In the paper we describe the data reduction process of the new experiment together with preliminary results.

  4. Radiometric dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, N.R.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of natural radioactivity in uranium, in the last decade of the nineteenth century, the nuclear property of radioactive decay of radionuclides at immutable rates has been effectively utilized in dating of varieties of naturally occurring geological matrices and the organisms which constantly replenish their "1"4C supply through respiration when alive on earth. During the period, applications of radiometric dating techniques have been extensively diversified and have enabled the geologists to indicate the absolute time scales of geological formations and the evolution of the solar system, the earth, meteorites, lunar rocks, etc. and the archaeologists to record the facts of history of several important events like dinosaur era, Iceman, the Shroud in Turin and many other ancient artefacts. In the development of dating methods, varieties of naturally occurring radio-isotopic systems with favorable half-lives ranging from about 10 years to over 100 billion years have been used as radiometric clocks. (author)

  5. Development of system technology for routine 10Be measurement in the JAEA-AMS-TONO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Akihiro; Saito-Kokubu, Yoko; Ishimaru, Tsuneari; Nishizawa, A.; Miyake, M.

    2013-01-01

    We have completed the development of system technology for routine 10 Be measurement with the 5 MV Pelletron system in the Tono Geoscience Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The function of separating 10 Be and 10 B provided in the gas cell set in the front of an ionization chamber was experimentally confirmed through observation of variation of ΔE 1 -E Res spectrum with the gas pressure of the gas cell. The test measurement with beryllium samples of an ice core shows that measured 10 Be/ 9 Be ratios were consistent with the values obtained by the group of the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT) in the University of Tokyo. (author)

  6. Evidence for multiple sources of 10Be in the early solar system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium-10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t 1/2 = 1.4 Myr) uniquely synthesized by spallation reactions and inferred to have been present when the solar system's oldest solids (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) formed. Yet, the astrophysical site of 10Be nucleosynthesis is uncertain. We...... in the gaseous CAI-forming reservoir, or in the inclusions themselves: this indicates at least two nucleosynthetic sources of 10Be in the early solar system. The most promising locale for 10Be synthesis is close to the proto-Sun during its early mass-accreting stages, as these are thought to coincide...

  7. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE SOURCES OF 10Be IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielandt, Daniel; Krot, Alexander N.; Bizzarro, Martin; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Huss, Gary R.; Ivanova, Marina A.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium-10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t 1/2 = 1.4 Myr) uniquely synthesized by spallation reactions and inferred to have been present when the solar system's oldest solids (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) formed. Yet, the astrophysical site of 10 Be nucleosynthesis is uncertain. We report Li-Be-B isotope measurements of CAIs from CV chondrites, including CAIs that formed with the canonical 26 Al/ 27 Al ratio of ∼5 × 10 –5 (canonical CAIs) and CAIs with Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects (FUN-CAIs) characterized by 26 Al/ 27 Al ratios much lower than the canonical value. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of four distinct fossil 10 Be/ 9 Be isochrons, lower in the FUN-CAIs than in the canonical CAIs, and variable within these classes. Given that FUN-CAI precursors escaped evaporation-recondensation prior to evaporative melting, we suggest that the 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio recorded by FUN-CAIs represents a baseline level present in presolar material inherited from the protosolar molecular cloud, generated via enhanced trapping of galactic cosmic rays. The higher and possibly variable apparent 10 Be/ 9 Be ratios of canonical CAIs reflect additional spallogenesis, either in the gaseous CAI-forming reservoir, or in the inclusions themselves: this indicates at least two nucleosynthetic sources of 10 Be in the early solar system. The most promising locale for 10 Be synthesis is close to the proto-Sun during its early mass-accreting stages, as these are thought to coincide with periods of intense particle irradiation occurring on timescales significantly shorter than the formation interval of canonical CAIs.

  8. Insights into Meteoric 10Be Dynamics and Climate Stability along the Hawaiian Kohala Climosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J. L.; Chadwick, O.

    2017-12-01

    We measure meteoric 10Be in soils across a well-studied climate gradient spanning Kohala, Hawaii to provide new understanding of the isotope behavior in soils and constraints on nuclide delivery rates to Earth's surface. Annual rainfall across the Kohala climogradient varies from 16 - 300 cm, with Hawaiian soils reflecting evolution over the past 150 ka, the nominal age of the volcanic parent material. We analyzed a sequence of nine soil profiles for meteoric 10Be and compared with previously measured data on soil chemistry and dust fluxes. In the Kohala system, soil inventories of 10Be span 40-300 x 109 atom/cm2 and generally increase linearly with rainfall, consistent with precipitation-driven fluxes and the high retention of 10Be in clay-rich soil horizons. However, nuclide inventories dramatically decrease for soils at rainfall >140 cm/y. The observed decrease corresponds with other strong changes in weathering intensity across the climate gradient, associated with previously studied and recognized pedogenic thresholds. These thresholds represent abrupt transitions in soil chemistry related to increased throughflow of soil solutions, decreases in base saturation and pH, and the destruction of phyllosilicates and replacement with amorphous oxyhydroxides. Meteoric-derived ages, based on 10Be-flux estimates and measured inventories are uniform for dry soils ( 60ka), but far less than the known substrate age (150ka), indicating that actual delivery rates are lower than predicted from current models in this region. Despite the offset in predicted and substrate ages, the consistency in pattern suggests that the rainfall gradient over the 150 thousand years of soil development has not deviated significantly from its present structure. Furthermore, based on clear 10Be losses in soils with high moisture availability, our results indicate meteoric 10Be may not be a robust tracer of soil age and movement in systems with high rainfall and weathering intensity and low soil

  9. Sup(10)Be variation in surficial sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Selvaraj, K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Chen, C.T.A.

    Distribution of 10Be in systematically collected (degree + degree interval at 10 to 16 degrees S; 73.5 to 76.5 degrees E) surficial siliceous ooze, siliceous clay and pelagic clay sediments (top 2 cm) from the abyssal Central Indian Basin...

  10. Elucidation of 10Be accumulation mechanism to sea floor with the marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamagata, T.; Saito, T.; Nagai, H.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    Marine sediment samples (0-30 cm in depth) were collected in the Northwest Pacific Ocean, and South Pacific Ocean during KH00-3 (BO, 7 samples) and KH04-5 (SX, 8 samples) cruise of R/V Hakuho-Maru. The 10 Be concentration in the marine sediment samples range between 0.9x10 9 and 6.5x10 9 atoms/g, and most of the red clay sediment in the Northwest Pacific Ocean showed uniform distribution. The 9 Be concentration in the red clay sediment samples range between 2.3 and 2.6 ppm, which showed a value almost the same as measured 9 Be concentration (1.6-2.3 ppm) in the Chinese loess. The 10 Be concentration in the marine sediment were 20 times higher than the 10 Be concentration (0.2x10 9 atoms/g) in the Chinese loess. These results were suggested that most of 10 Be in the marine sediment were regarded seawater as the origin. (author)

  11. Exploration of {sup 10}Be analysis using 10 μg of Be carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho, E-mail: kh@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hmatsu@um.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem Accelerator (MALT), The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A {sup 10}Be analysis using only 10 μg of commercially available Be carrier was explored using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator, The University of Tokyo. A combination of sample pretreatment and AMS analysis dedicated to this limited-carrier experiment enabled us to achieve reproducible measurements linear up to 10{sup −14} ({sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio). Using this method we determined an order of 10{sup 5} atoms g{sup −110}Be concentrations in sub-gram natural quartz samples taken from low (0.5–1 km) altitudes in Asian mid to high latitudes, and with apparent {sup 10}Be ages of 10–60 ka. Concentrations determined with the limited-carrier analysis were fairly consistent with those of previous ordinary analysis with tens of grams of quartz. Therefore, {sup 10}Be analysis using 10 μg of Be carrier was demonstrated for natural samples with an order of 10{sup 5} atoms g{sup −1}, with an error of about 10%.

  12. Active basement uplift as seen with cosmogenic lenses: the Sierra Pie de Palo case (Western Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siame, L. L.; Sébrier, M.; Costa, C. H.; Ahumada, E. A.; Bellier, O.

    2013-12-01

    The Andean foreland of western Argentina (28°S-33°S) corresponds to retroarc deformations associated with the ongoing flat subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American lithosphere, and associated with high levels of seismic activity and crustal active faulting. To improve earthquake source identification and characterization in the San Juan region, data from seismology, structural geology and quantitative geomorphology can be integrated and combined to provide a seismotectonic model. In this model, the Andean back-arc of western Argentina has to be regarded as an obliquely converging foreland where Plio-Quaternary deformations are partitioned between strike-slip and thrust motions that are localized on the E-verging, thin-skinned Argentine Precordillera, and the W-verging thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas, respectively. In this domain, the Sierra Pie de Palo is a key structure playing a major role in the partitioning of the Plio-Quaternary deformations. Located in the westernmost Sierras Pampeanas, the Sierra Pie de Palo forms a NNE striking, 80 km-long and 35-40 km-wide, ellipsoid range that reaches elevation as high as 3162 m. This mountain range is an actively growing basement fold associated with a high level of seismic activity (e.g., the November 23, 1977, Caucete, Mw 7.4 earthquake). To evaluate the degree of tectonic activity around the Sierra Pie de Palo, we combined a detailed morphometric analysis of the topography together with in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations measured in (1) bedrock outcrops corresponding to the exhumed erosional regional surface, (2) surface boulders abandoned on alluvial fans deformed by active faults, and (3) in fluvial sediments sampled at the outlets of selected watersheds that drains out from the Sierra Pie de Palo. All together, our results allows: (1) assessing quantitative constraints on the rate of tectonic and denudation processes that are responsible for the active growth and erosion of the Sierra

  13. Radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazos R, L.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the radiocarbon dating in archaeology has not served only to solve problems related with the establishment of chronologies, but also in the development of archaeological methods of excavation and interpretation. This has been possible because the dating method by radiocarbon provides a common temporary scale that transcends the cultural and regional frontiers. It is even spoken of the revolution that has meant the fact that the application of this method has allowed to the archaeologist to pass from the construction of chronologies until the evaluation and dynamic interpretation of the archaeological data to build theories. This work explains and compares methods for the detection of 14 C, as the gas counting, the liquid scintillation counting and the mass spectrometry with accelerators. (Author)

  14. A listing of cosmogenic, optically-stimulated-luminescence, (U-Th)/He, and fission-track sample locations, analyses, and age data compiled as part of Marsden contract GNS002 (2000-2004) : subduction initiation beneath Fiordland, southwest New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, R.

    2007-01-01

    This report is an archive of data relevant to Fiordland tectonic evolution. Specifically these are the data that were collected and compiled as part of Marsden contract GNS002 (2000-2004); samples were collected between 1987 and 2002. The principal investigator of the Marsden Fund project was Rupert Sutherland (GNS Science). Additional named investigators (with responsibilities and affiliations) were: Kyeong Kim (cosmogenic isotope dating; GNS Science); Peter Kamp (fission track dating; Waikato University); Martha House (U-Th/He dating; Caltech, USA); and Michael Gurnis (numerical models of subduction initiation; Caltech, USA). After the project began, Uwe Rieser from Victoria University agreed to undertake optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating as part of the project. (author). 6 refs

  15. Thermoluminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating of sediments depends upon the acquisition and long term stable storage of TL energy by crystalline minerals contained within a sedimentary unit. This energy is stored in the form of trapped electrons and quartz sand is the most commonly used mineral employed in the dating process. Prior to the final depositional episode it is necessary that any previously acquired TL is removed by exposure to sunlight. After burial the TL begins to build up again at a rate dependent upon the radiation flux delivered by long-lived isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium. The presence of rubidium and cosmic radiation generally play a lesser but contributory roll, and the total radiation dose delivered to the TL phosphor is modified by the presence of water. The period since deposition is therefore measured by determining the total amount of stored TL energy, the palaeodose (P), and the rate at which this energy is acquired, the annual radiation dose (ARD). TL dating may be applied to eolian, fluvial, coastal and in some cases, marine sediments. the technique is also successfully applied to volcanic materials and to a certain extent to archeological specimens

  16. First results from the 10Be marker experiment in JET with ITER-like wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Bykov, I.; Petersson, P.; Possnert, G.; Heinola, K.; Miettunen, J.; Groth, M.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Widdowson, A.; Riccardo, V.; Nunes, I.; Stamp, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Likonen, J.; Coad, J.P.; Schmid, K.; Krieger, K.

    2014-01-01

    When the ITER-like wall was installed in JET, one of the 218 Be inner wall guard limiter tiles had been enriched with 10 Be as a bulk isotopic marker. During the shutdown in 2012–2013, a set of tiles were sampled nondestructively to collect material for accelerator mass spectroscopy measurements of 10 Be concentration. The letter shows how the marker experiment was set up, presents first results and compares them to preliminary predictions of marker redistribution, made with the ASCOT numerical code. Finally an outline is shown of what experimental data are likely to become available later and the possibilities for comparison with modelling using the WallDYN, ERO and ASCOT codes are discussed. (letter)

  17. Improved 10Be and 26Al-AMS with a 5 MV spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Sheng; Dougans, Andrew B.; Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Schnabel, Christoph; Wilcken, Klaus M.

    2010-01-01

    Detector and ion source changes have increased Be and Al count rates and reduced measurement background at SUERC. Low energy 16 MeV 26 Al 3+ ions can be separated from interferences by adopting thin silicon nitride membrane detector windows. In contrast, a thick Havar detector window is used to preferentially slow boron ions for simplified 10 Be vs. 10 B separation without an additional gas cell.

  18. Galactic-bursts signatures in Antarctica 10Be spectra reveal cosmogenesis of climate switching

    OpenAIRE

    Omerbashich, M.

    2006-01-01

    A very strong period of 3592+-57 yrs in 10Be deposition rates from Vostok ice core raw data was detected and verified against concentration raw data at Taylor Dome and Vostok. Data show Hallstadzeit Solar cycle at 2296+-57 yrs, and indicate LaViolette period at 12500 yrs. The 99% confidence Gauss Vanicek spectral analysis was used, making data alteration avoidable thus enabling data separation that reflected cosmic ray background conditions at Galactic boundary. After the separation only the ...

  19. {sup 14} C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator; Datacao por {sup 14} C utilizando espectrometria de massa com acelerador de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: paulogom@if.uff.br; Yokoyama, Y. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Science; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1999-03-01

    The different aspects concerning the {sup 14} C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of {sup 14} C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  20. Climate-driven unsteady denudation and sediment flux in a high-relief unglaciated catchment-fan using 26Al and 10Be: Panamint Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cody C.; Romans, Brian W.

    2018-06-01

    Environmental changes within erosional catchments of sediment routing systems are predicted to modulate sediment transfer dynamics. However, empirical and numerical models that predict such phenomena are difficult to test in natural systems over multi-millennial timescales. Tectonic boundary conditions and climate history in the Panamint Range, California, are relatively well-constrained by existing low-temperature thermochronology and regional multi-proxy paleoclimate studies, respectively. Catchment-fan systems present there minimize sediment storage and recycling, offering an excellent natural laboratory to test models of climate-sedimentary dynamics. We used stratigraphic characterization and cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs; 26Al and 10Be) in the Pleasant Canyon complex (PCC), a linked catchment-fan system, to examine the effects of Pleistocene high-magnitude, high-frequency climate change on CRN-derived denudation rates and sediment flux in a high-relief, unglaciated catchment-fan system. Calculated 26Al/10Be burial ages from 13 samples collected in an ∼180 m thick outcropping stratigraphic succession range from ca. 1.55 ± 0.22 Ma in basal strata, to ca. 0.36 ± 0.18-0.52 ± 0.20 Ma within the uppermost part of the succession. The mean long-term CRN-derived paleodenudation rate, 36 ± 8 mm/kyr (1σ), is higher than the modern rate of 24 ± 0.6 mm/kyr from Pleasant Canyon, and paleodenudation rates during the middle Pleistocene display some high-frequency variability in the high end (up to 54 ± 10 mm/kyr). The highest CRN-derived denudation rates are associated with stratigraphic evidence for increased precipitation during glacial-pluvial events after the middle Pleistocene transition (post ca. 0.75 Ma), suggesting 100 kyr Milankovitch periodicity could drive the observed variability. We investigated the potential for non-equilibrium sedimentary processes, i.e. increased landslides or sediment storage/recycling, to influence apparent paleodenudation rates

  1. Precise Surface Exposure Dating of Early Holocene and Little Ice Age Moraines in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.; Taggart, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have established precise ages of two glacial events in the tropical Andean highlands of southern Peru. The field site is located on the flanks of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m asl; 13°20'S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba. A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the south face of Salcantay. Well-defined outer and inner moraines were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated 5 km and 3 km, respectively, from their head on the Salcantay massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders on the outer (n = 7) and inner (n = 7) moraine crests expands upon initial age control for these deposits and improves substantially on the precision of earlier 10Be measurements. The new results yield mean ages of 9.0 ± 0.3 ka for the outer moraine and 195 ± 24 years for the inner moraine, corresponding to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator with Lal-Stone production rate scaling and the default height-pressure relationship. The inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined from northern mid- and high latitude records, and indicates considerable expansion of glaciers heading on Nevado Salcantay during this climatic minimum. Recent geomorphic mapping has identified similar sequences of moraines in adjacent drainages on and near Salcantay, suggesting a broader regional signal of two prominent Holocene glacial events in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes; 10Be dating of these additional moraines is underway. Our new glacier chronologies complement ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby increasing spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of climate change in the tropical Andes during the Holocene. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the results also demonstrate a newly- developed capability of 10Be exposure

  2. Diffusion and supply rates of /sup 10/Be and /sup 230/Th radioisotopes in two manganese encrustations from the South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangini, A; Segl, M; Kudrass, H

    1986-01-01

    Ages of two Mn encrustations estimated by their /sup 230/Th and /sup 10/Be distributions are compared with K-Ar ages and micropaleontological datings of their nuclei to discuss possible diffusion and supply effects of the radioisotope distribution and their influence on the reliability of age determinations. Based on comparable results obtained by the different methods the effective diffusion coefficient of /sup 10/Be can be calculated as D* <= 1.0 x 10/sup -8/ cm/sup 2//y. This coefficient is 3 to 8 times smaller than the best estimates available at present. In both nodules we observe lower /sup 10/Be concentrations in the uppermost 2 to 3 mm (1.3 m.y.), which suggests that /sup 10/Be uptake has been reduced since the middle Pleistocene. The 2.7-fold increase of the growth rate starting 3.2 m.y. ago coincides with the initiation of the northern hemisphere glaciation.

  3. {sup 10}Be in rhodochrosite nodules from Neogene sediments along the Galapagos Ridge, equatorial Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldahan, A., E-mail: ala.aldahan@geo.uu.s [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Morad, S. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Petroleum Geosciences, Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Possnert, G. [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Sturesson, U. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); ElSaiy, A. [Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-04-15

    Microcrystalline, calcian rhodochrosite occurs as nodules around burrows in late Neogene pelagic sediments from the Galapagos Ridge in the Guatemala Basin, eastern equatorial Pacific (DSDP Leg 68; Site 503). {sup 10}Be isotope revealed that the rhodochrosite nodules have formed under growth conditions much faster than those reported for Fe-Mn nodules. The overall REE patterns of the nodules and host pelagic sediments indicate element derivation mainly from marine pore water. However, variations in the shale normalised Eu values suggest influx of hydrothermal fluids into mounds area at Galapagos, which is also evidenced by the similar minor and major element contents in the nodules and host sediments.

  4. The 10B (7Li, 7Be)10Be charge-exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etchegoyen, A.

    1987-01-01

    It is analysed the mechanisms: direct charge-exchange through the two-body residual force (Q opt ∼ 0.2 MeV, which is close to the reaction Q-value of - 1,42 MeV); and single-Nucleon Knock-on exchange (SNKE) due to the intereacting nucleons being undistinguishable. These mechanisms are analysed in detail for producing 10 B ( 7 Li, 7 Be) 10 Be reaction. The experience was carried out at the Tandar Laboratory using conventional electronics. The elastic scattering was simultaneously measured in order to obtain an optical model parameter set. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. 10Be in rhodochrosite nodules from Neogene sediments along the Galapagos Ridge, equatorial Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldahan, A.; Morad, S.; Possnert, G.; Sturesson, U.; ElSaiy, A.

    2010-01-01

    Microcrystalline, calcian rhodochrosite occurs as nodules around burrows in late Neogene pelagic sediments from the Galapagos Ridge in the Guatemala Basin, eastern equatorial Pacific (DSDP Leg 68; Site 503). 10 Be isotope revealed that the rhodochrosite nodules have formed under growth conditions much faster than those reported for Fe-Mn nodules. The overall REE patterns of the nodules and host pelagic sediments indicate element derivation mainly from marine pore water. However, variations in the shale normalised Eu values suggest influx of hydrothermal fluids into mounds area at Galapagos, which is also evidenced by the similar minor and major element contents in the nodules and host sediments.

  6. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with 10Be marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, I.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Zhou, Y.; Heinola, K.; Pettersson, J.; Conroy, S.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Widdowson, A.

    2016-03-01

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a 10Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011-2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm2 sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The 10Be/9Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the 10B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4-1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  7. Subbarrier fusion in the systems 11,10Be+209Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signorini, C.; Yoshida, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Stroe, L.; Fukuda, T.; Mazzocco, M.; Fukuda, N.; Mizoi, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Sakurai, H.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Hagino, K.

    2004-01-01

    The subbarrier fusion cross sections with radioactive ion beams in the systems 10,11 Be+ 209 Bi have been measured and compared also with the stable system 9 Be+ 209 Bi. All three cross sections are similar within experimental accuracy; this is somehow unexpected since, in particular, the fusion process with 11 Be should be influenced by its halo structure and small binding energy and could behave in a different way from the other two Be isotopes, in particular from 10 Be, well bound. Extensive calculations were undertaken within the formalism of continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) that considered only the coupling to two-body breakup, into n+core, of the projectile with excitation to continuum up to 10 MeV. The results are in agreement with the 11,10 Be experimental data except at low energy where the cross sections could be influenced by target/projectile collective excitations. The CCFULL theoretical approach, compared to CDCC, seems to reproduce better the subbarrier region and worse the above barrier one. The 9 Be cross sections are all underestimated by the CDCC approach while are well reproduced by CCFULL calculations. This suggests that, in this last case, the schematization of the breakup process into 2 only fragments maybe is not adequate and/or other excitations, properly handed by the CCFULL code, could be relevant

  8. New Magnetic and 10Be/9Be results from ODP site 851 (East Equatorial Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, J. P.; Savranskaia, T.; Anojh, T.; Meynadier, L.; Thouveny, N.; Gacem, L.; L2NC, A. T.; Bassinot, F. C.; Simon, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The paleomagnetic record from ODP site 851 was the first long data of relative paleointensity that attempted to describe 4 Ma of geomagnetic variations. Among other features, it was characterized by an asymmetrical saw-tooth pattern of the intensity changes across reversals. The upper part of the record (0 to 1.1 Ma) was documented by stepwise alternating field (af) demagnetization of U-channels, while the deeper part could not be sampled by U-channels and instead combined shipboard measurements and stepwise demagnetized single samples within specific intervals. Thermal demagnetization was also conducted within specific intervals to assess the absence of viscous component. We performed a new detailed study using U-channels and single samples that were taken along a continuous splice section that covers the upper 80 meters of sediment. Stepwise demagnetization of the natural magnetization and of the anhysteretic magnetization were carried out for all samples and U-channels in order to improve the resolution and the reliability of relative paleointensity for the older part of the record. The new results improve the detailed magnetostratigraphy that was formerly established and provide additional details to the paleointensity results. In parallel, 10Be/9Be measurements were carried out at the same levels as the magnetic measurements to test further the controversial asymmetrical pattern of relative paleointensity. Unfortunately, the 10Be/9Be results did not provide any consistent signal. This failure most likely results from high carbonate concentration (about 85%) that yields poor adsorption of beryllium by the sediment particles and therefore generates large fluctuations. The reliability of the paleointensity record is linked to downcore homogeneity of the sediment that is characterized by little variability of carbonate content and therefore little changes in the magnetization response to the field. Summarizing poor clay content appears to be a favorable situation

  9. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm -2 . Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures

  10. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Martian surface: constraints for sample recovery and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, P.A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects such as cosmic ray tracks can provide information on the surface history of Mars. A recent overview on developments in cosmogenic nuclide research for historical studies of predominantly extraterrestrial materials was published previously. The information content of cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects produced in the Martian surface is based on the different ways of interaction of the primary galactic and solar cosmic radiation (GCR, SCR) and the secondary particle cascade. Generally the kind and extent of interactions as seen in the products depend on the following factors: (1) composition, energy and intensity of the primary SCR and GCR; (2) composition, energy and intensity of the GCR-induced cascade of secondary particles; (3) the target geometry, i.e., the spatial parameters of Martian surface features with respect to the primary radiation source; (4) the target chemistry, i.e., the chemical composition of the Martian surface at the sampling location down to the minor element level or lower; and (5) duration of the exposure. These factors are not independent of each other and have a major influence on sample taking strategies and techniques

  11. Reconstruction and measurement of cosmogenic signals in the neutrino experiment Borexino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meindl, Johannes Quirin

    2013-01-01

    Underground laboratories around the globe provide low-count rate experiments with the necessary shielding against the large flux of cosmic muons present at the Earth's surface. Depending on the depth of the underground site, the muon flux is reduced by up to eight orders of magnitude. Hower, the residual muons, and the neutrons and radioisotopes they produce in nuclear spallation processes, still pose a significant background for many of these experiments. This thesis focusses on cosmogenic background signals in the neutrino experiment Borexino, which is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso underground site at a depth of 3800 meters of water equivalent. The work encompasses the identification, spatial reconstruction, and measurement of rates and production yields of these cosmogenic events. For the efficient tagging of long-lived cosmogenic radioisotopes of lifetimes in the order of seconds and longer, the spatial reconstruction of the parent muon is essential. Based on the characteristic light emission profile of muons crossing the inner detector of Borexino, a new muon track reconstruction algorithm was developed. Furthermore, to increase the performance of the existing muon track reconstruction of Borexino's outer detector, a routine was programmed to automatically calibrate the photomultiplier tubes in timing and charge response. Muons entering the experiment can cause fast secondary signals from decays and captures of stopped muons, and the captures of muon-induced neutrons. To identify these events in the high noise environment after the muon, dedicated search algorithms were developed. Based on the detected signals, these fast muon-correlated events are studied. The fraction and lifetime of stopped muons are found to be in agreement with expectations. The production yield of cosmogenic neutrons is measured to (3.10±0.07 stat ±0.08 syst ) . 10 -4 n/(μ . (g/cm 2 )). The corresponding capture time in the Borexino scintillator pseudocumene is

  12. Reconstruction and measurement of cosmogenic signals in the neutrino experiment Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meindl, Johannes Quirin

    2013-06-14

    Underground laboratories around the globe provide low-count rate experiments with the necessary shielding against the large flux of cosmic muons present at the Earth's surface. Depending on the depth of the underground site, the muon flux is reduced by up to eight orders of magnitude. Hower, the residual muons, and the neutrons and radioisotopes they produce in nuclear spallation processes, still pose a significant background for many of these experiments. This thesis focusses on cosmogenic background signals in the neutrino experiment Borexino, which is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso underground site at a depth of 3800 meters of water equivalent. The work encompasses the identification, spatial reconstruction, and measurement of rates and production yields of these cosmogenic events. For the efficient tagging of long-lived cosmogenic radioisotopes of lifetimes in the order of seconds and longer, the spatial reconstruction of the parent muon is essential. Based on the characteristic light emission profile of muons crossing the inner detector of Borexino, a new muon track reconstruction algorithm was developed. Furthermore, to increase the performance of the existing muon track reconstruction of Borexino's outer detector, a routine was programmed to automatically calibrate the photomultiplier tubes in timing and charge response. Muons entering the experiment can cause fast secondary signals from decays and captures of stopped muons, and the captures of muon-induced neutrons. To identify these events in the high noise environment after the muon, dedicated search algorithms were developed. Based on the detected signals, these fast muon-correlated events are studied. The fraction and lifetime of stopped muons are found to be in agreement with expectations. The production yield of cosmogenic neutrons is measured to (3.10{+-}0.07{sub stat}{+-}0.08{sub syst}) . 10{sup -4} n/({mu} . (g/cm{sup 2})). The corresponding capture time in the

  13. Reorientation-effect measurement of the matrix element in 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orce, J. N.; Drake, T. E.; Djongolov, M. K.; Navrátil, P.; Triambak, S.; Ball, G. C.; Al Falou, H.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Finlay, P.; Forssén, C.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Hayes, A. B.; Kshetri, R.; Lassen, J.; Leach, K. G.; Li, R.; Meissner, J.; Pearson, C. J.; Rand, E. T.; Sarazin, F.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Stoyer, M. A.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E. R.; Teigelhoefer, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The highly-efficient and segmented TIGRESS γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF has been used to perform a reorientation-effect Coulomb-excitation study of the 21+ state at 3.368 MeV in 10Be. This is the first Coulomb-excitation measurement that enables one to obtain information on diagonal matrix elements for such a high-lying first excited state from γ-ray data. With the availability of accurate lifetime data, a value of -0.110±0.087 eb is determined for the diagonal matrix element, which assuming the rotor model, leads to a negative spectroscopic quadrupole moment of QS(21+)=-0.083±0.066 eb. This result is in agreement with both no-core shell-model calculations performed in this work with the CD-Bonn 2000 two-nucleon potential and large shell-model spaces, and Green's function Monte Carlo predictions with two- plus three-nucleon potentials.

  14. Reservoir effects in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The radiocarbon dating technique depends essentially on the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide containing the cosmogenic radioisotope 14 C enters into a state of equilibrium with all living material (plants and animals) as part of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Terrestrial reservoir effects occur when the atmospheric 14 C signal is diluted by local effects where systems depleted in 14 C mix with systems that are in equilibrium with the atmosphere. Naturally, this can occur with plant material growing close to an active volcano adding very old CO 2 to the atmosphere (the original 14 C has completely decayed). It can also occur in highly industrialised areas where fossil fuel derived CO 2 dilutes the atmospheric signal. A terrestrial reservoir effect can occur in the case of fresh water shells living in rivers or lakes where there is an input of ground water from springs or a raising of the water table. Soluble bicarbonate derived from the dissolution of very old limestone produces a 14 C dilution effect. Land snail shells and stream carbonate depositions (tufas and travertines) can be affected by a similar mechanism. Alternatively, in specific cases, these reservoir effects may not occur. This means that general interpretations assuming quantitative values for these terrestrial effects are not possible. Each microenvironment associated with samples being analysed needs to be evaluated independently. Similarly, the marine environment produces reservoir effects. With respect to marine shells and corals, the water depth at which carbonate growth occurs can significantly affect quantitative 14 C dilution, especially in areas where very old water is uplifted, mixing with top layers of water that undergo significant exchange with atmospheric CO 2 . Hence, generalisations with respect to the marine reservoir effect also pose problems. These can be exacerbated by the mixing of sea water with either terrestrial water in estuaries, or ground water where

  15. Detection of erosion events using 10Be profiles: Example of the impact of agriculture on soil erosion in the Chesapeake Bay area (U.S.A.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Brown, L.; Pavich, M.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1986-01-01

    10 Be concentration, total carbon and grain-size were measured in cores collected in undisturbed estuarine sediments of three tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. These cores were previously studied by Davis and Brush for pollen content, age and sedimentation rate. In this work, we compare the results obtained for these various analyses. In the cores, we observed two increases in 10 Be concentration concomitant with two major changes in the pollen composition of the sediments. These two pollen changes each correspond to well-dated agricultural horizons reflecting different stages in the introduction of European farming techniques. In the Chesapeake Bay area, the agricultural development, associated with forest clearing, appears to have triggered the erosion, transport, and sedimentation into the river mouths of large quantities of 10 Be-rich soils. This phenomenon explains the observed rise in the sedimentation rate associated with increases in agricultural land-use. (orig.)

  16. The new AMS system at CEDAD for the analysis of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 129}I and actinides: Set-up and performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagnile, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.calcagnile@unisalento.it [CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento (Italy); Quarta, Gianluca; Maruccio, Lucio [CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento (Italy); Synal, Hans-Arno; Müller, Arnold Milenko [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    The Centre for Dating and Diagnostics (CEDAD) at the University of Salento was established in 2001 and became fully operational for routine {sup 14}C radiocarbon dating in 2003. The facility has been continuously upgraded over the years with the installation of different beam lines for high energy ion implantation, IBA analyses both in vacuum and in air and nuclear microprobe. In 2011 a second AMS beamline was installed consisting of a dedicated high energy mass spectrometer for the AMS analysis of rare nuclides such as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 129}I and actinides. First tests on {sup 10}Be allowed to optimize the operating parameters resulting in the proper separation of {sup 10}Be from the interfering isobar {sup 10}B. In this paper we present the further tests and optimizations which resulted in an enhancement of the overall transmission efficiency, the reduction of the background (in the 10{sup −15} range) and in the possibility to obtain precision levels in routine {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be measurements of the order of 0.5%. Furthermore the first results obtained for the analysis of {sup 26}Al and {sup 129}I are also presented.

  17. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of {sup 36}Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric {sup 36}Cl production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide {sup 32}Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of {sup 32}Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured {sup 32}Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 {mu}Bql{sup -1}. These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured {sup 32}Si/Si{sub tot} ratios ranged from 2.5.10{sup -17} to 2.3.10{sup -15} and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10{sup -14}, showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X){sup 7}Be and N(p,X){sup 10}Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,{alpha}n)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  18. Cosmogenically-produced isotopes in natural and enriched high-purity germanium detectors for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Thomas; MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR advances toward measurements of the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Detectors employed in the DEMONSTRATOR are subject to cosmogenic spallation during production and processing, resulting in activation of certain long-lived radioisotopes. Activation of these cosmogenic isotopes is mitigated by shielded storage of detectors and through underground operation of the DEMONSTRATOR at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. In this work, we explore the appearance and reduction of cosmogenic contributions to the DEMONSTRATOR background spectrum. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  19. Dating of river terraces along Lefthand Creek, western High Plains, Colorado, reveals punctuated incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Melissa A.; Anderson, Robert S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon A.

    2017-10-01

    The response of erosional landscapes to Quaternary climate oscillations is recorded in fluvial terraces whose quantitative interpretation requires numerical ages. We investigate gravel-capped strath terraces along the western edge of Colorado's High Plains to constrain the incision history of this shale-dominated landscape. We use 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and thermally transferred OSL (TT-OSL) to date three strath terraces, all beveled in shale bedrock and then deposited upon by Lefthand Creek, which drains the crystalline core of the Front Range. Our study reveals: (i) a long history (hundreds of thousands of years) of fluvial occupation of the second highest terrace, T2 (Table Mountain), with fluvial abandonment at 92 ± 3 ka; (ii) a brief occupation of a narrow and spatially confined terrace, T3, at 98 ± 7 ka; and (iii) a 10-25 thousand year period of cutting and fluvial occupation of a lower terrace, T4, marked by the deposition of a lower alluvial unit between 59 and 68 ka, followed by deposition of an upper alluvial package at 40 ± 3 ka. In conjunction with other recent CRN studies of strath terraces along the Colorado Front Range (Riihimaki et al., 2006; Dühnforth et al., 2012), our data reveal that long periods of lateral planation and fluvial occupation of strath terraces, sometimes lasting several glacial-interglacial cycles, are punctuated by brief episodes of rapid vertical bedrock incision. These data call into question what a singular terrace age represents, as the strath may be cut at one time (its cutting-age) and the terrace surface may be abandoned at a much later time (its abandonment age), and challenge models of strath terraces that appeal to simple pacing by the glacial-interglacial cycles.

  20. The production of cosmogenic isotopes in the earth's atmosphere and their inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.; de la Zerda Lerner, A.; Shea. M.A.; Smart, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in the Earth's atmosphere and their dependence on solar modulation and geomagnetic field intensity are calculated. Spallation cross sections were also obtained using the Silberberg-Tsao equations and solar modulation effects were calculated using the force-field model. The current geomagnetic field is treated in detail, and past magnetic fields are modeled based on the archeomagnetic record. Radiocarbon and radioberyllium inventories so obtained are in good agreement with current values. The neutrino-emitting radioactivity of the Earth's atmosphere is shown to add a negligible contribution to the flux from the Sun

  1. Tungsten isotopic compositions of iron meteorites: Chronological constraints vs. cosmogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowski, A.; Quitté, G.; Halliday, A. N.; Kleine, T.

    2006-02-01

    High-precision W isotopic compositions are presented for 35 iron meteorites from 7 magmatic groups (IC, IIAB, IID, IIIAB, IIIF, IVA, and IVB) and 3 non-magmatic groups (IAB, IIICD, and IIE). Small but resolvable isotopic variations are present both within and between iron meteorite groups. Variations in the 182W/ 184W ratio reflect either time intervals of metal-silicate differentiation, or result from the burnout of W isotopes caused by a prolonged exposure to galactic cosmic rays. Calculated apparent time spans for some groups of magmatic iron meteorites correspond to 8.5 ± 2.1 My (IID), 5.1 ± 2.3 My (IIAB), and 5.3 ± 1.3 My (IVB). These time intervals are significantly longer than those predicated from models of planetesimal accretion. It is shown that cosmogenic effects can account for a large part of the W isotopic variation. No simple relationship exists with exposure ages, compromising any reliable method of correction. After allowance for maximum possible cosmogenic effects, it is found that there is no evidence that any of the magmatic iron meteorites studied here have initial W isotopic compositions that differ from those of Allende CAIs [ ɛ182W = - 3.47 ± 0.20; [T. Kleine, K. Mezger, H. Palme, E. Scherer and C. Münker, Early core formation in asteroids and late accretion of chondrite parent bodies: evidence from 182Hf- 182W in CAIs, metal-rich chondrites and iron meteorites, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)]. Cosmogenic corrections cannot yet be made with sufficient accuracy to obtain highly precise ages for iron meteorites. Some of the corrected ages nevertheless require extremely early metal-silicate segregation no later than 1 My after formation of CAIs. Therefore, magmatic iron meteorites appear to provide the best examples yet identified of material derived from the first planetesimals that grew by runaway growth, as modelled in dynamic simulations. Non-magmatic iron meteorites have a more radiogenic W isotopic composition than magmatic

  2. Cold rocks, hot sands: In-situ cosmogenic applications in Australia at ANTARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, David; McKelvey, B.; Hannan, D.; Newsome, D.

    2000-01-01

    The ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO is conducting a comprehensive program in the application of in-situ cosmogenic radionuclides based on strong university collaborations in the earth sciences. The program targets two major objectives: (1) to determine and improve the Quaternary glacial chronology of the Southern Hemisphere in support of global climate change studies; (2) to characterise the processes of surface weathering and landscape evolution in semi-arid regions of the Australian continent. An overview of the program is presented with preliminary results from the first phase of these studies

  3. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling

  4. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Antarctic Meteorites: Preliminary Results on Terrestrial Ages and Temporal Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlovich, E.; Vogt, S.; Wolf, S. F.; Elmore, D.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1993-07-01

    Since 1969, more than 15,000 meteorites have been recovered from various sites in Antarctica. Differences have been reported between the Antarctic populations and the population of non-Antarctic meteorites in volatile trace- element content, thermoluminescence properties, physical size, and relative distribution of meteorite type [1]. Lipschutz and Samuels [2] developed a method based upon multivariate linear and logistic regression that they applied to interpret trace-element content in Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites, showing that the two populations can be chemically distinguished. Since Antarctic meteorites have, on the whole, much longer terrestrial ages than non-Antarctic falls, such differences have been used to support the notion that the flux of meteorites sampled by the Earth has changed in the recent past. A subsequent study [3] showed a statistically significant difference in trace-element content between meteorites from Victoria Land and those found in Queen Maud Land, two groups that seem to have different terrestrial age distributions. Changes in meteorite flux patterns on the order of 60 yr are indicated from a study of Cluster 1 vs. non-Cluster 1 falls [4]. Rapid fluctuations would almost certainly require the existence of co-orbital meteoroid streams, an idea that has been criticized by some [5] on dynamical grounds. To quantify the discussion of a temporal dependence of meteorite flux patterns, and to continue systematic study of Antarctic meteorites, we have measured the contents of the cosmogenic radionuclides ^10Be and ^26Al in the bulk phase, and ^36Cl in the metal phase, of 40 Antarctic specimens that are from the same suite of samples analyzed in the trace-element studies and that were chosen to minimize any chances of paired meteorites. The means and standard deviations of ^10Be and ^26Al activities are 16.4 +/- 3.5 and 48 +/- 8 dpm/kg respectively. Correction for cosmic ray exposure [6,7] and terrestrial ages allows us to estimate

  5. 10Be and 9Be in South Atlantic DSDP Site 519: Relation to geomagnetic reversals and to sediment composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henken-Mellies, W.U.; Hsue, K.J.; Bonani, G.; Hofmann, H.J.; Woelfli, W.; Beer, J.; Heller, F.; Shen, C.; Suter, M.

    1990-01-01

    A high-resolution 10 Be profile has been measured on DSDP Site 519 (central South Atlantic) in order to search for changes in the flux of 10 Be into a pelagic sediment during geomagnetic reversals as compared with times of constant magnetic polarity. The decay corrected 10 Be concentrations range from 1 to 9x10 8 at/g. The average 10 Be flux rate is 5x10 8 [at cm -2 kyr -1 ]. 9 Be and CaCO 3 were measured on the same samples. The 10 Be vs. depth curve is overall similar to the 9 Be vs. depth curve, while the CaCO 3 vs. depth curve anticorrelates the beryllium isotope curves closely, implying that Be is carried mainly by the non-CaCO 3 phases of the sediment. The positive correlation between 10 Be along with the fact that the average 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio of 5.5x10 -8 is within the range of 10 Be/ 9 Be ratios reported for deep ocean water leads us to conclude (1) that the beryllium isotopes come close to an equilibrium in the open ocean, and (2) that the 10 Be/ 9 Be in deep sea sediments with a low detrital component monitors the 10 Be/ 9 Be of deep ocean water trough time. Relative increases of the 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio are observed in the vicinity of the geomagnetic reversals, but the relationship between reversals and higher 10 Be/ 9 Be remains doubtful. Other mechanisms which could alter the 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio are discussed (input of 10 Be by melting of glacial ice; changing input of 9 Be due to changes in continental erosion; changing deep ocean circulation; changing scavenging activity at ocean margins), but as yet no conclusive explanation for the observed behavior of the beryllium isotopes can be given. (orig.)

  6. ESR Dating Research of Glacial Tills in Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, W.; Yi, C.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, Quaternary Glacial-chronology has been made remarkable progress in the Tibetan Platean(TP) with the development of several numeric dating techniques, such as cosmogenic nuclides(NC), optically stimulated luminescence(OSL) and 14C. In constrast, the dating of Quaternary glacial tills in 100,000 years even more than million-year has been a challenge, just because the techniques has defects themselves and the sediments were stransformed during the geological and geomorphology progress later. Electron Spin Resonance(ESR) has been becoming one of the key methods of Quaternary Glacial-chronology with wide range of dating, expecially for the sample older than 100,000 years up to million-year scale. The accurate measurement of equivalent dose significantly impacts on accuracy and reliability of ESR dating method. Therefore, the study of the mechanisms of resetting processes is fundamental for accurate and reliable ESR dating. To understand the mechanism and characteristics of quartz ESR signal resetting of different samples, a series of laboratory simulation and field observation studies were carried out, which made lots of important breakthrough. But the research in quartz ESR signal of moraines is less and the test of ESR dating method is still in the qualitative investigation. Therefor, we use ESR dating and study on the mechanism and characteristics of quartz ESR signals in tills in the Tibetan Platean. In the adjust method of Modern, the quartz ESR signals in Modern glacial tills represent residual values which can be adjusted signals in the older glacial tills. As a consequence, ESR dating of the quartz in moraines needs to be explored in deep with building models to adjust ages which are measured by ESR dating. Therefore, ESR dating will become the trusted one of the cross dating methods in Quaternary Glacial-chronology with the adjust mothod improving the accuracy of ESR dating ages.

  7. Coupling data from U-series and 10Be CRN to evaluate soil steady-state in the Betic Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2015-04-01

    The regolith mantel is produced by weathering of bedrock through physical and biochemical processes. At the same time, the upper part of the regolith is eroded by gravity mass movements, water and wind erosion. Feedback's between production and erosion of soil material are important for soil development, and are essential to reach long-term steady-state in soil chemical and physical properties. Nowadays, long-term denudation rates of regolith can be quantified by using in-situ cosmogenic nuclides (CRN). If the soil thickness remains constant over sufficiently long time, soil production rates can be determined. However, the a priori assumption of long-term steady-state can be questionable in highly dynamic environments. In this study, we present analytical data from two independent isotopic techniques, in-situ cosmogenic nuclides and Uranium series disequilibrium. The disequilibrium of Uranium isotopes (238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra) is an alternative method that allows assessing soil formation rates through isotopic analysis of weathering products. Nine soil profiles were sampled in three different mountain ranges of the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain): Sierra Estancias, Filabres, Cabrera. All soils overly fractured mica schist and are very thin (< 60cm). In each soil profile, we sampled 4 to 6 depth slices in the soil profile, the soil-bedrock interface and (weathered) bedrock. Three of the nine soil profiles were sampled for U-series isotope measurements at EOST (University of Strasbourg). The surface denudation rates (CRN) are about the same in the Sierra Estancias and Filabres (26 ± 10 mm/ky) and increase up to 103 ± 47 mm/ky in the Sierra Cabrera. The spatial variation in soil denudation rates is in agreement with the variation in catchment-wide denudation rates presented by Bellin et al. (2014) which present the highest rates in the Sierra Cabrera (104-246mm/kyr). Moreover it roughly coincides with the pattern of long-term exhumation of the Betic Cordillera. Results

  8. Dating and Sexual Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Body Your sexuality Dating and sexual feelings Dating and sexual feelings Thinking about romance, starting to ... you learn how to stay healthy and strong. Dating older guys top If you date someone even ...

  9. 600 MeV Simulation of the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Meteorites by Galactic Protons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A large variety of stable and radioactive nuclides is produced by the interaction of solar and galactic cosmic rays with extraterrestrial matter. Measurements of such cosmogenic nuclides provide information about the constancy of cosmic ray fluxes in space and time and about the irradiation history of individual extraterrestrial objects provided that there exist reliable models describing the production process. For the calculation of the depth dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites no satisfactory Therefore, the irradiation of small stony meteorites (radii~$<$~40~cm) by galactic protons is simulated in a series of thick target irradiation experiments at the 600~MeV proton beam of the SC. \\\\ \\\\ The thick targets are spheres (R = 5, 15, 25 cm) and are made out of diorite because of its low water content, its high density (3.0~g/cm|3) and because it provides a good approximation of the chemical composition of some common meteorite clas These spheres will also contain a wide variety of pure...

  10. Simulating the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the landscape through a coupled soil-hillslope model (Be2D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be allows for the quantification of vertical and lateral soil fluxes over long time scales (103-105 yr). However, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the soil system makes a translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates complex. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model simulating the behaviour of meteoric 10Be on a hillslope. The model consists of two parts. The first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile, and the second component describes lateral soil and meteoric 10Be fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering as well as downslope fluxes of soil due to creep, water and tillage erosion. Synthetic model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can be related to erosion and deposition across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. Our results also show that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to detect human impact on soil fluxes for soils with a high affinity for meteoric 10Be. However, the quantification of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed variations in meteoric 10Be profiles and inventories. Application of the Be2D model to natural conditions using data sets from the Southern Piedmont (Bacon et al., 2012) and Appalachian Mountains (Jungers et al., 2009; West et al., 2013) allows to reliably constrain parameter values. Good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories is obtained with realistic parameter values. Furthermore, our results provide detailed insights into the processes redistributing meteoric 10Be at the soil-hillslope scale.

  11. Setting a date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Glenis.

    1987-01-01

    Dating techniques are discussed and explained. The age range and sensitivity of different techniques are given. Potassium/argon dating, amino-acid dating, radiocarbon dating, dendrochronology, thermoluminescence and geomagnetic field dating are all mentioned. Each technique is explained and a brief history given. The techniques and equipment used by the British Museum, and some examples of archaeological articles dated are mentioned. (UK)

  12. New Applications of Cosmogenic Radioactive Isotopes to Study Water Travel Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Deinhart, A.; Bibby, R. K.; Esser, B.

    2017-12-01

    The travel time of water moving through a landscape influences nutrient dynamics and biogeochemical cycles. Constraining water travel times helps to understand the functioning of the critical zone. Water travel times cannot be observed directly but can be constrained by measurements of cosmogenic radioactive isotopes. We studied a small (4.6 km2) subalpine (1660-2117 m) catchment in a Mediterranean climate (8 °C, 1200 mm/yr) in the California Sierra Nevada to assess subsurface water storage dynamics and investigate flow paths and flow velocities. We analyzed a combination of three cosmogenic radioactive isotopes with half-lives varying from 87 days (sulfur-35), 2.6 years (sodium-22) to 12.3 years (tritium) in precipitation and stream samples. Water stable isotopes and solute chemistry aided the interpretation of the cosmogenic isotopes. Tritium samples (1L) are analyzed by noble gas mass spectrometry after helium-3 accumulation. Samples for sulfur-35 and sodium-22 are collected by processing 20-1000 L of water through an anion and cation exchange column in-situ. Sulfur-35 is analyzed by liquid scintillation counting after chemical purification and precipitation. Sodium-22 is analyzed by gamma counting after eluting the cations into a 4L Marinelli beaker. Monthly collected precipitation samples show variability of deposition rate for tritium and sulfur-35. Sodium-22 levels in cumulative yearly precipitation samples are consistent with recent studies in the US and Japan. The observed variability of deposition rates complicates direct use as decaying age tracers. The level and variability of tritium in monthly stream samples indicate a mean residence time on the order of 10 years and only small contributions of younger water during high flow conditions. Sulfur-35 and sodium-22 concentrations were critically interpreted considering possible uptake by vegetation and cation exchange. Detections of sodium-22 confirm a small fraction of younger (water. Low concentrations

  13. AMS measurement of {sup 10}Be concentrations in marine sediments from Chile Trench at the TANDAR laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, D., E-mail: darodrig@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arazi, A. [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernández Niello, J.O. [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigación e Ingeniería Ambiental, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, 25 de Mayo y Francia, B1650BWA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martí, G.V. [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); and others

    2017-03-15

    The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios in marine sediments samples from the Southern Chile Trench have been measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The samples were measured at the TANDAR accelerator, where the discrimination of the {sup 10}Be radionuclides was achieved by means of a passive absorber in front of an ionization chamber. This setup along with the high voltage available, provided a complete suppression of the {sup 10}B isobar interference. The obtained values for the {sup 10}Be concentrations, of the order of 10{sup 9} atoms/g, are the first {sup 10}Be measurements from the Southern Chile Trench and offer an excellent tracer to quantitatively study the recycling of sediments in Andean magmas.

  14. {sup 10}Be/{sup 230}Th ratios as proxy for particle flux in the equatorial Pacific ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.F.; Fleisher, M.Q. [LDEO of Columbia Univ. (United States); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Particulate {sup 10}Be/{sup 230}Th ratios collected by sediment traps in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean exhibit a positive correlation with particle flux, but little or no correlation with particle composition. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs.

  15. Validation of cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling factors through direct measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, I.J. E-mail: i.graham@gns.cri.nz; Barry, B.J.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Whitehead, N.E

    2000-10-01

    {sup 7}Be produced in water targets by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays has been measured to determine cosmogenic nuclide production rates as a function of altitude (sea level to 2 km) and geomagnetic latitude (20-79 deg. S). Relative intensities of low energy cosmic ray neutrons have at the same time been measured using neutron monitors based on IGY/NM-64 designed to efficiently thermalise ca. 2-30 MeV neutrons. The research is on-going and we present here preliminary data from the past two years. Water target and neutron flux results are in general agreement, and are consistent with the altitude-dependent scaling factors of Lal [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 104 (1991) 4241]. Significant differences between the sea level, latitude-dependent neutron flux data and Lal's predictions are possibly related to the response function of the detector.

  16. Validation of cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling factors through direct measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, I J; Ditchburn, R G; Whitehead, N E

    2000-01-01

    sup 7 Be produced in water targets by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays has been measured to determine cosmogenic nuclide production rates as a function of altitude (sea level to 2 km) and geomagnetic latitude (20-79 deg. S). Relative intensities of low energy cosmic ray neutrons have at the same time been measured using neutron monitors based on IGY/NM-64 designed to efficiently thermalise ca. 2-30 MeV neutrons. The research is on-going and we present here preliminary data from the past two years. Water target and neutron flux results are in general agreement, and are consistent with the altitude-dependent scaling factors of Lal [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 104 (1991) 4241]. Significant differences between the sea level, latitude-dependent neutron flux data and Lal's predictions are possibly related to the response function of the detector.

  17. XCAMS: The compact 14C accelerator mass spectrometer extended for 10Be and 26Al at GNS Science, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondervan, A.; Hauser, T. M.; Kaiser, J.; Kitchen, R. L.; Turnbull, J. C.; West, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed description is given of the 0.5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, installed in early 2010 at GNS Science, New Zealand. Its design follows that of previously commissioned Compact 14C-only AMS (CAMS) systems based on the Pelletron tandem accelerator. The only basic departure from that design is an extension of the rare-isotope achromat with a 45° magnet and a two-anode gas-ionisation detector, to provide additional filtering for 10Be. Realised performance of the three AMS modes is discussed in terms of acceptance-test scores, 14C Poisson and non-Poisson errors, and 10Be detection limit and sensitivity. Operational details and hardware improvements, such as 10Be beam transport and particle detector setup, are highlighted. Statistics of repeat measurements of all graphitised 14C calibration cathodes since start-up show that 91% of their total uncertainty values are less than 0.3%, indicating that the rare-isotope beamline extension has not affected precision of 14C measurement. For 10Be, the limit of detection in terms of the isotopic abundance ratio 10Be/9Be is 6 × 10-15 at at-1 and the total efficiency of counting atoms in the sample cathode is 1/8500 (0.012%).

  18. Understanding Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Teen Dating Violence Fact Sheet 2014 Dating violence is a type of intimate partner violence. It occurs between two people in a close relationship. The nature of dating violence can be physical, emotional, or sexual. • Physical— This ...

  19. Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room Social Media Publications Injury Center Teen Dating Violence Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... serious forms of violence. What is teen dating violence? Teen Dating Violence [550 KB, 2 Pages, 508] ...

  20. Cosmogenic radionuclide 7Be in atmospheric fallouts, weather factors and solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungurov, F.R.

    2011-11-01

    Key words: 7 Be activity, atmospheric fallouts, solar activity, gamma spectroscopy. Subjects of research: cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in atmospheric fallouts and surrounding objects of environment, its migrational distribution connected to solar activity and weather meteorologic parameters of the region studied. Purpose of work: Defining correlation between atmospheric humidity and solar activity with concentration and distribution of cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be. Methods of research: gamma-spectrometry method of activity measurements. The results obtained and their novelty: Cycle of research works on definition of concentration and migrational distribution of CRN 7 Be in Samarkand region during 2002-2005 was carried out for the first time. Volumetric activity of 7 Be in squat air layer of Samarkand was determined. Average density of 7 Be fallouts for the four years of studies was determined. Qualitative correlation bet ween 7 Be fallouts density variations and solar activity, expressed through Wolf number has been found. Qualitative correlation between 7 Be fallouts density variations and amount of precipitations has been found. Regularity in 7 Be concentration decrease towards north latitudes has been detected. Practical value: Developed scintillation method of 7 Be activity detection in atmospheric fallouts was used in works performed in the framework of republican grants 2F-No 1.2.3, CNT RUz PFNI 2F-No 2.1.39 and ITD-7-024. Methodology was used for the estimation of the velocity of erosion processes in the soils of different regions of Uzbekistan. Methodology is used in the works on 7 Be radioactivity measurements. Degree of embed and economic effectivity: Gained results replenish database on 7 Be isotope distribution on Earth regions and its role in formation of some processes, connected with meteorology, agronomy and radioecology of Samarkand region. Field of application: meteorology, agronomy and radioecology. (author)

  1. Study of the cosmogenic activation in NaI(Tl) crystals within the ANAIS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, P.; Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Coarasa, I.; García, E.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    The direct detection of galactic dark matter particles requires ultra-low background conditions. NaI(Tl) crystals are applied in the search for these dark matter particles through their interactions in the detector by measuring the scintillation signal produced. The production of long-lived isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth’s surface can be an hazard for these ultra-low background demanding experiments, typically performed underground. Therefore, production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well-known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Here, analysis of the cosmogenic studies developed from the ANAIS experiment NaI(Tl) detectors are presented. Installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays and thanks to the prompt data taking developed, identification and quantification of isotopes with half-lives of the order of tens of days were allowed, and thanks to the long-term operation of the detectors long-lived isotopes have been also identified and quantified. Main results for the activation yields of iodine and tellurium isotopes, 22Na, 113Sn, 109Cd, and tritium are presented in this work, together with the estimate of the production rates for their activation by cosmic nucleons while on Earth’s surface based on a selection of excitation functions over the entire energy range of cosmic nucleons.

  2. Calculation of the rockwall recession rate of a limestone cliff, affected by rockfalls, using cosmogenic chlorine-36. Case study of the Montsec Range (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Guillem; Corominas, Jordi; Mavrouli, Olga; Merchel, Silke; Abellán, Antonio; Pavetich, Stefan; Rugel, Georg

    2018-04-01

    Cliff erosion may be a major problem in settled areas affecting populations and producing economic and ecological losses. In this paper we present a procedure to calculate the long-term retreat rate of a cliff affected by rockfalls in the Montsec Range, Eastern Pyrenees (Spain). It is composed of low, densely fractured limestones; and the rockwall is affected by rockfalls of different sizes. The rockfall scars are clearly distinguishable by their regular boundaries and by their orange colour, which contrast with the greyish old reference surface (S0) of the cliff face. We have dated different stepped surfaces of the rockwall, including S0, using cosmogenic 36Cl. The total amount of material released by rockfall activity was calculated using a high definition point cloud of the slope face obtained with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The present rockwall surface has been subtracted from the reconstructed old cliff surface. This has allowed the calculation of the total volume released by rockfalls and of the retreat rate. The latter ranges from 0.31 to 0.37 mm·a- 1. This value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other researchers in neighbouring regions in Spain, having similar geology and affected by rockfalls.

  3. Structure of 10Be and 16C nuclei via break-up reactions studied with the 4π Chimera array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2018-01-01

    The study of cluster states in neutron-rich Be and C isotopes is a subject of interest in Nuclear Physics. These states should be characterized by high deformation where α-clusters are bounded by valence neutrons. We performed a spectroscopic study of 10Be and 16C isotopes via projectile break-up reactions, by using radioactive beams produced at the INFN-LNS FRIBs facility and the Chimera 4π array. The possible evidence of a new 10Be state at 13.5 MeV excitation energy was found in the 6He+4He disintegration channel. The spectroscopy of 16C was studied via the 6He+10Be break-up channel; in this case we found the indication of a possible new state at about 20.6 MeV.

  4. Constraints on ice volume changes of the WAIS and Ross Ice Shelf since the LGM based on cosmogenic exposure ages in the Darwin-Hatherton glacial system of the Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, David; Storey, Bryan; Hood, David; Joy, Kurt; Shulmeister, James

    2010-05-01

    Quantitative assessment of the spatial and temporal scale of ice volume change of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) and Ross Ice Shelf since the last glacial maximum (LGM) ~20 ka is essential to accurately predict ice sheet response to current and future climate change. Although global sea level rose by approximately 120 metres since the LGM, the contribution of polar ice sheets is uncertain and the timing of any such contribution is controversial. Mackintosh et al (2007) suggest that sectors of the EAIS, similar to those studied at Framnes Mountains where the ice sheet slowly calves at coastal margins, have made marginal contributions to global sea-level rise between 13 and 7 ka. In contrast, Stone et al (2003) document continuing WAIS decay during the mid-late Holocene, raising the question of what was the response of the WAIS since LGM and into the Holocene. Terrestrial evidence is restricted to sparse coastal oasis and ice free mountains which archive limits of former ice advances. Mountain ranges flanking the Darwin-Hatherton glaciers exhibit well-defined moraines, weathering signatures, boulder rich plateaus and glacial tills, which preserve the evidence of advance and retreat of the ice sheet during previous glacial cycles. Previous studies suggest a WAIS at the LGM in this location to be at least 1,000 meters thicker than today. As part of the New Zealand Latitudinal Gradient Project along the Transantarctic, we collected samples for cosmogenic exposure dating at a) Lake Wellman area bordering the Hatherton Glacier, (b) Roadend Nunatak at the confluence of the Darwin and Hatherton glaciers and (c) Diamond Hill which is positioned at the intersection of the Ross Ice Shelf and Darwin Glacier outlet. While the technique of exposure dating is very successful in mid-latitude alpine glacier systems, it is more challenging in polar ice-sheet regions due to the prevalence of cold-based ice over-riding events and absence of outwash processes which removes

  5. Progress in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, R.E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The article concerns radiocarbon dating, the most important method for dating in archaeology. The principles and practice of the dating method are described. Recent developments in radiocarbon dating due to technical advances, are discussed, and include radiometric counting of small samples and accelerator mass spectrometry. Carbon isotopes and the environment are also discussed. (U.K.)

  6. Towards improvement of aluminium assay in quartz for in situ cosmogenic 26Al analysis at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Toshiyuki; Fink, David; Mifsud, Charles

    2015-10-01

    Accuracy and precision in the measurement of natural aluminium abundances in quartz can affect the reliability of 26Al exposure dating and 26Al/10Be burial dating. At ANSTO, aliquots extracted from the HF solutions of dissolved quartz are treated in our laboratory, whereas ICP-OES analysis is performed at a commercial laboratory. The long-term inter-run reproducibility of our in-house standards show a limiting precision in Al measurements of 3-4% (1σ), which is lower than the claimed precision of Al analysis by ICP-OES. This indicates that unaccounted random errors are incorporated during our aliquot preparation. In this study, we performed several controlled tests to investigate effects of possible inconsistencies and variances during our aliquot preparation procedure. The results indicate that our procedure is robust against any subtle change in the preparation procedure, e.g., fuming temperatures, fuming reagents, and drying conditions. We found that the density of the solutions dispatched for ICP analysis is occasionally variable due to the presence of residual fuming reagents in the solution. A comparison of the results between the calibration curve and standard addition methods show that the former results are consistently lower than the latter by up to ∼14%. Similar offsets have been reported by previous studies. The reason for these discrepancies is mostly likely matrix effect, which is not accounted for by the calibration curve method. Further tests by varying matrix with impurities such as HF, HClO4, H2SO4 and Si identified that Si could cause lower offset in Al measurements; however, our ICP solutions are confirmed to be free from Si and the cause of matrix effect remains to be investigated. Hence, care must be taken for the measurement of Al concentrations in quartz by ICP-OES, either by ensuring that matrix effect is fully accounted for or by routinely employing standard additions when required.

  7. Towards improvement of aluminium assay in quartz for in situ cosmogenic 26Al analysis at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Toshiyuki; Fink, David; Mifsud, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Accuracy and precision in the measurement of natural aluminium abundances in quartz can affect the reliability of 26 Al exposure dating and 26 Al/ 10 Be burial dating. At ANSTO, aliquots extracted from the HF solutions of dissolved quartz are treated in our laboratory, whereas ICP-OES analysis is performed at a commercial laboratory. The long-term inter-run reproducibility of our in-house standards show a limiting precision in Al measurements of 3–4% (1σ), which is lower than the claimed precision of Al analysis by ICP-OES. This indicates that unaccounted random errors are incorporated during our aliquot preparation. In this study, we performed several controlled tests to investigate effects of possible inconsistencies and variances during our aliquot preparation procedure. The results indicate that our procedure is robust against any subtle change in the preparation procedure, e.g., fuming temperatures, fuming reagents, and drying conditions. We found that the density of the solutions dispatched for ICP analysis is occasionally variable due to the presence of residual fuming reagents in the solution. A comparison of the results between the calibration curve and standard addition methods show that the former results are consistently lower than the latter by up to ∼14%. Similar offsets have been reported by previous studies. The reason for these discrepancies is mostly likely matrix effect, which is not accounted for by the calibration curve method. Further tests by varying matrix with impurities such as HF, HClO 4 , H 2 SO 4 and Si identified that Si could cause lower offset in Al measurements; however, our ICP solutions are confirmed to be free from Si and the cause of matrix effect remains to be investigated. Hence, care must be taken for the measurement of Al concentrations in quartz by ICP-OES, either by ensuring that matrix effect is fully accounted for or by routinely employing standard additions when required.

  8. LITHIUM-BERYLLIUM-BORON ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN METEORITIC HIBONITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ORIGIN OF 10Be AND EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM IRRADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ming-Chang; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Lee, Typhoon

    2010-01-01

    NanoSIMS isotopic measurements of Li, Be, and B in individual hibonite grains extracted from the Murchison meteorite revealed that 10 B excesses correlate with the 9 Be/ 11 B ratios in 26 Al-free PLAty hibonite Crystals. From these data, an initial 10 Be/ 9 Be = (5.5 ± 1.6) x 10 -4 (2σ) and 10 B/ 11 B = 0.2508 ± 0.0015 can be inferred. On the other hand, chondritic boron isotopic compositions were found in 26 Al-bearing Spinel-HIBonite spherules, most likely due to contamination with normal boron. No 7 Li excesses due to 7 Be decay were observed. When combined with previously reported data, the new data yield the best defined 10 Be/ 9 Be = (5.3 ± 1.0) x 10 -4 (2σ) and 10 B/ 11 B = 0.2513 ± 0.0012 for PLACs. A comparison of this value and the best constrained 10 Be/ 9 Be = (8.8 ± 0.6) x 10 -4 in CV Ca-Al-rich inclusions supports a heterogeneous distribution of 10 Be and its protosolar irradiation origin. We consider two possible irradiation scenarios that could potentially lead to the observed Li-Be-B isotopic compositions in PLACs. Although in situ irradiation of solids with hibonite chemistry seems to provide the simplest explanation, more high quality data will be needed for quantitatively constraining the irradiation history.

  9. Reconstructing temperatures in the Maritime Alps, Italy, since the Last Glacial Maximum using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marissa; Spagnolo, Matteo; Ribolini, Adriano; Shuster, David

    2016-04-01

    The Gesso Valley, located in the southwestern-most, Maritime portion of the European Alps, contains an exceptionally well-preserved record of glacial advances during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Detailed geomorphic mapping, geochronology of glacial deposits, and glacier reconstructions indicate that glaciers in this Mediterranean region responded to millennial scale climate variability differently than glaciers in the interior of the European Alps. This suggests that the Mediterranean Sea somehow modulated the climate of this region. However, since glaciers respond to changes in temperature and precipitation, both variables were potentially influenced by proximity to the Sea. To disentangle the competing effects of temperature and precipitation changes on glacier size, we are constraining past temperature variations in the Gesso Valley since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry. The cosmogenic noble gases 3He and 21Ne experience diffusive loss from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at Earth surface temperatures. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry utilizes this open-system behavior to quantitatively constrain thermal histories of rocks during exposure to cosmic ray particles at the Earth's surface. We will present measurements of cosmogenic 3He in quartz sampled from moraines in the Gesso Valley with LGM, Bühl stadial, and Younger Dryas ages. With these 3He measurements and experimental data quantifying the diffusion kinetics of 3He in quartz, we will provide a preliminary temperature reconstruction for the Gesso Valley since the LGM. Future work on samples from younger moraines in the valley system will be used to fill in details of the more recent temperature history.

  10. Travel Times of Water Derived from Three Naturally Occurring Cosmogenic Radioactive Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ate; Thaw, Melissa; Deinhart, Amanda; Bibby, Richard; Esser, Brad

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological travel times are studied on scales that span six orders of magnitude, from daily event water in stream flow to pre-Holocene groundwater in wells. Groundwater vulnerability to contamination, groundwater surface water interactions and catchment response are often focused on "modern" water that recharged after the introduction of anthropogenic tritium in precipitation in 1953. Shorter residence times are expected in smaller catchments, resulting in immediate vulnerability to contamination. We studied a small (4.6 km2) alpine (1660-2117 m) catchment in a Mediterranean climate (8 ˚ C, 1200 mm/yr) in the California Sierra Nevada to assess subsurface storage and investigate the response to the recent California drought. We analyzed a combination of three cosmogenic radioactive isotopes with half-lives varying from 87 days (sulfur-35), 2.6 years (sodium-22) to 12.3 years (tritium) in precipitation and stream samples. Tritium samples (1 L) are analyzed by noble gas mass spectrometry after helium-3 accumulation. Samples for sulfur-35 and sodium-22 are collected by processing 20-1000 L of water through an anion and cation exchange column in-situ. Sulfur-35 is analyzed by liquid scintillation counting after chemical purification and precipitation. Sodium-22 is analyzed by gamma counting after eluting the cations into a 4L Marinelli beaker. Monthly collected precipitation samples show variability of deposition rate for tritium and sulfur-35. Sodium-22 levels in cumulative yearly precipitation samples are consistent with recent studies in the US and Japan. The observed variability of deposition rates complicates direct estimation of stream water age fractions. The level and variability of tritium in monthly stream samples indicate a mean residence time on the order of 10 years and only small contributions of younger water during high flow conditions. Estimates of subsurface storage are in agreement with estimates from geophysical studies. Detections of sodium-22

  11. 10Be concentrations and the long-term fate of particle-reactive nuclides in five soil profiles from California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, M.C.; Krishnaswami, S.; Thomas, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Concentration-depth profiles of cosmic-ray-produced 10 Be(tsub(1/2)=1.5 m.y.) have been measured by accelerator-mass spectrometry in five soil profiles. These measurements were made in an effort (1) to understand the retentivity of soil surfaces for particle-reactive tracers depositing from the atmosphere on time scales of 10 4 -10 6 years, and (2) to explore the application of 10 Be as a chronometer of geomorphic surface age. The profiles sampled are from two wave-cut terraces located near Mendocino, California, a table mountain top and an alluvial fan, both located near Friant, California. The ages of the Mendocino terraces are inferred to be (1-5) x 10 5 years based on amino-stratigraphic correlations and models of terrace evolution; those of the table mountain top and alluvial fan are 9.5 x 10 6 years and 6.0 x 10 5 years, respectively, based on K-Ar analyses. All the surfaces sampled are nearly flat and exhibit few erosional features. In addition to 10 Be we measured 210 Pb, sup(239,) 240 Pu and 7 Be to ascertain the retentivity of the soils for particle-reactive nuclides and to assess the present-day delivery rate of nuclides from the atmosphere. The 7 Be inventory is 4.0 dpm/cm 2 similar to those observed at nearby locations. The inventories of 210 Pb and Pu isotopes conform to those predicted from model calculations and suggest that the soil surfaces sampled retain the entire burden of particle-reactive nuclides delivered to them over short time scales, approx.= 100 years. The 10 Be concentrations in the sample range between (0.2 and 7) x 10 8 atoms/g soil and show strong correlations with leachable Fe and/or Al. (orig./WL)

  12. Cosmogenic signature of geomagnetic reversals and excursions from the Réunion event to the Matuyama-Brunhes transition (0.7-2.14 Ma interval)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Bourlès, Didier L.; Thouveny, Nicolas; Horng, Chorng-Shern; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Choy, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    Long-term variations of the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) during periods of stable polarity and in transitional states (reversals and excursions) provide key information for understanding the geodynamo regime. Following several studies dealing with the Brunhes chron and the Matuyama-Brunhes transition, this study presents a new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio (Be-ratio) record obtained from the MD97-2143 core (western Pacific Ocean). This new Be-ratio series yields a record of GDM variations covering the early Brunhes and mid to late Matuyama time period (i.e. 700-2140 ka), independently from the relative paleointensity (RPI) record obtained from the same core, that can be compared with available RPI records and stacks. Stratigraphic offsets measured between the Be-ratio peaks and the corresponding RPI minima reach 2 to 14 cm. They can be assigned to (post-) detrital remanent magnetization (pDRM) effects leading to magnetization locking-in delays varying from 2 to 12 ka in the studied core. 10Be overproduction episodes triggered by geomagnetic dipole moment lows (GDL) linked to polarity reversals and excursions confirm the global control exerted by the GDM on cosmogenic radionuclides production. A dipole moment reconstruction derived from the Beryllium-10 (BeDiMo) was compiled and calibrated using absolute paleointensity data. This independent record complements the available paleomagnetic RPI records, permitting 1) to overcome the pDRM lock-in offsets induced below the mixing layer, 2) to confront and increase the robustness and precision of GDM reconstructions and, 3) to better constrain the chronology of geomagnetic field instabilities during the mid to late Matuyama chron. Our new 10Be derived inventory is fully compatible with the GDL series linked to geomagnetic polarity reversals and events (Matuyama-Brunhes transition, Jaramillo and Olduvai subchron boundaries, Cobb Mountain, Réunion) and it strengthens the occurrence of several excursions (Kamikatsura, Santa

  13. Measurement of the Spectroscopic Quadrupole Moment for the 2+1 State in 10Be:. Testing AB Initio Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orce, J. N.; Djongolov, M.; Navratil, P.; Ball, G.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Lassen, J.; Meissner, J.; Pearson, C. J.; Li, R.; Milovanovic, L.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Teigelhoefer, A.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.; Falou, H. Al; Drake, T. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Cross, D.; Kshetri, R.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Leach, K. G.; Rand, E. T.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E. R.; Wong, J.; Forssen, C.; Hayes, A. B.; Sarazin, F.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    2013-03-01

    The highly efficient and segmented TIGRESS HPGe γ-ray array at TRIUMF has been used to perform a reorientation effect Coulomb excitation study of the 2+1 state at 3.368 MeV in 10Be. This is the first Coulomb excitation measurement that provides information on diagonal matrix elements for such a high lying first excited state from μ-ray data. With the availability of accurate lifetime data, a restriction on the diagonal matrix element is determined. This result is compared to a no core shell model calculation with the CD-Bonn 2000 two nucleon potential.

  14. Structure of the excited states of 11Be reached through the reaction d(10Be,p)11Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, F.

    2003-10-01

    The one-neutron transfer reaction d( 10 Be,p) 11 Be has been studied at 32 A.MeV at GANIL with a 10 Be secondary beam. Protons were detected by the silicon strip array MUST. The ground state and excited states of 11 Be at 0.32, 1.78 and 3.41 MeV were populated, demonstrating the feasibility of transfer reactions induced by radioactive beams leading to bound and unbound states. A DWBA (distorted wave born approximation) analysis indicates for the 3.41 MeV state spin and parity 3/2 + or 5/2 + and a spectroscopic factor of 0.18 or 0.11, respectively. A broad structure centered at 10 MeV is also observed and corresponds to transfer to the 1d sub-shells. If one assumes that only the 1d3/2 orbital contributes to this structure, the splitting of the 1d neutron states in 11 Be is estimated to be 6.3 MeV. Using a 2-particle-RPA (random phase approximation) model, we have shown that neutron-neutron correlations play an important role in the inversion between the 2s1/2 and 1p1/2 neutron states in 11 Be. (author)

  15. Denudation rates of the Southern Espinhaço Range, Minas Gerais, Brazil, determined by in situ-produced cosmogenic beryllium-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Helen N.; Varajão, César A. C.; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Salgado, André A. R.; Varajão, Angélica F. D. C.

    2013-06-01

    To investigate denudation rates in the southern part of the Espinhaço Range (central-eastern Brazil) and to understand how this important resistant and residual relief has evolved in the past 1.38 My, cosmogenic 10Be concentrations produced in situ were measured in alluvial sediments from the three main regional basins, whose substratum is composed primarily of quartzites. The long-term denudation rates (up to 1.38 My) estimated from these measurements were compared with those that affect the western (São Francisco River) and eastern (Doce and Jequitinhonha Rivers) basins, which face the West San Francisco craton and the Atlantic, respectively. Denudation rates were measured in 27 samples collected in catchments of different sizes (6-970 km2) and were compared with geomorphic parameters. The mean denudation rates determined in the northern part are low and similar to those determined in the southern part, despite slightly different geomorphic parameter values (catchment relief and mean slope). For the southern catchments, the values are 4.91 ± 1.01 m My- 1 and 3.65 ± 1.26 m My- 1 for the Doce and São Francisco River basins, respectively; for the northern catchments, they are 4.40 ± 1.06 m My- 1 and 3.96 ± 0.91 m My- 1 for the Jequitinhonha and São Francisco River basins, respectively. These low values of denudation rates suggest no direct correlation if plotted against geomorphic parameters such as the catchment area, maximum elevation, catchment relief, average relief and mean slope gradients. These values show that the regional landscape evolves slowly and is strongly controlled by resistant lithology, with similar erosional rates in the three studied basins.

  16. 32Si dating of sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, U.

    2006-01-01

    Useful tools for determining absolute ages of sediments deposited within the last c. 100 years include 210 Pb, 137 Cs, and bomb radiocarbon. Cosmogenic 32 Si, with a half life of c. 140 years, can be applied in the age range 30-1000 years and is ideally suited for this time period. Detection of 32 Si is, however, very difficult due to its extremely low natural specific activity, and the vast excess of stable silicon (i.e. low 32 Si/Si ratio). 23 refs

  17. Correlates of minimal dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leck, Kira

    2006-10-01

    Researchers have associated minimal dating with numerous factors. The present author tested shyness, introversion, physical attractiveness, performance evaluation, anxiety, social skill, social self-esteem, and loneliness to determine the nature of their relationships with 2 measures of self-reported minimal dating in a sample of 175 college students. For women, shyness, introversion, physical attractiveness, self-rated anxiety, social self-esteem, and loneliness correlated with 1 or both measures of minimal dating. For men, physical attractiveness, observer-rated social skill, social self-esteem, and loneliness correlated with 1 or both measures of minimal dating. The patterns of relationships were not identical for the 2 indicators of minimal dating, indicating the possibility that minimal dating is not a single construct as researchers previously believed. The present author discussed implications and suggestions for future researchers.

  18. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  19. Dating of cremated bones

    OpenAIRE

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process. We developed a method of dating cremated bone by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), using this carbonate fraction. Here we present results for a variety of prehistoric sites and ages, showing a r...

  20. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gives a first introduction to 14 C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14 C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14 C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  1. Irradiation of dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Al-Charchafchy, F.; Al-Shaikhaly, M.H.; Mirjan, J.; Auda, H.

    1974-01-01

    Testing of the technical feasibility of radurization of fresh dates was attempted. In addition preliminary studies were carried out to investigate the applicability of gamma rays to date syrup manufacture. The varieties Zahdi, Lelwi and Tabarzel were studied at different stages of ripening. The eating quality of fresh dates was not affected significantly by irradiation even with doses of 270 and 540 krad. The duration of the softening process, after-ripening, of dates was prolonged by low doses of 10-30 krad in the majority of the experimental batches. The time period of after-ripening was reduced with 270 krad, as well as with 540 krad as a result of shortening of the induction period, i.e. the time after which the date begins to soften. The microbial spoilage of khalaal Lelwi dates was considerably reduced by irradiation with doses above 90 krad. The dibis yield of fully rutab dates was highly increased by the radiation doses of 375 to 2000 krad. The darkness and viable cell count of dibis pressed from irradiated dates were significantly lower than that of untreated dates. (F.J.)

  2. A new sampling technique for surface exposure dating using a portable electric rock cutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suganuma

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface exposure dating using in situ cosmogenic nuclides has contributed to our understanding of Earth-surface processes. The precision of the ages estimated by this method is affected by the sample geometry; therefore, high accuracy measurements of the thickness and shape of the rock sample (thickness and shape is crucial. However, it is sometimes diffi cult to meet these requirements by conventional sampling methods with a hammer and chisel. Here, we propose a new sampling technique using a portable electric rock cutter. This sampling technique is faster, produces more precisely shaped samples, and allows for a more precise age interpretation. A simple theoretical modeldemonstrates that the age error due to defective sample geometry increases as the total sample thickness increases, indicating the importance of precise sampling for surface exposure dating.

  3. Unravelling the Mysteries of Slip Histories, Validating Cosmogenic 36Cl Derived Slip Rates on Normal Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, H.; Gregory, L. C.; Wedmore, L.; Roberts, G.; Shanks, R. P.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Amey, R.; Hooper, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The cosmogenic isotope chlorine-36 (36Cl) is increasingly used as a tool to investigate normal fault slip rates over the last 10-20 thousand years. These slip histories are being used to address complex questions, including investigating slip clustering and understanding local and large scale fault interaction. Measurements are time consuming and expensive, and as a result there has been little work done validating these 36Cl derived slip histories. This study aims to investigate if the results are repeatable and therefore reliable estimates of how normal faults have been moving in the past. Our approach is to test if slip histories derived from 36Cl are the same when measured at different points along the same fault. As normal fault planes are progressively exhumed from the surface they accumulate 36Cl. Modelling these 36Cl concentrations allows estimation of a slip history. In a previous study, samples were collected from four sites on the Magnola fault in the Italian Apennines. Remodelling of the 36Cl data using a Bayesian approach shows that the sites produced disparate slip histories, which we interpret as being due to variable site geomorphology. In this study, multiple sites have been sampled along the Campo Felice fault in the central Italian Apennines. Initial results show strong agreement between the sites we have processed so far and a previous study. This indicates that if sample sites are selected taking the geomorphology into account, then 36Cl derived slip histories will be highly similar when sampled at any point along the fault. Therefore our study suggests that 36Cl derived slip histories are a consistent record of fault activity in the past.

  4. Snežna jama (Slovenia): Interdisciplinary dating of cave sediments and implication for landscape evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuselmann, Philipp; Mihevc, Andrej; Pruner, Petr; Horáček, Ivan; Čermák, Stanislav; Hercman, Helena; Sahy, Diana; Fiebig, Markus; Hajna, Nadja Zupan; Bosák, Pavel

    2015-10-15

    Caves are important markers of surface evolution, since they are, as a general rule, linked with ancient valley bottoms by their springs. However, caves can only be dated indirectly by means of the sediments they contain. If the sediment is older than common dating methods, one has to use multiple dating approaches in order to get meaningful results. U/Th dating, palaeomagnetic analysis of flowstone and sediment profiles, cosmogenic dating of quartz pebbles, and mammalian dating allowed a robust estimate of speleogenesis, sediment deposition, climatic change at the surface, and uplift history on the Periadriatic fault line during the Plio-Pleistocene. Our dates indicate that Snežna jama was formed in the (Upper) Miocene, received its sedimentary deposits during the Pliocene in a rather low-lying, hilly landscape, and became inactive due to uplift along the Periadriatic and Sava faults and climatic changes at the beginning of the Quaternary. Although it is only a single cave, the information contained within it makes it an important site of the Southern Alps.

  5. S K Date

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. S K Date. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 2 April 2000 pp 97-101 Magnetic Materials. Comparison of the irreversible thermomagnetic behaviour of some ferro- and ferrimagnetic systems · P S Anil Kumar P A Joy S K Date · More Details Abstract ...

  6. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  7. Dating of cremated bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process.

  8. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  9. Quaternary dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaney, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The papers in this book cover absolute, relative and multiple dating methods, and have been written by specialists from a number of different earth sciences disciplines - their common interest being the dating of geological materials within the Quaternary. Papers on absolute dating methods discuss radiocarbon, uranium-series, potassium argon, 40 Ar/ 39 Ar, paleomagnetic, obsidian hydration, thermoluminescence, amino acid racemization, tree rings, and lichenometric techniques. Those on relative dating include discussions on various geomorphic relative age indicators such as drainage density changes, hypsometric integrals, bifurcation ratios, stream junction angles, spur morphology, hillslope geometry, and till sheet characteristics. The papers on multiple dating cite examples from the Rocky Mountains, Australia, Lake Agassiz Basin, and the Southern Andes. Also included is the panel discussion which reviews and assesses the information presented, and a field trip guide which discusses the sequences of Wisconian tills and interlayered lacustrine and fluvial sediments. (orig.)

  10. 10Be evidence for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal in the EPICA Dome C ice core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisbeck, G M; Yiou, F; Cattani, O; Jouzel, J

    2006-11-02

    An ice core drilled at Dome C, Antarctica, is the oldest ice core so far retrieved. On the basis of ice flow modelling and a comparison between the deuterium signal in the ice with climate records from marine sediment cores, the ice at a depth of 3,190 m in the Dome C core is believed to have been deposited around 800,000 years ago, offering a rare opportunity to study climatic and environmental conditions over this time period. However, an independent determination of this age is important because the deuterium profile below a depth of 3,190 m depth does not show the expected correlation with the marine record. Here we present evidence for enhanced 10Be deposition in the ice at 3,160-3,170 m, which we interpret as a result of the low dipole field strength during the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal, which occurred about 780,000 years ago. If correct, this provides a crucial tie point between ice cores, marine cores and a radiometric timescale.

  11. Luminescence dating in archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is routinely applied to burnt lithic material. Simple fires are capable of enabling stones weighing a few hundred grams to reach 450 o C, thus zeroing the TL signal. TL dates have been obtained for Upper and Lower Paleolithic sites in Europe and the Near East. TL dating continues to be used for dating pottery and for authentification of ceramic works of art. Some recent studies report the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) (also know as photoluminescence) for dating very small samples of quartz, e.g. from small pieces of pottery or frm metallurgical slag The major recent advance has been in the development of a reliable laboratory procedure for using the OSL signal from quartz to obtain the past radiation exposure. The quartz OSL signal is extremely sensitive to light and is reduced to a negligible level on exposure to direct sunlight for radionuclides during burial, signal to date san.sized quartz grains extracted from sediments, The OSL signal is stimulated by 470 nm light from emitting diodes and the detected using flirters centred on 340 nm A similar signal can be obtained from feldspar grain when are exposed to infrared wavelengths around 880 nm. The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals is also rapidly depleted by exposure to sunlight, and dating of colluvial deposits from archaeological sites has been reported

  12. Cosmogenic nuclides in recently fallen meteorites: Evidence for galactic cosmic ray variations during the period 1967--1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Reeves, J.H.; Rancitelli, L.A.; Bogard, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides were measured on 48 fragments of 24 meteorites which fell between 1967 and 1978. Nondestructive gamma counting techniques were used to obtain data on 7 Be, 46 Sc, 48 V, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 56 Co, 57 Co, 58 Co, and 60 Co on at least some of the samples. Sodium 22 and 26 Al measurements are reported on all 48 samples. In addition, new rare gas data and exposure ages are reported for the meteorites Guibga, Gorlovka, Dhajala, Louisville, Acapulco, Jilin, Kabo, Alta-Ameen, and Canon City. The cosmogenic radioisotope and rare gas data are interpreted in terms of a time dependent modulation of galactic cosmic rays spanning one full 11 year sun spot cycle. Special attention is given to the data on 22 Na, 46 Sc, 54 Mn, and 48 V with either 26 Al or 22 Ne/ 21 Ne used to provide a shielding correction. The shielding normalized data using the 26 Al method appear to correlate well with calculated production rates scaled against the Deep River neutron monitor. The data for the four isotopes are consistent with a production rate variation of a factor of 2.5--3 between solar maximum and solar minimum for sun spot cycle 20. These data demonstrate that the production rates of cosmic ray-produced nuclides in meteorites vary considerably according to modulation by the 11-year solar cycle and support the concept that variations of solar-modulated, cosmic ray flux of similar magnitude have occurred over much longer time periods

  13. Date Rape (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... owe" someone sex, even if you're a couple. Rape is not always violent. If you say " ... date rape" drugs like: rohypnol , called roofies, lunch money, or mind erasers GHB (gamma hydroxybutyric acid), called ...

  14. Methods of dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatty, B

    1986-04-01

    Scientific methods of dating, born less than thirty years ago, have recently improved tremendously. First the dating principles will be given; then it will be explained how, through natural radioactivity, we can have access to the age of an event or an object; the case of radiocarbon will be especially emphasized. The principle of relative methods such as thermoluminescence or paleomagnetism will also be shortly given. What is the use for dating. The fields of its application are numerous; through these methods, relatively precise ages can be given to the major events which have been keys in the history of universe, life and man; thus, dating is a useful scientific tool in astrophysics, geology, biology, anthropology and archeology. Even if certain ages are still subject to controversies, we can say that these methods have confirmed evolution's continuity, be it on a cosmic, biologic or human scale, where ages are measured in billions, millions or thousands of years respectively.

  15. NAIP 2012 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  16. NAIP 2014 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  17. Food Product Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Food Product Dating "Best if Used By" is a ...

  18. NAIP 2013 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2013 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  19. NAIP 2011 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2011 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  20. Technological advances in cosmogenic neutron detectors for measuring soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreda, M. G.; Schrön, M.; Köhli, M.

    2017-12-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron probe is used for measuring area-average soil water content at the hectometer scale. Early work showed a simple exponential decrease with distance of the instrument's sensitivity and a footprint 300 m in radius. Recent research suggested a much higher sensitivity to local neutrons and reduced footprint. We show results confirming the high sensitivity to local neutrons, describe two ways to reduce local and increase far-field effects, and propose ways of measuring neutrons at different spatial scales. Measurements with moderated detectors across a 10-m-wide creek and a 2-m-wide water tank show a decrease by 30% and 20%, respectively, of neutron intensity over water compared to that over land nearby. These results mean that the detector is sensitive to meter-scale heterogeneities of water content. This sensitivity can be reduced by rising the detector or by shielding it from local neutrons. The effect of local water distributions on the measured neutron intensity decreases with height. In the water tank experiment it disappeared almost completely at the height of 2 m, leading to the conjecture that the height roughly equal to the horizontal scale of heterogeneity would eliminate the sensitivity. This may or may not be practical. Shielding the detector below by a hydrogenous material removes a substantial fraction of the local neutrons. The shielded detector has a reduced count rate, reduced sensitivity to local neutrons and increased sensitivity to neutrons farther afield, and a larger footprint. Such a detector could be preferable to the current cosmogenic-neutron probe under heterogeneous soil water conditions. The shielding experiments also inspired the development of a local-area neutron detector. It has hydrogenous neutron shields on all sides except the bottom, substantially blocking the neutrons coming from afar, while allowing the neutrons coming directly from below. Its footprint is equal to its physical dimension when the detector is

  1. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B.; Torrence, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO 2 nH 2 0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  2. History of radiocarbon dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, W F [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Geophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1967-08-15

    The development is traced of radiocarbon dating from its birth in curiosity regarding the effects of cosmic radiation on Earth. Discussed in historical perspective are: the significance of the initial measurements in determining the course of developments; the advent of the low-level counting technique; attempts to avoid low-level counting by the use of isotopic enrichment; the gradual appearance of the environmental effect due to the combustion of fossil fuel (Suess effect); recognition of the atmosphere ocean barrier for carbon dioxide exchange; detailed understanding of the mixing mechanism from the study of fallout radiocarbon; determination of the new half-life; indexing and the assimilation problem for the massive accumulation of dates; and the proliferation of measurement techniques and the impact of archaeological insight on the validity of radiocarbon dates. (author)

  3. Rate of bedrock channel incision by waterfall retreat and landscape response constrained by cosmogenic 3He, Kauai, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, B. H.; Lamb, M. P.; Scheingross, J. S.; Farley, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Channel incision and knickpoint retreat are the drivers of landscape evolution, yet we are still challenged to quantify the rate and processes by which rivers cut into rock. The Napali Coast on the northwestern side of Kauai, Hawaii, has multiple linear channels incising >200 m into the shield volcano surface. The channels have well-constrained initial conditions, including original topography, and relatively uniform layered basalt of known age (~4.5 Ma), which have attracted previous studies of channel evolution (e.g., Seidl et al., 1994, 1997). Many channels feature prominent waterfalls, although the mechanism of knickpoint initiation (submarine landslide vs cliff erosion) and subsequent retreat remain ambiguous. Motivated by these knowledge gaps and recent advances in cosmogenic helium geochronology, we revisited the Kaulaula Valley, a 9 km long narrow valley, beheaded on its upslope extent by the Waimea Canyon, and ending near the coast at the northern Mana Plain. Four kilometers up the canyon is a prominent 40 m high vertical knickpoint, dividing the valley into strongly contrasting geomorphic domains. The boulder-lined channel below the knickpoint is linear, steep (15%), and confined to a narrow valley with steep rocky cliffs (average slope 31°). Large, >2 m diameter angular boulders in the lower section of channel show evidence of mobility from debris flows. Above the knickpoint, average channel gradient is reduced (9%), bed load is much finer, and convex, soil-mantled hillslopes have a consistently lower mean slope of 18°. We constrained the exposure age of 18 features (in-channel boulders, stable boulders on terraces, and in-channel bedrock) along the length of the channel, by analysis of cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts. Cosmogenic exposure ages are oldest near the coast (80 ka) and systematically decrease with upstream distance towards the waterfall (model of knickpoint retreat and downstream terrace abandonment advocated by Seidl (1997), and we

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating from the modern age to the past million age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tosaki, Y.; Sueki, K.; Bessyo, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-nuclide Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) is able to measure the long-lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I. The Tsukuba AMS system is able to perform AMS measurements with the terminal voltage of more than 10 MV. It is difficult to estimate the modern age dating (timescale of the past ten years) by the AMS dating method because the low attenuation of long-lived radioisotopes. The atomic bomb-produced radioisotopes are proposed as the environmental traces for the modern age dating. There is the advantage that the long half life of radioisotopes makes the attenuation negligilbe compared with the short half life of radioisotopes. We applied the 36 Cl bomb pulse as a dating tool for modern groundwater (∼50 years) instead of the 3 H bomb pulse. In addition, we have developed 32 Si-AMS system. The half life of 32 Si is about 140 years, therefore 32 Si-AMS is a useful tool for the modern age dating. On the other hand, we have started a new project to measure the cosmogenic nuclide of 36 Cl in an ice core retrieved from Dome Fuji station at Antarctic in order to investigate the past solar activity and the past earth environment as the timescale of the past million age. (author)

  5. Obsidian dating prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrose, W.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Developments in the nuclear industry have shown that some of the problems related to the glassification of waste for long term storage are centred on the rate of glass weathering in various repositories. Long term weathering of artificial glasses is paralleled by the archaeological problem of determining hydration rates in obsidian artefacts as a means of dating their manufacture. Figures available for sites in Papua New Guinea indicate that the weathering rate is sufficiently fast to render conventional hydration measurement completely unreliable. This follows from the range of calculated surface reduction rates which range between .0002μ to .004μ per year depending on the site's location and the obsidian source. Hydration rates for key Papua New Guinea obsidians have been determined from long term experimental laboratory exposure and these are used to evaluate the age of obsidians from selected archaeological sites. By adopting a strategy of measuring hydration in concealed fissures both the weathering rate and the dating of the Papua New Guinea obsidians have been successfully achieved. The dissolution rates of natural obsidians could be useful in considering weathering rates for artificial glasses. An improved system for calculating the annual effective hydration temperature is presented which gives a better control of micro-environmental temperature in its crucial rate determining role. The combined result of these developments gives obsidian hydration dating an enhanced capacity to be a useful and independent dating system

  6. Confronting Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Raymond J.; Heller, Daniel A.; Binet, Tracy

    1997-01-01

    To be safe havens for children, schools cannot address the intellect only. Brattleboro (Vermont) Union High School went beyond academics by sponsoring a performance of "The Yellow Dress," a powerful one-woman play about a teenage victim of dating violence. The production challenged participants to unite school and community, intellect…

  7. The Realities of Date Rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Cara; Watson, Jennifer; Williams, Audrey R.

    This poster presentation addresses the issue of date rape, specifically in the college environment. Highlighted are date rape statistics, demographics, and date rape drugs. Also discussed are date rape warnings and prevention strategies. It is concluded that college and university administrators must place the issue of date rape and acquaintance…

  8. Thermoluminescence dating of pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashimura, Takenobu; Ichikawa, Yoneta.

    1978-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first half describes on the history of thermoluminescence dating, and the latter half, the principle and measurement examples. It was in late 1955 that the measurement of radiation dose using thermoluminescence began. The method to thermoluminescence dating was developed when it was found that most natural stones emit the thermoluminescence. About Greek earthen wares, the study of which was presented in 1961 by G. Kennedy of University of California, the dating was able to be made within the standard deviation of 10%. Since then, this dating method progressed rapidly, and a number of laboratories are now forwarding the investigation. In the samples of natural materials, intensity of thermoluminescence I is proportional to natural radiation dose D which has been absorbed by the samples, i.e. I = kD, where k is the susceptibility of thermoluminescence of the samples. Since k is different in each sample, D can be determined by irradiating the sample with β or γ ray of known dose D 0 , measuring its luminescence I 0 , and eliminating k through these two equations, because i 0 = kD 0 . Next, if t is assumed to be the time passed since a pottery was made, D is expressed as Rt, where R is the natural radiation dose per year absorbed by the pottery. Thus t is determined if R is known. The report describes on the method of measuring R. As an example, the results of measurement of the potteries excavated at Iwakura remains, Yorikura, Taishaku-kyo, are listed. Results by 14 C dating are also described for reference. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Determination of primordial and cosmogenic radioactivity in achondritic meteorites by low-level, gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muntean, R.A.

    1979-08-01

    A high-sensitivity, low-background gamma-ray spectrometer containing two 23 cm by 13 cm thallium-activated, sodium iodide detectors was used to measure long-lived primordial and cosmogenic radioactivity in a suite of achondritic meteorites. Potassium, thorium, uranium, and 26 Al abundances were established for sixteen brecciated eucrites, two unbrecciated eucrites, a nakhlite, a chassignite, and a unique meteorite from Antarctica by nondestructive counting techniques. In several cases, multiple samples of the same meteorite fall were examined. Concentrations ranged from 79.8 ppM to 1150 ppM for potassium, 55.6 ppb to 663 ppb for thorium, 18.1 ppb to 190 ppb for uranium, and 45.0 dpm/kg to 99.0 dpm/kg for 26 Al. In addition, a 137 Cs concentration of 264 dpm/kg was observed in the Allan Hills 77005,9 specimen

  10. A gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na/(7)Be activity ratio measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Ungar, Kurt; Stukel, Matthew; Mekarski, Pawel

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a digital gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer was developed and examined for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na and (7)Be in air-filter sample monitoring. The spectrometer consists of two bismuth germanate scintillators (BGO) and an XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The spectrometer design allows a more selective measurement of (22)Na with a significant background reduction by gamma-gamma coincidence events processing. Hence, the system provides a more sensitive way to quantify trace amounts of (22)Na than normal high resolution gamma spectrometry providing a critical limit of 3 mBq within a 20 h count. The use of a list-mode data acquisition technique enabled simultaneous determination of (22)Na and (7)Be activity concentrations using a single measurement by coincidence and anticoincidence mode respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A minimum age for Llullaillaco south flow from cosmogenic 3He: Much older than 19th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermann, S.; Althau, T.; Hahne, K

    2001-01-01

    Dating of Holocene lava flows can be a difficult task in cases when buried organic material suitable for 14 C dating is lacking, as typical for arid climatic conditions. Cosmic-ray-produced nuclides may provide an alternative dating method, especially for lava flows exposed at high altitudes: When cosmic ray particles (predominantly secondary neutrons) interact with terrestrial surface rocks, they can produce a variety of stable and radioactive nuclides by spallation reactions with target elements in the crystal lattice (e.g. Lal, 1988; Cerling and Craig, 1994). Some of these nuclides, such as the noble gas isotopes 3 He and 21 Ne or the radionuclides 10 Be, 26 Al, and 36 Cl, can be detected mass-spectrometrically, and their concentration can be used to determine the duration of the rock exposure on the surface as production rates decrease rapidly with depth. The intensity of cosmic rays increases with altitude due to the reduced shielding by the atmosphere, therefore production rates at 4000 m are more than an order of magnitude higher than at sea level (Lal, 1991; Dunai, 2000). The Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) in the Andes of northern Chile is a region of prevailing arid climate, where a lot of prehistoric lava flows are still undated. Typically, high elevations and low erosion rates render them well suited for surface exposure dating. However, there are a few obstacles also. Many lavas in the CVZ have andesitic to dacitic compositions and a very small-grained structure. The most abundant rock-forming mineral plagioclase is known not to retain the light noble gases He and Ne quantitatively, but separation of more retentive minerals cannot easily be achieved. Also, the isotopic composition of magmatic He in these lavas is not very well constrained. Hilton et al. (1993) report 3 He/ 4 He ratios between 0.8 and 6.0 R A (R A = 1.39x10 -6 is the 3 He/ 4 He ratio in the atmosphere) for olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts from CVZ lavas. Such a range of compositions

  12. Amino acid racemisation dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject

  13. Dating fractures in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, K.E., E-mail: kath.halliday@nuh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N J; Somers, J M [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, R [Department of Radiology, Paul O' Gorman Building, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  14. Dating fractures in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, K.E.; Broderick, N.J.; Somers, J.M.; Hawkes, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  15. Thermoluminescence dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zink, A.

    2004-01-01

    A crystal that is submitted to radiation stores energy and releases this energy under the form of light whenever it is heated. These 2 properties: the ability to store energy and the ability to reset the energy stored are the pillars on which time dating methods like thermoluminescence are based. A typical accuracy of the thermoluminescence method is between 5 to 7% but an accuracy of 3% can be reached with a sufficient number of measurement. This article describes the application of thermoluminescence to the dating of a series of old terra-cotta statues. This time measurement is absolute and does not require any calibration, it represents the time elapsed since the last heating of the artifact. (A.C.)

  16. Radiocarbon dating for contributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.S.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the radiocarbon facility at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences, and is written for potential contributors, current users, and for those who advise others. The report briefly outlines the principles and practices of C-14 dating; with emphasis on factors that enable contributors to judge whether C-14 work is appropriate, and to assist them with the procedures to be followed in order to get the best results. Age determinations, being the main requirements by contributors, have been discussed in detail

  17. Sediment dating in review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper will comment on a few issues of particular relevance to Australasia. Thermoluminescent (TL) methods applied to open sites have been demonstrated to be effective. A particularly good example of this is to be found in the South East of South Australia, where a sequence of low ranges runs roughly parallel with the coast. They represent relict sand dunes left behind, on a slowly rising land surface by successive interglacial incursions of the sea at roughly 120 ka intervals. Comparison with ages established on independent geological grounds allows a test of quartz TL and IRSL ages that is believable back to 500 ka. Older than this, we do not yet understand the physics of the quartz well enough to go unequivocally forward (backward?). Similar results are emerging elsewhere. With dating limits being pushed ever further back, the time variation of the environmental radiation giving rise to the stored luminescent energy needs to be addressed. Particularly at wet sites, radioactive disequilibrium must be considered. In any case, a time profile of the radiation dose rate needs to be determined.In dating a given site or sites the value of ages obtained by any dating method,including C-14, is enhanced by parallel measurements with an different method

  18. A new value for the half-life of {sup 10}Be by Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection and liquid scintillation counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korschinek, G., E-mail: Gunther.Korschinek@ph.tum.d [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bergmaier, A. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Faestermann, T. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gerstmann, U.C. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Knie, K.; Rugel, G. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wallner, A. [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Dillmann, I. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kossert, K. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Remmert, A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The importance of {sup 10}Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of {sup 10}Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of {sup 10}Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the {sup 10}Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched {sup 10}Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of {sup 9}Be. We then determined the initial {sup 10}Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the {sup 10}Be concentration and activity yields a {sup 10}Be half-life of T{sub 1/2} = 1.388 +- 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. ), found a value of 1.386 +- 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for {sup 10}Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 +- 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

  19. Radiogenic 3He/4He Estimates and Their Effect on Calculating Plio-Pleistocene Cosmogenic 3He Ages of Alluvial-Fan Terraces in the Lower Colorado River Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, C.; Pelletier, J.

    2005-12-01

    Several alluvial-fan terraces near Topock, AZ were created by successive entrenchment of Pliocene and Pleistocene alluvial-fan gravels shed from the adjacent Black Mountains along the lower Colorado River corridor below Hoover Dam. These fans interfinger with and overlie main-stem Colorado River sands and gravels and grade to terrace levels that correspond with pre-existing elevations of the Colorado River. Absolute dates for the ages of Quaternary deposits on the lower Colorado River are rare and cosmogenic 3He age estimates of these surfaces would help constrain the timing of aggradation and incision in the lower Colorado River corridor. We analyzed individual basalt boulders from several terrace surfaces for total 3He/4He concentrations to calculate cosmogenic 3He ages of each fan terrace; 3He/4He values, expressed as R/Ra where Ra is the 3He/4He of air, range from 0.29 to 590. Black Mountain volcanic rocks have reported K-Ar ages between 15 and 30 Ma and basalt samples from adjacent alluvial fans contain 0.42 to 47× 1012 at/g of 4He, which has likely accumulated due to nuclear processes. The amount of radiogenic 3He/4He can be significant in old rocks with young exposure ages and can complicate determination of cosmogenic 3 He content. Alpha-decay of U, Th, and their daughter isotopes produces large amounts of 4He, whereas significant amounts of radiogenic 3He are only produced through the neutron bombardment of Li and subsequent beta-decay of tritium. We measured Li, U, Th, major and rare-earth element concentrations in whole-rock basalts and mineral separates. These concentrations are used to estimate the ratio of radiogenic helium contributed to the total helium system in our samples. Li concentrations typically range from 6 to 17 ppm, with one outlier of 62 ppm. U contents range from calculations predict that the average radiogenic helium (R/Ra) contributed to the total helium in Black Mountain basalt samples is 0.011. Other noble gas studies have shown

  20. Cosmogenic He and Ne in chondrules from clastic matrix and a lithic clast of Murchison: No pre-irradiation by the early sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, My E. I.; Huber, Liliane; Metzler, Knut; Busemann, Henner; Luginbuehl, Stefanie M.; Meier, Matthias M. M.; Maden, Colin; Wieler, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    Whether or not some meteorites retain a record of irradiation by a large flux of energetic particles from the early sun in the form of excesses of cosmic-ray produced noble gases in individual crystals or single chondrules is a topic of ongoing debate. Here, we present He and Ne isotopic data for individual chondrules in Murchison, a chondritic regolith breccia of the CM group. We separated 27 chondrules from a clastic matrix portion and 26 chondrules from an adjacent single so-called "primary accretionary rock" (Metzler et al., 1992). All chondrules from the primary rock fragment are expected to share a common irradiation history, whereas chondrules from the clastic matrix were stirred in the regolith independently of each other. All "primary rock chondrules" and 23 of the "matrix chondrules" have very similar concentrations of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne, corresponding to a cosmic-ray exposure age to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of ∼1.3-1.9 Ma, in the range of Murchison's meteoroid exposure age determined with cosmogenic radionuclides. Four clastic matrix chondrules contain excesses of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne, corresponding to nominal 4π exposure ages of ∼4-∼29 Ma, with a Ne isotopic composition as expected for production by GCR. If the fraction of excess cosmogenic gas bearing chondrules in the primary rock and clastic matrix were the same, we would expect this result with a statistical probability of only 0.5 - 2.7%. Therefore, the exposure age distributions for Murchison chondrules in primary rock and clastic matrix are very likely different. Such a difference is expected if the excess cosmogenic gas was acquired by some of the matrix chondrules in the regolith, but not if chondrules were irradiated in the solar nebula by the early sun before they accreted on the Murchison parent body. Therefore, Murchison does not provide evidence for irradiation by a high fluence of energetic particles from the early sun. By inference, this statement likely holds for the

  1. Atmospheric radiocarbon calibration to 45,000 yr BP: Late glacial fluctuations and cosmogenic isotope production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H.; van der Plicht, J.

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present), The results confirm the

  2. Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, R.

    1990-01-01

    Basic radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology have been combined to yield calibrated dates that are more accurate than conventional radiocarbon dates. This has been shown to be true for medieval and Egyptian dynastic dating. Because radiocarbon is a cosmogenically produced radioisotope, heliomagnetic and geomagnetic fields play a major role in its synthesis in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Inasmuch as a calibrated radiocarbon record exists for nearly 10 000 years, we now seem to possess in the short-time variations of the production rate a history of solar activity expressed via heliomagnetic fields carried by the solar wind. In turn, solar activity has a controlling effect on climate on Earth within modifications provided by the complex interactions of the atmosphere-Earth-ocean system. Both radiocarbon measurements and other empirical research methods agree on variations of climate during historically more recent periods on Earth. This leads to the suggestion that the radiocarbon calibration curve may be also a significant indicator or tracer for climatic changes for the Holocene or the Neolithic-Mesolithic. (author)

  3. Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, R [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1990-04-24

    Basic radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology have been combined to yield calibrated dates that are more accurate than conventional radiocarbon dates. This has been shown to be true for medieval and Egyptian dynastic dating. Because radiocarbon is a cosmogenically produced radioisotope, heliomagnetic and geomagnetic fields play a major role in its synthesis in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Inasmuch as a calibrated radiocarbon record exists for nearly 10 000 years, we now seem to possess in the short-time variations of the production rate a history of solar activity expressed via heliomagnetic fields carried by the solar wind. In turn, solar activity has a controlling effect on climate on Earth within modifications provided by the complex interactions of the atmosphere-Earth-ocean system. Both radiocarbon measurements and other empirical research methods agree on variations of climate during historically more recent periods on Earth. This leads to the suggestion that the radiocarbon calibration curve may be also a significant indicator or tracer for climatic changes for the Holocene or the Neolithic-Mesolithic. (author).

  4. Rate of production of cosmogenic isotopes in the past and solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocharov, G.E.; Dergachev, V.A.; Gordeichik, N.I.; Ioffe, A.F.

    1975-01-01

    The available experimental data on abundances of 14 C, 10 Be and 26 Al in materials with known ages are analyzed with the aim of determining of solar activity in the past. Based on the authors results on the abundances of 14 C in the tree rings it is shown that concentration of radiocarbon in atmosphere is changed with the period of approximately 60 years, amplitude approcimately 1% and phase shift relatively to solar activity of approximately 10 years. (orig./WBU) [de

  5. Dating Violence among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  6. Flirting in Online Dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine Køhler

    2017-01-01

    Various fields have examined the activity of flirting, predominantly based on experimental and reported data; the interactional workings are therefore often overlooked. Based on emails and chats from two Danish online dating sites, this article investigates how users negotiate romantic connections...... through the flirting strategy of ‘imagined togetherness’, linguistically constructing imagery of a shared future. Using the notion of the chronotope, turn-by-turn analysis demonstrates how users, embedded in the activity of getting to know each other, tenuously communicate romantic interest by alluding...

  7. Bomb pulse radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.; Zoppi, U.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Modern forensic science has to deal not only with homicides and other traditional crimes but also with more global threats such as the smuggling of nuclear materials, clandestine production of weapons of mass destruction, stockpiling of illicit drugs by state controlled groups and war crimes. Forensic applications have always benefited from the use of advanced analytical tools that can characterize materials found at crime scenes. In this paper we will discuss the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) as an ultrasensitive tool for the crime laboratories of the third millennium. An important objective in forensic science is to order past events chronologically by analysing materials associated with criminal actions. Radiocarbon dating is known to the general public for its application to historical and prehistorical investigations. Examples of forensic significance include the assassination of the Inca Atahualpa by Francisco Pizarro in the early 1530s, the possible murder of the Tyrolean Ice Man (Oetzi) 5300 years ago and the analysis of the burial cloths allegedly associated with the crucifixion of Jesus Christ . Recent murders, including those associated with war crimes in the Balkans during the 1990s, can be studied using 14 C bomb pulse dating. This method has other forensic applications, including investigation of frauds related to food and wine counterfeiting, dating of opium crops and dating of substances used in biological warfare. AMS extends the applicability of the radiocarbon method, allowing the analysis of 14 C in submilligram organic samples. Specific molecular compounds extracted from bones, hair, skin and other carbon bearing substances of forensic significance can now be dated, enhancing the sensitivity and reliability of chronological determinations. AMS can also be used to analyse rare actinide isotopes released into the environment during the clandestine production of nuclear weapons or associated with the smuggling of nuclear materials. In

  8. Updating dating down under

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristow, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The article deals with the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP), Australia's only microprobe and its applications for geochronology. SHRIMP has the ability to analyse tiny areas (less than 30μm across) within crystals directly, the only sample preparation required being polishing of the crystal surface. Most analyses so far have been done on separated crystals prepared as grain mounts, although an increasing number of analyses are now being made of crystals in rock thin sections where their textural associations can be established. Important features of SHRIMP are its double-focusing mass spectrometer and great physical size, more than 8 meters long, employing a magnet weighing six tons. This enables the machine to distinguish ions with atomic masses differing by less than one part in ten thousand while at the same time having a very great sensitivity. SHRIMP was used for dating crustal zircons from southern African Kimberlites. Although low U and Pb abundances presents problems in peak selection and focusing on SHRIMP its was found that kimberlitic zircons could be dated successfully

  9. Surface Exposure Geochronology Using Cosmogenic Nuclides: Applications in Antarctic Glacial Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    in rocks, are particularly promising for directly dating 1 geological surfaces . In 1934, Grosse et al. first suggested that cosmic rays produce rare...and muons produced by cosmic ray irteractions in the atmosphere and in rocks, and spallation by I neutrons produced in muon capture reactions (Kurz...stable isotopes are useful for surface 3 exposure studies because they can act as integrators of cosmic ray exposure on long time scales, potentially up

  10. XCAMS: The compact "1"4C accelerator mass spectrometer extended for "1"0Be and "2"6Al at GNS Science, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zondervan, A.; Hauser, T.M.; Kaiser, J.; Kitchen, R.L.; Turnbull, J.C.; West, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We review the performance of a 0.5 MV AMS system for "1"0Be, "1"4C, and "2"6Al. • We identify the limiting factors to "1"0Be machine blank and detection efficiency. • We discuss an AMS data reduction method that accounts for non-Poisson uncertainty. - Abstract: A detailed description is given of the 0.5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system for "1"0Be, "1"4C, "2"6Al, installed in early 2010 at GNS Science, New Zealand. Its design follows that of previously commissioned Compact "1"4C-only AMS (CAMS) systems based on the Pelletron tandem accelerator. The only basic departure from that design is an extension of the rare-isotope achromat with a 45° magnet and a two-anode gas-ionisation detector, to provide additional filtering for "1"0Be. Realised performance of the three AMS modes is discussed in terms of acceptance-test scores, "1"4C Poisson and non-Poisson errors, and "1"0Be detection limit and sensitivity. Operational details and hardware improvements, such as "1"0Be beam transport and particle detector setup, are highlighted. Statistics of repeat measurements of all graphitised "1"4C calibration cathodes since start-up show that 91% of their total uncertainty values are less than 0.3%, indicating that the rare-isotope beamline extension has not affected precision of "1"4C measurement. For "1"0Be, the limit of detection in terms of the isotopic abundance ratio "1"0Be/"9Be is 6 × 10"−"1"5 at at"−"1 and the total efficiency of counting atoms in the sample cathode is 1/8500 (0.012%).

  11. XCAMS: The compact {sup 14}C accelerator mass spectrometer extended for {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al at GNS Science, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zondervan, A., E-mail: a.zondervan@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hauser, T.M. [National Electrostatics Corporation, Middleton, WI (United States); Kaiser, J. [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Kitchen, R.L. [National Electrostatics Corporation, Middleton, WI (United States); Turnbull, J.C.; West, J.G. [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We review the performance of a 0.5 MV AMS system for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, and {sup 26}Al. • We identify the limiting factors to {sup 10}Be machine blank and detection efficiency. • We discuss an AMS data reduction method that accounts for non-Poisson uncertainty. - Abstract: A detailed description is given of the 0.5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, installed in early 2010 at GNS Science, New Zealand. Its design follows that of previously commissioned Compact {sup 14}C-only AMS (CAMS) systems based on the Pelletron tandem accelerator. The only basic departure from that design is an extension of the rare-isotope achromat with a 45° magnet and a two-anode gas-ionisation detector, to provide additional filtering for {sup 10}Be. Realised performance of the three AMS modes is discussed in terms of acceptance-test scores, {sup 14}C Poisson and non-Poisson errors, and {sup 10}Be detection limit and sensitivity. Operational details and hardware improvements, such as {sup 10}Be beam transport and particle detector setup, are highlighted. Statistics of repeat measurements of all graphitised {sup 14}C calibration cathodes since start-up show that 91% of their total uncertainty values are less than 0.3%, indicating that the rare-isotope beamline extension has not affected precision of {sup 14}C measurement. For {sup 10}Be, the limit of detection in terms of the isotopic abundance ratio {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be is 6 × 10{sup −15} at at{sup −1} and the total efficiency of counting atoms in the sample cathode is 1/8500 (0.012%).

  12. Radiocarbon dates XXI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdon, J.A.; Blake, W. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This list includes 105 radiocarbon age determinations on 104 geological samples made by the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory. They are on samples from various areas as follows: Labrador Shelf (2); Newfoundland (12); Nova Scotia (2); New Brunswick (1); Quebec (3); Ontario (1); Manitoba (1); Alberta (2); British Columbia (15); Yukon Territory (35); Northwest Territories, Mainland (10); Northwest Territories, Arctic Archipelago (21). Details of background and standard for the 2 L and 5 L counters during the period from November 4, 1980 to October 31, 1981 are summarized in Tables 1 and 2; Table 3 gives the number of counts used to determine the average background and standard counting rates; and Table 4 lists the number of different background and standard gas preparations used for counting

  13. Variability of {sup 10}Be and {delta}{sup 18}O in snow pits from Greenland and a surface traverse from Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, A.-M. [Dept. of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villav. 16, 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Aldahan, A., E-mail: ala.aldahan@geo.uu.se [Dept. of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villav. 16, 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17551 Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Possnert, G. [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 529, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hansson, M. [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Steen-Larsen, H.C. [Centre for Ice and Climate, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej, 30,2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Sturevik Storm, A. [Dept. of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villav. 16, 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Moerth, C.-M. [Dept. of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Murad, A. [Dept. of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17551 Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-01-15

    To examine temporal variability of {sup 10}Be in glacial ice, we sampled snow to a depth of 160 cm at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) drilling site in Greenland. The samples span three years between the summers of 2006 and 2009. At the same time, spatial variability of {sup 10}Be in glacial ice was explored through collection of the upper {approx}5 cm of surface snow in Antarctica during part of the Swedish-Japanese traverse from Svea to Syowa station during the austral summer in 2007-2008. The results of the Greenlandic {sup 10}Be snow suggested variable concentrations that apparently do not clearly reflect the seasonal change as indicated by the {delta}{sup 18}O data. The {sup 10}Be concentration variability most likely reflects also effects of aerosol loading and deposition pathways, possibly in combination with post-depositional processes. The Antarctic traverse data expose a negative correlation between {sup 10}Be and {delta}{sup 18}O, while there are weaker but still significant correlations to altitude and distance to the coast (approximated by the distance to the 70th latitude). These relationships indicate that geographical factors, mainly the proximity to the coast, may strongly affect {sup 10}Be concentrations in snow in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica.

  14. Dates fruits classification using SVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzu'bi, Reem; Anushya, A.; Hamed, Ebtisam; Al Sha'ar, Eng. Abdelnour; Vincy, B. S. Angela

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we used SVM in classifying various types of dates using their images. Dates have interesting different characteristics that can be valuable to distinguish and determine a particular date type. These characteristics include shape, texture, and color. A system that achieves 100% accuracy was built to classify the dates which can be eatable and cannot be eatable. The built system helps the food industry and customer in classifying dates depending on specific quality measures giving best performance with specific type of dates.

  15. Dating technique tested

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical technique for dating ground water and polar ice up to a million years old has been successfully tested by scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system, known as a rare gas atom counter, extends the capabilities of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to include counting single atoms of krypton-81. The counter is composed of a pulsed dye laser operated in tandem with a mass spectrometer to separate the various isotopes of krypton. In a collaborative study, ORNL scientists recently used the method for the first time to count krypton-81 in a liter of ground water removed from a sandstone aquifer near Zurich. Fewer than 1000 krypton-81 atoms were isolated from the ground water samples. According to Bernard Lehman, a collaborating geochemist at the University of Bern, this first test proved that counting the small numbers of krypton-81 atoms necessary to make an estimate of the age of water could actually be done. Among the applications of this method, Lehman says, could be improved siting of locations for the disposal of radioactive wastes

  16. Cosmogenic /sup 22/Na and /sup 26/Al in samples of lunar ground from a drill column of Moon-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrukhina, A.K.; Povinets, P.; Ustinova, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    The method of low background (..beta..-..gamma..-..gamma..)-spectrometry without destruction of the sample has been used to measure /sup 22/Na and /sup 26/Al radioactivity in samples of lunar ground 24118.4-4, 24143.4-4 apd 24184.4-4 from the ''Luna-24'' drilling column. Equilibrium radioactivity of these cosmogenic isotopes is calculated by the analytic method. The analysis of theoretical and experimental data shows that at depths lower than approximately 40 cm from the lunar surface the drilling process did not bring about ground mixing in the drilling column. For the last million of years the regolite surface layer in the place of ''Luna-24'' landing remained pracically unchanged, i.e. has not been subjected to intensive effect of some mechanic processes on lunar surface. The average intensity of galactic cosmic rays with the rigidity > 0.5 GV for the last million years within the limits of approximtaely 20% remained stable and corresponded to their modern medium intensity 0.24 particlesxcm/sup -2/xc/sup -1/xsr/sup -1/. The average spectrum of galactic cosmic rays for a million years approximately corresponds to the average spectrum for 1962 or 1971.

  17. Unstable isotopes in a stable landscape?- Untangling Southern Africa's geological history with fission tracks and cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belton, D.; Brown, R.; Fink, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In the absence of direct evidence for burial and subsequent exposure of the land surface in the interior of Africa, researchers have argued for surface ages of several hundred million years. The proposition that landforms may have persisted at the surface for these extensive periods of time has a number of important implications. It suggests that the processes of tectonics and geomorphic evolution have been essentially absent for a period of up to 500 Ma. As a consequence, the persistence of these landscapes would require extremely low rates of weathering and erosion. Although this view of continental evolution has been widely held for several decades, recent studies suggest that continental interiors in Africa, Australia, Brazil and north America, have been subject to denudation in the order of several kilometres during the last 60 Ma. This study applies the complimentary techniques of apatite fission track and cosmogenic nuclide analysis, in an effort to measure both the long-term crustal-scale denudation and the short-term erosion rates, of which denudation is a function. We present preliminary data from the Zimbabwe Craton that illustrates the utility of such techniques in addressing both local and regional geological questions. The study provides a detailed picture of complex tectonic responses as well as large scale denudation over extended periods of time

  18. Age and evolution of diachronous erosion surfaces in the Amazon: Combining (U-Th)/He and cosmogenic 3He records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, H. S.; Vasconcelos, P. M. P.; Farley, K. A.; Lopes, C. A. M.

    2018-05-01

    (U-Th)/He geochronology of two weathered plateaus in the Carajás Mountains, Pará, Brazil, reveals a history of weathering spanning from ca. 80 Ma to the present for this high elevation (∼720 m) land surface. Cosmogenic 3He measurements of hematite pebbles and blocks cemented onto the plateaus at two sites, N1 and S11D, yield erosion rates as low as 0.09 and 0.08 m Ma-1, respectively. Thus, these results confirm that the plateau surfaces are nearly immune to physical erosion for tens of millions of years. (U-Th)/He geochronology of ferruginous duricrusts blanketing the low elevation (250-100 m) plains surrounding the Carajás Mountains yield results consistently younger than ∼10 Ma. The geochronology results also reveal that the low elevation plain is diachronous, becoming progressively younger towards the receding plateaus. The spatial distribution of (U-Th)/He ages permits reconstruction of the history of scarp retreat for the Carajás landscape, showing that scarp retreat along major river valleys may have been as fast as 20 km Ma-1 during tectonically active and humid periods in the Cenozoic. The cessation of scarp retreat at some sites suggests that metamorphosed banded iron-formations and quartzites provide effective barriers to retreating escarpments, helping to preserve some of the oldest continuously exposed land surfaces on Earth.

  19. Estimating background denudation rates and delivery of landslide sediment from a time series of 10Be concentrations in landslide dominated basins in the southern Central Range of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; Willett, S.; West, A. J.; Dadson, S. J.; Hovius, N.; Christl, M.; Shyu, J. B. H.

    2017-12-01

    The southern Central Range of Taiwan is located at a tectonic transition zone between an oceanic subduction zone and the arc-continent collision forming the Taiwan orogen. The rapidly evolving tectonic setting, tropical climate and frequent typhoons result in a complex uplift pattern, transient landscapes and extensive landslides. For this study, we obtained a series of 10Be concentrations over the last decade for 13 major drainage basins in the southern Central Range, bracketing the occurrence of a major typhoon, Morakot, which hit Taiwan in 2009 and triggered thousands of landslides. This time series allows us to simultaneously estimate the background erosion rate and assess the impact of Morakot-triggered landslides on 10Be concentrations. The time series of 10Be concentrations shows temporally lower concentrations of 10Be indicating dilution following the Morakot event in most basins. The diluted 10Be concentrations imply erosion rates up to three times higher than the lowest measured rates in the same basins. We constructed a simple sediment-mixing model parameterized by a sudden input of sediment supplied from landslides superimposed on a background denudation rate. This model was calibrated to measured landslide inventories and the series of 10Be data. We obtain a range of permissible background erosion rate and fraction of landslide sediments over time for each basin. The inferred background erosion rate reveals a northward increasing trend, reflecting the initial stage of the mountain building and indicating tectonic forcing is the main driver of the landscape evolution in the southern Central Range. The temporal changes in fraction of landslide sediments show that the available landslide material generated by the Morakot event is decreasing over time with a timescale of several years.

  20. 210Pb, 230Th, and 10Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S

    , 230 Th, and 10 Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin B. N. Nath, 1 D. V. Borole, 1 A. Aldahan, 2 S. K. Patil, 3 M. B. L. Mascarenhas-Pereira, 1 G. Possnert, 4 T. Ericsson, 2... V. Ramaswamy, 1 and S. M. Gupta 1 Received 4 March 2008; revised 17 March 2008; accepted 8 April 2008; published 14 May 2008. [1] Isotopic ( 210 Pb, 238 U- 230 Th, 10 Be), major and trace elements, and micromorphological and microchemical data, were...

  1. Comparing past accumulation rate reconstructions in East Antarctic ice cores using 10Be, water isotopes and CMIP5-PMIP3 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cauquoin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ice cores are exceptional archives which allow us to reconstruct a wealth of climatic parameters as well as past atmospheric composition over the last 800 kyr in Antarctica. Inferring the variations in past accumulation rate in polar regions is essential both for documenting past climate and for ice core chronology. On the East Antarctic Plateau, the accumulation rate is so small that annual layers cannot be identified and accumulation rate is mainly deduced from the water isotopic composition assuming constant temporal relationships between temperature, water isotopic composition and accumulation rate. Such an assumption leads to large uncertainties on the reconstructed past accumulation rate. Here, we use high-resolution beryllium-10 (10Be as an alternative tool for inferring past accumulation rate for the EPICA Dome C ice core, in East Antarctica. We present a high-resolution 10Be record covering a full climatic cycle over the period 269 to 355 ka from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 9 to 10, including a period warmer than pre-industrial (MIS 9.3 optimum. After correcting 10Be for the estimated effect of the palaeomagnetic field, we deduce that the 10Be reconstruction is in reasonably good agreement with EDC3 values for the full cycle except for the period warmer than present. For the latter, the accumulation is up to 13% larger (4.46 cm ie yr−1 instead of 3.95. This result is in agreement with the studies suggesting an underestimation of the deuterium-based accumulation for the optimum of the Holocene (Parrenin et al. 2007a. Using the relationship between accumulation rate and surface temperature from the saturation vapour relationship, the 10Be-based accumulation rate reconstruction suggests that the temperature increase between the MIS 9.3 optimum and present day may be 2.4 K warmer than estimated by the water isotopes reconstruction. We compare these reconstructions to the available model results from CMIP5-PMIP3 for a glacial and an

  2. Formation of quasicrystals in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanderka, N.; Macht, M. P.; Siedel, M.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of the quasicrystalline phase is observed as a first step of crystallization during isothermal annealing of the Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass. The structure of the quasicrystals and the sequence of phase formation have been investigated by x-ray powder diffraction and transm......The formation of the quasicrystalline phase is observed as a first step of crystallization during isothermal annealing of the Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass. The structure of the quasicrystals and the sequence of phase formation have been investigated by x-ray powder diffraction...... min) at high temperatures above 683 K. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Scissors Modes and Spin Excitations in Light Nuclei Including ΔN=2 Excitations: Behaviour of 8Be and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayache, M. S.; Sharma, S. Shelley; Zamick, L.

    1996-10-01

    Shell model calculations are performed for magnetic dipole excitations in8Be and10Be, first with a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction (Q·Q) and then with a realistic interaction. The calculations are performed both in a 0pspace and in a large space which includes all 2ℏωexcitations. In the 0pwithQ·Qwe have an analytic expression for the energies of all states. In this limit we find that in10Be theL=1S=0 scissors mode with isospinT=1 is degenerate with that ofT=2. By projection from an intrinsic state we can obtain simple expressions forB(M1) to the scissors modes in8Be and10Be. We plot cumulative sums for energy-weighted isovector orbital transitions fromJ=0+ground states to the 1+excited states. These have the structure of a low-energy plateau and a steep rise to a high-energy plateau. The relative magnitudes of these plateaux are discussed. By comparing8Be and10Be we find that contrary to the behaviour in heavy deformed nuclei,B(M1)orbitalis not proportional toB(E2). On the other hand, a sum rule which relatesB(M1) to the difference (B(E2)isoscalar-B(E2)isovector) succeeds in describing the difference in behaviours in the two nuclei. The results forQ·Qand the realistic interactions are compared, as are the results in the 0pspace and the large (0p+2ℏω) space. The Wigner supermultiplet scheme is a very useful guide in analyzing the shell model results.

  4. Cosmogenic 3He in hematite and goethite from Brazilian "canga" duricrust demonstrates the extreme stability of these surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, David L.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Balco, Greg; Monteiro, Hevelyn S.; Waltenberg, Kathryn; Stone, John O.

    2012-05-01

    Helium isotopes were measured in hematite and goethite samples from several lateritiric duricrusts (canga) developed on banded iron formations. These samples uniformly have high 3He concentrations which must arise from long periods of cosmic ray exposure. From coexisting phases from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero in east central Brazil, we determined the ratio of cosmogenic 3He in hematite to that of 21Ne in quartz to be 3.96 ± 0.19. Combined with best current estimates of the 21Ne production rate in quartz, this ratio implies a sea-level high latitude (SLHL) 3He production rate in hematite of 68.1 ± 8.1 atoms/g/yr; from the chemical composition we estimate the 3He production rate in goethite to be ~ 5% higher. We use these production rate estimates to interpret 3He concentrations measured in goethite and hematite from a ~ 10 m depth profile collected from a surface canga in Carajás, in the Amazon basin of Brazil. We find that the Carajás canga has experienced a very low rate of surface erosion (~ 0.16-0.54 m/Myr) over at least the last few millions of years. This iron-rich canga surface is remarkably resistant to erosion despite its location in a wet tropical environment. Details of the depth profile suggest that despite its stability, the canga has also been internally dynamic (translocation of material; solution and reprecipitation) over million-year timescales.

  5. Cosmogenic radionuclides and mineralogical properties of the Chelyabinsk (LL5) meteorite: What do we learn about the meteoroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Laubenstein, Matthias; Jull, A. J. Timothy; FerrièRe, Ludovic; BrandstäTter, Franz; Sýkora, Ivan; Masarik, Jozef; BeåO, Juraj; KováčIk, Andrej; Topa, Dan; Koeberl, Christian

    2015-02-01

    On February 15, 2013, after the observation of a brilliant fireball and a spectacular airburst over the southern Ural region (Russia), thousands of stones fell and were rapidly recovered, bringing some extremely fresh material for scientific investigations. We undertook a multidisciplinary study of a dozen stones of the Chelyabinsk meteorite, including petrographic and microprobe investigations to unravel intrinsic characteristics of this meteorite. We also study the short and long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides to characterize the initial meteoroid size and exposure age. Petrographic observations, as well as the mineral compositions obtained by electron microprobe analyses, allow us to confirm the classification of the Chelyabinsk meteorite as an LL5 chondrite. The fragments studied, a few of which are impact melt rocks, contain abundant shock melt veins and melt pockets. It is likely that the catastrophic explosion and fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid into thousands of stones was in part determined by the initial state of the meteoroid. The radionuclide results obtained show a wide range of concentrations of 14C, 22Na, 26Al, 54Mn, 57Co, 58Co, and 60Co, which indicate that the pre-atmospheric object had a radius >5 m, consistent with other size estimates based on the magnitude of the airburst caused by the atmospheric entry and breakup of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid. Considering the observed 26Al activities of the investigated samples, Monte Carlo simulations, and taking into account the 26Al half-life (0.717 Myr), the cosmic-ray exposure age of the Chelyabinsk meteorite is estimated to be 1.2 ± 0.2 Myr. In contrast to the other radionuclides, 14C showed a very large range only consistent with most samples having been exposed to anthropogenic sources of 14C, which we associate with radioactive contamination of the Chelyabinsk region by past nuclear accidents and waste disposal, which has also been confirmed by elevated levels of anthropogenic 137Cs and

  6. Solar cycles in the last centuries in 10Be and delta18O in polar ice and in thermoluminescence signals of a sea sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Bonino, G.; Galli, M.; Beer, J.

    1984-01-01

    The cyclogram method of time series analysis has been used to analyse 10 Be data (1181-1800 AD) and delta 18 O data (1181-1960 AD) from an artic ice core and thermoluminescence data (1181-1960 AD) from a Mediterranean sediment core. The 10 Be concentrations were determined at the ETH Zurich. The delta 18 O values were measured at the University of Copenhagen. The TL measurements were performed at the Istituto di Cosmo-geofisica del C.N.R., Torino. Common mean periodicities of 10.75 y are found for the period 1505 to 1710 AD in TL and 10 Be and of 11.4 y for the period 1715 to 1880 in TL and delta 18 O. This periodicity was found in the solar sunspot (Rsub(z)) series analysed in the same way, from 1825 to 1905. This supports the argument that the common periodicities found in the long-running series are peculiar of the solar activity in the past

  7. Microscopic analysis of Be,1110 elastic scattering on protons and nuclei, and breakup processes of 11Be within the 10Be +n cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Spasova, K.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The density distributions of 10Be and 11Be nuclei obtained within the quantum Monte Carlo model and the generator coordinate method are used to calculate the microscopic optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of these nuclei on protons and 12C at energies E energy approximation. In this hybrid model of OP the free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts obtained by fitting the experimental data. The well-known energy dependence of the volume integrals is used as a physical constraint to resolve the ambiguities of the parameter values. The role of the spin-orbit potential and the surface contribution to the OP is studied for an adequate description of available experimental elastic scattering cross-section data. Also, the cluster model, in which 11Be consists of a n -halo and the 10Be core, is adopted. Within the latter, the breakup cross sections of 11Be nucleus on 9Be,93Nb,181Ta , and 238U targets and momentum distributions of 10Be fragments are calculated and compared with the existing experimental data.

  8. Pressure effect of glass transition temperature in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Roseker, W.; Sikorski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition was det...... range of 0-2.2 GPa. This method opens a possibility to study the pressure effect of glass transition process in glassy systems under high pressures (>1 GPa). (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics.......Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition...... was detected from the change of the slope of peak position as a function of temperature. It is found that the glass transition temperature increases with pressure by 4.4 K/GPa for the Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass, and the supercooled liquid range decreases with pressure by 2.9 K/GPa in a pressure...

  9. Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Huntley et al. (1985), optical dating is being increasingly recognised as an important technique for establishing a time frame of deposition of sediments (Aitken, 1998). Optical dating differs from thermoluminescence (TL) dating in that visible/infrared light from lasers or LEDs (light-emitting-diodes) is used as a means of stimulation, in contrast to thermal stimulation. It has several advantages over TL dating: (i) the resetting of the OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) clock is more effective than that of TL clock; for sediments transported under water or in other situations where the sediment grains have undergone inhomogeneous bleaching, this property ensures that ages based on optical dating are generally more reliable than TL ages, (ii) the optical dating technique is non-destructive, and multiple readouts of the optical signal is possible; this feature has resulted in the development of single-aliquot and single-grain protocols (Murray and Wintle, 1999; Banerjee et al. 1999), (iii) the sample is not heated as in TL; thus, spurious luminescence is avoided and there is a significant reduction in blackbody radiation. Dating of materials which change phase on heating is also practical, and finally, (iv) thermal quenching of luminescence is negligible, allowing accurate estimation of kinetic parameters using standard techniques and providing access to deep OSL traps. This characteristic may be helpful in extending the limits of optical dating beyond the last 150 ka from a global point of view

  10. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  11. The isotopic dating of crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, G.; Cheilletz, A.

    1995-01-01

    The first part of this work deals with the answer to the question : why are the crystals dated ? Then, some isotopic dating methods are described : U-Th-Pb, K-Ar, 40 Ar/ 39 Ar, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, fission traces, carbon 14 methods. Examples concerning emeralds and diamonds are given. (O.L.). 12 refs., 2 figs

  12. The comparison of absolute dating (Radiocarbon dating) and relative dating of Pringapus and Gondosuli temples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, W; Arumbinang, H; Taftazani, A; Widayati, S; Sumiyatno; Suhardi

    1996-01-01

    The absolute dating (radiocarbon, 14 C dating) and relative dating of Pringapus and Gondosuli temples in Temanggung regency (district) of Central Java Province have been carried out. The field sampling was done especially with the purpose to obtain vertical data, so that excavation method was adopted in the case. The main data were the ecofacts of organic habitation such as bones, woods, charcoals, shells, and paper artefacts. The artefacts data were used as a comparison. The comparative data analysis were conducted at Yogyakarta archaeological Department Laboratory, thus included dating of artefacts which were performed according to archaeological analysis procedures, generally based on the attributes attached to the artefacts, whereas the absolute dating of charcoal samples were performed in the Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory at Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre. Based on the relative dating of epigraphy content on the andesit rock from Gondosuli Temple which showed the year of 754 Saka or 832 AD, the Pringapus Temple was estimated to be built in the 850 AD. According to the absolute dating (Radiocarbon Dating with delta 13 C and tree ring corrections) the age for Gondosuli temple based on GDS/LU-2/Spit-7 samples is (384 -602) AD and from GDS/LU-2/Spit-8 = (452 - 652) AD. With these significant differences in the results obtained, it can be concluded that culture environment where the sample were collected already existed before the temple was built. Further investigation is still required

  13. Accurate determination of 129I, 41Ca and 10Be long-lived radionuclides concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli-Lepage, E.

    2013-01-01

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste is essential for the management of storage sites. More particularly, determining the concentration of Long-Lived Radionuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long term management. This study focuses on the determination of three LLRN concentrations, i.e. 129 I (T 1/2 = 15.7*10 6 a), 41 Ca (T 1/2 = 9.94*10 4 a) and 10 Be (T 1/2 = 1.387*10 6 a), in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). To benefit from the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique allowing to measure extremely low levels of nuclide concentrations, analytical procedures including: 1) sample dissolution; 2) selective and quantitative extraction of the analyte; and, 3) analyte conditioning for AMS measurements, were developed. Applied on spent resin samples collected at a 900 MW PWR, the procedures developed for each studied LLRN allowed their quantitative recovery and their selective extraction from β-γ emitters and isobars. The concentration measurements of the LLRN of interest were then performed on the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry national facility ASTER housed by the Centre Europeen de Recherche et d'Enseignement des Geosciences de l'Environnement (CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence). 129 I, 41 Ca and 10 Be concentrations in spent resins were measured to be about 10 ng/g, 20 pg/g and 4 ng/g of dry resin, respectively. Considering 129 I and 41 Ca, the measured concentrations agree with those assessed from scaling factors established relatively to easily measured gamma emitters ( 137 Cs and 60 Co). For 10 Be, the presented results are significantly different from expected values but are in agreement with previous ICP-MS results. (author) [fr

  14. Pressure effect on crystallization kinetics in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Gerward, Leif; Xu, Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass in the supercooled liquid region have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. A pressure-time-temperature-transformation diagram......, describing the onset of crystallization as a function of time during isothermal annealing under pressure, is presented. Different pressure dependences of crystallization kinetics in the temperature range for the glass have been observed and further be explained by a model of competing processes...

  15. Relief evolution of the Continental Rift of Southeast Brazil revealed by in situ-produced 10Be concentrations in river-borne sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, André Augusto Rodrigues; Rezende, Eric de Andrade; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Régis; da Silva, Juliana Rodrigues; Garcia, Ricardo Alexandrino

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to quantify the denudation dynamics of the Brazilian passive margin along a segment of the Continental Rift of Southeast Brazil. The denudation rates of 30 basins that drain both horsts of the continental rift, including the mountain ranges of the Serra do Mar (seaside horst); and the Serra da Mantiqueira (continental horst); were derived from 10Be concentrations measured in sand-sized river sediment. The mean denudation rate ranges from 9.2 m Ma-1 on the plateau of the Serra do Mar to 37.1 m Ma-1 along the oceanic escarpment of the Serra do Mar. The seaward-facing scarps of both mountain ranges exhibit mean denudation rates that are approximately 1.5 times those of the inland-facing scarps. The escarpments of the horst nearer to the ocean (Serra do Mar) exhibit higher denudation rates (mean 30.2 m Ma-1) than the escarpments of the continental horst (Serra da Mantiqueira) (mean 16.5 m Ma-1). The parameters that impact these denudation rates include the catchment relief, the slope gradient, the rock and the climate. The incongruent combination of a mountainous landscape and moderate to low 10Be-based denudation rates averaging at ∼20 m Ma-1 suggests a reduction in intraplate tectonic activity beginning in the Middle Quaternary or earlier.

  16. Crystallization in Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Zhou, T.J.; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl

    2000-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the crystallization behavior of the bulk metallic glass-forming Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 alloy with a wide supercooled liquid region has been investigated by in situ high-pressure and high-temperature x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation......)], reporting a decrease of the crystallization temperature under pressure in a pressure range of 0-6 GPa for the bulk glass Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni9Be22.5C1 alloy. Compressibility with a volume reduction of approximately 22% at room temperature does not induce crystallization in the Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk...... glass alloy. This indicates that the densification effect induced by pressure in the pressure range investigated plays a minor role in the crystallization behavior of this bulk glass alloy. The different crystallization behavior of the carbon-free and the carbon-containing glassy alloys has been...

  17. Differential cross section measurement of the {sup 12}C(e,e{sup '}pp){sup 10}Be{sub g.s.} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makek, M.; Bosnar, D.; Friscic, I. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J.C.; Boehm, R.; Denig, A.; Distler, M.O.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanches Majos, S.; Schlimme, B.S.; Schwamb, M.; Walcher, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Barbieri, C. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Giusti, C. [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Collaboration: A1 Collaboration

    2016-09-15

    The differential cross section was measured for the {sup 12}C(e,e{sup '}pp){sup 10}Be{sub g.s.} reaction at energy and momentum transfers of 163 MeV and 198 MeV/c, respectively. The measurement was performed at the Mainz Microtron by using two high-resolution magnetic spectrometers of the A1 Collaboration and a newly developed silicon detector telescope. The overall resolution of the detector system was sufficient to distinguish the ground state from the first excited state in {sup 10}Be. We chose a super-parallel geometry that minimizes the effect of two-body currents and emphasizes the effect of nucleon-nucleon correlations. The obtained differential cross section is compared to the theoretical results of the Pavia reaction code in which different processes leading to two-nucleon knockout are accounted for microscopically. The comparison shows a strong sensitivity to nuclear-structure input and the measured cross section is seen to be dominated by the interplay between long- and short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. Microscopic calculations based on the ab initio self-consistent Green's function method give a reasonable description of the experimental cross section. (orig.)

  18. AHP 47: A NIGHT DATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phun tshogs dbang rgyal ཕུན་ཚོགས་དབང་རྒྱལ།

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The author was born in 1993 in Ska chung (Gaqun Village, Nyin mtha' (Ningmute Township, Rma lho (Henan Mongolian Autonomous County, Rma lho (Huangnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon (Qinghai Province, PR China. Night dating was popular for teenage boys some years ago. They rode horses and yaks when they went night dating. They generally rode yaks, because horses were important for their families and used for such important tasks as pursuing bandits and going to the county town for grain and supplies. An early experience with night dating is described.

  19. Dilution of 10Be in detrital quartz by earthquake-induced landslides: Implications for determining denudation rates and potential to provide insights into landslide sediment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. Joshua; Hetzel, Ralf; Li, Gen; Jin, Zhangdong; Zhang, Fei; Hilton, Robert G.; Densmore, Alexander L.

    2014-06-01

    The concentration of 10Be in detrital quartz (10Beqtz) from river sediments is now widely used to quantify catchment-wide denudation rates but may also be sensitive to inputs from bedrock landslides that deliver sediment with low 10Beqtz. Major landslide-triggering events can provide large amounts of low-concentration material to rivers in mountain catchments, but changes in river sediment 10Beqtz due to such events have not yet been measured directly. Here we examine the impact of widespread landslides triggered by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake on 10Beqtz in sediment samples from the Min Jiang river basin, in Sichuan, China. Landslide deposit material associated with the Wenchuan earthquake has consistently lower 10Beqtz than in river sediment prior to the earthquake. River sediment 10Beqtz decreased significantly following the earthquake downstream of areas of high coseismic landslide occurrence (i.e., with greater than ∼0.3% of the upstream catchment area affected by landslides), because of input of the 10Be-depleted landslide material, but showed no systematic changes where landslide occurrence was low. Changes in river sediment 10Beqtz concentration were largest in small first-order catchments but were still significant in large river basins with areas of 104-105 km. Spatial and temporal variability in river sediment 10Beqtz has important implications for inferring representative denudation rates in tectonically active, landslide-dominated environments, even in large basins. Although the dilution of 10Beqtz in river sediment by landslide inputs may complicate interpretation of denudation rates, it also may provide a possible opportunity to track the transport of landslide sediment. The associated uncertainties are large, but in the Wenchuan case, calculations based on 10Be mixing proportions suggest that river sediment fluxes in the 2-3 years following the earthquake increased by a similar order of magnitude in the 0.25-1 mm and the mixing calculations and

  20. Dating the humans by radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedi, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon has become a very powerful tool used for dating. This paper deals with a specific application of 1 4C i.e. dating of humans. Attention is focused on those aspects that, if neglected, might lead to a misinterpretation of the results or to an unsatisfying accuracy of the measurement. After a brief description of the main principles on which the radiocarbon method is based and of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, examples taken from the research activity of INFN-LABEC (Laboratorio di Tecniche Nucleari per I Beni Culturali) in Florence are presented. The case of the relic of St. Francis represents an example of dating not directly human remains but other objects that can be associated to them. The case of two burials from the archaeological area of Baratti-Populonia, in Tuscany, gives the possibility to show the importance of estimating the human palaeodiet when dating bone samples.

  1. Dating by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Rossi, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Some natural materials behave like dosimeters in front of the ionizing particle flux coming from environmental radioactivity and the cosmic radiation. This property is used for the dating by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Before presenting the basic principles of the EPR analysis and the dating method which uses such a phenomenous, it is reviewed several types of application currently in course of development. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Pocevičius, Matas

    2016-01-01

    Matas Pocevičius, Radiocarbon dating of lake sediments, bachelor thesis, Vilnius University, Faculty of Physics, Department of General Physics and Spectroscopy, physics, Vilnius, 45 p., 2016. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility of radiocarbon dating application for Tapeliai lake bottom sediments. The literature review discusses topics related to accelerator mass spectrometry, principles of radiocarbon formation, importance of nuclear fallout for 14C, possible applications of ...

  3. Study of the D(p,π+)T and 9Be(p,π+)10Be from 400 to 800MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanides, E.; Bauer, T.; Bertini, R.; Beurtey, R.; Bimbot, L.; Bing, O.; Boudard, A.; Brochard, F.; Bruge, G.; Catz, H.; Chaumeaux, A.; Couvert, P.; Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Duhm, H.; Garreta, D.; Gorodetzky, P.; Habault, J.; Hibou, F.; Igo, G.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lugol, J.C.; Matoba, M.; Tatischeff, B.; Terrien, Y.

    Pion production on CD 2 and 9 Be targets has been observed using the high resolution, energy loss, spectrometer SPES I. Differential cross sections for the D(p,π + ) reaction have been determined at 410, 605 and 809MeV and for the 9 Be(p,π + ) reaction at 410 and 605MeV. The 3.37MeV (2 + ) state in 10 Be is populated preferentially, but a significant part of the transition strength seems to populate the ground state and the higher lying multiplets at about 6.1MeV, 7.4MeV and 9.4MeV [fr

  4. Applying radiochemical methods and accelerator mass spectrometry for determination of the depth-dependent, long-lived spallation fragments 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl and 53Mn in stone meteorites. Some suggestions concerning the still unknown origin of the Shergottites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Stone meteorites from the Antarctica are examined for their cosmogenic nuclides. These arise from galactic and solar cosmic radiation. Concentration and activity of these nuclides permit to obtain information on the irradiation and the terrestrial age. By means of the neutron activation analysis and accelerator mass spectroscopy a very small number of samples can be analyzed. (PW) [de

  5. Radiocarbon dating of iron artefacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresswell, R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1997-12-31

    Iron artefacts are generally dated by association or on stylistic grounds. This may not give a true indication of the date of manufacture, or may not be possible if the piece is out of context, ambiguous in style, or a copy. Obtaining a direct date on the artefact would be preferable. During the processes of manufacture, carbon is incorporated into the iron from the fuel source. If the fuel is of a material containing contemporaneous carbon, i.e. has an ambient radiocarbon signature, e.g. charcoal, then we may reliably radiocarbon date the artefact by extracting this carbon. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that re-working has not introduced multiple sources of carbon that would give an erroneous date. Detailed chemical analysis must precede radiocarbon analysis. Sample size is determined by carbon content, and before the advent of accelerator mass spectrometry, several tens of grams of carbon were required for radiocarbon dating (van der Merwe, 1969), prohibiting this method except for high-carbon cast-irons and bulk samples, e.g. caches of nails. AMS permits the analysis of sub-gram pieces of iron (Cresswell, 1991), thereby permitting the analysis of museum pieces with only minimal loss of material, and small fragments of iron recovered from archaeological sites. A few examples are given to illustrate these points. Paper no. 41; Extended abstract. 6 refs.

  6. Radiocarbon dating of iron artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cresswell, R.

    1997-01-01

    Iron artefacts are generally dated by association or on stylistic grounds. This may not give a true indication of the date of manufacture, or may not be possible if the piece is out of context, ambiguous in style, or a copy. Obtaining a direct date on the artefact would be preferable. During the processes of manufacture, carbon is incorporated into the iron from the fuel source. If the fuel is of a material containing contemporaneous carbon, i.e. has an ambient radiocarbon signature, e.g. charcoal, then we may reliably radiocarbon date the artefact by extracting this carbon. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that re-working has not introduced multiple sources of carbon that would give an erroneous date. Detailed chemical analysis must precede radiocarbon analysis. Sample size is determined by carbon content, and before the advent of accelerator mass spectrometry, several tens of grams of carbon were required for radiocarbon dating (van der Merwe, 1969), prohibiting this method except for high-carbon cast-irons and bulk samples, e.g. caches of nails. AMS permits the analysis of sub-gram pieces of iron (Cresswell, 1991), thereby permitting the analysis of museum pieces with only minimal loss of material, and small fragments of iron recovered from archaeological sites. A few examples are given to illustrate these points

  7. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B.; Scherrer, Nadim C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14 C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14 C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  8. Direct dating of human fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The methods that can be used for the direct dating of human remains comprise of radiocarbon, U-series, electron spin resonance (ESR), and amino acid racemization (AAR). This review gives an introduction to these methods in the context of dating human bones and teeth. Recent advances in ultrafiltration techniques have expanded the dating range of radiocarbon. It now seems feasible to reliably date bones up to 55,000 years. New developments in laser ablation mass spectrometry permit the in situ analysis of U-series isotopes, thus providing a rapid and virtually non-destructive dating method back to about 300,000 years. This is of particular importance when used in conjunction with non-destructive ESR analysis. New approaches in AAR analysis may lead to a renaissance of this method. The potential and present limitations of these direct dating techniques are discussed for sites relevant to the reconstruction of modern human evolution, including Florisbad, Border Cave, Tabun, Skhul, Qafzeh, Vindija, Banyoles, and Lake Mungo. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron [ETH Zurich, Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Kueffner, Markus; Ferreira, Ester S.B. [SIK-ISEA, Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Scherrer, Nadim C. [Bern University of Applied Sciences, HKB, Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. {sup 14}C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the {sup 14}C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated. (orig.)

  10. 10Be exposure age chronology of the last glaciation of the Roháčská Valley in the Western Tatra Mountains, central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Mentlík, Pavel; Braucher, Régis; Křížek, Marek; Pluháčková, Markéta; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aster Team; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim

    2017-09-01

    10Be exposure ages from moraines and bedrock sites in the Roháčská Valley provide chronology of the last glaciation in the largest valley of the Western Tatra Mts., the Western Carpathians. The minimum apparent exposure age of 19.4 ± 2.1 ka obtained for the oldest sampled boulder and the mean age of 18.0 ± 0.8 ka calculated for the terminal moraine indicate that the oldest preserved moraine was probably deposited at the time of the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The age of this moraine coincides with the termination of the maximum glacier expansion in other central European ranges, including the adjacent High Tatra Mts. and the Alps. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the LGM glacier in the Roháčská Valley, estimated at 1400-1410 m a.s.l., was 50-80 m lower than in the eastern part of the range, indicating a positive ELA gradient from west to east among the north-facing glaciers in the Tatra Mts. Lateglacial glacier expansion occurred no later than 13.4 ± 0.5 ka and 11.9 ± 0.5 ka, as indicated by the mean exposure ages calculated for re-advance moraines. This timing is consistent with the exposure age chronology of the last Lateglacial re-advance in the High Tatra Mts., Alps and lower mountain ranges in central Europe. The ELA in the Roháčská Valley estimated at 1690-1770 m a.s.l. in this period was located 130-300 m lower than in the north-facing valleys in the High Tatra Mts. 10Be exposure ages obtained for a rock glacier constrains the timing of this landform stabilization in the Salatínska Valley and provides the first chronological evidence for the Lateglacial activity of rock glaciers in the Carpathians.

  11. Constraining Middle Pleistocene Glaciations in Birmingham, England; Using Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. M.; Gibbard, P. L.; Bateman, M. D.; Boreham, S.

    2014-12-01

    Birmingham is built on a complex sequence of Middle Pleistocene sediments, representing at least three lowland glaciations (MIS12, MIS6, and MIS2). British Geological Survey mapping accounts 75% of the land mass as Quaternary deposits; predominantly glacial-sandy tills, glacial-fluvial sands, clays and organic silts and peats. Understanding the age of fluvial-glacial outwash, related to specific glaciations, is critical in establishing a Geochronology of Birmingham. Shotton (1953) found a series of Middle Pleistocene glacial sediments, termed the Wolstonian, intermediate in age between MIS11 and MIS5e Interglacial's. Uncertainty surrounding the relation to East Anglian sequences developed by Rose (1987) implies Birmingham sequences should be referred to MIS12. Despite this, younger Middle Pleistocene glacial sequences occur in Birmingham, yet uncertainty has deepened over our understanding of the complex, inaccessible sediments, especially as deposits have similar extent with MIS2 sequences. Five Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dates from three sites around Birmingham have been sampled. East of Birmingham, ice advanced from the Irish Sea and later the North East. In Wolston, a sample of outwash sand, associated with the Thurssington Till, is dated. In Meriden, two samples of outwash sands, associated with a distal Oadby Till, are dated. West of Birmingham, ice advanced from the Welsh Ice Sheet. In Seisdon, two samples of an Esker and outwash sand, associated with a Ridgeacre Till, are dated. Correlation of OSL dates provide an important constraint on understanding the history of Birmingham. Using GSI3D modeling to correlate geochronology and sedimentology, the significance of OSL dating can be understood within the complex sequences (and regional stratigraphy), complimented by Cosmogenic and Palynology dates taken in South West and North East. OSL dating on Birmingham's outwash sands, deposited by extensive repeated Middle Pleistocene glaciations, asserts the

  12. Linguistic Dating of Biblical Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    2003-01-01

    For two centuries, scholars have pointed to consistent differences in the Hebrew of certain biblical texts and interpreted these differences as reflecting the date of composition of the texts. Until the 1980s, this was quite uncontroversial as the linguistic findings largely confirmed the chronol......For two centuries, scholars have pointed to consistent differences in the Hebrew of certain biblical texts and interpreted these differences as reflecting the date of composition of the texts. Until the 1980s, this was quite uncontroversial as the linguistic findings largely confirmed...... the chronology of the texts established by other means: the Hebrew of Genesis-2 Kings was judged to be early and that of Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles to be late. In the current debate where revisionists have questioned the traditional dating, linguistic arguments in the dating of texts have...... come more into focus. The study critically examines some linguistic arguments adduced to support the traditional position, and reviewing the arguments it points to weaknesses in the linguistic dating of EBH texts to pre-exilic times. When viewing the linguistic evidence in isolation it will be clear...

  13. Use of {sup 10}Be exposure ages and Schmidt hammer data for correlation of moraines in the Krkonose Mountains, Poland/Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Zbynek; Krizek, Marek [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Physical Geography and Geoecology; Traczyk, Andrzej [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland). Dept. of Geomorphology; Braucher, Regis [CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence (France); Woronko, Barbara [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Dept. of Geography and Regional Development

    2011-06-15

    Exposure ages and relative-age data are presented from eight sites in the Lomnica and Lomniczka valleys to provide essential information for reconstructing local glaciation chronology. A combination of {sup 10}Be exposure ages and Schmidt hammer data obtained for moraines indicate relatively short period of glacier accumulation lasting from 17.0{+-}0.4 ka to 13.6{+-}0.9 ka. Exposure age of 8.4{+-}0.3 ka measured on the lowermost section of the Lomnica cirque headwall further confirms the view of glacier preservation in favourable sites until the beginning of the Holocene. A comparison of the obtained chronological data with timing of mountain glaciation in the nearby Upa Valley is used to propose the first correlative model of Late Quaternary glaciation in the eastern part of the Krkonose Mountains. The correlation implies that the lowermost preserved moraines originated during the local maximum of the last glaciation whereas recessional moraines were deposited until the Lateglacial period. A subsequent melting of glaciers terminated at the beginning of the Holocene. The implications of the model are discussed and further investigations are suggested to extend its validity to the whole mountain area. (orig.)

  14. Kimberley rock art dating project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, G.L.; Morwood, M.

    1997-01-01

    The art's additional value, unequalled by traditionally recognised artefacts, is its permanent pictorial documentation presenting a 'window' into the otherwise intangible elements of perceptions, vision and mind of pre-historic cultures. Unfortunately it's potential in establishing Kimberley archaeological 'big picture' still remains largely unrecognised. Some of findings of the Kimberley Rock Art Dating Project, using AMS and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques, are outlined. It is estimated that these findings will encourage involvement by a greater diversity of specialist disciplines to tie findings into levels of this art sequence as a primary reference point. The sequence represents a sound basis for selecting specific defined images for targeting detailed studies by a range of dating technique. This effectively removes the undesirable ad hoc sampling of 'apparently old paintings'; a process which must unavoidably remain the case with researchers working on most global bodies of rock art

  15. ESR dating of fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2002-03-01

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene

  16. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene.

  17. 32Si dating of sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, U.

    2004-01-01

    Brief explanation of the use of 32 Si in the dating of sediments. 32 Si , with a half-life of c.140 years, can be applied in the age range 30-1000 years. An appropriate dating tool for that time range is essential because it includes three very important epochs: the impact of human colonisation and industrialisation during the last 150 years, the Little Ice Age between about 1650 AD and 1850 AD, and the last part of the Medieval Climatic Optimum. 23 refs

  18. The complexity behind the date

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    For the waiting world, and indeed for most of us here at CERN, ‘the LHC schedule’ simply means the date that the LHC will restart - and we only take notice when that end-date changes. But in fact the schedule is a constantly evolving intricate document coordinating all the repairs, consolidation and commissioning in every part of the machine. So, what actually goes on behind the scenes in timing and planning all the work on one of the most complex scientific instruments ever built?

  19. Taking the pulse of Mars via dating of a plume-fed volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin E; Mark, Darren F; Cassata, William S; Lee, Martin R; Tomkinson, Tim; Smith, Caroline L

    2017-10-03

    Mars hosts the solar system's largest volcanoes. Although their size and impact crater density indicate continued activity over billions of years, their formation rates are poorly understood. Here we quantify the growth rate of a Martian volcano by 40 Ar/ 39 Ar and cosmogenic exposure dating of six nakhlites, meteorites that were ejected from Mars by a single impact event at 10.7 ± 0.8 Ma (2σ). We find that the nakhlites sample a layered volcanic sequence with at least four discrete eruptive events spanning 93 ± 12 Ma (1416 ± 7 Ma to 1322 ± 10 Ma (2σ)). A non-radiogenic trapped 40 Ar/ 36 Ar value of 1511 ± 74 (2σ) provides a precise and robust constraint for the mid-Amazonian Martian atmosphere. Our data show that the nakhlite-source volcano grew at a rate of ca. 0.4-0.7 m Ma -1 -three orders of magnitude slower than comparable volcanoes on Earth, and necessitating that Mars was far more volcanically active earlier in its history.Mars hosts the solar system's largest volcanoes, but their formation rates remain poorly constrained. Here, the authors have measured the crystallization and ejection ages of meteorites from a Martian volcano and find that its growth rate was much slower than analogous volcanoes on Earth.

  20. Recent advances in thermoluminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Initially the application of thermoluminescent dating was to ancient pottery and other baked clay, the detection of forgeries in art ceramics having a particularly powerful impact. In recent years there has been a growing extension of TL into non-pottery materials. Heated flints from paleolithic fire-places is one application. Another is in the dating of igneous rocks from recent volcanic events; formerly this had been impossible on account of the malign phenomenon of non-thermal ('anomalous') fading exhibited by volcanic minerals but this is now being circumvented by utilising TL in the 600 0 C region of the glow curve. TL dating has also been extended to unburnt calcite, one application being stalagmitic floors in paleolithic caves. Another recent development is the use of TL for dating aeolian sediment and some types of waterborne sediment. These developments give prospect of establishing a TL-based chronology, both for archaeology and quaternary research, extending back well beyond the range of radiocarbon, perhaps reaching a million years ago. (author)

  1. Sexual Intimacy in Dating Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplau, Letitia Anne; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The patterning of sexual interaction in male-female dyads and the links between sexual behavior and emotional intimacy were investigated as part of a two-year study of college dating couples. Traditional sexual role playing was found to be common. (Author/AM)

  2. Online Dating and Conjugal Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dannagal Goldthwaite; Caplan, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined self-presentation in the online dating profiles of 241 widowed and 280 divorced individuals between 18 and 40 years old. A content analysis of open-ended user-generated profiles assessed the presence or absence of various themes, including the user's marital status, the backstory of their lost relationship, and whether they…

  3. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  4. Comparative study of radioimmunoassay dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas Sanchez, Ruth.

    1986-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay is frequently used in clinical chemistry for the concentration determination of several substances like hormones as thyrotropine and thyroxine. In this experiment the dates of tyroxine radioimmunoassay are processed by three methods: a) like the recommendation of the IAEA, b) Dr. G. Chase method, c) according to the provider. The best method was Dr. Chase's. (author)

  5. Peer Group Influences on Adolescent Dating Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Jennifer; Friedlander, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The peer group is a critical social context for dating and romantic relationships. Peer groups provide opportunities to meet potential dating partners and set norms for acceptable dating behaviors. This article explores how peer groups influence dating and dating aggression, as well as how they can be used in prevention efforts. It also reviews…

  6. Balance of the tropospheric ozone and its relation to stratospheric intrusions indicated by cosmogenic radionuclides. Technical progress report, 1 November 1977--30 June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, R.; Kanter, H.J.; Sladkovic, R.; Jaeger, H.; Mueller, H.

    1978-01-01

    The study of the balance of the tropospheric ozone as a function of atmospheric pollutants and tropospheric transport has been started. Continuous recordings are available of ozone concentration at three levels (3000 m, 1800 m, and 700 m a.s.l.) and of the concentration of the cosmogenic radionuclides 7 Be, 32 P, 33 P, and the CO 2 -concentration. Ozone concentrations >70 ppB have been observed after stratospheric intrusions as well as in consequence of photochemical reactions in the boundary layer. An observation sequence, covering now a period of 20 months, is presented of the stratospheric aerosol layer by means of lidar monitoring. Possible errors in the measuring technique are discussed. A filter photospectrometer for the measurement of the atmospheric total ozone is described, its suitability is checked by a direct intercomparison with a Dobson spectrometer

  7. Measurement of cosmogenic 36Cl/Cl in young volcanic rocks: An application of accelerator mass spectrometry in geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavy, B.D.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    We have measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in a number of young volcanic rocks in order to test the feasibility of using 36 Cl buildup as a geochronometer for materials less than about 700,000 years old. All of the analyzed rocks have been dated independently using K-Ar or other radiometric dating methods and have exposure histories that are known or can be reasonably assumed. Measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in these rocks are in good agreement with the calculated in-situ 36 Cl buildup curve. These analyses indicate that AMS measurement of 36 Cl buildup in young rocks is a potentially powerful new method for dating materials that had previously been undatable, and as such will have broad applications in volcanology, tectonics, geophysics, and Quaternary research

  8. 31 CFR 596.302 - Effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the...

  9. Linguistic dating of biblical texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Ian; Rezetko, Robert; Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    Since the beginning of critical scholarship biblical texts have been dated using linguistic evidence. In recent years this has become a controversial topic, especially with the publication of Ian Young (ed.), Biblical Hebrew: Studies in Chronology and Typology (2003). However, until now there has...... been no introduction and comprehensive study of the field. Volume 1 introduces the field of linguistic dating of biblical texts, particularly to intermediate and advanced students of biblical Hebrew who have a reasonable background in the language, having completed at least an introductory course...... in this volume are: What is it that makes Archaic Biblical Hebrew archaic , Early Biblical Hebrew early , and Late Biblical Hebrew late ? Does linguistic typology, i.e. different linguistic characteristics, convert easily and neatly into linguistic chronology, i.e. different historical origins? A large amount...

  10. Fission tracks dating for obsidian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picon, C.

    1991-01-01

    Obsidian from South America are dated by fission tracks methods. Samples are irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a flux of 10 15 n/cm 2 . Results, corrected by 'Plateau' methods, are the following: obsidian from Bolivia: 4.14 x 10 6 yr., Ecuador: 8.79 x 10 5 yr., Colombia: 3.52 x 10 6 yr., Peru: 6.55 x 10 6 yr., Chile: 1.13 x 10 6 yr. (MMZ). 5 refs., 3 tabs

  11. Radiokrypton dating coming of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Tian Lu

    2016-01-01

    The dream of radiokrypton dating began in 1969 when Heinz Hugo Loosli and Hans Oeschger of the University of Bern first detected the decay of81Rr(half-life=230 000 yr)in krypton gas extracted from air[1].This isotope is produced in the upper atmosphere by cosmic-ray-induced spallation and neutron-activation of stable krypton.Due to its long residence time(105 yr)in the atmosphere,81Rr is uniformly

  12. Current topics in ESR dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    After over 25 years, the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) is well-established in dating sites of geological, paleontological and archaeological interest. Like any scientific technique, there have been changes in understanding and in methodology. Improvements have not, however, changed the observation that external dose calculations are still a significant source of uncertainty in ages. Examples from Europe, Africa and the Americans illustrate this point. For Pradayrol Cave (France), the occupation age, 330 ka, is unchallenged, making this the oldest known Neanderthal site in France. For Roc de Marsal, also in France, on the other hand, discrepancies between TL and sedimentary dose rates imply substantial differences in interpretation. In the Western Egyptian Desert, where artifacts and datable material are not well-correlated, the dating results show consistency with expectations based on global climate change, even in deflated sites. Climate change is also the question in geological studies in the Bahamas where, despite concerns about cosmic dose history, ESR dates confirm other evidence for sea level changes. We show that an uncertain age is not the same as an impossible one.

  13. ESR dating of fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2003-02-01

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene

  14. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene.

  15. Evidence from cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating for the existence of a pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassas, C. D.; Bourlès, D. L.; Braucher, R.; Druitt, T. H.; Nomikou, P.; Léanni, L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating was performed on the caldera cliffs of Santorini with the aim of detecting cliff segments predating the Minoan eruption (17th century BCE). The methodology involved the determination of in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl concentration in basaltic-to-rhyodacitic whole rocks cropping out in the cliffs. After the samples were processed following the chemical protocol of 36Cl preparation for silicate rocks, 36Cl concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Important challenges during the implementation procedure were related to large amounts of radiogenic 36Cl, complex modeling of inherited 36Cl, and dominance of the thermal and epithermal (low-energy) neutron capture production pathway. Nevertheless, quantitative assessments on the basis of the contribution of the low-energy neutron capture pathway percent to the total production rate validated the calculated CRE dates. Current CRE ages demonstrate that an ancient caldera existed on pre-Minoan Santorini, occupying at least the northern half of the modern-day caldera.

  16. Structure of the excited states of {sup 11}Be reached through the reaction d({sup 10}Be,p){sup 11}Be; Structure des etats du {sup 11}Be excites par la reaction d({sup 10}Be,p){sup 11}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaunay, F

    2003-10-01

    The one-neutron transfer reaction d({sup 10}Be,p){sup 11}Be has been studied at 32 A.MeV at GANIL with a {sup 10}Be secondary beam. Protons were detected by the silicon strip array MUST. The ground state and excited states of {sup 11}Be at 0.32, 1.78 and 3.41 MeV were populated, demonstrating the feasibility of transfer reactions induced by radioactive beams leading to bound and unbound states. A DWBA (distorted wave born approximation) analysis indicates for the 3.41 MeV state spin and parity 3/2{sup +} or 5/2{sup +} and a spectroscopic factor of 0.18 or 0.11, respectively. A broad structure centered at 10 MeV is also observed and corresponds to transfer to the 1d sub-shells. If one assumes that only the 1d3/2 orbital contributes to this structure, the splitting of the 1d neutron states in {sup 11}Be is estimated to be 6.3 MeV. Using a 2-particle-RPA (random phase approximation) model, we have shown that neutron-neutron correlations play an important role in the inversion between the 2s1/2 and 1p1/2 neutron states in {sup 11}Be. (author)

  17. School Counselors' Role in Dating Violence Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigen, Laurie M.; Sikes, April; Healey, Amanda; Hays, Danica

    2009-01-01

    Dating violence among adolescents is a major public health concern. The purpose of this paper is to examine five factors of which school counselors must be aware in order to recognize, intervene, and report incidence of dating violence. These factors are (a) understanding the diverse definitions of dating violence, (b) recognizing dating violence…

  18. Thermoluminescence dating of pleistocene sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Souza, J.H.; Rivera, A.

    1984-01-01

    After a short introduction on recent trends in quaternary geochronology, this article focuses on the thermoluminescence dating of sediments, whose principles and present limits and prospects are discussed. Results are presented for the TL behaviour of sands from various geological contexts in Brazil. They show that the coarse (approx. 100-200μm) quartz fraction of coastal and intra continental, eolian and fluvial-type deposits, might be datable by TL from the upper Holocene to at least the basis of the upper Pleistocene, with a precision of + - 10-15%. (Author) [pt

  19. Thermoluminescence dating of pleistocene sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Souza, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    After a short introduction on recent trends in quaternary geochronology, this article focuses on the thermoluminescence (TL) dating of sediments, whose principles, present limits and prospects are discussed. Results are presented for TL behavior of sands from various geological contexts in Brazil. They show that the coarse (approx. 100-200 μm) quartz fraction of coastal and intracontinental, eolian and fluvial - type deposits, might be datable by TL from the upper Holocene to at least the base of the upper Pleistocene, with a precision of +- 10-15%. (Author) [pt

  20. Substitution of Sugar with Dates Powder and Dates Syrup in Cookies Making

    OpenAIRE

    W.A. Alsenaien; R.A. Alamer; Zhen-Xing Tang; S.A. Albahrani; M.A. Al-Ghannam; S.M. Aleid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of dates powder and dates syrup as a sugar substitution, on the physical properties and sensory attributes of cookies were studied. An increase in firmness and moisture content of cookies supplemented with dates was obtained. The diameter and spread ratio of cookies showed a decrease with increasing levels of date powder or date syrup. Partial replacement of sugar with date powder or date syrup produced cookies with more dark and red color. Sensory evaluation result...

  1. 85Kr dating of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, K.; Florkowski, T.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of 85 Kr dating of groundwater is being investigated. The method of gas extraction from 200 to 300 litres of water sample has been developed. The Argon and Krypton mixture, separated from the gas extracted from water, was counted in a 1.5 ml volume proportional counter. The amount of krypton gas in the counter was determined by mass spectrometry. A number of surface and groundwater samples were analyzed indicating an 85 Kr concentration ranging from present atmospheric content (river water) to zero values. 85 Kr 'blank value' was determined to be about 5 per cent of present 85 Kr atmospheric content. For groundwater samples, the mean residence time in the system was calculated assuming the exponential model and known 85 Kr input function. Further improvement of the method should bring higher yield of krypton separation and lower volume of water necessary for analysis. (orig.) [de

  2. Blind-date Conversation Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cesari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We focus on a form of joining conversations among multiple parties in service-oriented applications where a client may asynchronously join an existing conversation without need to know in advance any information about it. More specifically, we show how the correlation mechanism provided by orchestration languages enables a form of conversation joining that is completely transparent to clients and that we call 'blind-date joining'. We provide an implementation of this strategy by using the standard orchestration language WS-BPEL. We then present its formal semantics by resorting to COWS, a process calculus specifically designed for modelling service-oriented applications. We illustrate our approach by means of a simple, but realistic, case study from the online games domain.

  3. Making a date with radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of 14 C dating techniques for samples of organic materials up to 50,000 years old is discussed with especial reference to adjustment necessary to take account of both the most recent figure for the 14 C half-life and also the natural fluctuations in the production of 14 C over 50,000 years. Methods of detection and the accuracy of the measurements are considered. It is hoped that future developments including both the possibility of counting 14 C ions directly using an accelerator as a mass spectrometer, and also the use of laser enrichment techniques will not only push back the radiocarbon calendar to 100,000 years but will also allow the use of much smaller samples than before. (U.K.)

  4. Radioisotope dating beyond 50,000 years BP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukens, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    A counting method for radiocarbon dating has been developed by the Toronto-Rochester-General Ionex group over the past two years using electrostatic tandem-accelerators as part of a mass spectrometer. The method uses very small samples of 1 mg or less and reaches high accuracy after counting for only a few hours. In principle this 14 C method can be used to date samples up to 100,000 years old but severe problems are anticipated with respect to sample contamination, particularly beyond 70,000 years BP. The counting method can also be applied to the detection of longer lived radioisotopes created in the upper atmosphere by the interaction of cosmic radiation, such as 36 Cl, 26 Al and 10 Be. (author)

  5. Make a date with a tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillie, M.; Pilcher, J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper concerns the use of dendrochronology to check the accuracy of radiocarbon dating. The Belfast chronology is described - this involves wood samples precisely dated by tree ring analysis and analysed by high-precision radiocarbon analysis. The analysis resulted in the first continuous high-precision calibration of the radiocarbon time-scale, and confirmed the relationship between radiocarbon dates and tree-ring dates. The use of radiocarbon dating to reveal the age of wood samples that have too few rings to produce an accurate date, is also outlined. (U.K.)

  6. The scientific dating of standing buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Nathaniel W

    2017-11-17

    The techniques of dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) and radiocarbon (14C) dating are described, as they are applied to historic buildings. Both rely on determining the felling dates of the trees used in their construction. For dendrochronology, the construction of master chronologies and the matching of individual ring-width sequences to them is described and, for radiocarbon dating, the use of tree-ring results in calibration. Results of dating are discussed, ranging from the cathedrals of Peterborough and Beauvais and the development of crown-post roof structures, to the dating and identification of standing medieval peasant houses, particularly those built using cruck construction.

  7. 17 CFR 248.128 - Effective date, compliance date, and prospective application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Affiliate Marketing § 248.128 Effective date, compliance date, and prospective application. (a) Effective date. This subpart is effective September 10, 2009. (b) Mandatory compliance date. Compliance with this... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective date, compliance...

  8. Radiocarbon dates for Rangitoto and Motutapu, a consideration of dating accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The carbon dates for the eruptions of Rangitoto and the occupation of Maori sites on Motutapu contain inconsistencies which are explicable only after the dates have been corrected to allow for the nature of the dating method. The only date which is reasonably established is a 14th or 15th century dating for the ash shower covering Motutapu. (auth.)

  9. Inter-comparison of cosmogenic in-situ 3He, 21Ne and 36Cl at low latitude along an altitude transect on the SE slope of the Kilimanjaro volcano (3°S, Tanzania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelpfennig, I.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Niedermann, S.; Finkel, R. C.; Benedetti, L.; Schneider, B.

    2010-12-01

    Because the intensity and energy spectrum of the cosmic ray flux is affected by atmospheric depth and geomagnetic-field strength, cosmogenic nuclide production rates increase considerably with altitude and to a lesser degree with latitude. The scaling methods used to account for spatial variability in production rates assume that all cosmogenic nuclides have the same altitude dependence. In this study we evaluate whether the production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl, 3He and 21Ne change differently with altitude, which is plausible due to the different energy-thresholds of their production reactions. If so, nuclide-specific scaling factors would be required. Concentrations of the three cosmogenic nuclides were determined in mafic phenocrysts over an altitude transect between 1000 and 4300 m at Kilimanjaro volcano (3° S). Altitude-dependence of relative production rates was assessed in two ways: by determination of concentration ratios and by calculation of apparent exposure age ratios for all nuclide pairs. The latter accounts for characteristics of 36Cl that the stable nuclides 3He and 21Ne do not possess (radioactive decay, high sensitivity to mineral composition and significant contributions from production reactions other than spallation). All ratios overlap within error over the entire transect, and altitudinal variation in relative production rates is not therefore evident. This suggests that nuclide-specific scaling factors are not required for the studied nuclides at this low latitude location. However, because previous studies [1,2] documented anomalous altitude-dependent variations of 3He production at mid-latitude sites, the effect of latitude on cross-calibrations should be further evaluated. We determined cosmogenic 21Ne/3He concentration ratios of 0.187 ± 0.010 in pyroxenes and 0.375 ± 0.015 in olivines, agreeing with those reported in previous studies. Despite the absence of independently determined ages for the studied lava surfaces, the consistency in

  10. Geophysical Insights from Archaeomagnetic Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, R.; Lodge, A.; Suttie, N.; Shaw, J.; Hill, M. J.; Linford, P.

    2009-12-01

    We report on work which has been undertaken towards developing an improved methodology for archaeomagnetic dating of archaeological samples through the use of a dedicated field model. In this talk, we focus on the more general (non-archaeological) implications of our results. Our work has focused on Europe, taking advantage of the better spatial and temporal coverage of available samples. Nevertheless, we model the field globally, using an a priori model (such as, for example, CALS7K) to constrain the field away from the regions of available data. This is advantageous over the use of a local field modelling methodology, as it allows us to examine the physical consequences of structure in our model (for example, in terms of the spectra of the field and secular variation at the core-mantle boundary), and to control possible edge effects in the model, which in a local model might produce an unphysical solution. By focusing on one particular region, we produce models that may not be optimal in terms of global structure, but allow us to investigate the data content in the region where it may provide the most information on core-field evolution. In parallel, we have been expanding the archaeointensity record for Great Britain, towards producing an archaeointensity curve for the UK which could ultimately be used for dating of unoriented samples (such as pot sherds). This new record, combined with other recently acquired high-quality intensity data, allows us to consider the evolution of global geomagnetic field strength in parallel with a good model of directional measurements; from 1590, the GUFM model is appropriate. Recent attempts to determine global intensity variation have used all available data (some of uncertain quality) to quantify variations in field strength. By instead focusing on a more limited dataset of known quality, we are able to examine intensity trends in greater detail. We present evidence that the intensity of the field was higher prior to 1840 than

  11. The Range of Initial 10Be/9Be Ratios in the Early Solar System: A Re-Assessment Based on Analyses of New CAIs and Melilite Composition Glass Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, E.; Wadhwa, M.; Liu, M.-C.

    2017-07-01

    We report a more accurate range of initial 10Be/9Be in CAIs including FUN CAI CMS-1 from Allende (CV3) and a new CAI from NWA 5508 (CV3) using melilite composition glass standards; we suggest 10Be is largely produced by irradiation in the nebula.

  12. Balance of the tropospheric ozone and its relation to stratospheric intrusions indicated by cosmogenic radionuclides. Part 13. Annual report, 1 February 1982-31 January 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, R.; Kanter, H.J.; Jaeger, H.; Munzert, K.

    1985-06-01

    A statistical evaluation of tropospheric ozone concentrations in the air obtained at 3 different levels is presented from data covering 1977 to 1984. Annual and interannual variations are used to project a trend. To clarify the climatology of the stratospheric exchange, the measuring series of cosmogenic radionuclides Be7, P32, P33 covering the period 1970 through 1981 are statistically analyzed with regard to the ozone concentration recorded on the Zugspitze. The statistics of stratospheric intrusions is shown and the stratospheric residence time is estimated. Effects of the eruption of volcano El Chichon in April 1982 on the concentration of the stratospheric aerosol are documented. The time variation of the concentration of the stratospheric aerosol is studied with consideration of the stratospheric circulation. The noted effects are weighed by a comparison with earlier volcanic eruptions. First results of CO 2 recordings in the lower stratosphere are presented. Based on CO 2 recording series from two different levels (740 m and 1780 m a.s.1) from the years 1978 to 1980, systematic differences are shown as a function of height. The question of sources and sinks is discussed to assess the contribution from anthropogenic sources

  13. Balance of the tropospheric ozone and its relation to stratospheric intrusions indicated by cosmogenic radionuclides. Technical progress report, 1 November 1978-30 June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, R.; Kanter, H.J.; Poetzl, K.; Sladkovic, R.; Jaeger, H.; Mueller, H.

    The balance of the tropospheric ozone as a function of atmospheric pollutants, tropospheric transport, and stratospheric intrusions is under active investigation. Continuous recordings of the ozone concentration at three levels (3000 m, 1800 m, and 700 m a.s.l.) and of the cosmogenic radionuclides Be 7 , P 32 , P 33 , and the CO 2 are available and used for subject purposes. Results of a statistical evaluation concerning the frequency of high concentrations (> 70 ppB) of the tropospheric ozone are presented and possible sources discussed. Observations of changes in the fine structure of the ozone profile in the lower stratosphere after solar events are shown by balloon-borne ozone soundings up to 35 km altitude and discussed in connection with parameters of the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Monitoring of the stratospheric aerosol layer by lidar was continued. The accuracy of these measurements was considerably enhanced by significant system improvements. Intercomparisons with the results of nearby Dobson stations allowed conclusions to be drawn on the suitability of a filter spectrophotometer for the determination of the total ozone. Solar-terrestrial relationships were investigated and are discussed

  14. The determination of irradiation and so-called terrestrial ageing of rock meteorites based on the cosmogenic resulting radionuclides 53Mn and 26Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, P.

    1979-01-01

    The contents of cosmogenic occuring 53 Mn was determined by neutron activation in over 90 samples of 75 individual rock meteorites. The distinct depth effect of the 53 Mn production rate in rock meteorites could be measured by a depth profile at LL6 chondrite St. Severin (falling weight 271 kg). The experimental results confirm the present model concepts. By comparing with the spallogenic 22 Ne/ 21 Ne and 3 He/ 21 Ne ratios applicable as depth indicators, one could derive linear relationships suitable for correcting 53 Mn. They enable the determination of the average 53 Mn production rate from the saturation activities of long-term irradiated meteorites. Using this method it was possible to calculate the irradiation age of 40 rock meteorites. As 26 Al is formed with a similar effective cross-section to 53 Mn, the production rate ratio 53 Mn: 26 Al was also taken to derive the depth-independent irradiation ages. A method to determine the depth-independent terrestrial ageing of meteriorites has been developed based on the same isotope ratio, the effective field of application is between 0.10 to 2x10 6 a. Furthermore, an attempt was made to draw up the dependence of noble gas contents of 53 Mn resp. 53 Mn/ 26 Al irradiation age for the new determination of the 3 He, 21 Ne and 38 Ar production rates by means of a linear regression analysis. (orig./RB) [de

  15. Dates and Times Made Easy with lubridate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Grolemund

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the lubridate package for R, which facilitates working with dates and times. Date-times create various technical problems for the data analyst. The paper highlights these problems and oers practical advice on how to solve them using lubridate. The paper also introduces a conceptual framework for arithmetic with date-times in R.

  16. Modelling of Earthquake History of the Knidos Fault Zone SW Turkey Using in-situ 36Cl Surface Exposure Dating by R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, S.; Yıldırım, C.; Sarıkaya, M. A.; Tuysuz, O.; Genç, S. C.; Aksoy, M. E.; Doksanaltı, M. E.; Benedetti, L.

    2016-12-01

    Cosmogenic surface exposure dating is based on the production of rare nuclides in exposed rocks, which interact with cosmic rays. Through modelling of measured 36Cl concentrations, we might obtain information of the history of the earthquake activity. Yet, there are several factors which may impact production of rare nuclides such as geometry of fault, topography, geographic location of study area, temporal variations of the Earth's magnetic field, self-cover and denudation rate on the scarp. Our study area, the Knidos Fault Zone, is located on the Datça Peninsula in the Southwestern Anatolia and contains several normal fault scarps formed within the limestone, which are appropriate to apply cosmogenic chlorine-36 dating. Since it has a well-preserved scarp, we have focused on the Mezarlık Segment of the fault zone, which has an average length of 300 m and height 12-15 m. 128 continuous samples from top to bottom of the fault scarp were collected to carry out analysis of cosmic 36Cl isotopes concentrations. Recent research elucidated each step of the application of this method by the Matlab (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al., 2010). It is vitally helpful to generate models activity of normal faults. We, however, wanted to build a user-friendly program through an open source programing language R that might be able to help those without knowledge of complex math, programming, making calculations as easy as possible. We have set out to obtain accurate conclusions to compare and contrast our results with synthetic profiles and previous studies of limestone fault scarps. The preliminary results indicate at least three major or more earthquakes/earthquakes cluster events occurred on the Mezarlık fault within the past 20 kyr; over 10 meters of displacement took place between early Holocene and late Pleistocene. Estimated ages of those three large slip events are 18.7, 15.1 and 10.8 ka respectively. This study was conducted with the Decision of the Council of Ministers with No

  17. Radiocarbon dating of soils, a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenseel, H.W.; Schiffmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    The application of radiocarbon dating techniques for pedological purposes is reviewed in chronological sequence of its phases of introduction. Initially dating of charcoal and buried paleosols was dominating and accompanied by few soil dating attempts of recent soil formations on the basis of extracted humic acid-C. The following controversy regarding the potentialities and limitations of recent soil dating, still being involved in the intact turnover processes of modern biodynamics, led to intensive search for the relatively oldest, most favorable C-fraction, particularly a biologically inert C-fraction of the organic C-pool. Inclusion of C-14 dating in pedogenetic working concepts required soil profile date-scanning in order to reveal the age versus depth interdependence. (orig./HK) [de

  18. Sample processing procedures and radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlik, Ivo; Tomaskova, Lenka; Dreslerova, Dagmar

    2010-01-01

    The article outlines radiocarbon dating routines and highlights the potential and limitations of this method. The author's institutions have been jointly running a conventional radiocarbon dating laboratory using the international CRL code. A procedure based on the synthesis of benzene is used. Small samples are sent abroad for dating because no AMS instrumentation is available in the Czech Republic so far. Our laboratory plans to introduce routines for the processing of milligram samples and preparation of graphitized targets for AMS

  19. Thermoluminescence dating of Indian archaeological sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhvi, A.K.; Sharma, Y.P.; Agrawal, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to provide a chronology for Indian archaeological sites, an extensive pottery dating programme was initiated during 1978-1979. So far we have provided a chronology for seven important Indian archaeological sites. The dated cultures include: 1) the Ochre Colour Ware culture, 2) the Pre-Harappan culture, 3) the megalithic culture and 4) the Painted Grey Ware culture. A complete survey of recently measured TL dates are presented in a model format similar to that used in Radiocarbon. (author)

  20. How AMS dating changed my life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating was developed in the late 1970s. Remembering back to a time before AMS dating was available to archaeologists is a bit like trying to remember how we ever survived without desktop computers, email or automatic teller machines. My own particular interest in AMS dating was an inevitable offshoot from my long-established interest in chronometric hygiene, or 'getting the dates right'. In this paper I attempt to illustrate that accurate dating matters, by discussing some examples of AMS dating projects with which I have been involved over the last six years or so. In relation to these projects, AMS has given us the ability to date sites which we could not before. It has enabled us to provide more detailed stratigraphies when datable materials are rare. It has allowed us to date materials we could not date before, such as rock art pigments. It has been able to provide indications of the degree of site disturbance in the absence of other obvious forms of evidence. And it has allowed us to assess claims for the antiquity of particular material cultural types and faunal introductions. (author). 41 refs

  1. AMS Radiocarbon Dating at Notre Dame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sean

    2014-09-01

    Current development of a local radiocarbon dating method using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Notre Dame seeks to provide sensitive, reproducible, and accurate measurements for future interdisciplinary projects. While AMS has been the premier radiocarbon dating method for a few decades, repurposing Notre Dame's FN Tandem accelerator for radiocarbon dating has provided many unique challenges. Experiments have shown radiocarbon dating possible and reproducible using the FN Tandem accelerator, found optimal settings for said accelerator, and established sensitivity limits comparable to dedicated radiocarbon dating facilities. In addition, there is ongoing work to create a local chemistry lab to convert organic artifacts into graphite samples to be dated locally. Once the chemistry side has been completed, several artifacts from the IAEA's radiocarbon intercomparison have been procured. Dating these previously studied artifacts will provide an additional measure on the accuracy and repeatability of both the accelerator and chemical treatment. Provided that these IAEA artifacts are dated successfully, exciting projects will ensue, such as the authentication of artwork and dating of anthropological samples.

  2. NERC radiocarbon dating: 1975-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, D.Q.; Harkness, D.D.

    1986-06-01

    The paper reviews the work of the Natural Environment Research Council Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory in connection with Quaternary research, over the last decade. A description is given of the development of the dating service and in-house research. Quaternary research investigations aided by radiocarbon dating are described under the topic headings: The late Devensian glacial maximum, late glacial, middle Devensian, palaeomagnetic secular variation in lake sediments, vegetational history, faunal history, palaeolimnology, ground water, volcanology, periglacial research, palaoeohydrology, geomorphology, quaternary events in low-latitudes, environmental archaeology, archaeology, deep sea sediments, continental shelf, coastal geomorphology, and radiocarbon dating in Antarctica. (U.K.)

  3. Using microwaves in Disinsection of dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouba, Anis

    2008-01-01

    The date palm plays a very significant role in Tunisia in term of culture as well as social, economic and ecological aspects. The production of the dates which is estimated to 120.000 tons/year ensures the principal income for the majority of the oasis population of the South of Tunisia and constitutes the basis for agricultural, industrial, commercial and tourist activities, offering million of working days. The date palm is cultivated mainly for the production of dates which are consumed locally or also exported abroad but for its by-products (food of the cattle, wind breaks, fuel, construction) which are marketed and/ or used in the everyday life thus taking part in the sedentarisation of the populations and the maintenance of a fragile socio-economic balance. The date moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zell. ( L will epidoptera, Pyralidae) is without question the most significant problem of the Tunisian date palm. The infestation of dates in the field and in the storage and packing houses enormously depreciates the marketable quality of dates and risk to compromise exports in particular those of the variety Deglet Nour. rates of infestations of about 20% are often recorded in Tunisia where as the European standards require rates lower than 5%. In Tunisia the desinsectisation of dates is done until now by the use of methyl bromide, its high toxicity substantially reduces the duration of date treatment, and consequently the treated volumes. The replacement of this product becomes an urgent need its use will not be authorized by 2015. Within the framework of a agreement between the Regional Research Center in Oasis Agriculture (CRRAO), The Interprofessional Grouping of Fruits (GIF), and the Italian Company IMETEC, the use one of micro-waves as a desinsectisation method of dates was evaluated. The results of this present work showed that total desinsectisation of dates by microwaves can be obtained only with homogeneous dates in term of water content. Total

  4. Chromatographic separation of fructose from date syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Eid, Salah M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a process for separating fructose from a mixture of sugars containing essentially fructose and glucose, obtained from date palm fruits. The extraction procedure of date syrup from fresh dates gave a yield of 86.5% solids after vacuum drying. A process for separating fructose from an aqueous solution of date syrup involved adding the date syrup solutions (20, 30 and 40% by weight) to a chromatographic column filled with Dowex polystyrene strong cation exchange gel matrix resin Ca2 + and divinylbenzene, a functional group, sulfonic acid, particle size 320 microm, with a flow rate of 0.025 and 0.05 bed volume/min, under 30 and 70 degrees C column temperature. After the date sugar solution batch, a calculated quantity of water was added to the column. Glucose was retained by the resin more weakly than fructose and proceeded faster into the water batch flowing ahead. Three fractions were collected: a glucose-rich fraction, a return fraction, and a fructose-rich fraction. The return fraction is based on when the peaks of fructose and glucose were reached, which could be determined by means of an analyzer (polarimeter) based on the property of glucose and fructose solutions to turn the polarization level of polarized light. A high yield of fructose is obtained at 70 degrees C column temperature with a flow rate of 0.025 bed volume/min and date syrup solution containing 40% sugar concentration. The low recovery by weight obtained using date syrup solutions having a sugar concentration of 20 and 30%, encourages the use of a concentration of 40%. However, with the 40% date syrup supply the average concentrations of glucose and fructose in the return fractions were more than 40%, which can be used for diluting the thick date syrup solution extracted from dates.

  5. 75 FR 57252 - Designated Transfer Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ..., as the date for the transfer of functions to the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (``CFPB... other laws. After consulting with the heads of the agencies whose functions will transfer to the CFPB... July 21, 2011, as the transfer date will advance the mission of the CFPB and promote an orderly and...

  6. 12 CFR 563g.6 - Effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effective date. 563g.6 Section 563g.6 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SECURITIES OFFERINGS § 563g.6 Effective date. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (d) of this section, an offering circular filed by a...

  7. 40 CFR 425.05 - Compliance dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates. 425.05 Section 425.05 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 425.05 Compliance dates...

  8. Jealousy during Dating among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanchandani, Laveena; Durham, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between several situational and personality variables and jealousy in dating relationships among 100 college women volunteers who completed a series of questionnaires about themselves and their dating situations. Six research questions were examined. Results showed that jealousy was lower for women in a steady…

  9. 21 CFR 211.137 - Expiration dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expiration dating. 211.137 Section 211.137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... § 211.137 Expiration dating. (a) To assure that a drug product meets applicable standards of identity...

  10. ESR dating of marine fossil shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, U.; Mangini, A.; Gruen, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to establish the relatively new ESR dating method for marine shells a detailed comparison with the independent U-series technique was carried out. Agreement of both dating methods with the geological classification is strongly dependent on the species investigated and environmental conditions. Several problems encountered in the determination of the accumulated dose as well as the annual dose are discussed. (author)

  11. ESR dating of marine fossil shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, U; Mangini, A; Gruen, R

    1985-01-01

    In order to establish the relatively new ESR dating method for marine shells a detailed comparison with the independent U-series technique was carried out. Agreement of both dating methods with the geological classification is strongly dependent on the species investigated and environmental conditions. Several problems encountered in the determination of the accumulated dose as well as the annual dose are discussed.

  12. 16 CFR 314.5 - Effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effective date. 314.5 Section 314.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS STANDARDS FOR SAFEGUARDING CUSTOMER INFORMATION § 314.5 Effective date. (a) Each financial institution subject to the...

  13. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... filed and disbursed except, for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral. The maturity date for transferred marketing assistance loan collateral will be the maturity date applicable to the original loan... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS GRAINS AND SIMILARLY HANDLED COMMODITIES-MARKETING...

  14. Dating violence and suicidal behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kristin; Sher, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the possible consequences of adolescent physical, emotional and sexual dating violence through a review of the literature on the topic. An electronic search of major biomedical bibliographic databases (Pubmed, ISI, PsycINFO) was used to retrieve articles providing information on the prevalence rates, risk factors, associated consequences and possible preventive measures for adolescent dating violence across different populations. Currently, there have been few longitudinal studies conducted to identify potential risk factors for entering a violent dating relationship in adolescence. Risky behaviors such as early sexual intercourse may predispose someone for victimization. Dating violence itself is also a predictor of future dating violence. Adolescent dating violence was associated with an increase in other violence-related behaviors, substance use, depression, poorer educational outcomes, posttraumatic stress, unhealthy weight control and risky sexual behavior. The association between adolescent dating violence and an increase in suicidal behavior is a major public health concern. Future research should focus on longitudinal studies so that a causal relationship between dating violence and suicidality may be better understood.

  15. Peer Involvement in Adolescent Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pam S.; Martsolf, Donna; Draucker, Claire Burke

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the ways in which peers are involved in adolescent dating violence. Eighty-eight young adults aged 18-21 were interviewed and asked to reflect on aggressive dating relationships they experienced as teens. The researchers used grounded theory to analyze the data. Findings showed that male and female peers were involved in…

  16. Teen Dating Violence Prevention Program Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Quincy Arrianna Rose

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) has identified the prevention of and intervention in relationship violence as a top priority (APA, n.d.). According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 Teen Dating Violence Fact Sheet, dating violence is a serious problem in the United States. In accordance with Foshee et al. (1998):…

  17. 46 CFR 308.552 - Effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective date. 308.552 Section 308.552 Shipping... Cargo Insurance Iv-General § 308.552 Effective date. This subpart shall be effective as and when the... commerce of the United States cannot be obtained on reasonable terms and conditions from companies...

  18. 38 CFR 3.54 - Marriage dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marriage dates. 3.54..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Relationship § 3.54 Marriage dates. A surviving spouse may qualify for pension, compensation, or dependency and indemnity compensation if the marriage to the...

  19. Ambiguity and violence in adolescent dating relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draucker, Claire Burke; Martsolf, Donna; Stephenson, Pam Shockey

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about dyadic processes that lead to adolescent dating violence. The purpose of this study was to examine the phenomenon of relationship ambiguity in adolescent dating relationships to better understand how ambiguity contributes to violence and aggression between dating partners. Data were drawn from 88 narratives of young adults who had participated in a study on adolescent dating violence. Interpretive phenomenology was used to produce an in-depth description of the phenomenon of relationship ambiguity. Relationship ambiguity results in differing expectations between partners regarding closeness and intimacy, fidelity, and obligation. These differences lead to conflicts that set the stage for violence and aggression in adolescent dating relationships. A series of recommendations for clinicians working with adolescents are presented. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Record date in Serbian company law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The right of the shareholder to participate in and vote at the general meeting is determined based on the shares he holds on a certain date prior to the general meeting (record date. However, the rules regulating the record date deviate from the principle of indivisibility of shares. In extreme cases it is possible to have persons, none of which are shareholders at a given time, to participate in and vote at the general meeting. Hence, it is possible to have persons with no investment interest in the company to decide, for example, on adoption of financial reports, or on disposal of high-value assets. This issue, by its virtue, is not put forward in cases where there was no transfer of shares in the period between the record date and the date of the general meeting.

  1. 12 CFR 41.28 - Effective date, compliance date, and prospective application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Affiliate Marketing § 41.28 Effective date, compliance date, and prospective... an affiliate to make solicitations to a consumer if the bank receives such information prior to...

  2. 16 CFR 680.28 - Effective date, compliance date, and prospective application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.28 Effective date, compliance date, and prospective application. (a... part shall not prohibit you from using eligibility information that you receive from an affiliate to...

  3. 12 CFR 571.28 - Effective date, compliance date, and prospective application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Affiliate Marketing § 571.28 Effective date, compliance date, and... receive from an affiliate to make solicitations to a consumer if you receive such information prior to...

  4. Investigations of neutron-rich nuclei at the dripline through their analogue states : The cases of $^{10}$Li - $^{10}$Be (T=2) and $^{17}$C - $^{17}$N (T=5/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the elastic resonance scattering reactions $^{9}$Li+p and $^{16}$C+p to investigate the energies, spins and parities of the lowest T=2 states in $^{10}$Be and the T=5/2 states in $^{17}$N. These are analogue states of the ground states and first excited states in $^{10}$Li and $^{17}$C.

  5. Longitudinal relationships between individual and class norms supporting dating violence and perpetration of dating violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Katherine A; Sullivan, Terri N; Farrell, Albert D

    2015-03-01

    Dating violence is commonly perpetrated in adolescence, making it imperative to understand risk factors in order to inform prevention efforts. Although individual norms supporting dating violence are strongly related to its perpetration, few studies have examined their longitudinal impact. Moreover, the influence of class norms (i.e., norms for students in the same grade, cohort, and school) supporting dating violence on perpetration has rarely been studied. The current study examined longitudinal relationships between individual and class norms supporting dating violence and perpetration of physical and psychological dating violence. Participants were two cohorts of sixth graders from 37 schools who were in dating relationships at Wave 1 and 6 months later at Wave 2 (N = 2,022; 43% female; 52% African American, 21% Latino/a, 20% White, and 7% other). The analyses used a multilevel approach, with students represented at Level 1 and classes (n = 74) at Level 2. The models tested direct effects of Wave 1 individual and class norms supporting dating violence on subsequent changes in perpetration of dating violence at Wave 2 and the extent to which gender moderated these relationships. The findings indicated that greater individual norms supporting male dating violence predicted greater change in perpetration of physical and psychological dating violence and greater individual norms supporting female dating violence predicted greater change in perpetration of psychological dating violence. Greater class norms supporting male dating violence predicted greater change in perpetration of physical dating violence; whereas greater class norms supporting female dating violence predicted less change in perpetration of physical dating violence. These findings highlight the need to address norms in early adolescence.

  6. Dating of fossil hominid: problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Danon, J.; Baksi, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    The hominid dating anterior to the Homo Erectus has been based up to now on the rocks and minerals geochronology of vulcanic origem in stratigraphic relation with the fossils. Two methods are widely used, potassium-argon and uranium fission track dating. The vulcanic material dating; lava, lephra, associated with the hominid leavings show big difficults essentially connected to several types of contamination and modification. Two available examples inside the east-african rift show the probelms linked to these dating. The current progresses in the dating methods can contribute by one hand to a better utilization of the K-Ar and fisson track methods for the vulcanic materials. By other hand, with the introduction of new dating methods (thermoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance) will be possible to date directly whether the fossil bone itself or the associated sedimentar material. This open new perspectives in particular for every sites which are not inter-stratified with the vulcanic material. (L.C.) [pt

  7. A Phenomenological Investigation of Adolescent Dating Relationships and Dating Violence Counseling Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Michel, Rebecca E.; Cole, Rebekah F.; Emelianchik, Kelly; Forman, Julia; Lorelle, Sonya; McBride, Rebecca; Sikes, April

    2011-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of dating violence, incidences often go unreported due to a lack of awareness among students as to appropriate dating behaviors. This phenomenology investigated how adolescents conceptualize and experience dating relationships. We explored adolescent females' definitions of healthy and abusive relationships, experiences with…

  8. 20 CFR 404.630 - Use of date of written statement as filing date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... data on the Internet Social Security Benefit Application to us, we will use the date of the... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of date of written statement as filing date. 404.630 Section 404.630 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE...

  9. Development of thermoluminescence dating techniques at Oxford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The two-decade long history of thermoluminescene as a pottery dating method is surveyed with particular reference to the various problems that have been encountered in the Oxford Laboratory's research programme. Effects, such as supralinearity and radon emanation, are explained in terms of how they are measured and how their existence influences thermoluminescence (TL) dating accuracy (currently close to plus minus 7% per analysis). Illustrations of Thermoluminescence (TL) applications include a Nok culture terracotta from Nigeria and a Cambodia bronze Buddha figure of the Khmer period, dated ising the ceramic-like casting-core retained within it. (author)

  10. ESR dating of tooth enamel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tiemei; Yang quan; Wu En

    1993-01-01

    Five tooth samples from the palaeoanthropological site of Jinniushan were dated with both electron-spin-resonance (ESR) and uranium-series techniques. The ESR age of about 230 ka is in good agreement with the U-series dating result, which confirms the hypothesis of possible coexistence of Homo erect us and Homo sapiens in China. Problems in ESR dating are discussed such as: 1) inappropriate of simple exponential extrapolation for accumulated dose determination; 2)experimental measurement of alpha detection efficiency and radon emanation and 3)selection of U-uptake model

  11. Some wholesomeness studies on irradiated Iraqi dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Rawi, A.M.; Hamoudi, H.I.

    1981-01-01

    Iraqi dates (Zahdi and Khestawi) were irradiated at different dose levels (0 to 1500 krad) to extend their shelf-lives. Samples irradiated at 150 krad showed no change in the behaviour studies of tested Swiss albino mice. Fungi were found to have a constant rate of growth on the syrup irradiated dates. Chemical products such as malondialdehyde, deoxy sugars, acids and reducing sugars were quantified. In conclusion, 150 krad is a convenient dose to extend the shelf-lives of the tested dates and is therefore recommended. (author)

  12. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of young sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    of OSL dating, outlines the problems specific to the dating of young material, and then uses recent applications to young sediments to illustrate the greatly increased scope and potential of the method in geomorphology and the geology of recent deposits. The overall reliability of this new generation...... for determining the time of deposition of water-lain sediments from the coastal zone, and aeolian deposits from both coastal and inland environments. Our conclusion is supported by the growing popularity of OSL dating in geomorphology and geology...

  13. TL and EPR dating: some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The intensity of thermoluminescence light emitted by a crystal is a function of radiation dose. The number of defects or of radicals in a crystal or organic substances is also a function of radiation dose. Since such defects or radicals present EPR signals, the EPR intensity is also a function of radiation dose. These facts are basis for radiation dosimetry and can be applied in dating of archaeological potteries or other materials, as well as in dating geological substances such as sediments, caves speleothemes, animal teeth and bones. Recent investigation on sensitized quartz based dosimeters and dating calcite covering ancient wall painting to find early settlers in Brazil will be presented. (Author)

  14. Annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huhou

    1988-01-01

    The annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating has been discussed. The autor gives an entirely new concept of the enviromental radiation in the thermoluminescence dating. Methods of annual dose detemination used by author are dating. Methods of annual dose determination used by author are summed up, and the results of different methods are compared. The emanium escapiug of three radioactive decay serieses in nature has been considered, and several determination methods are described. The contribution of cosmic rays for the annual radiation dose has been mentioned

  15. Annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhou, Li [Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Archaeology

    1988-11-01

    The annual radiation dose in thermoluminescence dating has been discussed. The autor gives an entirely new concept of the enviromental radiation in the thermoluminescence dating. Methods of annual dose detemination used by author are dating. Methods of annual dose determination used by author are summed up, and the results of different methods are compared. The emanium escapiug of three radioactive decay serieses in nature has been considered, and several determination methods are described. The contribution of cosmic rays for the annual radiation dose has been mentioned.

  16. Amtrak's strategic business plan : progress to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-24

    To address its financial crisis and make its operations more efficient, in 1995 : Amtrak undertook a major corporate restructuring, along with developing its : Strategic Business Plan. This report (1) reviews Amtrak's success to date in : achieving f...

  17. Potassium-argon dating in archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, I. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Sciences)

    1990-01-01

    The potassium-argon (K-Ar) isotopic dating method can provide precise and accurate numerical ages on suitable rocks, especially igneous rocks, over a wide range of age from less than 100,000 years old, with no older limit. Together with its variants, the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar technique, the K-Ar method is very useful for the numerical age calibration of stratigraphic sequences, including those containing archaeological or fossil material, in cases where appropriate rocks for dating are present. This brief review of the basis of the K-Ar dating method and the underlying assumptions, concludes with an example of its application to the Plio-Pleistocene stratigraphic sequence in the Turkana Basin, northern Kenya. By dating alkali feldspars separated from pumice blocks in tuffaceous beds, excellent age control has been obtained for the wealth of vertebrate fossils, including hominids, as well as archaeological materials that has been found in the sequence. (author).

  18. Coconut, date and oil palm genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review of genomics research is presented for the three most economically important palm crops, coconut (Cocos nucifera), date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), encompassing molecular markers studies of genetic diversity, genetic mapping, quantitative trait loci discovery...

  19. Bullying: a stepping stone to dating aggression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Wendy L; Pepler, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Bullying is the use of power and aggression to control and distress another. In this paper, we review research to explore whether the lessons learned in bullying provide a stepping stone to aggressive behavior in dating relationships. We start by considering definitions and a relationship framework with which to understand both bullying and dating aggression. We consider bullying from a developmental-contextual perspective and consider risk factors associated with the typical developmental patterns for bullying and dating aggression, including developmental and sociodemographic, individual attributes, and family, peer group, community, and societal relationship contexts that might lead some children and youths to follow developmental pathways that lead to bullying and dating aggression. We conclude by discussing implications for intervention with a review of evidence-based interventions.

  20. 38 CFR 21.4135 - Discontinuance dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not leading to a standard college degree is not timely received, payments will be terminated date of... withdraws from correspondence, flight, farm cooperative, cooperative or job training, benefits will be...

  1. Chlorine-36 dating of continental evaporites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qi

    1990-01-01

    Teh chloring-36 production, principle and experimental method of 36 Cl dating are briefly described. The ages calculated from the 36 Cl/Cl ratios are generally concordant with those obtained by using 14 C, 230 Th and magnetostratigraphic techniques. It confirms the constancy of the chlorine input ratio over the last million years and implys that 36 Cl can provide accurate dates on continental saline sediments

  2. Reduction of date microbial load with ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Davood; Qorbanpoor, Ali; Rafati, Hasan; Isfeedvajani, Mohsen Saberi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Date is one of the foodstuffs that are produced in tropical areas and used worldwide. Conventionally, methyl bromide and phosphine are used for date disinfection. The toxic side effects of these usual disinfectants have led food scientists to consider safer agents such as ozone for disinfection, because food safety is a top priority. The present study was performed to investigate the possibility of replacing common conventional disinfectants with ozone for date disinfection and microbial load reduction. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, date samples were ozonized for 3 and 5 hours with 5 and 10 g/h concentrations and packed. Ozonized samples were divided into two groups and kept in an incubator which was maintained at 25°C and 40°C for 9 months. During this period, every 3 month, microbial load (bacteria, mold, and yeast) were examined in ozonized and non-ozonized samples. Results: This study showed that ozonization with 5 g/h for 3 hours, 5 g/h for 5 hours, 10 g/h for 3 hours, and 10 g/h for 5 hours leads to about 25%, 25%, 53%, and 46% reduction in date mold and yeast load and about 6%, 9%, 76%, and 74.7% reduction in date bacterial load at baseline phase, respectively. Appropriate concentration and duration of ozonization for microbial load reduction were 10 g/h and 3 hours. Conclusion: Date ozonization is an appropriate method for microbial load reduction and leads to an increase in the shelf life of dates. PMID:24124432

  3. REPORT ON THE DATING THE ODYSSEY

    OpenAIRE

    r.e. Schmid

    2012-01-01

    STUDY SUPPORTS ACCURACY OF GREEK POET HOMER, SETS DATE FOR ODYSSEUS’ RETURN FROM TROJAN WAR

    Using clues from star and sun positions mentioned by the ancient Greek poet Homer, scholars think they have determined the date when King Odysseus returned from the Trojan War and slaughtered a group of suitors who had been pressing his wife to marry one of them.

  4. Correction procedures for C-14 dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKerrell, H.

    1975-01-01

    There are two quite separate criteria to satisfy before accepting as valid the corrections to C-14 dates which have been indicated for some years now by the bristlecone pine calibration. Firstly the correction figures have to be based upon all the available tree-ring data and derived in a manner that is mathematically sound, and secondly the correction figures have to produce accurate results on C-14 dates from archaeological test samples of known historical date, these covering as wide a period as possible. Neither of these basic prerequisites has yet been fully met. Thus the two-fold purpose of this paper is to bring together, and to compare with an independently based procedure, the various correction curves or tables that have been published up to Spring 1974, as well as to detail the correction results on reliable, historically dated Egyptian, Helladic and Minoan test samples from 3100 B.C. The nomenclature followed is strictly that adopted by the primary dating journal Radiocarbon, all C-14 dates quoted thus relate to the 5568 year half-life and the standard AD/BC system. (author)

  5. Dating ancient monuments by nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedicke, C.

    2000-01-01

    In the fifties and sixties several disciplines dealing with chronologies but lacking precise methods of measurements (geology, biology, archaeology and art history) became aware of the radioactive decay as a tool of measuring elapsed time. Among the disciplines that benefit most from physical methods archaeology has to be named first. So was archaeological work revolutionised by the introduction of the C-14 dating method. A wider selection of material became datable after the introduction of luminescence techniques using the effect of nuclear radiation on semiconductors. These minerals are widespread among archaeological materials. In ancient monuments, the objective of this paper, semiconductors almost exclusively form the material basis. Over the last four millennia wood, stone, mortar and fired bricks have been used for the construction of buildings. After discussing methods taking wood as a dating material, a broader view will be given on the results achieved by luminescence dating of fired bricks, mortar and stone. For many years brick dating was performed by thermoluminescence, the recipes followed those of ceramic dating. Preferably multiple aliquot additive dose protocols were used on polymineral fine grain fractions (1-10 μm). It was expected that the error in dating monuments would be smaller compared to ceramic dating, because of the constancy of the environmental conditions which a brick experiences during its lifetime. However, the variability of firing temperatures in brick kilns overthrows this advantage. Therefore, the demands of art historians to fall short of an error margin of 5% could generally not be fulfilled. Especially in medieval or renaissance times the temporal resolution of thermoluminescence is inferior to traditional stylistic dating as long as specific stylistic forms are present. New optical luminescence techniques and a new philosophy of dose evaluation, based on single aliquot regeneration protocols, produce less scatter, and in

  6. Plio-Quaternary river incision rates inferred from burial dating (Al-26/Be-10) of in cave-deposited alluvium in the Meuse catchment (E Belgium): new insights into the uplift history of the Ardennes massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Régis; Peeters, Alexandre; Demoulin, Alain

    2017-04-01

    Although the Late Cenozoic uplift of the intraplate Variscan Ardennes/Rhenish massif (N Europe) has been long studied, its causes, shape and timing are still under debate (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). This is mainly due to the scarcity of reliable ages for uplift markers, such as Quaternary terrace staircases along the deeply-incised valleys or Late Tertiary planation surfaces. In parallel, multi-level cave systems in limestone rocks, wherein abandoned phreatic passages filled with alluvium represent former phases of fluvial base-level stability, record the history of regional river incision (Anthony & Granger, 2007). Here, we present new burial ages (Al-26/Be-10) from fluvial gravels washed in a multi-level cave system developed in Devonian limestones of the lower Ourthe valley (main Ardennian tributary of the Meuse). Our results highlight a significant increase of incision rates from the Middle Pleistocene on, and allow reconstructing the incision history in the northern part of the Ardennes over the last 3.4 Ma. These long-term incision rates derived from burial ages are then discussed in relation to the existing studies dealing with river incision and/or tectonic uplift of the Ardennes/Rhenish massif (e.g. Demoulin & Hallot, 2009; Rixhon et al., 2011). Our cosmogenic nuclide ages thus enlarge the data pool required to explore the spatio-temporal characteristics of the drainage system's incision response to combined tectonic and climatic signals. References Anthony, D., Granger, D.E., 2007. A new chronology for the age of Appalachian erosional surfaces determined by cosmogenic nuclides in cave sediments. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 32, 874-887 Demoulin, A., Hallot, E., 2009. Shape and amount of the Quaternary uplift of the western Rhenish shield and the Ardennes (western Europe). Tectonophysics 474, 696-708. Rixhon, G., et al., 2011. Quaternary river incision in NE Ardennes (Belgium): Insights from Be-10/Al-26 dating of rive terraces. Quaternary Geochronology 6

  7. Development of BASIC program for radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Kunio

    1982-01-01

    The continuous improvement of the system and the needs have produced the successful radiocarbon dating system of today to detect very low energy β-radioactivity. However, it still takes longer than 1,000 minutes for a sample counting. In a gas counting system, it is very difficult to keep the drift of impressed high voltage for a proportional counter less than 5 volts throughout the counting time. The temperature and the characteristics of gas itself also change during experiment. The accumulation of the above drift and errors are closely concerned with the accuracy and reliability of the radiocarbon date. The detection and reduction of the errors are only possible by using a ''fully automatic radiocarbon dating system'' linked to a personal computer system. In this paper, the author presents the BASIC (Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) program for a fully automatic radiocarbon dating system. In this paper, the outline of the system and software development are described. The details of the program include the description for gas-collection, gas-enclosing, plateau counting, β-ray counting, age calculation and data file maintenance. The author wrote numerous remark statements into the program so that it can be understood by users without detailed knowledge of the operation of a personal computer system or of the radiocarbon dating. Using this system, the author found that the radiocarbon dating has greatly progressed in speed and labour-saving, and that the accuracy and reliability of the date itself has also improved much than former manual systems. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Bullying Predicts Reported Dating Violence and Observed Qualities in Adolescent Dating Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wendy E; Wolfe, David A

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between reported bullying, reported dating violence, and dating relationship quality measured through couple observations was examined. Given past research demonstrating similarity between peer and dating contexts, we expected that bullying would predict negative dating experiences. Participants with dating experience (n = 585; 238 males, M(age) = 15.06) completed self-report assessments of bullying and dating violence perpetration and victimization. One month later, 44 opposite-sex dyads (M(age) = 15.19) participated in behavioral observations. In 10-min sessions, couples were asked to rank and discuss areas of relationship conflict while being video-recorded. Qualities of the relationship were later coded by trained observers. Regression analysis revealed that bullying positively predicted dating violence perpetration and victimization. Self-reported bullying also predicted observations of lower relationship support and higher withdrawal. Age and gender interactions further qualified these findings. The bullying of boys, but not girls, was significantly related to dating violence perpetration. Age interactions showed that bullying was positively predictive of dating violence perpetration and victimization for older, but not younger adolescents. Positive affect was also negatively predicted by bullying, but only for girls. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that adolescents carry forward strategies learned in the pee