WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmogenic 10be dating

  1. Deglaciation chronology in the Mérida Andes from cosmogenic 10Be dating, (Gavidia valley, Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Isandra; Audemard M., Franck A.; Carcaillet, Julien; Carrillo, Eduardo; Beck, Christian; Audin, Laurence

    2016-11-01

    In the Mérida Andes, a detailed deglaciation history reconstruction is difficult to achieve due to scattered deglaciation chronologies available. This paper contributes with 24 exposure ages of glacial landforms sampled in the Gavidia valley. Exposure ages were obtained based on terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide 10Be dating. Results indicate deglaciation mainly occurred between ∼21 ka and 16.5 ka and the complete deglaciation occurred at ∼16.0 ka. The glacier retreated in two different phases. The oldest one occurred since the LGM until middle OtD or the local climate event El Caballo Stadial. The youngest phase occurred at ages younger than ∼16.5 ka until complete deglaciation. A combination of topographic features and changes in the paleoclimate conditions at the end of the El Caballo Stadial seems leaded the fastest former glacier extinction. The topographic feature which seems contributed to the fastest glacier extinction was the low valley bottom slopes. In addition, exposure ages of the Gavidia valley were integrated with deglaciation chronologies from the central Mérida Andes to compare deglaciation histories. Asynchronous deglaciation histories were observed. Local paleotemperatures and paleoprecipitations contrasts, different valleys aspects, insolation and catchments steepness could explain different deglaciation histories.

  2. Morphogenetic evolution of the Têt river valley (eastern Pyrenees) using 10Be/21Ne cosmogenic burial dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartégou, Amandine; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Calvet, Marc; Zimmermann, Laurent; Tibari, Bouchaïb; Hez, Gabriel; Gunnell, Yanni; Aumaitre, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The rates and chronologies of valley incision are closely modulated by the tectonic uplift of active mountain ranges and were controlled by repeated climate changes during the Quaternary. The continental collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates induced a double vergence orogen, the Pyrenees, which has been considered as a mature mountain range in spite of significant seismicity (e.g. Chevrot et al., 2011) and evidence of neotectonics (e.g. Goula et al., 1999). Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that the range may have never reached a steady state (Ford et al., in press). One option for resolving this controversy is to quantify the incision rates since the Miocene by reconstructing the vertical movement of geometric markers such as fluvial terraces. However, the few available ages from the Pyrenean terrace systems do not exceed the middle Pleistocene. Thus, to enlarge the time span of this dataset, we studied alluvium-filled horizontal epiphreatic passages in limestone karstic networks. Such landforms are used as substitutes of fluvial terraces because they represent former valley floors (e.g. Palmer, 2007; Audra et al., 2013). They record the transient position of former local base levels during the process of valley deepening. The Têt river valley (southern Pyrenees) was studied near the Villefranche-de-Conflent limestone gorge where 8 cave levels have been recognized over a vertical height of 600 meters. Given that 26Al/10Be cosmogenic burial dating in this setting was limited to the last ~5 Ma (Calvet et al., 2015), here we used the cosmogenic 10Be/21Ne method in order to restore a more complete chronology of valley incision (e.g. Balco & Shuster, 2009; McPhilipps et al., 2016). Burial age results for alluvial deposits from 12 caves document incision rates since the Langhian (~14 Ma). Preliminary results indicate a history of valley deepening in successive stages. The data show a regular incision rate of 70-80 mm/a from the Langhian to the Messinian

  3. In situ cosmogenic 10Be dating of the Quaternary glaciations in the southern Shaluli Mountain on the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jian; Raisbeck; Grand; XU; Xiaobin; Yiou; Francios; BAI; Shibiao

    2006-01-01

    It is generally considered that four-times ice age happened during the Quaternary epoch on the Tibetan Plateau.However,the research on the chronology of the four-times ice age is far from enough.The Shaluli Mountain on the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau is an ideal place for plaeo-glacier study,because there are abundant Quaternary glacial remains there.This paper discusses the ages of the Quaternary glaciations,based on the exposure dating of roche moutonnée,moraines and glacial erosion surfaces using in situ cosmogenic isotopes 10Be.It is found that the exposure age of the roche moutonnée at Tuershan is 15 ka,corresponding to Stage 2 of the deep-sea oxygen isotope,suggesting that the roche moutonnée at Tuershan is formed in the last glacial maximum.The exposure age of glacial erosion surface at Laolinkou is 130-160 ka,corresponding to Stage 6 of the deep-sea oxygen isotope.The oldest end moraine at Kuzhaori may form at 421-766 kaBP,corresponding to Stages 12-18 of the deep-sea oxygen isotope.In accordance with the climate characteristic of stages 12,14,16 and 18 reflected by the deep-sea oxygen isotope,polar ice cores and loess sequence,the oldest end moraine at Kuzhaori may form at stage 12 or stage 16,the latter is more possible.

  4. Shortening rates across the foothills of the Western Kunlun (Xinjiang, China) inferred from geomorphic measurements and cosmogenic 10Be dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudroy, T.; van der Woerd, J.; Li, H.; Barrier, L.; Tapponnier, P.; Simoes, M.; Thuizat, R.; Pan, J.; Si, J.; Xu, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Western Kunlun, which bounds north-western Tibetan Plateau, is one of the largest mountain range of Asia, with altitudes peaking at 6500-7500 m asl, and crustal thicknesses of up to ~70 km. North of the plateau, in the foreland of the range, an active fold-and-thrust belt extends 200 km into the Tarim basin, but remains poorly documented regarding amounts of shortening or deformation rates. We discuss the distribution of deformation on the basis of a study of specific foreland folds and faults using high resolution satellite imagery, digital elevation models, seismic reflection data, on-site topographic measurements and cosmogenic isotope dating. South of Hotan city, the 250 km-long Tekelike Fault - the mountain-front thrust that dips beneath the 45 km-wide, 5400m-high Tekelike Range, a basement ramp-anticline - cuts and offsets terraces abandoned by the Karakash River. 10Be concentrations of surface and sub-surface samples from these terraces upper-most deposits yield an exposure age of about 100 kyr for the upper terrace that lies 140 m above the present river bed, implying an incision rate of 1.4 mm/yr. Assuming a dip of 45 +/-15° and neglecting changes in river dynamics over this time period, this age would imply a minimum, average shortening rate of 1.4 +/- 0.7 mm/yr across the thrust. Farther North, 100 to 200 km-long WNW-ESE trending anticlines deform the thick Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary series lying in the foreland of the range. The 150 km-long, 35 km-wide Yecheng-Pishan anticline folds Plio-Quaternary molasses. Drainages crossing this growing anticline have abandoned flights of inset terraces on the sides of wind-gaps. The maximum elevation of the highest terrace above local drainage is about 350m. Near Pishan city, flat, well-preserved terrace surfaces are covered by thin loess, in turn capped by loose gravel pavement. On the uppermost two terraces of this valley, 70 and 120 meters-high, cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in surface and sub

  5. Consideration of geomorphological uncertainties with terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND): combining Schmidt-hammer and 10Be dating, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    As the importance of glaciers as key indicators of global change has increased during recent years, investigating Holocene glaciers chronologies has gained higher attention accordingly. One reason is the need for a better understanding of the climate - glacier relationship. Comparative studies play a major role in this field of research owing to the natural diversity of glacier behaviour. Detailed Holocene glacier chronologies are, furthermore, necessary to verify and eventually adjust glacier models indispensable for many attempts to predict future glacier changes. The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the few key study areas on the Southern Hemisphere where, in general, evidence is still sparse compared to its Northern counterpart. Improvement and reassessment of the Late Holocene glacier chronology in this region is, therefore, an important goal of current research. Recently, terrestrial (in situ) cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating has been increasingly applied to Holocene moraines in New Zealand and elsewhere. In the context of numerical ("absolute") dating techniques, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) seems to have been established as an alternative to the previously dominating radiocarbon (14C) dating of organic material (plant remains, organic-rich soil layers etc.) buried beneath or within moraines. Precision and time resolution achieved by the newest laboratory standards and procedures (Schaefer et al. 2009) is truly a milestone and will promote future attempts of TCND in any comparable context. Maybe, TCND has the potential to at least partially replace radiocarbon (14C) dating in its dominating role for the "absolute" dating of Holocene glacial deposits. By contrast, field sampling for TCND often lacks appropriate consideration of geomorphological uncertainties. Whereas much effort is made with the high precision results achieved in the laboratory, the choice of boulders sampled on Holocene moraines is often purely made

  6. The deep accumulation of 10Be at Utsira, southwestern Norway: Implications for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating in peripheral ice sheet landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, Jason P.; Goehring, Brent M.; Mangerud, Jan; Svendsen, John Inge

    2016-09-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is a widely used method for constraining past ice sheet histories. We scrutinize a recently published data set of cosmogenic 10Be data from erratic boulders in Norway used to constrain the deglaciation of the western Scandinavian Ice Sheet to 20 ka. Our model of the 10Be inventory in glacial surfaces leads us to conclude that the chronology may be afflicted by the deep subsurface accumulation of 10Be during long-lasting ice-free periods that resulted in 10Be ages >10% too old. We suggest that the majority of the dated erratic boulders contain a uniform level of inherited muon-produced 10Be and were derived from bedrock depths >2.5 m and most likely ~4 m. The implication of our finding is that for landscapes that experience long ice-free periods between brief maximum glacial phases, glacial erosion of >5 m is required to remove detectable traces of inherited 10Be.

  7. Fossil debris-covered glaciers in Demanda Sierra (Northern Spain): geomorphological research and 10Be cosmogenic exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fernández, José M.; Palacios, David; Andrés, Nuria; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Gómez-Villar, Amelia; Santos-González, Javier; Álvarez-Martínez, Javier; Arnáez, José; Úbeda, José; García-Ruiz, José M.

    2017-04-01

    The Demanda Sierra, at altitudes above 2000 m.a.s.l., is located in the Iberian Range (Northern Iberian Peninsula, 42°15' N). The main divide extends from west to east between 3°25' W and 2°52' W. The most relevant evidences of Pleistocene glaciation are found in small cirques above 1800 m a.s.l., most of them in the northern face. These cirques hosted small-size glaciers with ice tongues fossil debris-covered glaciers. To elucidate such a complex issue, two north-facing cirques in the Mencilla Peak (42°11'11" N, 3°18'45" W; 1932 m a.s.l.) and a southeast-facing cirque in the San Lorenzo Peak (42°14'28" N, 2°58'31" W; 2261 m a.s.l.) have been selected as they host similar block accumulations. The aim of this paper is: 1) to identify the debris-covered glacier features in such block accumulations; 2) to present the chronology obtained for the first time from debris-covered glaciers and to put them in the context of deglaciation in the Iberian Range and in the Iberian Peninsula and the Mediterranean mountains; 3) to analyze the glacier evolution during the deglaciation. To carry out these objectives, different methodological approaches and techniques have been applied: 1) detailed geomorphological mapping at 1:1000 scale over stereoscopic pairs, high-resolution LIDAR Digital Elevation Models and fieldwork to identify glacial and debris-covered glacier features (e.g. moraines, ridges, furrows, etc.); 2) Cosmogenic Exposure Dating (CED), 10Be, applied to 18 quartzite samples taken from stable boulders over moraine ridges or fossil debris-covered glaciers; 3) glacier reconstruction for modelling the glacier evolution at different stages; 4) Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) calculation. The results obtained show that the large chaotic block accumulations are fossil debris-covered glaciers given the numerous longitudinal ridges and furrows. These fossil debris-covered glaciers consist of a relatively thin debris mantle (<2 m thick), deposited over the residual ice

  8. Surface exposure dating with cosmogenic 10Be of Late Holocene rock avalanches onto glaciers in the Mont Blanc massif, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deline, Philip; Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter W.

    2013-04-01

    Rock avalanching represents a potential high risk for growing infrastructure and people living in high mountain areas. This hazardous process is due to steep slopes, high relief, intensive rock fracturing, seismicity, paraglacial control, periglacial climatic conditions and the presence and interaction of snow, glaciers, and permafrost. The timing of rock avalanche recurrence intervals and the recognition of their spatial extension are essential. Very steep and elevated slopes on the Italian flank of the Mont Blanc massif are prone to rock avalanches (RAs) which travel onto glaciers. Whereas small RAs occurred in the Glacier du Miage basin during the 20th Century (the latest in July 2012), large RAs (volume > 1 M m3) travelled repeatedly onto Glaciers de Triolet, Frébouge, and la Brenva during the late Holocene The nature of the granitic deposit which largely overlaps the bottom of the upper Val Ferret over 2 km has been discussed since the 19th century. This extensive deposit was attributed to either glacial, or a September 12th 1717 AD rock avalanche, or a complex mixture of glacial, earlier RA and 1717 RA origin. Surface exposure dating of 16 boulders of the deposit shows that the 1717 RA, covering the whole upper Ferret valley floor, was one of the largest late Holocene RAs of the Alps, with a rock volume of 10-15 M m3 and a likely similar volume of glacier ice travelling more than 7 km downvalley. Two main RA deposits are lying downstream of the Glacier de Frébouge: a sheet of granite boulders with an open-work structure covers the south side of the Val Ferret, which ran > 100 m up the opposite metasedimentary side of the valley; a smaller RA deposit is located at the south and east margins of the large Frébouge polygenic fan. Surface exposure dating of 7 granite boulders of these deposits could in particular confirm whether the larger RA occurred sometime between 991 and 1154 AD, as suggested by a radiocarbon-dated piece of wood. Large RAs (volume > 2 M m3

  9. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  10. Reconstruction of the rock fall/avalanche frequency in the Mont Blanc massif since the Last Glacial Maximum. New results using 10Be cosmogenic dating and reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallach, Xavi; Ogier, Christophe; Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip; Carcaillet, Julien

    2017-04-01

    ., Brandová, D., Haeberli, W., Ivy-Ochs, S., Christl, M., Kubik, P.W., Deline, P. (2008). Comparison of exposure ages and spectral propierties of rock surfaces in steep, high alpine rock walls of Aiguille du Midi, France. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Permafrost, 143-148. Gallach, X. et al. (submitted). Timing of rockfalls in the Mont Blanc massif (western Alps). Evidences from surface exposure dating with cosmogenic 10Be. Landslides.

  11. Climatic and topographic controls on the style and timing of Late Quaternary glaciation throughout Tibet and the Himalaya defined by 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Barnard, P.L.; Haizhou, Ma; Asahi, K.; Caffee, M.W.; Derbyshire, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in glacier cover throughout the Late Quaternary in Tibet and the bordering mountains are poorly defined because of the inaccessibility and vastness of the region, and the lack of numerical dating. To help reconstruct the timing and extent of glaciation throughout Tibet and the bordering mountains, we use geomorphic mapping and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface dating in study areas in southeastern (Gonga Shan), southern (Karola Pass) and central (Western Nyainqentanggulha Shan and Tanggula Shan) Tibet, and we compare these with recently determined numerical chronologies in other parts of the plateau and its borderlands. Each of the study regions receives its precipitation mainly during the south Asian summer monsoon when it falls as snow at high altitudes. Gonga Shan receives the most precipitation (>2000 mm a-1) while, near the margins of monsoon influence, the Karola Pass receives moderate amounts of precipitation (500-600 mm a-1) and, in the interior of the plateau, little precipitation falls on the western Nyainqentanggulha Shan (???300 mm a -1) and the Tanggula Shan (400-700 mm a-1). The higher precipitation values for the Tanggula Shan are due to strong orographic effects. In each region, at least three sets of moraines and associated landforms are preserved, providing evidence for multiple glaciations. The 10Be CRN surface exposure dating shows that the formation of moraines in Gonga Shan occurred during the early-mid Holocene, Neoglacial and Little Ice Age, on the Karola Pass during the Lateglacial, Early Holocene and Neoglacial, in the Nyainqentanggulha Shan date during the early part of the last glacial cycle, global Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial, and on the Tanggula Shan during the penultimate glacial cycle and the early part of the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraine succession in each of these regions varies from the early Holocene (Gonga Shan), Lateglacial (Karola Pass), early Last Glacial (western

  12. 10Be dating of Neogene halite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmaker, Reuven; Lazar, Boaz; Beer, Jürg; Christl, Marcus; Tepelyakov, Natalya; Stein, Mordechai

    2013-12-01

    Direct radioactive dating of ancient halite formations is difficult because this mineral typically lacks conventionally datable material. We describe an attempt to date Neogene halite using the cosmogenic isotope 10Be (T1/2 = 1.39 Ma). We dated marine-derived salt deposits from the Sedom and Amora (The Hebrew forms of Sodom and Gomorrah) Formations, Dead Sea basin, Israel. To verify whether Be is incorporated into marine halite we measured the stable isotope 9Be, 7Be (the short lived “cosmogenic brother” of 10Be having T1/2 = 53.3 d), and 10Be in evaporation pans of sea-salt production plants. The data suggest that seawater beryllium is incorporated into the halite with a halite-brine distribution coefficient, (KD) of about unity. A 10Be/9Be decay curve constructed for Sedom Formation halite yielded an age that lies in the range of ∼2-6 Ma. The 10Be decay curve constructed for Sedom Formation halite yielded an age that lies in the range of 3-5 Ma. This age is consistent with previous estimates of the Sedom Formation age. Furthermore, this age lies in the same range of 10Be in situ ages obtained on the lacustrine Erq El Ahmer Formation located in the northern Jordan Valley. This may imply that during the Mid Pliocene the Sedom Lagoon, the water-body that deposited the Sedom Formation, might have been already disconnected from the open sea.

  13. Pleistocene uplift, climate and morphological segmentation of the Northern Chile coasts (24°S-32°S): Insights from cosmogenic 10Be dating of paleoshorelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinod, Joseph; Regard, Vincent; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Aguilar, German; Guillaume, Benjamin; Carretier, Sébastien; Cortés-Aranda, Joaquín; Leanni, Laetitia; Hérail, Gérard

    2016-12-01

    We present new cosmogenic (10Be) exposure ages obtained on Pleistocene marine abrasion shore terraces of Northern Chile between 24°S and 32°S in order to evaluate the temporal and spatial variability of uplift rates along the coastal forearc. Both the dispersion of cosmogenic concentrations in samples from the same terrace and data obtained in vertical profiles show that onshore erosion rates, following emergence of paleoshorelines, approached 1 m/Myr. Therefore, minimum ages calculated without considering onshore erosion may be largely underestimated for Middle Pleistocene terraces. The elevation of the last interglacial (MIS-5) paleoshoreline is generally between 25 and 45 m amsl, suggesting that the entire coast of the study area has been uplifting during the Upper Pleistocene at rates approaching 0.3 mm/yr. Available ages for Middle Pleistocene terraces suggest similar uplift rates, except in the Altos de Talinay area where uplift may have been accelerated by the activity of the Puerto Aldea Fault. The maximum elevation of Pleistocene paleoshorelines is generally close to 250 m and there is no higher older Neogene marine sediment, which implies that uplift accelerated during the Pleistocene following a period of coastal stability or subsidence. We observe that the coastal morphology largely depends on the latitudinal climatic variability. North of 26.75°S, the coast is characterized by the presence of a high scarp associated with small and poorly preserved paleoshorelines at its foot. The existence of the coastal scarp in the northern part of the study area is permitted by the hyper-arid climate of the Atacama Desert. This particular morphology may explain why paleoshorelines evidencing coastal uplift are poorly preserved between 26.75°S and 24°S despite Upper Pleistocene uplift rates being comparable with those prevailing in the southern part of the study area.

  14. Using 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating to determine the evolution of the Purgatorio active fault in the Andean forearc, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Benavente; Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Fabrizio, Delgado; Marianne, Saillard; Sarah, Hall R.; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Active transpressive deformation has been occurring along the Andean hyperarid forearc for the last 3 Myrs but many of these faults are still not described even if able to produce large damaging earthquakes. Active faulting along the northern part of the Arica Bend can be recognized due to the presence of well-preserved and sharp fault scarps indicating recent surface slip. During the Mio-Pliocene, deposition within the forearc continental basins resulted in the formation of vast fan deposits and conglomerates of the Moquegua Formation, which can be considered as bedrock in this exposure study (~45-4 Ma; Tosdal et al., 1984; Sebrier et al., 1988a; Roperch et al., 2006). The typical vertical Purgatorio fault scarps offset both the Moquegua bedrock and several younger geomorphic features associated with Moquegua formation outcroping vertically along the fault scarp. These samples are well-suited to the application of in situ produced cosmogenic radionuclides for surface exposure dating, as the hyperarid region has extremely low erosion rates. We sampled the scarp away from any significant drainage so as to avoid possibly disturbed areas. The sampling did involve extracting quarzite conglomeratic material along the bedrock scarp and on the upper surrounding crests. The aim has been to measure Berylium-20 TCN (Terrestrial in situ Cosmogenic Nuclides) concentrations to determine exposure age as a function of height on the scarp. This has been successfully employed on one scarp in Italy based on Chlorine-36 TCN (Palumbo et al., 2004). However, slow faults behaviour remains unclear and more contributions are needed. Quaternary activity of the Purgatorio fault system was evidenced by Hall et al. (2008). They highlighted a vertical offset of about ~100 m for a pediment surface intercepted by the fault, and dated at ~280 ka. Considering that the pediment surface is horizontal, this would gave a maximum of ~0.3 mm/yr of vertical deformation since 280 ka. Our new data provide

  15. Production Rate of Cosmogenic 10Be in Magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, D. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Riebe, C. S.; Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be is widely used for determining exposure ages, soil production rates, and catchment-wide erosion rates. To date, measurements have been almost exclusively in the mineral quartz (SiO2), which is resistant to weathering and easily cleaned of meteoric 10Be contamination. However, this limits the method to quartz-bearing rocks and requires specialized laboratories due to the need for large quantities of hydrofluoric acid (HF). Here, we present initial results for 10Be production in the mineral magnetite (Fe3O4). Magnetite offers several advantages over quartz; it is (1) present in mafic rocks, (2) easily collected in the field, (3) quickly and easily separated in the lab, and (4) digested without HF. In addition, 10Be can be measured in both detrital quartz and magnetite from the same catchment to yield information about the intensity of chemical weathering (Rogers et al., this conference). The 10Be production rate in magnetite relative to quartz was determined for a granitic boulder from Mt. Evans, Colorado, USA. The boulder was crushed and homogenized to facilitate production rate comparisons among various minerals. We separated magnetite using a combination of hand magnets, froth flotation, and a variety of selective chemical dissolutions in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate solution, 5% nitric acid (HNO3) and 1% HF/HNO3. Six aliquots of magnetite were analyzed for 10Be and compared to quartz. Three aliquots that were not exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 were contaminated with meteoric 10Be, probably associated with residual mica. Three aliquots that were exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 treatments agreed to within 2% measurement uncertainty. Our preliminary results indicate that the relative production rate by mass of 10Be in magnetite and quartz is 0.462 × 0.012. Our results are similar to theoretically predicted values. Recently updated excitation functions for neutron and proton spallation reactions allow us to partition 10Be production in quartz and magnetite among

  16. Combination of in situ cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) and Schmidt-hammer dating for the investigation of Late-Holocene lateral moraines in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, S.

    2009-04-01

    absolute' age of the boulder surfaces was needed to allow the construction of a dating curve by reliable fixed points to, radiocarbon (14C) dating could not provide those information because of the lack of organic material indisputable be related to the glacier advance forming the moraine ridges. On base on these considerations, this study comprises the first attempt to combine in situ (terrestrial) cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating with Schmidt-hammer measurements for the dating of Holocene moraines and the reconstruction of a regional glacier chronology. Cosmogenic 10Be dating has the important advantage of delivering an ‘absolute' age for the exposure of boulder or bedrock surfaces, i.e. the same surface tested with the Schmidt-hammer. One disadvantage of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is, however, the limited number of boulders sampled due to high costs. From this background, a combination with the Schmidt-hammer technique seems ideal as the latter could provide measurement of a large number of boulders. The Schmidt-hammer measurements can, on the other hand, help with the selection of representative boulders for cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating avoiding boulders that have been exposed to post-depositional movement (e.g. rotation). Results from the application of this combined ‘multi-proxy-approach' at Strauchon Glacier in Westland/Tai Poutini National Park and Hooker Glacier in Mt Cook/Aoraki National Park on large lateral moraine complex with several individual moraine ridges proof its potential. Three pre-‘Little Ice Age' moraine sequences each related to an individual Late-Holocene Little Ice Age-type event unambiguously distinguished by Schmidt-hammer measurements provides cosmogenic (10Be) ages of 2,400/2,500 a BP, c. 1,700 a BP, and c. 1,000/1,100 a BP. The preliminary construction of a dating curve based on both Schmidt-hammer and cosmogenic (10Be) dating results shows high significance and confirms the successful

  17. Cosmogenic 26Al/10Be surface production ratio in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Caffee, Marc W.; Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Woodruff, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    The assumed value for the cosmogenic 26Al/10Be surface production rate ratio in quartz is an important parameter for studies investigating the burial or subaerial erosion of long-lived surfaces and sediments. Recent models and data suggest that the production ratio is spatially variable and may be greater than originally thought. Here we present measured 26Al/10Be ratios for 24 continuously exposed bedrock and boulder surfaces spanning 61-77°N in Greenland. Empirical measurements, such as ours, include nuclides produced predominately by neutron-induced spallation with percent-level contributions by muon interactions. The slope of a York regression line fit to our data is 7.3 ± 0.3 (1σ), suggesting that the 26Al/10Be surface production ratio exceeds the commonly used value of 6.75, at least in the Arctic. A higher 26Al/10Be production ratio has implications for multinuclide cosmogenic isotope studies because it results in greater modeled burial durations and erosion rates.

  18. Evaluating the reliability of Late Quaternary landform ages: Integrating 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating with U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate on alluvial and fluvial deposits, Sonoran desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    To assess the reliability of Quaternary age determinations of alluvial and fluvial deposits across the Sonoran Desert (Coachella Valley and Anza Borrego) in southern California, we applied both 10Be exposure age dating of surface clasts and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate from subsurface clast-coatings to the same deposits. We consider agreement between dates from the two techniques to indicate reliable age estimates because each technique is subject to distinct assumptions and therefore their systematic uncertainties are largely independent. 10Be exposure dates should yield maximum ages when no correction is made for inheritance and post-depositional erosion is negligible. U-series dating, in contrast, provides minimum dates because pedogenic carbonate forms after deposition. Our results show that: (1) For deposits ca. 70 ka or younger, 10Be and U-series dates were generally concordant. We note, however, that in most cases U-series soil dates exceed 10Be exposure dates that are corrected for inheritance when using 10Be in modern alluvium. This suggests that 10Be concentrations of modern alluvium may exceed the 10Be acquired by late Pleistocene deposits during fluvial transport and hillslope residence (i.e., Pleistocene inherited 10Be). (2) For deposits older than ~70 ka, U-series dates are significantly younger than the 10Be dates. This implies that U-series dates in this region may significantly underestimate the depositional age of older alluvium, probably because of delayed onset of deposition, slow accumulation, or poor preservation of secondary carbonate in response to climatic controls. Thus, whenever possible, multiple dating methods should be applied to obtain reliable ages for late Quaternary deposits.

  19. Constraining processes of landscape change with combined in situ cosmogenic 14C-10Be analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Reconstructing Quaternary landscape evolution today frequently builds upon cosmogenic-nuclide surface exposure dating. However, the study of complex surface exposure chronologies on the 102-104 years' timescale remains challenging with the commonly used long-lived radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl). In glacial settings, key points are the inheritance of nuclides accumulated in a rock surface during a previous exposure episode and (partial) shielding of a rock surface after the main deglaciation event, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance. Combining the short-lived in situ cosmogenic 14C isotope with 10Be dating provides a valuable approach to resolve and quantify complex exposure histories and burial episodes within Lateglacial and Holocene timescales. The first studies applying the in situ14C-10Be pair have demonstrated the great benefit from in situ14C analysis for unravelling complex glacier chronologies in various glacial environments worldwide. Moreover, emerging research on in situ14C in sedimentary systems highlights the capacity of combined in situ14C-10Be analysis to quantify sediment transfer times in fluvial catchments or to constrain changes in surface erosion rates. Nevertheless, further methodological advances are needed to obtain truly routine and widely available in situ14C analysis. Future development in analytical techniques has to focus on improving the analytical reproducibility, reducing the background level and determining more accurate muonic production rates. These improvements should allow extending the field of applications for combined in situ14C-10Be analysis in Earth surface sciences and open up a number of promising applications for dating young sedimentary deposits and the quantification of recent changes in surface erosion dynamics.

  20. Controls on the distribution of cosmogenic 10Be across shore platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Martin D.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ellis, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying rates of erosion on cliffed coasts across a range of timescales is vital for understanding the drivers and processes of coastal change and for assessing risks posed by future cliff retreat. Historical records cover at best the last 150 years; cosmogenic isotopes, such as 10Be could allow us to look further into the past to assess coastal change on millennial timescales. Cosmogenic isotopes accumulate in situ near the Earth surface and have been used extensively to quantify erosion rates, burial dates and surface exposure ages in terrestrial landscapes over the last 3 decades. More recently, applications in rocky coast settings have quantified the timing of mass wasting events, determined long-term averaged rates of cliff retreat and revealed the exposure history of shore platforms. In this contribution, we develop and explore a numerical model for the accumulation of 10Be on eroding shore platforms. In a series of numerical experiments, we investigated the influence of topographic and water shielding, dynamic platform erosion processes, the presence and variation in beach cover, and heterogeneous distribution of erosion on the distribution of 10Be across shore platforms. Results demonstrate that, taking into account relative sea level change and tides, the concentration of 10Be is sensitive to rates of cliff retreat. Factors such as topographic shielding and beach cover act to reduce 10Be concentrations on the platform and may result in overestimation of cliff retreat rates if not accounted for. The shape of the distribution of 10Be across a shore platform can potentially reveal whether cliff retreat rates are declining or accelerating through time. Measurement of 10Be in shore platforms has great potential to allow us to quantify long-term rates of cliff retreat and platform erosion.

  1. Long-term cosmogenic 10Be catchment-wide erosion rates in the Kruger National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Paape, Alexander; Reinwarth, Bastian; Baade, Jussi; Miller, Jordan; Rowntree, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In this study we estimated long-term catchment-wide erosion rates in the central and southern Kruger National Park with cosmogenic 10Be analyses. Samples were collected in small catchments (2-100 km2) upstream of dams, which were used to determine short-term sediment yield rates. 10Be-derived erosion rates vary from 4-15 mm/kyr. Although there are significant site-specific differences in geomorphic parameters and precipitation we could not identify a single parameter controlling long-term erosion. Geomorphic fieldwork reveals that an unknown fraction of sampled sand-sized channel sediments derived from partly extensive and up to a few-meters deep gully erosion, which may lead to an overestimation of 10Be-derived erosion rates. Cosmogenic nuclide production is rapidly decreasing with depth and consequently the measured 10Be concentration of stream sediments is a mixture of (i) sand with high 10Be concentration from colluvial creep or sheet flow from hillslopes and (ii) sand with low 10Be concentration from gully erosion. To correct erosion rates, we quantify sediments derived from gullies using a combination of mapping gullies using remote sensing data and field work and geochemical characterisation of intact hillslopes and gully side walls.

  2. Chronology of Tropical Glaciation from Cosmogenic Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Farber, D. L.; Seltzer, G. O.; Finkel, R. C.; Rodbell, D. T.

    2002-12-01

    Moraines from multiple glaciations dating back more than a million years are preserved in deglaciated valleys bordering the Junin Plain in the Peruvian Andes. We have used cosmogenic dating (10Be) of boulders on moraines in Alcacocha Valley (S 11° 03', W 75° 58', elev. ~4100-4800 m) to identify deposits ranging in age from the last glaciation (~12-33 ka) to >1.5 Ma. This may be the longest and most detailed record of tropical glaciation yet produced. In Alcacocha Valley, lateral moraines of several older glaciations are considerably larger and extend farther downvalley than end moraines of the last glacial maximum. Preservation of the older moraines and of polished surfaces on some old boulders argues for extremely low boulder erosion rates. We estimate a maximum erosion rate of ~0.3 m/Myr, which approaches published rates for Antarctica and suggests that aridity is important in slowing boulder erosion. Our findings are consistent with results from other Andean locations, such as the Cordillera Real in Bolivia, where moraines of older glaciations are also more extensive than those of the last glacial maximum. Tectonics, climate, or a combination of both may have been responsible for the apparent decrease in glacial extent and ice volume in the Junin Plain during the Quaternary. A late Tertiary pulse of tectonism may have resulted in an increase in high-elevation topography in the Junin region, allowing growth of large ice masses. The subsequent trend in decreasing ice volume could have been caused by either a decrease in the area of high-elevation topography through glacial erosion or a decrease in the amplitude of climate variability. These hypotheses could be tested by analyzing the sediment record preserved in the Junin basin.

  3. Understanding complex exposure history of Mount Hampton, West Antarctica using cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 10Be in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Ana; Rodes, Angel; Stuart, Finlay; Smellie, John

    2016-04-01

    Combining stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides is an established tool for revealing the complexities of long-term landscape development. To date most studies have concentrated on 21Ne and 10Be in quartz. We have combined different chemical protocols for extraction of cosmogenic 10Be from olivine, and measured concentrations in olivine from lherzolite xenoliths from the peak of Mount Hampton (~3,200 m), an 11 Ma shield volcano on the West Antarctic rift flank. We combine this data with cosmogenic 3He (and 21Ne) in the olivines in order to unravel the long-term environmental history of the region. The mean 3He/21Ne ratio (1.98 ± 0.22) is consistent with the theoretical value and previous determinations. 10Be/3He ratios (0.012 to 0.018) are significantly lower than the instantaneous production ratio (~0.045). The data are consistent with 1-3 Ma of burial. The altitude of the volcano rules out over-topping of the peak by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet only possible burial could be generated by the growth of an ice cap although this contradicts the absence of evidence for ice cover. The 3He-10Be data can also be generated during episodic erosion of the volcanic ash over the last few million years. The data requires a minimum depth of 1 to 2.5 m for the samples during a minimum age of 5 Ma and maximum long-term erosion rate of ~0.5 m/Ma with at least one erosive episode reflecting short-term erosion rate of ~7 m/Ma that would have brought the samples into the surface during the last ~350 ka. Erosion in this type of landscape could be related to interglacial periods where cryostatic erosion can occur generating an increase in the erosion rate. This study shows that episodic erosion can produce stable-radioactive cosmogenic isotope systematics that are similar to those generated by exposure-burial cycles.

  4. Cosmogenic 10Be Age Constraints on the Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Wohlfarth, B.; Lunkka, J.

    2011-12-01

    An important question in climate science is how ice sheets will respond to a climate warmer than present. Because our understanding of how these changes will occur remains limited, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a climate warmer than present along with understanding their contribution to sea-level rise. We will present new cosmogenic 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. By constraining the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, we will establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, improving our understanding of ice-sheet response to warming climates.

  5. Cosmogenic 10Be, 21Ne and 36Cl in sanidine and quartz from Chilean ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kober, F.; Alfimov, V.; Kubik, P. W.; Synal, H.-A.

    2007-06-01

    Our initial results indicate that three cosmogenic nuclides: 10Be, 21Ne and 36Cl can be analyzed in sanidine. To uncover complex exposure histories or marked changes in denudation rates over time several nuclides with different half-lives (or stable) must be measured. Because of its shorter half-life, the combination of 36Cl and a long-lived nuclide 10Be or stable nuclide 21Ne will provide more information than the pairs 10Be and 26Al or 10Be and 21Ne (in quartz). Sanidine (alkali feldspar) is a common high temperature mineral and often dominates the phenocryst assemblage in silicic to intermediate volcanic rocks. Bedrock surfaces studied come from the Oxaya (erupted 19-23 Ma) and Lauca (erupted 2.7 Ma) ignimbrites of northern Chile. Quartz and sanidine phenocrysts coexist; therefore, we can check the viability of sanidine through direct comparison with nuclide concentrations in quartz. In addition, as quartz has no target for 36Cl in significant abundance we show that the unique power of sanidine is that 36Cl can be measured. We have obtained very good agreement between 10Be and 21Ne concentrations measured in sanidine and coexisting quartz. No meteoric 10Be was apparent in these sanidines. Concentrations of all three nuclides in mineral separates from rock sample CN309 from the Lauca ignimbrite in the Western Cordillera agree well and correspond to minimum exposure ages of 30-50 ka. 10Be and 21Ne measured in both sanidine and quartz from three rock samples from the Oxaya ignimbrite (CN19, CN23, CN104a) in the Western Escarpment record low average landscape modification rates (<0.70 m/Ma) over the last several million years. In contrast, 36Cl data from sanidine in CN23 seem to indicate shorter minimum exposures and more rapid maximum erosion rates.

  6. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of glaciofluvial deposits: insights from the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasily; Claude, Anne; Reber, Regina; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Schlunegger, Fritz; Rahn, Meinert; Dehnert, Andreas; Schlüchter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al can be employed to reconstruct the chronology of sediment layers. Accumulation of these can be used to exposure date the sediment layer as the variation of cosmogenic nuclide concentration with depth can be modeled. Decay of 10Be and 26Al in the samples from a well-defined single bed in a deposit enables the modeling of the post-burial component and the determination of the 26Al/10Be at the time of burial. The isochron-burial age can then be calculated from the initial and the measured ratios. In this study, we focus on the depth-profile and isochron-burial dating of the oldest Quaternary deposits of the Alpine Foreland. These are called Swiss Deckenschotter (cover gravels) as they build mesa-type hill tops on the Mesozoic or Cenozoic bedrock of the Swiss Alpine forelands. Deckenschotter consists of glaciofluvial gravel layers intercalated with glacial and/or overbank deposits. Although previously morphostratigraphically correlated with Günz and Mindel glaciations of Penck and Brückner, the Swiss Deckenschotter is likely much older, and their chronostratigraphy is not well constrained. In order to reconstruct the chronology of these deposits, we studied two Deckenschotter outcrops in abandoned gravel pits in Mandach (507 m a.s.l.) and Siglistorf (530 m a.s.l.) in canton Zurich. We collected four samples from Mandach for 10Be analysis and more than 30 clasts of different lithology, shape and size from a single stratigraphic horizon in Siglistorf among which we processed 19 clasts for 10Be and 26Al analysis. 10Be concentrations of the Mandach samples vary between 10000 and 30000 at/g. Based on these, we calculated a modal depth-profile age of around 1.0 Ma. Among Siglistorf samples, four did not yield successful 26Al measurements and two were unsuccessful for 10Be. Most of the samples have low nuclide concentrations, i.e. <20000 10Be at/g and <150000 26Al at/g. The 26Al/10Be ratio of eight samples was above the surface ratio of 6

  7. An improved experimental determination of cosmogenic 10Be/ 21Ne and 26Al/ 21Ne production ratios in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethals, M. M.; Hetzel, R.; Niedermann, S.; Wittmann, H.; Fenton, C. R.; Kubik, P. W.; Christl, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2009-06-01

    The confidence in surface exposure dating and related research, such as erosion rate studies or burial dating, strongly depends on the accuracy and precision of the currently used production rates of in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides. Reducing the uncertainties of nuclide production rates by more accurate calibrations with independently dated natural rock surfaces is crucial for further improving the quantification of earth surface processes. Here we use surface samples from the 760 ± 2 ka old Bishop Tuff in eastern California to quantify the 10Be/ 21Ne and 26Al/ 21Ne production rate ratios in quartz. Our determination is based on (1) measured nuclide concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be, 21Ne, and 26Al, (2) a conservative estimate for the erosion of the tuff in the Volcanic Tableland area, which we base on our previously published 21Ne concentrations [Goethals, M.M., Niedermann, S., Hetzel, R., Fenton, C.R., 2009. Determining the impact of faulting on the rate of erosion in a low-relief landscape: A case study using in situ produced 21Ne on active normal faults in the Bishop Tuff, California. Geomorphology 103, 401-413] and a conservative estimate for the uncertainty of the 21Ne production rate, and (3) the assumption of steady-state erosion. Other assumptions, such as the applied scaling procedure, the muon contribution to nuclide production, or the attenuation lengths of neutrons and muons in rock, do not substantially affect the results. Based on 13 samples, the following average production rate ratios and conservative uncertainty estimates are obtained for sea level, high latitude, open sky, and rock surface: 0.249 ± 0.009 or 0.232 ± 0.009 for 10Be/ 21Ne using 10Be half-lives of 1.51 and 1.39 Ma, respectively, and 1.80 ± 0.09 for 26Al/ 21Ne (for an 26Al half-life of 0.72 Ma). The 10Be/ 21Ne and the 26Al/ 21Ne production ratios are consistent with currently used production rates but the ratios are much more precise than previous determinations. The

  8. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potential for dating land surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-07-01

    To exploit natural sedimentary archives and geomorphic landforms it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. This paper explores the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric 10Be in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or the surface exposure determination using in situ produced 10Be). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric 10Be and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of 10Be deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric 10Be deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant 10Be input for the Central Alps, and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the 10Be inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the 10Be input agreed reasonably well with the age using surface exposure or radiocarbon dating. The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced ages that were mostly too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the 10Be inventory and 10Be deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The calculated erosion rates using these scenarios seemed to be plausible with values in the range of 0-57 mm/ky. The dating of soils using 10Be has

  9. Exploring ice core drilling chips from a cold Alpine glacier for cosmogenic radionuclide (10Be) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Lars; Merchel, Silke; Bohleber, Pascal; Rugel, Georg; Scharf, Andreas

    Ice cores offer unique multi-proxy paleoclimate records, but provide only very limited sample material, which has to be carefully distributed for various proxy analyses. Beryllium-10, for example, is analysed in polar ice cores to investigate past changes of the geomagnetic field, solar activity, and the aerosol cycle, as well as to more accurately date the material. This paper explores the suitability of a drilling by-product, the so-called drilling chips, for 10Be-analysis. An ice core recently drilled at a cold Alpine glacier is used to directly compare 10Be-data from ice core samples with corresponding drilling chips. Both sample types have been spiked with 9Be-carrier and identically treated to chemically isolate beryllium. The resulting BeO has been investigated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 10Be/9Be-ratios to calculate 10Be-concentrations in the ice. As a promising first result, four out of five sample-combinations (ice core and drilling chips) agree within 2-sigma uncertainty range. However, further studies are needed in order to fully demonstrate the potential of drilling chips for 10Be-analysis in alpine and shallow polar ice cores.

  10. Cosmogenic 10Be: A critical view on its widespread dominion in geosciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Lal

    2000-03-01

    The radionuclide 10Be (half-life 9 1:5 my), produced naturally in the Earth's atmosphere by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays, was sought in ocean sediments in the late fifties, considering its potential usefulness as a radiotracer for dating sediments. 10Be was discovered independently by two groups, one in India and the other in the USA, and used only for dating marine sediments and manganese nodules until the seventies. Subsequently, as a result of a technical advance resulting in the improvement in the sensitivity of measurement of 10Be by about a factor of 106, there was a global rush to measure this nuclide in most materials participating in the physical, chemical and biological processes in the dynamic geosphere. This paper outlines the reasons for this ``isotope rush'', and the lessons learned from these studies. I also present my personal views of the special attractive features of this nuclide on the one hand, and on the other, the pitfalls or the wrong message this nuclide could convey!

  11. Paleoseismology of the Mejillones Fault, northern Chile: Insights from cosmogenic 10Be and optically stimulated luminescence determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    CortéS A., J.; GonzáLez L., Gabriel; Binnie, S. A.; Robinson, R.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Vargas E., G.

    2012-04-01

    We have undertaken the first paleoseismological study on an upper plate fault in Chile. The selected structure was the Mejillones Fault, which is marked by a conspicuous fault-scarp. Using cosmogenic 10Be and OSL dating and detailed sedimentary logging of trenches, we have constrained the abandonment of two alluvial surfaces by fault activity at ca. 35 ka and ca.14 ka. Based on stratigraphic observation we characterized the fault evolution in four intervals over the last ca. 35 ka. During the first three intervals the fault had a steady slip rate of 0.61 ± 0.26 m/ka. The fourth interval is delineated by the last vertical fault slip and the accumulation of un-deformed hillslope deposits after ca. 3.3 ka and has a slip rate of 0.22 ± 0.06 m/ka. The younger surface abandonment was caused by two Mw ˜ 7 paleoearthquakes with a recurrence interval of 5.0 ± 3.5 ka. The third interval is characterized by the interaction of hillslope deposits and aseismic slip and/or centimeter scale seismic slip events. At ca. 3.5 ka, a last large (Mw ˜ 6.6) earthquake took place. The recurrence intervals of large (Mw > 8.5) subduction earthquakes do not appear to be the same as the recurrence intervals of the Mw ˜ 7 events on the upper plate Mejillones Fault.

  12. Eroding and Inflating the Atacama Desert, Chile: Insights Through Cosmogenic 10-Be, 26-Al and 21-Ne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimsath, A. M.; Jungers, M. C.; Amundson, R.; Balco, G.; Shuster, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Enigmas of the Atacama Desert are as abundant as the hypotheses formulated to explain them. This fascinating and extreme landscape attracts scientists from disparate disciplines, spawning remarkable insights into the connections between climate, tectonics, biota and landscape evolution. Recent work explores such connections on timescales ranging from millions to thousands of years. Both the timing of the onset of hyperaridity in the Atacama and its relationship to the uplift of the Andes are especially well-debated topics. Similarly enigmatic, but less widely studied, are the connections between the timing of hyperaridity and the surface morphology of the region. Specifically, the extent, nature, and timing of formation for the extensive salars across the Atacama are undeniably linked to the climate history of the region. Adjacent to the extensive salars are landscapes that appear to be shaped by processes more typically associated with temperate landscapes: rilling and gullying, extensive terrace deposition, steep fault scarps, landslide deposits, and extensive fan and paleosurface deposits. Our primary goal in this project is to establish chronologies and rates for the surface processes driving landscape evolution for two field regions in the Atacama. To achieve this goal we are also testing and expanding upon the burial dating methodology (Balco and Shuster, 2009) that couples the stable cosmogenic nuclide, 21Ne, with the radiogenic nuclides, 10Be and 26Al. Here we present new results from remarkably different field settings from the north-central Atacama. The southern region, inland from Antofagasta, is relatively well studied to determine how the onset of hyperaridity impacted water-driven processes. The northern region, north of the Rio Loa and Calama, differs most notably by the enormous basin fills of salt (e.g. Salar de Llamara and Salar Grande) and evidence of more extensive recently active salars. Across both regions we use in 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne to

  13. Cosmogenic 10Be production rate calibrated against 3He in the high Tropical Andes (3800-4900 m, 20-22° S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blard, P.-H.; Braucher, R.; Lavé, J.; Bourlès, D.

    2013-11-01

    Many geomorphologic applications, notably glacier chronologies, require improvements in both the precision and the accuracy of the cosmogenic dating tool. Of particular importance is the need to better constrain the spatial variability of the cosmogenic nuclides production rates at high elevation and low latitudes. One strategy that can be adopted for this is to couple absolute calibrations, from independently dated surfaces, with cross-calibration studies, performed by measuring several cosmogenic nuclides in the same rock. In the present study, we report the highest-elevation (>4800 m) cross-calibration published to date, comprising measurements of cosmogenic 3He and 10Be in cogenetic pyroxene and quartz. The samples were collected from six dacitic moraine boulders, exposed from 32 to 65 ka at 4820 m on the flanks of the Uturuncu volcano (22° S, 67° W), Southern Lipez (Bolivia). The samples yield a remarkably tight cluster of 3He-10Be production ratios, with a weighted mean of 33.3±0.9 (1σ). This production ratio is undistinguishable, within uncertainties, from the 3He-10Be production ratio of 32.3±0.9 determined in the same mineral pair at low elevation (1333 m) by Amidon et al. (2009). These results agree at the 1σ level and suggest that any hypothetical increase of the 3He-10Be production ratio in pyroxene and quartz is likely to be lower than 5% over this elevation range (1000-5000 m). Moreover, the production ratio is almost insensitive to the Li content of the pyroxene (20 to 50 ppm Li), suggesting that the cosmogenic thermal neutron production of 3He is very low in this setting. The high-elevation 3He-10Be production ratio is used in combination with a local determination of the 3He production rate in the high Central Altiplano (3800 m) (Blard et al., 2013) to establish a local 10Be production rate of 30.0±1.4 at g yr at 3800 m and 20° S. After scaling to sea-level high latitude with the time-dependent Lal/Stone model, this yields a 10Be production

  14. Long-term background denudation rates of southern and southeastern Brazilian watersheds estimated with cosmogenic 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Gonzalez, Veronica; Bierman, Paul R.; Fernandes, Nelson F.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-09-01

    In comparison to humid temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, less is known about the long-term (millennial scale) background rates of erosion in Southern Hemisphere tropical watersheds. In order to better understand the rate at which watersheds in southern and southeastern Brazil erode, and the relationship of that erosion to climate and landscape characteristics, we made new measurements of in situ produced 10Be in river sediments and we compiled all extant measurements from this part of the country. New data from 14 watersheds in the states of Santa Catarina (n = 7) and Rio de Janeiro (n = 7) show that erosion rates vary there from 13 to 90 m/My (mean = 32 m/My; median = 23 m/My) and that the difference between erosion rates of basins we sampled in the two states is not significant. Sampled basin area ranges between 3 and 14,987 km2, mean basin elevation between 235 and 1606 m, and mean basin slope between 11 and 29°. Basins sampled in Rio de Janeiro, including three that drain the Serra do Mar escarpment, have an average basin slope of 19°, whereas the average slope for the Santa Catarina basins is 14°. Mean basin slope (R2 = 0.73) and annual precipitation (R2 = 0.57) are most strongly correlated with erosion in the basins we studied. At three sites where we sampled river sand and cobbles, the 10Be concentration in river sand was greater than in the cobbles, suggesting that these grain sizes are sourced from different parts of the landscape. Compiling all cosmogenic 10Be-derived erosion rates previously published for southern and southeastern Brazil watersheds to date (n = 76) with our 14 sampled basins, we find that regional erosion rates (though low) are higher than those of watersheds also located on other passive margins including Namibia and the southeastern North America. Brazilian basins erode at a pace similar to escarpments in southeastern North America. Erosion rates in southern and southeastern Brazil are directly and positively related to

  15. Active basement uplift of Sierra Pie de Palo (Northwestern Argentina): Rates and inception from10Be cosmogenic nuclide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siame, Lionel L.; Sébrier, Michel; Bellier, Olivier; Bourlès, Didier; Costa, Carlos; Ahumada, Emilio A.; Gardini, Carlos E.; Cisneros, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Quaternary tectonic and denudation rates are investigated for an actively growing basement anticline: the Sierra Pie de Palo range, which belongs to the Andean foreland of Northwestern Argentina (28°S-33°S). In this study, a detailed morphometric analysis of the topography is combined with in situ-produced cosmogenic10Be concentrations measured in (1) surface boulders abandoned on alluvial terraces affected by fault activity (along the north bounding fault) and growth of the basement fold (along the southeastern border), (2) bedrock outcrops corresponding to an exhumed and folded, regional erosion surface, and (3) fluvial sediments sampled at the outlets of several watersheds. Along the eastern and northern borders of the range, incision and uplift rates have been estimated at approximately 0.5 and 1 mm/yr when integrated on Holocene and Pleistocene time scales, in close agreement with both long-term (structural and basin evolution data) and short-term (GPS-derived velocity field) analyses. Cosmogenic-derived denudation and uplift rates combined with geomorphic characteristics of watersheds and river channels allows estimating the onset of the uplift at 4-6 Ma, followed by a more recent period of topographic rejuvenation at roughly 1-2 Ma, probably synchronous with steepening of the eastern and northern flanks of the anticline.

  16. Observations of historical sea cliff retreat rates exceed long-term estimates derived from cosmogenic 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Martin D.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ellis, Michael A.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Historical observation of coastal retreat are limited to relatively short timescales (change may be accelerated in the face of anticipated stormier climates and rising sea level, yet there is little knowledge of rates of coastal change prior to the relatively brief historical records. In order to make predictions about potential future coastal change it is important to establish baseline conditions averaged over longer time periods. Here we present analysis of sea cliff retreat throughout the Holocene averaged for chalk cliffs in south-east England using cosmogenic isotopes. We determine long-term rates of sea cliff erosion from 10Be measured from in-situ flint samples collected from three transects across coastal platforms in East Sussex. A numerical model of 10Be accumulation on an evolving coastal profile allows estimation of cliff retreat rate during the Holocene. The model accounts for variation in 10Be accumulation with tides and sea-level rise, and takes into account platform downwear and topographic shielding by adjacent cliffs. We find that cliff retreat rates during the Holocene were significantly slower (2-6 cm yr-1) than those derived from recent historical observations (15-25 cm yr-1). Modelled accumulation of 10Be requires retreat rates that increase rapidly in recent times, potentially reflecting human modification of the coastal sediment budget through construction of sea defences, flood defenses and aggregate extraction. Therefore knowledge of past human activity at the coastline may be important in anticipating future rates of coastal retreat.

  17. 10Be systematics in the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra catchment: the cosmogenic nuclide legacy of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupker, Maarten; Lavé, Jérôme; France-Lanord, Christian; Christl, Marcus; Bourlès, Didier; Carcaillet, Julien; Maden, Colin; Wieler, Rainer; Rahman, Mustafizur; Bezbaruah, Devojit; Xiaohan, Liu

    2017-08-01

    The Tsangpo-Brahmaputra River drains the eastern part of the Himalayan range and flows from the Tibetan Plateau through the eastern Himalayan syntaxis downstream to the Indo-Gangetic floodplain and the Bay of Bengal. As such, it is a unique natural laboratory to study how denudation and sediment production processes are transferred to river detrital signals. In this study, we present a new 10Be data set to constrain denudation rates across the catchment and to quantify the impact of rapid erosion within the syntaxis region on cosmogenic nuclide budgets and signals. The measured 10Be denudation rates span around 2 orders of magnitude across individual catchments (ranging from 0.03 to > 4 mm yr-1) and sharply increase as the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra flows across the eastern Himalaya. The increase in denudation rates, however, occurs ˜ 150 km downstream of the Namche Barwa-Gyala Peri massif (NBGPm), an area which has been previously characterized by extremely high erosion and exhumation rates. We suggest that this downstream lag is mainly due to the physical abrasion of coarse-grained, low 10Be concentration, landslide material produced within the syntaxis that dilutes the upstream high-concentration 10Be flux from the Tibetan Plateau only after abrasion has transferred sediment to the studied sand fraction. A simple abrasion model produces typical lag distances of 50 to 150 km compatible with our observations. Abrasion effects reduce the spatial resolution over which denudation can be constrained in the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. In addition, we also highlight that denudation rate estimates are dependent on the sediment connectivity, storage, and quartz content of the upstream Tibetan Plateau part of the catchment, which tends to lead to an overestimation of downstream denudation rates. While no direct 10Be denudation measurements were made in the syntaxis, the dilution of the upstream 10Be signal, measured in Tsangpo-Brahmaputra sediments, provides constraints on the

  18. 10Be systematics in the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra catchment: the cosmogenic nuclide legacy of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lupker

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Tsangpo-Brahmaputra River drains the eastern part of the Himalayan range and flows from the Tibetan Plateau through the eastern Himalayan syntaxis downstream to the Indo-Gangetic floodplain and the Bay of Bengal. As such, it is a unique natural laboratory to study how denudation and sediment production processes are transferred to river detrital signals. In this study, we present a new 10Be data set to constrain denudation rates across the catchment and to quantify the impact of rapid erosion within the syntaxis region on cosmogenic nuclide budgets and signals. The measured 10Be denudation rates span around 2 orders of magnitude across individual catchments (ranging from 0.03 to > 4 mm yr−1 and sharply increase as the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra flows across the eastern Himalaya. The increase in denudation rates, however, occurs  ∼  150 km downstream of the Namche Barwa–Gyala Peri massif (NBGPm, an area which has been previously characterized by extremely high erosion and exhumation rates. We suggest that this downstream lag is mainly due to the physical abrasion of coarse-grained, low 10Be concentration, landslide material produced within the syntaxis that dilutes the upstream high-concentration 10Be flux from the Tibetan Plateau only after abrasion has transferred sediment to the studied sand fraction. A simple abrasion model produces typical lag distances of 50 to 150 km compatible with our observations. Abrasion effects reduce the spatial resolution over which denudation can be constrained in the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. In addition, we also highlight that denudation rate estimates are dependent on the sediment connectivity, storage, and quartz content of the upstream Tibetan Plateau part of the catchment, which tends to lead to an overestimation of downstream denudation rates. While no direct 10Be denudation measurements were made in the syntaxis, the dilution of the upstream 10Be signal, measured in Tsangpo

  19. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1999-11-01

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, {sup 10}Be (T{sub 1/2}=1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth`s crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of {sup 10}Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka 20 refs., 4 figs.

  20. A first 10Be cosmogenic glacial chronology from the High Atlas, Morocco, during the last glacial cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, David; Hughes, Philip; Fenton, Cassie

    2014-05-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping, 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages of 21 erratics from cirque-valley systems and paleo-glacier climate modelling in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco (31.1° N, 7.9° W), provides new and novel insights as to the history and evolution of the largest desert region on Earth. The Atlas Mountains display evidence of extensive and multiple Late Pleistocene glaciations whose extent is significantly larger than that recognised by previous workers. The largest glaciers formed in the Toubkal massif where we find 3 distinct phases of glacial advances within the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraines occurring at the lowest elevations have yielded eight 10Be ages ranging from 30 to 88 ka. Six of eight samples from moraines at intermediate elevations gave ages of 19 to 25 ka (2 outliers) which correlates well with the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 26-21 ka) and the last termination during marine isotope stage 2. Five erratics from the youngest and most elevated moraines yielded a suite of normally distributed exposure ages from 11 to 13 ka which supports a correlation with the northern hemisphere Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glacial record of the High Atlas effectively reflects moisture supply to the north-western Sahara Desert and can provide an indication of shifts between arid and pluvial conditions. The plaeo equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) of these three glacier phases was more than 1000 m lower than the predicted ELA based on today's temperatures. Glacier-climate modelling indicates that for each of these glacier phases climate was not only significantly cooler than today, but also much wetter. The new evidence on the extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance of glaciations in this region has major implications for understanding moisture transfer between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sahara Desert during Pleistocene cold stages.

  1. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: Implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Keith A.; Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.

    2017-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma.Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the

  2. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.; Howard, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma. Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the inclusion

  3. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  4. Quantifying the rates of Quaternary deformation in the Peruvian Forearc using in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. R.; Farber, D. L.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R. C.; Meriaux, A.

    2005-12-01

    While the canonical view is that active deformation in the Andes is mostly confined to the eastern slopes in the subandean fold and thrust belt, recent studies have highlighted the existence of active deformation in the central Andean forearc (Audin et al, 2003, Hartley et al., 2000, Husson and Sempere, 2003, Farias et al., 2005). The forearc of southern Peru, between ~14.5{o}S-18{o}S, consists of the Moquegua Basin longitudinal depression which is bound by the Cordillera de la Costa in the west and the Precordillera and main Cordillera Occidental to the east. The well-preserved fan deposits of the Moquegua Formation cover vast areas of up to 5 km{2}. Developed on top of the Moquegua Formation are a series of well-preserved pediment surfaces (Tosdal et al., 1984), along which, abrupt changes in topography, visible changes in drainage incision, and the offset of alluvial terraces indicate recent uplift and/or faulting. We use in situ produced {10}Be and {26}Al to calculate the exposure ages of these surfaces thereby establishing bounds on timing and extent of tectonic activity. Near the town of Mirave in the Locumba river valley (17.4{o}S, 70.8{o}W) we have used satellite imagery and field mapping to identify an active right-lateral reverse fault. The fault vertically offsets an active channel as evidenced by a 2 m scarp and an abandoned surface of river deposits on the upthrown side of the fault. Cosmogenic ages of vertically and horizontally offset abandoned surfaces provide an opportunity to establish slip-rates along this fault. Preliminary data yields an estimated minimum vertical slip-rate of ~0.22 - 1.1 mm per yr. However, this is just one of many newly mapped active strike-slip and reverse faults within the forearc region, which together can be used to establish regional rates of forearc deformation. The presence of significant of deformation within the forearc region suggests present models convergence distribution may underestimate the amount slip locked

  5. First quantification of severe wind erosion in yardang fields using cosmogenic 10Be within the western Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, A.; Heermance, R.; Kapp, P. A.; Mc-Callister, A.

    2010-12-01

    Desert environments are a major source of global loess and may undergo substantial wind-erosion as evidenced by yardangs, which are streamlined bedrock ridges sculpted from uni-directional winds. However, there are few quantitative estimates of wind erosion rates in deflationary deserts, globally. Here, we report the first quantitative rates of bedrock wind erosion determined using cosmogenic 10Be in the western Qaidam basin, China, where roughly one-third of the modern basin floor (~3.88 × 104 km2) exposes yardangs. Eleven Neogene bedrock sandstone samples and one pre-Cenozoic granite sample were analyzed for 10Be concentrations. The Neogene samples were collected from crests and limbs of broad and actively growing anticlines, where in most places strata have been wind-sculpted into yardangs. Sedimentary bedrock erosion rates vary from 0.04-0.34 mm/yr, although 60 percent (n=7) of all samples cluster tightly at 0.1 ± 0.03 mm/yr. Erosion rates assume steady-state erosion over ~10,000 years. The lowest rate of 0.0025 mm/yr was obtained from a granite bedrock sample along the Altyn-Tagh range bounding the northwestern margin of the Qaidam basin and is consistent with other 10Be bedrock erosion rates collected from granitic bedrock elsewhere on the Tibetan Plateau. These results demonstrate the importance of lithology in controlling bedrock erodibility by wind. The highest erosion rates of 0.17, 0.25, and 0.34 mm/yr were determined along a transect across an active anticline. The lowest of the three rates was obtained from the top of the structure, suggesting that wind erosion and thus wind speeds are highest on the limbs of an anticline as wind is forced around the obstacle (Bernoulli-effect), rather than flowing over it. The determined sedimentary bedrock erosion rates of 0.04-0.34 mm/yr are in good agreement with previous analysis of basin wide-average erosion rates from geological cross-sections (0.29 mm/yr) and simple erosion calculations using previous lake

  6. Early to Late Pleistocene history of debris-flow fan evolution in western Death Valley (California) using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dühnforth, Miriam; Densmore, Alexander L.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Allen, Philip; Kubik, Peter W.

    2017-03-01

    Debris-flow fans with depositional records over several 105 years may be useful archives for the understanding of fan construction by debris flows and post-depositional surface modification over long timescales. Reading these archives, however, requires that we establish the temporal and spatial pattern of debris-flow activity over time. We used a combination of geomorphic mapping of fan surface characteristics, digital topographic analysis, and cosmogenic radionuclide dating using 10Be and 26Al to study the evolution of the Warm Springs fan on the west side of southern Death Valley, California. The 10Be concentrations yield dates that vary from 989 ± 43 to 595 ± 17 ka on the proximal fan and between 369 ± 13 and 125 ± 5 ka on distal fan surfaces. The interpretation of these results as true depositional ages though is complicated by high inheritance with a minimum of 65 ka measured at the catchment outlet and of at least 125 ka at the distal fan. Results from the 26Al measurements suggest that most sample locations on the fan surfaces underwent simple exposure and were not affected by complex histories of burial and re-exposure. This implies that Warm Springs fan is a relatively stable landform that underwent several 105 years of fan aggradation before fan head incision caused abandonment of the proximal and central fan surfaces and deposition continued on a younger unit at the distal fan. We show that the primary depositional debris-flow morphology is eliminated over a time scale of less than 105 years, which prevents the delineation of individual debris flows as well as the precise reconstruction of lateral shifts in deposition as we find it on younger debris-flow fans. Secondary post-depositional processes control subsequent evolution of surface morphology with the dissection of planar surfaces while smoothing of convex-up interfluves between incised channels continues through time.

  7. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  8. Distinguishing between tectonic and lithologic controls on bedrock channel longitudinal profiles using cosmogenic 10Be erosion rates and channel steepness index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Andrew J.; Granger, Darryl E.; Olivetti, Valerio; Molin, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Knickpoints in fluvial channel longitudinal profiles and channel steepness index values derived from digital elevation data can be used to detect tectonic structures and infer spatial patterns of uplift. However, changes in lithologic resistance to channel incision can also influence the morphology of longitudinal profiles. We compare the spatial patterns of both channel steepness index and cosmogenic 10Be-determined erosion rates from four landscapes in Italy, where the geology and tectonics are well constrained, to four theoretical predictions of channel morphologies, which can be interpreted as the result of primarily tectonic or lithologic controls. These data indicate that longitudinal profile forms controlled by unsteady or nonuniform tectonics can be distinguished from those controlled by nonuniform lithologic resistance. In each landscape the distribution of channel steepness index and erosion rates is consistent with model predictions and demonstrates that cosmogenic nuclide methods can be applied to distinguish between these two controlling factors.

  9. Long-term variations in the flux of cosmogenic isotope 10Be over the last 10000 years: Variations in the geomagnetic field and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, S. S.; Dergachev, V. A.; Raspopov, O. M.; Jungner, H.

    2012-02-01

    A spectral analysis of data on the flux of cosmogenic 10Be in ice core samples from the Central Greenland (project GRIP) over the last 10 thousand years have been carried out. It has been shown that the 10Be flux varies cyclically; the most significant cycle is of about 2300 years. Variations in the position of the virtual geomagnetic pole over 8000 years have been analyzed. Significant components, pointing to the cyclic variation in the position of the geomagnetic pole with a period of about 2300 years, have been revealed in a periodogram of the virtual geomagnetic pole longitude. In addition to the nearly 2300-year-long cycle, some lines are observable in the 10Be flux periodogram, which can be considered as a manifestation of the 1000-year-long cycle of the 10Be deposition rate on the ice surface. The relationship between the cyclicity of the geomagnetic pole position and the 10Be flux is discussed.

  10. Early Acheulean technology in the Rietputs Formation, South Africa, dated with cosmogenic nuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Ryan J; Granger, Darryl E; Kuman, Kathleen; Partridge, Timothy C

    2009-02-01

    An absolute dating technique based on the build-up and decay of (26)Al and (10)Be in the mineral quartz provides crucial evidence regarding early Acheulean hominid distribution in South Africa. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of an ancient alluvial deposit of the Vaal River (Rietputs Formation) in the western interior of South Africa shows that coarse gravel and sand aggradation there occurred ca 1.57+/-0.22Ma, with individual ages of samples ranging from 1.89+/-0.19 to 1.34+/-0.22Ma. This was followed by aggradation of laminated and cross-bedded fine alluvium at ca 1.26+/-0.10Ma. The Rietputs Formation provides an ideal situation for the use of the cosmogenic nuclide burial dating method, as samples could be obtained from deep mining pits at depths ranging from 7 to 16 meters. Individual dates provide only a minimum age for the stone tool technology preserved within the deposits. Each assemblage represents a time averaged collection. Bifacial tools distributed throughout the coarse gravel and sand unit can be assigned to an early phase of the Acheulean. This is the first absolute radiometric dated evidence for early Acheulean artefacts in South Africa that have been found outside of the early hominid sites of the Gauteng Province. These absolute dates also indicate that handaxe-using hominids inhabited southern Africa as early as their counterparts in East Africa. The simultaneous appearance of the Acheulean in different parts of the continent implies relatively rapid technology development and the widespread use of large cutting tools in the African continent by ca 1.6Ma.

  11. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potentiality for dating land surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-05-01

    To exploit natural archives and geomorphic objects it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. We explored the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric Be-10 in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or surface exposure dating using in situ produced Be-10). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric Be-10 and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of Be-10 deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric Be-10 deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant Be-10 input for the Central Alps and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the Be-10 inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the Be-10 input agreed reasonably well with the expected age (obtained from surface exposure or radiocarbon dating). The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced mostly ages that were too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the Be-10 inventory and Be-10 deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The estimated erosion rates are in a reasonable range. The dating of soils using Be-10 has several potential error sources. Analytical errors as well as errors

  12. Slip rate determination along the Southern Dead Sea fault: optically stimulated luminescence, 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide, and 14C ages brought face to face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Beon, Maryline; Jaiswal, Manoj; Kunz, Alexander; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Burr, George; Klinger, Yann; Moumani, Khaled; Chen, Yue-Gau; Abdelghafoor, Mohammed; Suppe, John

    2014-05-01

    Active tectonics studies are often limited by difficulties in accurately and precisely dating Late Quaternary alluvial deposits that commonly lack organic matter or date beyond the 14C dating limit. This is illustrated at a site called Fidan, in arid southern Jordan, where a series of alluvial fans are laterally offset by the southern Dead Sea fault. Geodetic, geomorphic and geologic studies converge to a fault slip rate of 5 ± 2 mm/a. Yet, Late Pleistocene slip rate at Fidan cover a wide range due to the dispersion of 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) ages. The maximum slip rate since ~100 ka is up to a value of 11 mm/a, possibly suggesting significant variations in fault activity with time. In order to reduce the uncertainty on the Late Pleistocene slip rate and draw further conclusions regarding the fault seismic behavior, we implement complementary dating using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques on both quartz and K-feldspar minerals and using 14C when possible. OSL measurements include a newly developed technique called post-infra-red infra-red stimulated luminescence at 290°C (pIR290). We extensively sampled surface levels F2 and F4, digging ~50-cm deep pits into the geomorphic surfaces. Annual dose rates were determined in the laboratory from both geochemical analysis of the sediment and gamma-ray spectrometry. Due to sediment heterogeneity, we consider gamma-ray spectrometry as more reliable because it is based on a larger volume of sediment. Quartz OSL ages and preliminary pIR290 results on K-feldspars give consistent Early Holocene ages of 9-14 ka for F2, also in agreement with a 14C age of 13 ka from a landsnail shell. 10Be CRN exposure ages on F2 were significantly older, with 37 ± 4 ka, probably due to inheritance. On F4, 10Be CRN exposure ages showed a scattered distribution, from ~50 ka to ~120 ka, with most samples comprised in the mean interval of 87 ± 26 ka. Quartz OSL ages from 5 locations on F4 are comprised between 32 ± 3

  13. Rates of basin-wide rockwall retreat in the K2 region of the Central Karakoram defined by terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Yeong Bae; Owen, Lewis A.; Caffee, Marc W.; Kamp, Ulrich; Bishop, Michael P.; Bush, Andrew; Copland, Luke; Shroder, John F.

    2009-06-01

    Basin-wide rockwall retreat rates are estimated using cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in supraglacial debris from the Baltoro Glacier basin in K2 region of the Central Karakoram, Pakistan. Total cosmogenic 10Be concentrations of the supraglacial debris were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to determine 10Be concentrations inherited from the rockwalls within the glaciated basin. Given that rockfall induced by periglacial weathering and snow and ice avalanches is the most important source of supraglacial debris production in the high mountain glaciated basin, the erosion rate of the bare bedrock can be considered to be the rate of rockwall retreat. The rate of the rockwall erosion, converted from the calculated inheritance of 10Be concentrations, using the maximum velocity of the active glacier, places an upper limit ranging from 0.65 mm/year to 2.48 mm/year. This rate of rockwall retreat is in the same order of magnitude reported in other high Himalayan mountains. The rate, however, is an order of magnitude higher than erosion rates inferred from sediment budget studies and half that of the fluvial incision rate and exhumation rate for the same region. The difference between rates of basin-wide rockwall retreat and fluvial incision rates over the Late Quaternary suggests that in this glaciated basin fluvial incision is likely enhanced by localized/differential tectonism and/or isostatic uplift.

  14. Marine biogeochemistries of Be and Al: A study based on cosmogenic 10Be, Be and Al in marine calcite, aragonite, and opal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weiquan Dong; Devendra Lal; Barbara Ransom; Wolfgang Berger; Marc W Caffee

    2001-06-01

    The geochemical behaviors of Be and Al in ocean waters have been successfully studied in recent years using natural, cosmogenic, radioactive 10Be and 26Al as tracers. The present day dissolved concentrations and distribution of the stable and radioactive isotopes of Be and Al in ocean waters have revealed their short residence times and appreciable effects of exchange uxes at the coastal and ocean-sediment interfaces. It follows that concentrations of these particle-active elements must have varied in the past with temporal changes in climate, biological productivity and aeolian ux of continental detritus to the oceans. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extending the measurements of Be and Al isotope concentrations in marine systems to the 103-106 BP time scale. We report here the discovery of significant amounts of intrinsic Be and Al in marine foraminiferal calcite and coral aragonite, and of Al in opal (radiolarians) and aragonite (coral), which makes it possible to determine 10Be/Be and 26Al/Al in oceans in the past. We also report measured 10Be/9Be in foraminiferal calcite in Pacific Ocean cores, which reveal that the concentrations and ratios of the stable and cosmogenic isotopes of Be and Al have varied significantly in the past 30 ky. The implications of these results are discussed.

  15. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of Sahelanthropus tchadensis and Australopithecus bahrelghazali: Mio-Pliocene hominids from Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Arnaud, Nicolas; Monié, Patrick; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2008-03-04

    Ages were determined at two hominid localities from the Chad Basin in the Djurab Desert (Northern Chad). In the Koro Toro fossiliferous area, KT 12 locality (16 degrees 00'N, 18 degrees 53'E) was the site of discovery of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) and in the Toros-Menalla fossiliferous area, TM 266 locality (16 degrees 15'N, 17 degrees 29'E) was the site of discovery of Sahelanthropus tchadensis (Toumaï). At both localities, the evolutive degree of the associated fossil mammal assemblages allowed a biochronological estimation of the hominid remains: early Pliocene (3-3.5 Ma) at KT 12 and late Miocene ( approximately 7 Ma) at TM 266. Atmospheric (10)Be, a cosmogenic nuclide, was used to quasicontinuously date these sedimentary units. The authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be dating of a pelite relic within the sedimentary level containing Abel yields an age of 3.58 +/- 0.27 Ma that points to the contemporaneity of Australopithecus bahrelghazali (Abel) with Australopithecus afarensis (Lucy). The 28 (10)Be/(9)Be ages obtained within the anthracotheriid unit containing Toumaï bracket, by absolute dating, the age of Sahelanthropus tchadensis to lie between 6.8 and 7.2 Ma. This chronological constraint is an important cornerstone both for establishing the earliest stages of hominid evolution and for new calibrations of the molecular clock.

  16. Extensive MIS 3 glaciation in southernmost Patagonia revealed by cosmogenic nuclide dating of outwash sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Hein, Andrew S.; Rodés, Ángel

    2015-11-01

    The timing and extent of former glacial advances can demonstrate leads and lags during periods of climatic change and their forcing, but this requires robust glacial chronologies. In parts of southernmost Patagonia, dating pre-global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) ice limits has proven difficult due to post-deposition processes affecting the build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in moraine boulders. Here we provide ages for the Río Cullen and San Sebastián glacial limits of the former Bahía Inútil-San Sebastián (BI-SSb) ice lobe on Tierra del Fuego (53-54°S), previously hypothesised to represent advances during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 12 and 10, respectively. Our approach uses cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure dating, but targets glacial outwash associated with these limits and uses depth-profiles and surface cobble samples, thereby accounting for surface deflation and inheritance. The data reveal that the limits formed more recently than previously thought, giving ages of 45.6 ka (139.9/-14.3) for the Río Cullen, and 30.1 ka (+45.6/-23.1) for the San Sebastián limits. These dates indicate extensive glaciation in southern Patagonia during MIS 3, prior to the well-constrained, but much less extensive MIS 2 (gLGM) limit. This suggests the pattern of ice advances in the region was different to northern Patagonia, with the terrestrial limits relating to the last glacial cycle, rather than progressively less extensive glaciations over hundreds of thousands of years. However, the dates are consistent with MIS 3 glaciation elsewhere in the southern mid-latitudes, and the combination of cooler summers and warmer winters with increased precipitation, may have caused extensive glaciation prior to the gLGM.

  17. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    CERN Document Server

    Poluianov, Stepan; Mishev, Alexander L; Usoskin, Ilya G

    2016-01-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radio-isotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air-mass dynamics using cosmogenic radio-isotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the $^{10}$Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 AD and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice c...

  18. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluianov, S. V.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radioisotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air mass dynamics using cosmogenic radioisotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the 10Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 A.D. and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores.

  19. Denudation rates and the degree of chemical weathering in the Ganga River basin from ratios of meteoric cosmogenic 10Be to stable 9Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Waliur; Wittmann, Hella; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2017-07-01

    The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be, precipitated from the atmosphere, to the stable nuclide 9Be, released by silicate weathering, was measured in suspended sediment of the Ganga River basin to determine denudation rates, degrees of weathering, and sediment storage in the floodplain. The 10Be precipitated and the 9Be released are carried to ca. 90% by amorphous and to 10% by crystalline Fe-hydroxides, as revealed by chemical extractions, whereas the dissolved Be transport is negligible due to the river pH of 8. Resulting 10Be/9Be ratios increase from 0.75 ×10-9 for the northern and Himalaya-draining rivers to 1.7 ×10-9 in the downstream basin. The increase in 10Be/9Be ratios results from two compounding effects: with 1) average denudation rates decrease from 0.5 mm yr-1 in the Himalayas to 0.17 mm yr-1 for the Ganga main stem in the lowlands, 2) the southern tributaries draining the low-relief craton contribute sediment with a ratio of 2.0 ×10-9, corresponding to a denudation rate of 0.03 mm yr-1. We find that at the spatial scale of the entire basin, the atmospheric delivery flux of 10Be equals its sedimentary export flux. Hence fluxes can be considered to be at steady state and radioactive decay of 10Be during sediment storage is not discernible. The lack of a resolvable increase in 10Be concentration during sediment transfer along the floodplain stretch furthermore suggests that the sediment transfer time is indeed short. We also cannot resolve any additional release of silicate-bound 9Be there, testifying to the lower degree of weathering there. When multiplied with the basin area the 10Be/9Be-derived denudation rate of 0.14 mm yr-1 corresponds to a sediment flux of 350 Mt yr-1 which is in good agreement with gauging-derived sediment fluxes (ca. 400 Mt yr-1). Because they integrate over the entire basin, denudation rates from 10Be/9Be are lower than floodplain-corrected denudation rates from in situ cosmogenic 10Be that reflect the rates of the

  20. Production of the cosmogenic isotopes 3H, 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl in the Earth's atmosphere by solar and galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, W. R.; Higbie, P. R.; McCracken, K. G.

    2007-10-01

    In a follow-up study to the earlier work of Webber and Higbie (2003) on 10Be production in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays, we have calculated the atmospheric production of the cosmogenic isotopes 3H, 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This new calculation of atmospheric yields of these isotopes is based on 107 vertically incident protons at each of 24 logarithmically spaced energies from 10 MeV to 10 GeV, 102 times the number used in the earlier calculation, along with the latest cross sections. This permits a study of the production due to solar cosmic rays as well as galactic cosmic rays at lower energies where isotope production is a very sensitive function of energy. Solar cosmic ray spectra are reevaluated for all of the major events occurring since 1956. In terms of yearly production of 10Be, only the February 1956 solar event makes a major contribution. For 36Cl these yearly SCR production contributions are 2-5 times larger depending on the solar cosmic ray energy spectra. We have determined the yearly production of 10Be, 36Cl, and other cosmogenic isotopes above 65° geomagnetic latitude for the time period 1940-2006 covering six solar 11-year (a) cycles. The average peak-to-peak 11-a amplitude of this yearly production is 1.77. The effects of latitudinal mixing alter these direct polar production values considerably, giving an average peak-to-peak 11-a amplitude of 1.48 for the global average production.

  1. 10Be dating reveals early-middle Holocene age of the Drygalski Moraines in central West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronauer, Sandra L.; Briner, Jason P.; Kelley, Samuel E.; Zimmerman, Susan R. H.; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    We reconstruct the history of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin on the Nuussuaq Peninsula in central West Greenland through the Holocene using lake sediment analysis and cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating of the prominent Drygalski Moraines. Erratics perched on bedrock outboard of the Drygalski Moraines constrain local deglaciation to ∼9.9 ± 0.6 ka (n = 2). Three Drygalski Moraine crests yield mean 10Be ages of 8.6 ± 0.4 ka (n = 2), 8.5 ± 0.2 ka (n = 3), and 7.6 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) from outer to inner. Perched erratics between the inner two moraines average 7.8 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) and are consistent with the moraine ages. Sediments from a proglacial lake with a catchment area extending an estimated 2 km beneath (inland of) the present ice sheet terminus constrain an ice sheet minimum extent from 5.4 ka to 0.6 ka. The moraine chronology paired with the lake sediment stratigraphy reveals that the ice margin likely remained within ∼2 km of its present position from ∼9.9 to 5.4 ka. This unexpected early Holocene stability, preceded by rapid ice retreat and followed by minimum ice extent between ∼5.4 and 0.6 ka, contrasts with many records of early Holocene warmth and the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation maximum. We suggest ice margin stability may instead be tied to adjacent ocean temperatures, which reached an optimum in the middle Holocene.

  2. Authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 ((10)Be) production rates. Authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric (10)Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and MD05-2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05-2920, MD05-2930 and MD90-0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest (10)Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 10(22) Am(2)) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant (10)Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The (10)Be-derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes-Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial-scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities.

  3. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Valet, Jean‐Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium‐10 (10Be) production rates. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05‐2920 and MD05‐2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05‐2920, MD05‐2930 and MD90‐0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest 10Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 1022 Am2) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant 10Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The 10Be‐derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes‐Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial‐scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities. PMID:28163989

  4. Quantifying denudation rates and sediment storage on the eastern Altiplano, Bolivia, using cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and in situ 14C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Kristina; Kober, Florian; Zeilinger, Gerold; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Maden, Colin; Wacker, Lukas; Kubik, Peter W.; Wieler, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    Denudation processes and sediment transfer are investigated in a high-elevation, low-relief environment (eastern Altiplano, Bolivia) using 10Be, 26Al, and in situ 14C analysis in fluvial sediments. Concentrations of the long-lived nuclides 10Be and 26Al yield consistently low catchment-wide denudation rates of ~ 3-29 mm ky- 1 (integrating over 21-194 ky), which reflect the low geomorphic gradients and the discontinuity of fluvial transport along the eastern Altiplano margin. No significant correlation is recorded between denudation rates of individual catchments and morphological basin parameters (slope, area, elevation). This is attributed to the overall little variability in morphology. The agreement between the denudation rates and published modern sediment discharge data suggests steady landscape evolution of the eastern Altiplano from the latest Pleistocene until today. While 10Be and 26Al provide long-term estimates on sediment production, in situ cosmogenic 14C is used to trace short-term sediment storage. In situ 14C concentrations are comparatively low indicating that 14C decayed during alluvial storage over at least the past ~ 11-20 ky. We assume storage at shallow depth (2 m) and consider the influence of soil-mantled hillslopes on the in situ 14C concentration. Our results illustrate the importance of sediment storage even over short distances and demonstrate the potential of in situ 14C to study sediment routing and transfer times within drainage systems. However, this study also demonstrates that the long-lived 10Be and 26Al nuclides can provide adequate estimates on long-term denudation rates even if sediment transport is not fast but interrupted by several thousands of years of storage.

  5. 26Al/10Be burial dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin, northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tu

    Full Text Available The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years. This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ. The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site's lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL dating at 160-220 ka.

  6. 26Al/10Be burial dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin, northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hua; Shen, Guanjun; Li, Haixu; Xie, Fei; Granger, Darryl E

    2015-01-01

    The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years). This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ). The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site's lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating at 160-220 ka.

  7. Cosmogenic Dating of Moraines of the Local Last Glacial Maximum in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Seltzer, G. O.; Rodbell, D. T.; Finkel, R. C.; Farber, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    We have used cosmogenic dating (10Be) to identify moraines of the local last glacial maximum along two east-west transects in the tropical Andes: the Junin region of central Peru ( ˜11° S 76° W) and the Cordillera Real of western Bolivia ( ˜16.3° S 68.2° W). The 10Be ages from boulders on moraines in our study areas suggest that the local last glacial maximum occurred ca. 30,000 10Be yr BP (before the inferred peak of Northern Hemisphere glaciation at ca. 21,000 calendar yr BP) and that deglaciation was well underway by 20,000 10Be yr BP. Recessional moraines were deposited between about 20,000 and 15,000 10Be yr BP. Published 14C dates from the Cordillera Real indicate that glaciers were within their present limits by about 11,000 calendar yr BP. Asymmetry in the east-west glacial extent and amount of snowline depression was relatively minor in the Junin region, but was more pronounced in the Cordillera Real. In the Junin region, terminal moraines of the local last glacial maximum lie at ˜4150-4200 m on the east side of the cordillera and at ˜4250-4400 m on the west side. In the Cordillera Real, lateral moraines of the local last glacial maximum lie at ˜4600 m on the southwest side of the cordillera (Milluni Valley), while a late-glacial (ca. 12,000 10Be yr BP) terminal moraine lies at ˜3800 m on the northeast side of the cordillera (Zongo Valley). Snowline depression during the local last glacial maximum in the Andes was ˜200-600 m on both sides of the eastern cordillera in the Junin region and on the southwest (Altiplano) side of the Cordillera Real, but closer to ˜900-1000 m on the northeast side of the Cordillera Real. The asymmetry likely arose from differences in precipitation (which comes mainly from the east) and from variations in shading, amount of supraglacial material, and topography between the deeply incised eastern valleys and the relatively broad, shallow valleys descending to high-altitude plateau surfaces on the west sides.

  8. 10Be depth-profile dating of glaciofluvial sediments in the northern Alpine Foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, Anne; Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kubik, Peter; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Dehnert, Andreas; Rahn, Meinert; Schlüchter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    10Be depth-profile dating is based on the fact that nuclide production is decreasing as an exponential function of depth. This method requires collecting at least four sediment samples in a vertical profile. The obtained nuclide concentrations are plotted against depth and fitted depth-profiles to the measured dataset. The age is then calculated based on the best-fit. The requirements for this method are the following: sampling geological units in artificial outcrops with minimum thickness of soil (less than around 80 cm), preferably with a flat-topped landform in order to guarantee that the uppermost surface of the deposit remains as unmodified as possible and is related to a defined geomorphologic process. Additionally at least one sample, preferably three, from the uppermost one meter of the profile as the exponential decrease mainly occurs around this depth. No sample is collected from the overlying soil. In this study, we aim to establish the chronology of the oldest Quaternary sediments in the northern Alpine Foreland using depth-profile dating with 10Be. These ages contribute to the understanding of the Quaternary landscape evolution of the Alpine Foreland. Here, we unravel the chronology of five sites at different morphostratigraphic positions: Mandach and Ängi (canton Aargau), Stadlerberg and Irchel (canton Zurich) and Rechberg (Germany, 4 km from the border to Switzerland). All sites are abandoned gravel pits and at each site we collected between four and seven sediment samples. First results yielded chronologies between 0.8 and 2 Ma for these glaciofluvial deposits. Our study shows that this relatively new method is successful when the geological setting matches the methodological requirements.

  9. Regolith evolution on the millennial timescale from combined U-Th-Ra isotopes and in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis in a weathering profile (Strengbach catchment, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Van der Woerd, J.; Viville, D.; Pelt, E.; Kali, E.; Lerouge, C.; Ackerer, P.; di Chiara Roupert, R.; Négrel, P.

    2016-11-01

    U-Th-Ra disequilibria, cosmogenic in situ 10Be concentrations and major and trace element concentrations have been analyzed in a 2 m-deep weathering profile sampled at the summit of the granitic Strengbach catchment (France). The data have been used to independently estimate both the long-term regolith production and denudation rates and the weathering and erosion rates. Modeling of the 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibrium variations in the lower part of the profile yields a regolith production rate of 12 ± 4 mm/kyr (30 ± 10 T/km2/yr), while modeling of the high-resolution 10Be concentration profile leads to an exposure age of 19.7 ± 2.2 kyr, an inherited concentration of 15,000 ± 1,000 at/g in quartz and a mean denudation rate of 22 ± 10 mm/kyr (37 ± 15 T/km2/yr). The consistency between production and denudation rates suggests that, on a millennial timescale, the regolith mass balance at the summit of the catchment is close to a steady state, even if the watershed may have been impacted by Quaternary climatic changes and by recent anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., 20th century acid rain and recent afforestation efforts). The results also indicate that physical erosion is likely the dominant long-term process of regolith denudation in the catchment. Furthermore, the comparison of the long-term production and denudation rates and of weathering and erosion rates determined from the depth profile analyses with the current weathering and erosion rates estimated at the outlet of the watershed based on monitoring of the water chemistry and sediment fluxes suggests that physical erosion may have varied more than the chemical weathering flux during the last 150 kyr. Although very few other sites with U-series, in situ 10Be and stream monitoring data are available for comparison, the current data suggest that (1) the mass balance steady state of regolith might be commonly achieved in soil mantled landscapes, and (2) physical erosion has varied much more than

  10. Fluvial terrace dating using in situ cosmogenic {sup 21}Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Caffee, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Through the analysis of cosmic-ray produced radio-genic and stable nuclide concentrations, specifically {sup 21}Ne, we hope to date certain geomorphic features located along the tributaries of the Colorado River in the Eastern Grand Canyon and the Rainbow Plateau located in Utah. During the Quaternary, the Colorado River system was fed by glacial melting and run-off from the Wind River and Colorado Mountain Ranges. Past periods of aggradation allowed the emplacement of terrace features from debris flow activity. By dating such features we can further constrain the timing of key events such as river down cutting, terrace genesis/exposure age, and rates of surface erosion. Knowing the age and elevation of each terrace we can determine an average rate of down cutting of this river system. This, in turn, will offer information regarding alpine glaciation which is a sensitive indicator of global climate change. Studying the relative concentrations of these isotopic species in surface rocks can be useful in researching glacial periodicity and the relationship between solar activity and climate.

  11. 10Be concentrations of Red soils in Southwest Japan and its possibility of dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nakano, C.

    2004-08-01

    10Be concentrations of six Red soils distributed in Southwest Japan ranged from 0.8 × 108 to 2.7 × 109 atoms g-1, and minimum absolute ages were estimated by inventory of meteoric 10Be. The results are follows: Red soils on Toyota derived from granite (⩽25 ka), Kashii derived from Tertiary shale (⩽24 ka), Akiyoshidai derived from limestone (⩽110 ka), Okinawa Island derived from Kunigami gravel bed (⩽9 ka) and Ogasawara Island derived from agglomerate and Boninite (⩽22 and ⩽7 ka) were obtained, respectively. Soil age except with Akiyoshidai indicated younger age. It suggested that the loss of 10Be from the soil was caused by leaching of 10Be or by soil erosion, and 10Be is susceptible to leaching out from these Red soils under the humid climate condition such as Southwest Japan.

  12. Climatic controls on steady state erosion using the relationship between channel steepness and cosmogenic 10Be-derived catchment averaged erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M. W.; Whipple, K. X.; DiBiase, R. A.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    To understand landscape response to climate change, baseline controls on erosion rates must be established for given climate conditions. Theory suggests a number of climate metrics should be important to erosion (i.e. precipitation, temperature, storminess, seasonality, snow fraction). Nevertheless, definitive field evidence quantifying how climate affects erosion rate has proven difficult to obtain. This is at least partly due to the difficulty of isolating climatic influences on erosion rates from topographic and rock strength influences. We circumvent this problem by evaluating how climate influences the relationship between erosion rate and topography in settings with similar rock types. At steady state, tectonic uplift dictates erosion rate, and climate and rock strength are manifest as changes in erosional efficiency - the topographic relief necessary to maintain the tectonically imposed erosion rate. In fluvial landscapes, bedrock rivers set the relevant scale of topographic relief, which can be described by the channel steepness index. A number of recent studies have shown that the relationship between channel steepness and millennial scale erosion rates is non-linear, implying that erosional efficiency increases with relief. Work in the San Gabriel Mountains suggests this relationship is due to erosion thresholds that limit incision of channels in low relief landscapes. By using a fluvial incision model that incorporates a range of daily discharge events coupled with an erosion threshold (Lague et al., 2005), the influence of flood frequency on the relationship between channel steepness and erosion rate can be explored. We apply this same modeling approach to five other landscapes that exhibit a range of channel steepness, have similar rock types (granitoids), but that are in dramatically different climate regimes ranging from desert to rainforest (annual rainfall, P, from 0.25 to 3 m/yr). Specifically, we present new cosmogenic 10Be erosion rate data from

  13. Dating of prehistoric caves sediments and flints using {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al in quartz from Tabun Cave (Israel): Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaretto, E. E-mail: elisa@wis.weizmann.ac.il; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hui, S.K.; Kaufman, A.; Paul, M.; Weiner, S

    2000-10-01

    There is an important need to develop additional dating methods beyond the {sup 14}C limit and independent of thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We propose to apply the method of burial dating to prehistoric sites using the decay of in situ produced radioisotopes {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al. The Tabun Cave, Mt. Carmel (Israel) has a sedimentary sequence which represents the type section for about the last 800,000 years in the Levant. The sediments in the cave are mainly of aeolian origin and are rich in quartz. Flint tools are also found in the sediments. Sediment samples and flint tools were selected from the same layer. Physical and chemical procedures to extract {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al atoms from the quartz fraction of the sediments and from the flint samples were developed, while measuring the natural Al levels as a monitor of the atmospheric component of the cosmogenic nuclides. AMS measurements were performed at the 14UD Pelletron Koffler Accelerator Laboratory, Weizmann Institute, and sensitivities of the order of 1x10{sup -14}, in isotopic abundances for both {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al respectively (corresponding to {approx}5 x 10{sup 5} atoms) were obtained. First, measurements of a number of Tabun Cave sediment samples and flints show that {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al analyses have the potential for dating prehistoric cave sediments, provided problems relating to the presence of relatively large amounts of stable Al can be solved, as well as obtaining a better understanding of the burial history of the flints prior to being brought into the cave.

  14. Dating of prehistoric caves sediments and flints using 10Be and 26Al in quartz from Tabun Cave (Israel): Progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaretto, E.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hui, S. K.; Kaufman, A.; Paul, M.; Weiner, S.

    2000-10-01

    There is an important need to develop additional dating methods beyond the 14C limit and independent of thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We propose to apply the method of burial dating to prehistoric sites using the decay of in situ produced radioisotopes 10Be and 26Al. The Tabun Cave, Mt. Carmel (Israel) has a sedimentary sequence which represents the type section for about the last 800,000 years in the Levant. The sediments in the cave are mainly of aeolian origin and are rich in quartz. Flint tools are also found in the sediments. Sediment samples and flint tools were selected from the same layer. Physical and chemical procedures to extract 10Be and 26Al atoms from the quartz fraction of the sediments and from the flint samples were developed, while measuring the natural Al levels as a monitor of the atmospheric component of the cosmogenic nuclides. AMS measurements were performed at the 14UD Pelletron Koffler Accelerator Laboratory, Weizmann Institute, and sensitivities of the order of 1×10 -14, in isotopic abundances for both 10Be and 26Al respectively (corresponding to ˜5 × 10 5 atoms) were obtained. First, measurements of a number of Tabun Cave sediment samples and flints show that 10Be and 26Al analyses have the potential for dating prehistoric cave sediments, provided problems relating to the presence of relatively large amounts of stable Al can be solved, as well as obtaining a better understanding of the burial history of the flints prior to being brought into the cave.

  15. Timing of European fluvial terrace formation and incision rates constrained by cosmogenic nuclide dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.; Stor, Tomas; Torrent, Jose; Lobato, Leonardo; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-10-01

    Age constraints of late Cenozoic fluvial terraces are important for addressing surface process questions related to the incision rates of rivers, or tectonic and climate controls on denudation and sedimentation. Unfortunately, absolute age constraints of fluvial terraces are not always possible, and many previous studies have often dated terraces with relative age constraints that do not allow for robust interpretations of incision rates and timing of terrace formation. However, in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides allow absolute age determination, and hence incision rates, of fluvial deposits back to 5 Ma. Here we present, cosmogenic depth profile dating and isochron burial dating of four different river systems in Europe spanning 12° of latitude. We do this to determine river incision rates and spatial variations in the timing of terrace formation. Isochron burial age constraints of four selected terraces from the Vltava river (Czech Republic) range between 1.00 ± 0.21 to 1.99 ± 0.45Ma. An isochron burial age derived for the Allier river (Central France) is 2.00 ± 0.17Ma. Five terrace levels from the Esla river (NW Spain) were dated between 0.08 + 0.04 / - 0.01Ma and 0.59 + 0.13 / - 0.20Ma with depth profile dating. The latter age agrees with an isochron burial age of 0.52 ± 0.20Ma. Two terrace levels from the Guadalquivir river (SW Spain) were dated by depth profile dating to 0.09 + 0.03 / - 0.02Ma and 0.09 + 0.04 / - 0.03Ma. The one terrace level from the Guadalquivir river dated by isochron burial dating resulted in an age of 1.79 ± 0.18Ma. Results indicate that the cosmogenic nuclide-based ages are generally older than ages derived from previous relative age constraints leading to a factor 2-3 lower incision rates than previous work. Furthermore, the timing of terrace formation over this latitudinal range is somewhat obscured by uncertainties associated with dating older terraces and not clearly synchronous with global climate variations.

  16. LGM and Late Glacial glacier advances in the Cordillera Real and Cochabamba (Bolivia) deduced from 10Be surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, R.; Kull, Ch.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2007-10-01

    Surface exposure dating (SED) is an innovative tool already being widely applied for moraine dating and for Late Quaternary glacier and climate reconstruction. Here we present exposure ages of 28 boulders from the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, Bolivia. Our results indicate that the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Eastern Cordilleras occurred at ~22-25 ka and was thus synchronous to the global temperature minimum. We were also able to date several Late Glacial moraines to ~11-13 ka, which likely document lower temperatures and increased precipitation ("Coipasa" humid phase). Additionally, we recognize the existence of older Late Glacial moraines re-calculated to ~15 ka from published cosmogenic nuclide data. Those may coincide with the cold Heinrich 1 event in the North Atlantic region and the pronounced "Tauca" humid phase. We conclude that (i) exposure ages in the tropical Andes may have been overestimated so far due to methodological uncertainties, and (ii) although precipitation plays an important role for glacier mass balances in the tropical Andes, it becomes the dominant forcing for glaciation only in the drier and thus more precipitation-sensitive regions farther west and south.

  17. LGM and Late Glacial glacier advances in the Cordillera Real and Cochabamba (Bolivia deduced from 10Be surface exposure dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Veit

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface exposure dating (SED is an innovative tool already being widely applied for moraine dating and for Late Quaternary glacier and climate reconstruction. Here we present exposure ages of 28 boulders from the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, Bolivia. Our results indicate that the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM in the Eastern Cordilleras occurred at ~22–25 ka and was thus synchronous to the global temperature minimum. We were also able to date several Late Glacial moraines to ~11–13 ka, which likely document lower temperatures and increased precipitation ("Coipasa" humid phase. Additionally, we recognize the existence of older Late Glacial moraines re-calculated to ~15 ka from published cosmogenic nuclide data. Those may coincide with the cold Heinrich 1 event in the North Atlantic region and the pronounced "Tauca" humid phase. We conclude that (i exposure ages in the tropical Andes may have been overestimated so far due to methodological uncertainties, and (ii although precipitation plays an important role for glacier mass balances in the tropical Andes, it becomes the dominant forcing for glaciation only in the drier and thus more precipitation-sensitive regions farther west and south.

  18. Using (1)(0)Be cosmogenic isotopes to estimate erosion rates and landscape changes during the Plio-Pleistocene in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Paul H G M; Placzek, Christa J; Fink, David; Dosseto, Anthony; Roberts, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic (10)Be, measured in quartz from chert and river sediment around the Cradle of Humankind (CoH), are used to determine basin-averaged erosion rates and estimate incision rates for local river valleys. This study focusses on the catchment area that hosts Malapa cave with Australopithecus sediba, in order to compare regional versus localized erosion rates, and better constrain the timing of cave formation and fossil entrapment. Basin-averaged erosion rates for six sub-catchments draining the CoH show a narrow range (3.00 ± 0.28 to 4.15 ± 0.37 m/Mega-annum [Ma]; ±1σ) regardless of catchment size or underlying geology; e.g. the sub-catchment with Malapa Cave (3 km(2)) underlain by dolomite erodes at the same rate (3.30 ± 0.30 m/Ma) as the upper Skeerpoort River catchment (87 km(2)) underlain by shale, chert and conglomerate (3.23 ± 0.30 m/Ma). Likewise, the Skeerpoort River catchment (147 km(2)) draining the northern CoH erodes at a rate (3.00 ± 0.28 m/Ma) similar to the Bloubank-Crocodile River catchment (627 km(2)) that drains the southern CoH (at 3.62 ± 0.33 to 4.15 ± 0.37 m/Ma). Dolomite- and siliciclastic-dominated catchments erode at similar rates, consistent with physical weathering as the rate controlling process, and a relatively dry climate in more recent times. Erosion resistant chert dykes along the Grootvleispruit River below Malapa yield an incision rate of ∼8 m/Ma at steady-state erosion rates for chert of 0.86 ± 0.54 m/Ma. Results provide better palaeo-depth estimates for Malapa Cave of 7-16 m at the time of deposition of A. sediba. Low basin-averaged erosion rates and concave river profiles indicate that the landscape across the CoH is old, and eroding slowly; i.e. the physical character of the landscape changed little in the last 3-4 Ma, and dolomite was exposed on surface probably well into the Miocene. The apparent absence of early Pliocene- or Miocene-aged cave deposits and

  19. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of glaciations in the Frankland Range, southwest Tasmania reveal a limited MIS-2 ice advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Kevin; Fink, David; McConnell, Anne

    2017-02-01

    New mapping of the glacial geomorphology coupled with 10Be and 26Al exposure age dating of moraines on the flanks of the Frankland Range in south west Tasmania indicate that glacier extent during MIS-2 was far smaller than during earlier glaciations with the ice cover being confined to only the uppermost cirques of the range. Moraines further down the range flanks, ∼50-150 m lower in altitude than the MIS-2 dated advance, indicate that glaciers were only slightly larger during earlier glaciations and, depending on the interpretation of their exposure ages, may range from MIS 7 to MIS 12. These older moraines are nested inside the maximum ice limits of an even more ancient and extensive glaciation, defined by degraded valley floor moraines and coalescing glacio-fluvial fans that remain undated but appear no younger than MIS 12. Patterns of glacial erosion and moraine deposition on the Frankland Range suggest that the more recent glaciations were increasingly influenced by the erosional morphology initiated by earlier glaciers. Microclimatic differences resulting from this earlier glacial topography were particularly influential determinants of glaciation during MIS 2. These results are consistent with emerging evidence from studies of other ranges in southwest Tasmania.

  20. Cosmogenic 10Be Chronologies of Moraines and Glacially Scoured Bedrock in the Teton Range, with Implications for Paleoclimatic Events and Tectonic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Pierce, K. L.; Thackray, G. D.; Finkel, R. C.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.

    2015-12-01

    At its Pleistocene maximum, the greater Yellowstone glacial system consisted of an ice cap on the Yellowstone Plateau joined by glaciers from adjacent high mountains, including the Teton Range. In prior research, we obtained 112 exposure ages from moraines and bedrock in this region. These chronologies identified asynchronous outlet glacier culminations around the periphery of the Yellowstone glacier complex, supporting a model of spatial and temporal progressions in buildup and decay of the various ice source regions. Here we build on this previous work and present >30 recently developed 10Be exposure ages on glacial features in the Teton Range. Although the Tetons harbored a relatively small portion of the greater Yellowstone ice complex, glaciers in this range left behind some of the region's best-preserved moraine sequences and scoured bedrock. Ongoing investigations are focused on developing moraine chronologies in several drainages on the eastern and western Teton Range fronts, and obtaining exposure ages along scoured bedrock transects in glacial troughs upvalley from the dated moraines to define rates of ice recession. Notably, our dating campaign includes lateral moraines that are offset by the Teton fault, providing a rare opportunity to establish direct constraints on integrated long-term slip rates. All new and previously obtained 10Be ages are calculated using recently published calibrations and scaling of 10Be production rates. Initial results show that massive lateral moraines in selected drainages are several thousands of years older than adjacent distal end moraines, implying that the laterals were constructed during an earlier phase of the last glaciation and then acted to topographically confine subsequent ice advances. Mean ages of ca. 17-16 ka from terminal moraine loops along with limiting ages from scoured bedrock upvalley of the moraines indicate glacier culminations followed by the onset of rapid ice retreat long after the end of the global

  1. Cosmic ray exposure dating with in situ produced cosmogenic He-3 - Results from young Hawaiian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mark D.; Colodner, Debra; Trull, Thomas W.; Moore, Richard B.; O'Brien, Keran

    1990-01-01

    Cosmogenic helium contents in a suite of Hawaiian radiocarbon-dated lava flows were measured to study the use of the production rate of spallation-produced cosmogenic He-3 as a surface exposure chronometer. Basalt samples from the Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes were analyzed, showing that exposure-age dating is feasible in the 600-13000 year age range. The data suggest a present-day sea-level production rate in olivine of 125 + or - 30 atoms/g yr.

  2. Cosmogenic Exposure Dating of Paleo-Rockfall Deposits, Christchurch, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, B. H.; Quigley, M.

    2013-12-01

    The 22nd February 2011 MW 6.2 Christchurch earthquake occurred on a previously unrecognized blind thrust fault and generated severe localized vertical ground accelerations (>2 g). Constraining rupture history for such faults is challenging as there is no surface evidence of faulting (e.g., scarps, fault traces) which can be studied directly. However, the earthquake generated a range of secondary effects, including extensive rockfall and cliff collapse at many locations around the Port Hills south of Christchurch, remnants of a Miocene strato-shield volcanic complex. Many of these sites also exhibit pre-historic rockfall deposits. Here we ask whether ancient rockfall deposits can serve as off-fault evidence for paleo-earthquakes, and can be used to constrain the timing of previous episodes of severe shaking? Our site at Rapaki Bay west of Lyttelton is ideally suited for analysis of paleo-rockfall events as it has a prominent 60 m high sub-vertical cliff comprised of stratified lava flows, and a 600-m-long planar fore-slope. The site experienced significant, well-documented rockfall during the 2011 event, and has large (2-10 m diameter), lichen-covered boulders scattered down slope and partially embedded in late Quaternary loess and colluvium. We employ cosmogenic exposure dating of paleo-rockfall boulders to establish the timing of boulder emplacement. The basalt rock contains abundant clinopyroxene (augite) which is able to quantitatively retain cosmogenic 3He. This approach requires constraining the inherited 3He from non-cosmogenic sources, the potential cosmogenic exposure while boulders are on the cliff, and the background erosion rate. The probability distribution of exposure ages from the surface of pre-historically emplaced boulders show significant clustering of ages in the mid Holocene, with a long tail of individual ages out to ~60 ka. Comparison with numerical modeling of a range of rockfall event scenarios reveals the measured age distribution is most

  3. The cosmogenic record of mountain erosion transmitted across a foreland basin: Source-to-sink analysis of in situ10Be, 26Al and 21Ne in sediment of the Po river catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Hella; Malusà, Marco G.; Resentini, Alberto; Garzanti, Eduardo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the source-to-sink variations of in situ10Be, 26Al and 21Ne concentrations in modern sediment of the Po river catchment, from Alpine, Apennine, floodplain, and delta samples, in order to investigate how the cosmogenic record of orogenic erosion is transmitted across a fast-subsiding foreland basin. The in situ10Be concentrations in the analyzed samples range from ∼ 0.8 ×104 at /gQTZ to ∼ 6.5 ×104 at /gQTZ. The 10Be-derived denudation rates range from 0.1 to 1.5 mm/yr in the Alpine source areas and from 0.3 to 0.5 mm/yr in the Apenninic source areas. The highest 10Be-derived denudation rates are found in the western Central Alps (1.5 mm/yr). From these data, we constrain a sediment flux leaving the Alpine and the Apenninic source areas (>27 Mt/yr and ca. 5 Mt/yr, respectively) that is notably higher than the estimates of sediment export provided by gauging (∼10 Mt/yr at the Po delta). We observe a high variability in 10Be concentrations and 10Be-derived denudation rates in the source areas. In the Po Plain, little variability is observed, and at the same time, the area-weighed 10Be concentration of (2.29 ± 1.57) ×104 at /gQTZ (±1 SD of the dataset) from both the Alps and the Apennines is poorly modified (by tributary input) in sediment of the Po Plain ((2.68 ± 0.78 , ± 1 SD) ×104 at /gQTZ). The buffering effect of the Po floodplain largely removes scatter in 10Be signals. We test for several potential perturbations of the cosmogenic nuclide record during source to sink transfer in the Po basin. We find that sediment trapping in deep glacial lakes or behind dams does not significantly change the 10Be-mountain record. For example, similar 10Be concentrations are measured upstream and downstream of the postglacial Lake Maggiore, suggesting that denudation rates prior to lake formation were similar to today's. On the scale of the entire basin, the 10Be concentration of basins with major dams is similar to those without major dams. A potential

  4. Dating of Quaternary basalts using the cosmogenic 3He and 14C methods with implications for excess 40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, A. William; Poths, Jane; Healey, Heather A.; Reneau, Steven; Woldegabriel, Giday

    1994-02-01

    Concordant radiocarbon and cosmogenic 3He dates of 3 and 11 ka on basalt flows and associated scoria deposits from the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in New Mexico further substantiate published production rates and latitudinal and altitudinal corrections for 3He. Identical 3He concentrations in coexisting olivine and clinopyroxene confirm that these two minerals have very similar production rates. A cosmogenic 3He date of 57 ka on another flow is concordant with a U-series date and is younger than two K-Ar dates, suggesting that this flow contains excess 40Ar. This excess 40Ar is also evident in gases released by vacuum crushing of olivine-clinopyroxene fractions from all three flows.

  5. Determination of the specific activities of the cosmogenic nuclides {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al in meteorites from the Sahara by means of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meltzow, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearchemie; Herpers, U. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearchemie; Romstedt, J. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Planetologie; Dittrich-Hannen, B. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik

    1996-06-01

    In 30 samples of meteorites from the Sahara the specific activity of {sup 26}Al, and in the case of rare meteorite types also that of {sup 10}Be was determined. In most cases, the measured data are consistent with the suggestions about possible pairings which were based on mineralogical and petrographical investigations. The investigated CR and CH chondrites were found to be saturated in {sup 26}Al and {sup 10}Be. The {sup 26}Al and {sup 10}Be production rates can be assumed to be (44.5{+-}0.9) dpm/kg and (20.7{+-}0.3) dpm/kg, respectively, for CR as well as (30.1{+-}0.9) dpm/kg and (16.7{+-}0.4) dpm/kg for CH chondrites. Furthermore the {sup 26}Al data of 11 ordinary chondrites can also be interpreted as saturation activities and allow the assumption of 3.10{sup 6} y to be the lower limit of the exposure ages of these meteorites. In the case of Acfer 277, in addition to the {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al determinations, a study on nuclear tracks was performed. These data suggest that the investigated sample was located at no more than 8 cm below the original surface of a meteoroid of a radius between 25 cm and 65 cm which traveled through space (0.3{+-}0.1).10{sup 6} y before entering the earth`s atmosphere. (orig.)

  6. A test of the cosmogenic 10Be(meteoric)/9Be proxy for simultaneously determining basin-wide erosion rates, denudation rates, and the degree of weathering in the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, H.; Blanckenburg, F.; Dannhaus, N.; Bouchez, J.; Gaillardet, J.; Guyot, J. L.; Maurice, L.; Roig, H.; Filizola, N.; Christl, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an extensive investigation of a new erosion and weathering proxy derived from the 10Be(meteoric)/9Be(stable) ratio in the Amazon River basin. This new proxy combines a radioactive atmospheric flux tracer, meteoric cosmogenic 10Be, with 9Be, a trace metal released by weathering. Results show that meteoric 10Be concentrations ([10Be]) and 10Be/9Be ratios increase by >30% from the Andes to the lowlands. We can calculate floodplain transfer times of 2-30 kyr from this increase. Intriguingly however, the riverine exported flux of meteoric 10Be shows a deficit with respect to the atmospheric depositional 10Be flux. Most likely, the actual area from which the 10Be flux is being delivered into the mainstream is smaller than the basin-wide one. Despite this imbalance, denudation rates calculated from 10Be/9Be ratios from bed load, suspended sediment, and water samples from Amazon Rivers agree within a factor of 2 with published in situ 10Be denudation rates. Erosion rates calculated from meteoric [10Be], measured from depth-integrated suspended sediment samples, agree with denudation rates, suggesting that grain size-induced variations in [10Be] are minimized when using such sampling material instead of bed load. In addition, the agreement between erosion and denudation rates implies minor chemical weathering intensity in most Amazon tributaries. Indeed, the Be-specific weathering intensity, calculated from mobilized 9Be comprising reactive and dissolved fractions that are released during weathering, is constant at approximately 40% of the total denudation from the Andes across the lowlands to the Amazon mouth. Therefore, weathering in the Amazon floodplain is not detected.

  7. Growth ages of ferromanganese crusts from the western and central Pacific: Comparison between nannofossil analysis and 10Be dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhenbo; SHI Fengdeng; M.Hiroyuki; SHI Xuefa; WU Yonghua; SU Xin; LI Xiaoyan; WANG Kunshan; YANG Yongliang; GE Shulan; JU Xiaohua

    2006-01-01

    Based on results of nannofossil analysis and 10Be dating in ferromanganese crusts M1-1 and A1-1 (no nannofossils were found in it), from the western and central Pacific respectively, it is found that the crust growth ages from nannofossil biostratigraphy agree well with those based on 10Be isotope analysis. Both crusts have three growth layers, and the oldest layer was deposited in Miocene at about 12.80 Ma. The maximum, minimum, and average growth rates of crust A1-1 (from the central Pacific)are 8.11, 1.92 and 3.47 mm/Ma, and those of crust M1-1 (from the western Pacific) are 2.93, 0.47, and0.94 mm/Ma.

  8. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  9. New cosmogenic exposure dates from Sermilik Fjord, southeast Greenland document rapid early Holocene retreat of Helheim Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, A. L.; Rainsley, E.; Murray, T.; Fogwill, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers are currently the dominant route for mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Over the last decade Helheim Glacier, in concert with the majority of marine-terminating glaciers of the southeast sector of the GrIS, has exhibited dramatic changes in speed, thinning and retreat rates. The Holocene retreat history of the outlet glaciers of southeast Greenland is, however, largely unconstrained. Without detailed records of retreat over longer-time scales recent changes cannot be placed in context, nor is there sufficient evidence to constrain ice sheet models for improved estimates of future sea level rise. We present the first direct chronological constraint on the retreat of ice from Sermilik Fjord in southeast Greenland, the former drainage route of Helheim Glacier. Samples spanning the full length of the 80 km fjord were collected from erratics and streamlined bedrock in July 2009-10 and analysed for terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) dating. Overlapping exposure ages indicate rapid evacuation of ice from much of the fjord at around 10.5 ka BP. Such substantial early Holocene retreat coincides with establishment of the local marine limit at c. 11 ka BP (Long et al. 2008). The new dates extend and confirm results from a tributary valley close to the fjord mouth that placed retreat from the present day coastline at c. 11.5 ka (Roberts et al. 2008). References: Roberts, D.H., Long, A.J., Schnabel, C., Freeman, S. and Simpson, M.J.R. 2008. The deglacial history of southeast sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum. Quaternary Science Reviews, 27, 1505-1516. Long, A.J., Roberts, R.H., Simpson, M.J.R., Dawson, S., Milne, G.A. and Huybrechts, P. 2008. Late Weichselian relative sea-level changes and ice sheet history in southeast Greenland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 272, 8-18.

  10. Terrestrial Cosmogenic-Nuclide Dating of Alluvial Fans in Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machette, Michael N.; Slate, Janet L.; Phillips, Fred M.

    2008-01-01

    We have used terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) to establish the age of some of the most extensive Quaternary alluvial fans in Death Valley, California. These intermediate-age alluvial fans are most extensive on the western side of the valley, where tectonic deformation is considerably less pronounced than on the eastern side of the valley. These fans are characterized by a relatively smooth, densely packed desert pavement formed by well-varnished (blackened) clasts. These surfaces have been mapped as the Q2 gravel by previous workers and as unit Qai (intermediate age) by us. However, the intermediate-age gravels probably contain multiple subunits, as evidenced by slight differences in morphologic expression, soil formation, and inset geomorphic relations. The TCN technique used herein sums the cosmogenic 36Cl in approximately 2.5-meter-deep profiles through soil and host alluvium, thus avoiding some of the problems associated with the more typical surface-exposure dating of boulders or smaller clasts. Our TCN 36Cl dating of 12 depth profiles indicates that these intermediate-age (Qai) alluvial fans range from about 100 to 40 kilo-annum (ka), with a mean age of about 70 ka. An alternative interpretation is that alluvial unit Qai was deposited in two discrete episodes from 90 to 80 ka and from 60 to 50 ka, before and after MIS (marine oxygen-isotope stage) 4 (respectively). Without an intermediate-age unit, such as MIS 4 lake deposits, we can neither disprove nor prove that Qai was deposited in two discrete intervals or over a longer range of time. Thus, in Death Valley, alluvial unit Qai largely brackets MIS 4, which is not associated with a deep phase of Lake Manly. These Qai fans extend to elevations of about -46 meters (150 feet below sea level) and have not been transgressed by Lake Manly, suggesting that MIS 4 or MIS 2 lakes were rather shallow in Death Valley, perhaps because they lacked inflow from surface runoff of the Sierra Nevada drainages through

  11. Rapidly Melting Ice Caps of Northern Baffin Island: Insights From Cosmogenic and Conventional Radiocarbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. K.; Miller, G. H.; Briner, J. P.; Lifton, N.; Devogel, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    The interior plateau of northern Baffin Island in the eastern Canadian Arctic is home to several small (history on the plateau since deglaciation 6 ka, several techniques have been used in concert. The recent extent of the ice caps during the Little Ice Age can be estimated from the preservation of lichen trimlines across much of the plateau. These trimlines represent previous multi-year snow or ice cover and their aerial extent can be measured via satellite imagery. Based on these measurements, modern ice caps represent only ~3% of ice-cap extent during the Little Ice Age. Radiocarbon dating of moss, preserved beneath the ice caps due to their cold-based nature, suggests a sudden expansion of ice cover around 520 calendar years before present (cal BP), indicated by a mode of 7 dates of approximately this age. This coincides with a pulse of global volcanic activity; predicted cooling from increased aerosol loading may have triggered rapid ice-cap growth. However, dead moss emerging at three sites is more than 1000 years old, with a maximum age of 1326±15 cal BP, indicating that portions of the remaining ice caps have remained intact from more than 1000 years Further constraints on ice cap size are provided by 14C cosmogenic exposure dating. 14C concentrations in rocks at the modern ice margin are too low to be the result of continuous exposure since deglaciation followed by shielding for 500-1000 years by ice cover. Exposure history modeling indicates at least one additional prior period of ice cover of approximately 1000 years. This cold interval most likely occurred sometime since 4 ka, after the Holocene Thermal Maximum in the Arctic and coeval with the onset of Neoglaciation. Radiocarbon dating reveals that some plateau ice caps have been continuously present for more than 1000 years, whereas others formed early in the Little Ice Age (~520 cal BP). Even without additional warming, continuation of current climatic conditions on northern Baffin Island will

  12. The deglaciation of the Tröllaskagi Peninsula, Northern Iceland, based on cosmogenic datings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, David; Andres, Nuria; Sæmundsson, Þorsteinn; Brynjólfsson, Skafti

    2015-04-01

    .5 ka was obtained on a polished threshold in the Eyjafjafjörður valley, 3 km south of the town of Akureyri. d) The behavior of the inland valleys in the Tröllaskagi Peninsula is very different from that of the great fjords and valleys which drain the interior of the island. The most significant feature, limiting the application of cosmogenic dating methods, is the total absence of polished thresholds, probably because they are composed of easily fragmented tertiary lavas. The summits are completely covered with block fields and periglacial pattern ground. The valley slopes are extremely unstable and affected by different types of mass movements. Cosmogenic methods can only be applied to moraine blocks located very near the Little Ice Age (LIA) moraines, on stable platforms. These dating methods have been applied in two valleys: in the Hóladalur valley, north of the Hólar farm, and in the Vatnsdalur valley, an affluent of the Svarfaðardalur valley, NW of the town of Dalvik. The results were very similar in both cases: the outermost moraines can be linked to the Oldest Dryas with minimum dates of 16.9 ± 1.4 ka, demonstrating a much more limited glaciation in the interior of this peninsula than in the rest of the island. Some fossil rock glaciers remained inactive at the end of the Oldest Dryas, with ages for the front termini of around 14 ka. There are also moraines from the Younger Dryas, dating between 12 and 11.3 ka. The only moraines completely within the Holocene are found in the Vatnsdalur valley, of 9 ka. Ablation moraines in this same valley, which appear to be much more recent, obtained ages of 1.4 and 0.8 ka. All these formations are found in a belt of 500 m wide which surrounds the snout of the present glaciers. Thus, it can be concluded that in the inner Tröllaskagi Peninsula, the glaciers had already retreated to their headwalls before the Oldest Dryas. Glacial advances have occurred since then, although these are very limited with a maximum

  13. Cosmogenic Nuclide Exposure Dating of the Tiltill Rock Avalanche, Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K. R.; Pluhar, C. J.; Stone, J. O.; Stock, G. M.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Yosemite National Park serves as an excellent natural laboratory for studying rock falls and rock avalanches because these are the main processes modifying the nearly vertical slopes of this recently glaciated landscape. Mass wasting represents a significant hazard in the region and the database of previous rock falls and other mass wasting events in Yosemite is extensive, dating back to the mid-1800s. However, this record is too short to capture the recurrence characteristics and triggering mechanisms of the very largest events, necessitating studies of the geologic record of mass wasting. Rock falls and rock avalanches are readily dated by cosmogenic nuclide methods due to their instantaneous formation, and results can be tied to triggering events such as seismic activity (e.g. Stock et al., 2009). Here, we apply exposure dating to the Holocene Tiltill rock avalanche north of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. The deposit comprises what appear to be two separate lobes of rock and debris, yielding a total volume of ~3.1 x 106 m3. Assuming an erosion rate of 0.0006 cm/yr and neglecting snowpack shielding, preliminary data suggest a mean exposure age of 11,000 + 600 year B.P. for both deposits, indicating that they were emplaced in a single event. The age of the Tiltill 'slide' is similar to earthquakes on the Owens Valley Fault between 10,800 + 600 and 10,200 + 200 cal year B.P. (Bacon, 2007) and the White Mountain Fault, ~10,000 cal year B.P. (Reheis, 1996; DePolo, 1989). Given that movement on the Owens Valley fault in 1872 caused a number of rock falls in Yosemite and the coincidence of ages between the Tiltill 'slide' and paleoseismic events, a large earthquake in Eastern Sierra Nevada may have triggered this event. Other trigger events are also possibilities, but only through compilation of a database of large rock avalanches can statistically significant groupings of events begin to demonstrate whether seismic triggering is a dominant process.

  14. Last glacial maximum climate inferences from cosmogenic dating and glacier modeling of the western Uinta ice field, Uinta Mountains, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsnider, Kurt A.; Laabs, Benjamin J. C.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Mickelson, David M.; Singer, Bradley S.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2008-01-01

    During the last glacial maximum (LGM), the western Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah were occupied by the Western Uinta Ice Field. Cosmogenic 10Be surface-exposure ages from the terminal moraine in the North Fork Provo Valley and paired 26Al and 10Be ages from striated bedrock at Bald Mountain Pass set limits on the timing of the local LGM. Moraine boulder ages suggest that ice reached its maximum extent by 17.4 ± 0.5 ka (± 2σ). 10Be and 26Al measurements on striated bedrock from Bald Mountain Pass, situated near the former center of the ice field, yield a mean 26Al/ 10Be ratio of 5.7 ± 0.8 and a mean exposure age of 14.0 ± 0.5 ka, which places a minimum-limiting age on when the ice field melted completely. We also applied a mass/energy-balance and ice-flow model to investigate the LGM climate of the western Uinta Mountains. Results suggest that temperatures were likely 5 to 7°C cooler than present and precipitation was 2 to 3.5 times greater than modern, and the western-most glaciers in the range generally received more precipitation when expanding to their maximum extent than glaciers farther east. This scenario is consistent with the hypothesis that precipitation in the western Uintas was enhanced by pluvial Lake Bonneville during the last glaciation.

  15. Paleoseismology of Upper Plate Faults in the Chilean Covergent Margin: Insights from 10BE and OSL Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, G.; Cortes, J. A.; Binnie, S.; Robinson, R.; Toledo, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Chilean convergent margin is the locus of most of the largest subduction earthquakes recorded in history. Slip deficit along this plate boundary is absorbed by elastic deformation of the upper plate. Numerical models and geodetic data suggest a fully elastic behaviour of the overriding crust and that deformation is balanced between inter- and co-seismic phases earthquake cycle; thus, non permanent deformation should be expected. However,the topographic surface of the coastal area, especially in the arid northern region of Chile (18°-26°S), shows clear evidences of permanent deformation expressed as kilometric-long fault scarps produced by normal faults. It suggests that normal faulting is a regional-scale extended process characteristic of the near surface structure of the upper plate. Some unanswered, yet critical, questions in this plate boundary are the present activity of these faults and the causal relationship between them and the subduction earthquake cycle. In order to answer these questions we conducted a paleoseismological project aimed at understanding the most recent activity of the upper plate faults in northern Chile. Here, we present the first results of two main faults located nearby the city of Antofagasta and the Mejillones Peninsula. One of these faults corresponds to the main strand of the Atacama Fault System whereas the other is the Mejillones Fault. At least 18 trenches were excavated for paleoseismological logging across these faults. OSL samples were extracted from wedge shaped colluvium and 10Be exposures ages were determined in alluvial surfaces displaced by the faults. Our results indicate that fault scarps were formed during Late Pleistocene-Holocene with a fault slip rate of 0.3 to 0.6 m/ky. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these faults generated large Mw~7 earthquakes with recurrence interval of many thousands years. In the Mejillones Fault, we determined that the elapsed time since the last large earthquake Mw~6.7 is ~3 ky BP

  16. The Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet deglaciation and its contribution to meltwater pulse 1a: Constraining ice sheet history with geomorphological mapping and 10Be exposure dating on Svalbard's southern cape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothaft, D. B.; Koffman, T.; Schaefer, J. M.; Young, N. E.; Hormes, A.; Briner, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Pinpointing the sources of meltwater pulse (MWP) 1a—the most abrupt period of sea level rise during the last glacial termination—remains one of paleoclimatology's greatest challenges, with implications for the understanding of rapid climate change, isostatic rebound, and past ocean circulation. Here, we present an annotated geomorphological map of a southern region of Svalbard, Norway, that we will use in the interpretation of a soon-to-be published 10Be chronology of this study area where no cosmogenic nuclide exposure data has yet been produced. From this map, we infer historic ice sheet thickness, flow rate, and erosivity. Together, this data will enable us to constrain ice sheet volume change over time in southern Svalbard. The map identifies raised beaches at an altitude of 40 m, indicating an ice sheet thickness of 400-800 m during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) when compared to other shoreline data from the region and ice sheet models. We also observed an abundance of glacially smoothed features in valleys, despite an absence of such features at higher elevations. This could suggest a transition from warm-based, erosive ice to cold-based, non-destructive ice with increasing elevation. It is also possible that mountain peaks in this region were not glaciated at LGM. It is important to assess the historic erosivity of an ice sheet because cosmogenic nuclides may be inherited from prior interstadials when the bedrock was deglaciated, if not "reset" by erosion. This can result in erroneously old exposure dates. If this portion of the Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet (SBSIS) did contribute largely to MWP-1a, then we would expect exposure dates from sites differing in elevation by 100 m or more to fall within a 500-year range, centered around 14 ka. Expeditions to collect samples for exposure dating at other field sites in southern Svalbard, scheduled for the coming field season, will help to further inform our understanding of the SBSIS deglaciation and the MWP

  17. Late Quaternary Glacial Chronology in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica, Investigated Using Cosmogenic Cl-36 Surface Exposure Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Potter, R.; Horn, S.; Orvis, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The role of the tropics in past and future climate change has garnered significant attention in recent decades, but debate still exists over climate linkages between the tropics and the middle and high latitudes. Glaciers in tropical mountains are highly sensitive indicators of climate, and glacial landforms left behind by past glacier fluctuations provide key evidence of paleoclimate trends and their forcing mechanisms. We investigated late Quaternary glacial chronology from two glaciated valleys on the Chirripó massif in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica. Previous studies in this highland have constrained the most recent deglaciation to 12.4-9.7 ka cal BP based on radiocarbon dates on basal sediments of glacial lakes within the cirque at the head of the Morrenas Valley. However, no studies have been conducted to constrain the ages of the moraines located down valley. We dated the formation ages of these moraines in the Morrenas and Talari valleys using cosmogenic Cl-36 surface exposure dating. Our results indicate a major glacial event ~21-18 ka, broadly synchronous with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Glaciers during this period advanced 3.2-3.4 km down valley on both sides of the Chirripó massif. Our ages also suggest periods of glacial retreat or standstills ~18-10 ka before complete deglaciation of this highland ~10 ka. These results provide insight into the timing and extent of glacial events in this tropical highland that is of critical importance for reconstructing regional and global climate patterns.

  18. Cosmic ray exposure dating with in situ produced cosmogenic 3He: results from young Hawaiian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M.D.; Colodner, D.; Trull, T.W.; Moore, R.B.; O'Brien, K.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to determine the in situ production rate of spallation-produced cosmogenic 3He, and evaluate its use as a surface exposure chronometer, we have measured cosmogenic helium contents in a suite of Hawaiian radiocarbon-dated lava flows. The lava flows, ranging in age from 600 to 13,000 years, were collected from Hualalai and Mauna Loa volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Because cosmic ray surface-exposure dating requires the complete absence of erosion or soil cover, these lava flows were selected specifically for this purpose. The 3He production rate, measured within olivine phenocrysts, was found to vary significantly, ranging from 47 to 150 atoms g-1 yr-1 (normalized to sea level). Although there is considerable scatter in the data, the samples younger than 10,000 years are well-preserved and exposed, and the production rate variations are therefore not related to erosion or soil cover. Data averaged over the past 2000 years indicate a sea-level 3He production rate of 125 ?? 30 atoms g-1 yr-1, which agrees well with previous estimates. The longer record suggests a minimum in sea level normalized 3He production rate between 2000 and 7000 years (55 ?? 15 atoms g-1 yr-1), as compared to samples younger than 2000 years (125 ?? 30 atoms g-1 yr-1), and those between 7000 and 10,000 years (127 ?? 19 atoms g-1 yr-1). The minimum in production rate is similar in age to that which would be produced by variations in geomagnetic field strength, as indicated by archeomagnetic data. However, the production rate variations (a factor of 2.3 ?? 0.8) are poorly determined due to the large uncertainties in the youngest samples and questions of surface preservation for the older samples. Calculations using the atmospheric production model of O'Brien (1979) [35], and the method of Lal and Peters (1967) [11], predict smaller production rate variations for similar variation in dipole moment (a factor of 1.15-1.65). Because the production rate variations, archeomagnetic data

  19. Deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica from glacial geomorphology and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Shanks, R.; Xu, S.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.

    2017-02-01

    The retreat history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is important for understanding rapid deglaciation, as well as to constrain numerical ice sheet models and ice loading models required for glacial isostatic adjustment modelling. There is particular debate about the extent of grounded ice in the Weddell Sea embayment at the Last Glacial Maximum, and its subsequent deglacial history. Here we provide a new dataset of geomorphological observations and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages of erratic samples that constrain the deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, adjacent to the present day Foundation Ice Stream and Academy Glacier in the southern Weddell Sea embayment. We show there is evidence of at least two glaciations, the first of which was relatively old and warm-based, and a more recent cold-based glaciation. During the most recent glaciation ice thickened by at least 450 m in the Williams Hills and at least 380 m on Mt Bragg. Progressive thinning from these sites was well underway by 10 ka BP and ice reached present levels by 2.5 ka BP, and is broadly similar to the relatively modest thinning histories in the southern Ellsworth Mountains. The thinning history is consistent with, but does not mandate, a Late Holocene retreat of the grounding line to a smaller-than-present configuration, as has been recently hypothesized based on ice sheet and glacial isostatic modelling. The data also show that clasts with complex exposure histories are pervasive and that clast recycling is highly site-dependent. These new data provide constraints on a reconstruction of the retreat history of the formerly-expanded Foundation Ice Stream, derived using a numerical flowband model.

  20. Constraining the age of Aboriginal rock art using cosmogenic Be-10 and Al-26 dating of rock shelter collapse in the Kimberley region, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazes, Gaël; Fink, David; Fülöp, Réka-Hajnalka; Codilean, Alexandru T.

    2017-04-01

    The Kimberley region, northwest Australia, possesses an extensive and diverse collection of aboriginal rock art that potentially dates to more than 40,000 years ago. However, dating of such art using conventional techniques remains problematic. Here, we develop a new approach which makes use of the difference in production rates of in-situ 10Be and 26Al between intact rock walls and exposed surfaces of detached slabs from rock art shelters to constrain the age of Aboriginal rock-art. In the prevailing sandstone lithology of the Kimberley region, open cave-like rock shelters with cantilevered overhangs evolve by the collapse of unstable, partially rectangular, blocks weakened typically along joint-lines and fractures. On release, those slabs which extend outside the rock face perimeter will experience a higher production rate of cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al than the adjacent rock which remains intact within the shelter. The dating of these freshly exposed slabs can help reconstruct rock-shelter formation and provide either maximum or minimum ages for the rock art within the shelter. At each site, both the upper-face of the newly exposed fallen slab and the counterpart intact rock surface on the ceiling need to be sampled at their exact matching-point to ensure that the initial pre-release cosmogenic nuclide concentration on slab and ceiling are identical. The calculation of the timing of the event of slab release is strongly dependent on the local production rate, the new shielding of the slab surface and the post-production that continues on the ceiling sample at the matching point. The horizon, ceiling and slab shielding are estimated by modelling the distribution of neutron and muon trajectories in the irregular shaped rock-shelter and slab using 3D photogrammetric reconstruction from drone flights and a MATLAB code (modified from G. Balco, 2014) to estimate attenuation distances and model the production rate at each sample. Five rock-art sites have been dated and

  1. Dating buried glacier ice using cosmogenic 3He in surface clasts: Theory and application to Mullins Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Sean L.; Marchant, David R.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a modeling framework to describe the accumulation of terrestrial cosmogenic 3He in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers. The framework helps quantify the expected range in cosmogenic-nuclide inventories for measured clasts at the surface of supraglacial debris. We first delineate the physical factors that impact clast movement within, and on top of, debris-covered glaciers, including the effects of (1) ice ablation, (2) erosion at the debris surface, and (3) stochastic geomorphic processes that impact clast movement within and on top of supraglacial debris; we then explicitly calculate the impact of each process in altering the total inventory of cosmogenic nuclides in surface clasts. Assuming basic elements of ice-dynamics and debris entrainment are known, the model results provide an estimate for the total accumulation of cosmogenic nuclides, as well as the expected range in nuclide inventories, for any clast at the surface of debris-covered glaciers. Because the values are quantified, the approach can be applied to help evaluate the robustness of existing and future cosmogenic datasets applied to these systems. As a test, we applied our model framework towards Mullins Glacier, a cold-based debris-covered alpine glacier in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. Our simulated values for cosmogenic-nuclide inventories compare well with those previously measured from fifteen surface cobbles along Mullins Glacier (3He), both in terms of expected ranges and absolute values, and suggest that our model framework adequately incorporates most of the complicating factors that impact cosmogenic datasets for cold-based, debris-covered glaciers. Relating these cosmogenic-nuclide inventories to ice ages, the results show that ice within Mullins Glacier increases non-linearly, ranging from 12 ka to ∼220 ka in areas of active flow, to ≫1.6 Ma in areas of slow-moving-to-stagnant ice.

  2. Timing of last deglaciation in the Cantabrian Mountains (Iberian Peninsula; North Atlantic Region) based on in situ-produced 10Be exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier L.; Keddadouche, Karim; Aster Team

    2017-09-01

    The Last Glacial Termination led to major changes in ice sheet coverage that disrupted global patterns of atmosphere and ocean circulation. Paleoclimate records from Iberia suggest that westerly episodes played a key role in driving heterogeneous climate in the North Atlantic Region. We used 10Be Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating to explore the glacier response of small mountain glaciers (ca. 5 km2) that developed on the northern slope of the Cantabrian Mountains (Iberian Peninsula), an area directly under the influence of the Atlantic westerly winds. We analyzed twenty boulders from three moraines and one rock glacier arranged as a recessional sequence preserved between 1150 and 1540 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the Monasterio valley (Redes Natural Park). Results complement previous chronologic data based on radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence from the Monasterio valley, which suggest a local Glacial Maximum (local GM) prior to 33 ka BP and a long-standing glacier advance at 24 ka coeval to the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Resultant 10Be CRE ages suggest a progressive retreat and thinning of the Monasterio glacier over the time interval 18.1-16.7 ka. This response is coeval with the Heinrich Stadial 1, an extremely cold and dry climate episode initiated by a weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Glacier recession continued through the Bølling/Allerød period as indicate the minimum exposure ages obtained from a cirque moraine and a rock glacier nested within this moraine, which yielded ages of 14.0 and 13.0 ka, respectively. Together, they suggest that the Monasterio glacier experienced a gradual transition from glacier to rock glacier activity as the AMOC started to strengthen again. Glacial evidence ascribable to the Younger Dryas cooling was not dated in the Monasterio valley, but might have occurred at higher elevations than evidence dated in this work. The evolution of former glaciers documented in the

  3. Cosmogenic radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Jürg; Von Steiger, R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. This book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any f

  4. Glacial and volcanic evolution on Nevado Coropuna (Tropical Andes) based on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, J.; Palacios, D.; Vázquez-Selém, L.

    2012-04-01

    flow of 6 ka, to the East, where we dated two units similar to the previous one at 2 and Andes. Quaternary Science Reviews, 1-13. Bromley, R.M. et al., 2011. Glacier fluctuations in the southern Peruvian Andes during the late-glacial period, constrained with cosmogenic 3He. Journal of Quaternary Science, 26 (1): 37-43. Fritz, S.C. et al., 2007. Lake Titicaca 370KYr LT01-2B Sediment Database. Lake Titicaca 370KYr LT01-2B Sediment Data. IGBP PAGES/World Data Center-A for Paleoclimatology Data Contribution Series # 92-008. NOAA/NGDC Paleoclimatology Program. Boulder (EEUU). Lea, D.W. et al., 2006. Galápagos TR163-22 Foraminiferal ^18O and Mg/Ca Data and SST Reconstruction. IGBP PAGES/World Data Center for Paleoclimatology Data Contribution Series # 2006-090. NOAA/NCDC Paleoclimatology Program, Boulder (EEUU). Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

  5. Reconstructing the paleoseismic history of the Priene-Sazli Fault using 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating method, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Sümer, Ökmen; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Uzel, Bora; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2014-05-01

    The 300-km wide West Anatolian Extensional Province is one of the regions of intense seismic activity in the world within the Alpine-Himalayan belt. Deformation pattern in the area is controlled by three major E-W trending graben systems of Gediz, Küçük Menderes and Büyük Menderes which have been formed as a result of roughly N-S extensional tectonic regime since the early Miocene. These graben systems show evidences of surface faulting during the Pleistocene-Holocene and are geomorphologically characterized by well-exposed limestone normal fault scarps with a relief of tens of meters and well-preserved slickenlines. Since limestones are resistant to weathering, the limestone scarps can efficiently record several past earthquakes. Cosmogenic 36Cl is the only element to identify and date the rupture events. Each rupture causes exposure of previously buried section of the scarp to the surface. Accordingly, due to being well enough exposed to cosmic rays, accumulation of 36Cl accelerates during period of quiescence. Thus, distribution of measured 36Cl concentrations can be applied to investigate periods of seismic activity and inactivity and also to calculate the vertical displacement along the fault plane in association with each rupture. In this study, we focus on the Priene-Sazli Fault, located on the most western part of Büyük Menderes graben. Along the active fault zone, well exposed archaeological sites (e.g. Priene) have been discovered, where destructive historical earthquakes have left evidence of ancient damages in the historical period and during the 20th century. The Priene-Sazli Fault caused the July 16, 1955 Söke-Balat earthquake (M=6.8) with fault-plane solution indicating of normal southeast downthrow along with subsidiary dextral motion. We collected 117 samples from four continuous strips on the Priene-Sazli Fault to measure 36Cl concentrations. We used a new Matlab code to identify the significant ruptures and their timing. Our preliminary

  6. Long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault, from 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating of an offset alluvial fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    der Woerd, J v; Klinger, Y; Sieh, K; Tapponnier, P; Ryerson, F; M?riaux, A

    2006-01-13

    We determine the long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault in the southeastern Indio Hills using {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al isotopes to date an offset alluvial fan surface. Field mapping complemented with topographic data, air photos and satellite images allow to precisely determine piercing points across the fault zone that are used to measure an offset of 565 {+-} 80 m. A total of twenty-six quartz-rich cobbles from three different fan surfaces were collected and dated. The tight cluster of nuclide concentrations from 19 samples out of 20 from the offset fan surface implies a simple exposure history, negligible prior exposure and erosion, and yield an age of 35.5 {+-} 2.5 ka. The long-term slip rate of the San Andreas Fault south of Biskra Palms is thus 15.9 {+-} 3.4 mm/yr. This rate is about 10 mm/yr slower than geological (0-14 ka) and short-term geodetic estimates for this part of the San Andreas Fault implying changes in slip rate or in faulting behavior. This result puts new constraints on the slip rate of the San Jacinto and on the Eastern California Shear Zone for the last 35 ka. Our study shows that more sites along the major faults of southern California need to be targeted to better constrain the slip-rates over different time scales.

  7. Erratic boulder trains and cosmogenic exposure dating of former glacial limits: A case-study from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvill, Christopher; Stokes, Chris; Bentley, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Erratic Boulder Trains (EBTs) are a spectacular yet poorly-understood glacial geomorphological feature. These linear clusters of glacial erratic boulders help to illustrate the flow-lines of former glaciers by pin-pointing the parent rock from which they have originated and are often used as targets for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Consequently, there is a need to understand their geomorphological significance to improve ice-sheet reconstructions and provide important contextual information for dating studies. The EBTs in Tierra del Fuego are some of the finest examples of this feature in the world, and this paper presents the first comprehensive mapping and physical assessment of four boulder trains. Unlike most other examples, they were deposited laterally rather than medially and are tightly clustered, presenting linear features only a few kilometres long that contain hundreds to thousands of huge boulders (often >8 m in diameter). The size and angularity of the boulders strongly supports the hypothesis that they were deposited as a supraglacial rock avalanche. The boulders have been the subject of previous cosmogenic dating, which have yielded anomalously young ages from deposits thought to be hundreds of thousands of years old. Analysis of weathering proxies shows little difference between boulder trains thought to be of radically different ages, with important implications for the timing of glaciations and potentially contradicting previous age constraints on glacial limits in the region.

  8. 宇宙成因核素埋藏年龄测定及其在地球科学中的应用%TERRESTRIAL IN SITU COSMOGENIC NUCLIDES BURIAL DATING AND ITS APPLICATION IN GEOSCIENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁兆德; 陈杰; 张会平

    2011-01-01

    原地生成宇宙成因核素埋藏测年方法,在晚新生代沉积物尤其是陆相碎屑沉积物测年上具有广泛的应用前景.在同一岩石或矿物中的宇宙成因核素对,例如26Al和10Be在地表的生成速率比值是固定的,不受纬度和海拔的影响,但是这一核素对分别具有不同的半衰期.在地表经历了暴露的沉积物被埋藏后,该比值会随着时间而降低,因此具有不同的半衰期的核素对(例如26Al/10Be)可以作为一种地质时钟,测年范围在几十万a至5Ma.文中简要介绍了目前常用的4种方法及其应用:暴露-埋藏图解法、深度剖面法、等时线法以及26Al-21Ne和10Be-21Ne法.%Terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides burial dating has a promising application in dating of late Cenozoic detrital sediments,for example,cave sediments,fluvial sediments and moraine. This method relies on a pair of cosmic-ray-produced nuclides that are produced in the same rock or mineral target at a fixed ratio, but have different half-lives. For example, 26Al and 10Be are produced in quartz at 26Al: 10Be = 6.75: 1. The ratio is not affected by latitude and altitude. After sediments are buried, the ratio would become less as time goes. Therefore, 26Al/10Be ratio can be used as a geological clock. The dating range can be from several hundreds of thousand years to five million years. In this article, we introduce four methods and their applications: exposure-burial diagram method,depth profile method,isochron method, 26Al-21Ne and 10Be-21Ne method. Exposure-burial diagram method is often applied to cave sediments dating, for exposure-burial history of cave deposits is easy. Depth profile method is applied to fluvial sediments dating. There is a good application for isochron approach in till-paleosol sequences in North America. 26Al-21Ne and 10Be-21Ne method has a great potential applicaton in future for its larger dating time and less uncertainty than other methods. The dating method still

  9. Placing Absolute Timing on Basin Incision Adjacent to the Colorado Front Range: Results from Meteoric and in Situ 10BE Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehnforth, M.; Anderson, R. S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    A sequence of six levels of gravel-capped surfaces, mapped as Pliocene to Holocene in age, are cut into Cretaceous shale in the northwestern part of the Denver Basin immediately adjacent to the Colorado Front Range (CFR). The existing relative age constraints and terrace correlations suggest that the incision of the Denver Basin occurred at a steady and uniform rate of 0.1 mm yr-1 since the Pliocene. As absolute ages in this landscape are rare, they have the potential to test the reliability of the existing chronology, and to illuminate the detailed history of incision. We explore the timing of basin incision and the variability of geomorphic process rates through time by dating the three highest surfaces at the northwestern edge of the Denver Basin using both in situ and meteoric 10Be concentrations. As the tectonic conditions have not changed since the Pliocene, much of the variability of generation and abandonment of alluvial surfaces likely reflects the influence of glacial-interglacial climate variations. We selected Gunbarrel Hill (mapped as pre-Rocky Flats (Pliocene)), Table Mountain (mapped as Rocky Flats (early Pleistocene)), and the Pioneer surface (mapped as Verdos (Pleistocene, ~640 ka)) as sample locations. We took two amalgamated clast samples on the Gunbarrel Hill surface, and dated depth profiles using meteoric and in situ 10Be on the Table Mountain and Pioneer surfaces. In addition, we measured the in situ 10Be concentrations of 6 boulder samples from the Table Mountain surface. We find that all three surfaces are significantly younger than expected and that in situ and meteoric age measurements largely agree with each other. The samples from the pre-Rocky Flats site (Gunbarrel Hill) show ages of 250 and 310 ka, ignoring post-depositional surface erosion. The ages of the Table Mountain and Pioneer sites fall within the 120 to 150 ka window. These absolute ages overlap with the timing of the penultimate glaciation during marine isotope stage (MIS) 6

  10. INHERITED COSMOGENIC NUCLIDE 10Be IN MODERN MORAINE OF HAILUOGOU GLACIER IN THE GONGGA MOUNTAINS,SICHUAN PROVINCE, CHINA%海螺沟现代冰碛物中的宇生核素10Be浓度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建; 徐晓彬; 张志刚; 张茂恒; 孔屏; David Fink

    2010-01-01

    尽管许多学者都意识到继承性宇生核素对冰碛物暴露年代测量可能会带来一定的误差,然而影响究竟有多大,还缺乏对现代冰碛物宇生核素浓度的研究.对采自贡嘎山海螺沟冰川现代冰碛物碎屑和冰碛砾石的本地生宇生核素10Be.浓度的分析表明.即使是海洋性冰川(暖底冰川),其冰碛物碎屑和冰碛砾石都残留一定量的本地生宇生核素;即使是具有明显磨蚀痕迹的现代冰碛砾石表面,也残留一定最的本地生宇生核素.因此,进行宇生核素测年时要给予充分的重视.当然,其冰碛物基质和具有明显磨蚀痕迹的现代冰碛砾石表面的本地生宇生核素10Be浓度比较低,一般不大于2×104atoms/g.对暴露年代的影响一般不大于0.61ka.尽管其适用范围还有待于更多的研究结果的进一步证实,但是却为残留影响的研究提供了一个研究的实例和一组可以参考的数据.

  11. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  12. Glacial evolution in King George and Livingston Islands (Antarctica) since the Last Glacial Maximum based on cosmogenic nuclide dating and glacier surface reconstruction - CRONOANTAR project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; Fernández Menéndez, Susana del Carmen; García Hernández, Cristina; Menéndez Duarte, Rosa Ana; Pellitero Ondicol, Ramón; Pérez Alberti, Augusto; Schimmelpfennig, Irene

    2017-04-01

    CRONOANTAR brings together researchers from Spain, Portugal, France and United Kingdom with the objective of spatially and temporally reconstruct the deglaciation process at the two largest islands in the South Shetlands Archipelago (Maritime Antarctica), since the Global Last Glacial Maximum. Glacier retreat in polar areas has major implications at a local, regional and even planetary scale. Global average sea level rise is the most obvious and socio-economically relevant, but there are others such as the arrival of new fauna to deglaciated areas, plant colonisation or permafrost formation and degradation. This project will study the ice-free areas in Byers and Hurd peninsulas (Livingston Island) and Fildes and Potter peninsulas (King George Island). Ice-cap glacier retreat chronology will be revealed by the use of cosmogenic isotopes (mainly 36Cl) on glacially originated sedimentary and erosive records. Cosmogenic dating will be complemented by other dating methods (C14 and OSL), which will permit the validation of these methods in regions with cold-based glaciers. Given the geomorphological evidences and the obtained ages, a deglaciation calendar will be proposed and we will use a GIS methodology to reconstruct the glacier extent and the ice thickness. The results emerging from this project will allow to assess whether the high glacier retreat rates observed during the last decades were registered in the past, or if they are conversely the consequence (and evidence) of the Global Change in Antarctica. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (Reference: CTM2016-77878-P).

  13. Seismic slip history of the Pizzalto fault (Central Apennines, Italy) using in situ 36Cl cosmogenic dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli Rocioli, Mattia; Pace, Bruno; Benedetti, Lucilla; Visini, Francesco; Guillou, Valery; Bourlès, Didier; Arnorld, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2013-04-01

    A prerequisite to constrain fault-based and time-dependent earthquake rupture forecast models is to acquire data on the past large earthquake frequency on an individual seismogenic source. Here we present a paleoseismological study on the Pizzalto fault using the in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide 36Cl (Schlagenhauf et al., 2011). The Pizzalto fault, located in central Italy about 50 km southeast of the epicenter of L'Aquila 2009 earthquake, is about 12 km long, SW dipping and belongs to the 30 km long Rotella-Aremogna active normal fault system. Recent activity along the Pizzalto fault is suggested by the presence of a continuous and linear 2 to 5 m high limestone fault scarp that was sampled every 10 cm at a site located in its particularly well-preserved central portion. 49 samples have been chemically processed and measured, and their 36Cl and Cl concentrations have been determined using isotope dilution mass spectrometry at the French AMS national facility ASTER located at CEREGE. Modeling the in situ 36Cl concentration with the scarp height allow deciphering the age and slip of the last major earthquake events on the fault. To derive those earthquake parameters, we used the published Matlab code from Schlagenhauf et al. (2011) that we implemented with a Monte Carlo approach to explore a large number of earthquake recurrence scenarios varying both the number of events, their slip and their ages. The "a priori" constraints input in the Monte Carlo code were: 1-the number of events, which is given by the stacking of individual probability density functions (assumed to be Gaussian) of each sample concentration; and, 2-the cumulative slip that should be equal to the height of the fault scarp. The first results show that 36Cl concentrations are reproduced better considering five events occurring over the last 5 ka and a previous one at about 13 ka. This suggests that most earthquake events clustered during a period of intense seismic activity preceded by a longer

  14. A varved lake sediment record of the 10Be solar activity proxy for the Lateglacial-Holocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymzik, Markus; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Mekhaldi, Florian; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Brauer, Achim

    2016-12-01

    Solar modulated variations in cosmogenic radionuclide production provide both information on past changes in the activity of the Sun and a global synchronization tool. However, to date the use of cosmogenic radionuclides for these applications is almost exclusively based on 10Be records from ice cores and 14C time-series from tree rings, all including archive-specific limitations. We present the first 10Be record from annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for the Lateglacial-Holocene transition from Meerfelder Maar. We quantify environmental influences on the catchment and, consequently, 10Be deposition using a new approach based on regression analyses between our 10Be record and environmental proxy time-series from the same archive. Our analyses suggest that environmental influences contribute to up to 37% of the variability in our 10Be record, but cannot be the main explanation for major 10Be excursions. Corrected for these environmental influences, our 10Be record is interpreted to dominantly reflect changes in solar modulated cosmogenic radionuclide production. The preservation of a solar production signal in 10Be from varved lake sediments highlights the largely unexplored potential of these archives for solar activity reconstruction, as global synchronization tool and, thus, for more robust paleoclimate studies.

  15. 36Cl terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating suggests Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene mass movements on the south face of Aconcagua mountain and in the Las Cuevas–Horcones valleys, Central Andes, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanns, Reginald; Fauque, Luis; Wilson, Carlos GW

    2014-01-01

    The morphology, sedimentology and mineralogy of deposits that previously had been associated with glacial advances (the Penitentes, Horcones and Almacenes drifts) were reinvestigated and dated using the terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) 36Cl. These results indicate that the deposits previously associated with the Horcones and Almacenes drifts are actually deposits of a rock slope failure from the southern face of Aconcagua mountain forming a debris–ice avalanche that were deposited 10 490±...

  16. Deriving earthquake history of the Knidos Fault Zone, SW Turkey, using cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of the fault scarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Cengiz; Ersen Aksoy, Murat; Akif Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tuysuz, Okan; Genc, S. Can; Ertekin Doksanalti, Mustafa; Sahin, Sefa; Benedetti, Lucilla; Tesson, Jim; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    Formation of bedrock fault scarps in extensional provinces is a result of large and successive earthquakes that ruptured the surface several times. Extraction of seismic history of such faults is critical to understand the recurrence intervals and the magnitude of paleo-earthquakes and to better constrain the regional seismic hazard. Knidos on the Datca Peninsula (SW Turkey) is one of the largest cities of the antique times and sits on a terraced hill slope formed by en-echelon W-SW oriented normal faults. The Datça Peninsula constitutes the southern boundary of the Gulf of Gökova, one of the largest grabens developed on the southernmost part of the Western Anatolian Extensional Province. Our investigation relies on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of limestone faults scarps. This method is a powerful tool to reconstruct the seismic history of normal faults (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al 2010, Benedetti et al. 2013). We focus on one of the most prominent fault scarp (hereinafter Mezarlık Fault) of the Knidos fault zone cutting through the antique Knidos city. We collected 128 pieces of tablet size (10x20cm) 3-cm thick samples along the fault dip and opened 4 conventional paleoseismic trenches at the base of the fault scarp. Our 36Cl concentration profile indicates that 3 to 4 seismic events ruptured the Mezarlık Fault since Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results from the paleoseismic trenching are also compatible with 36Cl results, indicating 3 or 4 seismic events that disturbed the colluvium deposited at the base of the scarp. Here we will present implications for the seismic history and the derived slip-rate of the Mezarlık Fault based on those results. This project is supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Grant number: 113Y436) and it was conducted with the Decision of the Council of Ministers with No. 2013/5387 on the date 30.09.2013 and was done with the permission of Knidos Presidency of excavation in

  17. 10Be cosmic-ray exposure dating of moraines and rock avalanches in the Upper Romanche valley (French Alps): Evidence of two glacial advances during the Late Glacial/Holocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenet, Marie; Brunstein, Daniel; Jomelli, Vincent; Roussel, Erwan; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Mokadem, Fatima; Biette, Melody; Robert, Vincent; Léanni, Laëtitia

    2016-09-01

    Cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) dating of moraines allow glacier fluctuations and past climate change reconstructions. In the French Alps, there is a lack of moraine dating for the Late Glacial/Holocene transition period. Here we present a chronology of glacier advances in the Upper Romanche valley (French Alps - Massif des Ecrins) based on 10Be CRE dating. CRE ages of moraines of 13.0 ± 1.1 ka and 12.4 ± 1.5 ka provide evidence for two stages of glacial advance or standstill at the end of the Late Glacial. The CRE dating of a rock avalanche deposit at 12.2 ± 1.5 ka is attributed to post-glacial debuttressing and reveals rapid deglaciation at the end of the Late Glacial. A CRE age of 7.1 ± 0.7 ka of a second mass-wasting, whose triggering factor is unidentified so far, indicates that up to an altitude of 2300 m a.s.l., the valley was ice-free as of ∼7 kyr at the latest. The re-evaluation of 21 moraine 10Be CRE ages from nine glacial valleys across the Alps shows multiple glacial advances occurring at the Late Glacial/Holocene transition. These results lead to a re-evaluation of the importance of cooling events during the Allerød and the Younger Dryas in the Alps.

  18. 10Be DATED BOULDERS FROM THE THIRD TERRACE OF NUJIANG RIVER AT BINGZHONGLUO,YUNNAN PROVINCE,CHINA%云南怒江丙中洛河段第三级阶地10Be暴露年龄

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕延武; 顾兆炎; 许冰; A.Aldahan; G.Possnert

    2012-01-01

    宇宙成因核素可用于河流阶地测年,然而保存于阶地面上的漂砾暴露年龄是否能代表其形成年代还缺乏深入研究.应用宇宙成因核素10Be对怒江丙中洛河段第三级阶地上的花岗岩漂砾进行测年研究,结果显示继承性组分可以忽略,而风化侵蚀将对其暴露年龄产生较大影响.基于采集自第三级阶地保存较好的基岩中石英脉样品,应用有效暴露年龄、暴露时间与风化速率间的关系图解出花岗岩漂砾的风化速率为0.3cm/ka,并据此得到第三级阶地的形成年代大约为 150~203 ka.%Fluvial terraces are common in the Nujiang River valley,while the third level is widest and mostly distributed. There are five level terraces at Bingzhongluo(28°01'N,98°37'E) ,where located southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, Yunnan, China. The third and the forth level terraces are covered with reddish-brown soil, indicating a long history of the terraces. Many granite boulders are spread out on the surface of the first, second and third level terraces, whose exposure ages could represent the terrace formation time. Three granite boulders were taken as samples at the posterior margin of the third terrace of the Nujiang River at Bingzhongluo(Fig. la and lc). The diameters of all boulders are large (>2m)and partly buried in soil layers. Sample NJ2-1 was collected from one granite boulder(about 2. 3m)on floodplain, which is used to estimate the inheritance. Sample BZL43 was chiseled about 1. 5cm from the surface of a quartz vein,which insets a sandy slate of the third terrace at downstream about 2km. The quartz purification, 10Be extraction,and BeO preparation,were done in the Cosmogenic Nuclide Laboratory at the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The 10e/9Be ratio was measured by AMS facility at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University in Sweden. The "Be concentrations (Table 1) show that the 10Be concentration of sample BZL43 is

  19. A preliminary study on the use of {sup 10}Be in forensic radioecology of nuclear explosion sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, N.E. [Institute of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: whiteh@paradise.net.nz; Endo, S. [Institute of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: endos@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, K. [Institute of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: tanakak@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Takatsuji, T. [Faculty of Environmental Studies, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)], E-mail: takatsuj@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Hoshi, M. [Institute of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: mhoshi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Fukutani, S. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)], E-mail: fukutani@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ditchburn, R.G. [National Isotope Centre, GNS-Science, P.O. Box 31-312, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)], E-mail: r.ditchburn@gns.cri.nz; Zondervan, A. [National Isotope Centre, GNS-Science, P.O. Box 31-312, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)], E-mail: a.zondervan@gns.cri.nz

    2008-02-15

    Cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, known for use in dating studies, unexpectedly is also produced in nuclear explosions with an atom yield almost comparable to (e.g.) {sup 137}Cs. There are major production routes via {sup 13}C(n, {alpha}){sup 10}Be, from carbon dioxide in the air and the organic explosives, possibly from other bomb components and to a minor extent from the direct fission reaction. Although the detailed bomb components are speculative, carbon was certainly present in the explosives and an order of magnitude calculation is possible. The (n, {alpha}) cross-section was determined by irradiating graphite in a nuclear reactor, and the resulting {sup 10}Be estimated by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) giving a cross-section of 34.5 {+-} 0.7 mb (6-9.3 MeV), within error of previous work. {sup 10}Be should have applications in forensic radioecology. Historical environmental samples from Hiroshima, and Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) showed two to threefold {sup 10}Be excesses compared with the background cosmogenic levels. A sample from Lake Chagan (a Soviet nuclear cratering experiment) contained more {sup 10}Be than previously reported soils. {sup 10}Be may be useful for measuring the fast neutron dose near the Hiroshima bomb hypocenter at neutron energies double those previously available.

  20. Inner gorges incision history: A proxy for deglaciation? Insights from Cosmic Ray Exposure dating (10Be and 36Cl) of river-polished surfaces (Tinée River, SW Alps, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Y.; Petit, C.; Saillard, M.; Braucher, R.; Bourlès, D.; Darnault, R.; Cassol, D.

    2017-01-01

    10Be and 36Cl Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating performed on river polished surfaces of river gorges in a mountain-to-sea river system in the French SW Alps highlights transient erosional events involving incision rates >10 mm a-1. These events took place during the last two major deglaciation phases following (1) the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 16-14 ka, (2) the Younger Dryas at 8-11 ka, and during the warm and humid Holocene climatic optimum at 4-5 ka. These periods of high incision rates (3- > 30 mma-1) alternated with periods of low incision rates (<1 mm a-1), which probably correspond to a long-term equilibrium between incision and relative uplift. The Alpine river staircase shape profiles evidence local and transient responses that are ascribed to cumulate disequilibrium after the long-time-spanned glaciations. After each glaciation, rivers rush down to get closer to their equilibrium profile. Incision is amplified both by the sediment discharge due to the erosion of moraines and by landslides triggered by the glacier retreat.

  1. Calibrating a long-term meteoric 10Be accumulation rate in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusser, Lucas; Graly, Joseph; Bierman, Paul; Rood, Dylan

    2010-10-01

    Using 13 samples collected from a 4.1 meter profile in a well-dated and stable New Zealand fluvial terrace, we present the first long-term accumulation rate for meteoric 10Be in soil (1.68 to 1.72 × 106 at/(cm2·yr)) integrated over the past ˜18 ka. Site-specific accumulation data, such as these, are prerequisite to the application of meteoric 10Be in surface process studies. Our data begin the process of calibrating long-term meteoric 10Be delivery rates across latitude and precipitation gradients. Our integrated rate is lower than contemporary meteoric 10Be fluxes measured in New Zealand rainfall, suggesting that long-term average precipitation, dust flux, or both, at this site were less than modern values. With accurately calibrated long-term delivery rates, such as this, meteoric 10Be will be a powerful tool for studying rates of landscape change in environments where other cosmogenic nuclides, such as in situ 10Be, cannot be used.

  2. New dating method: Groundwater residence time estimated from the 4He accumulation rate calibrated by using cosmogenic and subsurface-produced 36Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermehl M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater contains dissolved He, and its concentration increases with the residence time of the groundwater. Thus, if the 4He accumulation rate is constant, the dissolved 4He concentration in ground-water is equivalent to the residence time. Since accumulation mechanisms are not easily separated in the field, we estimate the total He accumulation rate during the half-life of 36Cl (3.01 × 105 years. We estimated the 4He accumulation rate, calibrated using both cosmogenic and subsurface-produced 36Cl, in the Great Artesian Basin (GAB, Australia, and the subsurface-produced 36Cl increase at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden. 4He accumulation rates range from (1.9±0.3 × 10−11 to (15±6 × 10−11 ccSTP·cm−3·y−1 in GAB and (1.8 ±0.7 × 10−8 ccSTP·cm−3·y−1 at Äspö. We confirmed a ground-water flow with a residence time of 0.7-1.06 Ma in GAB and stagnant groundwater with the long residence time of 4.5 Ma at Äspö. Therefore, the groundwater residence time can be deduced from the dissolved 4He concentration and the 4He accumulation rate calibrated by 36Cl, provided that 4He accumulation, groundwater flow, and other geo-environmental conditions have remained unchanged for the required amount of geological time.

  3. Slip rate variability over the Holocene period in the middle Aterno fault system (Italy), retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating of exhumed fault-plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla; Pucci, Stefano; Villani, Fabio; Bourles, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aumaitre, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Numerous numerical modeling studies have described and quantified non-stochastic spatio-temporal variations of earthquake occurrences within fault-networks, such as temporal clustered earthquakes or fault synchronization. However, very few long-enough paleoseismological and geological records are available to test those models against well-constrained dataset and thus account for such variability in the fault behavior. The prerequisites for improving our understanding of fault-rupture processes and thus our capacity to better assess seismic hazard are to acquire paleoseismological records that enable to derive both long-term slip-rate and short-term variability, on a large population of faults and/or within a fault system. These conditions met in Central Apennines, an extensional province where substantial paleoseismological dataset accurately described the Holocene seismic history of a dense network of normal faults. In this study we use 36Cl in situ cosmogenic nuclide to retrieve the seismic history of 3 faults belonging to the Middle Aterno fault system, from north to south: the Bazzano fault, the Roccapreturo fault and the Sulmona fault, a portion of which ruptured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy. We use a new modeling approach to determine the age and slip of past seismic events from the 36Cl concentration profiles. This model is based on an inverse approach and uses an optimization algorithm enabling all the parameter space (number of events, age and slip of events, pre-exposure) to be explored without a priori constraints (see Tesson et al. in session TS4.2/NH4.16/SM3.8). Using this new approach, we precisely determine the slip events occurrences over the Holocene period of those three faults. The results indicate that the three studied faults have ruptured between 4.5 and 5.5 ka, while the southernmost part of the system has also ruptured between at 1.5-3 ka (Sulmona fault and southern segment of Roccapreturo). Those results are in agreement

  4. Identifying large chondrites using cosmogenic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welten, K.C. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Caffee, M.W., E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed [PRIME Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hillegonds, D.J. [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Masarik, J. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Nishiizumi, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    We measured the concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca in the metal and stone fractions of three large chondrite showers to determine their pre-atmospheric size. Large chondrites are characterized by substantial contributions of neutron-capture {sup 41}Ca in the stone fraction (up to approx2 dpm/gCa), low radionuclide concentrations in the metal fraction and high {sup 10}Be(stone)/{sup 10}Be(metal) ratios. Based on the measured concentrations in comparison with calculated cosmogenic nuclide depth profiles, using a semi-empirical and a purely physical model, we conclude that these objects had pre-atmospheric radii ranging from approx80 cm to >3 m. We conclude that the semi-empirical model is more reliable for spallogenic production rates in large objects, while the purely physical model is more reliable for neutron-capture products.

  5. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signature of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary in the Montalbano Jonico marine succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Bourlès, Didier L.; Bassinot, Franck; Nomade, Sébastien; Marino, Maria; Ciaranfi, Neri; Girone, Angela; Maiorano, Patrizia; Thouveny, Nicolas; Choy, Sandrine; Dewilde, Fabien; Scao, Vincent; Isguder, Gulay; Blamart, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) lows associated with polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions induce significant modulation of the cosmogenic nuclide Beryllium-10 (10Be) production. Hence, the reconstruction of atmospheric 10Be production rates from natural archives such as marine sedimentary sequences or ice cores constitutes a complementary approach, independent from paleomagnetic measurements, to decipher past GDM fluctuations. This is particularly important in the Montalbano Jonico succession (South Italy) since it is candidate to host the Global Stratotype Section and Point of the Middle Pleistocene Stage but where the magnetostratigraphic positioning of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary (MBB) has not been available up to now. This study presents (1) original authigenic 10Be cosmogenic nuclide and 9Be stable isotope results, and (2) new high-resolution benthic oxygen isotope record covering termination IX and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 19. A robust chronological framework is established on the basis of (i) our oxygen isotope stratigraphy, using the strong analogies between MIS 1 and MIS 19c in terms of orbital forcing and CO2 level, and (ii) one precise 40Ar/39Ar date obtained in the tephra layer V4. The authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio record marks the atmospheric 10Be overproduction linked to the dipole low accompanying the MBB transition, with a characteristic twofold increase of the 10Be production at the end of MIS 19c and early MIS 19b. This signature is similar to those described in both marine and ice core records. The detailed chronostratigraphy constrained by a radiometrically-dated tephra layer (773.9 ± 1.3 ka) within the MBB interval, makes it possible to discuss the structure and to assess the timing of the 10Be-production changes, and thus the MBB geomagnetic variations, with an unprecedented accuracy for a marine archive (sedimentation rates ∼80 cm/ka). These new cosmogenic nuclide production signatures provide the only missing constraint required

  6. Determination of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, S.; Herpers [Koeln Univ. (Germany); Neumann, S.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany); Kubik, P.W.; Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides were determined in stony ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al) and iron ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl) meteorites using AMS after radiochemical separation. A selection of these data is briefly discussed with respect to exposure histories of the meteorites and is compared to model calculations. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  7. Cosmogenic Backgrounds to 0{\

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Auty, D J; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Feyzbakhsh, S; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Krücken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Njoya, O; Nelson, R; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Retière, F; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2015-01-01

    As neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments become more sensitive and intrinsic radioactivity in detector materials is reduced, previously minor contributions to the background must be understood and eliminated. With this in mind, cosmogenic backgrounds have been studied with the EXO-200 experiment. Using the EXO-200 TPC, the muon flux (through a flat horizontal surface) underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been measured to be {\\Phi} = 4.07 $\\pm$ 0.14 (sys) $\\pm$ 0.03 (stat) $\\times$ $10^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, with a vertical intensity of $I_{v}$ = 2.97$^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$ (sys) $\\pm$ 0.02 (stat) $\\times$ $10^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$. Simulations of muon-induced backgrounds identified several potential cosmogenic radionuclides, though only 137Xe is a significant background for the 136Xe 0{\

  8. Just the right age: well-clustered exposure ages from a global glacial 10Be compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Jakob; Margold, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Cosmogenic exposure dating has been used extensively for defining glacial chronologies, both in ice sheet and alpine settings, and the global set of published ages today reaches well beyond 10,000 samples. Over the last few years, a number of important developments have improved the measurements (with well-defined AMS standards) and exposure age calculations (with updated data and methods for calculating production rates), in the best case enabling high precision dating of past glacial events. A remaining problem, however, is the fact that a large portion of all dated samples have been affected by prior and/or incomplete exposure, yielding erroneous exposure ages under the standard assumptions. One way to address this issue is to only use exposure ages that can be confidently considered as unaffected by prior/incomplete exposure, such as groups of samples with statistically identical ages. Here we use objective statistical criteria to identify groups of well-clustered exposure ages from the global glacial "expage" 10Be compilation. Out of ˜1700 groups with at least 3 individual samples ˜30% are well-clustered, increasing to ˜45% if allowing outlier rejection of a maximum of 1/3 of the samples (still requiring a minimum of 3 well-clustered ages). The dataset of well-clustered ages is heavily dominated by ages <30 ka, showing that well-defined cosmogenic chronologies primarily exist for the last glaciation. We observe a large-scale global synchronicity in the timing of the last deglaciation from ˜20 to 10 ka. There is also a general correlation between the timing of deglaciation and latitude (or size of the individual ice mass), with earlier deglaciation in lower latitudes and later deglaciation towards the poles. Grouping the data into regions and comparing with available paleoclimate data we can start to untangle regional differences in the last deglaciation and the climate events controlling the ice mass loss. The extensive dataset and the statistical analysis

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry of particle-bound 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priller, Alfred; Berger, Michael; Gäggeler, Heinz W.; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Kubik, Peter W.; Schnabel, Christoph; Tobler, Leonhard; Wild, Eva-Maria; Zanis, Prodromos; Zerefos, Christos

    2004-08-01

    In the framework EU Project STACCATO (Influence of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange in A Changing Climate on Atmospheric Transport and Oxidation Capacity), the first long-term, simultaneous monitoring of the two cosmogenic radionuclides 7Be and 10Be was performed. Emphasis was paid to a high-resolution record of the data, too. A comprehensive data set was created in order to validate model calculations and to provide an independent estimate of the strength of atmospheric transport processes, such as stratosphere-troposphere exchange. For that reason, particle-bound beryllium isotopes were collected at three high-alpine meteorological stations: at Sonnblick (Austria), Zugspitze (Germany) and Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), respectively. A total of 400 daily or bi-daily 10Be measurements are now available. While 7Be sampling and measurement processes are well standardized, the determination of 10Be concentrations using AMS is more complicated. For that reason an extensive description of the 10Be measurement is given. Moreover, the basic characteristics of the 10Be/7Be ratios are presented, leading to a mean annual value of 2.08 and 1.82 for Jungfraujoch and Zugspitze, respectively. Analysis in combination with meteorological parameters shows the usefulness of the ratio as an index of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT), especially when wet scavenging becomes important. Regression analysis of the 10Be/7Be ratio with 7Be, 10Be and relative humidity revealed that the ratio is virtually independent from the effect of wet scavenging while inspection of the weather patterns related to the highest ratios indicated the presence of typical patterns for stratospheric intrusions. Nevertheless, although the 10Be/7Be ratio can be successful in identifying certain STT cases it is a difficult parameter for an automated stratospheric intrusion detection algorithm.

  10. 10Be evidence for delayed acquisition of remanent magnetization in marine sediments: Implication for a new age for the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Yusuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Kawamura, Kenji; Horng, Chorng-Shern; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-01

    Fluxes of the meteoric cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be vary with changes in the incoming cosmic rays modulated by geomagnetic field intensity variations. The variability in the 10Be flux can be used to synchronize ice cores, as well as marine sediments, by comparison with the relative paleointensity variations of the geomagnetic field. However, lock-in of the paleomagnetic signal at some depth below the sediment-water interface in marine sediments through acquisition of a post-depositional remanent magnetization (PDRM) adds uncertainty to synchronization. Despite the long history of such studies, the magnitude of the PDRM lock-in depth remains controversial. In this article, we present clear evidence for a downward offset of the paleointensity minimum relative to the 10Be flux anomaly at the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) geomagnetic polarity boundary, which we interpret to result from a ˜ 15 cm PDRM lock in depth. This lock-in depth indicates that up to several tens of thousands years of age offset probably occurs when a paleomagnetic record is used for dating marine sediments, and the age of the M-B boundary should be revised to ca. 10 kyr younger, which is consistent with a younger ice core derived age of 770 ± 6 ka (2 σ). This cosmogenic age tuning strategy will contribute to refining paleomagnetic-based age models for marine sediments and identifying of lead-lag relationships for global abrupt environmental changes.

  11. Reconstruction of solar activity for the last millennium using $^{10}$Be data

    CERN Document Server

    Usoskin, I G; Solanki, S K; Schüssler, M; Alanko, K

    2003-01-01

    In a recent paper (Usoskin et al., 2002a), we have reconstructed the concentration of the cosmogenic $^{10}$Be isotope in ice cores from the measured sunspot numbers by using physical models for $^{10}$Be production in the Earth's atmosphere, cosmic ray transport in the heliosphere, and evolution of the Sun's open magnetic flux. Here we take the opposite route: starting from the $^{10}$Be concentration measured in ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland, we invert the models in order to reconstruct the 11-year averaged sunspot numbers since 850 AD. The inversion method is validated by comparing the reconstructed sunspot numbers with the directly observed sunspot record since 1610. The reconstructed sunspot record exhibits a prominent period of about 600 years, in agreement with earlier observations based on cosmogenic isotopes. Also, there is evidence for the century scale Gleissberg cycle and a number of shorter quasi-periodicities whose periods seem to fluctuate in the millennium time scale. This invalidate...

  12. Do Fungi Transport 10Be During Wood Degradation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, G.; Granger, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Meteoric cosmogenic 10Be is increasingly used to determine erosion and soil transport rates. To calculate these rates, it is assumed that 10Be is a conservative passive tracer of soil particles. However, there is experimental evidence that beryllium is mobilized in natural soils complexed with organic acids. For example, up to 50% of beryllium can be mobilized by humic acids in soils at pH 7 (Takahashi et al., 1999). Beryllium is also known to be taken up in plants such as tobacco and vegetables (World Health Organization, 1990) at ppm levels, primarily as organic acid chelates. It is not known to what extent biological beryllium transport in the environment affects the cosmogenic 10Be budget, or how it influences beryllium mobility. In this study, we address a problem recognized early in the development of meteoric 10Be methods. It has been observed that decayed organic matter in soils and sediments contains very high concentrations of 10Be of up to 109-1010 atoms/g (Lundberg, et al., 1983). On the other hand, living trees contain much lower concentrations of 106 atoms/g (Klein et al., 1982). The driving question for this study is how 10Be becomes bound to decayed organic matter. Direct fallout seems unlikely as the residence time of organic matter in soil is too short. One possibility is that 10Be is transported by fungi. Wood-degrading fungi are known to transport and bioaccumulate metals from large areas, facilitated by acids such as oxalic acid in the fungal hyphae. To test the hypothesis that fungi transport 10Be, we analyzed both intact and fungally degraded wood of oak, hickory, and hemlock. From these data, we reached two conclusions (observations?): 1) Oak has a 10Be concentration of about 2x106 at/g, similar to that observed by Klein et al. (1982). Hickory has a significantly higher concentration of about 3x107 atoms/g, confirming observations that hickory bioaccumulates beryllium. Using these data, the inventory of 10Be in a temperate forest is expected

  13. Terrestrial cosmogenic 3He: where are we 30 years after its discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Pik, Raphaël; Farley, Kenneth A.; Lavé, Jérôme; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-04-01

    It is now 30 years since cosmogenic 3He has been detected for the first time in a terrestrial sample (Kurz, 1986). 3He is now a widely used geochemical tool in many fields of Earth sciences: volcanology, tectonics, paleoclimatology. 3He has the advantage to have a high "production rate" to "detection limit" ratio, allowing surfaces as young as hundred of years to be dated. Although its nuclear stability implies several limitations, it moreover represents a useful alternative to 10Be in mafic environments. This contribution is a review of the progresses that have been accomplished since this discovery, and discuss strategies to improve both the accuracy and the precision of this geochronometer. 1) Measurement of cosmogenic 3He Correction of magmatic 3He. To estimate the non-cosmogenic magmatic 3He, Kurz (1986) invented a two steps method involving crushing of phenocrysts (to analyze the isotopic ratio of the magmatic component), followed by a subsequent melting of the sample, to extract the remaining components, including the cosmogenic 3He: 3Hec = 3Hemelt -4Hemelt x (3He/4He)magmatic (1) Several studies suggested that the preliminary crushing may induce a loss of cosmogenic 3He (Hilton et al., 1993; Yokochi et al., 2005; Blard et al., 2006), implying an underestimate of the cosmogenic 3He measurement. However, subsequent work did not replicate these observations (Blard et al., 2008; Goerhing et al., 2010), suggesting an influence of the used apparatus. An isochron method (by directly melting several phenocrysts aliquots) is an alternative to avoid the preliminary crushing step (Blard and Pik, 2008). Atmospheric contamination. Protin et al. (in press) provides robust evidences for a large and irreversible contamination of atmospheric helium on silicate surfaces. This unexpected behavior may reconcile the contrasted observations about the amplitude of crushing loss. This undesirable atmospheric contamination is negligible if grain fractions smaller than 150 mm are

  14. Cosmogenic nuclide age constraints on Middle Stone Age lithics from Niassa, Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercader, Julio; Gosse, John C.; Bennett, Tim; Hidy, Alan J.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2012-07-01

    The late phases of the Middle Stone Age (MSA) in the East African Rift System (EARS) are known for their evolutionary shifts and association with bottlenecks, transcontinental expansion, and climatic fluctuations. The chronology of MSA sites contemporaneous with these eco-demographic upheavals is uncertain because of the scarcity of datable sites and the poor understanding of their depositional and erosional histories. We apply terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating in a stratigraphic section with a complex exposure history to the study of the Luchamange Beds, a widespread sedimentological unit underlying MSA sites from the shores of Lake Niassa (Mozambican EARS). We use an innovative approach, which may be applicable elsewhere, to calculate their age using a Monte Carlo-based Bayesian model that links depth profiles of 26Al and 10Be, and uses other geomorphic and cosmogenic nuclide age constraints on episodic erosion and burial. The age of the basal Luchamange Beds is 42 + 77/-15 ka, and the MSA occupation on top is 29 + 3/-11 ka. These dates suggest temporal overlap between MSA and the earliest Later Stone Age and diversity in cultural manifestations at the end of the MSA.

  15. Meteoric cosmogenic Beryllium-10 adsorbed to river sediment and soil: Applications for Earth-surface dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall scavenges meteoric cosmogenic 10Be from the atmosphere. 10Be falls to the Earth's surface, where it binds tightly to sediment particles in non-acidic soils over the life-span of those soils. As such, meteoric 10Be has the potential to be an excellent geochemical tracer of erosion and stability of surfaces in a diverse range of natural settings. Meteoric 10Be has great potential as a recorder of first-order erosion rates and soil residence times. Even though this tracer was first developed in the late 1980s and showed great promise as a geomorphic tool, it was sidelined in the past two decades with the rise of the "sister nuclide", in situ10Be, which is produced at a known rate inside quartz minerals. Since these early days, substantial progress has been made in several areas that now shed new light on the applicability of the meteoric variety of this cosmogenic nuclide. Here, we revisit the potential of this tracer and we summarize the progress: (1) the atmospheric production and fallout is now described by numeric models, and agrees with present-day measurements and paleo-archives such as from rain and ice cores; (2) short-term fluctuations in solar modulation of cosmic rays or in the delivery of 10Be are averaged out over the time scale soils accumulate; (3) in many cases, the delivery of 10Be is not dependent on the amount of precipitation; (4) we explore where 10Be is retained in soils and sediment; (5) we suggest a law to account for the strong grain-size dependence that controls adsorption and the measured nuclide concentrations; and (6) we present a set of algebraic expressions that allows calculation of both soil or sediment ages and erosion rates from the inventory of meteoric 10Be distributed through a vertical soil column. The mathematical description is greatly simplified if the accumulation of 10Be is at a steady state with its export through erosion. In this case, a surface sample allows for the calculation of an erosion rate. Explored

  16. Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in Neogene rivers of the Great Plains reveal the evolution of fluvial storage and recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Hugh; Stuart, Fin; McCann, Louise; Tao, Zui

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of the duration of near surface residence of sediment grains from the stratigraphic record has the potential to quantitatively reconstruct processes such as stratal condensation, sediment recycling and the exposure histories of unconformities. Geomorphological measurements of dates and rates of surfaces and erosion respectively has enabled significant advances in understanding, however, the radiogenic half life of typical cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al means they are not suitable for the stratigraphic record. Instead, we have applied the stable cosmogenic nuclide of 21Ne to quartz-rich sediment to quantify the routing history of the river systems that have drained the southern Rockies of Wyoming and Colorado during Neogene times. The Neogene sediments of Nebraska record fluvial systems of the Great Plains that flow from the Rockies towards the east and into the Mississippi catchment. This succession is climate change. As part of an evaluation of the application of 21Ne to the stratigraphic record, we sampled quartzite pebbles from an Upper Miocene, Pliocene and modern river channel of the North Platte approximately 400 km from their mountainous source. The quartzite is derived from a single exposure of the Medicine Bow quartzites in Wyoming, therefore all three intervals recorded the same travel distance from source. Additionally, we know the erosion rate of the Medicine Bow quartzites from detrital 10Be analyses, and we also sampled shielded bedrock samples from the quartzite to evaluate for any non-cosmogenic 21Ne. This means that the concentrations of 21Ne in detrital pebbles >400 km from their source could be corrected for both inherited non-cosmogenic and erosion induced accumulation at source. Therefore, any additional amounts of 21Ne must record storage and exposure during transport down the river systems. Based on 40 analyses of pebbles from these intervals, we are able to demonstrate that approximately half of the pebbles record

  17. AD 775 Pulse of Cosmogenic Radionuclides Production as Imprint of a Galactic Gamma-Ray Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlov, A K; Konstantinov, A N; Ostryakov, V M; Vasilyev, G I; Vdovina, M A; Volkov, P A

    2013-01-01

    We suggest an explanation of a sharp increase in the abundance of cosmogenic radiocarbon found in tree rings dated AD 775. The increase could originate from high-energy irradiation of the atmosphere by a galactic gamma-ray burst. We argue that, unlike a cosmic ray event, a gamma-ray burst does not necessarily result in a substantial increase in long-lived 10Be atmospheric production. At the same time, the 36Cl nuclide would be generated in the amounts detectable in the corresponding ice core samples from Greenland and Antarctica. These peculiar features allow experimental discrimination of nuclide effects caused by gamma-ray bursts and by powerful proton events.

  18. 宇宙成因核素26Al/10Be埋藏测年法在宁夏沙坡头黄河砾石阶地年代研究中的应用%COSMOGENIC NUCLIDES 26Al/10Be BURIAL DATING OF YELLOW RIVER GRAVEL TERRACES AROUND YEMINGSHAN HILL, NINGXIA, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩非; 顾兆炎; 尹功明; David Fink; 王躲

    2016-01-01

    本文利用宇宙成因核素26Al/10Be埋藏测年法对宁夏沙坡头地区黄河左岸的T5、T6、T8和T9阶地开展了年代学研究.采用简单快速埋藏模式获得4级阶地的26Al/10Be埋藏年龄分别约为0.25Ma、0.36Ma、0.59Ma和1.06Ma,如果考虑后期剥蚀作用的影响(E≈5m/Ma),则4级阶地的年龄分别约为0.42Ma、0.39Ma、1.02Ma和1.59Ma.本研究未发现砾石大小与10Be、26Al核素浓度及26Al/10Be比值有明显相关性.

  19. Reconstructing the cosmogenic 21Ne inventory of Neogene sedimentary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Finlay; Sinclair, Hugh; McCann, Louise

    2016-04-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclides, in particular 10Be, have found use in modern sediments as a way of determining the erosion rate of river catchments. Cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz is easier and faster to measure than 10Be and has the potential to record erosion rates back 10s million years. However the routine use of cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz sand is hampered by ubiquitous nucleogenic 21Ne. When the eroding lithology can be identified it is possible to measure the nucleogenic in samples that are shielded from cosmic rays and correct for it in exposed bedrock [1]. However, identifying the lithologies that contributes quartz sand in large river catchments, and determining precise nucleogenic contributions is more problematic. The North and South Platte rivers drain early Prototerozoic lithologies of the Laramie and Front Ranges in the high Rockies of Wyoming. They have deposited several km of coarse clastic fluvial deposits on the Great Plains of Nebraska and Colorado up to 200 km from the mountain front. Quartz from shielded samples of granite and gneiss - the dominant quartz-bearing rocks - has high concentrations of nucleogenic 21Ne (60-140 e6 atoms/g). The 21Ne concentration in modern sand from the river (n=10) overlaps that measured in the shielded granite and gneiss. The sand data rarely lie on the air-spallation mixing line in the Ne three isotope plot indicating that it is dominantly derived from the granite and gneiss and has no resolvable cosmogenic 21Ne. Building on previous studies of cosmogenic 21Ne in pebbles [2] we have started a programme of analysis of pebbles derived from the Medicine Bow quartzite that are abundant throughout the Cenozoic alluvial sequence. Nucleogenic 21Ne in shielded quartzite is lower than granites (3-7 e6 atoms/g, n=4) and the data tend to lie on the air-spallation mixing line. All pebbles (n=14) from modern sediments analysed so far contain 2-80 times more excess 21Ne than the highest shielded quartzite suggesting that cosmogenic 21

  20. Production and Recoil Loss of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Presolar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3He, 6,7Li, and 21,22Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3He and 21Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  1. AMS measurements of cosmogenic and supernova-ejected radionuclides in deep-sea sediment cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feige J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Samples of two deep-sea sediment cores from the Indian Ocean are analyzed with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS to search for traces of recent supernova activity ~2 Myr ago. Here, long-lived radionuclides, which are synthesized in massive stars and ejected in supernova explosions, namely 26Al, 53Mn and 60Fe, are extracted from the sediment samples. The cosmogenic isotope 10Be, which is mainly produced in the Earth's atmosphere, is analyzed for dating purposes of the marine sediment cores. The first AMS measurement results for 10Be and 26Al are presented, which represent for the first time a detailed study in the time period of 1.7-3.1 Myr with high time resolution. Our first results do not support a significant extraterrestrial signal of 26Al above terrestrial background. However, there is evidence that, like 10Be, 26Al might be a valuable isotope for dating of deep-sea sediment cores for the past few million years.

  2. AMS measurements of cosmogenic and supernova-ejected radionuclides in deep-sea sediment cores

    CERN Document Server

    Feige, J; Fifield, L K; Korschinek, G; Merchel, S; Rugel, G; Steier, P; Winkler, S R; Golser, R

    2013-01-01

    Samples of two deep-sea sediment cores from the Indian Ocean are analyzed with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to search for traces of recent supernova activity around 2 Myr ago. Here, long-lived radionuclides, which are synthesized in massive stars and ejected in supernova explosions, namely 26Al, 53Mn and 60Fe, are extracted from the sediment samples. The cosmogenic isotope 10Be, which is mainly produced in the Earths atmosphere, is analyzed for dating purposes of the marine sediment cores. The first AMS measurement results for 10Be and 26Al are presented, which represent for the first time a detailed study in the time period of 1.7-3.1 Myr with high time resolution. Our first results do not support a significant extraterrestrial signal of 26Al above terrestrial background. However, there is evidence that, like 10Be, 26Al might be a valuable isotope for dating of deep-sea sediment cores for the past few million years.

  3. (UnResolved contradictions in the Late Pleistocene glacial chronology of the Southern Carpathians - new samples and recalculated cosmogenic radionuclide age estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia RUSZKICZAY-RÜDIGER

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Application of cosmogenic nuclides in the study of Quaternary glaciations has increased rapidly during the last decade owing to the previous absence of direct dating methods of glacial landforms and sediments. Although several hundred publications have already been released on exposure age dating of glacial landforms worldwide, very few studies targeted the Carpathians so far (Kuhlemann et al, 2013a; Makos et al., 2014; Reuther et al, 2004, 2007; Rinterknecht et al. 2012.There are many unresolved or contradictory issues regarding the glacial chronology of the Romanian Carpathians. Recently, some attempts have been made to develop an improved temporal framework for the glaciations of the region using cosmogenic 10Be dating (Reuther et al. 2004, 2007, Kuhlemann et al. 2013a. However, these studies made the picture even more confusing because the local last glacial maximum, for instance, apparently occurred in asynchronous timing compared to each other and also to other dated glacial events in Europe (Hughes et al, 2013.This situation is even more interesting if we take into account that the local glacial maximum tends to agree with the global LGM derived from the Eastern Balkans (Kuhlemann et al. 2013b, while the penultimate glaciation seems to significantly overtake the LGM advance over the Western Balkans (Hughes et al. 2011.The primary candidate reasons to resolve these discrepancies are methodological, e.g. insufficient number of samples (one sample/landform ignoring geological scatter of the data and the application of different half-lives, production rates and scaling schemes during the calculation of exposure ages. Systematic methodological uncertainties in computing exposure ages from measured nuclide concentrations have a significant impact on the conclusions concerning correlations of exposure-dated glacier chronologies with millennial scale climate changes (Balco, 2011. The changes in glacial timing generated by only using the most

  4. Late Pleistocene intraplate extension of the Central Anatolian Plateau, Turkey: Inferences from cosmogenic exposure dating of alluvial fan, landslide, and moraine surfaces along the Ecemiş Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Cengiz; Sarıkaya, M. Akif; ćiner, Attila

    2016-06-01

    Here we documented the vertical displacement, slip rate, extension rate, and geochronology of normal faults within a narrow strip along the main strand of the Ecemiş Fault Zone. The Kartal, Cevizlik, and Lorut Faults are normal faults that have evident surface expression within the strip. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide geochronology revealed that the Kartal Fault deformed the 104.2 ± 16.5 ka aged alluvial fan surface and the Cevizlik Fault deformed the 21.9 ± 1.8 ka old moraine and talus fan surfaces. Our topographic surveys indicated 120 ± 10 m and 13.1 ± 1.4 m surface-breaking vertical displacements along the Kartal and Cevizlik Faults, respectively. Accordingly, we suggest a 1.15 ± 0.21 mm a-1 slip rate and 0.66 ± 0.12 mm a-1 extension rate for the last 104.2 ± 16.5 ka on the Kartal Fault, and a 0.60 ± 0.08 mm a-1 slip rate and 0.35 ± 0.05 mm a-1 extension rate for the last 21.9 ± 1.8 ka on the Cevizlik Fault. We believe that these structures are an integral part of intraplate crustal deformation in the Central Anatolia. They imply that intraplate structures such as the Ecemiş Fault Zone may change their mode through time; presently, the Ecemiş Fault Zone has been deformed predominantly by normal faults. The presence of steep preserved fault scarps along the Kartal, Cevizlik, and Lorut Faults point to surface-breaking normal faulting away from the main strand and particularly signify that these structures need to be taken into account for regional seismic hazard assessments.

  5. Cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, Silke; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Rugel, Georg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Cartwright, Julia A.; Ott, Ulrich [MPI fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    After successful installation of the Dresden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (DREAMS) facility, determinations of the lighter radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 41}Ca are now easily attainable in Germany. Accompanied by data for the heavier radionuclides (i.e. {sup 53}Mn and {sup 60}Fe) that can be measured at the 14 MV tandem at Munich and stable nuclides such as {sup 21,22}Ne and {sup 38}Ar from noble gas mass spectrometry at MPI Mainz, complete and unique exposure histories of extraterrestrial material can be reconstructed. For example, recent analyses of the 100{sup th} Martian meteorite Ksar Ghilane 002 and four samples from the nickel-rich ataxite Gebel Kamil show interesting features revealing amazing stories.

  6. Beryllium-10 dating the last retreat of the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream at Utsira, western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, J. P.; Goehring, B. M.; Svendsen, J. I.; Mangerud, J.

    2016-12-01

    Knowing the age of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) extent of ice sheets is fundamental to ice age theory, but methods available for constraining maximum ice extent during the LGM are limited. Cosmogenic-nuclide exposure dating (e.g., 10Be dating) has emerged in the past two decades as a useful tool for dating LGM terminal moraine boulders. Cosmogenic-nuclide exposure dating has allowed many additional chronologies of LGM terminal moraines to arise from locations otherwise difficult to date. In some cases, however, cosmogenic-nuclide exposure ages might be skewed towards being too old due to the deep accumulation of 10Be from muon production. Svendsen et al. (2015, QSR v. 107, 231-242) used 10Be dating of erratic boulders on the island of Utsira to constrain the initial retreat of the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (a major artery of the southern Scandinavian Ice Sheet) from its maximum LGM extent. The 10Be chronology, indicating retreat of the outer ice stream 20.2 ka, is at odds with radiocarbon constraints indicating that ice sheet recession initiated 18.5 ka. Commonly discussed factors such as uncertainty in the 10Be production rate, isotopic inheritance from neutron-produced 10Be, or problematic radiocarbon ages do not satisfactorily explain the disagreement. Although inheritance affects the 10Be age of some erratics, and one bedrock sample from the island has obvious inheritance, the strong cluster of 10Be ages from Utsira, which are identical in age to erratics from a nearby island, is not the typical age pattern reflecting inheritance. We attempt to reconcile the age offset by suggesting that all of the 10Be ages are influenced by the deep accumulation of muon-produced 10Be, making them too old. Using the latest knowledge in production of 10Be from muons in the Earth's crust, we show that muogenic 10Be is significant at depths of 5-10 m. In ice sheet distal landscapes, where there is commonly >100,000 years of exposure between glacial overriding events (like

  7. Long-term erosion rates of Panamanian drainage basins determined using in situ 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica Sosa; Bierman, Paul R.; Nichols, Kyle K.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-12-01

    Erosion rates of tropical landscapes are poorly known. Using measurements of in situ-produced 10Be in quartz extracted from river and landslide sediment samples, we calculate long-term erosion rates for many physiographic regions of Panama. We collected river sediment samples from a wide variety of watersheds (n = 35), and then quantified 24 landscape-scale variables (physiographic, climatic, seismic, geologic, and land-use proxies) for each watershed before determining the relationship between these variables and long-term erosion rates using linear regression, multiple regression, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). We also used grain-size-specific 10Be analysis to infer the effect of landslides on the concentration of 10Be in fluvial sediment and thus on erosion rates. Cosmogenic 10Be-inferred, background erosion rates in Panama range from 26 to 595 m My- 1, with an arithmetic average of 201 m My- 1, and an area-weighted average of 144 m My- 1. The strongest and most significant relationship in the dataset was between erosion rate and silicate weathering rate, the mass of material leaving the basin in solution. None of the topographic variables showed a significant relationship with erosion rate at the 95% significance level; we observed weak but significant correlation between erosion rates and several climatic variables related to precipitation and temperature. On average, erosion rates in Panama are higher than other cosmogenically-derived erosion rates in tropical climates including those from Puerto Rico, Madagascar, Australia and Sri Lanka, likely the result of Panama's active tectonic setting and thus high rates of seismicity and uplift. Contemporary sediment yield and cosmogenically-derived erosion rates for three of the rivers we studied are similar, suggesting that human activities are not increasing sediment yield above long-term erosion rate averages in Panama. 10Be concentration is inversely proportional to grain size in landslide and fluvial samples

  8. The CREp program, a fully parameterizable program to compute exposure ages (3He, 10Be)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.; Blard, P. H.; Lave, J.; Delunel, R.; Balco, G.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decades, cosmogenic exposure dating permitted major advances in Earth surface sciences, and particularly in paleoclimatology. Yet, exposure age calculation is a dense procedure. It requires numerous choices of parameterization and the use of an appropriate production rate. Nowadays, Earth surface scientists may either calculate exposure ages on their own or use the available programs. However, these programs do not offer the possibility to include all the most recent advances in Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating. Notably, they do not propose the most recent production rate datasets and they only offer few possibilities to test the impact of the atmosphere model and the geomagnetic model on the computed ages. We present the CREp program, a Matlab © code that computes CRE ages for 3He and 10Be over the last 2 million years. The CREp program includes the scaling models of Lal-Stone in the "Lal modified" version (Balco et al., 2008; Lal, 1991; Stone, 2000) and the LSD model (Lifton et al., 2014). For any of these models, CREP allows choosing between the ERA-40 atmosphere model (Uppala et al., 2005) and the standard atmosphere (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1976). Regarding the geomagnetic database, users can opt for one of the three proposed datasets: Muscheler et al. 2005, GLOPIS-75 (Laj et al. 2004) and the geomagnetic framework proposed in the LSD model (Lifton et al., 2014). They may also import their own geomagnetic database. Importantly, the reference production rate can be chosen among a large variety of possibilities. We made an effort to propose a wide and homogenous calibration database in order to promote the use of local calibration rates: CREp includes all the calibration data published until July 2015 and will be able to access an updated online database including all the newly published production rates. This is crucial for improving the ages accuracy. Users may also choose a global production rate or use their own data

  9. Reconciling radiocarbon and ice core timescales over the Holocene - Cosmogenic radionuclides as synchronization tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscheler, R.; Adolphi, F.; Mekhaldi, F.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 14C and 10Be, vary globally due to external processes, namely the solar and geomagnetic modulation of the galactic cosmic ray flux as well as solar proton events. This signature is recorded in various archives such as ice cores (10Be) and tree-rings (14C). Hence, cosmogenic radionuclides offer a means to continuously assess timescale differences between two of the most widely used timescales in paleoclimatology - the radiocarbon and the ice core timescales. Short lived solar proton events additionally provide distinct marker horizons that allow synchronization of discrete horizons at annual precision. We will present a cosmogenic radionuclide based synchronization of the Greenland ice core timescale (GICC05, Svensson et al., 2008) and the radiocarbon timescale (IntCal13, Reimer et al., 2013) over the Holocene. This synchronization allows radiocarbon dated and ice core paleoclimate records to be compared on a common timescale at down to sub-decadal precision. We will compare these results to independent discrete isochrones obtained from tephrochronology and solar proton events. In addition, we will discuss implications for the accuracy and uncertainty estimates of GICC05 over the Holocene. Reimer, P. J., Bard, E., Bayliss, A., Beck, J. W., Blackwell, P. G., Bronk Ramsey, C., Buck, C. E., Cheng, H., Edwards, R. L., Friedrich, M., Grootes, P. M., Guilderson, T. P., Haflidason, H., Hajdas, I., Hatté, C., Heaton, T. J., Hoffmann, D. L., Hogg, A. G., Hughen, K. A., Kaiser, K. F., Kromer, B., Manning, S. W., Niu, M., Reimer, R. W., Richards, D. A., Scott, E. M., Southon, J. R., Staff, R. A., Turney, C. S. M., and van der Plicht, J.: IntCal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0-50,000 Years cal BP, Radiocarbon, 55, 1869-1887, 10.2458/azu_js_rc.55.16947, 2013. Svensson, A., Andersen, K. K., Bigler, M., Clausen, H. B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Davies, S. M., Johnsen, S. J., Muscheler, R., Parrenin

  10. Cosmogenic and nucleogenic 3He in apatite, titanite, and zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, K. A.; Libarkin, J.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Amidon, W.

    2006-08-01

    Cosmogenic 3He was measured in apatite, titanite, and zircon and cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz at 13 depth intervals in a 2.7-m long drill core in a Miocene ignimbrite from the Altiplano of Bolivia. All three 3He depth profiles as well as the 21Ne profile attenuate exponentially with depth, indicating that both of these isotopes are cosmogenic in origin with no significant contribution from other sources. The attenuation lengthscale for 3He production of Λ = 180 ± 11 g/cm 2 is consistent with expectations for neutron spallation, and is identical to that found for the cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz. By normalizing the measured 3He concentrations to 21Ne and using the independently known cosmogenic 21Ne production rate, the apparent cosmogenic 3He production rates in apatite, titanite, and zircon were respectively found to be 112, 97, and 87 atoms/g/yr at sea-level and high latitude. The formal uncertainty on these estimates is ˜ 20% (2 σ), and arises in equal parts from uncertainties in the measured 3He/ 21Ne ratios and the uncertainty in the 21Ne production rate. However an additional factor affecting the apparent 3He production rate in these phases arises from the long stopping range of spalled 3He and tritium (which decays to 3He). Because all three accessory phases have higher mean atomic number than major rock-forming minerals, they will have lower 3He production rates than their surroundings. As a consequence the long stopping ranges will cause a net implantation of 3He and therefore higher apparent production rates than would apply for purely in-situ production. Thus these apparent production rates apply only to the specific grain sizes analyzed. Analysis of sieved zircon aliquots suggests that a factor of 2 increase in grain size (from ˜ 50 to ˜ 100 μm cross-section) yields a 10% decrease in apparent production rate. While this effect warrants further study, the grain sizes analyzed here are typical of the accessory phases commonly encountered, so the apparent

  11. The 10Be contents of SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Vajda, S.; Kruse, T.; Herzog, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    Several authors have explored the possibility that the Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) came from Mars. The spallogenic gas contents of the SNC meteorites have been used to: constrain the sizes of the SNC's during the last few million years; to establish groupings independent of the geochemical ones; and to estimate the likelihood of certain entries in the catalog of all conceivable passages from Mars to Earth. The particular shielding dependence of Be-10 makes the isotope a good probe of the irradiation conditions experienced by the SNC meteorites. The Be-10 contents of nine members of the group were measured using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry. The Be-10 contents of Nakhla, Governador Valadares, Chassigny, and probably Lafayette, about 20 dpm/kg, exceed the values expected from irradiation of the surface of a large body. The Be-10 data therfore do not support scenario III of Bogard et al., one in which most of the Be-10 in the SNC meteorites would have formed on the Martian surface; they resemble rather the Be-10 contents found in many ordinary chondrites subjected to 4 Pi exposures. The uncertainties of the Be-10 contents lead to appreciable errors in the Be-10 ages, t(1) = -1/lambda ln(1 Be-10/Be-10). Nonetheless, the Be-10 ages are consistent with the Ne-21 ages calculated assuming conventional, small-body production rates and short terrestrial ages for the finds. It is believed that this concordance strengthens the case for at least 3 different irradiation ages for the SNC meteorites. Given the similar half-thicknesses of the Be-10 and Ne-21 production rates, the ratios of the Be-10 and Ne-21 contents do not appear consistent with common ages for any of the groups. In view of the general agreement between the Be-10 and Ne-21 ages it does not seem useful at this time to construct multiple-stage irradiation histories for the SNC meteorites.

  12. History of Alibek Glacier based on Earth remote sensing images, bioindication and cosmogenic isopotes (14С and 10Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Bushueva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the reconstruction of fluctuations of Alibek valley glacier situated in the Teberda valley, Western Caucasus. The former positions of glacier of the past 120 years were reconstructed basing on the old photographs of 1904, 1921, remote sensing data of 1955, 1987, 2007, 2008 and 2012, plans created in 20th century. Since the middle of 20th century Alibek Glacier decreased by 650 m in length and by 0,67 km2 in area and its tongue has risen by 110 m.

  13. Recent progress of {sup 10}Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weijian, E-mail: weijian@loess.llqg.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061 (China); Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Application, Xi’an AMS Center, Xi' an 710061 (China); Joint Center for Global Change Studies, Beijing 100875 (China); Xie, Xingjun [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061 (China); Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Application, Xi’an AMS Center, Xi' an 710061 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Beck, Warren [NSF-Arizona AMS Facility, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun [State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061 (China); Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Application, Xi’an AMS Center, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Studies of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of {sup 10}Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make {sup 10}Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as {sup 10}Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes {sup 10}Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of {sup 10}Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes–Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 ± 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using {sup 10}Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  14. Orbital forcing of the East Asian summer monsoon based on quantitative paleorainfall records from Chinese Loess using 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W.; White, L.; Cheng, L.; Wu, Z.; zhou, W.; Kong, X.

    2013-12-01

    Here we outline a method for deriving quantitative records of paleoprecipitation using meteoric 10Be flux as recorded in Quaternary loess sediments, and apply this method to derive a ~500ka rainfall record from Chinese loess. The method involves measuring loess 10Be concentration by AMS, then applying corrections for radioactive decay, recycled 10Be in reaerosolized dust, and for variations in geomagnetic field to correct for atmospheric 10Be production rate variations. 10Be flux is calculated by multiplying the corrected 10Be concentrations with loess accumulation rate, where the later is derived from a (non-orbitally tuned) timescale determined from correlating variations in loess magnetic susceptibility with U/Th dated Chinese speleothem δ18O records. The dependence of 10Be flux on rainfall rate is determined using modern observations of 7Be flux in rainfall, and atmospheric 10Be/7Be cosmogenic nuclide production ratios. Modern rainfall on the Chinese Loess Plateau has been shown to be primarily a function of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) intensity. Our 10Be rainfall proxy shows that glacial to peak interglacial rainfall rates in this region have varied by about a factor of two over the last 0.5 Ma. Our results suggests EASM intensity during interglacials MIS11, MIS 9c and MIS13 were all comparable (~850 mm/yr), but slightly less (by ~8%) than for MIS1, and about 15% less than for MIS5e, which is similar to the high latitude ice volume pattern of response except for MIS11. We note that the 10Be rainfall record of MIS13 differs from typical Chinese loess magnetic susceptibility records that suggest MIS13 was the strongest EASM of the last 6 interglacials. Our record instead indicates a relative subdued MIS13 EASM, more consistent with the Antarctic EPICA ice core deuterium or marine δ18O records. We correlate our results with orbital forced solar insolation variations at high and low latitudes as well as with interhemispheric insolation gradients. We find

  15. Cosmogenic isotopes and geomagnetic signals in a Mediterranean sea sediment at 35 000 y BP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Bonino, G.; Taricco, C. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Generale]|[CNR, Turin (Italy). Ist. di Cosmogeofisica; Lehman, B. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Rome (Italy)

    1998-03-01

    In this paper the authors present the results on the relative changes of the geomagnetic field intensity measured in the Tyrrenian sea core CT85-5 between 23 and 51 ky BP in order to investigate the origin of the enhancement of the cosmogenic isotope {sup 10}Be concentration, recently reported in the same core at 35 ky BP.

  16. Constraining Regolith Production on a Hillslope Over Long Timescales: Interpreting In Situ 10Be Concentrations on an Evolving Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, M. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Duehnforth, M.; Kelly, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ produced 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations provide geomorphologists with a quantitative tool to calculate regolith production rates in a variety of landscapes. However, the power of CRN dating is limited by the care with which these hard-earned numbers are interpreted. As rock is exhumed through the weathered zone, it accumulates in situ produced CRNs. Most studies assume a steady-state condition to calculate regolith production rates from 10Be concentrations obtained from rock at the base of mobile regolith; ignoring decay, the regolith production rate becomes simply Poe-H/z*/[10Be]. Although the balance of regolith production and the spatial pattern of divergence required to maintain steady regolith thickness is valid in some landscapes, steady-state is unlikely on hillslopes where time scales for generating soils are longer than climatic cycles. We report in situ 10Be concentrations to calculate production rates for mobile regolith in 8 soil pits along north- and south-facing slopes in Gordon Gulch, an intensively studied catchment in the Boulder Creek CZO. Gordon Gulch hillslopes exhibit variable regolith and saprolite thicknesses over gneissic and granitic parent rock; mean regolith thickness is 0.65 m. Local denudation rates in nearby catchments are 25 ± 8 m/Ma (Dethier and Lazarus, 2006). The mean residence time of mobile regolith in Gordon Gulch catchment is therefore 20-45 ka; less than half of this time is spent in Holocene climatic conditions. Although Gordon Gulch presently has mean annual temperature (MAT) ~4°C, it was likely at least 6°C cooler during the Last Glacial Maximum, meaning that periglacial conditions likely dominated. We therefore anticipate that parent rock could be more rapidly damaged by increased frost-cracking, and regolith transport be enhanced by increased frost-heave; thus steady-state conditions cannot be assumed over this timescale. To develop strategies for interpretation of 10Be, we employ a 1D

  17. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect of

  18. New approaches investigating production rates of in-situ produced terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); FZD, Dresden (Germany); Braucher, Regis; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourles, Didier [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2010-07-01

    In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides have proved to be valuable tools for environmental and Earth sciences. However, accurate application of this method is only possible, if terrestrial production rates in a certain environment over a certain time period and their depth-dependence within the exposed material are exactly known. Unfortunately, the existing data and models differ up to several tens of percent. Thus, one of the European project CRONUS-EU goals is the high quality calibration of the {sup 36}Cl production rate by spallation at independently dated surfaces. As part of fulfilling this task we have investigated calcite-rich samples from four medieval landslide areas in the Alps: Mont Granier, Le Claps, Dobratsch, and Veliki Vrh (330-1620 m, 1248-1442 AD). For investigating the depth-dependence of the different nuclear reactions, especially, the muon- and thermal neutron-induced contributions, we have analysed mixtures of carbonates and siliceous conglomerate samples - for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl - exposed at different shielding depths and taken from a core drilled in 2005 at La Ciotat, France (from surface to 11 m shielding). AMS of {sup 36}Cl was performed at LLNL and ETH, {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al at ASTER.

  19. Paired proglacial lake sediment and cosmogenic ages reveal the timing of Late Glacial and Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Huaguruncho Massif of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, Nathan; Rodbell, Donald; Licciardi, Joseph; Schweinsberg, Avriel; Huss, Elizabeth; Finkel, Robert; Zimmerman, Susan

    2015-04-01

    The pairing of cosmogenic ages on moraine boulders and radiocarbon-dated lake sediments provides a powerful tool for reconstructing past climates based on former ice positions. Surface exposure ages (10Be) and clastic sediment records from a proglacial lake at Nevado Huaguruncho, Peru, document the waxing and waning of tropical alpine glaciers in the Eastern Cordillera during the last ca. 15 ka. Moraine ages indicate that glaciers were advanced at ca. 14.1 ± 0.4 ka, a pattern that is consistent with cooling associated with the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Yanacocha is located immediately upvalley from this 14.1 ka moraine, and lake sediments and cosmogenic ages also suggest that glaciers advanced just prior to, or at the start of, the Younger Dryas from 13.1 to 12.5 ka. Lake sediments and cosmogenic ages then indicate that glaciers retreated after ca. 12.5 ka, and again advanced during the early Holocene between ca. 12 and 9 ka. Short-lived increases in clastic lake sediment values suggest that ice margins advanced briefly at times through the middle Holocene from ca. 8 to 4 ka, and the lack of moraine boulders dating to this interval suggest that glaciers were less extensive than during the late Holocene. Lake sediments suggest that glaciers experienced a relatively limited advance at the start of the late Holocene from ca. 4 to 2 ka, followed by retreat until the start of the Medieval Climate Anomaly at ca. 1.1 ka. Clastic sediment values in the lake sediments then suggest that ice began advancing during the MCA, and the most pronounced Holocene advance at Huaguruncho occurred during the Little Ice Age (ca. 0.4 to 0.2 ka) under colder and wetter conditions. The pattern of glacier variability in Huaguruncho during the Late Glacial and Holocene provides further evidence that tropical Atlantic Ocean conditions drove much of the observed temperature and precipitation changes along the Eastern Cordillera.

  20. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Martian meteorites ALHA 77005, Lafayette and Zagami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T.; Herpers, U. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearchemie; Kubik, P.W. [PSI c/o Institute of Particle Physics, HPK, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Knie, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.; Ott, U. [MPI fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Strahlenschutz und Radiooekologie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of effective physical models for the calculation of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites allows an exact analysis of the irradiation history of meteorites. The relative errors of calculated production rates lay below 10%. At present, concentration ratios of cosmogenic nuclides can be calculated even with errors of less than 3%. The model used in this work calculates the part of the nuclide production which comes from the interaction of the galactic cosmic radiation with the meteoroid matter. For this reason any other additional production is easily identifiable. Such overproductions are basically caused by two phenomena: complex irradiation histories and the solar cosmic radiation (SCR-effect). In this work the SCR-effect for the cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 53}Mn is demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  2. 10Be climate fingerprints during the Eemian in the NEEM ice core, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturevik-Storm, Anna; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie; Muscheler, Raimund; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Vinther, Bo M.; Usoskin, Ilya

    2014-09-01

    Several deep Greenland ice cores have been retrieved, however, capturing the Eemian period has been problematic due to stratigraphic disturbances in the ice. The new Greenland deep ice core from the NEEM site (77.45°N, 51.06°W, 2450 m.a.s.l) recovered a relatively complete Eemian record. Here we discuss the cosmogenic 10Be isotope record from this core. The results show Eemian average 10Be concentrations about 0.7 times lower than in the Holocene which suggests a warmer climate and approximately 65-90% higher precipitation in Northern Greenland compared to today. Effects of shorter solar variations on 10Be concentration are smoothed out due to coarse time resolution, but occurrence of a solar maximum at 115.26-115.36 kyr BP is proposed. Relatively high 10Be concentrations are found in the basal ice sections of the core which may originate from the glacial-interglacial transition and relate to a geomagnetic excursion about 200 kyr BP.

  3. 7Be and 10Be concentrations in recent firn and ice at Law Dome, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Fink, D.; Child, D.; Levchenko, V. A.; Morgan, V. I.; Curran, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Elliott, G.

    2000-10-01

    Over the past three years, the Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES) AMS facility at ANSTO has been expanding its sample preparation and measurement capability, particularly for 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. During this time, ANSTO has continued its collaboration with the AAD and CSIRO Atmospheric Research on the measurement of cosmogenic isotopes from Law Dome, Antarctica. This research program has been supported by the construction of a dedicated geochemistry laboratory for the processing of ice and rock samples for the preparation of AMS targets. Here we present our first results for 10Be concentrations measured in ice cores from three sites at Law Dome and describe the sample processing protocol and aspects of the AMS measurement procedure. These sites are characterised by an eightfold difference in accumulation rate with a common precipitation source. In combination with an established ice chronology, this has enabled some preliminary findings concerning the relationship between the snow accumulation rate and the measured 10Be concentration for Law Dome during recent times. Additionally, we present 7Be and 10Be/ 7Be measurements made for a few surface snow samples from Law Dome and Australia.

  4. Cosmogenic radionuclide production in NaI(Tl) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2015-02-01

    The production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth surface can be an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions, typically performed deep underground. Production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators are being used in experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter since the first nineties of the last century, very few data about cosmogenic isotopes production rates have been published up to date. In this work we present data from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed in the frame of the ANAIS project, which were installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays. The very fast start of data taking allowed to identify and quantify isotopes with half-lives of the order of tens of days. Initial activities underground have been measured and then production rates at sea level have been estimated following the history of detectors; values of about a few tens of nuclei per kg and day for Te isotopes and 22Na and of a few hundreds for I isotopes have been found. These are the first direct estimates of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in NaI crystals. A comparison of the so deduced rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a carefully selected description of excitation functions will be also presented together with an estimate of the corresponding contribution to the background at low and high energies, which can be relevant for experiments aiming at rare events searches.

  5. CosmoCalc: An Excel add-in for cosmogenic nuclide calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2007-08-01

    As dating methods using Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclides (TCN) become more popular, the need arises for a general-purpose and easy-to-use data reduction software. The CosmoCalc Excel add-in calculates TCN production rate scaling factors (using Lal, Stone, Dunai, and Desilets methods); topographic, snow, and self-shielding factors; and exposure ages, erosion rates, and burial ages and visualizes the results on banana-style plots. It uses an internally consistent TCN production equation that is based on the quadruple exponential approach of Granger and Smith (2000). CosmoCalc was designed to be as user-friendly as possible. Although the user interface is extremely simple, the program is also very flexible, and nearly all default parameter values can be changed. To facilitate the comparison of different scaling factors, a set of converter tools is provided, allowing the user to easily convert cut-off rigidities to magnetic inclinations, elevations to atmospheric depths, and so forth. Because it is important to use a consistent set of scaling factors for the sample measurements and the production rate calibration sites, CosmoCalc defines the production rates implicitly, as a function of the original TCN concentrations of the calibration site. The program is best suited for 10Be, 26Al, 3He, and 21Ne calculations, although basic functionality for 36Cl and 14C is also provided. CosmoCalc can be downloaded along with a set of test data from http://cosmocalc.googlepages.com.

  6. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclei on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tie-Kuang; Yun, Su-Jun; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin; Dong, Wu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Long; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2014-07-01

    A physical model for Geant4-based simulation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles' interaction with the lunar surface matter has been developed to investigate the production rates of cosmogenic nuclei. In this model the GCRs, mainly very high energy protons and α particles, bombard the surface of the Moon and produce many secondary particles, such as protons and neutrons. The energies of protons and neutrons at different depths are recorded and saved as ROOT files, and the analytical expressions for the differential proton and neutron fluxes are obtained through the best-fit procedure using ROOT software. To test the validity of this model, we calculate the production rates of the long-lived nuclei 10Be and 26Al in the Apollo 15 long drill core by combining the above differential fluxes and the newly evaluated spallation reaction cross sections. Our numerical results show that the theoretical production rates agree quite well with the measured data, which means that this model works well. Therefore, it can be expected that this model can be used to investigate the cosmogenic nuclei in future lunar samples returned by the Chinese lunar exploration program and can be extended to study other objects, such as meteorites and the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Cosmogenic radionuclide production in NaI(Tl) crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Amaré, J; Cuesta, C; García, E; Ginestra, C; Martínez, M; Oliván, M A; Ortigoza, Y; de Solórzano, A Ortiz; Pobes, C; Puimedón, J; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A; Villar, P

    2014-01-01

    The production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth surface can be an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions, typically performed deep underground. Production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators are being used in experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter since the first nineties of the last century, very few data about cosmogenic isotopes production rates have been published up to date. In this work we present data from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed in the frame of the ANAIS project, which were installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays. The very fast star...

  8. Earth surface erosion and weathering from the 10Be (meteoric)/9Be ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.; Wittmann, H.; Dannhaus, N.

    2012-12-01

    A perfect clock of the stability of the Earth surface is one that combines a first isotope the flux of which depends on the release rate during erosion, and a second isotope produced at constant rate. The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be is such a system. We provide a quantitative framework for its use. In a weathering zone some of the 9Be, present typically in 2.5ppm concentrations in silicate minerals, is released and partitioned between a reactive phase (adsorbed to clay and hydroxide surfaces, given the high partition coefficients at intermediate pH), and into the dissolved phase. The combined mass flux of both phases is defined by the soil formation rate and a mineral dissolution rate - and is hence proportional to the chemical weathering rate and the denudation rate. At the same time, the surface of the weathering zone is continuously exposed to fallout of meteoric 10Be. This 10Be percolates into the weathering zone where it mixes with dissolved 9Be. Both isotopes may exchange with the adsorbed Be, given that equilibration rate of Be is fast relative to soil residence times. Hence a 10Be/9Be(reactive) ratio results in soils from which the total denudation rate can be calculated. A prerequisite is that the flux of meteoric 10Be is known from field experiments or from global production models [1], that the 9Be concentration in bedrock (mostly 2.5ppm) is known [2], and that the reactive Be can be chemically extracted from soil or sediment [3]. In rivers, when reactive Be and dissolved Be equilibrate, a catchment-wide denudation rate can be determined from both sediment and a sample of filtered river water, where the sediment 10Be/9Be ratio is independent of grain size. We have tested this approach in sediment-bound Be and dissolved Be in water of the Amazon and Orinoco basin. The reactive Be was extracted from sediment by combined hydroxylamine and HCl leaches [2]. In the Amazon trunk stream, the Orinoco, Apure, and La Tigra river 10Be

  9. Debris flows and cosmogenic catchment wide denudation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, F.; Hippe, K.; Salcher, B.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kubik, P. W.; Christl, M.; Wacker, L.

    2012-04-01

    One of the basic question in alpine Quantitative Geomorphology is: Are widely measured cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates in alpine catchments truly representative for the whole catchment at any given time? Or in contrast can they vary markedly in response to extreme events and perturbations? And if such perturbations affect cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates then what bias can occur when such denudation rates are compared with sediment yield or thermochronological data or to various morphometric parameters, such as slope, mean elevation or uplift rates as potential controlling factors? We present 10Be and 14C results measured in sand samples from an active river channel from a single catchment (upper Aare), in the Swiss Alps (up to monthly sampling between 2008 to 2011). Our goal was to establish a time series to see if extreme events (such as landslides or debris flows) do have a discernible effect on derived denudation rates. The admixture of sediment of debris flows in 2009, originating upstream of the sampling spot, began to have a marked effect on 10Be concentrations and thus catchment wide denudation rates that are assumed to be in a long-term range mode prior to 2009. In summer of 2010, several extreme debris flows were recorded in the studied catchment. Samples taken document a doubling of denudation rates over the values determined from 2008. These cosmogenic nuclide data clearly demonstrate the impact of episodic events on sediment flux and the related perturbation of catchment wide denudation rates. We have recently expanded this dataset into 2011, with i) a spatial sub-sampling of debris flow and non-debris flow catchment compartments and ii) including again a major debris flow event in early autumn 2011. These data will be presented at the conference. Never-the-less the fact that the CWDR's only doubled does suggest a certain robustness in the method beyond a certain catchment size. In addition to the 10Be data, in situ 14C

  10. River fluxes to the sea from the ocean's 10Be/9Be ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be to the stable isotope 9Be is proposed here to be a flux proxy of terrigenous input into the oceans. The ocean's dissolved 10Be/9Be is set by (1) the flux of meteoric 10Be produced in the atmosphere; (2) the denudational flux of the rivers discharging into a given ocean basin; (3) the fraction of 9Be that is released from primary minerals during weathering (meaning the 9Be transported by rivers in either the dissolved form or adsorbed onto sedimentary particles and incorporated into secondary oxides); and (4) the fraction of riverine 10Be and 9Be actually released into seawater. Using published 10Be/9Be data of rivers for which independent denudation rate estimates exist we first find that the global average fraction of 9Be released during weathering into river waters and their particulate load is 20% and does not depend on denudation rate. We then evaluate this quantitative denudation rate proxy by using published dissolved seawater Be isotope data and a compilation of global river loads (15Gt/yr). We find that the measured global average oceanic dissolved 10Be/9Be ratio of about 0.9E-7 is satisfied by the mass balance if only 6.5% of the dissolved and reactive riverine Be is eventually released to the open ocean by boundary exchange. Except for the South Atlantic and the South Pacific, in which the 10Be/9Be ratio is dominated by Be advected through ocean circulation, good agreement results between 10Be/9Be ratios predicted by denudation rates and measured ocean 10Be/9Be ratios when we establish this mass balance for individual ocean basins. As the seawater 10Be/9Be ratio is faithfully recorded in marine chemical precipitates the 10Be/9Be ratio extracted from authigenic sediments can now serve to estimate relative changes in terrigenous input into the oceans back through time on a global and on a basin scale.

  11. River fluxes to the sea from the oceanʼs 10Be/9Be ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien

    2014-02-01

    The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be to the stable isotope 9Be is proposed here to be a flux proxy of terrigenous input into the oceans. The ocean's dissolved 10Be/9Be is set by (1) the flux of meteoric 10Be produced in the atmosphere; (2) the denudational flux of the rivers discharging into a given ocean basin; (3) the fraction of 9Be that is released from primary minerals during weathering (meaning the 9Be transported by rivers in either the dissolved form or adsorbed onto sedimentary particles and incorporated into secondary oxides); and (4) the fraction of riverine 10Be and 9Be actually released into seawater. Using published 10Be/9Be data of rivers for which independent denudation rate estimates exist we first find that the global average fraction of 9Be released during weathering into river waters and their particulate load is 20% and does not depend on denudation rate. We then evaluate this quantitative proxy for terrigenous inputs by using published dissolved seawater Be isotope data and a compilation of global river loads. We find that the measured global average oceanic dissolved 10Be/9Be ratio of about 0.9×10-7 is satisfied by the mass balance if only about 6% of the dissolved and adsorbed riverine Be is eventually released to the open ocean after escaping the coastal zone. When we establish this mass balance for individual ocean basins good agreement results between 10Be/9Be ratios predicted from known river basin denudation rates and measured ocean 10Be/9Be ratios. Only in the South Atlantic and the South Pacific the 10Be/9Be ratio is dominated by advected Be and in these basins the ratio is a proxy for ocean circulation. As the seawater 10Be/9Be ratio is faithfully recorded in marine chemical precipitates the 10Be/9Be ratio extracted from authigenic sediments can now serve to estimate relative changes in terrigenous input into the oceans back through time on a global and on an ocean basin scale.

  12. Measurement of 26Al for atmospheric and climate research and the potential of 26Al/ 10Be ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, M.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Wagenbach, D.; Wallner, A.; Wild, E. M.

    2007-06-01

    The measurement of the paired cosmogenic radionuclides 26Al and 10Be in environmental samples has potential applications in atmospheric and climate research. For this study, we report the first measurements of the 26Al/10Be atomic ratio in tropospheric aerosol samples from sites in Europe and Antarctica performed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). These initial results show that the 26Al/10Be atomic ratio in tropospheric aerosols averages 1.78 × 10-3 and does not vary significantly between the different locations. We also report results of systematic investigations of the ionization and detection efficiency which we performed to improve the measurement precision for 26Al by AMS. Maximum detection efficiencies of up to 9 × 10-4 (in units of 26Al atoms detected/initial) were achieved for chemically pure Al2O3, while for atmospheric samples we reached efficiencies of up to 2.2 × 10-4.

  13. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  14. Cosmogenic in situ production of radionuclides: Exposure ages and erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisinger, B.; Nolte, E.

    2000-10-01

    Experimental data for the cosmogenic in situ production of radionuclides and its depth dependence are used for two applications, the determination of exposure ages and of erosion rates. Concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides 10Be, 14C and 26Al in quartz are presented as function of exposure age, depth before exposure and erosion rate after exposure. It is shown that the cosmogenic production before exposure can introduce important corrections to the representation without consideration of pre-exposure production. Depth profiles of 10Be, 14C and 26Al in quartz and sulfur, of 36Cl in K 2O, CaCO 3, granite and concrete and of 53Mn in Fe 2O 3 are given as function of erosion rate. Consequences to determinations of neutron fluences in Hiroshima are discussed.

  15. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  16. Cosmogenic nuclides principles, concepts and applications in the earth surface sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Dunai, Tibor J

    2010-01-01

    This is the first book to provide a comprehensive and state-of-the-art introduction to the novel and fast-evolving topic of in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides. It presents an accessible introduction to the theoretical foundations, with explanations of relevant concepts starting at a basic level and building in sophistication. It incorporates, and draws on, methodological discussions and advances achieved within the international CRONUS (Cosmic-Ray Produced Nuclide Systematics) networks. Practical aspects such as sampling, analytical methods and data-interpretation are discussed in detail and an essential sampling checklist is provided. The full range of cosmogenic isotopes is covered and a wide spectrum of in-situ applications are described and illustrated with specific and generic examples of exposure dating, burial dating, erosion and uplift rates and process model verification. Graduate students and experienced practitioners will find this book a vital source of information on the background concepts and...

  17. Erosion of mountain plateaus along Sognefjord, Norway, constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    instead to a significant impact of glacial and periglacial erosion processes on the long-term development of the low-relief surfaces (Egholm et al. 2015). Here, we present a large new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from the high, flat summit surfaces along....... Earth Surface Dynamics 3(4), 463-482, 2015....

  18. Glacial erosion of high-elevation low-relief summits on passive continental margins constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    We present a new, extensive in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al dataset from high-elevation low-relief summits along Sognefjorden in Norway. Contrary to previous studies of high-elevation low-relief summits in cold regions, we find only limited cosmogenic nuclide inheritance in bedrock surfaces......, indicating that warm-based ice eroded the summits during the last glacial period. From the isotope concentrations we model denudation histories using a recently developed Monte Carlo Markov Chain inversion model (Knudsen et al, 2015). The model relies on the benthic d18O curve (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005...

  19. Cosmogenic isotopes and neo-tectonics. Active tectonics and cosmic radiations: in situ generated cosmogenic nuclides; Isotopes cosmogeniques et neotectonique. Tectonique active et rayons cosmiques: les nucleides cosmogeniques produits in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siame, L.; Braucher, R.; Bourles, D.; Derrieux, F

    2009-06-15

    In situ generated cosmogenic nuclides ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl) allow to analyse and determine the velocity in landscape changes. The build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in surface rocks submitted to cosmic radiations is proportional to the geomorphological stability of the exposed surfaces. Thus the concentration of in situ generated cosmogenic nuclides depends on the duration of the exposure and on the denudation rate. In some favorable circumstances the method allows to estimate the age of surface exposure. For a given sample at a given depth, an infinity of time-denudation solutions can be calculated to explained the measured concentration. The use of multiple samples taken at different depths allows to solve this mathematical problem and to obtain a unique solution. (J.S.)

  20. Cosmogenic 3He in detrital gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Finlay; Yakubovich, Olga; Caracedo, Ana; Nesterenok, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Since the measurement of cosmogenic He in an alluvial diamond by McConville and Reynolds (1996) the application of cosmogenic noble gases to individual detrital grains to quantify surface processes has not been vigorously pursued. The likely low rate of diffusion of cosmogenic He in native metals, and their resistance to weathering and disintegration during erosion and transport, makes them a potential record of long-term Earth surface processes. In an effort to assess the extent that detrital refractory metals record the exposure history during transport and storage we have undertaken a reconnaissance study of the He isotope composition in 18 grains (2-200 mg) of native gold, copper, silver, and PtPd, Pt3Fe and OsIr alloys from alluvial placer deposits from around the world. 4He is dominantly the result of U and Th decay within the grains, or decay of 190Pt in the Pt-rich alloys. 3He is measurable in 13 grains, concentrations range up to 2.7E+6 atoms/g. 3He/4He are always in excess of the crustal radiogenic ratio, up to 306 Ra. Although nucleogenic 3He produced by (n,α) reactions on 6Li, and 3He from trapped hydrothermal fluids, are present, the majority of the 3He is cosmogenic in origin. Using newly calculated cosmogenic 3He production rates in heavy metals, and a determination of the effect of implantation based on the stopping distances of spallogenic 3He and 3H, the grains have 3Hecos concentrations that are equivalent to 0.35 to 1.5 Ma exposure at Earth's surface. In a study of detrital gold grains from several sites in Scotland we have found that 10 % have 3He concentrations that are significantly in excess of that generated since the Last Glacial Maximum. These studies demonstrate that, with refinement, cosmogenic 3He in refractory detrital minerals can be used to quantify sediment transport and storage on the 1-10 Ma timescale. P. McConville & J.H. Reynolds (1989). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 2365-75.

  1. Occurrence Probability of Large Solar Energetic Particle Events: Assessment from Data on Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Lunar Rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kovaltsov, Gennady A

    2014-01-01

    We revisited assessments of the occurrence probability distribution of large events in solar energetic particles (SEP), based on measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides in lunar rocks. We present a combined cumulative occurrence probability distribution of SEP events based on three time scales: directly measured SEP fluences for the last 60 years; estimates based on terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclides 10Be and 14C for the multi-millennial (Holocene) time scale; and cosmogenic radionuclides measured in lunar rocks on the time scale of up to 1 Myr. All the three time scales yield a consistent distribution. The data suggest a strong rollover of the occurrence probability so that SEP events with the fluence of protons with energy >30 MeV greater than 10^{11} (protons /cm2/yr) are not expected at the Myr time scale.

  2. MASCOT: a new mass-spectrometer facility dedicated to the analysis of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) from terrestrial samples (Institute of Geological Sciences - University of Bern, Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunel, Romain; Enderli, Patrick; Jenni, Hans-Erich; Leya, Ingo; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2017-04-01

    In the past years, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides have been successfully used for dating exposure history of landforms and measuring erosional processes on Earth's surface. In this context, quantifications of landscape change have mainly been accomplished through the use of radioactive cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al, but their application has generally been restricted to Quaternary time scales because of their relatively short half-lives. The results are 10Be and 26Al concentrations that are below the detection limit of available accelerator mass spectrometers if the samples have a Late Miocene or even a Pliocene age. Contrariwise, cosmogenic noble gases such as 3He and 21Ne do not experience any radioactive decay through time, which places these isotopes in an unbeatable position for measuring paleo-denudation rates preserved in detrital material even if the ages of these deposits are up to 10 Ma and even older. These isotopes are thus keys for assessing the interplays between tectonic, climate and surface processes involved in the long-term evolution of mountain belts. Here we report the technical specifications of a noble gas analytical system that we have developed and set up at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, Switzerland, with the motivations to get dates and rates of erosion processes from the measurement of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) concentrations from terrestrial samples. This new facility, hosted at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, combines a MAP215-50 mass spectrometer fitted with a new high-sensitivity channel electron multiplier with an all-metal extraction and purification line. This later system thus comprises: (i) a double vacuum resistance furnace loaded by a 22-samples carrousel, (ii) three in-vacuo crushers (iii) an ultra high vacuum pumping system (<10-8 mbar) composed of turbo-molecular, ion-getter pumps and backed by a scroll pump, (iv) the line itself made

  3. Signatures of cosmic-ray increase attributed to exceptional solar storms inferred from multiple cosmogenic radionuclide records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhaldi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Svensson, Anders; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; McConnell, Joseph R.; Sigl, Michael; Welten, Kees C.; Woodruff, Thomas E.

    2014-05-01

    Miyake et al. (2012, 2013) discovered rapid increases of 14C content in tree rings dated to AD 774-5 and AD 993-4 which they have attributed to cosmic-ray events. These extreme particle events have no counterparts in the instrumental record and have been tentatively associated with solar proton events, supernovae and short gamma-ray bursts, which have very different energy spectra. Cosmogenic radionuclides such as 14C, 10Be and 36Cl arise from the interaction of cosmic rays with atmospheric nitrogen, oxygen and argon. These radio-isotopes are produced through different reaction pathways and vary with different energy dependencies of the production rate cross section. Owing to this, yield functions can be used to determine the energy level of incident particles. However, only 14C has been measured at high resolution to quantify the energy and thus the origin of the outbursts. We present an annually resolved record of 10Be from the NGRIP ice core for the two events. In addition, we also utilized the GRIP ice core 36Cl record in our analysis. Our results show that the differential production of cosmogenic 14C, 10Be and 36Cl is consistent with a solar energy spectrum. Considering the notable increase in radionuclides, the solar storms would have had to be substantially greater than the largest recorded geomagnetic storm, the so-called Carrington event. This challenges our understanding of the sun's dynamics. Furthermore, the events could possibly be of interest for the investigation of potential cosmic ray-cloud linkages (Svensmark & Friis-Christensen, 1997). Alternatively, such outbursts of energetic particles have the potential to deplete atmospheric ozone and alter atmospheric circulation. Ultimately, the magnitude of such particle events draws attention to the perhaps underestimated potential of the sun to cause great damage to modern technologies. References Miyake, F., Masuda, K. & Nakamura, T. Another rapid event in the carbon-14 content of tree rings. Nature

  4. Carbonate and silicate rock standards for cosmogenic 36Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechernich, Silke; Dunai, Tibor J.; Binnie, Steven A.; Goral, Tomasz; Heinze, Stefan; Dewald, Alfred; Benedetti, Lucilla; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Phillips, Fred; Marrero, Shasta; Akif Sarıkaya, Mehmet; Gregory, Laura C.; Phillips, Richard J.; Wilcken, Klaus; Simon, Krista; Fink, David

    2017-04-01

    The number of studies using cosmogenic nuclides has increased multi-fold during the last two decades and several new dedicated target preparation laboratories and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facilities have been established. Each facility uses sample preparation and AMS measurement techniques particular to their needs. It is thus desirable to have community-accepted and well characterized rock standards available for routine processing using identical target preparation procedures and AMS measurement methods as carried out for samples of unknown cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. The usefulness of such natural standards is that they allow more rigorous quality control, for example, the long-term reproducibility of results and hence measurement precision, or the testing of new target preparation techniques or newly established laboratories. This is particularly pertinent for in-situ 36Cl studies due to the multiplicity of 36Cl production pathways that requires a variety of elemental and isotopic determinations in addition to AMS 36Cl assay. We have prepared two natural rock samples (denoted CoCal-N and CoFsp-N) to serve as standard material for in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl analysis. The sample CoCal-N is a pure limestone prepared from pebbles in a Namibian lag deposit, while the alkali-feldspar CoFsp-N is derived from a single crystal in a Namibian pegmatite. The sample preparation took place at the University of Cologne, where first any impurities were removed manually from both standards. CoCal-N was leached in 10 % HNO3 to remove the outer rim, and afterwards crushed and sieved to 250-500 μm size fractions. CoFsp-N was crushed, sieved to 250-500 μm size fractions and then leached in 1% HNO3 / 1% HF until 20% of the sample were removed. Both standards were thoroughly mixed using a rotating sample splitter before being distributed to other laboratories. To date, a total of 28 CoCal-N aliquots (between 2 and 16 aliquots per facility) and 31 Co

  5. Production of cosmogenic radionuclides at great depth: A multi element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braucher, R.; Merchel, S.; Borgomano, J.; Bourlès, D. L.

    2011-09-01

    For the last two decades, in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides are increasingly applied in Earth sciences to quantify surface processes. In parallel, significant reduction of the analytical uncertainties linked to advances in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows more precise measurements. However, among all the published works on cosmogenic nuclides, only few studies are dedicated to a better understanding of their production systematic or to a better constrain of the physical parameters involved in their production. Thus, an approach to investigate in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl along a single 11-meter long core drilled from the surface and composed of carbonates and quartzose conglomerates has been launched. These measurements have been used to quantify muon-induced productions based on natural samples for each studied nuclide. Contrary to the current most oftenly used calculation of muon-induced production parameters which are based on irradiation experiments at discrete energies, productions based on natural samples are considering the entire energy range of particles reaching the ground surface. The evolution of 36Cl concentrations with depth needs to agree with those parameters deduced from 10Be and 26Al data. This is optimized when considering a fast muon-induced 36Cl production contribution and a spallation production rate at Sea Level High Latitude (SLHL) of (42.0 ± 2.0) atoms 36Cl·g·Ca - 1 ·a - 1 (1 sigma uncertainty).

  6. Global sediment production from in-situ cosmogenic nuclides in large river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedke, H.; Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Gaillardet, J.

    2016-12-01

    The worlds 30 largest rivers represent half of the total runoff to the ocean and thus integrate the fluxes of Earth surface weathering and erosion over a large portion of global tectonic, geomorphic, and climatic zones. In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides (10Be, 26Al) in detrital quartz sand can be used to constrain the mean millennial-scale denudation of these large basins. Yet cosmogenic nuclides have mostly been applied to small and intermediate size basins of significant relief. One reason is that in these settings, lowland sediment storage and burial are short compared to the half life of the nuclide (e.g. 1.4 Myr for 10Be). However, if sediment storage is long compared to the half-life, paired nuclides (e.g. 26Al/10Be), through their differential decay, allow to assess the duration of sediment transfer and burial ages from source to sink[1]. Here we present a new dataset of cosmogenic nuclides from 60 large rivers that integrate over 30% of Earth's terrestrial surface. 26Al/10Be ratios of around 6 to 7.5 for most rivers reveal burial durations shorter than the nuclides' decay time scales, indicating high source-sink connectivity. In slowly-eroding basins such as the tectonically quiescent Australian Murray-Darling or the central African Okavango and Congo rivers, 26Al/10Be ratios of millennial-scale sediment fluxes to global source areas provides an estimate of the global sediment flux. The comparison with estimates of modern sediment fluxes from river load gauging offers to deciphering the controls of sediment generation versus sediment transport across large basins. [1] Wittmann and von Blanckenburg (2016), Earth Science Reviews, 159,118-141.

  7. Short and long-term delivery rates of meteoric 10Be to terrestrial soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Bierman, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Well-constrained, long-term average meteoric 10Be deposition rates are important when meteoric 10Be is used as a chronometer or tracer of Earth surface processes. To constrain meteoric 10Be delivery to terrestrial soils, we estimate time-integrated 10Be deposition rates from meteoric 10Be inventories measured in dated soils and compare these results to a new synthesis of short-term measurements of 10Be in precipitation. Comparison of these long-term rates to short-term measurements suggests that short-term measurements likely predict long-term meteoric 10Be deposition rates within uncertainties of ~ 20%. In precipitation measurements, it is possible to deconvolve the contribution of atmospherically-produced "primary" meteoric 10Be from "recycled" meteoric 10Be delivered by terrestrial dust if a second isotope is measured that quantifies either the recycled or primary components of meteoric 10Be deposition. We use dust-concentration dependent differences between 7Be and 10Be measurements to make new estimates of the recycled contribution to total meteoric 10Be flux delivered to the Earth's surface. These dust-corrected data show a strong linear dependence between precipitation amount and primary meteoric 10Be flux. Concentrations of primary meteoric 10Be in mid- and low-latitude precipitation vary predictably by latitude between 0.63 · 10 4 and 2.05 · 10 4 atoms/cm 3 of precipitation, providing a first-order estimate of primary meteoric 10Be deposition for a given latitude and precipitation rate.

  8. The dating and interpretation of a Mode 1 site in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Lawrence; Phillips, William M; Maher, Barbara A; Karloukovski, Vassil; Duller, Geoff A T; Jain, Mayank; Wintle, Ann G

    2011-05-01

    Flake based assemblages (Mode 1) comprise the earliest stone technologies known, with well-dated Oldowan sites occurring in eastern Africa between ~2.6-1.7 Ma, and in less securely dated contexts in central, southern and northern Africa. Our understanding of the spread and local development of this technology outside East Africa remains hampered by the lack of reliable numerical dating techniques applicable to non-volcanic deposits. This study applied the still relatively new technique of cosmogenic nuclide burial dating ((10)Be/(26)Al) to calculate burial ages for fluvial gravels containing Mode 1 artefacts in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The Manzi River, a tributary of the Luangwa River, has exposed a 4.7 m deep section of fluvial sands with discontinuous but stratified gravel layers bearing Mode 1, possibly Oldowan, artefacts in the basal layers. An unconformity divides the Manzi section, separating Mode 1 deposits from overlying gravels containing Mode 3 (Middle Stone Age) artefacts. No diagnostic Mode 2 (Acheulean) artefacts were found. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating was attempted for the basal gravels as well as exposure ages for the upper Mode 3 gravels, but was unsuccessful. The complex depositional history of the site prevented the calculation of reliable age models. A relative chronology for the full Manzi sequence was constructed, however, from the magnetostratigraphy of the deposit (N>R>N sequence). Isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) dating of the upper Mode 3 layers also provided consistent results (~78 ka). A coarse but chronologically coherent sequence now exists for the Manzi section with the unconformity separating probable mid- or early Pleistocene deposits below from late Pleistocene deposits above. The results suggest Mode 1 technology in the Luangwa Valley may post-date the Oldowan in eastern and southern Africa. The dating programme has contributed to a clearer understanding of the geomorphological processes that have shaped the valley and

  9. The dating and interpretation of a Mode 1 site in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, L.; Phillips, W.M.; Maher, B.A.; Karloukovski, V.; Duller, G.A.T.; Jain, M.; Wintle, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Flake based assemblages (Mode 1) comprise the earliest stone technologies known, with well-dated Oldowan sites occurring in eastern Africa between ??? 2.6-1.7 Ma, and in less securely dated contexts in central, southern and northern Africa. Our understanding of the spread and local development of this technology outside East Africa remains hampered by the lack of reliable numerical dating techniques applicable to non-volcanic deposits. This study applied the still relatively new technique of cosmogenic nuclide burial dating (10Be/26Al) to calculate burial ages for fluvial gravels containing Mode 1 artefacts in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The Manzi River, a tributary of the Luangwa River, has exposed a 4.7 m deep section of fluvial sands with discontinuous but stratified gravel layers bearing Mode 1, possibly Oldowan, artefacts in the basal layers. An unconformity divides the Manzi section, separating Mode 1 deposits from overlying gravels containing Mode 3 (Middle Stone Age) artefacts. No diagnostic Mode 2 (Acheulean) artefacts were found. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating was attempted for the basal gravels as well as exposure ages for the upper Mode 3 gravels, but was unsuccessful. The complex depositional history of the site prevented the calculation of reliable age models. A relative chronology for the full Manzi sequence was constructed, however, from the magnetostratigraphy of the deposit (N>R>N sequence). Isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) dating of the upper Mode 3 layers also provided consistent results (???78 ka). A coarse but chronologically coherent sequence now exists for the Manzi section with the unconformity separating probable mid- or early Pleistocene deposits below from late Pleistocene deposits above. The results suggest Mode 1 technology in the Luangwa Valley may post-date the Oldowan in eastern and southern Africa. The dating programme has contributed to a clearer understanding of the geomorphological processes that have shaped the valley and

  10. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2015-12-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19[1-2], leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments[3-5]. Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity [6]. This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records [1]. These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements, which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Tauxe, L., et al., 1996, EARTH PLANET SC LETT, 140, 133-1462.Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, 1999

  11. Brunhes-Matuyama Magnetic Polarity Reversal Tracing using Chinese loess10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal is generally considered to occur synchronously around the world, and is commonly used as a time marker. However, in the case of the most recent reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) reversal (~780 ka), comparison of paleomagnetic studies in Chinese loess-paleosol sequences versus marine sediments revealed a marked discrepancy in timing of this event (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out the 10Be studies in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau, both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7corresponding to MIS 19. These results have proven that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996) and reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the magnetic polarity reversal recorded in these same Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Jin, C.S.,et al., 2011,PALAEOGEOGR PALAEOCL, 299, 309-3172.Liu, Q.S., et al., 2008, EARTH

  12. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  13. Landscape preservation under ice? In-situ 10Be and 26Al from summit surfaces along Sognefjord, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    et al. Landscape preservation under Fennoscandian ice sheets determined from in situ produced 10 Be and 26 Al. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 201(2), 397-406, 2002. Gjermundsen et al. Minimal erosion of Arctic alpine topography during late Quaternary glaciation. Nature Geoscience 8(10), 789......In-situ cosmogenic nuclides demonstrate existence of landforms preserved under glacial ice in regions such as Northern Sweden (Fabel, 2002), Svalbard (Gjermundsen, 2015) and New England (Bierman, 2015). Elsewhere, the existence of relict landforms is inferred from landscape morphology. Low......-792, 2015. Nesje & Whillans. Erosion of Sognefjord, Norway. Geomorphology 9(1), 33-45, 1994. Steer et al. Bimodal Plio-Quaternary glacial erosion of fjords and low-relief surfaces in Scandinavia. Nature Geoscience 5(9), 635-639, 2012....

  14. Production Rates of Cosmogenic Nuclides Deep in the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements of radionuclide activities in Apollo samples extend to depths of only about 400 g/cm2 in the Moon. Some Apollo samples and lunar meteorites probably have significant concentrations of cosmogenic nuclides made while they were buried at depths greater than 400 g/cm2. We report here initial calculations for production rates of cosmogenic nuclides for depths in the Moon down to 1500 g/cm2. The LAHET Code System (LCS) [1] was used to numerically simulate the irradiation of the Moon by galactic-cosmic-ray particles and to calculate particle fluxes and production rates of various cosmogenic nuclides. The advantage of these calculations is that the LCS physical model used for the production and transport of particles in the Moon has no free parameters. Some previous models, such as Reedy and Arnold (1972) [2], had semi-empirical or adopted parameters that never were tested below about 400 g/cm2. Our simulations started by selecting the energy and direction of the primary particle that starts a particle cascade and following all particles until they are removed by nuclear interactions or escape from the Moon. The calculations were validated by modeling production of 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, and 53Mn in the Apollo 15 drill core and getting good agreement with measurements to depths of about 400 g/cm2 [3]. We used the composition of the Apollo 15 deep drill core for these calculations, assumed a density of 1.5 g/cm3, and did calculations to a depth of 1000 cm (1500 g/cm2). We ran 5 million incident particles to try to get good statistics at great depths. Statistical uncertainties for depths below about 1000 g/cm2 were about 10%, so we splined the results for depths below 750 g/cm2. We reproduced our original results [3] down to 500 g/cm2, extended the calculated production rates of those four radionuclides to 1500 g/cm2, and also calculated production rates of 14C, 21Ne, 22Ne, and 38Ar from 0 to 1500 g/cm2. As reported earlier [3], production rates for various

  15. 10Be in last deglacial climate simulated by ECHAM5-HAM – Part 1: Climatological influences on 10Be deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Heikkilä

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of solar irradiance has only been possible for the Holocene so far. During the last deglaciation two solar proxies (10Be and 14C deviate strongly, both of them being influenced by climatic changes in a different way. This work addresses the climate influence on 10Be deposition by means of ECHAM5-HAM atmospheric aerosol-climate model simulations, forced by sea surface temperatures and sea ice extent created by the coupled climate system model CSIRO Mk3L. Three time slice simulations were performed during the last deglaciation: 10 000 BP ("10k", 11 000 BP ("11k" and 12 000 BP ("12k", each 30 yr long. The same 10Be production rate was used in each simulation to isolate the impact of climate on 10Be deposition. The changes are found to follow roughly the reduction in the greenhouse gas concentrations within the simulations. The 10k and 11k simulations produce a surface cooling which is symmetrically amplified in the 12k simulation. The precipitation rate is only slightly reduced at high latitudes, but there is a northward shift in the polar jet in the Northern Hemisphere and the stratospheric westerly winds are significantly weakened. These changes occur where the sea ice change is largest in the deglaciation simulations. This leads to a longer residence time of 10Be in the stratosphere by 30 (10k and 11k to 80 (12k days, heavily increasing the atmospheric concentrations. Furthermore the shift of westerlies in the troposphere leads to an increase of tropospheric 10Be concentrations, especially at high latitudes. The contribution of dry deposition generally increases, but decreases where sea ice changes are largest. In total, the 10Be deposition rate changes by no more than 20% at mid- to high latitudes, but by up to 50% in the tropics. We conclude that on "long" time scales (a year to a few years, climatic influences on 10Be deposition remain small even though atmospheric concentrations can vary significantly. Averaged over a longer

  16. In situ production of terrestrial cosmogenic helium and some applications to geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mark D.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of cosmogenic He-3 have been measured in a series of basaltic drill core samples from Hawaiian volcanoes Haleakala and Mauna Loa. The He-3 concentration in the surface of a radiocarbon dated Mauna Loa flow (20,000 years) gives reasonable agreement with a theoretical production rate of 140 atoms/g/yr, and suggests that the uncertainty in this rate is roughly 10 percent. The results illustrate the feasibility of using He-3 to measure exposure ages of young basaltic lava flows and for measuring erosion rates. Erosion rates calculated from the three Haleakala cores range from 7 to 11 meters/million years. The drill core data demonstrate that accurate depth control is crucial to the use and evaluation of cosmogenic helium. Depth profiles from several of the older cores display a nonexponential depth dependence of He-3(c) below 170 g/sq cm, which is attributed to the contribution from Li-6(n, alpha)T, where the neutrons are from stopped muons. This has important implications for depth dependence of cosmogenic He-3 because muons are weakly attenuated compared to the nucleonic component that produces spallation.

  17. In situ production of terrestrial cosmogenic helium and some applications to geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mark D.

    1986-12-01

    The concentrations of cosmogenic He-3 have been measured in a series of basaltic drill core samples from Hawaiian volcanoes Haleakala and Mauna Loa. The He-3 concentration in the surface of a radiocarbon dated Mauna Loa flow (20,000 years) gives reasonable agreement with a theoretical production rate of 140 atoms/g/yr, and suggests that the uncertainty in this rate is roughly 10 percent. The results illustrate the feasibility of using He-3 to measure exposure ages of young basaltic lava flows and for measuring erosion rates. Erosion rates calculated from the three Haleakala cores range from 7 to 11 meters/million years. The drill core data demonstrate that accurate depth control is crucial to the use and evaluation of cosmogenic helium. Depth profiles from several of the older cores display a nonexponential depth dependence of He-3(c) below 170 g/sq cm, which is attributed to the contribution from Li-6(n, alpha)T, where the neutrons are from stopped muons. This has important implications for depth dependence of cosmogenic He-3 because muons are weakly attenuated compared to the nucleonic component that produces spallation.

  18. Microscopic three-cluster model of 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashko, Yu. A.; Filippov, G. F.; Vasilevsky, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and scattering of alpha-particles on 6He. For this aim we make use of a three-cluster microscopic model. This model incorporates Gaussian and oscillator basis functions and reduces three-cluster Schrödinger equation to a two-body like many-channel problem with the two-cluster subsystem being in a bound or a pseudo-bound state. Much attention is given to the effects of cluster polarization on spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and on elastic and inelastic 6He + α scattering.

  19. Cosmogenic activation of a natural tellurium target

    CERN Document Server

    Lozza, V

    2014-01-01

    130Te is one of the candidates for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is currently planned to be used in two experiments: CUORE and SNO+. In the CUORE experiment TeO2 crystals cooled at cryogenic temperatures will be used. In the SNO+ experiment natTe will be deployed up to 0.3% loading in the liquid scintillator volume. A possible background for the signal searched for, are the high Q-value, long-lived isotopes, produced by cosmogenic neutron and proton spallation reaction on the target material. A total of 18 isotopes with Q-value larger than 2 MeV and T1/2 >20 days have been identified as potential backgrounds. In addition low Q-value, high rate isotopes can be problematic due to pile-up effects, specially in liquid scintillator based detectors. Production rates have been calculated using the ACTIVIA program, the TENDL library, and the cosmogenic neutron and proton flux parametrization at sea level from Armstrong and Gehrels for both long and short lived isotopes. The obtained values for the...

  20. A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tims S.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A catchment level study to obtain soil formation rates using beryllium-10 (10Be tracers has been undertaken in the Daly River Basin in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Three soil cores have been collected to bedrock, with depths ranging from ~1-3.5 m. Due to agricultural practices, modern soil loss rates can be significantly higher than long-term soil formation rates, but establishing soil formation rates has proved to be a difficult problem. At long-term equilibrium, however, soil formation from the underlying rock is balanced by soil loss from the surface. This long-term rate at which soil is being lost can be determined using the cosmogenic tracer 10Be, created in spallation of atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. Since the annual fallout rate of 10Be is known, the complete 10Be inventory over the depth of the top soil can be used to establish the soil formation rates.

  1. In situ 10Be-26Al exposure ages at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Kohl, C.P.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Arnold, J.R.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Middleton, R.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of dating the surface exposure of rocks from in situ production of 10Be and 26Al has been applied to determine the age of Meteor Crater, Arizona. A lower bound on the crater age of 49,200 ?? 1,700 years has been obtained by this method. ?? 1991.

  2. Reactive and dissolved meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Hella; Dannhaus, Nadine; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Suessenberger, Annette; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Maurice, Laurence; Filizola, Naziano; Gaillardet, Jerome; Christl, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be has been established as a weathering and erosion proxy where meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in reactive phases of secondary weathering products leached from detrital Amazonian river sediment were measured[1]. For this dataset, we derived a new 10Be-based mass balance, which compares the fluxes exported during erosion and weathering, Fout, calculated by the sum of [10Be]reac multiplied by gauging-derived sediment discharge and [10Be]dissmultiplied by water discharge, to the meteoric depositional flux Fin. This assessment allows evaluating the weathering state of the Amazon basin. Further, in order to assess equilibration of reactive phases in the water column, we measured (10Be/9Be)reac ratios leached from suspended sediments for two depth profiles of the Amazon (55m depth) and Madeira (12m depth) Rivers, their corresponding surface dissolved 10Be/9Be ratios, as well as dissolved ratios of smaller Amazon tributaries (Beni, Madre de Dios) to compare with published reactive ratios[1]. In these rivers, modest pH and salinity fluctuations help to constrain a 'simple' system that might however still be affected by seasonally changing isotopic compositions between water and suspended sediment[2] and seasonal fluctuations of TSS and TDS[3]. The 10Be-based mass balance shows that in Andean source areas Fout/Fin ≡1, indicating a balance between ingoing and exported flux, whereas in the Shield headwaters, Fout/Fin=0.3, indicating a combination of decay of 10Be during storage and little export of 10Be associated with particulate and dissolved loads. In central Amazonia, the export of 10Be decreases slightly relative to its atmospheric flux as evidenced by Fout/Fin=0.8 for the Amazon and Madeira Rivers. This value is interpreted as being close to steady state, but its modification could be due to additions of Shield-derived sediment to sediment carried in the main river[4]. Regarding the depth profiles, our

  3. Reconstruction of Subdecadal Changes in Sunspot Numbers Based on the NGRIP 10Be Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceoglu, F.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.; Olsen, J.

    2014-11-01

    Sunspot observations since 1610 A.D. show that the solar magnetic activity displays long-term changes, from Maunder Minimum-like low-activity states to Modern Maximum-like high-activity episodes, as well as short-term variations, such as the pronounced 11-year periodicity. Information on changes in solar activity levels before 1610 relies on proxy records of solar activity stored in natural archives, such as 10Be in ice cores and 14C in tree rings. These cosmogenic radionuclides are produced by the interaction between Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and atoms in the Earth's atmosphere; their production rates are anti-correlated with the solar magnetic activity. The GCR intensity displays a distinct 11-year periodicity due to solar modulation of the GCRs in the heliosphere, which is inversely proportional to, but out of phase with, the 11-year solar cycle. This implies a time lag between the actual solar cycles and the GCR intensity, which is known as the hysteresis effect. In this study, we use the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) records of the 10Be flux to reconstruct the solar modulation strength (Φ), which describes the modulation of GCRs throughout the heliosphere, to reconstruct both long-term and subdecadal changes in sunspot numbers (SSNs). We compare three different approaches for reconstructing subdecadal-scale changes in SSNs, including a linear approach and two approaches based on the hysteresis effect, i.e. models with ellipse-linear and ellipse relationships between Φ and SSNs. We find that the ellipse approach provides an amplitude-sensitive reconstruction and the highest cross-correlation coefficients in comparison with the ellipse-linear and linear approaches. The long-term trend in the reconstructed SSNs is computed using a physics-based model and agrees well with the other group SSN reconstructions. The new empirical approach, combining a physics-based model with ellipse-modeling of the 11-year cycle, therefore provides a method for

  4. Neutronless $^{10}Be$-Accompanied Ternary Fission of $^{252}Cf$

    CERN Document Server

    Sandulescu, A; Misicu, S; Florescu, A; Ramayya, A V; Hamilton, J H; Greiner, W

    1998-01-01

    A new type of decay corresponding to the neutronless $^{10}$Be-accompanied fragmentation of $^{252}$Cf is studied. We employ a cluster model similar to the model used for the description of cluster radioactivity. No preformation factors were considered. The ternary relative isotopic yields were calculated as the ratio of the penetrability of a given ternary fragmentation over the sum of penetrabilities of all possible ternary neutronless fragmentations. The corresponding barriers between the light and heavy fragment and between the $^{10}$Be cluster and the two heavier fragments were computed with the help of a double folding potential generated by M3Y-$NN$ effective interaction and realistic fragment ground state deformations. Also, we studied the influence of the fragment excitation energies on the yields, by including the level densities and the $\\beta$-stretching of the fragments. The new phenomenon could be experimentally observed by the triple gamma coincidence technique between the fragments and $^{10}...

  5. 26Al and 10Be Activities of Lodranites and Winona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, G. F.; Xue, S.; Klein, J.; Juenemann, D.; Middleton, R.

    1993-07-01

    Noble gas measurements by [1] indicate that four lodranites LEW 88280, Lodran (a fall), MAC 88177, and Yamato 791491 have the same cosmic ray exposure age of a few million years. The elevated ^22Ne/^21Ne ratios of these lodranites, from 1.22 to 1.28 [1], suggest that shielding was light and production rates appreciably lower than in average chondrites. Cosmic-ray irradiation in space for, say, 4 My would bring ^26Al and ^10Be to within 2% and 16% of their respective saturation values. Thus measurement of ^26Al may provide information about production rates and shielding and ^10Be about exposure age. We separated magnetically metal- and silicate-rich material from the four lodranites mentioned above and from Winona. The ^26Al and/or ^10Be activities (Table 1) were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry [2] with the statistical 1-sigma precision shown; the activities are thought to have an overall accuracy of 6-8%. Although the metal phases were etched with HF, they retained some silicate. To get a quantitative indication of the amounts of silicate present, the Mg concentrations in aliquots of the dissolved metal samples (Table 1) were measured by ICP/MS. The Mg, Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe contents of the silicate phases were determined by DCP emission spectrometry [3]. The measured activities in silicates from LEW 88280, Lodran, and Y 791491 resemble one another closely: The average ^26Al and ^10Be activities are 50.9 and 16.7 dpm/kg compared to estimated production rates of about 55 and 23 dpm/kg. These results lead to an exposure age of ~3.3 My, but do not indicate substantial lowering of production rates. The ^26Al and ^10Be contents of MAC 88177 are about half the values expected at saturation under normal shielding and are lower than those in the other three lodranites. These results are consistent with the very light shielding inferred from the exceptionally high ^22Ne/^21Ne ratio of 1.28, and perhaps with some lowering due to terrestrial age. Kirsten et al. [4

  6. Cosmogenic Nuclei Production Rate on the Lunar Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Tie-Kuang; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin; Dong, Wu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Long; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    A physical model of Geant4-based simulation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interaction with the lunar surface matter has been developed to investigate the production rate of cosmogenic nuclei. In this model the GCRs, mainly very high energy protons and $\\alpha$ particles, bombard the surface of the Moon and produce many secondary particles such as protons and neutrons. The energies of proton and neutron at different depths are recorded and saved into ROOT files, and the analytical expressions for the differential proton and neutron fluxes are obtained through the best-fit procedure under the ROOT software. To test the validity of this model, we calculate the production rates of long-lived nuclei $^{10}$Be and $^{26}$Al in the Apollo 15 long drill core by combining the above differential fluxes and the newly evaluated spallation reaction cross sections. Numerical results show that the theoretical production rates agree quite well with the measured data. It means that this model works well. Therefore, i...

  7. He-3 in diamonds - The cosmogenic component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, D.; Craig, H.; Wacker, J. F.; Poreda, R.

    1989-02-01

    Results are presented of measurements of He-3 and He-4 concentrations in diamonds received directly from mines, as well as in industrual samples. None of the diamonds recovered from underground mining was found to have a He-3/He-4 ratio, R, exceeding three times the atmospheric He-3/He-4 ratio R(A), while one of the industrial diamonds was found to have an R value of 142 R(A). It is concluded that the hypothesis of Ozima et al. (1983) of high primordial He-3/He-4 ratios in diamonds exceeding MORB ratios is not required. The present findings on the He-3/He-4 ratios are explained as the result of cosmogenic and nucleogenic production of He-3 within the diamonds.

  8. Miocene to recent ice elevation variations from the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet: Constraints from geologic observations, cosmogenic nuclides and ice sheet modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Ackert, Robert P.; Pope, Allen E.; Pollard, David; DeConto, Robert M.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) behavior can be used to test and constrain dynamic ice sheet models. Long-term observational constraints are however, rare. Here we present the first constraints on long-term (Miocene-Holocene) WAIS elevation from the interior of the ice sheet near the WAIS divide. We use geologic observations and measurements of cosmogenic 21Ne and 10Be in bedrock surfaces to constrain WAIS elevation variations to WAIS elevations to have been similar to, or lower than present, since the beginning of the Pliocene warm period. We use a continental ice sheet model to simulate the history of ice cover at our sampling sites and thereby compute the expected concentration of the cosmogenic nuclides. The ice sheet model indicates that during the past 5 Ma interior WAIS elevations of >65 m above present-day ice levels at the Ohio Range occur only rarely during brief ice sheet highstands, consistent with the observed cosmogenic nuclide data. Furthermore, the model's prediction that highstand elevations have increased on average since the Pliocene is in good agreement with the cosmogenic nuclide data that indicate the highest ice elevation over the past 5 Ma was reached during the highstand at 11 ka. Since the simulated cosmogenic nuclide concentrations derived from the model's ice elevation history are in good agreement with our measurements, we suggest that the model's prediction of more frequent collapsed-WAIS states and smaller WAIS volumes during the Pliocene are also correct.

  9. Meteoric 10Be in Lake Cores as a Measure of Climatic and Erosional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. E.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Utilization of meteoric 10Be as a paleoenvironmental proxy has the potential to offer new insights into paleoprecipitation records and paleoclimate models, as well as to long-term variations in erosion with climate. The delivery of meteoric 10Be to the surface varies with precipitation and its strong adsorption to sediment has already proven useful in studies of erosion. Thus, it is likely meteoric 10Be concentrations in lake sediments vary under both changing climate and changing sediment influx. Assessment of the relative importance of these changes requires the comparison of 10Be concentrations in well-dated lake cores with independent paleoenvironmental proxies, including oxygen isotope, pollen, and charcoal records, as well as variation in geochemical composition of the sediments. Blacktail Pond details 15,000 years of climatic change in the Yellowstone region. We develop a new model framework for predicting meteoric 10Be concentrations with depth in the core, based on sedimentation rates of both lake-derived and terrigenous sediments and changes in the flux of meteoric 10Be with precipitation. Titanium concentrations and previously determined 10Be concentrations in wind-derived loess provide proxies for changing delivery of 10Be to the lake by terrigenous sources. We use existing paleoenvironmental data obtained from this core and the surrounding region to develop models for changing rainfall across the region and predict meteoric 10Be delivery to the lake by precipitation. Based on a suite of ~10 models, sedimentation rate is the primary control of meteoric 10Be in the Blacktail Pond core unless terrestrial input is very high, as it was post-glacial in the early Holocene when the lake experienced a high influx of loess and terrigenous sediments. We used these models to inform sample selection for 10Be analysis along the Blacktail pond core. Core sediments are processed for meteoric 10Be analysis using sequential digestions and standard extraction procedures

  10. Geomagnetic field intensity and quantitative paleorainfall reconstruction from Chinese loess using 10Be and magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W.; zhou, W.; Li, C.; Wu, Z.; White, L.; Xian, F.

    2011-12-01

    7Be is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols, usually encapsulated in rain or snow. Numerous studies have shown that its flux to the ground is proportional to rainfall amount. Unfortunately, with a half life of only a few weeks, this observation has little relevance for reconstruction past rainfall amounts in paleosoils. Fortunately, 7Be has a long-lived sister isotope (10Be) with a half life of ~1.5 Ma which can be used for such purposes. There are a number of complications, however. First, 10Be atmospheric production rate changes when the geomagnetic field intensity changes. Secondly, 10Be half life is long enough that 10Be which fell to the ground attached to dust some time in the past can become resuspended, meaning that there are two sources of 10Be, one meteoric, and the other recycled aeolian dust. Fortunately, we have found a method to deconvolute this knotty situation and have applied it to soils of the Chinese Loess Plateau, allowing us to reconstruct records of both geomagnetic field intensity and paleorainfall. To do so, we use the additional parameters magnetic susceptibility and coercivity to help define the inherited amount of each component, and to define what fraction of the variations in 10Be are associated with magnetic field fluctuations, versus that linked to rainfall variations. We also use a sediment age/depth model to convert 10Be concentration to 10Be flux, and finally, we use the modern 7Be vs. rainfall relationship and 10Be/7Be atmospheric production rate ratio to calculate quantitative paleorainfall rates. We have used these techniques to generate several such records ranging from the Holocene to MIS13 (Circa 525 ka BP), and will compare some of these to U-series dated speleothem records of δ18O.

  11. Determination of the 10Be half-life by multicollector ICP-MS and liquid scintillation counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmeleff, Jérôme; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Kossert, Karsten; Jakob, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    A new method was designed and used for determining the half-life of the isotope 10Be. The method is based on (1) accurate 10Be/ 9Be measurements of 9Be-spiked solutions of a 10Be-rich master solution using multicollector ICP mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and (2) liquid scintillation counting (LSC) using the CIEMAT/NIST method for determining the activity concentrations of the solutions whose 10Be concentrations were determined by mass spectrometry. Important requirements for the success of this approach (a) was the previous coating of glass ampoules filled for counting experiments with 9Be, thereby reducing the risk of the adsorptive loss of 10Be; (b) the removal of Boron from solutions to be measured by MC-ICP-MS by cation chromatography without the introduction of mass fractionation and (c) the accurate determination of the mass bias of 10Be/ 9Be measurements by ICP-MS which are always affected by the space-charge effect. The mass bias factor was determined to be 1.1862 ± 0.071 for 10Be/ 9Be from careful fitting and error propagation of ratios of measured Li, B, Si, Cr, Fe, Cu, Sr, Nd, Hf, Tl and U standard solutions of known composition under the same measurement conditions. Employing this factor, an absolute 10Be/ 9Be ratio of 1.464 ± 0.014 was determined for a first dilution of the 10Be-rich master solution. This solution is now available as an absolute Be ratio standard in AMS measurements. Finally, a half-life of (1.386 ± 0.016) My (standard uncertainty) was calculated. This value is much more precise than previous estimates and was derived from a fully independent set of experiments. In a parallel, fully independent study using the same master solution, Korschinek et al. [35] have determined a half-life of (1.388 ± 0.018) My. The combined half-life and uncertainty amounts to (1.387 ± 0.012) My. We suggest the use of this value in nuclear studies and in studies that make use of cosmogenic 10Be in environmental and geologic samples.

  12. Testing the potential of 10Be in varved sediments from two lakes for solar activity reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymzik, Markus; Muscheler, Raimund; Brauer, Achim; Adolphi, Florian; Ott, Florian; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Slowinski, Michal; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The potential of 10Be in annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for solar activity reconstruction is, to date, largely unexplored. It is hypothesized that 10Be contents in sediments from well-chosen lakes reflect the solar induced atmospheric production signal. The varved nature of these archives provides the chance to establish solar activity time-series with very high temporal precision. However, so far solar activity reconstruction from 10Be in varved lake sediments is hampered due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the process chain from production in the atmosphere to deposition on the lake floor. Calibrating 10Be time-series from varved lake sediments against complementary proxy records from the same sediment archive as well as instrumental meteorological and solar activity data will allow a process-based understanding of 10Be deposition in these lakes and a quantitative evaluation of their potential for solar activity reconstruction. 10Be concentration and flux time-series at annual resolution were constructed for the period 1983 to 2007 (approx. solar cycles 22 and 23) conducting accelerator mass spectrometry and varve chronology on varved sediments of Lakes Tiefer See and Czechowski, located on an east-west transect at a distance of about 450 km in the lowlands of northern-central Europe. 10Be concentrations vary between 0.9 and 1.8*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1.3*108atoms/g in Lake Tiefer See and between 0.6 and 1.6*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1*108atoms/g in Lake Czechowski. Calculated mean 10Be flux is 2.3*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Tiefer See and 0.7*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Czechowski. Calibrating the 10Be time-series against corresponding geochemical μ-XRF profiles, varve thickness and total organic carbon records as well as precipitation data from the nearby stations Schwerin for Lake Tiefer See and Koscierzyna for Lake Czechowski and a neutron monitor record of solar activity suggests (1) a complex interaction of varying processes influencing

  13. Contrasting Modern and 10Be- derived erosion rates for the Southern Betic Cordillera, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, N.; Vanacker, V.; Kubik, P.

    2012-04-01

    In Europe, Southeast Spain was identified as one of the regions with major treat of desertification in the context of future land use and climate change. During the last years, significant progress has been made to understand spatial patterns of modern erosion rates in these semi-arid degraded environments. Numerous European projects have contributed to the collection of modern erosion data at different spatial scales for Southeast Spain. However, these data are rarely analysed in the context of long-term changes in vegetation, climate and human occupation. In this paper, we present Modern and Holocene denudation rates for small river basins (1 to 10 km2) located in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. Long-term erosion data were derived from cosmogenic nuclide analyses of river-borne sediment. Modern erosion data were quantified through analysis of sediment deposition volumes behind check dams, and represent average erosion rates over the last 10 to 40 years. Modern erosion rates are surprisingly low (mean erosion rate = 0.048 mm y-1; n=36). They indicate that the steep, sparsely vegetated hillslopes in the Betic Cordillera cannot directly be associated with high erosion rates. 10Be -derived erosion rates integrate over the last 37500 to 3500 years, and are roughly of the same magnitude. They range from 0.013 to 0.243 mm y-1 (mean denudation rate = 0.062 mm y-1 ± 0.054; n=20). Our data suggest that the modern erosion rates are similar to the long-term erosion rates in this area. This result is in contrast with the numerous reports on human-accelerated modern erosion rates for Southeast Spain. Interestingly, our new data on long-term erosion rates show a clear spatial pattern, with higher erosion rates in the Sierra Cabrera and lower erosion rates in Sierra de las Estancias, and Sierra Torrecilla. Preliminary geomorphometric analyses suggest that the spatial variation that we observe in long-term erosion rates is related to the gradient in uplift rates of the Betic

  14. Global analysis of the stream power law parameters based on worldwide 10Be denudation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, M.-A.; Mudd, S. M.; Attal, M.

    2016-09-01

    The stream power law, expressed as E = KAmSn - where E is erosion rate [LT - 1], K is an erodibility coefficient [T - 1L (1 - 2m)], A is drainage area [L 2], S is channel gradient [L/L], and m and n are constants - is the most widely used model for bedrock channel incision. Despite its simplicity and limitations, the model has proved useful for topographic evolution, knickpoint migration, palaeotopography reconstruction, and the determination of rock uplift patterns and rates. However, the unknown parameters K, m, and n are often fixed arbitrarily or are based on assumptions about the physics of the erosion processes that are not always valid, which considerably limits the use and interpretation of the model. In this study, we compile a unique global data set of published basin-averaged erosion rates that use detrital cosmogenic 10Be. These data (N = 1457) enable values for fundamental river properties to be empirically constrained, often for the first time, such as the concavity of the river profile (m/n ratio or concavity index), the link between channel slope and erosion rate (slope exponent n), and substrate erodibility (K). These three parameters are calculated for 59 geographic areas using the integral method of channel profile analysis and allow for a global scale analysis in terms of climatic, tectonic, and environmental settings. In order to compare multiple sites, we also normalize n and K using a reference concavity index m/n = 0.5. A multiple regression analysis demonstrates that intuitive or previously demonstrated local-scale trends, such as the correlation between K and precipitation rates, do not appear at a global scale. Our results suggest that the slope exponent is generally > 1, meaning that the relationship between erosion rate and the channel gradient is nonlinear and thus support the hypothesis that incision is a threshold controlled process. This result questions the validity of many regional interpretations of climate and/or tectonics where

  15. Holocene glacial history of the west Greenland Ice Sheet inferred from cosmogenic exposure ages and threshold lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Kjaer, K. H.; Colding, Sune Oluf

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use a combination of 10Be exposure ages and threshold lakes to constrain the ice sheet history in Godthåbs- and Buksefjorden, west Greenland (63-64°N) during the Holocene. The 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages have been used to quantify both the ice retreat and thinning of the west ......) and this suggest that the ice sheet in this area may have been more retracted and probably more sensitive to climate change than other areas in south and west Greenland....

  16. 10Be-derived denudation rates from the Burdekin catchment: The largest contributor of sediment to the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croke, Jacky; Bartley, Rebecca; Chappell, John; Austin, Jenet M.; Fifield, Keith; Tims, Stephen G.; Thompson, Chris J.; Furuichi, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs) such as Beryllium-10 (10Be) are now routinely used to reconstruct erosional rates over tens of thousands of years at increasingly large basin scales (> 100,000 km2). In Australia, however, the approach and its assumptions have not been systematically tested within a single, large drainage basin. This study measures 10Be concentrations in river sediments from the Burdekin catchment, one of Australia's largest coastal catchments, to determine long-term (> 10,000 years), time-integrated rates of sediment generation and denudation. A nested-sampling design was used to test for effects of increasing catchment scale on nuclide concentrations with upstream catchment areas ranging from 4 to 130,000 km2. Beryllium-10 concentrations in sediment samples collected from the upstream headwater tributaries and mid-stream locations range from 1.8 to 2.89 × 105 atoms g- 1 and data confirm that nuclide concentrations are well and rapidly mixed downstream. Sediment from the same tributaries consistently yielded 10Be concentrations in the range of their upstream samples. Overall, no decrease in 10Be concentrations can be observed at the range of catchment scales measured here. The mean denudation rate for all river sediment samples throughout the Fanning subcatchment (1100 km2) is 18.47 m Ma- 1, which compares with the estimate at the end of the Burdekin catchment (130,000 km2) of 16.22 m Ma- 1. Nuclide concentrations in the lower gradient western and southern catchments show a higher degree of variability, and several complications emerged as a result of the contrasting geomorphic processes and settings. This study confirms the ability of TCNs to determine long-term denudation rates in Australia and highlights some important considerations in the model assumptions that may affect the accuracy of limited sampling in large, low-gradient catchments with long storage times.

  17. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  18. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Kish, Alexander; Piastra, Francesco [University of Zuerich, Department of Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schumann, Marc [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470 m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of {sup 7}Be, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 126}I and {sup 127}Xe in xenon, out of which only {sup 125}Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only existing dedicated activation measurement, while we observe lower rates for the remaining ones. The specific saturation activities for both samples are also compared to predictions obtained with commonly used software packages, where we observe some underpredictions, especially for xenon activation. (orig.)

  19. Cosmogenic activation of xenon and copper

    CERN Document Server

    Baudis, Laura; Piastra, Francesco; Schumann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Rare event search experiments using liquid xenon as target and detection medium require ultra-low background levels to fully exploit their physics potential. Cosmic ray induced activation of the detector components and, even more importantly, of the xenon itself during production, transportation and storage at the Earth's surface, might result in the production of radioactive isotopes with long half-lives, with a possible impact on the expected background. We present the first dedicated study on the cosmogenic activation of xenon after 345 days of exposure to cosmic rays at the Jungfraujoch research station at 3470m above sea level, complemented by a study of copper which has been activated simultaneously. We have directly observed the production of 7Be, 101Rh, 125Sb, 126I and 127Xe in xenon, out of which only 125Sb could potentially lead to background for a multi-ton scale dark matter search. The production rates for five out of eight studied radioactive isotopes in copper are in agreement with the only exis...

  20. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Hooke, R. L.; Eppes, M. C.; Persico, L.; Caffee, M.; Finkel, R.

    2001-12-01

    Low-gradient alluvial piedmonts are common in desert areas throughout the world; however, long-term rates of processes that modify these landscapes are poorly understood. Using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al, we attempt to quantify the long-term (>103 y) behavior of desert piedmonts in Southern California. We measured the activity of 10Be and 26Al in three samples of drainage basin alluvium and six amalgamated samples from transects spaced at 1-km intervals down a piedmont in Fort Irwin, Mojave Desert, California. Each transect sample consists of sediment from 21 collection sites spaced at 150 m intervals. Such sampling averages the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history of sediment as it is transported from uplands to the distal piedmont. The piedmont is heavily used during military training exercises during which hundreds of wheeled and tracked vehicles traverse the surface. The piedmont surface is planar, and fan-head incision is minimal at the rangefront decreasing to zero between the first and second transects, 1.5 km from the rangefront. 10Be activity increases steadily from 5.87 X 105 atoms g-1 at the rangefront to 1.02 X 6 atoms g-1 at the piedmont bottom. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r2 = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed uniformly as it is transported down piedmont. We have measured similar increases in nuclide activity in transect samples collected from two other Mojave Desert piedmonts, those fringing the Iron and Granite Mountains (Nichols et al, in press, Geomorphology). These piedmonts have nuclide activities that also correlate well with distance (r2 = 0.98 and 0.96, respectively) from their rangefronts, but nuclides increase at a lower rate down piedmont. Modeled sediment transport speeds for the Iron and Granite Mountain piedmonts are decimeters per year. The regular increase in nuclide activities down three different Mojave Desert piedmonts suggests that

  1. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  2. Reconstructing the 11-year solar cycle length from cosmogenic radionuclides for the last 600 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Emma; Adolphi, Florian; Mekhaldi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund

    2017-04-01

    The cyclic behavior of the solar magnetic field has been known for centuries and the 11-year solar cycle is one of the most important features directly visible on the solar disc. Using sunspot records it is evident that the length of this cycle is variable. A hypothesis of an inverse relationship between the average solar activity level and the solar cycle length has been put forward (e.g. Friis-Christensen & Lassen, 1991), indicating longer solar cycles during periods of low solar activity and vice versa. So far, studies of the behavior of the 11-year solar cycle have largely been limited for the last 4 centuries where observational sunspot data are available. However, cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 10Be and 14C from ice cores and tree rings allow an assessment of the strength of the open solar magnetic field due to its shielding influence on galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere. Similarly, very strong solar storms can leave their imprint in cosmogenic radionuclide records via solar proton-induced direct production of cosmogenic radionuclides in the Earth atmosphere. Here, we test the hypothesis of an inverse relationship between solar cycle length and the longer-term solar activity level by using cosmogenic radionuclide records as a proxy for solar activity. Our results for the last six centuries suggest significant solar cycle length variations that could exceed the range directly inferred from sunspot records. We discuss the occurrence of SPEs within the 11-year solar cycle from a radionuclide perspective, specifically the largest one known yet, at AD 774-5 (Mekhaldi et al., 2015). References: Friis-Christensen, E. & Lassen, K. Length of the solar-cycle - An indicator of solar activity closely associated with climate. Science 254, 698-700, doi:10.1126/science.254.5032.698 (1991). Mekhaldi, F., Muscheler, R., Adolphi, F., Aldahan, A., Beer, J., McConnell, J. R., Possnert, G., Sigl, M., Svensson, A., Synal, H. A., Welten, K. C. & Woodruff, T. E

  3. Unexpected Delivery of Meteoric 10Be to Critical Zone Soils, Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.; Bierman, P. R.; Wyshnytsky, C.; Rood, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Using meteoric 10Be in geomorphic studies requires knowing its long-term delivery rate to the earth surface. Delivery rates vary by latitude due to the influence of geomagnetic field intensity and solar activity and locally due to differences in precipitation and rates of dustfall accumulation, which are responsible for depositing primary and recycled meteoric 10Be to geomorphic surfaces, respectively. Because influences on delivery rate vary in space and time, recent studies emphasize the use of inventory sites where the total concentration of meteoric 10Be is measured on stable landforms of known age to determine site-specific, long-term delivery rates. To date, measured long-term delivery rates typically have fallen within the range of expected rates for the site's latitude and modern annual rate of precipitation, including minor contributions of dust to the total inventory of meteoric 10Be. Here, we present the results of a meteoric 10Be inventory measured on a Pinedale (~15 ka) moraine within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Front Range, Colorado. We report a long-term delivery rate of meteoric 10Be for this site of 4.2 to 4.6 × 106 atoms/cm2/yr, significantly higher than the expected delivery rate (1 to 1.3 × 106 atoms/cm2/yr) for it's latitude (40 degrees) and annual precipitation rate (85-95 cm/yr). A detailed analysis of soils in the Front Range (of various age) indicate that long-term dust accumulation rates are less than ~0.1 grams/cm2/kyr and therefore do not significantly influence the total amount of meteoric 10Be delivered to geomorphic surfaces. When applied to measured concentrations of meteoric 10Be in soils within the Gordon Gulch CZO catchment, our high, inventory-based delivery rate suggests that hillslopes are 10 to 40 ka younger (all post-LGM) than suggested by published precipitation based delivery rates. Furthermore, this result, combined with a long-term delivery rate calibrated nearby on the High Plains (1200 m lower in

  4. Cosmogenic activation of materials used in rare event search experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Mei, D.-M.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Fiorucci, S.

    2016-11-01

    We evaluate the cosmogenic production rates in some materials that are commonly used as targets and shielding/supporting components for detecting rare events. The results from Geant4 simulations and the calculations of ACTIVIA are compared with the available experimental data. We demonstrate that the production rates from the Geant4-based simulations agree with the available data reasonably well. As a result, we report that the cosmogenic production of several isotopes in various materials can generate potential backgrounds for direct detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

  5. Cosmogenic Activation of Materials Used in Rare Event Search Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C; Kudryavtsev, V A; Fiorucci, S

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the cosmogenic production rates in some materials that are commonly used as targets and shielding/supporting components for detecting rare events. The results from Geant4 simulations are compared with the calculations of ACTIVIA and the available experimental data. We demonstrate that the production rates from the Geant4-based simulations agree with the available data reasonably well. As a result, we report that the cosmogenic production of several isotopes in various materials can generate potential backgrounds for direct detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

  6. Systematic Uncertainties of Glacial Chronologies Based on Surface Exposure Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgner, J.; Zech, R.; Baechtiger, C.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2008-12-01

    Surface exposure dating using terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides provides the opportunity to establish glacial chronologies in semi-arid high mountain regions, where the lack of organic material for radiocarbon dating has limited our knowledge about the timing and the causes of glacial advances so far. However, several scaling systems and calculation schemes exist. This can result in significant systematic uncertainties, particularly at high altitudes as e.g. in the Central Andes. We present and discuss previously published exposure ages from Bolivia and Argentina in order to illustrate the extent of the current uncertainties. It is neither possible to unambiguously determine whether the local Last Glacial Maximum (local LGM) in the tropics occurred in-phase with or predated the global LGM, nor can the subsequent Late Glacial stages be dated accurately enough to infer temperature or precipitation changes at millennial-scale timescales. We then also present new results from the Tres Lagunas in the Sierra de Santa Victoria, NW Argentina. There we can compare our glacial exposure age chronology with bracketing radiocarbon ages from lake sediments. The Tres Lagunas may thus serve as a high-altitude calibration site for 10Be dating. Paleoclimatically, we conclude that glacial deposits in NW-Argentina document glacial advances in-phase with the global LGM, but that the prominent moraines there date to the Late Glacial. This coincides with the well-documented intensification and/or southward shift of the tropical circulation and reflects the strong precipitation-sensitivity of glaciers in arid and semi-arid environments.

  7. Cosmogenic Induced Background Estimation for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brandon; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay experiments probe for such rare events that the suppression and understanding of backgrounds are major experimental concerns. Cosmogenic induced isotopes have the potential to be a major background for such experiments. For the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment 76Ge isotope is used as both detector and source and pure electroformed copper is primarily used for detector housing. The isotopes 68Ge and 60Co are cosmogenically produced when the Germanium and Copper components are near Earth's surface. The decay of these isotopes can mimic events in the region of interest. The experiment is located at the 4850 foot level at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota to suppress cosmogenic activation. In this talk I will present the calculations of cosmogenic backgrounds for the enriched 76Ge and electroformed Copper materials used in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The activation is determined by the surface exposure time of materials. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  8. Cosmogenic neon from precompaction irradiation of Kapoeta and Murchison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    Neon from hand-picked Murchison and Kapoeta grains, selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks, was analyzed in order to delineate the precompaction history of this material. The irradiated grains showed large enrichments of cosmogenic neon relative to the unirradiated grains. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure ages for the unirradiated grains yield the nominal values reported for the recent exposure history of these meteorites. Apparent minimum precompaction galactic exposure ages of 28 m.y. and 56 m.y. would have been obtained for Murchison and Kapoeta, respectively, if the cosmogenic effects in the irradiated grains were due to GCR irradiation. Since this seems unreasonably long, the cosmogenic neon in the irradiated grains may be due to spallation by solar cosmic rays. This, however, would require a more active early sun. The isotopic composition of the cosmogenic neon in these grains suggests a harder energy spectrum than is characteristic of present solar flares. Lack of apparent solar wind effects may require some kind of shielding, such as nebular gas.

  9. The competition between coastal trace metal fluxes and oceanic mixing from the 10Be/9Be ratio: Implications for sedimentary records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Mohtadi, M.; Christl, M.; Bernhardt, A.

    2017-08-01

    At an ocean margin site 37°S offshore Chile, we use the meteoric cosmogenic 10Be/9Be ratio to trace changes in terrestrial particulate composition due to exchange with seawater. We analyzed the marine authigenic phase in surface sediments along a coast-perpendicular transect and compared to samples from their riverine source. We find evidence for growth of authigenic rims through coprecipitation, not via reversible adsorption, that incorporate an open ocean 10Be/9Be signature from a deep water source only 30 km from the coast, overprinting terrestrial 10Be/9Be signatures. Together with increasing 10Be/9Be ratios, particulate-bound Fe concentrations increase, which we attribute to release of Fe-rich pore waters during boundary exchange in the sediment. The implications for the use of 10Be/9Be in sedimentary records for paleodenudation flux reconstructions are the following: in coast-proximal sites the authigenic record will likely preserve local riverine ratios unaffected by exchange with seawater, whereas sites beneath well-mixed seawater will preserve global flux signatures.

  10. Dynamics of erosion in a compressional mountain range revealed by 10Be paleoerosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, P.; Hoke, G. D.; Fosdick, J. C.; Wittmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understanding the evolution of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge evolution predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based landscape evolution models predict catchment-wide erosion maxima that lag behind a rock uplift pulse. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S where extensive previous work documents deformation, climate and sediment accumulation histories. Sandstone samples spanning 8.8 to 1.8 Ma were collected from the previously dated wedge-top (Iglesia) and foredeep basins (Bermejo) for quartz purification and 10Be extraction. 10Be concentrations due to burial and exhumation were estimated and subtracted from the measured concentrations and yielded the inherited 10Be concentrations, which were then corrected for sample magnetostratigraphic age. The inherited concentrations were then used to calculate paleoerosion rates. We modeled various pre-burial and post-burial exposure scenarios in order to assess potential sources of uncertainty in the recovered paleoerosion rates. The modeling results reveal that pre-burial and post-burial exposure periods only marginally affect our results. By combining the 10Be-derived paleoerosion rates and geomorphic observations with detrital zircon provenance, we document the isolation of the wedge-top basin, which was later reconnected by an upstream migrating pulse of erosion in a process that was directly controlled by thrust activity and base level. The data further indicate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags maximum rates of deformation and subsidence over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic

  11. Synchronizing the North American Varve Chronology with Greenland ice core records using meteoric 10Be flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, B.; Balco, G.; Ridge, J. C.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The North American Varve Chronology (NAVC) is a floating 5700-year sequence of glacial lake varves deposited in the Connecticut River Valley of the northeast US ~18,000-12,500 years ago. The NAVC is an annually resolved record of regional climate and ice-marginal processes at 40-45° N latitude, near the margin of the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). NAVC deposition occurred at the same time as rapid and abrupt Arctic and North Atlantic climate changes that took place during the last deglaciation. An age estimate for the NAVC based on radiocarbon dated plant macrofossils in individual varves implies a relationship between ice-marginal events recorded by the NAVC and climate events recorded in Greenland ice cores. For example, the retreat rate of the LIS up the Connecticut River Valley increased during the Bolling warming in Greenland, a readvance of the LIS margin took place during the Older Dryas cold period, and a correlation between an outburst flood from glacial Lake Iroquois and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period supports the hypothesis that the flood affected North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. On the other hand, a doubling of the ice-margin retreat rate recorded by the NAVC around 16,000 years ago coincides with a relatively cold period in Greenland. Our goal is to investigate the precise time relationship between these events by synchronizing the NAVC with the Greenland ice core time scale using atmospherically-produced 10Be. Existing 10Be flux records, including those from Greenland ice cores, exhibit solar variability on a range of time scales. Because this variability is globally synchronous, a 10Be flux record for the NAVC can, in principle, be used to align NAVC and ice core timescales. We are generating such a record at present. First, we are analyzing short varve sections at high temporal resolution to evaluate the magnitude of solar variability signals; a single section analyzed so far displays interannual variability with a period consistent

  12. 10Be content in clasts from fallout suevitic breccia in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana: Clues to preimpact target distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Rocks from drill cores LB-07A (crater fill) and LB-08A (central uplift) into the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana, were analyzed for the presence of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which target rocks of various depths were mixed during the formation of the crater-filling breccia, and also to detect meteoric water infiltration within the impactite layer. 10Be abundances above background were found in two (out of 24) samples from the LB-07A core, and in none of five samples from the LB-08A core. After excluding other possible explanations for an elevated 10Be signal, we conclude that it is most probably due to a preimpact origin of those clasts from target rocks close to the surface. Our results suggest that in-crater breccias were well mixed during the impact cratering process. In addition, the lack of a 10Be signal within the rocks located very close to the lake sediment-impactite boundary suggests that infiltration of meteoric water below the postimpact crater floor was limited. This may suggest that the infiltration of the meteoric water within the crater takes place not through the aerial pore-space, but rather through a localized system of fractures.

  13. Holocene glacial history of the west Greenland Ice Sheet inferred from cosmogenic exposure ages and threshold lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Kjaer, K. H.; Colding, Sune Oluf

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use a combination of 10Be exposure ages and threshold lakes to constrain the ice sheet history in Godthåbs- and Buksefjorden, west Greenland (63-64°N) during the Holocene. The 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages have been used to quantify both the ice retreat and thinning of the west...... Greenland Ice Sheet in 3 transects from the coast to the present ice margin. Preliminary results (n=47) indicate initial deglaciation of coastal areas around 11 ka in concert with existing radiocarbon chronology, followed by a rapid retreat from the outer coast to the present ice margin around 10 ka....... Boulder samples from the highest peaks demonstrate that the ice was warm-based whereas bedrock samples often contain an inherited signal. These results may have implications for other studies in Greenland, which have inferred thin LGM ice based on 10Be ages of bedrock samples. The threshold lakes are used...

  14. Decadal {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl QA measurements on the SUERC 5 MV accelerator mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Sheng, E-mail: s.xu@suerc.gla.ac.uk; Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Rood, Dylan H.; Shanks, Richard P.

    2015-10-15

    We quantify the routine performance and uncertainties of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl QA measurements made on the SUERC 5 MV accelerator mass spectrometer since 2004. Our analysis compiles data from primary (NIST SRM4325 for {sup 10}Be, Purdue Z92-0222 for {sup 26}Al and Purdue Z93-0005 for {sup 36}Cl) and secondary (Nishiizumi’s series for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl) reference samples with {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be, {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al and {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios ranging between 10{sup −11} and 10{sup −13}. Our decadal datasets indicate that the {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl secondary standard samples have average standard deviations 1.1%–2.4%, 1.1%–2.8% and 3.0%–3.1%, respectively. The average statistical uncertainties based on counting statistics are 1.0%–1.8%, 0.9%–2.8% and 2.5%–2.7% for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl, respectively. These indicate additional uncertainties (0.6%–1.6% for {sup 10}Be, 0.5%–2.4% for {sup 26}Al and 1.4%–1.7% for {sup 36}Cl) above those calculated from counting statistics alone. The average differences between the measured and the nominal values are within ±1% in 13 of 14 secondary samples.

  15. Reprocessing of {sup 10}B-contaminated {sup 10}Be AMS targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, K.J., E-mail: ksz@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee NSW 2232 (Australia); Pedro, J.B. [Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Private Bag 129, Hobart TAS 7001 (Australia); Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Private Bag 80, Hobart TAS 7001 (Australia); Smith, A.M.; Child, D.P.; Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 10}Be accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an increasingly important tool in studies ranging from exposure age dating and palaeo-geomagnetism to the impact of solar variability on the Earth's climate. High levels of boron in BeO AMS targets can adversely impact the quality of {sup 10}Be measurements through interference from the isobar {sup 10}B. Numerous methods in chemical sample preparation and AMS measurement have been employed in order to reduce the impact of excessive boron rates. We present details of a method developed to chemically reprocess a set of forty boron-contaminated BeO targets derived from modern Antarctic ice. Previously, the excessive boron levels in these samples, as measured in an argon-filled absorber cell preceding the ionisation detector, had precluded routine AMS measurement. The procedure involved removing the BeO + Nb mixture from the target holders and dissolving the BeO in hot concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The solution was then heated with HF to remove the boron as volatile BF{sub 3} before re-precipitating as Be(OH){sub 2} and calcining to BeO. This was again mixed with niobium and pressed into fresh target holders. Following reprocessing, the samples gave boron rates reduced by 10-100 Multiplication-Sign , which were sufficiently low and similar to previous successful batches of ice core, snow and associated blank samples, thus allowing a successful {sup 10}Be measurement in the absence of any boron correction. Overall recovery of the BeO for this process averaged 40%. Extensive testing of relevant processing equipment and reagents failed to determine the source of the boron. As a precautionary measure, a similar H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + HF step has been subsequently added to the standard ice processing method.

  16. Isotopic hysteresis in detrital cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rate studies (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Crosby, B. T.; Brocard, G. Y.; Belmont, P.

    2013-12-01

    In equilibrium landscapes, the concentration of beryllium-10 (10Be) from fluvially transported material is expected to quantitatively reflect basin-wide denudation rates. No isotopic time-dependent path is considered because the concentrations reflect an integrated measurement over a sufficiently long period of time to be static. However, the responses of landscapes to changing conditions are often addressed with cosmogenic nuclides in transient landscapes to identify and quantify the primary topographic and climatic controls on erosion. With the advent of techniques that allow event-scale measurement of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations over the course of a flood wave, in the case of meteoric 10Be, or over the course of an uplift wave, in the case of in situ-produced 10Be, we can now evaluate the how the isotope changes and what the 'mean' denudation rate from a single time means. Meteoric 10Be concentrations can be extracted from, and measured in, milligram-sized sediment samples. This attribute enables us to measure suspended sediment through a hydrograph. Here, we give a case study in an agricultural setting. The meteoric 10Be concentration in river sediment changes with the source areas of the fine sediment and fluxes of material supplied to the stream. The average concentration from the couplet of the rising and falling limbs of the hydrograph can differ from the concentration of the sediment that is preserved in depo-centers. Using traditional in situ-produced 10Be, the timescale of the perturbation must be sufficiently long to change the isotopic composition of the bedload, but also for the landscape to respond to the forcing factor. Here, we give an example from a transient landscape where a wave of uplift moves through the basin and a wave of incision follows in its wake. In this setting, 10Be from detrital quartz is derived from both the incising, adjusting lowland and the unadjusted, relict upland, and the integrated 10Be concentrations still provide a

  17. Erosion of mountain plateaus along Sognefjord, Norway, constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David L.; Knudsen, Mads F.; Linge, Henriette; Jansen, John D.

    2016-04-01

    Norway is famous for its deeply incised, steep-sided fjords, carved out by glacial erosion. The high relief of the fjords stands in contrast to the extensive areas of relatively low relief found between the fjords. The origin and development of these low-relief areas remain debated. The classical interpretation relates them to a Mesozoic peneplanation surface, uplifted to the current high elevation in the early Cenozoic (e.g. Nesje, 1994). The validity of this interpretation has, however, been repeatedly questioned in recent times (e.g. Nielsen et al. 2009, Steer et al. 2012). Recent studies point instead to a significant impact of glacial and periglacial erosion processes on the long-term development of the low-relief surfaces (Egholm et al. 2015). Here, we present a large new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from the high, flat summit surfaces along a transect from the coast to the inner parts of Sognefjorden in Norway. Our results indicate substantial glacial modification of the sampled low-relief surfaces within the last 50 ka. Close to the coast, at an elevation of around 700 meters, the cosmogenic nuclide signal was reset around the Younger Dryas due to extensive glacial erosion. Regarding the higher surfaces further inland, our results indicate a maximum cosmogenic nuclide inheritance of 20-30 ka prior to the last deglaciation. We do not find any signs of exceptional longevity of the low-relief landscape. In contrast, our results indicate that the low-relief areas were continuously eroded by glacial and periglacial processes in the Quaternary. Nesje & Whillans. Erosion of Sognefjord, Norway. Geomorphology 9(1), 33-45, 1994. Nielsen et al. The evolution of western Scandinavian topography: a review of Neogene uplift versus the ICE (isostasy-climate-erosion) hypothesis. Journal of Geodynamics 47(2), 72-95, 2009. Steer et al. Bimodal Plio-Quaternary glacial erosion of fjords and low-relief surfaces in Scandinavia

  18. Detection of landscape transience using cosmogenic nuclides and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Upland landscapes are frequently perturbed by changing tectonics and climate, which can lead to temporally and spatially varying erosion rates. Hillslopes and channels respond to these changes with different rates, and the dissonance between hillslope and channel response times can be exploited to gain information about the nature and timing of landscape transience. I explore the limits to which differences between channel and hillslope processes can be used to detect transience. Slowing channel erosion rates are difficult to detect, whereas increased erosion rates can be detected if erosion rates more than double. Signals of transient erosion driven by upslope propagation of channel incision can persist for thousands to tens of thousands of years; the time perturbations can be detected is proportional to the square of the hillslope length and the inverse of the hillslope sediment transport coefficient. Climate driven ("top down") and tectonic driven ("bottom up") have different responses to transient perturbation, and lead to different sediment flux responses that are reflected in basinwide cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. Climate driven perturbations are mirrored in cosmogenic concentrations leaving basins whereas tectonic perturbations tend to be averaged when estimated from basinwide cosmogenics.

  19. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic-ray Proton Dip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 109 GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 109 GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  20. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Deloule, Etienne; Trappitsch, Reto

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of 'water' in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. Here, we re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. These in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides (3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17 ± 0.11) ×10-12 mol(g rock)-1 Ma-1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios have been severely overestimated.

  1. Continuous 25-yr aerosol records at coastal Antarctica. Part 2: variability of the radionuclides 7Be, 10Be and 210Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaesser, Christoph; Wagenbach, Dietmar (Institut fur Umweltphysik, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)), e-mail: Christoph.Elsaesser@iup.uni-heidelberg.de; Weller, Rolf (Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)); Auer, Matthias (Institut fur Umweltphysik, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)); Wallner, Anton (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)); Christl, Marcus (Laboratory for Ion Beam Physics, ETH-Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland))

    2011-11-15

    We investigated the variability of 210Pb, 7Be and 10Be in coastal Antarctic aerosol samples based on continuous,monthly and annually resolved time series obtained from Neumayer Station over the period 1983 to 2008. Clear seasonal cycles peaking in the local summer half year stand out as a common feature of all three radionuclide records. Time series analyses suggest that significant multiannual changes are confined to a 4-6 yr periodicity resembling that of the Southern Annual Mode index in case of 210Pb and to the expected decadal solar cycle in case of the cosmogenic Be-isotopes. Both, changes in the meridional transport and surface inversion strength appear to drive the seasonal 210Pb cycle, which generally peaks in November. In contrast, stratospheric air mass intrusions are proved to be the main reason for the Be-isotopes seasonality. This finding is revealed by enhanced 10Be/7Be ratios occurring during late summer / early autumn broadly concurrently with the individual Be-isotopes and the 7Be/210Pb ratio. The 10Be and 7Be records clearly reflect the decadal, solar-modulated production signal but, for unknown reasons, they substantially differ in their detailed pattern. It is ruled out, that an excess 7Be production by solar energetic particles was responsible for this mismatch

  2. Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet: Preliminary 10Be Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Marcott, S. A.; Lunkka, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Caffee, M. W.; Carlson, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The response of ice sheets to a warming climate is not well understood. Because we are limited in our understanding of present dynamics, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a warming climate along with their contribution to sea-level rise. These reconstructions also serve as critical constraints for ice sheet modeling efforts. Here, we present a suite of new 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland, that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. Dates from southern Finland, beginning at the Salpausselka Younger Dryas moraine (11.5 × 0.7 ka, n=4), inland southern Finland near Jyvaskyla (11.5 × 0.5ka, n=2), and coastal Finland (~60km from Gulf of Bothnia) near Vimpeli (11.5 × 0.4ka, n=4) indicate a rapid retreat following the Younger Dryas for Southern Finland (~500km within uncertainty of ages). Preliminary dates also exist for Northern Finland, near Inari (10.8 × 0.5ka, n=4) and near Oulu (10.5 × 0.6 ka, n = 4) suggesting a later retreat in the north. Dates from southern Sweden, near Skovde (12.73 × 0.8ka, n=4) to Mora (10.41 × 0.6ka, n=5) suggest a slower retreat (over ~400km). Lastly, dates in Northwestern Sweden suggest a final termination of the SIS around 9.4 × 0.7ka (n = 3). Additional ages are now being processed at PRIME Lab, Purdue University, which will further strengthen our understanding of SIS retreat from all sampled sites. These new data will help to constrain the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, and establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, which will improve our understanding of ice-sheet response to a warming climate.

  3. In situ cosmogenic radiocarbon production and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizert, Christo; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey L.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Brook, Edward J.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2012-06-01

    Radiocarbon measurements at ice margin sites and blue ice areas can potentially be used for ice dating, ablation rate estimates and paleoclimatic reconstructions. Part of the measured signal comes from in situ cosmogenic 14C production in ice, and this component must be well understood before useful information can be extracted from 14C data. We combine cosmic ray scaling and production estimates with a two-dimensional ice flow line model to study cosmogenic 14C production at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica. We find (1) that 14C production through thermal neutron capture by nitrogen in air bubbles is negligible; (2) that including ice flow patterns caused by basal topography can lead to a surface 14C activity that differs by up to 25% from the activity calculated using an ablation-only approximation, which is used in all prior work; and (3) that at high ablation margin sites, solar modulation of the cosmic ray flux may change the strength of the dominant spallogenic production by up to 10%. As part of this effort we model two-dimensional ice flow along the central flow line of Taylor Glacier. We present two methods for parameterizing vertical strain rates, and assess which method is more reliable for Taylor Glacier. Finally, we present a sensitivity study from which we conclude that uncertainties in published cosmogenic production rates are the largest source of potential error. The results presented here can inform ongoing and future 14C and ice flow studies at ice margin sites, including important paleoclimatic applications such as the reconstruction of paleoatmospheric 14C content of methane.

  4. New Insights on Long Term Geomagnetic Moment Variation from Cosmogenic Nuclide and Paleointensity Signatures along Ocean Sediment Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Valet, J. P.; Bassinot, F. C.; Ménabréaz, L.; Simon, Q.; Demory, F.; Valery, G.; Vidal, L.; Beaufort, L.; de Garidel-Thoron, T.

    2015-12-01

    Some numerical and experimental simulations suggest that precession might supply enough power to influence planetary dynamos. The demonstration of a causal relationship between the Earth's orbital motion and variations of the geomagnetic field intensity, would open interesting perspective for modelling the past and future geomagnetic field behaviour and its eventual relationships to past and future orbitally constrained, climatic changes. Although pristine geomagnetic signals can be extracted by filtering and stacking multiple normalized intensity records, the reconstruction of high resolution geomagnetic field variations still raises questions. Namely, significant variance at orbital frequencies in relative paleointensity (RPI) records are generally considered as clues of residual contamination by paleoclimatically induced variations of magnetic carriers size ranges or mineralogy. Such questions can be adressed using other indicators of the geomagnetic dipole moment variation, such as the cosmogenic production modulated by the magnetospheric shielding. During the MAGORB project (ANR-09-BLAN-053-001) cosmogenic nuclide geochemistry, d18O, and paleomagnetic records were constructed along thick clayey-carbonate sequences deposited in the equatorial pacific and indian oceans over the last million of years. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio and RPI variations generally exhibit similar ranges of oscillations. However significant offsets appear between some RPI lows and their corresponding 10Be/9Be peaks, suggesting delayed lock-in of the remanent magnetization. After transfer on time scales the new geomagnetic moment series can be compared with the PISO-1500 and SINT-2000 stacks, and with the 10Be ice core record of EPICA Dome C. These new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio records provide new opportunities to: 1) assess the validity of high resolution RPI records, 2) evaluate address the question of the presence of orbital periods in the paleo-field geomagnetic spectrum, and 3) to

  5. The effect of the changing solar system environment on galactic cosmic ray propagation through the heliosphere: Consequences for cosmogenic isotope production in the Earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, W. I.; Florinski, V.; Zank, G. P.

    2004-12-01

    The solar system is traveling through highly inhomogeneous interstellar medium. Our galactic environment (the Local Bubble) is a vast region formed by supernova explosions filled with extremely tenuous fully ionized gas at a temperature of over a million K. Embedded in the Local Bubble are interstellar clouds ranging from cold (Twarm (T ˜ 104 K) and relatively tenuous (n ˜ 0.3 cm-1) partially ionized clouds, such as the Local Cloud where the Sun is currently located. The properties of the cloud control the size and shape of the heliosphere and, consequently, affect the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) between the boundary of the modulation region (the heliopause) and Earth. GCRs with energies above several hundred MeV initiate nuclear reactions in the Earth's upper atmosphere producing radioactive isotopes of Beryllium and Carbon that are precipitated on the surface and eventually incorporated into sediments. It is then quite plausible that the history of the variability of the solar environment may be preserved in cosmogenic isotope records available from ice and sea sediment cores dating back more than 100,000 years. Previously, we showed that increasing the density of the cloud surrounding the solar system by a factor of 30 leads to an increase in 1 AU GCR fluxes by a factor of 1.5--3, and that cloud encounters may have been responsible for the observed peaks in 10Be records 35 and 60 thousand years ago. Extending our early model, we now calculate GCR distribution from the solution of the 2D Parker equation using the global model-calculated plasma and magnetic field parameters as a background to determine the diffusion coefficients. Initial results from a more comprehensive investigation of the global structure of the heliosphere embedded in clouds of varying density, from the present conditions in the Local Cloud to the extreme case of dense molecular clouds, are discussed.

  6. Determining the growth rate of topographic relief using in situ-produced 10Be: A case study in the Black Forest, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H.; Hetzel, R.; Fügenschuh, B.; Strauss, H.

    2010-02-01

    To determine how topographic relief in mountainous regions evolves through time we present a new approach that uses in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be to quantify (1) spatially averaged denudation rates of small watersheds and (2) local denudation rates of the ridge crests bounding these basins. The technique is applied to two catchments in the Black Forest, a forested mountain range with a local relief of a few hundred meters, which is typical for ranges in central Europe. Both the Acher and the Gutach catchments expose predominantly Carboniferous granite, and only minor amounts of high-grade gneiss and Triassic sandstone. The latter occurs on ridges defining the eastern boundaries of the catchments, above a regional unconformity. In the Acher and northern Gutach watersheds denudation rates of subcatchments derived from 10Be concentrations in stream sediment range from 52 to 87 mm/ka and 59 to 91 mm/ka, respectively. In contrast, grus samples from the ridge crests bounding both watersheds yield lower denudation rates of 34 to 59 mm/ka. The differences in denudation rates for sample pairs from individual subcatchments and adjacent ridge crests reveals that topographic relief is growing at a mean rate of 24 ± 12 mm/ka (with the exception of the flat southwestern part of the Gutach catchment, where catchment-wide denudation rates are similar to the rate of ridge crest lowering). The inferred rates of denudation and relief growth are consistent with erosion rates calculated from the known thickness of Triassic to Lower Jurassic sediments, which were once present above the regional unconformity but have been largely eroded during the exhumation of the Black Forest. The onset of exhumation ˜ 19 Ma ago is constrained by thermal modelling of apatite fission track data, which suggest a cooling rate of ˜ 3 °C/Ma. Combined with a geothermal gradient of 30 to 40 °C/km this cooling rate yields an average exhumation rate of 75-100 mm/ka for the modelled apatite fission track

  7. Determination of Cross-Sections of Fast-Muon-Induced Reactions to Cosmogenic Radionuclides

    CERN Multimedia

    Hagner, T; Heisinger, B; Niedermayer, M; Nolte, E; Oberauer, L; Schonert, S; Kubik, P W

    2002-01-01

    %NA54 %title\\\\ \\\\We propose to measure cross-sections for fast muon-induced production of radionuclides. Firstly to study the contribution of fast-muon-induced reactions to the in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in the lithosphere. Concrete is used to simulate the rock and to generate a secondary particle shower. The reaction channels to be measured are: C to $^{10}$Be, O to $^{10}$Be and $^{14}$C, Si to $^{26}$Al, S to $^{26}$Al, Ca to $^{36}$Cl, Fe to $^{53}$Mn and $^{205}$Tl to $^{205}$Pb. The energy dependent cross-section can be described by one single parameter $\\sigma_0$ and the energy dependence $\\rm\\overline{E}^{0.7}$ on the mean energy $\\rm\\overline{E}$. The irradiations of the targets is done at CERN. The produced radionuclides are measured by accelerator mass spectrometry in Munich and Zurich.\\\\ \\\\Secondly, muon induced signals can be a major source of background in experiments with low event rates located deep underground. We intent to study the produced radioactivity by fast-muon-ind...

  8. Unsteady late Pleistocene incision of streams bounding the Colorado Front Range from measurements of meteoric and in situ 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dühnforth, Miriam; Anderson, Robert S.; Ward, Dylan J.; Blum, Alex

    2012-03-01

    Dating of gravel-capped strath terraces in basins adjacent to western U.S. Laramide Ranges is one approach to document the history of late Cenozoic fluvial exhumation. We use in situ 10Be measurements to date the broad surfaces adjacent to the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, and compare these calculated ages with results from meteoric 10Be measurements. We analyze three sites near Boulder, Colorado (Gunbarrel Hill, Table Mountain, and Pioneer) that have been mapped as the oldest terrace surfaces with suggested ages ranging from 640 ka to the Plio-Pleistocene transition. Our in situ 10Be results reveal abandonment ages of 95 ± 129 ka at Table Mountain, 175 ± 27 ka at Pioneer, and ages of 251 ± 10 ka and 307 ± 15 ka at Gunbarrel Hill. All are far younger than previously thought. Inventories of meteoric 10Be support this interpretation, yielding ages that are comparable to Table Mountain and ˜20% lower than Pioneer in situ ages. We argue that lateral beveling by rivers dominated during protracted times of even moderate glacial climate, and that vertical incision rates of several mm/yr likely occurred during times of very low sediment supply during the few interglacials that were characterized by particularly warm climate conditions. In contrast to the traditional age chronology in the area, our ages suggest that the deep exhumation of the western edge the High Plains occurred relatively recently and at an unsteady pace.

  9. The effect of permafrost on soil erosion using meteoric 10Be, 137Cs and 239+240Pu in the Eastern Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Barbara; Brandovà, Dagmar; Alewell, Christine; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter W.; Kneisel, Christof; Meusburger, Katrin; Ketterer, Michael; Egli, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost ecosystems are highly sensitive to climate warming. The expected changes in the thermal and hydrological soil regime might have crucial consequences on soil erosion processes. Therefore, the determination of erosional activities on the long- (since the beginning of soil formation) and mid-term (last 50-60 yr) using cosmogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides can provide important information on past and ongoing processes. Permafrost soils in the Alps and their behaviour with climate change are only rarely studied. The expected new insights will lead to a better understanding of the processes of high mountain soils and are a further step towards improving climate-related modelling of fast warming scenarios and increasing system disequilibria. Our aim is to quantify soil erosion processes in permafrost soils and nearby unfrozen soils in the Alpine (sites at 2700 m asl) and the sub-Alpine (sites 1800 m asl) range of the Swiss Alps (Upper Engadine). We hypothesise that permafrost soils differ distinctly in their long- and mid-term soil erosion rates due to different water retention capacities. Long-term soil erosion was assessed using meteoric 10Be. Meteoric 10Be in a soil profile was estimated assuming that it is has been deposited as a function of precipitation and adsorbed in the fine earth fraction (

  10. Recent Contractile Deformation in the Forearc of Southern Peru: A Geomorphologic Analysis And 10Be Surface Exposure Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S.; Farber, D. L.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R.

    2007-12-01

    . Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages from a set of three distinct abandoned terraces in the Pampa Cabeza de Vaca region yield ages ranging from ~35-550ky and incision rates of ~0.04-0.09mm/yr. Thus, the contractile deformation within this region has been active for at least the last 500ky and is plausibly presently active. The documentation of recent contractile deformation within the forearc of southern Peru stylistically contrasts with previously held view active deformation in this region is dominated by extensional topographic collapse. Moreover, active shortening within the Peruvian forearc bears on our models of how the Altiplano plateau is currently being maintained along the western margin. Indeed, by identifying and quantifying active deformation within the Peruvian forearc, we can begin to address the potential links between surface processes related to climate and active tectonics, and the dynamics of the lithosphere.

  11. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied. The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile. In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  12. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  13. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic Ray Proton Dip Model

    CERN Document Server

    Heinze, Jonas; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We perform a three-parameter scan of the cosmic-ray proton flux to the latest (7-year) combined data of the Telescope Array experiment, which are consistent with a pure proton composition. That is, we include at the same time the source evolution, maximal energy and spectral index. We demonstrate that the full three-parameter fit leads to different qualitative conclusions compared to two-parameter scans of the parameter space frequently shown in the literature: it slightly favors a maximal energy cutoff coming from the sources over the GZK cutoff, together with hard injection spectra and a strong source evolution. We then derive the range of allowed cosmogenic neutrino fluxes corresponding to the region allowed by TA data. We find that the latest IceCube cosmogenic neutrino analysis challenges the cosmic ray proton dip model at more than the 95\\% confidence level including any considered parameter combination. This is the first independent evidence against the proton dip model after the composition results me...

  14. Forbush decreases geomagnetic and atmospheric effects cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueckiger, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An overview and synthesis is given of recent developments that have occurred in the areas of Forbush decreases, geomagnetic and atmospheric effects, and cosmogenic nuclides. Experimental evidence has been found for substantial differences in the effects of the various types of interplanetary perturbations on cosmic rays, and for a dependence of these effects on the three-dimensional configuration of the interplanetary medium. In order to fully understand and to be able to simulate the solar cosmic ray particle access to the polar regions of the earth we need accurate models of the magnetospheric magnetic field. These models must include all major magnetospheric current systems (in particular the field aligned currents), and they should represent magnetically quiet time periods as well as different levels of geomagnetic activity. In the evolution of magnetospheric magnetic field models, cosmic ray and magnetospheric physicists should work closely together since cosmic ray measurements are a powerful additional tool in the study of the perturbed magnetosphere. In the field of cosmogenic nuclides, finally, exciting new results and developments follow in rapid succession. Thanks to new techniques and new isotopes the analysis of cosmic ray history has entered into a new dimension.

  15. Determination of erosion rates with cosmogenic 26Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, E.; Heisinger, B.; Dockhorn, B.; Hartmann, F. J.; Korschinek, G.; Nolte, E.; Morteani, G.; Petitjean, C.; Neumaier, S.

    1994-06-01

    A preliminary depth profile of the long-lived cosmogenic radioisotope 26Al(5 +) in quartz samples from pre-drill cores of the continental deep drill core (KTB) at Egerer Waldhaeusl, Poppenreuth and Puellersreuth was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These drill cores are situated in Upper Palatinate (Oberpfalz, Germany) in a region with very low erosion. The cosmogenic production of 26Al in quartz was calculated. The calculation is based on two reactions: spallation reactions on silicon in the first few meters and the capture reaction of slow negative muons Si(μ -, ν μxn, which is the dominant process below a few meters. The branching ratio of the μ - capture reaction in silicon to 26Al(5 +) was determined by irradiating a quartz sample with slow negative muons at PSI in Villigen (Switzerland) and by measuring the produced 26Al by AMS. Calculations of 26Al depth profiles taking erosion into account were performed. The agreement between the depth profile calculated with no erosion and the measured preliminary profile is very satisfactory.

  16. Catchment-scale denudation and chemical erosion rates determined from 10Be and mass balance geochemistry (Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestland, Erick A.; Liccioli, Caterina; Soloninka, Lesja; Chittleborough, David J.; Fink, David

    2016-10-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles have, as a central component, estimates of physical and chemical erosion rates. These erosion rates are becoming better quantified by the development of a global database of cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be (CRN) analyses of soil, sediment, and outcrops. Here we report the denudation rates for two small catchments (~ 0.9 km2) in the Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia as determined from 10Be concentrations from quartz sand from the following landscape elements: 1) dissected plateaux, or summit surfaces (14.10 ± 1.61 t km- 2 y- 1), 2) sandstone outcrops (15.37 ± 1.32 t km- 2 y- 1), 3) zero-order drainages (27.70 ± 1.42 t km- 2 y- 1), and 4) stream sediment which reflect a mix of landscape elements (19.80 ± 1.01 t km- 2 y- 1). Thus, the more slowly eroding plateaux and ridges, when juxtaposed with the more rapidly eroding side-slopes, are leading to increased relief in this landscape. Chemical erosion rates for this landscape are determined by combining cosmogenic denudation rates with the geochemical mass balance of parent rock, soil and saprolite utilizing zirconium immobility and existing mass balance methods. Two different methods were used to correct for chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite zone that is shielded at depth from CRN production. The corrected values are higher than uncorrected values: total denudation of 33.24 or 29.11 t km- 2 y- 1, and total chemical erosion of 15.64 or 13.68 t km- 2 y- 1. Thus, according to these methods, 32-40% of the denudation is taking place by chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite below CRN production depth. Compared with other similar areas, the overall denudation and chemical erosion rates are low. In most areas with sub-humid climates and tectonic uplift, physical erosion is much greater than chemical erosion. The low physical erosion rates in these Mt. Lofty Range catchments, in what is a relatively active tectonic setting, are thought to be due to low rainfall intensity

  17. Using 10Be erosion rates and fluvial channel morphology to constrain fault throw rates in the southwestern Sacramento River Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, is a critical region for California water resources, agriculture, and threatened or endangered species. This landscape is affected by an extensive set of levees that enclose artificial islands created for agricultural use. In addition to their importance for sustaining agriculture, this levee system also supports extensive transport and power transmission infrastructure and urban/suburban development. These levees are susceptible to damage from even moderate ground shaking by either a large earthquake on one of the high-activity faults in the nearby San Francisco Bay region, or even a moderate earthquake on one of the low-activity faults in the Delta region itself. However, despite this danger the earthquake hazards in this region are poorly constrained due to our lack of understanding of faults in and near the Delta region. As part of an effort to better constrain the seismic hazard associated with known, but poorly constrained, faults in the region, a geomorphic analysis of the Dunnigan Hills, northwest of Woodland, CA, is being combined with cosmogenic 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates. The Dunnigan Hills are a low-relief (maximum elevation 87 m) landscape generated by fault-bend folding above the west-vergent Sweitzer reverse fault that soles into a blind east-vergent reverse fault. These faults have been imaged by seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity indicates that this system is actively propagating to the east. However, the throw rates on the faults in this system remain unconstrained, despite the potential for significant shaking such as that experienced in the nearby April, 1892 earthquake sequence between Winters and Vacaville, Ca, ~25 km to the south, which has been estimated at magnitude 6.0 or greater. Geomorphic and cosmogenic 10Be analyses from 12 catchments draining the eastern flank of the Dunnigan Hills will be used to infer vertical rock uplift rates to better constrain

  18. New ways of using an old isotopic system - meteoric 10-Be is back and ready to do geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, P.; Reusser, L.; Pavich, M.

    2009-04-01

    Meteoric 10-Be, produced in the atmosphere and delivered in precipitation, is an important tracer of sediment and geomorphic processes. This talk will review several decades of work measuring 10-Be adhered to soil and sediment collected from varied terrains around the world. We will then present new data and modeling approaches demonstrating the rich potential but complex, dynamic nature of this isotope system. Considering all of these data, we will examine the utility of meteoric10-Be, produced in the atmosphere and delivered in precipitation, as a tracer of watershed and hillslope sediment transport processes at a variety of spatial scales. We will finish the talk by examining uncertainties that require additional research to resolve. After a brief hay-day in the 1980s, tracing sediment down rivers, dating a few terraces, and following sediment through subduction zones, meteoric or garden variety 10-Be was largely forgotten. It's been lurking somewhere in the dark corners of isotope geoscience while its more famous but difficult-to-measure twin, the 10-Be produced in quartz, got all the attention. Recently, several research groups have again begun to build upon the excellent foundation constructed by those working in the 1980s and early 1990s. New data from a series of soil pits on hillslopes from around the world suggest that meteoric 10-Be is mobile in the soil column moving from the more acidic, organic-rich A-horizon to the B-horizon. Meteoric 10-Be concentrations are well correlated with both soil pH and extractable Al suggesting that Be is retained in Al-rich grain coatings that we know, from numerous attempts to purify riverine quartz, survive fluvial transport all too well. The important take-away message is that meteoric 10-Be is mobile in soil fluids while in situ 10-Be only moves with the quartz grains in which it resides. Depth profiles of in situ and meteoric 10-Be can be quite different, helping us to learn about rates of soil stirring and 10-Be

  19. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  20. Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  1. Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  2. A Numerical Model to Assess Soil Fluxes from Meteoric 10Be Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, B.; Govers, G.; Vanacker, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Smolders, E.; Baken, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be may be mobile in the soil system. The latter hampers a direct translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into spatial variations in erosion and deposition rates. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows us to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system. The Be2D model is then used to analyse the potential impact of human-accelerated soil fluxes on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile including particle migration, chemical leaching and bioturbation, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes from creep, water and tillage erosion. Model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can indeed be related to erosion and deposition, across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. However, quantification of the effects of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed spatial patterns in 10Be data. Moreover, our simulations suggest that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to unravel human impact on soil fluxes when soils have a high retention capacity for meteoric meteoric 10Be. Application of the Be2D model to existing data sets shows that model parameters can reliably be constrained, resulting in a good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories. This confirms the suitability of the Be2D model as a robust tool to underpin quantitative interpretations of spatial variability in meteoric 10Be data for eroding landscapes.

  3. AMS measurement of 10Be concentrations in marine sediments from Chile Trench at the TANDAR laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, D.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Martí, G. V.; Negri, A. E.; Abriola, D.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Gollan, F.; Hojman, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Samsolo, N.; Togneri, M.; Villanueva, D.

    2017-03-01

    The 10Be/9Be ratios in marine sediments samples from the Southern Chile Trench have been measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The samples were measured at the TANDAR accelerator, where the discrimination of the 10Be radionuclides was achieved by means of a passive absorber in front of an ionization chamber. This setup along with the high voltage available, provided a complete suppression of the 10B isobar interference. The obtained values for the 10Be concentrations, of the order of 109 atoms/g, are the first 10Be measurements from the Southern Chile Trench and offer an excellent tracer to quantitatively study the recycling of sediments in Andean magmas.

  4. Tectonics and Unroofing of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California, from Low-Temperature Thermochronology and Catchment-Averaged 10Be-Derived Denudation Rates (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, G. E.; Burgmann, R.; Dumitru, T. A.; Ebert, Y.; Fosdick, J. C.; Le, K.; Levine, N. M.; Wilson, A.; Gudmundsdottir, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present eleven Apatite Fission Track (AFT) and Apatite (U-Th)/He (A-He) analyses and eighteen catchment-averaged cosmogenic 10Be denudation rates from the Santa Cruz Mountains (SCM) that resolve the unroofing history of this range over the past several Myr. This range lies within a restraining bend in the San Andreas Fault (SAF), which appears to be fixed to the crust on the northeast side of the fault based on previous work. In this view, the topographic asymmetry of the SCM reflects the advection of material southwest of the right-lateral SAF through a zone of uplift centered on the restraining bend, while material northwest of the fault remains trapped this zone. Northeast of the fault bend in the Sierra Azul block of the SCM, AFT ages adjacent to the SAF appear completely reset during the Pliocene, and show partial resetting at the periphery of the block. This suggests that total exhumation exceeded 3-4 km within the heart of the block and was SCM are near mass flux steady state over the timescales captured by the CRN (~1.5-6.5 ka). Nonetheless, the extent of topography in areas far from the bend suggests that there may be some component of regional fault-normal contraction and/or that this steady state has not been fully attained because of geomorphic lags and isostatic adjustments.

  5. Characterization and (10)Be content of iron carbonate concretions for genetic aspects - Weathering, desert varnish or burning: Rim effects in iron carbonate concretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgári, Márta; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Horiuchi, Kazuho; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kovács, Tibor; Józsa, Sándor; Bendő, Zsolt; Fintor, Krisztián; Fekete, József; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő; Gucsik, Arnold; Gyollai, Ildikó; Kovács, János; Dódony, István

    2017-07-01

    The research investigated three iron carbonate (siderite) sedimentary concretions from Nagykovácsi, Úri and Délegyháza, Hungary. To identify possible source rocks and effects of the glaze-like exposed surface of the concretions, we carried on comparative petrological, mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic studies. The samples were microbially mediated siderite concretions with embedded metamorphous and igneous mineral clasts, and had specific rim belts characterized by semi-concentric outer Fe-oxide layers, fluffy pyrite-rich outer belts and siderite inner parts. We investigated the cross section of the Fe-carbonate concretions by independent methodologies in order to identify their rim effects. Their surficial oxide layers showed evidence of degassing of the exposed surface caused most probably by elevated temperatures. The inner rim pyrite belt in the concretions excluded the possibility of a prolonged wet surface environment. Microtextural and mineralogical features did not support desert varnish formation. (10)Be nuclide values of the Nagykovácsi and Uri concretions were far above the level of terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides, but they were consistent with the lowest levels for meteorites. Though the data were not conclusive to confirm any kind of known origin, they are contradictary, and open possibilities for a scenario of terrestrial meteorite origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Noble gases and cosmogenic radionuclides in the Eltanin Pacific meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, D D; Garrison, D H; Caffee, M W; Kyte, F; Nishiizumi, K

    2000-01-14

    A 1.5 cm long, 1.2 g specimen of the Eltanin meteorite was found at 10.97 m depth in Polarstern piston core PS2704-1. The early studies indicated that the small fragments of the Eltanin meteorite was debris from a km-sized asteroid which impacted into the deep-ocean basin. In this study, the authors measured {sup 39}Ar-{sup 40}Ar age, noble gases, and cosmogenic radionuclides in splits of specimen as a part of consortium studies of Eltanin meteorite. They concluded that the specimen was about 3 m deep from the asteroid surface. The exposure age of the Eltanin asteroid was about 20 Myr.

  7. Cosmogenic nuclide evidence on ages, sizes and orbits of meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, V.A.; Ustinova, G.K. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii

    1995-12-01

    Meteorites, being the most ancient objects in the solar system, retain evidence of many events and processes which have played, perhaps, a crucial role in its formation. To derive and interpret correctly the available information, the history and evolution of the meteorites themselves must be studied thoroughly. Due to radiogenic and cosmogenic nuclides the chronology of meteorites can be retraced from the moment of solidification to their fall to Earth. A consideration of the properties and features of meteorites with different radiogenic and cosmic-ray ages of exposure makes it possible to locate key events in their evolution on a long term scale. Peculiarities in the formation mechanism of H- and L-chondrites have emerged. (author).

  8. Recent advances in studies of meteorites using cosmogenic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Robert C. E-mail: rreedy@unm.edu

    2004-08-01

    The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites has greatly enabled studies of cosmic-ray exposure histories. The high sensitivity of AMS has allowed measurements of samples that are very small or have very low activities. AMS measurements have much better accuracy and precision than usually possible with decay counting. AMS allows the routine measurements of many long-lived radionuclides, including some with half-lives not regularly measured previously or some made by neutron-capture reactions (such as {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 59}Ni). These advancements have enabled many meteorite studies that previously were not often done, such as terrestrial ages. All aspects of a meteorite's cosmic-ray exposure history, its ages and geometries, now can be better studied.

  9. Ecological Management and the Cosmogenic Mechanism of Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogiljuk Zhanna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical issue of ecological risk management in urban areas is to predict the evolution of the dangerous natural processes intensity. The special situation in the realization of these risks take the earthquake threat and the stresses emergency fluctuations in the geological environment of the buildings and structures bases. This article is devoted to one of the main problems of earthquake engineering - verification of the dominant mechanisms and causality of the earthquakes intensity dangerous evolution. In it discusses the comparative analysis results of the Earth gravitational interaction energy variations amplitudes with the Sun, with the Moon and the solar system planets. Also presented the comparative evaluations results of the Earth geospheres gravitational perturbations amplitudes with the Earth solar radiation energy with the energy of its own heat of the Earth. It is shown that the energy of his own heat and Sun exposure of the Earth much less energy to gravitational perturbations in the near-earth space. In the article presents the spectral analysis results of earthquakes global daily energy on the Earth before and after the Shoemaker-Levy comet explosion on Jupiter. It is shown that the seismic events number on Earth with magnitude greater than 2.5 on the Richter scale after the comet explosion increased in 10 times. In the earthquakes global daily energy spectrum shows the spectral manifestations of solar system planets gravitational resonances. In given article the researches results of natural disasters cosmogenic sources power allow us to argue that ecological risk effective management is impossible without the evolution forecast of the cosmogenic effects intensity on natural processes for sustainable urban development.

  10. Accelerating Uplift Rate and Non-uniform Inheritance: Cosmogenic Be10 Depth Profiles from the Montecito Anticline, Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, W.; Schoenbohm, L.; Brooks, B.; Costa, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Andean orogenic front between 31° S and 33° S marks the transition between west-vergent thick- skinned faulting in the Sierras Pampeanas, and east vergent thin-skinned faulting in the Precordillera. This area has experienced several devastating earthquakes in the last century, and geodetic studies indicate that this area has a long-term shortening rate of ~5mm/yr. One of the growing anticlines in this region that partially accommodates this shortening is the Montecito anticline, a fault propagation fold above a blind thrust fault. Uplifted and deformed fluvial terraces formed along the axis of this anticline were dated using Be10 cosmogenic depth profiles. In 3 of the 5 dated terraces the horizon sampled directly above the strath had a higher nuclide concentration than the other samples in the profile, which suggests that the assumption of constant inheritance with depth is violated. One possible explanation for the cosmogenic profile irregularity is that catastrophic flooding events mobilize sediment from storage locations which are not normally tapped, such as hillslopes or alluvial fan surfaces. This sediment, which has an abnormally high inheritance value due to its increased time in storage, is deposited on the strath of the newly formed terrace, thus leading to higher Be10 values at the base of the profile. After discarding the abnormally high bottom value in each profile the terrace ages are found to be ~6.5 ka, ~4.1 ka, ~1.9 ka. Given their height above the river the uplift rate is 0.63-0.68 mm/yr for the period between 6.5 ka and 1.9 ka. However, surprising preliminary data indicates that the uplift rate of the Montecito Anticline has increased 4-fold since 1.9 ka. This could reflect stochastic variations in slip rate or interactions with other regional faults, and suggests a greater seismic threat in this earthquake prone region.

  11. {sup 10}Be application to soil development on Marion Island, southern Indian Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haussmann, N. [Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Aldahan, A., E-mail: ala.aldahan@geo.uu.s [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Boelhouwers, J. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Possnert, G. [Tandem Laboratory, Department of Engineering Science, Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    Marion Island, located in the southern Indian Ocean, constitutes the summit of an active shield volcano. It is a small terrestrial environment where glacially abraded bedrock became exposed c x 10 kyr ago. These conditions provide an interesting possibility for the assessment of {sup 10}Be accumulation rates and their application to soil erosion studies on the island. {sup 10}Be concentrations were measured in precipitation, soil profiles and an Azorella selago cushion plant. The data reveal a {sup 10}Be precipitation flux several times higher than model prediction. Estimation of the {sup 10}Be accumulation based on the soil inventory suggests a span between 2000 and 7000 yr. This time span is not in accordance with the accepted notion that the island was covered with ice about 10,000 yr ago and suggests either removal of {sup 10}Be from the soil profile, an overestimated Holocene {sup 10}Be-flux or a delayed soil development history. Our results provide new data on {sup 10}Be concentrations from the sub-Antarctic islands and contribute towards enlarging the southern-hemisphere {sup 10}Be database.

  12. A 600-year annual 10Be record from the NGRIP ice core, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggren, A.M.; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann; Vinther, Bo Møllesøe

    2009-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of 10Be as the most significant information source on past solar activity, there has been only one record (Dye-3, Greenland) providing annual resolution over several centuries. Here we report a new annual resolution 10Be record spanning the period 1389-1994 AD, measured...

  13. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  14. Long term low latitude and high elevation cosmogenic 3He production rate inferred from a 107 ka-old lava flow in northern Chile; 22°S-3400 m a.s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunel, Romain; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Martin, Léo C. P.; Nomade, Sébastien; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2016-07-01

    Available geological calibration sites used to estimate the rate at which cosmogenic 3He is produced at the Earth's surface are mostly clustered in medium to high latitudes. Moreover, most of them have exposure histories shorter than tens of thousands of years. This lack of sites prevents a qualitative assessment of available production models used to convert cosmogenic 3He concentrations into exposure ages and/or denudation rates. It thus limits our ability to take into account the atmospheric, geomagnetic and solar modulation conditions that might have affected the production of cosmogenic nuclides in the past for longer exposure histories and in low latitude regions. We present the cosmogenic 3He production rate inferred from a new geological calibration site located in northern Chile. Five samples were collected on the surface of the largest and best-preserved lava flow of the San Pedro volcano (21.934°S-68.510°W-3390 m a.s.l.), which displays pristine crease-structure features. 40Ar/39Ar dating yields a reliable plateau age of 107 ± 12 ka for the eruption of this lava flow. Eight pyroxene aliquots separated from the surface samples yield a weighted average cosmogenic 3He concentration of 99.3 ± 1.2 Mat g-1 from which a local cosmogenic 3He production rate of 928 ± 101 at g-1 yr-1 is calculated. The local production rate is then scaled to a sea level high latitude (SLHL) reference position using different combinations of geographic spatialization schemes, atmosphere models and geomagnetic field reconstructions, yielding SLHL production rates between 103 ± 11 and 130 ± 14 at g-1 yr-1 consistent with the most recent estimates available from the literature. Finally, we use the same scaling frameworks to re-evaluate the mean global-scale cosmogenic 3He production rate in olivine and pyroxene minerals at 120 ± 16 at g-1 yr-1 from the compilation of previously published calibration datasets.

  15. Inter-comparison in {sup 10}Be analysis starting from pre-purified quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, C. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Rankine Avenue, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: c.schnabel@suerc.gla.ac.uk; Reinhardt, L. [Department of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Barrows, T.T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bishop, P. [Department of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Davidson, A. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Rankine Avenue, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Fifield, L.K. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Freeman, S. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Rankine Avenue, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Kim, J.Y. [Department of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Maden, C. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Rankine Avenue, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Xu, S. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), Rankine Avenue, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    The results of the first international inter-comparison of {sup 10}Be analysis from quartz are presented. This inter-comparison includes the sample preparation starting from pre-purified quartz and AMS measurements at SUERC and ANU. Measured {sup 10}Be concentrations agree within their uncertainties for six out of seven samples with {sup 10}Be concentrations greater than 1 x 10{sup 4} at/g quartz. This agreement and also the agreement of {sup 10}Be concentrations analysed from two aliquots of the same sample at SUERC indicate that addition of {sup 9}Be carrier before (used at ANU) or after quartz dissolution (used at SUERC apart from one aliquot of one sample) should not result in substantially different results.

  16. Investigation of 10Be and its cluster dynamics from nonlocalized clustering concept

    CERN Document Server

    Lyu, Mengjiao; Zhou, Bo; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Xu, Chang; Yamada, Taiichi

    2015-01-01

    We extend the new concept of nonlocalized clustering to the nucleus 10Be with proton number Z=4 and neutron number N=6 (N=Z+2). The Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"opke (THSR) wave function is formulated for the description of different structures of 10Be. Physical properties such as energy spectrum and root-mean-square radii are calculated for the first two 0+ states and corresponding rotational bands. With only one single THSR wave function, the calculated results show good agreement with other models and experimental values. We apply, for the first time, the THSR wave function on the chain orbit ({\\sigma}-orbit) structure in the 0^+_2 state of 10Be. The ring orbit ({\\pi}-orbit) and {\\sigma}-orbit structures are further illustrated by calculating the density distribution of the valence neutrons. We also investigate the dynamics of ff-clusters and the correlations of two valence neutrons in 10Be.

  17. Off-line production of intense {sup 7,10}Be{sup +} beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, U. E-mail: ulli.koster@cern.ch; Argentini, M.; Catherall, R.; Fedoseyev, V.N.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jonsson, O.C.; Weinreich, R

    2003-05-01

    {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be were produced by 590 MeV proton bombardment of a graphite target at PSI. Parts of this graphite target were transferred into an ISOLDE target and ion source unit and ionized with the ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source. Thus intense radioactive ion beams of 300 nA of {sup 7,10}Be{sup +} were produced off-line.

  18. Off-line production of intense $^{7,10}Be^{+}$ beams

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Gäggeler, H W; Jonsson, O C; Weinreich, R

    2003-01-01

    $^7$Be and $^{10}$Be were produced by 590~MeV proton bombardment of a graphite target at PSI. Parts of this graphite target were transferred into an ISOLDE target and ion source unit and ionized with the ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS). Thus intense radioactive ion beams of 300~nA of $^{7,10}$Be$^+$ were produced off-line.

  19. Tracing hillslope sediment production and transport with in situ and meteoric 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, Matthew C.; Bierman, Paul R.; Matmon, Ari; Nichols, Kyle; Larsen, Jennifer; Finkel, Robert

    2009-12-01

    We use in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be, analyzed in soils from 28 pits on four hillcrest-parallel transects along a 14° hillslope in the Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina, as tracers of soil production and transport. We rely upon amalgamation both to investigate and smooth spatial variability in 10Be concentrations. Lidar indicates that the hillslope is topographically complex and that soil is moved downslope diffusively until it encounters the ephemeral channel network and is rapidly exported. In situ-produced 10Be, measured in depth profiles, indicates that over millennial timescales, soils are mixed above the soil-saprolite boundary. In contrast, meteoric 10Be concentrations increase with depth and are correlated to concurrent increases of dithionite-extractable Al and pH, observations explained by similar Al and Be mobility in the soil. The concentrations of both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be increase downslope proportional to the maximum soil particle path length. The data suggest virtual downslope soil velocities of 1.1-1.7 cm yr-1 in a well-mixed active transport layer ˜60 cm thick. The thickness of this transport layer is constant downslope and depends on the rooting depth and consequent root wad thickness of downed trees on the slope, both of which reflect depth to the soil/saprolite boundary. Both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be suggest that soil production is balanced by surface denudation at rates between 10 and 13 m Myr-1. Soil residence times on the slope range from 21 to 33 kyr based on the meteoric 10Be inventories. Major element geochemical analysis suggests little if any elemental loss during soil transport downslope.

  20. Can cosmic ray exposure dating reveal the normal faulting activity of the Cordillera Blanca Fault, Peru?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Siame

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The build-up of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be within bedrock scarps and escarpments associated to the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, Peru, was measured to evaluate, through Cosmic Ray Exposure dating, its normal faulting activity. The highest mountain peaks in Peru belong to the 210 km-long, NW- striking, Cordillera Blanca. Along its western border, the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault is responsible for a vertical relief over 4.4 km, whose prominent 2 km high escarpment is characterized by ~1 km-high triangular facets corresponding to vertical displacements cumulated during the last 1-2 million years. At a more detailed scale, this fault system exhibits continuous geomorphic evidence of repeated displacements, underlined by 2 to 70 m-high scarps, corresponding to vertical displacements cumulated since Late Pleistocene and Holocene periods. Although microseismicity occurs along the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, no major historical or instrumental earthquake has been recorded since the beginning of the Spanish settlement in the 16th century. To evaluate the vertical slip rate along the major 90 km-long central segment of the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, the Quaternary fault escarpment (i.e., triangular facet, as well as the bedrock fault scarp, have been sampled for 10Be Cosmic Ray Exposure dating. Even if the uppermost part of the triangular facets have been resurfaced by the Last Glacial Maximum glaciers, our results allow to estimate a vertical slip-rate of 3±1 mm/yr, and suggest at least 2 seismic events during the last 3000 years.

  1. Eight Million Years of Land-Based Antarctic Ice Sheet Stability Recorded By In Situ 10Be from the ANDRILL-1B Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, J. D.; Corbett, L. B.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) to Pliocene warmth provides a critical way to gauge its sensitivity to climate change. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the Pliocene behavior of the EAIS, however. For instance, global sea level estimates for the mid-Pliocene warm period range from 30 m, and numerous cosmogenic nuclide and sedimentological studies from the Transantarctic Mountains imply extreme landscape stability over the last several Myr whereas ocean records suggest orbital-scale instability of at least marine-based sectors of the ice sheet. These stabilist versus dynamicist views are difficult to resolve because onshore records are generally biased toward intervals of expanded ice cover and limited to areas with exposed land, while marine sediments typically provide indirect evidence for conditions on land and cannot distinguish between marine versus land-based ice sheet collapse. The AND-1B marine sediment core drilled beneath the Ross Ice Shelf contains a remarkably complete late Cenozoic sequence of glacial diamictons sourced from the adjacent EAIS, intercalated with open-water sediments likely associated with West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse. We measured concentrations of in situ 10Be - produced only when ice cover is reduced and the landscape is exposed - in eight samples of glacially-derived quartz sand from AND-1B spanning parts of the last 8 Myr. Decay-corrected concentrations are low and show a long-term decline from 13,000 atoms/g to 1000 atoms/g over the record. These low values and the monotonic trend suggest that land-based ice sheet sectors have experienced little, if any, exposure during the past 8 Myr; the 10Be concentrations we measured are equivalent to only centuries or a few kyr of surface exposure. Perhaps more likely, the small quantities of 10Be were produced prior to the establishment of a full EAIS in the mid-Miocene, and reflect deeply-exhumed and thus 10Be-poor material that has been radioactively decaying beneath

  2. Dinucleon correlation of $^9$Li, $^{10}$Be, and $^{9,10}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Fumiharu

    2013-01-01

    We study the dinucleon (dineutron and diproton) correlation of the ground states of $^9$Li, $^{10}$Be, and $^{9,10}$C. We assume an $\\alpha+t$ core for $^9$Li, an $\\alpha+\\alpha$ core for $^{10}$Be and $^{10}$C, and an $\\alpha+^3$He core for $^9$C, and investigate the effect of core structure changes on the degree of dineutron formation and spatial expansion from the core. For $^9$Li, $t$ cluster breaking in the core significantly enhances the dineutron component inside the nuclei. Moreover, its component markedly depends on the strength of the spin-orbit interaction since a dineutron is fragile and dissociates readily due to the spin-orbit interaction. Compared with $^9$Li, the dineutron of $^{10}$Be dissociates largely due to the stronger spin-orbit attraction from the $\\alpha+\\alpha$ core than the $\\alpha+t$ core. We also investigate diproton features in $^{9,10}$C, the mirror nuclei of $^9$Li and $^{10}$Be, respectively, and compare them with the dineutron features of $^9$Li and $^{10}$Be. No qualitative ...

  3. {sup 10}Be({alpha},n){sup 13}C angular distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, J.; Massey, T.N.; O`Donnell, J.E.; Saito, E.F.; Lane, R.O. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1993-10-01

    As a continuation of our investigation of the {sup 14}C system, {sup 10}Be targets have been bombarded with a pulsed beam of alpha particles from the Ohio University Tandem Accelerator. The {sup 10}Be target is in the form of {sup 10}BeO (92 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) deposited on a platinum foil. Neutron time-of-flight spectra were produced with the Beam Swinger facility and a 4.88 in flight path. Fifty-four neutron angular distributions for the {sup 10}Be({alpha},n{sub {circ}}){sup 13}C and {sup 10}Be({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 13}C reactions were obtained at angles 0{degrees} to 160{degrees} for 3.675 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 6.325 MeV. A zero-degree excitation function for alpha particles between 3.5 MeV and 8.5 MeV in 75 keV steps was also produced. A preliminary analysis of the ground state transition shows only a narrow peak of approximately 200 keV FWHM and a broad peak of approximately 1.0 MeV FWHM at E{sub {alpha}} = 4.0 MeV and E{sub {alpha}} = 5.6 MeV, respectively. Details and results of this investigation as well as preliminary R-Matrix calculations will be discussed.

  4. Cluster structure of neutron-rich 10Be and 14C via resonant alpha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Kolata, J. J.; Mittig, W.; AT-TPC Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-rich ^{10} Be and ^{14} C nuclei were studied via resonant α scattering of radioactive 6 He and ^{10} Be beams, respectively, produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (pAT-TPC) was used as a thick gaseous α target to induce resonant scattering and as a device to track reacted particles inside the target, providing continuous excitation functions and angular distributions over a wide range of energies and angles. The experimental results indicate a melting phenomenon of α clusters in the 4+ rotational member of the ^{10} Be ground state and a linear chain alignment of three α clusters in ^{14} C excited states, as recently predicted by an anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics calculation.

  5. {sup 10}Be measurements at MALT using reduced-size samples of bulk sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho, E-mail: kh@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Oniyanagi, Itsumi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Wasada, Hiroshi [Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Graduate school of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [MALT, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    In order to establish {sup 10}Be measurements on reduced-size (1-10 mg) samples of bulk sediments, we investigated four different pretreatment designs using lacustrine and marginal-sea sediments and the AMS system of the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT) at University of Tokyo. The {sup 10}Be concentrations obtained from the samples of 1-10 mg agreed within a precision of 3-5% with the values previously determined using corresponding ordinary-size ({approx}200 mg) samples and the same AMS system. This fact demonstrates reliable determinations of {sup 10}Be with milligram levels of recent bulk sediments at MALT. On the other hand, a clear decline of the BeO{sup -} beam with tens of micrograms of {sup 9}Be carrier suggests that the combination of ten milligrams of sediments and a few hundred micrograms of the {sup 9}Be carrier is more convenient at this stage.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE SOURCES OF {sup 10}Be IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielandt, Daniel; Krot, Alexander N.; Bizzarro, Martin [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-1350 (Denmark); Nagashima, Kazuhide; Huss, Gary R. [Hawai' i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, HI 96822 (United States); Ivanova, Marina A. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-01

    Beryllium-10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t{sub 1/2} = 1.4 Myr) uniquely synthesized by spallation reactions and inferred to have been present when the solar system's oldest solids (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) formed. Yet, the astrophysical site of {sup 10}Be nucleosynthesis is uncertain. We report Li-Be-B isotope measurements of CAIs from CV chondrites, including CAIs that formed with the canonical {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratio of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} (canonical CAIs) and CAIs with Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects (FUN-CAIs) characterized by {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratios much lower than the canonical value. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of four distinct fossil {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be isochrons, lower in the FUN-CAIs than in the canonical CAIs, and variable within these classes. Given that FUN-CAI precursors escaped evaporation-recondensation prior to evaporative melting, we suggest that the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio recorded by FUN-CAIs represents a baseline level present in presolar material inherited from the protosolar molecular cloud, generated via enhanced trapping of galactic cosmic rays. The higher and possibly variable apparent {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios of canonical CAIs reflect additional spallogenesis, either in the gaseous CAI-forming reservoir, or in the inclusions themselves: this indicates at least two nucleosynthetic sources of {sup 10}Be in the early solar system. The most promising locale for {sup 10}Be synthesis is close to the proto-Sun during its early mass-accreting stages, as these are thought to coincide with periods of intense particle irradiation occurring on timescales significantly shorter than the formation interval of canonical CAIs.

  7. Possible cosmogenic neutrino constraints on Planck-scale Lorentz violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, David M. [New Hamshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States); Maccione, Luca [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Galaverni, Matteo [INAF-IASF Bologna (Italy); Liberati, Stefano [INFN, Trieste (Italy); SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2009-11-15

    We study, within an effective field theory framework, O(E{sup 2}/M{sup 2}{sub Pl}) Planck-scale suppressed Lorentz invariance violation (LV) effects in the neutrino sector, whose size we parameterize by a dimensionless parameter {eta}{sub {nu}}. We find deviations from predictions of Lorentz invariant physics in the cosmogenic neutrino spectrum. For positive O(1) coefficients no neutrino will survive above 10{sup 19} eV. The existence of this cutoff generates a bump in the neutrino spectrum at energies of 10{sup 17} eV. Although at present no constraint can be cast, as current experiments do not have enough sensitivity to detect ultra-high-energy neutrinos, we show that experiments in construction or being planned have the potential to cast limits as strong as {eta}{sub {nu}}

  8. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mang; Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2016-10-01

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic 35S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high 35S concentrations (7,390 atoms m-3; ˜16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced 35S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that 35S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level.

  9. The interactions of atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclides with spacecraft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Parnell, T. A.; Herzog, G.; Klein, J.; Jull, A. J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of the cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the front surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has opened new opportunities to study several unexplored regions of space science. The experiments have shown that the Be-7 found was concentrated in a thin surface layer of spacecraft material. The only reasonable source of the isotope is the atmosphere through which the spacecraft passed. It is expected that the uptake of Be in such circumstances will depend on the chemical form of the Be and the chemical nature of the substrate. It was found that the observed concentration of Be-7 does differ between metal surfaces and organic surfaces such as PTFE (Teflon). It is noted however, that (1) organic surfaces are etched by the atomic oxygen found under these orbital conditions, and (2) the relative velocity of the species is 8 km/s relative to the surface and the interaction chemistry and physics may differ from the norm. Be-7 is formed by disintegration of O and N nuclei under cosmic ray proton bombardment. Many other isotopes are produced by cosmic ray reactions, and some of these are suited to measurement by the extremely sensitive methods of accelerator mass spectrometry.

  10. Cosmogenic Samarium-150 and Calcium-41 in Norton County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, D.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Albrecht, A.; Ma, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.; Garrison, D. H.; Masarik, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Rugel, G.; Faestermann, T.; Korschinek, G.

    2010-01-01

    Though brecciated, the Norton County (NC) aubrite contains little or no trapped noble gas and has been widely assumed to have a simple if unusually long cosmic ray exposure (CRE), 115 Ma. One goal of this ongoing study of NC has been to search for signs of pre-irradiation as proposed. One may test for multiple stages of CRE by comparing thermal neutron fluences inferred from Ca-41 (t(sub 1/2)=0.1 Ma) activities, which reflect irradiation conditions over the last approximately 0.3 Ma, with those inferred from (stable) Sm isotope abundances, which integrate over the entire CRE history. In the case of a one-stage exposure the fluences should agree. We focus on these particular comparisons because the properties of NC - its long CRE exposure, relatively large size, and low iron concentration - all promised high production rates and ease of measurement. Previously, we reported on several cosmogenic nuclides in NC. Here we present new Ca-41 data, Sm isotope measurements, and comparisons with model calculations of cosmic ray production.

  11. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mang; Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C H; Thiemens, Mark H

    2016-10-04

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic (35)S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high (35)S concentrations (7,390 atoms m(-3); ∼16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced (35)S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that (35)S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level.

  12. Insights on the post-seismic geomorphological response to the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake from detrital cosmogenic nuclides data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Godard, Vincent; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Scherler, Dirk; Xu, Chong; Xu, Quiang; Xie, Kejia; Bellier, Olivier; Ansberque, Claire; de Sigoyer, Julia; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    In high-relief mountain ranges bounded by reverse faults, large-magnitude earthquakes can contribute to topographic growth by co- and inter-seismic surface uplift of the hanging wall; meanwhile, earthquakes can also lower relief by causing erosion through extensive landslides. Quantifying evacuation process of co-seismic landslides material is central to our understanding of mass redistribution at the earth surface and the evolution of active mountain ranges. The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake in the Longmen Shan range of eastern Tibet provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate such direct impact. Cosmogenic nuclides concentrations in river sands are diluted by the input of low-concentration landslide debris materials after the earthquake (West et al., 2014), and we document the evolution 10Be concentrations in quartz for several years after the Wenchuan earthquake to trace the routing processes of co-seismic landslides. Over the 2008-2013 period we collected river sand samples at 19 locations annually along the rivers that flow through the rupture zone. When compared with published pre-earthquake data, our results show that the 10Be concentration in river sand declined dramatically after the earthquake at all sampling sites. Meanwhile, multi-year time series of 10Be concentration at single sites present roughly constant level of dilution with moderate fluctuations. Our analyses indicate that the 10Be dilution amplitude is closely controlled by local catchment slope and landslide density, rather than by the location of landslides with respect to sampling sites. The perturbation we observed for 10Be concentrations in the 0.25~1 mm size fraction appears to be sustained over the timescale of our survey with no clear relaxation, which is consistent with independent results from suspended sediment analysis (Wang et al., 2015).

  13. Exhumation and incision history of the Lahul Himalaya, northern India, based on (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Byron; Dietsch, Craig; Owen, Lewis A.; Caffee, Marc W.; Spotila, James; Haneberg, William C.

    2009-06-01

    Low-temperature apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) thermochronology on vertical transects of leucogranite stocks and 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure dating on strath terraces in the Lahul Himalaya provide a first approximation of long-term (10 4-10 6 years) exhumation rates for the High Himalayan Crystalline Series (HHCS) for northern India. The AHe ages show that exhumation of the HHCS in Lahul from shallow crustal levels to the surface was ~ 1-2 mm/a and occurred during the past ~ 2.5 Ma. Bedrock exhumation in Lahul fits into a regional pattern in the HHCS of low-temperature thermochronometers yielding Plio-Pleistocene ages. Surface exposure ages of strath terraces along the Chandra River range from ~ 3.5 to 0.2 ka. Two sites along the Chandra River show a correlation between TCN age and height above the river level yielding maximum incision rates of 12 and 5.5 mm/a. Comparison of our AHe and surface exposure ages from Lahul with thermochronometry data from the fastest uplifting region at the western end of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, illustrates that there are contrasting regions in the High Himalaya where longer term (10 5-10 7 years) erosion and exhumation of bedrock substantially differ even though Holocene rates of fluvial incision are comparable. These data imply that the orogen's indenting corners are regions where focused denudation has been stable since the mid-Pliocene. However, away from these localized areas where there is a potent coupling of tectonic and surface processes that produce rapid uplift and denudation, Plio-Pleistocene erosion and exhumation can be characterized by disequilibrium, where longer term rates are relatively slower and shorter term fluvial erosion is highly variable over time and distance. The surface exposure age data reflect differential incision along the length of the Chandra River over millennial time frames, illustrate the variances that are possible in Himalayan river incision, and highlight

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry with 14C and 10Be in utrecht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, K. van der; Alderliesten, C.; Houston, C.M.; Jong, A.F.M. de; Zwol, N.A. van

    1987-01-01

    The Utrecht facility for accelerator mass spectrometry is now in operation for routine measurements of 14C and 10Be in natural samples. Sample preparation techniques have been introduced. A 1% precision for 14C/12C ratios is routinely achieved. In the last year, more than 500 samples have been prepa

  15. No-Core MCSM calculation for $^{10}$Be and $^{12}$Be low-lying spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lang; Shimizu, Noritaka; Utsuno, Yutaka; Roth, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The low-lying excited states of $^{10}$Be and $^{12}$Be are investigated within a no-core Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM) framework employing a realistic potential obtained via the Unitary Correlation Operator Method. The excitation energies of the 2$^+_1$ and 2$^+_2$ states and the B(E2; 2$^+_{1}\\rightarrow$ 0$^+_{g.s.}$) for $^{10}$Be in the MCSM with a treatment of spurious center-of-mass motion show good agreement with experimental data. The deformation properties of the 2$^+_1$, 2$^+_2$ states for $^{10}$Be and of the 2$^+_1$ state for $^{12}$Be are studied in terms of quadrupole moments, E2 transitions and the single-particle occupations. The triaxial deformation of $^{10}$Be is tested by the B(E2; 2$^+_{2}\\rightarrow$ 2$^+_{1}$) value. The removal of the spurious center-of-mass motion shifts the 1$^-_1$ level significantly, improving agreement with experiment.

  16. Synchronizing the North American Varve Chronology with Greenland ice core records during late MIS 2 using Meteoric 10Be Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Benjamin D.; Balco, Greg; Ridge, Jack C.; Rood, Dylan H.; Bierman, Paul R.

    2013-04-01

    The North American Varve Chronology (NAVC) is a floating 5700-year sequence of glacial lake varves deposited in the Connecticut River Valley of the northeast US ~18,000-12,500 years ago. The NAVC is an annually resolved record of regional climate and ice-marginal processes at 40-45° N latitude, near the margin of the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). NAVC deposition occurred at the same time as rapid and abrupt Arctic and North Atlantic climate changes that took place during the last deglaciation. Age calibration estimates for the NAVC based on radiocarbon dated plant macrofossils in individual varves imply a relationship between ice-marginal events recorded by the NAVC and climate events recorded in Greenland ice cores. For example, the retreat rate of the LIS up the Connecticut River Valley increased during the Bolling warming in Greenland, a readvance of the LIS margin took place during the Older Dryas cold period, and a correlation between an outburst flood from glacial Lake Iroquois and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period supports the hypothesis that the flood affected North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. On the other hand, a doubling of the ice-margin retreat rate recorded by the NAVC around 16,000 years ago coincides with a relatively cold period in Greenland. Our goal is to investigate the precise time relationship between these two records by synchronizing the NAVC with the Greenland ice core time scale using atmospherically-produced 10Be. Existing 10Be flux records, including those from Greenland ice cores, exhibit solar variability on a range of time scales. Because this variability is globally synchronous, a 10Be flux record for the NAVC can, in principle, be used to align NAVC and ice core timescales. In the first phase of this research we tested this potential by generating 10Be flux records for two 80-year varve sequences and analyzing them using multi-taper spectral analysis for determination of statistically significant periodicities. We were

  17. 10Be Content in Suevite Breccia from the Bosumtwi Impact Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: According to the current understanding of meteorite impact processes, surface target material is transported from a crater in the form of ejecta or is vaporized/melted (e.g., [1]). The formation model of tektites from the surface of the target rocks has been established using the 10Be content of tektites (e.g., [2]), and chemical comparison with the possible target surface material (e.g., [3]); it was also reproduced by computer modeling (e.g., [4]). On the other hand, some observations ([5, 6]) suggest that part of the surface material may be incorporated into the crater-fill. The aim of this study is to check if surface-derived material is present in suevitic breccias to better understand formation mechanisms of fallback breccias. Also, 10Be can be used to trace contamination of rocks in the top layer of the suevitic layer by meteoric (lake) water. This abstract is an update (based on more data now available) of the previous report presented during the Metsoc75 conference. Samples: The Bosumtwi crater was chosen as study site because of its relatively large size (10.5 km in diameter), young age of 1.07 Ma [7], good state of preservation, and availability of core samples. Clasts from suevitic breccia selected for this study come from the LB-07A and LB-08A cores that are located within the crater and represent fallback breccia (e.g., [7]). Of 41 analyzed samples (22 single clasts and 21 matrix samples - 11 of those being monomictic breccia), 36 came from core LB-07A (in the zone outside the central uplift) and represent depths of 333.7 - 407.9 m and 5 are from core LB-08A (on the flank of the central uplift) from depths 239.5 - 264.9 m. Methods: For each sample, 0.8 g of finely grounded material from clasts containing in situ produced and meteoric 10Be was dissolved in a mixture of HF and HNO3 by microwave digestion. A 9Be carrier (1 mg or 0.6 mg, 10Be/9Be ratio: 2.82±0.31*10-15 [2? uncertainty]) was added to the sample, and then Be was chemically

  18. Glacial history of a mid-altitude mountain massif: cartography and dating in the Chablais area (France, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, A.; Reynard, E.; Delannoy, J.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The Chablais area, considered as one of the cradles of glaciology (de Charpentier, 1841; Morlot, 1859), has been studied for a long time but several questions still remain unresolved. This study aims to reconstruct the glacial history of the massif, in order to explain the glacial landforms, which constitute an important part of the local geomorphology. The study focuses on the last glacial cycle (OIS 5 - OIS 2). The area is primarily associated with the the Valais glacier, by several local glacial flows and, to a lesser extent, by the Giffre glacier. Its position at the interface of the important Valais glacial flow and less powerful local flows is a specificity of the study area, which implies several bifurcations, penetration of the main glacier into laterals valleys, damming situations, and different responses of the various ice bodies to climatic changes. The study is divided in four steps. (1) The first step was to carry out a wide bibliographic survey to identify the state of knowledge, especially in relation to areas previously poorly studied and areas that needed to be reconsidered given developments in dating methods. (2) Field surveys allowed us to complete observations and prepare local geomorphological maps (of glacial landforms and associated phenomena). (3) The third step was to assemble heterogeneous data (old and new maps, Digital Terrain Models, aerial photographies) in a GIS to establish maps of glacial stages. (4) Finally, the absolute and relative chronology of deglaciation (Guitter, 2003) was completed by cosmogenic nuclide dating. Results have allowed us to address the conditions of glacial landform deposition and evolution in a mid-altitude mountain range, and show the need to be prudent in comparing results of different dating methods. Our results suggest that the ages obtained are overall too young in regard to 10Be ages on the northern alpine foreland (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004) and are in conflict with 14C dates obtained in the area

  19. Cosmogenic and primordial radioisotopes in copper bricks shortly exposed to cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coarasa, I.; Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuestá, C.; García, E.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortíz de Solórzano, A.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmogenic activation is the most common source of radioactivity in copper, being 60 Co the most significant because of its long half-life (5.27 y) and saturation activity at sea level of 1 mBq/kg. Copper bricks, which had been exposed to cosmic rays for 41 days after their casting, were used to replace the internal 10 cm of the lead shielding of a HPGe detector placed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. We describe the outcome of the new shielding and the cosmogenic and primordial radioisotopes observed.

  20. Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in $^{9}$Be and $^{10}$Be studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshik

    2015-01-01

    Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in $^9$Be and $^{10}$Be are investigated in the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics, in which angular-momentum and parity projections are performed. In the present method, 1p-1h excitations on the ground state and large amplitude $\\alpha$-cluster mode are incorporated. The isovector giant dipole resonance (GDR) in $E>20$ MeV shows the two peak structure which is understood by the dipole excitation in the 2$\\alpha$ core part with the prolate deformation. Because of valence neutron modes against the $2\\alpha$ core, low-energy E1 resonances appear in $E20$ MeV.

  1. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with 10Be marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, I.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Zhou, Y.; Heinola, K.; Pettersson, J.; Conroy, S.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Widdowson, A.

    2016-03-01

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a 10Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011-2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm2 sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The 10Be/9Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the 10B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4-1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  2. Meteoric 10Be in volcanic materials and its behavior during acid-leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Minoru; Hiyagon, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Imamura, Mineo

    2004-08-01

    We have investigated the chemical and isotopic behavior of beryllium (Be) during acid leaching for removing meteoric 10Be in volcanic samples. Determination of the Be isotopic ratio in the leachate was carried out using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Elemental distribution of Be and other incompatible elements including boron (B) were also examined by ion microprobe (SIMS) for a deeper understanding of their chemical behavior in volcanic samples. SIMS analysis show that Be is concentrated in the groundmass together with B. However, the behavior of their elements during acid leaching is quite different. The Be concentration decreases through progressive leaching, while the concentration of B remains constant. Furthermore, the variation in the Be isotopic ratio after acid leaching is different between the two samples, neither of which has altered minerals under microscopic observation. It is demonstrated that meteoric 10Be resides in a rather narrow region of the rock and can be removed by acid leaching with minimum loss of the main host phase of Be.

  3. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with {sup 10}Be marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, I. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Bergsåker, H., E-mail: henricb@kth.se [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Possnert, G. [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala Universitet, Box 256, Uppsala 75105 (Sweden); Zhou, Y. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Heinola, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Pettersson, J. [Department of Chemistry – BMC, Uppsala Universitet, Box 599, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Conroy, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala Universitet, Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Likonen, J. [VTT, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Petersson, P. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Widdowson, A. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a {sup 10}Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011–2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm{sup 2} sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the {sup 10}B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4–1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  4. Identification and dating of the Mono Lake excursion in lava flows from the Canary islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, Hervé; Laj, Carlo; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Kissel, Catherine; Nomade, Sebastien; Perez-Torrado, Francisco; Wandres, Camille

    2010-05-01

    age is, within the uncertainties, consistent with 33.5 to 34.5 ka distribution of the 10Be peak (centered at 34 ka) in NGRIP core. The directional deviation observed at these sites coupled with a first absolute dating of this excursion indicates that it can constitute an accurate chronostratigraphic tie point for many geological and climatic studies, similarly to the Laschamp excursion. In addition, the different directions and intensities obtained from the four sites with statistically similar ages imply a short duration for this excursion (shorter than the age uncertainty).

  5. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  6. Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in 9Be and 10Be studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-02-01

    Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in 9Be and 10Be are investigated in the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics, in which angular-momentum and parity projections are performed. In the present method, 1p-1h excitation modes built on the ground state and a large amplitude α -cluster mode are taken into account. The isovector giant dipole resonance (GDR) in E >20 MeV shows the two-peak structure, which is understood from the dipole excitation in the 2 α core part with the prolate deformation. Because of valence neutron modes against the 2 α core, low-energy E 1 resonances appear in E Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule and 10 % of the calculated energy-weighted sum. The dipole resonance at E ˜15 MeV in 10Be can be interpreted as the parity partner of the ground state having a 6He+α structure and has remarkable E 1 strength because of the coherent contribution of two valence neutrons. The isoscalar dipole strength for some low-energy resonances is significantly enhanced by the coupling with the α -cluster mode. For the E 1 strength of 9Be, the calculation overestimates the energy-weighted sum (EWS) in the low-energy (E <20 MeV) and GDR (20

  7. Surface exposure dates of cirque basin deglaciation along a western Ireland transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, A. M.; Clark, J.; Clark, P. U.; McCabe, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (20ka -11ka), variations in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), accompanied by changes in North Atlantic Deep Water production, caused centennial-to-millennial abrupt climate change. Because of Ireland's proximity to North Atlantic deep-water convection sites, changes in climate associated with variations in the AMOC would be particularly pronounced there, and are recorded by fluctuations of the Irish Ice Sheet. Many of Ireland's mountains also hosted cirque glaciers during the last glaciation, which would have been particularly sensitive to abrupt climate changes of the last deglaciation. Dating of cirque glacier moraines with cosmogenic nuclides can provide a millennial-scale reconstruction of variability in these highly sensitive cirque glaciers. We report 11 new 10Be ages from two cirques basins in County Mayo, western Ireland. A moraine adjacent to Lougaharry Lough near Killary Harbour suggests deglaciation at 13.81 × 0.14 ka during the Bølling-Allerød interval. Two moraines, one inner and one outer, at Lough Accorymore on Achill Island returned ages of 17.04 × 0.31 ka and 18.43 × 0.79 ka, respectively. Both Accorymore dates are Oldest Dryas in age and suggest variability during the millennial-scale Clogher Head Stadial in Ireland. To develop a more regional reconstruction of glacier-climate variability during the last deglaciation, we have also sampled moraines from cirque basins spanning western Ireland from County Kerry in the south to County Donegal in the north. Boulders were sampled from a total of 23 moraines from seven additional cirques to provide this more expansive coverage.

  8. {sup 14} C dating by using mass spectrometry with particle accelerator; Datacao por {sup 14} C utilizando espectrometria de massa com acelerador de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.M.; Gomes, P.R.S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: paulogom@if.uff.br; Yokoyama, Y. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Science; Tada, M.L. di; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1999-03-01

    The different aspects concerning the {sup 14} C dating are described, including the cosmogenic origin of {sup 14} C, its production and absorption by matter, the procedures to be followed for the age determination and the associated errors, particularly by the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, and the different steps of the sample preparation process. (author)

  9. The cosmogenic induced background estimation for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR enriched 76Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brandon; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay experiments probe for such rare events that the suppression of backgrounds are major experimental concerns. Cosmogenic induced isotopes have the potential to be a major background for such experiments. For the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment 76Ge isotope is used as both detector and source. The isotope 68Ge is cosmogenically produced when the Ge is on the Earth's surface. The decay of this isotope can mimic events in the region of interest. The experiment is located at the 4850 foot level at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota to suppress cosmogenic activation. In this talk I will present the calculations of cosmogenic background for the enriched 76Ge materials used in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR HPGe detectors. The activation is determined by the surface exposure from the time of production, storage, and delivery of the enriched Ge detectors to the underground experimental site. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Faci.

  10. 26Al/10Be burial ages for a Pleistocene terrace in the Vienna Basin, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumann, S.; Fiebig, M.; Neuhuber, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Haeuselmann, P.; Schwartz, R.; Finkel, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Vienna Basin in the northeastern part of Austria between the Eastern Alps and the West Carpathians is a pull-apart basin crossed by the Danube river. The structure is filled with marine and terrestrial sediments showing thicknesses of up to 6 km. An increase in glacial melt water discharges, typically linked to high productivity of Alpine glaciers, had an essential impact on the formation of the investigated terrace. The scale of erosion and sediment transport translates to deposition rates in the foreland and is influenced by the magnitude of melt water discharges in Alpine catchment areas. Variations in layer characteristics (i.e. grain size, sorting, thickness) are an indicator for glacial pulses. Burial dates of ten quartz pebbles originating from the Gaenserndorfer terrace, situated in the northeastern part of the basin, set time dependent constraints on the required hydrological regime for mobilization, transport and sedimentation of bedloads and allow relating the deposition of glacial sediments to past glacial periods. But the geomorphic evolution of the Vienna Basin was not only determined by sedimentation processes. A number of irregularities manifest that tectonics affected the area as well: Terrace tilts are dipping against the slope of the Danube and offsets of some decameters between sediment layers showing the same facies, but located several kilometers apart from each other, could be identified. An extensive Miocene fault system was partly reactivated during the Middle Pleistocene and could have caused the formation of these discontinuities. It is of great interest to discriminate impacts on the area due to deposition from morphological elements formed by seismic events. The preliminary burial ages afford for putting the sampled terrace segment into a coherent geochronological context and provide a dataset to compare ages of the Gaenserndofer terrace to ages of sediment layers at other locations within the basin in order to either validate or

  11. Reactions with a 10Be beam to study the one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, K L

    2016-01-01

    Halo nuclei are excellent examples of few-body systems consisting of a core and weakly-bound halo nucleons. Where there is only one nucleon in the halo, as in 11Be, the many-body problem can be reduced to a two-body problem. The contribution of the 1s1/2 orbital to the ground state configuration in 11Be, characterized by the spectroscopic factor, S, has been extracted from direct reaction data by many groups over the past five decades with discrepant results. An experiment was performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility using a 10Be primary beam at four different energies with the goal of resolving the discrepancy through a consistent analysis of elastic, inelastic, and transfer channels. Faddeev-type calculations, released after the publication of the experimental results, show that dynamic core excitation in the transfer process can lead to reduced differential cross sections at higher beam energies. This reduction would lead to the extraction of decreasing values of S with increasing beam ener...

  12. The new AMS system at CEDAD for the analysis of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 129}I and actinides: Set-up and performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagnile, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.calcagnile@unisalento.it [CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento (Italy); Quarta, Gianluca; Maruccio, Lucio [CEDAD (Centre for Dating and Diagnostics), Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento (Italy); Synal, Hans-Arno; Müller, Arnold Milenko [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    The Centre for Dating and Diagnostics (CEDAD) at the University of Salento was established in 2001 and became fully operational for routine {sup 14}C radiocarbon dating in 2003. The facility has been continuously upgraded over the years with the installation of different beam lines for high energy ion implantation, IBA analyses both in vacuum and in air and nuclear microprobe. In 2011 a second AMS beamline was installed consisting of a dedicated high energy mass spectrometer for the AMS analysis of rare nuclides such as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 129}I and actinides. First tests on {sup 10}Be allowed to optimize the operating parameters resulting in the proper separation of {sup 10}Be from the interfering isobar {sup 10}B. In this paper we present the further tests and optimizations which resulted in an enhancement of the overall transmission efficiency, the reduction of the background (in the 10{sup −15} range) and in the possibility to obtain precision levels in routine {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be measurements of the order of 0.5%. Furthermore the first results obtained for the analysis of {sup 26}Al and {sup 129}I are also presented.

  13. A note of caution on the use of boulders for exposure dating of depositional surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Hetzel, R.; Kuhlmann, J.; Ramos, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    subsequent excavation of these basin sediments is common in the Andes and other fold-and-thrust belts. Hence, pre-depositional nuclide components should be quantified when applying exposure dating at active mountain fronts, which is best achieved via depth profiles. References Bierman, P.R., Gillespie, A.R., Caffee, M.W., 1995. Cosmogenic ages for earthquake recurrence intervals and debris flow fan deposition, Owens Valley, California. Science 270, 447-450. van der Woerd, J., Klinger, Y., Sieh, K., Tapponnier, P., Ryerson, F.J., Mériaux, A.-S., 2006. Long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault from 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating of an offset alluvial fan. Journal of Geophysical Research 111, B04407.

  14. Young displacements on the Atacama Fault System, northern Chile from field observations and cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    GonzáLez L., Gabriel; Dunai, Tibor; Carrizo, Daniel; Allmendinger, Richard

    2006-06-01

    We present the first numerical age constraint for young deformation of the Atacama Fault System (AFS) in northern Chile. The young activity of the AFS is expressed by several fault scarps which affects alluvial fan sediments of the eastern side of the Coastal Cordillera (23°30'-23°42'S). Detailed mapping of alluvial fans reveals a complex relationship between fault motion, erosion and alluvial fan development. An older group of alluvial fans became inactive prior to the scarp formation. Younger alluvial fans, arising directly from feeder channels and entrenched in the fault scarps, posts date the scarp formation. The youngest slip on the AFS is recorded by headward eroding channels entrenched across the scarp which are in turn displaced vertically 0.3-0.5 m by the fault. Quartz fragments in four sites on the older inactive fan group were analyzed for cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations yielding an average age of 424 ± 151 ka, the upper limit for the recent activity of the fault. Combined with the height of fault scarp, we calculate a 0.01 mm/yr minimum vertical fault slip rate. Thus young displacement on the AFS is Quaternary in age and confined to the late Pleistocene.

  15. Differential erosion by different-sized glaciers as reflected in 10Be-derived erosion rates of glacier valley walls, Kichatna Mts., Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Anderson, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Kichatna Mountains, Alaska Range, Alaska comprise a dramatic landscape carved into a small ~65 Ma granitic pluton about 100 km west of Denali, in which kilometer-tall rock walls and “cathedral” spires tower over a radial array of over a dozen individual valley glaciers. The sheer scale of the relief speaks to the relative rates of valley incision by glaciers and rockwall retreat, but absolute rates are difficult to determine. We use cosmogenic 10Be to measure rockwall backwearing rates (and discuss several very important caveats to this use) on timescales of 103-104 yr, with a straightforward sampling strategy that exploits ablation-dominated medial moraines. In simple cases, a medial moraine and its associated englacial debris serve as a conveyor belt that brings supraglacial rockfall debris from the accumulation zone valley wall to a moraine crest in the ablation zone. Our samples come from the largest medial moraine on each of three glaciers. The northeast-flowing Trident glacier is the largest (15 km long, 1.4 km wide) and most deeply incised, and it has the lowest modern snowline in the range (~1200 m). Its primary medial moraine is sourced from west-facing sidewalls. The north-flowing Shadows glacier is slightly smaller (13 km long, 0.8 km wide) and has a large moraine sourced in dominantly east-facing sidewalls. The south-flowing Caldwell glacier is the smallest of the three (7 km long, 0.7 km wide), has a high modern snowline (~1500 m), and is nearly completely covered in debris. Its primary moraine is sourced from all south-facing aspects. These three glaciers share divides in their headwaters, and so are sourced in identical rock. Sidewall relief is similar (~1 km) in all three catchments. Each sample was amalgamated from 25-35 clasts collected over a 1 km longitudinal transect of each moraine. Replicate samples are internally consistent. The lowest 10Be concentrations (8000 at/g), and thus the highest inferred sidewall erosion rates (1.4 mm

  16. Denudation rates derived from spatially-averaged cosmogenic nuclide analysis in Nelson catchments, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdis, A.; Norton, K. P.; Ditchburn, B.; Zondervan, A.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand's tectonically and climatically dynamic environment generates erosion rates that outstrip global averages by up to ten times in some locations. In order to assess recent changes in erosion rate, and also to predict future erosion dynamics, it is important to quantify long-term, background erosion. Current research on erosion in New Zealand predominantly covers short-term (100 yrs) erosion dynamics and Myr dynamics from thermochronological proxy data. Without medium-term denudation data for New Zealand, it is uncertain which variables (climate, anthropogenic disturbance of the landscape, tectonic uplift, lithological, or geomorphic characteristics) exert the dominant control on denudation in New Zealand. Spatially-averaged cosmogenic nuclide analysis can effectively offer this information by providing averaged rates of denudation on millennial timescales without the biases and limitations of short-term erosion methods. Basin-averaged denudation rates were obtained in the Nelson region, New Zealand, from analysis of concentrations of meteoric 10Be in clay and in-situ produced 10Be in quartz. The measured denudation rates integrate over ~8000 yrs (meteoric) and ~3000 yrs (in-situ). Not only do the 10Be records produce erosion rates that are remarkably consistent with each other, but they are also independent of topographic metrics. Denudation rates range from ~116 - 306 t km-2 yr-1, with the exception of one basin which is eroding at 789 t km-2 yr-1(derived from meteoric 10Be) and 644 t km-2 yr-1(derived from in-situ 10Be). The homogeneity of rates and absence of a significant correlation with geomorphic or lithological characteristics suggest another factor is exerting the dominant control on landscape denudation in the Nelson region. Storm variability is a likely driver of erosion in this setting. The background rates are higher than current short term rates (~50 - 200 t km-2 yr-1) due to the significant erosion caused by high magnitude, low frequency

  17. Spatially and temporally varying Quaternary uplift rates of the Gerecse Hills, Northern Pannonian Basin, using dated geomorphological horizons in the Danube valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Fodor, László; Csillag, Gábor; Braucher, Régis; Kele, Sándor; Novothny, Ágnes; Thamó-Bozsó, Edit; Virág, Attila; Molnár, Gábor; Madarász, Balázs; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of Quaternary vertical deformation rates of uplifted, low altitude hilly regions is based mainly on the dating of paleo-surfaces that can be related to reference levels through several stages of landscape evolution. Regarding the Gerecse Hills (NE part of the Transdanubian Range, Hungary), situated to the south of the incised Danube River the all-time base-level of the river provides a suitable reference level, because the intracontinental setting of the study area makes it insensitive of the global sea level changes. The terrace sequences of the Hungarian part of the Danube valley preserve a record of varying tectonic uplift rates along the river course and throughout several climate stages. The Gerecse Hills consists mainly of Triassic carbonatic rocks and a thin Paleogene and Neogene siliciclastic cover. The Danube is escorted by a set of Quaternary river terraces and higher planation surfaces, which may be of Pliocene age. The terraces are covered by alluvial sediments frequently capped by travertine and/or loess. To establish the chronology of these terraces, we rely on U-series data of travertines and on new in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides data combined with luminescence (OSL and postIR-IRSL) ages from the lower terraces. In situ produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations were measured in samples distributed along vertical depth profiles to enable the determination of both the exposure duration and the denudation rate at each studied locality. We used Monte Carlo approach to model the denudation rate-corrected exposure ages. Burial age determinations were performed using cosmogenic 26Al/10Be nuclide ratios. Post-IR IRSL measurements were carried out on K-feldspar and OSL measurements on quartz grains to determine the ages of sediment deposition. The highest dated horizon (˜115 m above the river) provided a preliminary burial age of ˜2.7 Ma, which is in accordance with the possible time span of sedimentation deduced from the occurrence of

  18. A cosmogenic 3He chronology of late Quaternary glacier fluctuations in North Island, New Zealand (39°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Shaun R.; N. Mackintosh, Andrew; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Alloway, Brent V.; Townsend, Dougal B.

    2016-01-01

    Mountain glaciers advance and retreat primarily in response to changes in climate. Establishing the timing and magnitude of mountain glacier fluctuations from geological records can thus help to identify the drivers and mechanisms of past climate change. In this study, we use cosmogenic 3He surface exposure dating and tephrochronology to constrain the timing of past glaciation on Tongariro massif in central North Island, New Zealand (39°S). Exposure ages from moraine boulders show that valley glaciation persisted between c. 30-18 ka, which coincides with the global Last Glacial Maximum. Reinterpretation of moraine tephrostratigraphy, using major element geochemistry analysis, shows that ice retreat and climatic amelioration at the last glacial termination was well underway prior to 14 ka. The equilibrium line altitude in central North Island, during the Last Glacial Maximum, was c. 1400-1550 m above sea level, which is c. 930-1080 m lower than present. Considering the uncertainties in the glacial reconstruction and temperature lapse rates, we estimate that this equilibrium line altitude lowering equates to a temperature depression of 5.6 ± 1.1 °C, relative to present. Our mapping and surface exposure dating also show evidence for an earlier period of glaciation, of similar magnitude to the Last Glacial Maximum, which culminated prior to 57 ka, probably during Marine Isotope Stage 4. Good agreement between the timing and magnitude of glacier fluctuations in central North Island and the Southern Alps indicate a response to a common climatic forcing during the last glacial cycle.

  19. Extracting dynamic topography from river profiles and cosmogenic nuclide geochronology in the Middle Atlas and the High Plateaus of Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Alvar; Babault, Julien; Owen, Lewis A.; Teixell, Antonio; Arboleya, María-Luisa

    2015-11-01

    The Moulouya river system has intensely eroded the Arhbalou, Missour, and Guercif Neogene foreland basins in northeastern Morocco, having changed from net aggradation during the Miocene-early Pliocene to net incision punctuated by alluvial fan deposition at late Pliocene or early Quaternary time. This region as a whole has experienced mantle-driven, surface uplift (dynamic topography) since the late Cenozoic, being locally affected by uplift due to crustal shortening and thickening of the Middle Atlas too. Knickpoints located along the major streams of the Moulouya fluvial network, appear on both the undeformed margins of the Missour and Guercif foreland basins (High Plateaus), as well as along the thrust mountain front of the southern Middle Atlas, where they reach heights of 800-1000 m. 500-550 m of the knickpoint vertical incision might be explained by long-wavelength mantle-driven dynamic surface uplift, whereas the remaining 450-500 m in the southern Middle Atlas front and 200-300 m in the northeastern Middle Atlas front seem to be thrust-related uplift of the Jebel Bou Naceur. Be-10 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides have been used to date two Quaternary river terraces in the Chegg Ard valley at 62 ± 14 ka and 411 ± 55 ka. The dated terraces allow the incision rates associated with the frontal structures of the Middle Atlas to be estimated at ~ 0.3 mm yr- 1. Furthermore, these ages have served to evaluate mantle-driven regional surface uplift since the middle Pleistocene in the central Missour basin, yielding values of ~ 0.1-0.2 mm yr- 1.

  20. Isochron burial dating of the Haslau terrace of the Danube (Vienna Basin) and interlaboratory comparison of sample preparation in Vienna and Budapest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Neuhuber, Stephanie; Decker, Kurt; Braucher, Régis; Fiebig, Marcus; Braun, Mihály; Lachner, Johannes; Aster Team

    2017-04-01

    In the Vienna Basin, terraces to the South of the Danube form a staircase with altitudes ranging between 25 and 130 m above current water level. The terrace system has been strongly dissected by faults related to the sinistral movement of the Vienna Basin Transform Fault System [1, 2]. Although each fault block displays a slightly different succession of terraces, fault-related vertical displacements south of the Danube have not yet been quantified. To better understand the Quaternary terrace sequence and its displacement along a fault segment south of the Danube, the isochron burial dating method [3] based on the 26Al and 10Be cosmogenic nuclide pair has been used on a terrace at Haslau an der Donau (˜40 m above river level). This terrace is locally the lowest of a staircase of a total of 6 different levels. Based on geomorphological mapping, its age was considered to be Middle Pleistocene [4]. The sample set consisted of several quartzite cobbles taken from two sedimentary units (5.5 m and 11.8 m depth) separated by an erosional hiatus of unknown duration. Six cobbles were selected for inter-laboratory comparison and processed at both the Cosmogenic Nuclide Sample Preparation Laboratory at Vienna and at Budapest [5]. AMS measurements were performed at the French national facility ASTER (CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence) and at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). Initially, the obtained results show that the 10Be and 26Al concentrations calculated from the subsamples processed independently using different extraction schemes at both laboratories overlap within error for all subsamples but one, whose 26Al concentrations were significantly different. The low 26Al concentration measured in one Budapest sample probably resulted from Al having been trapped within the insoluble residues observed after evaporation to dryness. A modification of the sample processing allows overcoming this difficulty while treating for the following sample set. The results

  1. A Comparison Of New Calculations Of The Yearly 10Be Production In The Earths Polar Atmosphere By Cosmic Rays With Yearly 10Be Measurements In Multiple Greenland Ice Cores Between 1939 And 1994 - A Troubling Lack Of Concordance Paper #2

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R; Webber, C W

    2010-01-01

    We have compared the yearly production rates of 10Be by cosmic rays in the Earths polar atmosphere over the last 50-70 years with 10Be measurements from two separate ice cores in Greenland. These ice cores provide measurements of the annual 10Be concentration and 10Be flux levels during this time. The scatter in the ice core yearly data vs. the production data is larger than the average solar 11 year production variations that are being measured. The cross correlation coefficients between the yearly 10Be production and the ice core 10Be measurements for this time period are <0.4 in all comparisons between ice core data and 10Be production, including 10Be concentrations, 10Be fluxes and in comparing the two separate ice core measurements. In fact, the cross correlation between the two ice core measurements, which should be measuring the same source, is the lowest of all, only ~0.2. These values for the correlation coefficient are all indicative of a "poor" correlation. The regression line slopes for the bes...

  2. Radiometric dating of the Earlier Stone Age sequence in excavation I at Wonderwerk Cave, South Africa: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazan, Michael; Ron, Hagai; Matmon, Ari; Porat, Naomi; Goldberg, Paul; Yates, Royden; Avery, Margaret; Sumner, Alexandra; Horwitz, Liora Kolska

    2008-07-01

    We present here the results of 44 paleomagnetic measurements, and single cosmogenic burial and optically stimulated luminescence ages for the Earlier Stone Age deposits from Wonderwerk Cave, Northern Cape, South Africa. The resulting paleomagnetic sequence: N>R>N>R>N constrains the Earlier Stone Age strata in this part of the site to between approximately 0.78-1.96 Ma. A single cosmogenic date of approximately 2.0 Ma from the base of the section offers some corroboration for the paleomagnetic sequence. Preliminary results indicate that the small lithic assemblage from the basal stratum may contain an Oldowan facies. This is overlain by several strata containing Acheulean industries. The preliminary radiometric dates reported here place the onset of the Acheulean at this site to approximately 1.6 Ma, which is roughly contemporaneous with that of East Africa.

  3. Simulations of terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic-nuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nishiizumi, K.; Arnold, J.R. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lal, D. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Englert, P.A.J. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Facility; Klein, J.; Middleton, R. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analysis

    1993-12-31

    Targets of silicon and silicon dioxide were irradiated with spallation neutrons to simulate the production of long-lived radionuclides in the surface of the earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to measure {sup 7}Be and {sup 22}Na, and accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, and {sup 26}Al. The measured ratios of these nuclides are compared with calculated ratios and with ratios from other simulations and agree well with ratios inferred from terrestrial samples.

  4. Production and relevance of cosmogenic radionuclides in NaI(Tl) crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Calle Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc, Paseo de los Ayerbe s/n, 22880 Canfranc Estación, Huesca (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The cosmogenic production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials is an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators have been used in this context for a long time, very few activation data were available. We present results from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed within the ANAIS project and installed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. The prompt data taking starting made possible a reliable quantification of production of some I, Te and Na isotopes with half-lives larger than ten days. Tnitial activities underground were measured and then production rates at sea level were estimated following the history of detectors; a comparison of these rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a selected description of excitation functions was also carried out. After including the contribution from the identified cosmogenic products in the detector background model, we found that the presence of {sup 3}H in the crystal bulk would help to fit much better our background model and experimental data. We have analyzed the cosmogenic production of {sup 3}H in NaI, and although precise quantification has not been attempted, we can conclude that it could imply a very relevant contribution to the total background below 15 ke in NaI detectors.

  5. A model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, R. C.

    1985-02-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions and energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g/cm (2). Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurments of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth.

  6. Cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations and exposure ages of summit bedrocks in the Grove Mountains,Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Various sources of 21Ne and 22Ne exist in surface rocks:cosmogenic,in situ nucleogenic from internal U and Th,trapped crustal nucleogenic and trapped atmospheric.This paper reports the first measurement,in China,of cosmogenic 21Ne and 22Ne in surface bedrocks.We developed a unique sample pre-treatment procedure that effectively removed inclusions inside quartz grains,and thus maximally reduced nucleogenic contributions of 21Ne and 22Ne.Step-heating experiments show that concen-trations of cosmogenic 21Ne and 22Ne in summit bedrock samples R9202 and R9203 from Grove Mountains,Antarctica,are(3.83±0.87)×108 and(5.22±0.51)×108 atoms/g,respectively.The corresponding minimum exposure ages are 2.2±0.5 and 3.0±0.3 Ma.This indicates that the ice sheet in East Antarctica was uncovered the crest of Mount Harding,a typical nunatak in Grove Mountains,since at least mid-Pliocene.

  7. How does a single precipitation event erode a landscape? Clues from meteoric 7Be and 10Be analysis of suspended sediments and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhi, M.; Willenbring, J. K.; Kaste, J. M.; Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Stream sediment contains a history recorded in isotopes that cling to suspended particles. In this study we exploit this recorded history in order to understand how a single precipitation event erodes the landscape at two watershed sites (Bisley I and Mameyes) within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. We use fallout cosmogenic radionuclides Beryllium-7 (7Be) and Beryllium-10 (10Be) to determine the provenance of suspended sediment at various stages of a hydrograph. Sediments from source areas within the watersheds, such as stable ridge crests and active landslide scars, were also sampled and analyzed. Exploiting the large difference in half-life, the 10Be/7Be ratio of suspended sediments coupled with the concentration and nature of organic material present show original depth of mobilized stream sediment in the hillslope. The storm hydrographs of a one-month recurrence interval storm on June 7th, 2011 were sampled at both watersheds. In the small watershed (0.067 km2), storm discharge and total suspended solids (TSS) show short lag times between the initiation of precipitation and the initial rise of the hydrograph and no lag time between peak discharge and peak TSS. The larger site (17.8 km2) had a lag time of approximately 30 minutes between the initiation of precipitation and a rise in discharge and had a 15-minute lag between peak stage (which occurred first) and peak TSS, highlighting the longer travel distances that particles must take to reach the stream sampling point in the larger basin. We compare fallout 7Be nuclide concentration in source sediments and assume a simple, two end-member model to mix these sources in the stream. Soil sediments collected from stable ridge crests ('old') have relatively high average 7Be concentrations of 2.7x106 atoms/g±10% and sediments collected from active landslide scars ('new') have relatively low 7Be concentrations of 4.0x104 atoms/g±15%. Suspended sediments had an average 7Be concentration of 7.2x

  8. ESR Dating Research of Glacial Tills in Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, W.; Yi, C.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, Quaternary Glacial-chronology has been made remarkable progress in the Tibetan Platean(TP) with the development of several numeric dating techniques, such as cosmogenic nuclides(NC), optically stimulated luminescence(OSL) and 14C. In constrast, the dating of Quaternary glacial tills in 100,000 years even more than million-year has been a challenge, just because the techniques has defects themselves and the sediments were stransformed during the geological and geomorphology progress later. Electron Spin Resonance(ESR) has been becoming one of the key methods of Quaternary Glacial-chronology with wide range of dating, expecially for the sample older than 100,000 years up to million-year scale. The accurate measurement of equivalent dose significantly impacts on accuracy and reliability of ESR dating method. Therefore, the study of the mechanisms of resetting processes is fundamental for accurate and reliable ESR dating. To understand the mechanism and characteristics of quartz ESR signal resetting of different samples, a series of laboratory simulation and field observation studies were carried out, which made lots of important breakthrough. But the research in quartz ESR signal of moraines is less and the test of ESR dating method is still in the qualitative investigation. Therefor, we use ESR dating and study on the mechanism and characteristics of quartz ESR signals in tills in the Tibetan Platean. In the adjust method of Modern, the quartz ESR signals in Modern glacial tills represent residual values which can be adjusted signals in the older glacial tills. As a consequence, ESR dating of the quartz in moraines needs to be explored in deep with building models to adjust ages which are measured by ESR dating. Therefore, ESR dating will become the trusted one of the cross dating methods in Quaternary Glacial-chronology with the adjust mothod improving the accuracy of ESR dating ages.

  9. Simulating the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the landscape through a coupled soil-hillslope model (Be2D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be allows for the quantification of vertical and lateral soil fluxes over long time scales (103-105 yr). However, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the soil system makes a translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates complex. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model simulating the behaviour of meteoric 10Be on a hillslope. The model consists of two parts. The first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile, and the second component describes lateral soil and meteoric 10Be fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering as well as downslope fluxes of soil due to creep, water and tillage erosion. Synthetic model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can be related to erosion and deposition across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. Our results also show that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to detect human impact on soil fluxes for soils with a high affinity for meteoric 10Be. However, the quantification of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed variations in meteoric 10Be profiles and inventories. Application of the Be2D model to natural conditions using data sets from the Southern Piedmont (Bacon et al., 2012) and Appalachian Mountains (Jungers et al., 2009; West et al., 2013) allows to reliably constrain parameter values. Good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories is obtained with realistic parameter values. Furthermore, our results provide detailed insights into the processes redistributing meteoric 10Be at the soil-hillslope scale.

  10. Using meteoric 10Be to constrain the age and structure of the frontal wedge at the Japan Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalla, C.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D.; Motoyama, I.; Fisher, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present new meteoric 10Be concentration data from marine sediments recovered during International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Exp. 343 that help constrain the age and internal structure of the frontal prism at the Japan trench in the vicinity of the 2011 Tohoku-oki M9 earthquake rupture. Exp. 343 recovered sediments from an ~200 m interval of the frontal wedge at site C0019. Core and log observations identify the plate boundary décollement at ~820 mbsf, which separates a deformed sedimentary wedge from relatively undeformed underthrust sediments. However, reconstructions of the structural evolution of the wedge are difficult because of similarity in lithology between sediments from the incoming and overriding plate, and the chaotic character of seismic reflectors in the frontal wedge. We utilize the radiogenic decay of 10Be (t1/2 =1.36 Ma) in marine sediments to constrain variations in sediment age with depth in core C0019. Meteoric 10Be was isolated from marine sediments at the University of Vermont using total fusion and 10Be/9Be ratios were measured at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre. Concentrations of meteoric 10Be in core C0019 range from 1.7x107 to 2.1x109 atm/g and are consistent with 10Be concentrations at nearby DSDP sites 436 and 434. We calculate 10Be sediment ages for analyzed samples assuming a range of initial 10Be concentrations from 1.6 to 2.1x109 atm/g. These concentrations are constrained by a 10Be sample co-located with a radiolarian micropaleontology sample at 780 mbsf that yields a Quaternary age, and from previously reported 10Be concentrations for Quaternary sediments in nearby DSDP cores. 10Be and radiolarian micropaleontology samples from similar depths yield consistent ages for late Miocene to Quaternary sediments (R2 = 0.89). Calculated 10Be ages range from 0-10 Ma, with ~50% of analyzed samples yielding ages 10Be concentrations (109 to 107 atm/g) occurs across the plate boundary décollement between cores 16

  11. Origin, structure and exposure history of a wave-cut platform more than 1 Ma in age at the coast of northern Spain: A multiple cosmogenic nuclide approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Marrón, J.; Hetzel, R.; Niedermann, S.; Menéndez, R.; Marquínez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Along the Asturian coast of northern Spain an uplifted wave-cut platform extends for ˜ 100 km east-west. The steep cliff which bounds the gently seaward-dipping platform to the north increases in height from 30 m in the west to 100 m in the east and reflects the overall eastward increase in platform elevation. The southern edge of the 2-4 km-wide platform runs along the foothills of the Cantabrian Mountains, as constrained by a high-resolution digital elevation model. The marine platform, which was carved into deformed Paleozoic bedrock with abundant quartzite beds, is largely covered by weathered marine and continental sediments. Quartzite samples from flat bedrock outcrops which are currently not covered by sediment or soil yield cosmogenic nuclide concentrations ( 21Ne, 10Be and 26Al) that demonstrate a long and complex exposure history, including periods of burial with partial or complete shielding from cosmic rays. The combination of multiple cosmogenic nuclides yields a minimum age of 1-2 Ma for the platform. Taking into account (i) the horizontal and vertical extent of the platform, (ii) the high resistance to erosion of the quartzitic bedrock, and (iii) published data on the magnitude of past sea level fluctuations, we suggest that the wave-cut platform formed in the Pliocene. Subvertical faults cutting the platform at high angles to the coastline offset the southern edge of the platform by 20 to 40 m and reactivate the pre-existing anisotropy in the Paleozoic bedrock. Uplift and crustal deformation of the coastal region have occurred after platform formation in the Pliocene and may still be active. The slow deformation of the northern edge of the Iberian plate including the Cantabrian Mountains may result from the ongoing slow convergence at an incipient subduction zone extending along the coast of northern Spain.

  12. Beryllium-Boron Systematics of Refractory Inclusions in CR2 and CV3 Chondrites: Evidence for 10Be Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, E.; Wadhwa, M.; Simon, S.; Grossman, L.

    2016-08-01

    Be-B systematics of Allende (CV3), Axtell (CV3), and NWA 5028 (CR2) CAIs suggests that 10Be was distributed heterogeneously in the early solar system which implies that 10Be was produced in the solar nebula by irradiation of nebular gas or dust.

  13. A simple model for reconstructing geomagnetic field intensity with (10)~Be production rate and its application in Loess studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.; Warren; BECK

    2008-01-01

    A simple model for reconstructing the paleomagnetic field intensity with (10)~Be production rate was used for the first time in Loess (10)~Be studies of Luochuan profile. Using the LGM (Last Glacial Maxmium) method, the climatic effects and geomagnetic modulation effects on loess (10)~Be was separated and in turn the 80 ka geomagnetic excursion sequence reconstructed, of which the globally remarkable geomagnetic excursion events such as the Laschamp (42 ka), Mono Lake (32 ka) during the Last Glacial period were revealed and the paleo-geomagnetic intensity curve from Loess (10)~Be over the past 80 ka was quantitatively reconstructed. The reconstructed paleo-intensity fits well with the paleo-intensity curves (SINT200 and NAPIS75), which indicates the significance of global criterion of the (10)~Be paleo- intensity curve and the future direction of loess (10)~Be tracing studies. Results show the irregular vari-ability of the East Asian monsoon precipitation in Loess Plateau is the main cause that has resulted in the ambiguity of the geomagnetic modulation of the (10)~Be record in the loess, and the intrinsic source component of the loess (10)~Be and inherited fraction of magnetic susceptibility (SUS) are characterized by the "quasi-homogeneous distribution" manner.

  14. A simple model for reconstructing geomasnetic field intensity with 10Be production rate and its application in Loess studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAN Feng; AN ZhiSheng; WU ZhenKun; J.Warren BECK; YU HuaGui; KANG ZhiHai; CHENG Peng

    2008-01-01

    A simple model for reconstructing the paleomagnetic field intensity with 10Be production rate was used for the first time in Loess 10Be studies of Luochuan profile. Using the LGM (Last Glacial Maxmium) method, the climatic effects and geomagnetic modulation effects on loess 10Be was separated and in turn the 80 ka geomagnetic excursion sequence reconstructed, of which the globally remarkable geomagnetic excursion events such as the Laschamp (42 ka), Mono Lake (32 ka) during the Last Glacial period were revealed and the paleo-geomagnetic intensity curve from Loess 10Be over the past 80 ka was quantitatively reconstructed. The reconstructed paleo-intensity fits well with the paleo-intensity curves (SINT200 and NAPIS75), which indicates the significance of global criterion of the 10Be paleo-intensity curve and the future direction of loess 10Be tracing studies. Results show the irregular vari-ability of the East Asian monsoon precipitation in Loess Plateau is the main cause that has resulted in the ambiguity of the geomagnetic modulation of the 10Be record in the loess, and the intrinsic source component of the loess 10Be and inherited fraction of magnetic susceptibility (SUS) are characterized by the "quasi-homogeneous distribution" manner.

  15. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of {sup 36}Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric {sup 36}Cl production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide {sup 32}Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of {sup 32}Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured {sup 32}Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 {mu}Bql{sup -1}. These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured {sup 32}Si/Si{sub tot} ratios ranged from 2.5.10{sup -17} to 2.3.10{sup -15} and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10{sup -14}, showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X){sup 7}Be and N(p,X){sup 10}Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,{alpha}n)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  16. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of {sup 36}Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric {sup 36}Cl production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide {sup 32}Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of {sup 32}Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured {sup 32}Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 {mu}Bql{sup -1}. These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured {sup 32}Si/Si{sub tot} ratios ranged from 2.5.10{sup -17} to 2.3.10{sup -15} and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10{sup -14}, showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X){sup 7}Be and N(p,X){sup 10}Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,{alpha}n)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  17. In Situ-produced vs. Meteoric 10Be in Hillslope Soils: One Isotope, Two Tracers, Different Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, M. C.; Bierman, P. R.; Matmon, A.; Cox, R.; Pavich, M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    In situ-produced and meteoric 10Be are both powerful tools for tracing the production and transport of hillslope sediment. In situ-produced 10Be is used to infer sediment production rates as well as investigate sediment sources and transport. Meteoric 10Be may also be useful for inferring sediment production and transport rates in some landscapes, especially those that lack the target minerals for in situ-produced 10Be. Few studies have investigated the insights gained by a comparing in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be inventories. We present a series of paired 10Be inventories from different climatic and tectonic regimes to illustrate both the value and the potential pitfalls of coupling these geomorphic tracers. The mean in situ and meteoric 10Be near surface (within a meter) inventories for our field areas are as follows: Great Smoky Mountains, NC, USA: 3.6 x 107 atoms cm-2 and 3.3 x 1010 atoms cm-2; Laurely Fork, PA, USA: 2.6 x 106 atoms cm-2 and 3.0 x 109 atoms cm-2; Oregon Coast Range, OR, USA: no in situ data and 3.87 x 1010 atoms cm-2; North Island, New Zealand: no in situ data and 1.8 x 109 atoms cm-2; and Amparafaravola, Madagascar: 1.86 x 107 atoms cm-2 and 8.0 x 109 atoms cm-2. The associated inferred soil residence times, respectively, are: Great Smoky Mountains, NC, USA: 40.9 ky and 25.6 ky; Laurely Fork, PA, USA: 2.9 ky and 2.3 ky; Oregon Coast Range, OR, USA: n/a and 30ky; North Island, New Zealand: n/a and 1.5 ky; and Amparafaravola, Madagascar: 21 ky and 6.2 ky. Soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be assume a global average delivery rate of 1.3 x 106 atoms cm-2 yr-1. These soil residence times are minimum values that assume that all in situ and meteoric 10Be is accounted for. Discrepancies between inferred soil residence times most likely highlight some error in assumptions regarding meteoric 10Be retention in the soil mantles that we sampled. For example, if meteoric 10Be is not retained at the near surface where we collected our samples

  18. Determining eruption ages and erosion rates of Quaternary basaltic volcanism from combined U-series disequilibria and cosmogenic exposure ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Ackert, Robert P., Jr.; Ramos, Frank C.; Sohn, Robert A.; Murrell, Michael T.; Depaolo, Donald J.

    2007-05-01

    We present 238U-230Th -226Ra disequilibria and cosmogenic 3He and 36Cl data for the Bluewater flow of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico. The 238U-230Th disequilibria measured on separated groundmass phases yield an internal isochron age of 68 ka (+24/ 20 ka; 2σ). This value cannot be directly compared with surface exposure ages unless erosion rates are known. The apparent (zero erosion) ages determined from both the 3He concentration (47.5 ± 5 ka; 2σ) and the 36Cl concentration (41.2 ± 8.8 ka; 2σ) are significantly younger than the U-Th isochron age. When minimum estimates of surface erosion based on flow morphology are considered, the 3He concentrations indicate a minimum exposure age of 60 ka, in good agreement with the U-Th isochron age, with a minimum erosion rate of 1.7 mm/k.y. and an erosion rate as high as 5 mm/k.y. in other locations. Correcting for erosion has little effect on the model 36Cl age and, as a result, the 36Cl age is significantly younger than the U-Th isochron age and erosion-corrected 3He ages; this discordance is attributed to a lack of closed-system behavior in the 36Cl system. These new ages have local significance for the geochronology of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field; however, their larger significance is in their applicability to dating Quaternary basalts and quantifying erosion rates.

  19. AMS measurement of {sup 10}Be concentrations in marine sediments from Chile Trench at the TANDAR laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, D., E-mail: darodrig@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arazi, A. [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernández Niello, J.O. [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigación e Ingeniería Ambiental, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, 25 de Mayo y Francia, B1650BWA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martí, G.V. [Departamento de Física Experimental, Laboratorio TANDAR, GIyA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín (Argentina); and others

    2017-03-15

    The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios in marine sediments samples from the Southern Chile Trench have been measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The samples were measured at the TANDAR accelerator, where the discrimination of the {sup 10}Be radionuclides was achieved by means of a passive absorber in front of an ionization chamber. This setup along with the high voltage available, provided a complete suppression of the {sup 10}B isobar interference. The obtained values for the {sup 10}Be concentrations, of the order of 10{sup 9} atoms/g, are the first {sup 10}Be measurements from the Southern Chile Trench and offer an excellent tracer to quantitatively study the recycling of sediments in Andean magmas.

  20. {sup 10}Be/{sup 230}Th ratios as proxy for particle flux in the equatorial Pacific ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.F.; Fleisher, M.Q. [LDEO of Columbia Univ. (United States); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Particulate {sup 10}Be/{sup 230}Th ratios collected by sediment traps in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean exhibit a positive correlation with particle flux, but little or no correlation with particle composition. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs.

  1. Date Rape (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Date Rape KidsHealth > For Teens > Date Rape A A ... Rape en español Violaciones durante citas What Is Date Rape? When people think of rape , they might ...

  2. Preliminary study of 10Be/7Be in rainwater from Xi’an by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fu, Yun-Chong

    2017-01-01

    The 10Be/7Be ratio is a sensitive tracer for the study of atmospheric transport, particularly with regard to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Measurements with high accuracy and efficiency are crucial to 7Be and 10Be tracer studies. This article describes sample preparation procedures and analytical benchmarks for 7Be and 10Be measurements at the Xi’an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (Xi’an-AMS) laboratory for the study of rainwater samples. We describe a sample preparation procedure to fabricate beryllium oxide (BeO) AMS targets that includes co-precipitation, anion exchange column separation and purification. We then provide details for the AMS measurement of 7Be and 10Be following the sequence BeO-→Be2+→Be4+ in the Xi’an- AMS. The 10Be/7Be ratio of rainwater collected in Xi’an is shown to be about 1.3 at the time of rainfall. The virtue of the method described here is that both 7Be and 10Be are measured in the same sample, and it is suitable for routine analysis of large numbers of rainwater samples by AMS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205161) and CAS Key Technology Talent Program

  3. Preliminary study of 10Be/7Be in rainwater from Xi'an by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The 10Be/7Be ratio is a sensitive tracer for the study of atmospheric transport, particularly with regard to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Measurements with high accuracy and efficiency are crucial to 7Be and 10Be tracer studies. This article describes sample preparation procedures and analytical benchmarks for 7Be and 10Be measurements at the Xian Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (Xian-AMS) laboratory for the study of rainwater samples. We describe a sample preparation procedure to fabricate beryllium oxide (BeO) AMS targets that includes co-precipitation, anion exchange column separation and purification. We then provide details for the AMS measurement of 7Be and 10Be following the sequence BeO- -> Be2+ -> Be4+ in the Xian- AMS. The 10Be/7Be ratio of rainwater collected in Xian is shown to be about 1.3 at the time of rainfall. The virtue of the method described here is that both 7Be and 10Be are measured in the same sample, and is suitable for routine analysis of large numbers of rainwater samples by AMS.

  4. A comparison of new calculations of 10be production in the earths polar atmosphere by cosmic rays with 10be concentration measurements in polar ice cores between 1939-2005 - a troubling lack of concordance paper #1

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2010-01-01

    Using new calculations of 10Be production in the Earths atmosphere which are based on direct measurements of the 11-year solar modulation effects on galactic cosmic rays and spacecraft measurements of the cosmic ray energy spectrum, we have calculated the yearly average production of 10Be in the Earths atmosphere by galactic and solar cosmic rays since 1939. During the last six 11-year cycles the average amplitude of these production changes is 36%. These predictions are compared with measurements of 10Be concentration in polar ice cores in both the Northern and Southern hemisphere over the same time period. We find a large scatter between the predicted and measured yearly average data sets and a low cross correlation ~0.30. Also the normalized regression line slope between 10Be production changes and 10Be concentration changes is found to be only 0.4-0.6; much less than the value of 1.0 expected for a simple proportionality between these quantities, as is typically used for historical projections of the rela...

  5. Dating upper plate normal fault slip events in Late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. A.; Binnie, S.; Gonzalez, G.; Cortés, J.

    2011-12-01

    In order to understand how subduction earthquakes along the Nazca-South America plate boundary affect upper plate faults in the coastal forearc of northern Chile, we are developing the first detailed paleoseismological study to characterize the Late Quaternary activity of the Mejillones and Salar del Carmen faults, located around 40 km north and 15 km east of Antofagasta, respectively. There is currently a lack of basic palaeo-seismological data on these and other upper plate faults, such as long term slip rates, amount of slip per event, palaeo-earthquake magnitude and recurrence intervals. This lack of knowledge impedes understanding of how large subduction earthquakes, occurring at depths of around 50 km in this region, relate to upper plate seismicity and deformation. We have used OSL dating of fault-related sediments, and cosmogenic-ray nuclide dating of terrace surfaces, to constrain slips rates over the last 45 ka. Several trenches were excavated across both faults in order to expose and log the most recent fault-related sediments. In the hanging wall of these normal faults, vertically stacked colluvial wedges and hillslope deposits are the product of discrete slip events and post-slip fault scarp degradation. Multiple trenches along each fault permit the spatial variability in slip amount and fault-related sedimentation to be investigated. Long-term slip rates have been measured using cosmogenic-ray nuclide exposure dating of the alluvial terraces offset by the Mejillones Fault. OSL dating of the fault-related sediments in the trenches has been used to compare the ages of individual slip events on both faults, and the age of events recorded along the trace of each fault. The application of both cosmogenic-ray nuclide and OSL methods in this type of setting (hyper-arid with low erosion rates, yet tectonically active) is non-trivial, due to cosmogenic inheritance accumulated in cobbles on the terrace surfaces, low sensitivity of the quartz for OSL dating, and

  6. Long-term erosion and interglacial period exposure in Western Greenland from meteoric 10Be in ice-bound sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, J. A.; Corbett, L.; Bierman, P. R.; Neumann, T.; Rood, D. H.; Finkel, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    To examine the history of surface exposure and erosion in areas of Western Greenland presently covered by ice, we measured the concentration of meteoric 10Be in ice-bound fine sediment at three locations: Kangerlussuaq (67.1°N), Ilulissat (69.4°N), and Upernavik (72.5°N). Meteoric 10Be concentrations at Ilulissat and Upernavik range from 2×106 to 2×108 atoms/g and are statistically indistinguishable from each other. Meteoric 10Be concentrations at Kangerlussuaq range from 2×106 to 5×107 atoms/g and are significantly lower than the values found at the northern two sites. Through comparison to typical meteoric 10Be distribution in soils, source soil ages can be estimated at each of these locations. These estimates suggest on the order of 105 years of exposure at the northern sites and on the order of 104 years of exposure at Kangerlussuaq. Because meteoric 10Be is lost from the soil system both by erosion and isotope decay, these exposure ages represent a minimum length of cumulative interglacial exposure. This exposure signal likely developed over several Late Pliocene and Pleistocene interglacial periods and prior to the onset of Northern hemisphere glaciation, ~2.7 Ma before present. To further constrain the glacial history of Western Greenland implied from the meteoric 10Be data, we constructed forward models of interglacial period exposure and glacial period erosion. The high levels of meteoric 10Be at Upernavik and Ilulissat imply erosion rates below 5 m/My and some preservation of pre-glacial regolith. The lower levels of meteoric 10Be at Kangerlussuaq can be explained with erosion rates as high as 20 m/My. Because of the substantial debris fluxes in modern Kangerlussuaq glaciers [Knight, et al., 2002], erosion rates greater than 10 m/My are likely. Meteoric 10Be inventories at Kangerlussuaq under 10-20 m/My of long-term erosion imply substantial interglacial exposure and the slow evacuation of sediment by glacial transport. These results suggest that

  7. Cosmogenic nuclides in core samples of the Chico L6 chondrite - Evidence for irradiation under high shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Middleton, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of core samples obtained from different depths of the Chico (New Mexico) L6 chondrite for various cosmogenic nuclides (Be-10, Al-26, and stable isotopes of He, Ne, and Ar). The relationships between the measured abundances of cosmogenic nuclides and cosmogenic Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio were compared with predictions of recent semiempirical models of Graf et al. (1990) and Reedy (1991), and it was found that both models closely reproduce the observed trends and absolute values of the data obtained. Noble gas data indicate that Chico experienced shielding similar to that of Jilin and greater than those of the Knyahinya or the Keyes chondrites. The exposure history for Chico is discussed.

  8. Monte Carlo evaluation of the cosmogenic neutron background at Gran Sasso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Riznia Jenifa

    The nature of dark matter is conceivably the most interesting enigma in modern science. Evidence for its existence is profound and theoretical astrophysics suggests that dark matter in the universe is dominated by a non-luminous, non-baryonic and non-relativistic matter. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) in the form of neutralinos are the most favored candidate which satisfice all properties of dark matter. Hence the detection of a WIMP will reveal physics beyond the standard model. The current quest for the direct WIMP search is to reach a WIMP-nucleon cross-section of 10-46 cm2 with an optimistic expected event rate of 1/event/ton/100days. Ton scale detectors with low energy thresholds are proposed to reach the expected sensitivity. These detectors need extraordinary low background to make a positive claim of the detection of WIMPs. The ultimate limiting background for present direct WIMP searches is low energy nuclear recoil events produced by the interaction of muon-induced fast neutrons in the detector. Due to very low intensity, the underground muon-induced neutron flux is difficult to measure. In order to precisely understand this background, detailed simulation studies are essential. The focus of this study is to investigate the cosmogenic neutron background at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory and obtain a consistent and complete description of the cosmogenic neutron profile at Gran Sasso depth using the latest FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study further indicates that FLUKA does not need to include an increase to the neutron multiplicity in order to reproduce the muon-induced neutron background as previously suggested. Darkside-50, a new generation dark matter experiment, is expected to be located at Gran Sasso at the end of 2012. The experiment will insert the detector inside the CTF water tank to which provides a Cherenkov veto facility. This study shows that CTF is very powerful veto for low cosmogenic neutron background.

  9. Regolith production and transport at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, Part 2: Insights from meteoric 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicole; Kirby, Eric; Bierman, Paul; Slingerland, Rudy; Ma, Lin; Rood, Dylan; Brantley, Susan

    2013-09-01

    Regolith-mantled hillslopes are ubiquitous features of most temperate landscapes, and their morphology reflects the climatically, biologically, and tectonically mediated interplay between regolith production and downslope transport. Despite intensive research, few studies have quantified both of these mass fluxes in the same field site. Here we present an analysis of 87 meteoric 10Be measurements from regolith and bedrock within the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO), in central Pennsylvania. Meteoric 10Be concentrations in bulk regolith samples (n = 73) decrease with regolith depth. Comparison of hillslope meteoric 10Be inventories with analyses of rock chip samples (n = 14) from a 24 m bedrock core confirms that >80% of the total inventory is retained in the regolith. The systematic downslope increase of meteoric 10Be inventories observed at SSHO is consistent with 10Be accumulation in slowly creeping regolith (~ 0.2 cm yr-1). Regolith flux inferred from meteoric 10Be varies linearly with topographic gradient (determined from high-resolution light detection and ranging-based topography) along the upper portions of hillslopes at SSHO. However, regolith flux appears to depend on the product of gradient and regolith depth where regolith is thick, near the base of hillslopes. Meteoric 10Be inventories at the north and south ridgetops indicate minimum regolith residence times of 10.5 ± 3.7 and 9.1 ± 2.9 ky, respectively, similar to residence times inferred from U-series isotopes in Ma et al. (2013). The combination of our results with U-series-derived regolith production rates implies that regolith production and erosion rates are similar to within a factor of two on SSHO hillcrests.

  10. Calculation of the Solar Activity Effect on the Production Rate of Cosmogenic Radiocarbon in Polar Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenok, A V

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere is simulated. Calculations of the omnidirectional differential flux of neutrons for different solar activity levels are presented. The solar activity effect on the production rate of cosmogenic radiocarbon by the nuclear-interacting and muon components of cosmic rays in polar ice is studied. It has been obtained that the $^{14}C$ production rate in ice by the cosmic ray nuclear-interacting component is lower or higher than the average value by 30% during periods of solar activity maxima or minima, respectively. Calculations of the altitudinal dependence of the radiocarbon production rate in ice by the cosmic ray components are illustrated.

  11. Cold rocks, hot sands: In-situ cosmogenic applications in Australia at ANTARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, David; McKelvey, B.; Hannan, D.; Newsome, D.

    2000-10-01

    The ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO is conducting a comprehensive program in the application of in-situ cosmogenic radionuclides based on strong university collaborations in the earth sciences. The program targets two major objectives: (1) to determine and improve the Quaternary glacial chronology of the Southern Hemisphere in support of global climate change studies; (2) to characterise the processes of surface weathering and landscape evolution in semi-arid regions of the Australian continent. An overview of the program is presented with preliminary results from the first phase of these studies.

  12. Boundary conditions on the early Sun from ancient cosmogenic neon in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberg, C. M.; Caffee, M. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of neon from individual grains of the meteorites Murchison (CM) and Kapoeta (howardite) shows large enrichments of cosmogenic neon in grains with solar flare tracks. The quantity of this component is incompatible with galactic cosmic ray or solar cosmic ray irradiation under present conditions and is attributed to irradiation by energetic flares from an early active Sun. Handpicked grains from each meteorite were grouped according to the presence or absence of solar flare heavy ion tracks, and these four samples were analyzed with an ion counting noble gas mass spectrometer.

  13. Patterns of cosmogenic radionuclide production rates in the heliosphere and problems of solar modulation on a long time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2016-11-01

    The results of long-term studies of cosmogenic radionuclide production rates along the orbits of 39 chondrites that fell to the Earth between 1959 and 2013 are presented. They constitute a long series of homogeneous data, a statistical smoothing of which demonstrate some general patterns of the distribution and variations of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) with energy >100 MeV in the inner (chondrite to the short-term closure of the heliosphere for positively charged particles over 14 months between June 2012 and July 2013 is used as an example to show the high resolution of the method of using cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites as natural GCR detectors.

  14. 大气生成宇宙成因核素10Be在中国黄土中的应用研究进展%Review on the application of the atmospheric produced10Be in Chinese loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔祥辉; 周卫健; 武振坤; 杜雅娟; 赵国庆; 谢兴俊

    2016-01-01

    中国黄土10Be研究大体上经历了三个阶段:(1)地球化学行为研究:10Be主要吸附于细颗粒及粘土颗粒,在黄土中保存性好,不会发生明显的化学迁移过程;(2)古气候代用指标应用:10Be在黄土和古土壤层中的浓度变化与代表气候变化的深海氧同位素曲线变化一致,且可借此进行黄土年代标尺的建立;(3)地球环境示踪研究:示踪地磁场倒转及漂移事件,恢复古地磁场相对强度变化,以及定量重建黄土高原地区古降水变化历史等。由于近年来黄土10Be环境示踪研究取得了可喜的成果,笔者认为有必要从以上三个方面对中国黄土10Be研究历史进行较为系统的梳理回顾,总结当前最新研究进展,展望未来黄土10Be在环境示踪中的研究方向,希望能使读者在短时间内了解中国黄土10Be研究的发展脉络。%Background, aim, and scope The history of Chinese loess10Be studies can be recognized as three stages. (1) The geochemical behavior of10Be in Chinese loess: it is preferred to be absorbed on the small size particles and the clay minerals, it can be preserved well after it deposited and would not be leached by the raillfall; (2) as a paleoclimatic proxy: the variation of10Be concentration in the loess and paleosol correlated well with the marine isotope stages and with the correlation between these two proxies, it can be used to establish the chronology of Chinese loess-paleosol sequences; (3) tracing earth’s environmental changes: recovering the variations of geomagnetic ifeld intensity, tracing the geomagnetic polarity reversals/excursions and reconstructing the paleorainfall over the Chinese Loess Plateau. Since very signiifcant progress has been made about the third one recently, it is necessary to make a comprehensive review on the application of cosmogenic10Be in Chinese loess, and by doing this to discuss the future work about the Chinese loess10Be

  15. Cenozoic rejuvenation events of Massif Central topography (France): Insights from cosmogenic denudation rates and river profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivetti, Valerio; Godard, Vincent; Bellier, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The French Massif Central is a part of the Hercynian orogenic belt that currently exhibits anomalously high topography. The Alpine orogenesis, which deeply marked Western European topography, involved only marginally the Massif Central, where Cenozoic faulting and short-wavelength crustal deformation is limited to the Oligocene rifting. For this reason the French Massif Central is a key site to study short- and long-term topographic response in a framework of slow tectonic activity. In particular the origin of the Massif Central topography is a topical issue still debated, where the role of mantle upwelling is invoked by different authors. Here we present a landscape analysis using denudation rates derived from basin-averaged cosmogenic nuclide concentrations coupled with longitudinal river profile analysis. This analysis allows us to recognize that the topography of the French Massif Central is not fully equilibrated with the present base level and in transient state. Our data highlight the coexistence of out-of-equilibrium river profiles, incised valleys, and low cosmogenically derived denudation rates ranging between 40 mm/kyr and 80 mm/kyr. Addressing this apparent inconsistency requires investigating the parameters that may govern erosion processes under conditions of reduced active tectonics. The spatial distribution of denudation rates coupled with topography analysis enabled us to trace the signal of the long-term uplift history and to propose a chronology for the uplift evolution of the French Massif Central.

  16. Cosmogenic Backgrounds in Borexino at 3800 m water-equivalent depth

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, G; Bick, D; Bonfini, G; Bravo, D; Avanzini, M Buizza; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; Chepurnov, A; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; Derbin, A; Empl, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Göger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Grandi, L; Hagner, C; Hungerford, E; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Lombardi, F; Ludhova, L; Lukyanchenko, G; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Manuzio, G; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Möllenberg, R; Mosteiro, P; Muratova, V; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Otis, K; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Perasso, L; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, A; Rossi, N; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schönert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Wurm, M; Xu, J; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

    2013-01-01

    The solar neutrino experiment Borexino, which is located in the Gran Sasso underground laboratories, is in a unique position to study muon-induced backgrounds in an organic liquid scintillator. In this study, a large sample of cosmic muons is identified and tracked by a muon veto detector external to the liquid scintillator, and by the specific light patterns observed when muons cross the scintillator volume. The yield of muon-induced neutrons is found to be Yn =(3.10+-0.11)10-4 n/({\\mu} (g/cm2)). The distance profile between the parent muon track and the neutron capture point has the average value {\\lambda} = (81.5 +- 2.7)cm. Additionally the yields of a number of cosmogenic radioisotopes are measured for 12N, 12B, 8He, 9C, 9Li, 8B, 6He, 8Li, 11Be, 10C and 11C. All results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation predictions using the Fluka and Geant4 packages. General agreement between data and simulation is observed for the cosmogenic production yields with a few exceptions, the most prominent case being 1...

  17. 600 MeV Simulation of the Production of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Meteorites by Galactic Protons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A large variety of stable and radioactive nuclides is produced by the interaction of solar and galactic cosmic rays with extraterrestrial matter. Measurements of such cosmogenic nuclides provide information about the constancy of cosmic ray fluxes in space and time and about the irradiation history of individual extraterrestrial objects provided that there exist reliable models describing the production process. For the calculation of the depth dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites no satisfactory Therefore, the irradiation of small stony meteorites (radii~$<$~40~cm) by galactic protons is simulated in a series of thick target irradiation experiments at the 600~MeV proton beam of the SC. \\\\ \\\\ The thick targets are spheres (R = 5, 15, 25 cm) and are made out of diorite because of its low water content, its high density (3.0~g/cm|3) and because it provides a good approximation of the chemical composition of some common meteorite clas These spheres will also contain a wide variety of pure...

  18. Production and relevance of cosmogenic radionuclides in NaI(Tl) crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Amare, J; Cuesta, C; Garcia, E; Ginestra, C; Martinez, M; Olivan, M A; Ortigoza, Y; de Solorzano, A Ortiz; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A; Villar, P

    2015-01-01

    The cosmogenic production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials is an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators have been used in this context for a long time, very few activation data were available. We present results from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed within the ANAIS project and installed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. The prompt data taking starting made possible a reliable quantification of production of some I, Te and Na isotopes with half-lives larger than ten days. Initial activities underground were measured and then production rates at sea level were estimated following the history of detectors; a comparison of these rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a selected description of excitation functions was also carried out. After including the contribution from the identified cosmogenic products in the detector background model, we found that the presence of 3H in the crystal bulk...

  19. The production rate of cosmogenic 21-Ne in chondrites deduced from 81-Kr measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, L.; Freundel, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic Ne-21 is used widely to calculate exposure ages of stone meteorites. In order to do so, the production rate P(21) must be known. This rate, however, is dependent on the chemical composition of the meteorite as well as the mass of, and position within, the meteoroid during its exposure to the cosmic radiation. Even for a mean shielding the production rates determined from measurments of different radionuclides vary by a factor of two. A method that can be used to determine exposure ages of meteorites that avoids shielding and chemical composition corrections is the -81-Kr-Kr-method. However, for chondrites, in many cases, the direct determination of production rates for the Kr isotopes is prevented by the trapped gases and the neutron effects on bromine. Therefore, this method was applied to four eucrite falls and then their 81-Kr-83-Kr-ages were compared to their cosmogenic Ne-21 and Ar-38 concentrations. The eucrites Bouvante-le-Haut, Juvinas, Sioux County, and Stannern were chosen for these measurements because of their similar chemical composition regarding the major elements.

  20. Influence of topography and human activity on apparent in situ 10Be-derived erosion rates in Yunnan, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Amanda H.; Neilson, Thomas B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ouimet, William B.; Sosa Gonzalez, Veronica

    2016-11-01

    In order to understand better if and where erosion rates calculated using in situ 10Be are affected by contemporary changes in land use and attendant deep regolith erosion, we calculated erosion rates using measurements of in situ 10Be in quartz from 52 samples of river sediment collected from three tributaries of the Mekong River (median basin area = 46.5 km2). Erosion rates range from 12 to 209 mm kyr-1 with an area-weighted mean of 117 ± 49 mm kyr-1 (1 standard deviation) and median of 74 mm kyr-1. We observed a decrease in the relative influence of human activity from our steepest and least altered watershed in the north to the most heavily altered landscapes in the south. In the areas of the landscape least disturbed by humans, erosion rates correlate best with measures of topographic steepness. In the most heavily altered landscapes, measures of modern land use correlate with 10Be-estimated erosion rates but topographic steepness parameters cease to correlate with erosion rates. We conclude that, in some small watersheds with high rates and intensity of agricultural land use that we sampled, tillage and resultant erosion has excavated deeply enough into the regolith to deliver subsurface sediment to streams and thus raise apparent in situ 10Be-derived erosion rates by as much as 2.5 times over background rates had the watersheds not been disturbed.

  1. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Chronology of glaciations in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Iberia) during the Last Glacial Cycle based on in situ-produced 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Bourlès, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The mountain ranges of the Iberian Peninsula preserve a valuable record of past glaciations that may help reconstruct past atmospheric circulation patterns in response to cooling events in the North Atlantic Ocean. Available chronologies for the glacial record of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are mainly based on radiocarbon and luminescence dating of glacial-related sediments, suggest that glaciers recorded their Glacial Maximum (GM) during MIS 3 and experienced a later Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) advance. This LGM extent is not established yet, preventing a fair correlation with available Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) based chronologies for the glacial record of the Pyrenees and the Sistema Central. We present a glacial reconstruction and a 10Be CRE chronology for the Porma valley, in the southern slope of the central Cantabrian Mountains. Glacial evidence at the lowest altitudes correspond to erratic boulders and composite moraines whose minimum 10Be CRE age of 113.9 ± 7.1 ka suggests that glaciers were at their maximum extent during MIS 5d, most likely in response to the minima in summertime insolation of the Last Glacial Cycle. Recessional moraines preserved within the glacial maximum limits allow the assessment of subsequent glacier advances or stagnations. The most remarkable advance took place prior to 55.7 ± 4.0 ka (probably at the end of MIS 4), consistently with minimum radiocarbon ages previously reported for lacustrine glacial-related deposits in the Cantabrian Mountains. A limited number of 10Be CRE ages from a composite moraine suggest a possible advance of the Porma glacier coeval with the global LGM; the glacier front attributed to the LGM would be placed within the margins of the previous GM like in the western Pyrenees. Erratic boulders perched on an ice-moulded bedrock surface provided a mean 10Be CRE age of 17.7 ± 1.0 ka, suggesting that part of the recessional moraine sequence corresponds to minor advances or stagnations of the glacier fronts

  3. Isochron burial dating of Danube terraces in the course of an interlaboratory comparison on sample preparation in Vienna and Budapest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhuber, Stephanie; Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Decker, Kurt; Braucher, Regis; Fiebig, Markus; Braun, Mihály; Häuselmann, Philipp; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    The Neogene development of the Vienna Basin's tectonic history is well-documented in seismic sections and hydrocarbon wells. The late Neogene to Quaternary history is less well preserved due to a gap in the sediment record starting from the Late Pannonian due to a large-scale uplift during a phase of basin inversion [1]. Quaternary sediments in the Vienna Basin form prominent Pleistocene terraces north and south of the Danube's recent floodplain. The Danube's course currently shifts to the south where it erodes into its own gravel terraces that were presumably accumulated during the Pliocene and Early to Middle Pleistocene. North of the Danube, a wide alluvial plain has developed with one prominent Middle Quaternary terrace level 17-25 m above the river (Gänserndorf and Schlosshof Terraces). The most recent tectonic events related to the sinistral movement of the Vienna Basin transform fault system are recorded north of the Danube by faulted terrace segments that were identified by paleoseismological trenching in combination with OSL [2]. In contrast, terraces south of the Danube form a staircase with altitudes ranging between 25 and 130 m above todays water level. The terraces in the south have also been strongly dissected by faults [3], each fault block preserved a slightly different succession of terraces. The fault-related vertical displacements south of the Danube have not yet been quantified. To better understand the Quaternary terrace sequence and its displacement in the southern zone, we use the cosmogenic nuclide pair of 26Al and 10Be for isochron burial dating of a Danube terrace at Haslau an der Donau (~40 m above river level). This terrace is locally the lowest of a staircase of a total of 6 different levels. Based on published geomorphological works, the expected age is Middle Pleistocene. The isochron burial dating method is therefore well-suited to date this sedimentary setting due to the presence of large individual clasts that share the same post

  4. Shift of the 2+1 state of 10Be in ternary cold fission of 252Cf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mişicu, Ş.; Săndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    2000-04-01

    Recent experimental data indicate that in the ternary cold fission of 252Cf the energy of the first excited state of the accompanying light cluster 10Be is decreased by an amount ranging between ~ 6 and 26 keV. A model is proposed to calculate the shift of the vibrational 2+1 state in 10Be when its heavy companions are the even-even nuclei 146Ba and 96Sr. The stiffness parameters of the β vibrations are calculated within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with BCS pairing correlations taken into account, and their change is determined by the interaction of the light cluster with the heavy fragments. The results point to a dependence of the shift magnitude and signature on the relative distance between the three clusters and their mutual orientation. Eventually it is the anharmonic perturbation of the spherical vibrator which is responsible for obtaining a negative energy shift of the 2+1 state.

  5. Quantifying Sub-Glacial Abrasion at Jakobshavn Isbræ: A Novel Approach Using In Situ 10Be Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N. E.; Briner, J. P.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Warm-based ice sheets and glaciers incontrovertibly erode and modify the terrain that they mantle; yet precise estimates of the rate and magnitude of sub-glacial erosion are rare. Estimates of sub-glacial erosion occurring beneath ice sheets, such as the Greenland Ice Sheet, are particularly important because they can provide key insights into sediment availability at ice-sheet margins that influences ice-sheet stability. Furthermore, estimates of sub-glacial erosion can help inform predictive geophysical ice-sheet models that incorporate a basal sliding parameter. Here, we take advantage of a detailed ice-margin history at Jakobshavn Isbræ over the last ~7,500 years, combined with in situ 10Be measurements from strategic bedrock locations, to quantify the rate of sub-glacial abrasion beneath Jakobshavn Isbræ's land-based margins. Our bedrock samples are from 1) locations that deglaciated ~7,500 years ago and have remained ice-free through present day, and 2) locations that also deglaciated ~7,500 years ago, but were re-occupied by the ice-margin during the last few hundred years. After accounting for the slightly different exposure histories between bedrock locations, and despite the short duration in ice-cover, initial 10Be measurements reveal a detectable difference in 10Be concentrations between the two bedrock surfaces. We hypothesize that the offset in 10Be concentrations reveals the magnitude of sub-glacial abrasion beneath Jakobshavn Isbræ's land-terminating margins.

  6. Combining bulk sediment OSL and meteoric 10 Be fingerprinting techniques to identify gully initiation sites and erosion depths

    OpenAIRE

    Portenga, E.W.; Bishop, P; Rood, D.H.; Bierman, P.R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep erosional gullies dissect landscapes around the world. Existing erosion models focus on predicting where gullies might begin to erode, but identifying where existing gullies were initiated and under what conditions is difficult, especially when historical records are unavailable. Here we outline a new approach for fingerprinting alluvium and tracing it back to its source by combining bulk sediment optically stimulated luminescence (bulk OSL) and meteoric 10Be (10Bem) measurements made on...

  7. Geomorphology and weathering characteristics of erratic boulder trains on Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America: Implications for dating of glacial deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.

    2015-01-01

    Erratic boulder trains (EBTs) are a useful glacial geomorphological feature because they reveal former ice flow trajectories and can be targeted for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. However, understanding how they are transported and deposited is important because this has implications for palaeoglaciological reconstructions and the pre-exposure and/or erosion of the boulders. In this study, we review previous work on EBTs, which indicates that they may form subglacially or supraglacially but that large angular boulders transported long distances generally reflect supraglacial transport. We then report detailed observations of EBTs from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America, where their characteristics provide a useful framework for the interpretation of previously published cosmogenic nuclide exposure dates. We present the first comprehensive map of the EBTs and analyse their spatial distribution, size, and physical appearance. Results suggest that they were produced by one or more supraglacial rock avalanches in the Cordillera Darwin and were then transported supraglacially for 100 s of kilometres before being deposited. Rock surface weathering analysis shows no significant difference in the weathering characteristics of a sequence of EBTs, previously hypothesized to be of significantly different age (i.e., different glacial cycles). We interpret this to indicate that the EBTs are much closer in age than previous work has implied. This emphasises the importance of understanding EBT formation when using them for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating.

  8. Food Product Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prior to its consumption to determine if the product shows signs of spoilage. [ Top of Page ] What Types of Food are Dated? Open dating is found on most foods including meat, poultry, egg and dairy products. "Closed or coded ...

  9. Spatial patterns of mobile regolith thickness and meteoric 10Be in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, N.; Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BcCZO) aims to understand the history, architecture and evolution of hillslopes found within the diverse topography and climate regimes of the Colorado Front Range. This information is crucial for testing and developing models of hillslope evolution, giving especial consideration to the production and downslope transport of mobile regolith on the hillslopes. Here, we present the results of a systematic study aiming to document spatial patterns of mobile regolith thickness and meteoric Beryllium-10 (10Be) concentrations in the Gordon Gulch basin of the BcCZO. Gordon Gulch lies within the unglaciated portion of the Colorado Front Range and is thought to be an artifact of long-term steady state evolution. The basin is characterized by mixed bedrock-soil mantled hillslopes, with intermittent bedrock outcrops (tors) on ~10% of slopes. It is currently unclear how the hillslopes of Gordon Gulch have evolved given the variable rock type and strength (i.e., fracture spacing), gradients (steep slopes in lower basin compared to gradual in the upper), and hillslope aspects (north versus south facing hillslopes, with varying tree types and soil moisture for frost cracking and heaving) that exist within the basin. Furthermore, climate data suggest that the current climate regime (relatively warm) is representative of only 20% of the last 65 ka. Mobile regolith thickness measurements provide a snapshot of hillslope evolution in the basin given these controls, and meteoric 10Be can used to constrain residence times and trace mobile regolith transport. We measure mobile regolith thickness as the depth to immobile weathered bedrock and/or saprolite. Preliminary analysis of over 200 soil pits reveals a high degree of variability in mobile regolith thickness. In general, the mobile regolith cover is thinner on the south facing slopes than the north facing and a general thickening of mobile regolith occurs on steeper slopes, especially along

  10. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  11. Guide to luminescence dating techniques and their application for paleoseismic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Nelson, Michelle Summa; Lund, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, luminescence dating has become a key tool for dating sediments of interest in paleoseismic research. The data obtained from luminescence dating has been used to determine timing of fault displacement, calculate slip rates, and estimate earthquake recurrence intervals. The flexibility of luminescence is a key complement to other chronometers such as radiocarbon or cosmogenic nuclides. Careful sampling and correct selection of sample sites exert two of the strongest controls on obtaining an accurate luminescence age. Factors such as partial bleaching and post-depositional mixing should be avoided during sampling and special measures may be needed to help correct for associated problems. Like all geochronologic techniques, context is necessary for interpreting and calculating luminescence results and this can be achieved by supplying participating labs with associated trench logs, photos, and stratigraphic locations of sample sites.

  12. Cosmogenic helium and volatile-rich fluid in Sierra Leone alluvial diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconville, P.; Reynolds, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    Noble gas measurements were carried out on two identical splits of a finely powdered harshly acid-washed sample derived from fragments of a single alluvial diamond from Sierra Leone, with essentially identical results obtained for both splits. Isotopic ratios for Ar, Kr, and Xe were found to be atmospheric. Their elemental abundances were high relative to published data, owing to the effect of shock implantation in the crushing step, as was verified in a supplementary experiment. No Ne was detected above the blank level. The He-3 was exceptionally abundant, while He-4 was exceptionally depleted, possibly due to the acid wash. The He-3/He-4 ratio was anomalously high at an R/Ra value of 246 + or - 16. The results support the hypothesis that the He-3 excess in diamonds is cosmogenic.

  13. Cosmogenic activation of Germanium and its reduction for low background experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Barabanov, I; Bezrukov, L; Denisov, A; Kornoukhov, V; Sobolevsky, N

    2006-01-01

    Production of $^{60}$Co and $^{68}$Ge from stable isotopes of Germanium by nuclear active component of cosmic rays is a principal background source for a new generation of $^{76}$Ge double beta decay experiments like GERDA and Majorana. The biggest amount of cosmogenic activity is expected to be produced during transportation of either enriched material or already grown crystal. In this letter properties and feasibility of a movable iron shield are discussed. Activation reduction factor of about 10 is predicted by simulations with SHIELD code for a simple cylindrical configuration. It is sufficient for GERDA Phase II background requirements. Possibility of further increase of reduction factor and physical limitations are considered. Importance of activation reduction during Germanium purification and detector manufacturing is emphasized.

  14. Validation of cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling factors through direct measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, I J; Ditchburn, R G; Whitehead, N E

    2000-01-01

    sup 7 Be produced in water targets by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays has been measured to determine cosmogenic nuclide production rates as a function of altitude (sea level to 2 km) and geomagnetic latitude (20-79 deg. S). Relative intensities of low energy cosmic ray neutrons have at the same time been measured using neutron monitors based on IGY/NM-64 designed to efficiently thermalise ca. 2-30 MeV neutrons. The research is on-going and we present here preliminary data from the past two years. Water target and neutron flux results are in general agreement, and are consistent with the altitude-dependent scaling factors of Lal [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 104 (1991) 4241]. Significant differences between the sea level, latitude-dependent neutron flux data and Lal's predictions are possibly related to the response function of the detector.

  15. Measurement of the cosmogenic activation of germanium detectors in EDELWEISS-III

    CERN Document Server

    Armengaud, E; Augier, C; Benoît, A; Bergé, L; Billard, J; Blümer, J; de Boissière, T; Broniatowski, A; Camus, P; Cazes, A; Chapellier, M; Charlieux, F; De Jésus, M; Dumoulin, L; Eitel, K; Foerster, N; Gascon, J; Giuliani, A; Gros, M; Hehn, L; Heuermann, G; Jin, Y; Juillard, A; Kéfélian, C; Kleifges, M; Kozlov, V; Kraus, H; Kudryavtsev, V A; Le-Sueur, H; Marnieros, S; Navick, X -F; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Paul, B; Piro, M -C; Poda, D; Queguiner, E; Rozov, S; Sanglard, V; Schmidt, B; Scorza, S; Siebenborn, B; Tcherniakhovski, D; Vagneron, L; Weber, M; Yakushev, E

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmogenic activation in the germanium cryogenic detectors of the EDELWEISS III direct dark matter search experiment. The decay rates measured in detectors with different exposures to cosmic rays above ground are converted into production rates of different isotopes. The measured production rates in units of nuclei/kg/day are 82 $\\pm$ 21 for $^3$H, 2.8 $\\pm$ 0.6 for $^{49}$V, 4.6 $\\pm$ 0.7 for $^{55}$Fe, and 106 $\\pm$ 13 for $^{65}$Zn. These results are the most accurate for these isotopes. A lower limit on the production rate of $^{68}$Ge of 74 nuclei/kg/day is also presented. They are compared to model predictions present in literature and to estimates calculated with the ACTIVIA code.

  16. Correlated cosmogenic W and Os isotopic variations in Carbo and implications for Hf-W chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liping; Dauphas, Nicolas; Horan, Mary F.; Leya, Ingo; Carlson, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    An obstacle for establishing the chronology of iron meteorite formation using 182Hf-182W systematics (t1/2 = 8.9 Myr) is to find proper neutron fluence monitors to correct for cosmic ray modification of W isotopic composition. Recent studies showed that siderophile elements such as Pt and Os could serve such a purpose. To test and calibrate these neutron dosimeters, the isotopic compositions of W and Os were measured in a slab of the IID iron meteorite Carbo. This slab has a well-characterized noble gas depth profile reflecting different degrees of shielding to cosmic rays. The results show that W and Os isotopic ratios correlate with distance from the pre-atmospheric center. Negative correlations, barely resolved within error, were found between ε190Os-ε189Os and ε186Os-ε189Os with slopes of -0.64 ± 0.45 and -1.8(+1.9/-2.1), respectively. These Os isotope correlations broadly agree with model predictions for capture of secondary neutrons produced by cosmic ray irradiation and results reported previously for other groups of iron meteorites. Correlations were also found between ε182W-ε189Os (slope = 1.02 ± 0.37) and ε182W-ε190Os (slope = -1.38 ± 0.58). Intercepts of these two correlations yield pre-exposure ε182W values of -3.32 ± 0.51 and -3.62 ± 0.23, respectively (weighted average ε182W = -3.57 ± 0.21). This value relies on a large extrapolation leading to a large uncertainty but gives a metal-silicate segregation age of -0.5 ± 2.4 Myr after formation of the solar system. Combining the iron meteorite measurements with simulations of cosmogenic effects in iron meteorites, equations are presented to calculate and correct for cosmogenic effects on 182W using Os isotopes.

  17. Shift of the $2^{+}_{1}$ state of $^{10}Be$ in the ternary cold fission of $^{252}Cf$

    CERN Document Server

    Misicu, S; Greiner, W

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data indicate that in the ternary cold fission of $^{252}$Cf the energy of the first excited state of the accompanying light cluster $^{10}$Be is decreased by an amount ranging between $\\approx$ 6 and 26 keV. A model is proposed to calculate the shift of the vibrational 2$^+_1$ state in $^{10}$Be when its heavy companions are the even-even nuclei $^{146}$Ba and $^{96}$Sr. The stiffness parameters of the $\\beta$-vibrations are calculated within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with BCS pairing correlations taken into account, and its change is determined by the interaction of the light cluster with the heavy fragments. The results are pointing to a dependence of the shift magnitude and signature on the relative distance between the three clusters and their mutual orientation. Eventually it is the anharmonic perturbation of the spherical vibrator which is responsible for obtaining a negative energy shift of the 2$^+_1$ state.

  18. Towards improvement of aluminium assay in quartz for in situ cosmogenic 26Al analysis at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Toshiyuki; Fink, David; Mifsud, Charles

    2015-10-01

    Accuracy and precision in the measurement of natural aluminium abundances in quartz can affect the reliability of 26Al exposure dating and 26Al/10Be burial dating. At ANSTO, aliquots extracted from the HF solutions of dissolved quartz are treated in our laboratory, whereas ICP-OES analysis is performed at a commercial laboratory. The long-term inter-run reproducibility of our in-house standards show a limiting precision in Al measurements of 3-4% (1σ), which is lower than the claimed precision of Al analysis by ICP-OES. This indicates that unaccounted random errors are incorporated during our aliquot preparation. In this study, we performed several controlled tests to investigate effects of possible inconsistencies and variances during our aliquot preparation procedure. The results indicate that our procedure is robust against any subtle change in the preparation procedure, e.g., fuming temperatures, fuming reagents, and drying conditions. We found that the density of the solutions dispatched for ICP analysis is occasionally variable due to the presence of residual fuming reagents in the solution. A comparison of the results between the calibration curve and standard addition methods show that the former results are consistently lower than the latter by up to ∼14%. Similar offsets have been reported by previous studies. The reason for these discrepancies is mostly likely matrix effect, which is not accounted for by the calibration curve method. Further tests by varying matrix with impurities such as HF, HClO4, H2SO4 and Si identified that Si could cause lower offset in Al measurements; however, our ICP solutions are confirmed to be free from Si and the cause of matrix effect remains to be investigated. Hence, care must be taken for the measurement of Al concentrations in quartz by ICP-OES, either by ensuring that matrix effect is fully accounted for or by routinely employing standard additions when required.

  19. Should precise numerical dating overrule glacial geomorphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerical age dating techniques, namely different types of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND), have achieved an impressive progress in both laboratory precision and regional calibration models during the past few decades. It is now possible to apply precise TCND even to young landforms like Late Holocene moraines, a task seemed hardly achievable just about 15 years ago. An increasing number of studies provide very precise TCND ages for boulders from Late Holocene moraines enabling related reconstruction of glacier chronologies and the interpretation of these glacial landforms in a palaeoclimatological context. These studies may also solve previous controversies about different ages assigned to moraines obtained by different dating techniques, for example relative-age dating techniques or techniques combining relative-age dating with few fixed points derived from numerical age dating. There are a few cases, for example Mueller Glacier and nearby long debris-covered valley glacier in Aoraki/Mt.Cook National Park (Southern Alps, New Zealand), where the apparent "supremacy" of TCND-ages seem to overrule glacial geomorphological principles. Enabled by a comparatively high number of individual boulders precisely dated by TCND, moraine ridges on those glacier forelands have been primarily clustered on basis of these boulder ages rather than on their corresponding morphological position. To the extreme, segments of a particular moraine complex morphologically and sedimentologically proven to be formed during one event have become split and classified as two separate "moraines" on different parts of the glacier foreland. One ledge of another moraine complex contains 2 TCND-sampled boulders apparently representing two separate "moraines"-clusters of an age difference in the order of 1,500 years. Although recently criticism has been raised regarding the non-contested application of the arithmetic mean for calculation of TCND-ages for individual moraines, this

  20. Evidence from stable isotopes and (10)Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-11-22

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived (10)Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  1. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  2. The age of fossil StW573 ("Little Foot": An alternative interpretation of 26Al/10Be burial data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan D. Kramers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the publication (Granger DE et al., Nature 2015;522:85–88 of an 26Al/10Be burial isochron age of 3.67±0.16 Ma for the sediments encasing hominin fossil StW573 (‘Little Foot’, we consider data on chert samples presented in that publication to explore alternative age interpretations. 10Be and 26Al concentrations determined on individual chert fragments within the sediments were calculated back in time, and data from one of these fragments point to a maximum age of 2.8 Ma for the sediment package and therefore also for the fossil. An alternative hypothesis is explored, which involves re-deposition and mixing of sediment that had previously collected over time in an upper chamber, which has since been eroded. We show that it is possible for such a scenario to yield ultimately an isochron indicating an apparent age much older than the depositional age of the sediments around the fossil. A possible scenario for deposition of StW573 in Member 2 would involve the formation of an opening between the Silberberg Grotto and an upper chamber. Not only could such an opening have acted as a death trap, but it could also have disturbed the sedimentological balance in the cave, allowing unconsolidated sediment to be washed into the Silberberg Grotto. This two-staged burial model would thus allow a younger age for the fossil, consistent with the sedimentology of the deposit. This alternative age is also not in contradiction to available faunal and palaeomagnetic data.

  3. Surface exposure dating of moraines and alluvial fans in the Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; García Morabito, Ezequiel; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus; Likermann, Jeremías; Tobal, Jonathan; Yamin, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    The role of tectonics versus climate in controlling the evolution of alluvial fans in discussed controversially. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study climate versus tectonic control of alluvial fans. On the one hand, the region is tectonically active and alluvial fan surfaces are offset by faults. The higher summits, on the other hand, are glaciated today, and glacial deposits document past periods of lower temperatures and increased precipitation. We applied 10Be surface exposure dating on 5 fan terraces 4 moraines of the Ansilta range (31.6°S - 69.8°W) using boulders and amalgamated pebbles to explore their chronological relationship. From youngest to oldest, the alluvial fan terraces yield minimum ages of 15 ± 1 ka (T1), 97 ± 9 ka (T2), 141 ± 9 ka (T3), 286 ± 14 ka (T4) and 570 ± 57 ka (T5). Minimum ages derived from moraines are 14 ± 1 ka (M1), 22 ± 2 ka (M2), 157 ± 14 ka (M3) and 351 ± 33 ka (M4), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. The moraines document glacial advances during cold periods at the marine isotope stages (MIS) 2, 6 and 10. The terraces T1, T3 seem to be geomorphologic counterparts during MIS 2 and 6. We suggest that T2, T4 and T5 document aggradation during the cold periods MIS 5d, 8 and 14 in response to glacial advances, although the respective moraines are not preserved. Our results highlight: i) the arid climate in the Southern Central Andes favors the preservation of glacial and alluvial deposits allowing landscape and climate reconstructions back to ~570 ka), ii) alluvial deposits correlate with moraines or fall into cold glacial times, so that climate, and in particular the existence of glaciers, seems to be the main forcing of alluvial fan formation at our study site. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary

  4. Second Quaternary dating workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The second Quaternary dating methods workshop was held at Lucas Heights and sponsored by ANSTO and AINSE. Topics covered include, isotope and thermoluminescence dating, usage of accelerator and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in environmental studies emphasizing on the methodologies used and sample preparation

  5. 'Wiggle matching' radiocarbon dates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, CB; van der Plicht, J; Weninger, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper covers three different methods of matching radiocarbon dates to the 'wiggles' of the calibration curve in those situations where the age difference between the C-14 dates is known. These methods are most often applied to tree-ring sequences. The simplest approach is to use a classical Chi

  6. Date with Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑慧敏

    2016-01-01

    Have you ever heard about a popular movie called date with an angel? It must be sweet and lovely. But have you ever imagine about dating with death? What is your feeling when you have a chance to talk with death? Excited or afraid? I believe that many people definitely do not think about this question and neither do I.

  7. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  8. Dating of cremated bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process.

  9. Pests of stored dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dates are a major food crop across a large band of Africa and Eurasia, and to a lesser extent elsewhere. In most of its growing range, dates are threatened with infestation in the field by a complex of pests including nitidulid beetles and pyralid moths of the Subfamily Phycitinae. They are further ...

  10. 10Be exposure age chronology of the last glaciation in the Krkonoše Mountains, Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Braucher, Régis; Traczyk, Andrzej; Laetitia, Léanni; AsterTeam

    2014-02-01

    A new chronology of the last glaciation is established for the Krkonoše (Giant) Mountains, Central Europe, based on in-situ produced 10Be in moraine boulders. Exposure ages and Schmidt Hammer rebound values obtained for terminal moraines on the northern and southern flank of the mountains suggest that the oldest preserved moraines represent early phases of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Large moraines at the outlet of the Snowy Cirques (Śnieżne Kotły) and in the middle part of the Úpa (Obří důl) trough were deposited around 21 ka while a series of smaller moraines above the LGM deposits represent readvances that occurred no later than 18.1 ± 0.6 ka, 15.7 ± 0.5 ka, 13.5 ± 0.5 ka and 12.9 ± 0.7 ka. An exposure age of 13.8 ± 0.4 ka obtained for protalus ramparts at the foot of the Úpská jáma Cirque headwall indicates that glaciers advanced only in north- to east-facing cirques during the Lateglacial. The last glacier fluctuation was synchronous with the Younger Dryas cold event. The timing of local glacier advances during the last glacial episode correlates with the late Weichselian glacier phases in the Alps and in the Bavarian/Bohemian Forest.

  11. Reconstructing temperatures in the Maritime Alps, Italy, since the Last Glacial Maximum using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marissa; Spagnolo, Matteo; Ribolini, Adriano; Shuster, David

    2016-04-01

    The Gesso Valley, located in the southwestern-most, Maritime portion of the European Alps, contains an exceptionally well-preserved record of glacial advances during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Detailed geomorphic mapping, geochronology of glacial deposits, and glacier reconstructions indicate that glaciers in this Mediterranean region responded to millennial scale climate variability differently than glaciers in the interior of the European Alps. This suggests that the Mediterranean Sea somehow modulated the climate of this region. However, since glaciers respond to changes in temperature and precipitation, both variables were potentially influenced by proximity to the Sea. To disentangle the competing effects of temperature and precipitation changes on glacier size, we are constraining past temperature variations in the Gesso Valley since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry. The cosmogenic noble gases 3He and 21Ne experience diffusive loss from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at Earth surface temperatures. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry utilizes this open-system behavior to quantitatively constrain thermal histories of rocks during exposure to cosmic ray particles at the Earth's surface. We will present measurements of cosmogenic 3He in quartz sampled from moraines in the Gesso Valley with LGM, Bühl stadial, and Younger Dryas ages. With these 3He measurements and experimental data quantifying the diffusion kinetics of 3He in quartz, we will provide a preliminary temperature reconstruction for the Gesso Valley since the LGM. Future work on samples from younger moraines in the valley system will be used to fill in details of the more recent temperature history.

  12. Cosmogenic 22Na as a steady-state tracer of solute transport and water age in first-order catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, James M.; Lauer, Nancy E.; Spaetzel, Alana B.; Goydan, Claire

    2016-12-01

    Naturally-occurring cosmogenic 22Na (T1/2 = 2.6 yr) is a potentially powerful tracer of solute and water movement in catchments. However, due to its low abundance in precipitation (∼10-20 molL-1), there are only a handful of datasets documenting cosmogenic 22Na atmospheric fluxes and concentrations in surface waters. Here we present the first record of cosmogenic 22Na fallout to North America and test its use as a radiometric tracer of water age in three small catchments in the Eastern United States. We show that 22Na deposition to southeastern Virginia, USA during 2012-2014 was 187 ± 10 mBqm-2yr-1 and that flux is largely additive with precipitation amounts. Our measurements of fallout combined with previous 22Na deposition data from other regions indicate that approximately 77% of the variability in the annual global 22Na atmospheric flux is controlled by precipitation. Export of 22Na in drainage waters from three first-order forested catchments ranged from 12.5 to 174 mBq m-2 yr-1 and can be explained by a flux-based radioactive decay model, indicating that the watersheds are in steady-state with respect to cosmogenic 22Na on annual timescales. We conclude that in temperate climates with no systematic changes in rainfall amounts at the annual timescale, 22Na may be useful for quantifying the recharge age of relatively young (<20 yr) surface waters and groundwaters and for tracing solute transport at the watershed scale.

  13. Age-dating of rockslides: Methods and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, M.; Sanders, D.; Prager, C.

    2009-04-01

    Age-dating of deposits of catastrophic rockslides is prerequisite to unravel the potential relation between the frequency of mass-wasting events with climatic change or earthquakes. In the Alps, about 250 rockslides exceeding 106 m3 in volume are known, but the age as yet is determined only for a comparatively small number of events. For age determination of rockslide events, different methods are available (e. g. Lang et al., 1999). Radiocarbon Dating In the past few decades, rockslide deposits commonly were proxy-dated by 14C age determination of organic remnants preserved (a) in glacial, fluvio-glacial sediments overridden by the rockslide, (b) within the rockslide mass, or (c) in rockslide-dammed backwater deposits or lakes situated atop the rockslide mass. In each case, the 14C age provides a different constraint on the age of the rockslide event: in case (a), the 14C age represents a maximum age of the event; in case (b), which is quite rare, the 14C age is generally considered as a good proxy of the event age; in case (c) the 14C age represents a minimum age for the rockslide event. Unfortunately, radiocarbon dating often cannot be applied because of absence of suited deposits or exposures thereof, lack of organic remnants or of remnants suited for age-dating, and/or because determined 14C ages are substantially biased. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Proxy-dating of rockslide events by OSL can be applied to silt- to sand-sized quartzose sediments present (a) directly below, (b) within, or (c) above/laterally aside a rockslide mass. For each case (a) to (c), the determined ages are subject to the same constraints as outlined for radiocarbon dating. Unfortunately, situations allowing for application of OSL to rockslide event dating are comparatively rare, and the resulting ages tend to have a wide error range. Surface Exposure Dating with cosmogenic radionuclides Surface exposure ages can be determined for rock samples taken from the sliding planes at

  14. Snežna jama (Slovenia): Interdisciplinary dating of cave sediments and implication for landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuselmann, Philipp; Mihevc, Andrej; Pruner, Petr; Horáček, Ivan; Čermák, Stanislav; Hercman, Helena; Sahy, Diana; Fiebig, Markus; Hajna, Nadja Zupan; Bosák, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    Caves are important markers of surface evolution, since they are, as a general rule, linked with ancient valley bottoms by their springs. However, caves can only be dated indirectly by means of the sediments they contain. If the sediment is older than common dating methods, one has to use multiple dating approaches in order to get meaningful results. U/Th dating, palaeomagnetic analysis of flowstone and sediment profiles, cosmogenic dating of quartz pebbles, and mammalian dating allowed a robust estimate of speleogenesis, sediment deposition, climatic change at the surface, and uplift history on the Periadriatic fault line during the Plio-Pleistocene. Our dates indicate that Snežna jama was formed in the (Upper) Miocene, received its sedimentary deposits during the Pliocene in a rather low-lying, hilly landscape, and became inactive due to uplift along the Periadriatic and Sava faults and climatic changes at the beginning of the Quaternary. Although it is only a single cave, the information contained within it makes it an important site of the Southern Alps.

  15. Snežna jama (Slovenia): Interdisciplinary dating of cave sediments and implication for landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuselmann, Philipp; Mihevc, Andrej; Pruner, Petr; Horáček, Ivan; Čermák, Stanislav; Hercman, Helena; Sahy, Diana; Fiebig, Markus; Hajna, Nadja Zupan; Bosák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Caves are important markers of surface evolution, since they are, as a general rule, linked with ancient valley bottoms by their springs. However, caves can only be dated indirectly by means of the sediments they contain. If the sediment is older than common dating methods, one has to use multiple dating approaches in order to get meaningful results. U/Th dating, palaeomagnetic analysis of flowstone and sediment profiles, cosmogenic dating of quartz pebbles, and mammalian dating allowed a robust estimate of speleogenesis, sediment deposition, climatic change at the surface, and uplift history on the Periadriatic fault line during the Plio-Pleistocene. Our dates indicate that Snežna jama was formed in the (Upper) Miocene, received its sedimentary deposits during the Pliocene in a rather low-lying, hilly landscape, and became inactive due to uplift along the Periadriatic and Sava faults and climatic changes at the beginning of the Quaternary. Although it is only a single cave, the information contained within it makes it an important site of the Southern Alps. PMID:26516294

  16. U-Th and 10Be constraints on sediment recycling in proglacial settings, Lago Buenos Aires, Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogez, Antoine; Herman, Frédéric; Pelt, Eric; Norton, Kevin; Darvill, Christopher; Christl, Marcus; Morvan, Gilles; Reuschlé, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    The sedimentary cycle includes the formation by erosion of rocks, transport and deposition. While erosion and deposition can be documented, the history of sediments between the time it is extracted from the rocks and ultimately deposited into basins remains a major challenge. However, the mechanism of transfer and alteration of the sediments during transport plays a key role in the evolution of basins, feedbacks between erosion and climate, and glacial-interglacial variability of sediment transport and weathering. This is particularly true in proglacial settings because large overdeepenings, in particular, are potential sediment traps for which the efficiency at evacuating those sediments is largely unknown. The Lago Buenos Aires moraines in Patagonia are particularly interesting because they are imbricated from the older in the outer part to the younger in the inner part of the system. We sampled fine grained sediments from these moraines and measured U-Th isotopes in the 4-50 μm silicate fraction. Deposition ages were refined using 10Be exposure ages. We show first that the comminution ages model can be improved by measuring also Th isotopes, from which weathering rates can be deduced. Moreover we show from our data that there is a time lag of 300 kyr on average between erosion and deposition in the moraine. This could be attributed to the long residence time of sediments in the lake overdeepening. This conclusion raises perspectives about the transport times and dynamic of the sediments during a whole sedimentary cycle, and the subsequent effect on weathering. This conclusion could also contradict some assumptions commonly made for our erosion rates/sediment fluxes reconstructions based on river sediments analysis, in recently deglaciated catchments.

  17. Surface exposure dating of glacial lake shorelines: implications for constraining ice margin positions and meltwater outbursts during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin; Schaefer, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) played an important role in the climate variability of the last deglaciation, notably through large discharges of meltwater to the North Atlantic that disturbed the ocean's circulation and heat transport. Deglaciation of the northeastern sector of the LIS was complex and included the development of large ice-dammed lakes that were confined within the main river valleys draining northward into Ungava Bay. The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador ice dome, but large uncertainties regarding the position and dynamic of the ice margin through time currently limit our understanding of these glacial lakes. In the Ungava lowlands, glacial lake Naskaupi invaded the George River valley, leaving a series of well-developed shorelines and deltas. These spectacular raised shorelines are 10 to 20 meters wide and can be followed for several kilometers. Our field investigations and remote sensing analysis indicate that Lake Naskaupi experienced a complex history, as shown by the succession of shorelines that likely reflect the opening of new topographic outlets during ice retreat. Constraining the timing of the different phases of the lake and its drainage has traditionally been challenging, as organic material suitable for radiocarbon dating is scarce or lacking. Recent progress in Surface Exposure Dating (SED) by cosmogenic nuclides now inspires novel approaches to glacial and deglacial geomorphology. Here we apply 10Be SED to boulders that form part of these shorelines and mark the main (high-level) stage of Lake Naskaupi. We sampled 4-6 multi-meter size boulders at 4 different sites. Preliminary results show high internal consistency and, indicate that the main lake phase developed very late in the regional deglaciation, which extends from about 8500 to 6800 cal. yr BP (Dyke and Prest, 1987). We also present SED results from boulders deposited by a substantial outburst flood presumably associated with

  18. Potential improvement of Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) of moraines in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, by application of the new electronic Schmidt-hammer (SilverSchmidt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stefan; Corbett, David

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Alps of New Zealand are among the few key study sites for investigating Holocene glacier chronologies in the mid-latitudinal Southern Hemisphere. Their characteristic highly dynamic geomorphological process systems prove, however, to be a considerable challenge for all attempts to date and palaeoclimatologically interpret the existing Holocene moraines record. As a multi-proxy approach combining 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) with Schmidt-hammer testing, the recently developed Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) has already shown its potential in this study area (cf. Winkler 2005, 2009, 2013). An electronic Schmidt-hammer (named SilverSchmidt) was introduced by the manufacturer of the original mechanical Schmidt-hammer (Proceq SA) a few years ago. It offers, in particular, facilities for much easier data processing and constitutes a major improvement and potential replacement for the mechanical Schmidt-hammer. However, its different approach to the measurement of surface hardness - based on Q-(velocity) values instead of R-(rebound) values - is a potential drawback. This difference effectively means that measurements from the two instruments are not easily interconvertible and, hence, that the instruments cannot be used interchangeably without previous comparative tests of both instruments under field conditions. Both instruments used in this comparative study were N-type models with identical impact energy of 2.207 Nm for the plunger. To compare both instruments and explore interconvertibility, parallel measurements were performed on a selected number of boulders (10 boulders per site with 5 impacts each, at least 2 sites per moraine) on moraines of homogeneous lithology but different established ages covering the entire Holocene and the Late Glacial. All moraines are located east of the Main Divide of the Southern Alps at Mueller Glacier, Tasman Glacier, and in the outer Tasman River Valley. All paired samples (n = 50) were

  19. NAIP 2014 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  20. NAIP 2012 Image Dates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map is produced by the Aerial Phtography Field Office (APFO) to show the image acquisition dates for the 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  1. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Expiration Dates Matter ... Should Know CDER FOIA Electronic Reading Room Related Consumer Updates How to Dispose of Unused Medicines Identifying ...

  2. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video, FDA Pharmacist Ilisa Bernstein explains how expiration dates help determine if medicine is safe to use and will work as intended. ... Lock it Up: Medicine Safety in Your Home Giving Medicine to ...

  3. A Blind Date

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立

    2003-01-01

    英语对话:A: Talking about girls, I still remember my first time to meet my girlfriend. Iwas so clumsy and very nervous.B: That’s the same case with me. I had the jitters at my blind date, too.A: Did you also meet your girlfriend at a blind date?B: Yeah. I was actually very shy of speaking to girls, you know?

  4. A First Search for Cosmogenic Neutrinos with the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Binns, W R; Boersma, D; Bose, R G; Braun, D L; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Buitink, S; Dookayka, K; Dowkontt, P F; Duffin, T; Euler, S; Gerhardt, L; Gustafsson, L; Hallgren, A; Hanson, J C; Israel, M H; Kiryluk, J; Klein, S; Kleinfelder, S; Niederhausen, H; Olevitch, M A; Persichelli, C; Ratzlaff, K; Rauch, B F; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Samanta, A; Simburger, G E; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Uggerhoj, U; Walker, J; Young, R

    2014-01-01

    The ARIANNA experiment seeks to observe the diffuse flux of neutrinos in the 10^8 - 10^10 GeV energy range using a grid of radio detectors at the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. The detector measures the coherent Cherenkov radiation produced at radio frequencies, from about 100 MHz to 1 GHz, by charged particle showers generated by neutrino interactions in the ice. The ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA) is being constructed as a prototype for the full array. During the 2013-14 austral summer, three HRA stations collected radio data which was wirelessly transmitted off site in nearly real-time. The performance of these stations is described and a simple analysis to search for neutrino signals is presented. The analysis employs a set of three cuts that reject background triggers while preserving 90% of simulated cosmogenic neutrino triggers. No neutrino candidates are found in the data and a model-independent 90% confidence level Neyman upper limit is placed on the all flavor neutrino+antineutrino...

  5. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B. [Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW (Australia). School of Resource Science and Management; Torrence, R. [Australian Museum, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Division of Anthropology

    1999-11-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO{sub 2}nH{sub 2}0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  6. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates To...: Notice of matching fund submission dates and submission dates for statements of net outstanding campaign... fund submission dates for publicly funded 2012 presidential primary candidates. Eligible candidates...

  7. Revealing the pace of river landscape evolution during the Quaternary: recent developments in numerical dating methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Briant, Rebecca M.; Cordier, Stéphane; Duval, Mathieu; Jones, Anna; Scholz, Denis

    2017-06-01

    During the last twenty years, several technical developments have considerably intensified the use of numerical dating methods for the Quaternary. The study of fluvial archives has greatly benefited from these enhancements, opening new dating horizons for a range of archives at distinct time scales and thereby providing new insights into previously unanswered questions. In this contribution, we separately present the state of the art of five numerical dating methods that are frequently used in the fluvial context: radiocarbon, Luminescence, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), 230Th/U and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) dating. We focus on the major recent developments for each technique that are most relevant for new dating applications in diverse fluvial environments and on explaining these for non-specialists. Therefore, essential information and precautions about sampling strategies in the field and/or laboratory procedures are provided. For each method, new and important implications for chronological reconstructions of Quaternary fluvial landscapes are discussed and, where necessary, exemplified by key case studies. A clear statement of the current technical limitations of these methods is included and forthcoming developments, which might possibly open new horizons for dating fluvial archives in the near future, are summarised.

  8. Understanding Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem by gathering and studying data. Step 2: Identify risk and protective factors It is not enough to ... DM, Breiding M. Beyond correlates: A review of risk and protective factors for adolescent dating violence perpetration. Journal of Youth and Adolescence 2013; 42:633-649. ...

  9. Expiration Dates Matter

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Updates Expiration Dates Matter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Get Consumer Updates by E-mail | ... Updates RSS Feed If your medicine has expired, it may not provide the treatment you need. In ...

  10. Assessment of different sunspot number series using the cosmogenic isotope 44Ti in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvestari, Eleanna; Usoskin, Ilya G.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.; Owens, Mathew J.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Rubinetti, Sara; Taricco, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Many sunspot number series exist suggesting different levels of solar activity during the past centuries. Their reliability can be assessed only by comparing them with alternative indirect proxies. We test different sunspot number series against the updated record of cosmogenic radionuclide 44Ti measured in meteorites. Two bounding scenarios of solar activity changes have been considered: the HH-scenario (based on the series by Svalgaard and Schatten, 2016) in particular predicting moderate activity during the Maunder minimum; and the LL-scenario (based on the RG series by Lockwood et al., 2014b) predicting moderate activity for the 18-19th centuries and the very low activity level for the Maunder minimum. For each scenario, the magnetic open solar flux, the heliospheric modulation potential and the expected production of 44Ti were computed. The calculated production rates were compared with the corresponding measurements of 44Ti activity in stony meteorites fallen since 1766. The analysis reveals that the LL-scenario is fully consistent with the measured 44Ti data, in particular recovering the observed secular trend between the 17th century and the Modern grand maximum. On the contrary, the HH-scenario appears significantly inconsistent with the data, mostly due the moderate level of activity during the Maunder minimum. It is concluded that the HH-scenario sunspot number reconstruction significantly overestimates solar activity prior to the mid-18th century, especially during the Maunder minimum. The exact level of solar activity after 1750 cannot be distinguished with this method, since both H- and L- scenarios appear statistically consistent with the data.

  11. Constraining Landscape History and Glacial Erosivity Using Paired Cosmogenic Nuclides in Upernavik, Northwest Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Graly, Joseph A.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude landscape evolution processes have the potential to preserve old, relict surfaces through burial by cold-based, nonerosive glacial ice. To investigate landscape history and age in the high Arctic, we analyzed in situ cosmogenic Be(sup 10) and Al (sup 26) in 33 rocks from Upernavik, northwest Greenland. We sampled adjacent bedrock-boulder pairs along a 100 km transect at elevations up to 1000 m above sea level. Bedrock samples gave significantly older apparent exposure ages than corresponding boulder samples, and minimum limiting ages increased with elevation. Two-isotope calculations Al(sup26)/B(sup 10) on 20 of the 33 samples yielded minimum limiting exposure durations up to 112 k.y., minimum limiting burial durations up to 900 k.y., and minimum limiting total histories up to 990 k.y. The prevalence of BE(sup 10) and Al(sup 26) inherited from previous periods of exposure, especially in bedrock samples at high elevation, indicates that these areas record long and complex surface exposure histories, including significant periods of burial with little subglacial erosion. The long total histories suggest that these high elevation surfaces were largely preserved beneath cold-based, nonerosive ice or snowfields for at least the latter half of the Quaternary. Because of high concentrations of inherited nuclides, only the six youngest boulder samples appear to record the timing of ice retreat. These six samples suggest deglaciation of the Upernavik coast at 11.3 +/- 0.5 ka (average +/- 1 standard deviation). There is no difference in deglaciation age along the 100 km sample transect, indicating that the ice-marginal position retreated rapidly at rates of approx.120 m yr(sup-1).

  12. On a solar origin for the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliver, E. W. [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Tylka, A. J. [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dietrich, W. F. [Praxis, Inc., Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); Ling, A. G. [Atmospheric Environmental Research, 3550 Aberdeen Ave., Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a >1 GV spectrum ∼45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a >30 MeV proton fluence (F {sub 30}) of ∼8 × 10{sup 10} proton cm{sup –2}, ∼10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F {sub 30} value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for >30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is ∼X230 (∼9 × 10{sup 33} erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of ∼X35 (∼10{sup 33} erg) and ∼X45 (∼2 × 10{sup 33} erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a ∼10{sup 34} erg flare is ∼2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The ∼1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last ∼2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  13. Neutrino production in electromagnetic cascades: An extra component of cosmogenic neutrino at ultrahigh energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Li, Zhuo; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2017-03-01

    Muon pairs can be produced in the annihilation of ultrahigh energy (UHE, E ≳1 018 eV ) photons with low energy cosmic background radiation in the intergalactic space, giving birth to neutrinos. Although the branching ratio of muon pair production is low, products of other channels, which are mainly electron/positron pairs, will probably transfer most of their energies into the new generated UHE photon in the subsequent interaction with the cosmic background radiation via Compton scattering in deep Klein-Nishina regime. The regeneration of these new UHE photons then provides a second chance to produce the muon pairs, enhancing the neutrino flux. We investigate the neutrino production in the propagation of UHE photons in the intergalactic space at different redshifts, considering various competing processes such as pair production, double pair production for UHE photons, and triplet production and synchrotron radiation for UHE electrons. Following the analytic method raised by Gould and Rephaeli, we firstly study the electromagnetic cascade initiated by an UHE photon, with paying particular attention to the leading particle in the cascade process. Regarding the least energetic outgoing particles as energy loss, we obtain the effective penetration length of the leading particle, as well as energy loss rate including the neutrino emission rate in the cascade process. Finally, we find that an extra component of UHE neutrinos will arise from the propagation of UHE cosmic rays due to the generated UHE photons and electron/positrons. However, the flux of this component is quite small, with a flux of at most 10% of that of the conventional cosmogenic neutrino at a few EeV, in the absence of a strong intergalactic magnetic field and a strong cosmic radio background. The precise contribution of extra component depends on several factors, e.g., cosmic radio background, intergalactic magnetic field, and the spectrum of proton, which are discussed in this work.

  14. Age and geomorphic history of Meteor Crater, Arizona, from cosmogenic 36Cl and 14C in rock varnish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, F.M.; Zreda, M.G.; Smith, S.S.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.; Dorn, R.I.; Roddy, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Using cosmogenic 36Cl buildup and rock varnish radiocarbon, we have measured the exposure age of rock surfaces at Meteor Crater, Arizona. Our 36Cl measurements on four dolomite boulders ejected from the crater by the impact yield a mean age of 49.7 ?? 0.85 ka, which is in excellent agreement with an average age of 49 ?? 3 ka obtained from thermoluminescence studies on shock-metamorphosed dolomite and quartz. These ages are supported by undetectably low 14C in the oldest rock varnish sample. ?? 1991.

  15. A new value for the half-life of {sup 10}Be by Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection and liquid scintillation counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korschinek, G., E-mail: Gunther.Korschinek@ph.tum.d [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bergmaier, A. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Faestermann, T. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gerstmann, U.C. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Knie, K.; Rugel, G. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wallner, A. [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Dillmann, I. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kossert, K. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Remmert, A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The importance of {sup 10}Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of {sup 10}Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of {sup 10}Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the {sup 10}Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched {sup 10}Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of {sup 9}Be. We then determined the initial {sup 10}Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the {sup 10}Be concentration and activity yields a {sup 10}Be half-life of T{sub 1/2} = 1.388 +- 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. ), found a value of 1.386 +- 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for {sup 10}Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 +- 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

  16. Amino acid racemisation dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences

    1999-11-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject 12 refs.

  17. Dating fractures in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, K.E., E-mail: kath.halliday@nuh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N.J.; Somers, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, R. [Department of Radiology, Paul O' Gorman Building, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  18. Truly Blind Dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Compared to parties,bars and nightclubs,in many countries parks are a site for family leisure and recreation and not a spot to find a date.It is not the case in China.Spouse-hunting fairs in big city parks organized by parents eager to see their children tie the knot have made parks in China a haven for relationshiphunters and their parents.

  19. What's the date of

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘京西

    2009-01-01

    @@ A:What's the date of our final examination? B:I'm not sure.I'll have to look it up.I'll let youknow tomorrow. A:Thank you. A:我们期末考试是哪一天? B:我也说不清.我给你查查,明天告诉你. A:谢谢你.

  20. A New Approach for Estimating Background Rates of Erosion Using Concentration of Meteoric 10-Be Adhered to River Sediment: Application to the Rapidly Eroding Waipaoa Basin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusser, L. J.; Bierman, P. R.; Pavich, M.; Finkel, R.

    2007-12-01

    New and existing data suggest that the concentration of atmospherically- produced, meteoric 10-Be adhered to river sediment provides a proxy for basin-scale erosion rates. Although the widely applied method of analyzing in situ produced 10-Be in river sediments has proven useful for estimating pre-anthropogenic rates of erosion in a variety of environments, there are lithologic limitation. In contrast, measuring the concentration of meteoric 10-Be adhered to river sediment allows erosion rate analysis in landscapes underlain by quartz-deficient or fine-grained lithologies, as well as in basins where the concentration of quartz varies spatially. By assuming that basins are in an overall isotopic steady-state, that erosion is rapid enough that decay is negligible, and that the integrated delivery rate of 10-Be from the atmosphere (D10-Be) can be estimated, basin-scale mass loss rates (Ms) can be solved by equating the 10-Be flux in from the atmosphere with the flux of 10-Be out of the basin on sediment (C10-Be) and expressed as sediment yield per unit area (Ys). Fin = Fout D10-Be * A = Ms * C10-Be Ms = (D10-Be * A)/ C10-Be Ys = D10-Be / C10-Be To validate this new approach, we examined the limited data that do exist and found reasonable correspondence between erosion rates estimated from meteoric 10-Be concentrations and estimated by other means. As a first application, we use meteoric 10-Be in river sediment to estimate basin-scale erosion rates from catchments within and near the mud-stone dominated Waipaoa River Basin draining the tectonically active east coast of New Zealand's North Island. Near total conversion of indigenous forest to pasture over the past century in the Waipaoa Basin has resulted in some of the most dramatic and widespread erosional features on the planet, and contemporary sediment yields that rank among the highest in the world (~7 million kg/(km2 * yr)). The amount of meteoric 10-Be adhered to eight river sediment samples suggests that modern

  1. Sediment dating in review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). Dept. of Mathematical Physics

    1997-12-31

    The paper will comment on a few issues of particular relevance to Australasia. Thermoluminescent (TL) methods applied to open sites have been demonstrated to be effective. A particularly good example of this is to be found in the South East of South Australia, where a sequence of low ranges runs roughly parallel with the coast. They represent relict sand dunes left behind, on a slowly rising land surface by successive interglacial incursions of the sea at roughly 120 ka intervals. Comparison with ages established on independent geological grounds allows a test of quartz TL and IRSL ages that is believable back to 500 ka. Older than this, we do not yet understand the physics of the quartz well enough to go unequivocally forward (backward?). Similar results are emerging elsewhere. With dating limits being pushed ever further back, the time variation of the environmental radiation giving rise to the stored luminescent energy needs to be addressed. Particularly at wet sites, radioactive disequilibrium must be considered. In any case, a time profile of the radiation dose rate needs to be determined.In dating a given site or sites the value of ages obtained by any dating method,including C-14, is enhanced by parallel measurements with an different method. Paper no. 10; extended abstract. 6 refs.

  2. Date and Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangJingxian

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays the pace of social life is very fast.TO make clear date and time is very important to everyone,especially those who are away fromhome.You need to learn ways to express date and time in Chinese.Otherwise how can you make arrangements with your Chinese friends?41.请问,今天(是)几号?Qǐngwèn,jīntiān(shǐ)jǐ hào?(May I ask,what is the date today?)In Chinese,jǐntiān.míngtiān,hòutiān and dàhòutiān are used to express today,tomorrow,the day after tomorrow,and the fourth day fromnow.jǐ(how many)is a character used in questioning the number from two to nine.If one asks the number above nine,then shí(ten),bǎi

  3. Stretched exponential relaxation of viscous remanence and magnetic dating of erratic boulders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Nakamura, N.; Nagahama, H.; Minoura, K.

    2016-11-01

    Viscous remanence continuously increases with the duration of reorientation of rocks, and the remanence gets partially overprinted in rocks parallel to the Earth's magnetic field. This overprinted viscous remanence is unblocked at a certain temperature that enables the estimation of the time required for the rock to acquire the magnetism, by assuming the exponential law of Néel's single-domain theory. However, previous results of dating the rocks by the exponential law have shown older ages than radiometric or cosmogenic exposure ages. Néel's exponential decay law is applicable to a system whose magnetic grains have an identical relaxation time. However, in real systems, the expected behavior is not usually observed because relaxation times vary for individual grains. Moreover, the variation of viscous remanence with the logarithmic law for a distribution of relaxation times is predicted to be concave downward. Here we found that the stretched exponential law, exp{-(t/τ)1 - n} with 0 ≤ n radiometric age.

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in denudation rates derived from cosmogenic nuclides in four European fluvial terrace sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, M.; Ehlers, T. A.; Stor, T.; Torrent, J.; Lobato, L.; Christl, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2016-12-01

    The denudation of landscapes is affected by temporal and spatial variations in tectonics, climate, and vegetation. However, deciphering the contributions of these different processes has proven challenging. In this study, cosmogenic nuclide-derived modern and paleo catchment-wide denudation rates in four European rivers are investigated. We present 12 new and 4 recalculated cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates from modern river sediments and 14 paleo-denudation rates from terraces deposited over the last 2 Ma. The catchments studied are located in regions with minimal Quaternary tectonic activity and span different climates over 12o latitude. Results indicate that modern denudation rates range between 16 ± 11 and 51 ± 7 mm/ka with no clear latitudinal variation. Modern denudation rates are compared with catchment geomorphic indices including slope, fluvial steepness index, and relief. The denudation rates correlate better to catchment topographic indices (R2 ≈ 0.4) rather than climate. Paleo-denudation rates range from 8 ± 7 to 56 ± 7 mm/ka and are associated with a possible increase in the average paleo-denudation rates over the past 2 Ma. Taken together, the results indicate that quantification of catchment-wide denudation rates over long (Quaternary) time scales because of climate change is difficult. Future work to study climate influence on denudation rates should focus on the successes of previous work that document transient denudation rates over shorter and more recent time scales, i.e., from the Last Glacial Maximum to present.

  5. Dating Violence among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  6. Comparing OSL and CN techniques for dating fluvial terraces and estimating surface process rates in Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Pohl, Eric; Sulaymonova, Vasila; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of surface process rates is crucial for understanding the topographic evolution of high mountains. Spatial and temporal variations in fluvial incision and basin-wide erosion enable to decipher the role of tectonic and climatic drivers. The Pamir is peculiar in both aspects because of its location at the western end of the India-Asia collision zone, and its position at the edge of two atmospheric circulation systems, the Westerlies and the Indian Summer Monsoon. The architecture of the Panj river network indicates prominent variations across the main tectonic structures of the Pamir. The trunk stream, deflects from the predominantly westward river orientation and cuts across the southern and central Pamir domes before doubling back to the west and leaving the orogen. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of fluvial terraces reveals short-term sedimentation along the trunk stream during the last ~25 kyr. The agreement of OSL results to new exposure ages based on the cosmogenic nuclide (CN) 10Be confirms accurate terrace age modelling and treatment of incomplete bleaching. The consistent terrace sedimentation and exposure ages suggest also fast terrace abandonment and rapid onset of incision. Considerable differences in terrace heights reflect high spatial variations of fluvial incision, independent of time interval, change in rock type or catchment increase. Highest rates of (5.9 ± 1.1) mm/yr to (10.0 ± 2.0) mm/yr describe the fluvial dynamic across the Shakhdara Dome and that related to the Darvaz Fault Zone. Lower rates of (3.9 ± 0.6) mm/yr to (4.5 ± 0.7) mm/yr indicate a transient stage north of the Yazgulom Dome. Fluvial incision decreases to rates ranging from (1.7 ± 0.3) mm/yr to (3.9 ± 0.7) mm/yr in graded river reaches associated to southern dome boundaries. The pattern agrees to the interpretation of successive upstream river captures across the southern and central Pamir domes inferred from morphometric analyses of river

  7. Unraveling rift margin evolution and escarpment development ages along the Dead Sea fault using cosmogenic burial ages