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Sample records for cosmic radiation physics

  1. Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawin, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: - Studies of asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions based on the analysis of cosmic ray propagation in the atmosphere. - Experimental and phenomenological studies of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. - Search for point sources of high energy cosmic rays. - Studies of cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy and mechanisms of particle acceleration. - Studies of mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 - 10 17 eV. Theoretical and experimental studies of Extensive Air Shower properties are performed mostly based on the results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. We analysed nearly 100,000 events of energies above 10 15 eV registered by the Lodz hodoscope. We have developed the method of data analysis which allows us to verify different models of cosmic ray mass composition. In our research in high energy cosmic rays we also used experimental data from other collaborating experiments in Karlsruhe, Baksan and THEMISTOCLE. The Lodz group collaborates with many foreign institutes and laboratories in construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments. Our most important partners are: Forschungszentrum in Karlsruhe (Germany), College de France, Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Science, University of Perpignan and Uppsala University (Sweden). (author)

  2. Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: -Studies of the asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions from the analysis of cosmic ray propagation in the atmosphere. -Studies of structure and properties of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. -Search for point sources of high energy cosmic rays. -Studies of cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy and mechanisms of particle acceleration. -Studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 -10 17 eV. Theoretical and experimental studies of nuclear interactions for energies exceeding those obtained by modern particle accelerators are performed employing results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. The Lodz hodoscope can register electromagnetic components of cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere as well as muons at two energy thresholds. Data collected by the Lodz array are also used to study mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 - 10 17 eV. The Lodz group collaborates with foreign institutes and laboratories on construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments. Our most important partners are: Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany), College de France, the Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the University of Durham, and the University of Perpignan. (author)

  3. Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawin, J.

    1998-01-01

    (full text) The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: -Studies of asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions based on the analysis of cosmic ray propagation in the atmosphere. -Studies of the structure and properties of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. - Search for point sources of high energy cosmic rays. - Studies of cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy and mechanisms of particle acceleration. - Studies of mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range l0 15 -10 17 eV. Theoretical and experimental studies of nuclear interactions for energies exceeding those obtained by modern particle accelerators are performed based on the results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. The Lodz hodoscope can register the electromagnetic component of cosmic ray showers developing in the atmosphere as well as muons of two energy thresholds. Data collected by the Lodz array are also used to study the mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 -10 17 eV. The Lodz group collaborates with many foreign institutes and laboratories in construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments. Our most important partners are: Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany), College de' France, the Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Science, the University of Perpignan (France) and Uppsala University (Sweden). (author)

  4. Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high-energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: -Studies of asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions based on the analysis of cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. -Experimental and phenomenological studies of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. - Search for high-energy cosmic ray point sources. - Studies of cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy and particle acceleration mechanisms. -Studies of mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 -10 17 eV. Theoretical and experimental studies of Extensive Air Shower properties are performed mainly on the basis of the results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. We have analysed nearly 100,000 events of energies above 10 15 eV registered in the Lodz hodoscope. We have developed a method to verify different models of cosmic ray mass composition. The Lodz group collaborates with many foreign institutes and laboratories in construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments. Our most important partners are: Forschungszentrum in Karlsruhe (Germany), College de France, Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Uppsala University (Sweden). (author)

  5. Cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevielle, J N

    1984-01-01

    First, the different instruments and techniques of cosmic particle detection are presented. Then the passage of the cosmic particles through the atmosphere is studied: electrons, photons, muons. The collective behavior of the different categories is also studied, the electromagnetic cascade is distinguished from the hadron cascade. Through the principal physical properties of the radiation and the medium, the ''mean'' aspects of the radiation are then successively dealt with out of the atmosphere, at different altitudes until the sea level, then at great depths. A chapter is devoted to cosmic radiation of more than 10,000 GeV, studied separately. Then solar radiation in universe is studied through their propagation in solar system and their origin. At last, the cosmic radiation effects are studied in environment (cosmic biophysics) and some applications of cosmic radiation are presented.

  6. Cloud chamber researches in nuclear physics and cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackett, P.

    1984-01-01

    An extract from Blackett's Nobel Prize speech of 1948, this recounts the work done by the author on particle tracks in a Wilson cloud chamber in 1932 at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge. In particular he studied the energetic particles in cosmic rays using a cloud chamber and camera. The improvements to the equipment are recounted and photographs of cosmic ray showers taken with it are shown. (UK)

  7. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The 20-ft horn-reflector antenna at Bell Laboratories is discussed in detail with emphasis on the 7.35 cm radiometer. The circumstances leading to the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation are explored

  8. Hazards of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J.M.; Dzitko, H.

    2000-06-01

    The main limitations on long-distance space transport is neither the energy source nor the propulsion system but appears to be the protection of cosmonauts from radiation. Cosmic radiation is made up of protons (87%), alpha particles (12%) and heavy nuclei (1%), all these particles travel through interstellar space and come from the explosion of stars at the end of their life. The earth is protected from cosmic radiation by 3 natural shields: i) the magnetic field generated by the solar wind, ii) the earth magnetic field (magnetosphere), and iii) the earth atmosphere, this elusive layer of air is equivalent to a 10 meter-high volume of water. Magnetosphere and atmosphere reduce the radiation dose by a factor 4000. According to a European directive (1996) air crews must be considered as radiation workers. (A.C.)

  9. What is cosmic radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The earth was indeed receiving ionizing radiations from the heavens. This cosmic radiation consists of particles travelling near the speed of light. It consists of two components, the first of which is permanent and of galactic origin, while the other is more sporadic, depending on the sun's activities. Natural land-based sources expose each of us to an average total dose of 2.4 mSv per year (source UNSCEAR). In addition, the human activities using ionizing radiation contribute to an average annual exposure of 1.4 mSv, originating primarily with medical activities ( radiodiagnostic and radiation therapy). Members of flights crew are subject to exposure. The total dose of cosmic radiation received is is directly proportional with the duration of exposure, and thus with the duration of the flight. Measurement taken on board aircraft during the 1990's showed that flight personnel (on long haul flights) receive an average dose of approximately the same magnitude as the one due to exposure to natural radioactivity in France. The damage caused by ionizing radiation depends on the quantity of energy released by radiation into the cells of each organ or tissue of the human body(exposure dose). For a given quantity of absorbed energy (dose expressed in Gray), the damage will vary according to the nature of the radiation and the affected organ. These effects are of two types: acute effects and deferred effects. Two measurements are essential for radiation protection: the measurements of the dose of radiation absorbed by the body and the assessment of the risk associated with the absorbed dose. Two units were thus created: the gray and the sievert. (N.C.)

  10. Constraining neutrino physics with big bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.H.; Melchiorri, A.; Mangano, G.; Miele, G.; Pisanti, O.

    2002-01-01

    We perform a likelihood analysis of the recent results on the anisotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation from the BOOMERanG and DASI experiments to show that they single out an effective number of neutrinos in good agreement with standard big bang nucleosynthesis. We also consider degenerate big bang nucleosynthesis to provide new bounds on effective relativistic degrees of freedom N ν and, in particular, on the neutrino chemical potential ξ α . When including supernova type Ia data we find, at 2σ, N ν ≤7 and -0.01≤ξ e ≤0.22, vertical bar ξ μ,τ vertical bar ≤2.6

  11. Cosmic Dark Radiation and Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Archidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB by the Planck mission have greatly increased our knowledge about the universe. Dark radiation, a weakly interacting component of radiation, is one of the important ingredients in our cosmological model which is testable by Planck and other observational probes. At the moment, the possible existence of dark radiation is an unsolved question. For instance, the discrepancy between the value of the Hubble constant, H0, inferred from the Planck data and local measurements of H0 can to some extent be alleviated by enlarging the minimal ΛCDM model to include additional relativistic degrees of freedom. From a fundamental physics point of view, dark radiation is no less interesting. Indeed, it could well be one of the most accessible windows to physics beyond the standard model, for example, sterile neutrinos. Here, we review the most recent cosmological results including a complete investigation of the dark radiation sector in order to provide an overview of models that are still compatible with new cosmological observations. Furthermore, we update the cosmological constraints on neutrino physics and dark radiation properties focusing on tensions between data sets and degeneracies among parameters that can degrade our information or mimic the existence of extra species.

  12. Primary cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, H.R.

    1972-01-01

    The term cosmic radiation means the charged particle flux that reaches the earth from outside its magnetosphere with energies above the solar wind energy of a few keV. There are two sources of flux. Sporadically the sun produces such particles, generally within the energy range 1--200 MeV, and these solar cosmic rays arrive at the earth for a period ranging from hours to days. There may be a small, rather constant flux from the sun also, but the bulk of the steady flux originates outside the earth's orbit. Although some have conjectured that part of this latter flux may be accelerated in the outer portions of the solar system where the outward flowing interplanetary medium meets the interstellar medium, it is generally thought that most or all of it arises in unique systems such as supernovae, and is distributed throughout the galaxy. These galactic particles range in energy from a few MeV to at least 10 13 MeV and consist primarily of protons with significant numbers of heavier nuclei, positrons and electrons. They are supposed to fill our galaxy, or at least the disc, more or less uniformly. However, the flux with energies below a few GeV that reaches earth's orbit is modulated by the interplanetary medium so that the number at earth varies inversely with solar activity and is always somewhat below the interstellar flux. A discussion is presented of primary galactic radiation at earth, its modulation by solar activity, and its interaction with the geomagnetic field. (U.S.)

  13. Cosmic perspectives in space physics

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Sukumar

    2000-01-01

    In the early years of the twentieth century, Victor Hess of Germany flew instruments in balloons and so discovered in 1912 that an extra-~errestial radiation of unknown origin is incident on the earth with an almost constant intensity at all times. These penetrating non­ solar radiations which were called Cosmic Rays by Millikan, USA, opened the new frontier of space physics and many leading scientists were attracted to it. At the end of World War II a number of space vehicles, e.g. stratospheric balloons, rockets and satellites were developed. In 1950 and onwards, these vehicles enabled spectacular advances in space physics and space astrophysics. New horizons were opened in the explorations of cosmic rays, the earth's magnetosphere, the Sun and the heliosphere, the moon and the planets. Using space-borne instruments, exciting discoveries were made of stars, and galaxies in the infra-red, ultra violet, x-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. In this text book these fascinating new findings are presented in depth a...

  14. Hydrology and Cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie

    and calibration. Yet, soil moisture measurements are traditionally provided on either point or kilometer scale from electromagnetic based sensors and satellite retrievals, respectively. Above the ground surface, the cosmic-ray neutron intensity (eV range) is inversely correlated to all hydrogen present...

  15. Radiation Exposure of Passengers to Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah El-Din, T.; Gomaa, M.A.; Sallah, N.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to review exposure of Egyptian passengers and occupational workers to cosmic radiation during their work. Computed effective dose of passengers by computer code CARI-6 using during either short route, medium route or long route as well as recommended allowed number of flights per year

  16. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  17. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Mitsuhiro

    2000-01-01

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  18. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuhiro [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  19. Cerenkov radiation from cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turver, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    It is almost 40 years since it was suggested that Cerenkov radiations may be produced in the atmosphere by the passage of the cosmic radiation and account for a small part of the night sky brightness. The first detection of this visible Cerenkov radiation followed within a few years and by the 1960s the atmospheric Cerenkov radiation technique was established as a tool in high energy astrophysics. An exciting new field of astronomy, high energy gamma ray astronomy, has developed which relies on the atmospheric Cerenkov light. We here review the mechanism for the production of Cerenkov light in the atmosphere and summarize the contributions to high energy astrophysics made using the technique. (author)

  20. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The history is described of the discovery of microwave radiation of the cosmic background using the 20-foot horn antenna at the Bell Laboratories back in 1965. Ruby masers with travelling wave were used, featuring the lowest noise in the world. The measurement proceeded on 7 cm. In measuring microwave radiation from the regions outside the Milky Way continuous noise was discovered whose temperature exceeded the calculated contributions of the individual detection system elements by 3 K. A comparison with the theory showed that relict radiation from the Big Bang period was the source of the noise. The discovery was verified by measurements on the 20.1 cm wavelength and by other authors' measurements on 0.5 mm to 74 cm, and by optical measurements of the interstellar molecule spectrum. (Ha)

  1. To the problem of superfluous cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savenko, I.A.; Saraeva, M.A.; Shavrin, P.I.

    1979-01-01

    From consideration of a number of basic works on the excessive cosmic radiation given is the most probable composition (electron, proton, and nuclear components) of this radiation in equatorial regions at altitudes corresponding to minimum altitudes of the drift trajectories hsub(min) <= 0, in case of detecting by detector on the artificial satellite of the Earth (ASE) with the mass up to 1t and of the heavier ASE. The disagreement in spectra of solar cosmic rays obtained along the latitude effect on the ASE. ''Molniya-1'' and in the experiments out of the magnetosphere on the ASE ''Explorer-41'' is explained by excessive radiation production of solar cosmic rays. The comparison of readings of the neutron channel with those of the charged particle channels of the apparatus on the ASE ''Molniya-1'' during the proton event on 25.01.1971 does not contradict to the supposition on the similarity of excessive cosmic radiation production of galactic and solar cosmic rays

  2. Cosmic Radiation - An Aircraft Manufacturer's View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, C.

    1999-01-01

    The relevance and context of cosmic radiation to an aircraft maker Airbus Industrie are outlined. Some future developments in aircraft and air traffic are described, along with their possible consequences for exposure. (author)

  3. Cosmic physics: the high energy frontier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecker, F W

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic rays have been observed up to energies 10 8 times larger than those of the best particle accelerators. Studies of astrophysical particles (hadrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. Thus, the cosmic high energy frontier is the nexus to new particle physics. This overview discusses recent advances being made in the physics and astrophysics of cosmic rays and cosmic γ-rays at the highest observed energies as well as the related physics and astrophysics of very high energy cosmic neutrinos. These topics touch on questions of grand unification, violations of Lorentz invariance as well as Planck scale physics and quantum gravity. (topical review)

  4. Progress in high-energy cosmic ray physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E.

    2018-01-01

    We review some of the recent progress in our knowledge about high-energy cosmic rays, with an emphasis on the interpretation of the different observational results. We discuss the effects that are relevant to shape the cosmic ray spectrum and the explanations proposed to account for its features and for the observed changes in composition. The physics of air-showers is summarized and we also present the results obtained on the proton-air cross section and on the muon content of the showers. We discuss the cosmic ray propagation through magnetic fields, the effects of diffusion and of magnetic lensing, the cosmic ray interactions with background radiation fields and the production of secondary neutrinos and photons. We also consider the cosmic ray anisotropies, both at large and small angular scales, presenting the results obtained from the TeV up to the highest energies and discuss the models proposed to explain their origin.

  5. Anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, focusing on intrinsic anisotropies caused by primordial matter fluctuations. The basic elements of the CBR are outlined and the contributions to anisotropy at different angular scales are discussed. Possible fluctuation spectra that can generate the observed large-scale structure of the universe through gravitational instability and nonlinear evolution are examined and compared with observational searches for cosmic microwave anisotropies. 21 refs

  6. Cosmic Ray Physics with ACORDE at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pagliarone, C.

    2008-01-01

    The use of large underground high-energy physics experiments, for comic ray studies, have been used, in the past, at CERN, in order to measure, precisely, the inclusive cosmic ray flux in the energy range from 2x10^10 - 2x10^12 eV. ACORDE, ALICE Cosmic Rays DEtector, will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE apparatus, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10^15 - 10^17 eV. This paper reviews the main detector features, the present status, commissioning and integration with other apparatus. Finally, we discuss the ACORDE-ALICE cosmic ray physics program.

  7. Cosmic ray physics with ACORDE at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagliarone, C; Fernandez-Tellez, A

    2008-01-01

    The use of large underground high-energy physics experiments, for comic ray studies, have been used, in the past, at CERN, in order to measure, precisely, the inclusive cosmic ray flux in the energy range from 2·10 10 to 2· 10 12 eV. ACORDE, ALICE Cosmic Rays DEtector, will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE apparatus, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10 15 to 10 17 eV. This paper reviews the main detector features, the present status, commissioning and integration with other apparatus. Finally, we discuss the ACORDE-ALICE cosmic ray physics program

  8. Cosmic ray physics with ACORDE at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C [Universita degli Studi di Cassino and INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo, 3 - Pisa (Italy); Fernandez-Tellez, A [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (BUAP), Puebla (Mexico)], E-mail: pagliarone@fnal.gov

    2008-05-15

    The use of large underground high-energy physics experiments, for comic ray studies, have been used, in the past, at CERN, in order to measure, precisely, the inclusive cosmic ray flux in the energy range from 2{center_dot}10{sup 10} to 2{center_dot} 10{sup 12} eV. ACORDE, ALICE Cosmic Rays DEtector, will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE apparatus, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} eV. This paper reviews the main detector features, the present status, commissioning and integration with other apparatus. Finally, we discuss the ACORDE-ALICE cosmic ray physics program.

  9. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high-energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: Experimental and phenomenological studies of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. Studies of ultra-high energy (above 10 19 eV) cosmic rays: determination of energy and primary particle mass composition. Studies of asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions based on the analysis of cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. Studies of mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 -10 17 eV. Registration of cosmic ray intensity variation correlated with solar activity. Theoretical and experimental studies of Extensive Air Shower properties are performed mostly based on the results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. We have noticed unexplainable delayed signals registered about 500-900 microseconds after the main EAS pulse. We prepared hardware for further experimental study of this effect. In September we have started registration of 5 GeV muon flux with the underground muon telescope. We registered 3 decreases of muon intensity correlated with Forbush decreases registered at lower energies. Variations of primary cosmic ray of energies up to about 100 GeV were responsible for our registrations. These set the upper limits for geometrical size of geomagnetic disturbances in interplanetary space. In construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments, the Lodz group collaborates with many foreign institutes and laboratories: Forschungszentrum in Karlsruhe (Germany), College de France, Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Uppsala University (Sweden). We have organised (together with the Physics Department of the University of Lodz) the 17 th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (24-?8 July 2000) in which about 150 physicists participated (about 100 from abroad). (author)

  10. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizot, E.

    2005-12-01

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  11. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Lawrence W. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  12. Search for Antihelium in the Cosmic Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streitmatter, R.E.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on July 16-17, 1992. Sixteen hours of data were taken. Measurements of multiple dE/dX, rigidity, and time of flight were used to search for antihelium in the cosmic radiation. A report on the r......The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on July 16-17, 1992. Sixteen hours of data were taken. Measurements of multiple dE/dX, rigidity, and time of flight were used to search for antihelium in the cosmic radiation. A report...

  13. Cosmic radiation exposure and persistent cognitive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett D.; Caressi, Chongshan; Kwok, Stephanie; Chu, Esther; Tran, Katherine K.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Giedzinski, Erich; Acharya, Munjal M.; Britten, Richard A.; Baulch, Janet E.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars mission will result in an inevitable exposure to cosmic radiation that has been shown to cause cognitive impairments in rodent models, and possibly in astronauts engaged in deep space travel. Of particular concern is the potential for cosmic radiation exposure to compromise critical decision making during normal operations or under emergency conditions in deep space. Rodents exposed to cosmic radiation exhibit persistent hippocampal and cortical based performance decrements using six independent behavioral tasks administered between separate cohorts 12 and 24 weeks after irradiation. Radiation-induced impairments in spatial, episodic and recognition memory were temporally coincident with deficits in executive function and reduced rates of fear extinction and elevated anxiety. Irradiation caused significant reductions in dendritic complexity, spine density and altered spine morphology along medial prefrontal cortical neurons known to mediate neurotransmission interrogated by our behavioral tasks. Cosmic radiation also disrupted synaptic integrity and increased neuroinflammation that persisted more than 6 months after exposure. Behavioral deficits for individual animals correlated significantly with reduced spine density and increased synaptic puncta, providing quantitative measures of risk for developing cognitive impairment. Our data provide additional evidence that deep space travel poses a real and unique threat to the integrity of neural circuits in the brain. PMID:27721383

  14. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  15. Focusing of cosmic radiation near power lines. A theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skedsmo, A.; Vistnes, A.I.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine if, and to what extent, cosmic radiation can be focused by power lines. As an alternative to experimental measurements, a computer program was developed for simulation of particle trajectories. Starting from given initial values, the cosmic particles trajectories through the electromagnetic field surrounding power lines were simulated. Particular efforts have been made to choose initial values which represent the actual physical condition of the cosmic radiation at ground level. The results show an average decrease in the particle flux density in an area below a power line and a corresponding increased flux between 12 m and 45 m on either side of the centre of the power line. The average shift in flux density is, however, extremely small (less than 0.1%) and probably not measurable with existing detector technology. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sang Hui

    1991-02-01

    This book deals with radiation physics, which introduces atomic theory and an atomic nucleus of materials, conception of an atom and materials, wave and particle, X ray generation and character, a radioactive element and change law, nature of radioactivity, neutron rays, fission, alpha collapse and beta collage and a neutrino collapse of artificial radioactivity such as collapse of artificial nucleus and artificial radioactivity and radiative capture, interaction with materials like interaction between a charged particle and materials and interaction among X-ray, r-ray and materials, radiation of quantity and unit and a charged particle accelerator.

  17. Dosimetry of environmental radiations (cosmic ray)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Keizo

    1978-01-01

    Cosmic ray is dominant as environmental radiation, though the experimental determination made on cosmic ray doses is few in Japan. The free air ionization intensity at sea level due to cosmic ray has been estimated in the Bay of Wakasa, Japan, at middle geomagnetic latitude (25 deg. N), in October 1977. The ionization chambers used were two air and one argon types. Where the responses to cosmic and terrestrial gamma rays were equal, the ionization intensity due to cosmic ray was obtained by subtracting the ionization intensity due to terrestrial gamma ray from the total ionization intensity. As the terrestrial gamma ray, (1) U-238 series, Th-232 series, and K-40 in seawater, (2) K-40 in the material of a wooden ship, and (3) Rn-222 and its daughter products in the atmosphere were considered. The result of free air ionization due to cosmic ray with the argon chamber was slightly smaller than those with the other two air chambers; however, both were in good agreement within standard errors. (JPN.)

  18. Cosmic radiation and air crew exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Lisjak, I.; Vekic, B.; Planinic, J.

    2005-01-01

    When the primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they interact with the air nuclei and induce cosmic-ray shower. When an aircraft is in the air, the radiation field within includes many types of radiation of large energy range; the field comprises mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons. Cosmic radiation dose for crews of air crafts A 320 and ATR 42 was measured using TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; radon concentration in the atmosphere was measured using the Alpha Guard radon detector. The total annual dose estimated for the A 320 aircraft crew, at altitudes up to 12000 meters, was 5.3 mSv (including natural radon radiation dose of 1.1 mSv).(author)

  19. European Legalisation on Protection Against Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courades, M.

    1999-01-01

    Specific provisions on protection of aircrew against cosmic radiation have been laid down for the first time at EU level as part of the Basic Safety Standards for the Health Protection of the General Public and Workers against the Dangers of Ionizing Radiation (Council Directive 96/29/Euratom of 13 May 1996). These provisions, focusing mainly on health and radiological surveillance, are minimal requirements; therefore the Directive leaves significant discretion to the Member States as regards actions to be taken; Member States have to transpose these provisions into national law before 13 May 2000. Further harmonisation of Community regulations on civil aviation safety will be needed in the field of protection against cosmic radiation. This is to obtain a high level of radiation protection for the aircrew and to maintain fair competition under the common transport policy. Additionally, particular requirement are foreseen for detection and monitoring devices as well as for working instructions (Operations Manual). (author)

  20. Radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation physics program is directed toward understanding the basic mechanism by which charged particles lose energy in traversing matter, and presenting this information in a way meaningful to the study of radiation dosimetry and biological damage. Measurements of the absolute cross sections for the ejection of electrons from ionization by fast charged particles, measurements of optical fluorescence from liquid systems, preliminary analyses of electron emission cross sections for proton bombardment of carbon foils, and nonexponential decay of fluorescence in both polar and nonpolar solutions are covered

  1. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The 31 st International Cosmic Ray Conference (31.ICRC) was held in Lodz on 7-15 July 2009. The Conference was organized by the University of Lodz (Department of High Energy Astrophysics and Department of Astrophysics) and IPJ (Department of Cosmic Ray Physics). ICRCs are held every two years and are the largest forums to present and discuss the current status of Cosmic Ray studies. The Conference we co-organized gathered about 750 scientists (including about 50 from Poland). This was a remarkable event. The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the field of high energy Cosmic Rays. Cosmic Rays are energetic panicles from outside the Solar System. Most studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: - the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for the high energies of the particles. - experimental search for sources of Cosmic Rays, - studies of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites, - properties of particle interactions at very high energies. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students has become a popular way to introduce panicle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people, in Lodz and Poznan we organize workshops on particle physics for high school students. This is part of the European activity: EPPOG Masterclass - Hands on CERN. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of panicles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EASs and their properties is the main means of studying experimentally high energy Cosmic Rays: · The satellite experiment JEM-EUSO will observe EASs from the International Space Station. The main target is to find Cosmic Ray Sources for the highest energy Cosmic Rays. JEM-EUSO will collect a large number of events since it will observe a large area of the atmosphere. We are participating in the preparation of this mission. · The KASCADE-Grande addresses

  2. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics; Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high-energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: - Experimental and phenomenological studies of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. - Studies of ultra-high energy (above 10 19 eV) cosmic rays: determination of energy spectrum and mass composition of primary particles - Studies of asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions based on the analysis of cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. - Studies of mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 - 10 17 eV. - Registration of cosmic ray intensity variation correlated with solar activity. Theoretical and experimental studies of Extensive Air Shower properties are performed mostly basing on the results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. We have noticed unexplainable delayed signals registered about 500-900 microseconds after the main EAS pulse. Neutron transport simulations were performed in collaboration with JINR in Dubna. We prepared hardware for further experimental study of this effect. Continuous registrations of 5 GeV muon flux with the underground muon telescope have been carried on over the year 2001. We have detected several changes of muon intensity correlated with Forbush decreases registered at lower energies. We have also started registrations of muon counting rate in the on-surface scintillation detectors. These measurements will be included to the analysis of the disturbed energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays and its dependence on interplanetary disturbances related to the solar activity. In construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments the Lodz group collaborates with many foreign institutes and laboratories: Forschungszentrum in Karlsruhe (Germany), College de France, Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, JINR in Dubna (Russia), Uppsala University (Sweden) and DESY (Germany). We have prepared a

  3. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text:The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the area of high-energy physics and cosmic ray physics related to: * Experimental and phenomenological studies of Extensive Air Showers induced by cosmic ray particles. * Studies of ultra-high energy (above 10 19 eV) cosmic rays: determination of energy spectrum and mass composition of primary particles * Studies of asymptotic properties of hadronic interactions based on the analysis of cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. * Studies of mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 10 15 -10 17 eV. * Registration of cosmic ray intensity variation correlated with solar activity. Theoretical and experimental studies of Extensive Air Shower properties are performed mostly based on the results obtained by the Lodz Extensive Air Shower Array. We have noticed unexplainable delayed signals registered about 500-900 microseconds after the main EAS pulse. We prepared hardware for further experimental study of this effect. Continuous registrations of 5 GeV muon flux with the underground muon telescope have been carried on during 2001. We detected several changes of muon intensity correlated with Forbush decreases registered at lower energies. We have also started registration of the muon counting rate in on-surface scintillation detectors. These measurements will be included to the analysis of the disturbed energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays and its dependence on interplanetary disturbances related to solar activity. In construction and data interpretation of cosmic ray experiments the Lodz group collaborates with many foreign institutes and laboratories: Forschungszentrum in Karlsruhe (Germany), College de France, Institute for Nuclear Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden) and DESY (Germany). We have prepared a project of large air shower array for studies of cosmic rays up to 10 20 eV. Detectors would be placed on the roofs of high

  4. Dose evaluation and protection of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Takagi, Toshiharu

    2004-01-01

    This paper explained the effects of cosmic radiation on aircraft crews and astronauts, as well as related regulations. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the practice of radiation exposure management for the handling/storage of radon and materials containing natural radioactive substances, as well as for boarding jet aircraft and space flight. Common aircraft crew members are not subject to radiation exposure management in the USA and Japan. In the EU, the limit value is 6 mSv per year, and for the crew group exceeding this value, it is recommended to keep records containing appropriate medical examination results. Pregnant female crewmembers are required to keep an abdominal surface dose within 1 mSv. For astronauts, ICRP is in the stage of thinking about exposure management. In the USA, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement has set dose limits for 30 days, 1 year, and lifetime, and recommends lifetime effective dose limits against carcinogenic risk for each gender and age group. This is the setting of the dose limits so that the risk of carcinogenesis, to which space radiation exposure is considered to contribute, will reach 3%. For cosmic radiation environments at spacecraft inside and aircraft altitude, radiation doses can be calculated for astronauts and crew members, using the calculation methods for effective dose and dose equivalent for tissue. (A.O.)

  5. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. The energy spectrum (power law energy dependence) suggests non-thermal origin of these particles. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: · the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for high energies of particles (up to about 1020 eV/particle), · an estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, · properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies (nuclear interactions at energies exceeding energy available in the laboratories). Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g.: · '' cosmic weather '' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students becomes a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. We organize in Lodz several workshops on particle physics for high school students. This is a part of European activity: Masterclass - Hands on CERN. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In Lodz Department we run Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are continuously being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. Back in 2004 we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors

  6. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: · the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for high energies of particles · an estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, · properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies. Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. · '' cosmic weather '' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students becomes a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. We organize in Lodz several workshops on particle physics for high school students. This is a part of European activity: EPPOG's Masterclass - Hands on CERN. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In Lodz Department we run Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are continuously being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. In 2004 we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors placed on the roofs of high schools in Lodz. We received funds from the City of Lodz budget to make a pilot project and equip 10 high schools, each with four 1m 2 detectors and GPS. The network is

  7. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics; Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. The energy spectrum (power law energy dependence) suggests a non-thermal origin of these particles. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems such as: - the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for the high energies of particles (up to about 10 20 eV/particle), - estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or a search for sources of Cosmic Rays, - properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies (nuclear interactions at energies exceeding energies available in the laboratories). Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. - ''cosmic weather'' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejections); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main theme of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In the Lodz Department we run an Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are registered. We concentrate our experimental research on the explanation of particle detection delayed by hundreds of microseconds with respect to the main EAS signals. In the underground (I5 meters) laboratory we continuously register muon (5 GeV energy threshold) flux with the multidirectional telescope. We have observed several disturbances (Forbush Decreases) in muon counting rates. The interpretation of these events for ''cosmic weather'' and for Cosmic Ray transport models in the interplanetary plasma are on going in collaboration with

  8. Dosimetry for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.T.; McAulay, I.R.; Schrewe, U.J.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft crew and frequent flyers are exposed to elevated levels of cosmic radiation of galactic and solar origin and secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere, aircraft structure, etc. This has been recognised for some time and estimates of the exposure of aircraft crew have been made previously and included in, for example, UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) publications. The recent increased interest has been brought about by several factors - the consideration that the relative biological effectiveness of the neutron component was being underestimated; the trend towards higher cruising altitudes for subsonic commercial aircraft and business jet aircraft; and most importantly, the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 60, and the revision of the Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive (BSS). In 1992, the European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) established a Working Group to consider the exposure to cosmic radiation of aircraft crew, and the scientific and technical problems associated with radiation protection dosimetry for this occupational group. The Working Group was composed of fifteen scientists (plus a corresponding member) involved in this field of study and with knowledge of radiation measurement at aviation altitudes. This paper is based on the findings of this Working Group. (author)

  9. Cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-11-01

    Modifying slightly the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe. This new cosmological model is consistent with the Mach principle, Einsteinian general theory of relativity, and observations of the universe. The origin, structure, evolution, and expansion of the black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published recently in a scientific journal: Progress in Physics. This paper explains the observed 2.725 K cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present universe with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses. According to the black hole universe model, the observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe, which can be considered as an ideal black body. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient materials and merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. A governing equation that expresses the possible thermal history of the black hole universe is derived from the Planck law of black body radiation and radiation energy conservation. The result obtained by solving the governing equation indicates that the radiation temperature of the present universe can be ˜2.725 K if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and is therefore consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. A smaller or younger black hole universe usually cools down faster. The characteristics of the original star-like or supermassive black hole are not critical to the physical properties of the black hole universe at present, because matter and radiation are mainly from the outside space, i.e., the mother universe.

  10. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high-energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: - the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for the high energies of the particles - an estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or the search for sources of Cosmic Rays, - properties of high-energy particle interactions at very high energies. Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. - '' cosmic weather '' forecasting - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares/Coronal Mass Ejection events); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipelines, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students has become a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. We organize in Lodz and Poznan workshops on particle physics for high school students. This is a part of the European activity: EPPOG's Masterclass - Hands on CERN. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimentally study's very high energy Cosmic Rays. Locally in Lodz we concentrate on methodological studies of the detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and the interpretation of this phenomenon. We have also performed two series of neutron background measurements in the deep underground Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy (within the ILIAS-TA Project). In 2004, we began the Roland Maze Project, a network of EAS detectors placed on the roofs of high schools in Lodz. The pilot project is to equip 10 high schools, each with four 1m

  11. Cosmic radiation doses at flight level altitudes of airliners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, E.; Petr, I.

    1985-01-01

    Changes are discussed in flux density of cosmic radiation particles with time as are the origin of cosmic radiation, the level of cosmic radiation near the Earth's surface, and the determination of cosmic radiation doses in airliners. Doses and dose rates are given measured on different flight routes. In spite of the fact that the flight duration at an altitude of about 10 km makes for about 80% of the total flight time, the overall radiation burden of the crews at 1000 flight hours a year is roughly double that of the rest of the population. (J.C.)

  12. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. The energy spectrum (power law energy dependence) suggests a non-thermal origin of these particles. Most studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: - the nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for high energies of particles (up to about 10 20 eV/particle), - estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, - properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies (nuclear interactions at energies exceeding energy available in laboratories). - Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. - ''cosmic weather'' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students is a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering the EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In our Lodz Department we run an Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are continuously being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. In 2004 we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors placed on the roofs of high schools in Lodz. We received funds from the City of Lodz's budget to make a pilot project and equip 10 high schools, each with

  13. Department of Cosmic Ray Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Cosmic Ray Physics in Lodz is involved in basic research in the high energy Cosmic Ray field. Cosmic Rays are energetic particles from outside the Solar System. The energy spectrum (power law energy dependence) suggests a non-thermal origin of these particles. Most of the studies of Cosmic Rays address fundamental problems: · The nature of the physical and astrophysical processes responsible for the high energies of the particles (up to about 1020 eV/particle), · An estimation of the astrophysical conditions at the acceleration sites and/or search for sources of Cosmic Rays, · properties of high energy particle interactions at very high energies (nuclear interactions at energies exceeding energy available in the laboratories). Some Cosmic Ray studies might have practical (commercial) implications, e.g. · 'cosmic weather' forecast - predictions of geomagnetic disturbances related to Solar activity changes (due to large Solar Flares / events of Coronal Mass Ejection); these are important for large electricity networks, gas pipes, radio-wave connections, space missions and satellite experiments. Presentation of Cosmic Ray registration to high school students becomes a popular way to introduce particle physics detectors and elementary particle detection techniques to young people. Energetic Cosmic Ray particles produce cascades of particles in the atmosphere, called Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Registering EAS and their properties is the main way of experimental studies of very high energy Cosmic Rays. In the Lodz Department we run the Extensive Air Shower array where EAS are being registered. We concentrate on the studies of detection of neutrons correlated with EAS and interpretation of this phenomenon. In 2004, we started realisation of the Roland Maze Project, the network of EAS detectors placed on roofs of high schools in Lodz. We received funds from the City of Lodz budget to make a pilot project and equip 10 high schools, each with four 1 m

  14. Cosmic radiation algorithm utilizing flight time tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katja Kojo, M.Sc.; Mika Helminen, M.Sc.; Anssi Auvinen, M.D.Ph.D.; Katja Kojo, M.Sc.; Anssi Auvinen, M.D.Ph.D.; Gerhard Leuthold, D.Sc.

    2006-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is considerably higher on cruising altitudes used in aviation than at ground level. Exposure to cosmic radiation may increase cancer risk among pilots and cabin crew. The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has recommended that air crew should be classified as radiation workers. Quantification of cosmic radiation doses is necessary for assessment of potential health effects of such occupational exposure. For Finnair cabin crew (cabin attendants and stewards), flight history is not available for years prior to 1991 and therefore, other sources of information on number and type of flights have to be used. The lack of systematically recorded information is a problem for dose estimation for many other flight companies personnel as well. Several cosmic radiation dose estimations for cabin crew have been performed using different methods (e.g. 2-5), but they have suffered from various shortcomings. Retrospective exposure estimation is not possible with personal portable dosimeters. Methods that employ survey data for occupational dose assessment are prone to non-differential measurement error i.e. the cabin attendants do not remember correctly the number of past flights. Assessment procedures that utilize surrogate measurement methods i.e. the duration of employment, lack precision. The aim of the present study was to develop an assessment method for individual occupational exposure to cosmic radiation based on flight time tables. Our method provides an assessment method that does not require survey data or systematic recording of flight history, and it is rather quick, inexpensive, and possible to carry out in all other flight companies whose past time tables for the past periods exist. Dose assessment methods that employ survey data are prone to random error i.e. the cabin attendants do not remember correctly the number or types of routes that they have flown during the past. Our method avoids this since survey data are not needed

  15. Cosmic radiation dose in the aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Varga, M.; Planinic, J.; Vekic, B.

    2006-01-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A 320 and ATR 42 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb - Paris - Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 μSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the total dose of 75 μSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to the Japan (24 hours-flight: Zagreb - Frankfurt - Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 μSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude the neutron component curried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data. (author)

  16. Cosmic thermalization and the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    A different origin of the microwave background radiation (MBR) is suggested in view of some of the difficulties associated with the standard interpretation. Extensive stellar-type nucleosynthesis could provide radiation with the requisite energy density of the MBR and its spectral features are guaranteed by adequate thermalization of the above radiation by an ambient intergalactic dust medium. This thermalization must have occurred in quite recent epochs, say around epochs of redshift z = 7. The model emerges with consistent limits on the cosmic abundance of helium, the general luminosity evolution of the extragalactic objects, the baryonic matter density in the Universe (or, equivalently the deceleration parameter) and the degree of isotropy of MBR. The model makes definite predictions on issues like the properties of the intergalactic thermalizers, the degree of isotropy of MBR at submillimetre wavelengths and cluster emission in the far infrared. (author)

  17. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the attributes of the 2.7-K microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, with emphasis on the analytic phase of CBR studies. Methods for the direct measurement of the CBR spectrum are discussed. Attention is given to receivers, antennas, absolute receiver calibration, atmospheric emission and absorption, the galactic background contribution, the analysis of LF measurements, and recent HF observations of the CBR spectrum. Measurements of the large-angular-scale intensity distribution of the CBR (the most convincing evidence that the radiation is of cosmological origin) are examined, along with limits on the linear polarization of the CBR. A description is given of the NASA-sponsored Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission. The results of the COBE mission will be a set of sky maps showing, in the wave number range from 1 to 10,000 kaysers, the galactic background radiation due to synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic rays, to diffuse thermal emission from H II regions, and to diffuse thermal emission from interstellar and interplanetary dust, as well as a residue consisting of the CBR and whatever other cosmological background might exist

  18. Cloud chamber photographs of the cosmic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Rochester, George Dixon

    1952-01-01

    Cloud Chamber Photographs of the Cosmic Radiation focuses on cloud chamber and photographic emulsion wherein the tracks of individual subatomic particles of high energy are studied. The publication first offers information on the technical features of operation and electrons and cascade showers. Discussions focus on the relationship in time and space of counter-controlled tracks; techniques of internal control of the cloud chamber; cascade processes with artificially-produced electrons and photons; and nuclear interaction associated with an extensive shower. The manuscript then elaborates on

  19. Learning Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides a precious window on fundamental physics at very high energy scales, possibly including quantum gravity, GUTs and supersymmetry. The CMB has already enabled defect-based rivals to inflation to be discarded, and will be able to falsify many inflationary models. In combination with other cosmological observations, including those of high-redshift supernovae and large-scale structure, the CMB is on the way to providing a detailed budget for the density of the Universe, to be compared with particle-physics calculations for neutrinos and cold dark matter. Thus CMB measurements complement experiments with the LHC and long-baseline neutrino beams.

  20. Atmospheric ions and pollution. Ions of the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachon, A.

    1977-01-01

    The principal historical steps before the so-called 'cosmic radiation' was known as an extra-terrestrial radiation are described. The origin, nature and energy of the radiation are discussed together with its evolution all along its path through atmosphere, in view of the interaction that occurs between the radiation and the atmosphere. The mechanism of the ionization induced by cosmic radiation is analyzed, the corresponding energy balance is established and the possible singularities in air ionization induced by cosmic rays are discussed [fr

  1. TeV Blazars and Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Aharonian, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The recent developments in studies of TeV radiation from blazars are highlighted and the implications of these results for derivation of cosmologically important information about the cosmic infrared background radiation are discussed.

  2. Probing exotic physics with cosmic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, Dan; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, collider experiments have been the primary tool used in searching for particle physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss alternative approaches for exploring exotic physics scenarios using high energy and ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos. Such neutrinos can be used to study interactions at energies higher, and over baselines longer, than those accessible to colliders. In this way, neutrino astronomy can provide a window into fundamental physics which is highly complementary to collider techniques. I will discuss the role of neutrino astronomy in fundamental physics, considering the use of such techniques in studying several specific scenarios including low scale gravity models, Standard Model electroweak instanton induced interactions, decaying neutrinos and quantum decoherence

  3. Cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. Current understandings and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic gamma-ray background radiation is one of the most fundamental observables in the gamma-ray band. Although the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation has been a mystery for a long time, the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has recently measured it at 0.1-820 GeV and revealed that the cosmic GeV gamma-ray background is composed of blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies. However, Fermi still leaves the following questions. Those are dark matter contribution, origins of the cosmic MeV gamma-ray background, and the connection to the IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino events. In this proceeding, I will review the current understandings of the cosmic gamma-ray background and discuss future prospects of cosmic gamma-ray background radiation studies. (author)

  4. Interpretation of observed cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.; Mendis, A.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the observed cosmic microwave background radiation, which closely fits a 2.7 K black body spectrum, is generally claimed to be the strongest piece of evidence in support of hot big bang cosmologies by its proponents. It is here stated that the observed radiation corresponds to the distribution of dust in galaxies or protogalaxies with a temperature approximately 110 K at the epoch corresponding to Z approximately 40, and not to a plasma of temperature > approximately 3000 K at an earlier epoch (Z > approximately 1000), as indicated by the canonical model of big bang cosmologies. The claim that the latter lends strong support to hot big bang cosmologies is stated to be without foundation. It is concluded that the microwave background radiation must be explained not in terms of a coupling between matter and radiation at the present epoch, but in terms of a coupling in a previous epoch within the framework of an evolutionary cosmology. (U.K.)

  5. Existence of dark matter with observed properties of cosmic microwave background radiation substantiates three conservation laws of classical physics and all principles of quantum mechanics as creates the value of Planck’s constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriev, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    Astronomical data indicate a presence of dark matter (DM) in the space, what is necessary for explanation of observed dynamics of the galaxies within Newtonian mechanics. DM, at its very low density (∼10-26kg/m3), constitutes main part of the matter in the Universe, 10 times the mass of all visible cosmic bodies. No doubt, namely properties of DM, which fills space, must determine its physical properties and fundamental physical laws. Taking into account observed properties of cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), whose energy is ∼90% of all cosmic radiation, and understanding that this radiation is produced by DM motion, conservation laws of classical physics and principles of quantum mechanics receive their materialistic substantiation. Thus, CMBR high homogeneity and isotropy (∼10-4), and hence the same properties of DM (and space) justify momentum and angular momentum conservation laws, respectively, according to E. Noether's theorems. CMBR has black body spectrum at ∼2.7K with maximum wavelength ∼1.9·10-3m, what allows calculate the value of mechanical action produced by DM thermal motion (∼7·10-34 J·s). This value corresponds well to the Planck’s constant, which is the mechanical action too, what gives materialistic basis for all principles of quantum mechanics. Obtained results directly confirm the reality of DM existence, and show that CMBR is an observed display of DM thermal motion. Understanding that namely from DM occur known creation of electron-positron pairs as contrarily rotating material vortexes (according to their spins) let substantiate positron nature of ball lightning what first explains all its observed specific properties.

  6. On the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will try to give a pale idea to the reader of what could be the Cosmic Microwave Background (RCFM that, according to the traditional Big Bang model, was generated by a primordial explosion. With this purpose we find it very important to present a brief historical summary of how the Microcosm, based on the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics (MPPE, and the Macrocosm, based on the Standard Big Bang Model (MPBB, have evolved over time. In addition, in the final part of the article we will analyze the two physical processes presented in the literature that seek to explain the RCFM: Bariogenesis and Plasma Quark-Gluon.

  7. The Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, John [Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-07

    ;Relic Radiation' (a much better name for the CMB) was done in Russia, and it is good to see these early authors receive the credit they deserve. But these historical advantages cannot obscure the fact that good books already exist on this subject, whereas the present text does not feel all that carefully thought through. One reflection of this may be found in the index: at only two pages, this is far too short to be useful-and it doesn't help that all the page numbers I tried to look up were incorrect. In contrast, the cosmology texts by Dodelson and by Mukhanov, for example, seem to me to be more consistent in their level and clearer in their pedagogical approach. They find a better balance between formalism and insight, and have ample problem material to help the reader progress. These texts are good recommendations for advanced students; the present book contains much useful information, but will appeal most to those who already know the subject well. (Book review of The Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background, Pavel D Naselsky, Dimitry I Novikov and Igor D Novikov, 2006 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 10: 052-185-550-0, ISBN 13: 978-052-185-550-1)

  8. Radiation protection of aviation personnel at exposure by cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicanova, M.; Pinter, I.; Liskova, A.

    2008-01-01

    For determination of radiation dose of aviation personnel we used the software EPCARD (European Program Package for the Calculation of Aviation Route Doses) developed by National Research Center for Environmental Health - Institute of Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany) and the software CARI 6, developed by the FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (USA). Both codes are accomplished by the Joint Aviation Authorities. Experimental measurement and estimation of radiation doses of aviation personnel at exposure by cosmic radiation were realised in the period of lowered solar activity. All-year effective dose of pilots, which worked off at least 11 months exceeds the value 1 mSv in 2007. The mean all-year effective dose of member of aviation personnel at exposure by cosmic radiation is 2.5 mSv and maximal all-year effective dose, which we measured in 2007 was 4 mSv. We assumed that in the period of increased solar activity the all-year effective doses may by higher

  9. Some problems of physics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Nearest 15-20 years will be years of flourishing of experimental researches into the energy of cosmic rays at > or ∼ 10 15 eV and of new discoveries in the physics of elementary particles of ultrahigh energies. Unsolved problems of modern physics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, which are relevant to the problems of elementary particles physics, are reviewed

  10. Nuclear Physics Meets the Sources of the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2017-07-07

    The determination of the injection composition of cosmic ray nuclei within astrophysical sources requires sufficiently accurate descriptions of the source physics and the propagation - apart from controlling astrophysical uncertainties. We therefore study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic ray astrophysics, which involves the photo-disintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that the impact of nuclear model uncertainties is potentially larger in environments with non-thermal radiation fields than in the cosmic microwave background. We also study the impact of nuclear models on the nuclear cascade in a gamma-ray burst radiation field, simulated at a level of complexity comparable to the most precise cosmic ray propagation code. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions in cosmic ray sources and propagation.

  11. Qigong meets quantum physics experiencing cosmic oneness

    CERN Document Server

    Bock-Möbius, Imke

    2012-01-01

    Quantum physicists have reached a point commonly only attained by mystics: they understand something with amazing clarity yet can only talk about it in parables and metaphors. In this context, qigong with its Daoist background is a powerful way to integrate these apparently opposing ways of apperception and understanding. It allows us to realise cosmic oneness in the activities of daily life. This book succeeds in presenting both an easily accessible outline of quantum physics and also an appreciation of mysticism beyond vagueness and obscurity. From here it describes the physical and mental movements of qigong as a way of integrating body and mind, head and heart, detailing specific exercises and outlining their rationale and effects.

  12. COMPARISON OF COSMIC RAYS RADIATION DETECTORS ON-BOARD COMMERCIAL JET AIRCRAFT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubančák, Ján; Ambrožová, Iva; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Jakoubek, J.; Kyselová, D.; Ploc, Ondřej; Bemš, J.; Štěpán, Václav; Uchihori, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 484-488 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cosmic radiation * commercial jet aircraft * radiation dose Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  13. Human population exposure to cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Lowder, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    Critical evaluations of existing data on cosmic radiation in the atmosphere and in interplanetary space have been carried out in order to estimate the exposure of the world's population to this important component of natural background radiation. Data on population distribution and mean terrain heights on a 1 x 1 degree grid have been folded in to estimate regional and global dose distributions. The per caput annual dose equivalent at ground altitudes is estimated to be 270 μSv from charged particles and 50 μSv from neutrons. More than 100 million people receive more than 1 mSv in a year, and two million in excess of 5 mSv. Aircraft flight crews and frequent flyers receive an additional annual dose equivalent in the order of 1 mSv, though the global per caput annual dose equivalent from airplane flights is only about 1 μSv. Future space travellers on extended missions are likely to receive dose equivalents in the range 0.11 Sv, with the possibility of higher doses at relatively high dose rates from unusually large solar flares. These results indicate a critical need for a better understanding of the biological significance of chronic neutron and heavy charged particle exposure. (author)

  14. Radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana Maria

    1994-01-01

    A brief historical review of radioactivity, nuclear physics, atomic nucleus, nuclear models,nuclear instability, mass defect, nuclear transmutations, radioactivity phenomenon, Batemand equations, decay constants, half life, mean life, des integration rates,units.Alpha, Beta and gamma decay, other less probably encountered decay modes.Bibliography

  15. Noncommutative black-body radiation: Implications on cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatollahi, A.H.; Hajirahimi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Including loop corrections, black-body radiation in noncommutative space is anisotropic. A direct implication of possible space non-commutativity on the cosmic microwave background map is argued. (authors)

  16. Collapse of radiating fluid spheres and cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    The radiating-fluid-sphere model studied by Lake and Hellaby is reanalyzed to show that flat spacetime is a valid C 1 extension to their model and thus it does not force a violation of strong cosmic censorship

  17. Radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    As in other technologically based field, progress in medical imaging occurs both by ''breakthroughs,'' such as completely new concepts, and by evolutionary advances, such as incremental improvements in existing technology. Both types of advances are of fundamental importance to the field. The new kinestatic charge detection technique, which represents a fundamentally new concept in image recording, qualifies as a ''breakthrough.'' This and several other articles describe new approaches to digital radiography, focusing in particular on the formidable problems of trying to match the excellent image recording and display capabilities of x-ray film. An example of an incremental improvement is a new design for x-ray tube filaments. The modified filament design can provide a significant reduction in focal-spot size, without loss of tube-loading capacity. Because spatial resolution is limited in many practical situations by focal-spot blurring, this incremental improvement in the design of an existing piece of hardware is as important a contribution to improving image quality as a new type of digital detector with a two-fold improvement in spatial resolution. The author has included a few articles dealing with practical issues in radiation protection and quality assurance of x-ray imaging systems

  18. Transition-radiation detectors for cosmic-ray research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Chicago Univ., Ill.

    1975-01-01

    Transition-radiation detectors for cosmic-ray work are described which consist of plastic foam of multiple plastic foil radiators, followed by proportional chambers. A summary of the properties of such detectors is given, and the detection and discrimination efficiencies for energetic particles are discussed. Several possible applications of such devices for studies of cosmic-ray particles in the energy region γ=E/mc 2 >10 3 are advertised

  19. The Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, John

    2007-01-01

    The award of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics is a reminder to non-specialists that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has yielded astonishing advances in our understanding of cosmology. Mather and Smoot received their prize for work done with NASA's COBE satellite in the early 1990s, but the subject has if anything accelerated since then. The results from NASA's WMAP satellite, reported in 2003 and 2006, have proved COBE's equal in importance and have generated huge worldwide interest. There could therefore hardly be a better time to be writing a detailed textbook to explain what the fuss is all about to a new generation of research students. A comprehensive treatment of the physics of the CMB is not easy to achieve, because it is connected to so much else in cosmology. A student must have a background knowledge of the geometry and dynamics of an expanding universe, plus a deep exposure to the physics of quantum fields, in order to understand the modern 'inflationary' view in which the universe was set expanding by the tension of the vacuum, and was seeded with small inhomogeneities as a result of quantum fluctuations. Although the theory of inflation is not yet verified, the CMB has the potential to accomplish this; testing inflation is undoubtedly one of the principal aims of cosmology over the next decade. Even with this preparation, understanding the properties of the CMB is quite hard at the professional level, requiring the perturbation expansion of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. These technical difficulties are particularly strong in the frontier area of CMB polarization. Naselsky and his collaborators have allocated themselves a relatively brief 255 pages in which to meet these challenges, so some compromise is inevitable. Although the preface is not explicit about the assumed prior knowledge, no systematic material on background cosmology or on inflation is to be found. The former is reasonable in a graduate-level text (which this certainly is

  20. Anisotropy of the cosmic blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, D T

    1986-06-20

    The universe is filled with thermal radiation having a current temperature of 2.75 K. Originating in the very early universe, this radiation furnishes strong evidence that the Big Bang cosmology best describes our expanding universe from an incredibly hot, compacted early stage until now. The model can be used to extrapolate our physics backward in time to predict events whose effects might be observable in the 2.75 K radiation today. The spectrum and isotropy are being studied with sophisticated microwave radiometers on the ground, in balloons, and in satellites. The results are as predicted by the simple theory: the spectrum is that of a blackbody (to a few percent) and the radiation is isotropic (to 0.01 percent) except for a local effect due to our motion through the radiation. However, a problem is emerging. Primordial fluctuations in the mass density, which later became the great clusters of galaxies that we see today, should have left an imprint on the 2.75 K radiation-bumpiness on the sky at angular scales of about 10 arc minutes. They have not yet been seen.

  1. Cosmic Ray Physics with the IceCube Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolanoski, H

    2013-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory with its 1-km 3 in-ice detector and the 1-km 2 surface detector (IceTop) constitutes a three-dimensional cosmic ray detector well suited for general cosmic ray physics. Various measurements of cosmic ray properties, such as energy spectra, mass composition and anisotropies, have been obtained from analyses of air showers at the surface and/or atmospheric muons in the ice.

  2. Cosmic ray physics goes to school

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    With the help of a CERN physicist, German Schools bring the Largest Cosmic Ray Detector in Europe one step closer to reality   Eric Berthier and Robert Porret (CERN, ST/HM), Frej Torp and Christian Antfolk from the Polytechnics Arcada in Finland, and Karsten Eggert, physicist at CERN who initiated this project, during the installation of cosmic ray detectors in the Pays de Gex, at point 4. Niina Patrikainen and Frej Torp, Finnish students from Rovaniemi and Arcada Polytechnics, installing cosmic ray counters at the Fachhochschule in Duesseldorf. The science of cosmic ray detection is growing, literally. Cosmic rays, energetic particles from space, strike our planet all the time. They collide with the air molecules in our upper atmosphere and initiate large showers of elementary particles (mainly electrons, photons, hadrons and muons) which rain down upon the earth. The shower size and the particle density in the showers reflect the initial energy of the cosmic ray particle, a detail which makes d...

  3. The effects of cosmic radiation on implantable medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, P.

    1996-01-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits, with the benefits of low power consumption, represent the state of the art technology for implantable medical devices. Three significant sources of radiation are classified as having the ability to damage or alter the behavior of implantable electronics; Secondary neutron cosmic radiation, alpha particle radiation from the device packaging and therapeutic doses(up to 70 Gγ) of high energy radiation used in radiation oncology. The effects of alpha particle radiation from the packaging may be eliminated by the use of polyimide or silicone rubber die coatings. The relatively low incidence of therapeutic radiation incident on an implantable device and the use of die coating leaves cosmic radiation induced secondary neutron single event upset (SEU) as the main pervasive ionising radiation threat to the reliability of implantable devices. A theoretical model which predicts the susceptibility of a RAM cell to secondary neutron cosmic radiation induced SEU is presented. The model correlates well within the statistical uncertainty associated with both the theoretical and field estimate. The predicted Soft Error Rate (SER) is 4.8 x l0 -12 upsets/(bit hr) compared to an observed upset rate of 8.5 x 10 -12 upsets/(bit hr) from 20 upsets collected over a total of 284672 device days. The predicted upset rate may increase by up to 20% when consideration is given to patients flying in aircraft The upset rate is also consistent with the expected geographical variations of the secondary cosmic ray neutron flux, although insufficient upsets precluded a statistically significant test. This is the first clinical data set obtained indicating the effects of cosmic radiation on implantable devices. Importantly, it may be used to predict the susceptibility of future to the implantable device designs to the effects of cosmic radiation

  4. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    In situ measurements in the magnetospheres together with general advancement in plasma physics are now necessitating introduction of a number of effects that have been recently discovered or earlier neglected. Examples are: electric double layers (like in the lower magnetosphere); thin current layer (like in the magnetopause) giving space a cellular structure; current produced filaments (e.g., in prominences, solar corona and interstellar clouds). Further it is important to use the electric current (particle) description and to study the whole circuit in which the current flows. The pinch effect cannot be neglected as is now usually done. The critical velocity phenomenon is essential, for example for the band structure of solar system. Theory of dusty plasmas is important. The result is a change in so many theories in cosmic plasma physics that it is appropriate to speak of an introduction of a new paradigm. This should be based on empirical knowledge from magnetospheric and laboratory investigations. Its application to astrophysics in general, including cosmology, will necessarily lead to a revision of, e.g., the present theories of the formation of stars, planets and satellites. It is doubtful whether the big bang cosmology will survive. (Auth.)

  5. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-06-01

    In situ measurements in the magnetospheres together with general advancement in plasma physics are now necessitating introduction of a number of effects that have been recently discovered or earlier neglected. Examples are: 1) Electric double layers (like in the lower magnetosphere) 2) Thin current layer (like in the magnetopause) giving space a cellular structure. 3) Current produced filaments (e.g. in prominences, solar corona and interstellar clouds). 4) Further it is important to use the electric current (particle) description and to study the whole circuit in which the current flows. 5) The pinch effect cannot be neglected as is now usually done. 6) The critical velocity phenomenon is essential, for example for the band structure of solar systems. 7) Theory of dusty plasmas is important. The result is a change in so many theories in cosmic plasma physics that it is appropriate to speak of an introduction of a new paradigm. This should be based on empirical knowledge from magnetospheric and laboratory investigations. Its application to astrophysics in general, including cosmology, will necessarily lead to a revision of e.g. the present theories of the formation of stars, planets and satellites. It is doubtful whether the big bang cosmology will survive. (Author)

  6. ATLAS and ultra high energy cosmic ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfold James

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief introduction to extended air shower cosmic ray physics the current and future deployment of forward detectors at ATLAS is discussed along with the various aspects of the current and future ATLAS programs to explore hadronic physics. The emphasis is placed on those results and future plans that have particular relevance for high-energy, and ultra high-energy, cosmic ray physics. The possible use of ATLAS as an “underground” cosmic muon observatory is briefly considered.

  7. Physical processes in hot cosmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, A.G.; Giovannelli, F.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of many high energy astrophysical phenomena relies on a detailed knowledge of radiation and transport processes in hot plasmas. The understanding of these plasma properties is one of the aims of terrestrial plasma physics. While the microscopic properties of astrophysical plasmas can hardly be determined experimentally, laboratory plasmas are more easily accessible to experimental techniques, but transient phenomena and the interaction of the plasma with boundaries often make the interpretation of measurements cumbersome. This book contains the talks given at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on astro- and plasma-physics in Vulcano, Sicily, May 29-June 2, 1989. The book focuses on three main areas: radiation transport processes in hot (astrophysical and laboratory) plasmas; magnetic fields; their generation, reconnection and their effects on plasma transport properties; relativistic and ultra-high density plasmas

  8. Space research and cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-08-01

    Scientific progress depends on the development of new instruments. The change from Ptolemaic to Copernican cosmology was to a large extent caused by the introduction of telescopes. Similarly, space research has changed our possibilities to explore our large scale environment so drastically that a thorough revision of cosmic physics is now taking place. A list is given of a large number of fields in which this revision is in progress or is just starting. The new view are based on in situ measurements in the magnetospheres. By extrapolating these measurments to more distant regions, also plasma astrophysics in general has to be reconsidered. In certain important fields the basic approach has to be changed. This applies to cosmogony (origin and evolution of the solar system) and to cosmology. New results from laboratory and magnetospheric measurements extrapolated to cosmogonic conditions give an increased reliability to our treatment of the origin and evolution of the Solar system. Especially the Voyager observations of the saturnian rings give us the hope that we may transfer cosmogony from a playground for more or less crazy ideas into a respectable science. (author)

  9. CALIBRATION OF MODIFIED LIULIN DETECTOR FOR COSMIC RADIATION MEASUREMENTS ON-BOARD AIRCRAFT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselová, Dagmar; Ambrožová, Iva; Krist, Pavel; Kubančák, Ján; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Ploc, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 489-492 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Liulin detector * on-board aircraft * cosmic radiation measurement Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  10. Cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew: compilation of measured and calculated data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindborg, L.; Bartlett, D.; Beck, P.; McAulay, I.; Schnuer, K.; Schraube, H.; Spurný, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-4 (2004), s. 417-422 ISSN 0144-8420 Grant - others:EC project(XE) FIGM-CT2000-00068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : cosmic radiation exposure * aircraft crew * measurement Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  11. Hungarian activity in cosmic physics in the last 20 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Ferenc.

    1987-01-01

    The Hungarian activity in cosmic physics is reviewed. Hungary is participant of the Interkosmos collaboration and participates in research programs to study the Earth's magnetosphere, interplanetary space, solar activity, planets of the Solar system, comets (e.g. Vega project to study Halley's comet). Cosmic geodesy is also cultivated in Hungary. A broadening field of the Hungarian cosmic physical activity is the design and construction of measuring intstruments used on board of probes and those of other space probe components, e.g. power supplies, telemetric and telecommunication systems. A brief summary of recent and future projects is also presented. (D.Gy.)

  12. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  13. Radiative hazard of solar flares in the nearterrestrial cosmic space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomenskij, A.V.; Petrov, V.M.; Zil', M.V.; Eremkina, T.M.

    1978-01-01

    Simulation of radiation enviroment due to solar cosmic rays was carried out in the near-terrestrial space. Systematized are the data on cosmic ray flux and spectra detected during 19-th and 20-th cycles of solar activity. 127 flares are considered with proton fluxes of more than 10 proton/cm 2 at energies higher than 30 MeV. Obtained are distribution functions of intervals between flares, flux distribution of flares and characteristic rigidity, and also distribution of magnetic disturbances over Dsub(st)-variation amplitude. The totality of these distributions presents the statistic model of radiation enviroment caused by solar flare protons for the period of maximum solar .activity. This model is intended for estimation of radiation hazard at manned cosmic flights

  14. Cosmic radiation exposure in supersonic and subsonic flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The main body of this document consists of four major sections: (1) an introduction describing the scope of Committee operations and proving a brief exposition of the concepts of radiation protection; (2) a survey of experimental and theoretical data on cosmic radiations that have been obtained in individual research projects with emphasis on investigations that were performed under the sponsorship of the Committee. The studies evaluate galactic and solar radiation as a function of altitude and magnetic latitude; (3) best current estimates of cosmic radiation levels in the atmosphere; and (4) radiation protection recommendations dealing with maximum permissible doses and operational aspects covering satellite warning systems, on-board instrumentation, and forecasting. Nine annexes submitted by individual authors cover various of these subjects in greater detail

  15. Advanced detection techniques for educational experiments in cosmic ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiola, Salvatore; La-Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we describe several detection techniques that can be employed to study cosmic ray properties and carry out training activities at high school and undergraduate level. Some of the proposed devices and instrumentation are inherited from professional research experiments, while others were especially developed and marketed for educational cosmic ray experiments. The educational impact of experiments in cosmic ray physics in high-school or undergraduate curricula will be exploited through various examples, going from simple experiments carried out with small Geiger counters or scintillation devices to more advanced detection instrumentation which can offer starting points for not trivial research work. (authors)

  16. Contribution of cosmic rays to radiation exposure of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.; Nikl, I.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the exposure of the Hungarian population to cosmic rays, the absorbed dose rate in air of cosmic radiation was directly measured by high pressure ionization chamber at ground level on the surface of different bodies of water and at various altitudes on the board of an aircraft. From the dose rates measured this way, the outdoor dose equivalent rate from the ionizing components of cosmic radiation to people living at sea level would be 300-325 μSv per year. Taking into account the altitude distribution of the population, the average weighted dose equivalent is about 320 μSv per year. At Kekestetoe, the highest peak of the Matra Mountains, (the highest altitude in Hungary), the annual dose equivalent is about 50 per cent higher than on the Great Hungarian Plain. (author)

  17. From cosmic ray physics to cosmic ray astronomy: Bruno Rossi and the opening of new windows on the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Bruno Rossi is considered one of the fathers of modern physics, being also a pioneer in virtually every aspect of what is today called high-energy astrophysics. At the beginning of 1930s he was the pioneer of cosmic ray research in Italy, and, as one of the leading actors in the study of the nature and behavior of the cosmic radiation, he witnessed the birth of particle physics and was one of the main investigators in this fields for many years. While cosmic ray physics moved more and more towards astrophysics, Rossi continued to be one of the inspirers of this line of research. When outer space became a reality, he did not hesitate to leap into this new scientific dimension. Rossi's intuition on the importance of exploiting new technological windows to look at the universe with new eyes, is a fundamental key to understand the profound unity which guided his scientific research path up to its culminating moments at the beginning of 1960s, when his group at MIT performed the first in situ measurements of the density, speed and direction of the solar wind at the boundary of Earth's magnetosphere, and when he promoted the search for extra-solar sources of X rays. A visionary idea which eventually led to the breakthrough experiment which discovered Scorpius X-1 in 1962, and inaugurated X-ray astronomy.

  18. Angular anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation is reviewed. Anisotropy on large-scale (dipole and quadrupole) and on small scales is discussed. The smoothing effects of secondary ionization (fractional ionization x) are found to be unimportant over an angular scale greater than approx.= 5(OMEGAx)sup(1/3) degrees. (author)

  19. Measurements of K/Π ratio in cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, J.R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of k/Π ratio in cosmic radiation by its half lives and its fluxes, were carried out. The kaon flux was obtained using the Cherenkov detector, and for pion flux scintillation detectors were used. The final results of K/Π ratio ∼ 0.2 was obtained. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  1. Introduction to high energy cosmic ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, G.; Grillo, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    After a few general qualitative considerations about the characteristics of primary cosmic rays arriving at the top of atmosphere, the fundamental concepts on their propagation and acceleration are discussed. The experimental situation, both from direct and indirect experiments, is presented, followed by a discussion on some concepts on hadronic interactions at high energy which are applied in a simplified and analytical model to the production of secondary particles in atmosphere

  2. PAMELA mission: heralding a new era in cosmic ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricciarini S. B.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available After seven years of data taking in space, the experiment PAMELA is showing very interesting features in cosmic rays, namely in the fluxes of protons, helium, electrons, that might change our basic vision of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy. In addition, PAMELA measurements of cosmic antiproton and positron fluxes are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. The continuous particle detection is allowing a constant monitoring of the solar activity and detailed study of the solar modulation for a long period, giving important improvements to the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA is also measuring the radiation environment around the Earth, and has recently discovered an antiproton radiation belt.

  3. Snowpack snow water equivalent measurement using the attenuation of cosmic gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterhuber, R.; Condreva, K.

    1998-01-01

    Incoming, background cosmic radiation constantly fluxes through the earth's atmosphere. The high energy gamma portion of this radiation penetrates many terrestrial objects, including the winter snowpack. The attenuation of this radiation is exponentially related to the mass of the medium through which it penetrates. For the past three winters, a device measuring cosmic gamma radiation--and its attenuation through snow--has been installed at the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, near Donner Pass, California. This gamma sensor, measuring energy levels between 5 and 15 MeV, has proved to be an accurate, reliable, non-invasive, non-mechanical instrument with which to measure the total snow water equivalent of a snowpack. This paper analyzes three winters' worth of data and discusses the physics and practical application of the sensor for the collection of snow water equivalent data from a remote location

  4. Cosmic gamma radiation of ultra high energy of primordial origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino Filho, F.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    The quantum mechanical effects near a collapsing black hole as shown by Stephen W.Hawking in 1974 to produce streaming particles through tunneling effect was explored in the context of cosmic gamma ray production. In this thesis, we show the possible production of gamma rays of high energies (ν approx 10 41 Hz) in the initial stages of the formation of the Universe by the explosion of primordial mini black holes. These mini black hole explosions happening at 10 -43 s to 10 -37 s after the start perhaps may account for the existing universal cosmic background radiation of 2.7 0 K. (Author) [pt

  5. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  6. Management of cosmic radiation exposure for aircraft crew in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, H.; Sato, T.; Yonehara, H.; Kosako, T.; Fujitaka, K.; Sasaki, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recommended that cosmic radiation exposure of crew in commercial jet aircraft be considered as occupational exposure. In Japan, the Radiation Council of the government has established a guideline that requests domestic airlines to voluntarily keep the effective dose of cosmic radiation for aircraft crew below 5 mSv y -1 . The guideline also gives some advice and policies regarding the method of cosmic radiation dosimetry, the necessity of explanation and education about this issue, a way to view and record dose data, and the necessity of medical examination for crew. The National Inst. of Radiological Sciences helps the airlines to follow the guideline, particularly for the determination of aviation route doses by numerical simulation. The calculation is performed using an original, easy-to-use program package called 'JISCARD EX' coupled with a PHITS-based analytical model and a GEANT4-based particle tracing code. The new radiation weighting factors recommended in 2007 are employed for effective dose determination. The annual individual doses of aircraft crew were estimated using this program. (authors)

  7. Cosmic radiation dose in aircraft - a neutron track etch detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Varga, M. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, P.O. Box 125, Gajev trg 6 (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, P.O. Box 125, Gajev trg 6 (Croatia)], E-mail: planinic@ffos.hr

    2007-12-15

    Cosmic radiation bombards us at high altitude by ionizing particles. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles produced in interaction of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the Earth. The radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard ATR 42 and A 320 aircrafts (flight level of 8 and 11 km, respectively) was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A 320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Other experiments, or dose rate measurements with the neutron dosimeter, consisting of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter, were performed on five intercontinental flights. Comparison of the dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level showed that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose. The dose rate measurements on the flights from the Middle Europe to the South and Middle America, then to Korea and Japan, showed that the flights over or near the equator region carried less dose rate; this was in accordance with the known geomagnetic latitude effect.

  8. Cosmic radiation dose in aircraft - a neutron track etch detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Varga, M.; Planinic, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic radiation bombards us at high altitude by ionizing particles. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles produced in interaction of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the Earth. The radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard ATR 42 and A 320 aircrafts (flight level of 8 and 11 km, respectively) was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A 320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Other experiments, or dose rate measurements with the neutron dosimeter, consisting of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter, were performed on five intercontinental flights. Comparison of the dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level showed that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose. The dose rate measurements on the flights from the Middle Europe to the South and Middle America, then to Korea and Japan, showed that the flights over or near the equator region carried less dose rate; this was in accordance with the known geomagnetic latitude effect

  9. FPGA development board for applications in cosmic rays physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, Ivo; Damov, Krasimir; Dimitrova, Svetla

    2013-01-01

    The modern experiments in cosmic rays and particle physics are usually performed with large number of detectors and signal processing have to be done by complex electronics. The analog signals from the detectors are converted to digital (by discriminators or fast ADC) and connected to different type of logic implemented in FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays). A FPGA development board based on Xilinx XC3S50AN was designed, assembled and tested. The board will be used for developing a modern registering controller (to replace the existing now) for the muon telescope in the University and can be used for other experiments in cosmic rays physics when fast digital pulses have to be processed. Keywords: FPGA, Spartan3A, muon telescope, cosmic rays variations

  10. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-15

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  11. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-01

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  12. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  13. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meier, M.; Trompier, F.; Ambrožová, Iva; Kubančák, Ján; Matthia, D.; Ploc, Ondřej; Santen, N.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, MAY (2016), A24 ISSN 2115-7251 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : aviation * radiation exposure of aircrew * comparison of radiation detectors * galactic cosmic radiation * ambient dose equivalent Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.446, year: 2016

  14. Radiative processes of two entangled atoms in cosmic string spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huabing; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the radiative processes of two static two-level atoms in a maximally entangled state coupled to vacuum electromagnetic field in the cosmic string spacetime. We find that the decay rate from the entangled state to the ground state crucially depends on the atomic separation, the polarization directions of the individual atoms, the atom-string distance and the deficit angle induced by the string. As the atom-string distance increases, the decay rate oscillates around the result in Minkowski spacetime and the amplitude gradually decreases. The oscillation is more severe for larger planar angle deficit. We analyze the decay rate in different circumstances such as near zone and specific polarization cases. Some comparisons between symmetric and antisymmetric states are performed. By contrast with the case in Minkowski spacetime, we can reveal the effects of the cosmic string on the radiative properties of the entangled atoms.

  15. Is there a cosmological cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montmerle, Thierry.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility that cosmological cosmic rays ('CCR': protons and α particles) may have existed in the post recombination era of the early universe (z approximately 100) is examined. In this context, the CCR interact with the ambient gaseous medium. High energy collisions (> 1 GeV/n) give rise to diffuse background γ-rays via π 0 decay, and low energy collisions (10-100 MeV/n) give rise to light nuclei: 6 Li, 7 Li and 7 Be (via the α+α reaction), D and 3 He (via p + α reactions). Taking expansion and ionization losses into account, a system of coupled time-dependent transport equations is solved in the case of a CCR burst. The 1-100 MeV γ-ray background spectrum and the light element abundances are then taken as observational constraints on the CCR hypothesis. It is found that, in this framework, it is possible to account simultaneously for the γ-ray background spectrum and for the 7 Li/H ratio, but there are some difficulties with the 7 Li/ 6 Li ratio. To avoid these, it is possible, because of the spread in the γ-ray data, to lower the CCR flux, so that the CCR hypothesis cannot be ruled out on this basis at present. The theoretical possibility of observing in 1-100 MeV γ-ray background some definite features (e.g. matter antimatter regions annihilating) at any redshift up to z sub(c) approximately 100 is, in the case of π 0 -decay theories, rather restricted with present experiments, and this is shown by the introduction of a 'visibility function' which folds the theoretical γ-ray background intensity as a function of redshift through the efficiency of a given experiment [fr

  16. Physics for radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, James E

    2013-01-01

    A much-needed working resource for health physicists and other radiation protection professionals, this volume presents clear, thorough, up-to-date explanations of the basic physics necessary to address real-world problems in radiation protection. Designed for readers with limited as well as basic science backgrounds, Physics for Radiation Protection emphasizes applied concepts and carefully illustrates all topics through examples as well as practice problems. Physics for Radiation Protection draws substantially on current resource data available for health physics use, providing decay schemes and emission energies for approximately 100 of the most common radionuclides encountered by practitioners. Excerpts of the Chart of the Nuclides, activation cross sections, fission yields, fission-product chains, photon attenuation coefficients, and nuclear masses are also provided.

  17. Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background and the Planck Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Kurki-Suonio, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    This lecture is a sketch of the physics of the cosmic microwave background. The observed anisotropy can be divided into four main contributions: variations in the temperature and gravitational potential of the primordial plasma, Doppler effect from its motion, and a net red/blueshift the photons accumulate from traveling through evolving gravitational potentials on their way from the primordial plasma to here. These variations are due to primordial perturbations, probably caused by quantum fluctuations in the very early universe. The ongoing Planck satellite mission to observe the cosmic microwave background is also described.

  18. Assessment of cosmic radiation doses received by air crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAulay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Cosmic radiation in the atmosphere is such a complex mixture of radiation type that it is difficult to get a single instrument which is suitable for such measurements. Passive devices such as film badges and track etch detectors have also been used, but again present difficulties of interpretation and requirements of multiple devices to accommodate the different types of radiation encountered. In summary, air crew are the occupational group most highly exposed to radiation. The radiation doses experienced by them are sufficiently high as to require assessment on a regular basis and possible control by appropriate rostering. There appears little possibility of the dose limit for workers being exceeded, except possibly in the case of pregnant female crew. This category of air crew should be the subject of special controls aimed at ensuring that the dose limits for the foetus should not be exceeded

  19. Solar Modulation of Atmospheric Cosmic Radiation:. Comparison Between In-Flight and Ground-Level Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, R. H. A.; Taylor, G. C.; Jones, J. B. L.

    January 2000 saw the start of a collaborative study involving the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Virgin Atlantic Airways, the Civil Aviation Authority and the National Physical Laboratory in a program to investigate the cosmic radiation exposure to aircrew. The study has been undertaken in view of EU Directive 96/291 (May 2000) which requires the assessment of the level of radiation exposure to aircrew. The project's aims include validation of radiation dose models and evaluation of space weather effects on atmospheric cosmic radiation levels, in particular those effects not accounted for by the models. Ground level measurements are often used as a proxy for variations in cosmic radiation dose levels at aircraft altitudes, especially during Forbush Decreases (FDs) and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. Is this estimation realistic and does the ground level data accurately represent what is happening at altitude? We have investigated the effect of a FD during a flight from Hong Kong to London Heathrow on the 15th July 2000 and compared count rate and dose measurements with simultaneous variations measured at ground level. We have also compared the results with model outputs.

  20. Fixed target measurements at LHCb for cosmic rays physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069608

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has the unique possibility, among the LHC experiments, to be operated in fixed target mode, using its internal gas target. The energy scale achievable at the LHC, combined with the LHCb forward geometry and detector capabilities, allow to explore particle production in a wide Bjorken-$x$ range at the $\\sqrt {s_{NN}} ~$ ~ 100 GeV energy scale, providing novel inputs to nuclear and cosmic ray physics. The first measurement of antiproton production in collisions of LHC protons on helium nuclei at rest is presented. The knowledge of this cross-section is of great importance for the study of the cosmic antiproton flux, and the LHCb results are expected to improve the interpretation of the recent high-precision measurements of cosmic antiprotons performed by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments.

  1. Cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies in brane worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2003-11-28

    We propose a new formulation to calculate the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum in the Randall-Sundrum two-brane model based on recent progress in solving the bulk geometry using a low energy approximation. The evolution of the anisotropic stress imprinted on the brane by the 5D Weyl tensor is calculated. An impact of the dark radiation perturbation on the CMB spectrum is investigated in a simple model assuming an initially scale-invariant adiabatic perturbation. The dark radiation perturbation induces isocurvature perturbations, but the resultant spectrum can be quite different from the prediction of simple mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations due to Weyl anisotropic stress.

  2. Long-range correlation in cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, M Sadegh; Ghasemi, F; Rahvar, Sohrab; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the statistical anisotropy and gaussianity of temperature fluctuations of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe survey, using the Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Rescaled Range, and Scaled Windowed Variance methods. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis shows that CMB fluctuations has a long-range correlation function with a multifractal behavior. By comparing the shuffled and surrogate series of CMB data, we conclude that the multifractality nature of the temperature fluctuation of CMB radiation is mainly due to the long-range correlations, and the map is consistent with a gaussian distribution.

  3. Air crew exposure to cosmic radiation. New analysis, recommendations EURADOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurny, F; Votockova, I [Academy of the Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Nuclear Physics Institute, Department of Radiation Dosimetry

    1996-12-31

    Cosmic radiation on the board of an aircraft consist of two components: directly ionizing radiation (electron, proton - low LET) and neutrons (high LET). Neither composition nor the energy spectrum of usual on-Earth calibration sources ({sup 60}Co, {sup 252}Cf) do not correspond to the field on a board. Therefore high energy reference fields behind shielding high energy accelerator at CERN and Dubna have been created and intensively studied. Their typical characteristics following from the results of our measurements were obtained. In-flight measurements on the board of commercial aircraft have been realized since 1991 during about 20 flights, Flight routes extended from the 1.3 grad N up to about 65 grad N, flying altitudes varied from 8.2 km to 12.5 km. The exposure level due to galactic cosmic radiation is inversely proportional to the solar activity. Some radiation protection aspects were concluded: (a) The usual limits of annual air crew flight hours correspond at 11.3 km to about 4 mSv per year, with new ICRP conversion factors to about 5 mSv per year; (b) Monthly flight hours limit does not exclude that the exposure of a pregnant women can exceed 1 mSv during this period; (c) The air crew exposure should therefore be checked, controlled a nd administered as conscientiously as for any other group of occupationally exposed persons. A Working group 11 of EURADOS `Exposure of air crew to cosmic radiation` has been formed (1992-1995) to prepare basic analysis and recommendations concerning the topics. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Badavi, Francis F.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Boothman, David A.; Borak, Thomas B.; Britten, Richard A.; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Elgart, S. Robin; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Guida, Peter M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hellweg, Christine E.; Huff, Janice L.; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I.; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S.; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A.; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Story, Michael D.; Turker, Mitchell S.; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2017-01-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation. PMID:26948012

  5. Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions Active and passive methods

    CERN Document Server

    Spillantini, P; Durante, M; Müller-Mellin, R; Reitz, G; Rossi, L; Shurshakov, V; Sorbi, M

    2007-01-01

    Shielding is arguably the main countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during interplanetary exploratory missions. However, shielding of cosmic rays, both of galactic or solar origin, is problematic, because of the high energy of the charged particles involved and the nuclear fragmentation occurring in shielding materials. Although computer codes can predict the shield performance in space, there is a lack of biological and physical measurements to benchmark the codes. An attractive alternative to passive, bulk material shielding is the use of electromagnetic fields to deflect the charged particles from the spacecraft target. Active shielding concepts based on electrostatic fields, plasma, or magnetic fields have been proposed in the past years, and should be revised based on recent technological improvements. To address these issues, the European Space Agency (ESA) established a Topical Team (TT) in 2002 including European experts in the field of space radiation shielding and superconducting magn...

  6. To the exposure of air crew members to cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.; Kovar, I.; Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Plawinski, L.

    1998-01-01

    According to an ICRP recommendation, the exposure of jet aircraft crew to radiation should be considered as occupational exposure when the annual equivalent doses are liable to exceed 1 mSv. Many new data on this type of exposure collected since 1991 are presented and analyzed. The dose equivalent rates established are fitted as a function of flight altitude. An analysis of data from cosmic ray monitors has shown that the presence of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere is rather stable since early 1992. An estimation was therefore made of the possible influence of the solar cycle phase by means of a transport code. The results obtained are compared with experimental data

  7. Cosmic Radiation Measurements in Airline Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagshaw, M

    1999-07-01

    Ionising radiation monitoring equipment is installed in all Concordes and much data have been derived. To validate the measurements from the on-board monitoring equipment, a programme of measurements on Concorde has been carried out using passive dosemeters in association with the UK National Radiological Protection Board. Data from a typical month (in this case October 1997) shows an arithmetic mean dose across the British Airways Concorde fleet of 12.9 ({+-}0.4) {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}. Results from the NRPB measurements for the same month give a dose of 11.4 ({+-}0.5) {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} and application of the CARI 3Q programme gives a dose of 9.6 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} for the same month. The effective route dose between London and New York gives a mean value of 43.1 {mu}Sv for the Concorde detectors. The NRPB results give a route dose of 38.9 {mu}Sv whereas the CARI 3Q programme gives a route dose of 32.5 {mu}Sv. Measurements have also been performed on the Boeing 747-400 aircraft on the high latitude ultralonghaul direct London-Tokyo flight and these give values in the region of 6 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}, against the CARI 3Q estimate of 3.7 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}. (author)

  8. Cosmic Radiation Measurements in Airline Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagshaw, M.

    1999-01-01

    Ionising radiation monitoring equipment is installed in all Concordes and much data have been derived. To validate the measurements from the on-board monitoring equipment, a programme of measurements on Concorde has been carried out using passive dosemeters in association with the UK National Radiological Protection Board. Data from a typical month (in this case October 1997) shows an arithmetic mean dose across the British Airways Concorde fleet of 12.9 (±0.4) μSv.h -1 . Results from the NRPB measurements for the same month give a dose of 11.4 (±0.5) μSv.h -1 and application of the CARI 3Q programme gives a dose of 9.6 μSv.h -1 for the same month. The effective route dose between London and New York gives a mean value of 43.1 μSv for the Concorde detectors. The NRPB results give a route dose of 38.9 μSv whereas the CARI 3Q programme gives a route dose of 32.5 μSv. Measurements have also been performed on the Boeing 747-400 aircraft on the high latitude ultralonghaul direct London-Tokyo flight and these give values in the region of 6 μSv.h -1 , against the CARI 3Q estimate of 3.7 μSv.h -1 . (author)

  9. Radiation physics for medical physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2016-01-01

    This textbook summarizes the basic knowledge of atomic, nuclear, and radiation physics that professionals working in medical physics and biomedical engineering need for efficient and safe use of ionizing radiation in medicine. Concentrating on the underlying principles of radiation physics, the textbook covers the prerequisite knowledge for medical physics courses on the graduate and post-graduate levels in radiotherapy physics, radiation dosimetry, imaging physics, and health physics, thus providing the link between elementary undergraduate physics and the intricacies of four medical physics specialties: diagnostic radiology physics, nuclear medicine physics, radiation oncology physics, and health physics. To recognize the importance of radiation dosimetry to medical physics three new chapters have been added to the 14 chapters of the previous edition. Chapter 15 provides a general introduction to radiation dosimetry. Chapter 16 deals with absolute radiation dosimetry systems that establish absorbed dose or ...

  10. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation aboard aircraft: the SIEVERT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottolier-Depois, J.F.; Clairand, I.; Blanchard, P.; Dessarps, P.; Lantos, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The study of naturally-occurring radiation and its associated risk is one of the preoccupations of bodies responsible for radiation protection. Cosmic particle flux is significantly higher on board aircraft that at ground level. Furthermore, its intensity depends on solar activity and eruptions. Due to their professional activity, flight crews and frequent flyers may receive an annual dose of some milliSieverts. This is why the European directive adopted in 1996 requires the aircraft operators to assess the dose and to inform their flight crews about the risk. The effective dose is to be estimated using various experimental and calculation means. In France, the computerized system for flight assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation in air transport (SIEVERT) is delivered to airlines for assisting them in the application of the European directive. This dose assessment tool was developed by the French General Directorate of Civil Aviation (DGAC) and partners: the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), the Paris Observatory and the French Institute for Polar Research - PaulEmile Victor (IPEV). This professional service is available since more than two years on an Internet server accessible to companies with a public section. The system provides doses that consider the routes flown by aircraft. Various results obtained are presented: experimental validation, in particular for the ground level event model (large solar eruption), and statistics on routes and personal doses. (author)

  11. PROTECTION FROM COSMIC RADIATION IN LONG-TERM MANNED SPACEFLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Durante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Current space programs are shifting toward planetary exploration, and in particular towards human missions to the moon and Mars. Space radiation, comprised of energetic protons and heavy nuclei, has been shown to produce distinct biological damage compared to radiation on Earth, leading to large uncertainties in the projection of health risks. Even if uncertainties in risk assessment will be reduced in the next few years, there is little doubt that appropriate countermeasures have to be taken to reduce the exposure or the biological damage produced by cosmic radiation. In addition, it is necessary to provide effective countermeasures against solar particle events, which can produce acute effects, even life threatening, for inadequately protected crews. Unfortunately, passive (bulk shielding is currently unable to provide adequate protection, because cosmic rays have very high energy and nuclear fragmentation in the absorbers produce light fragments. Material science could provide new materials with better shielding properties for space radiation. Active (magnetic shielding could be an interesting alternative, pending technical improvements.

  12. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation aboard aircraft: the Sievert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Biau, A.; Clairand, I.; Saint-Lo, D.; Valero, M.; Blanchard, P.; Dessarps, P.; Lantos, P.

    2003-01-01

    The study of naturally-occurring radiation and its associated risk is one of the preoccupations of bodies responsible for radiation protection. Cosmic particle flux is significantly higher on board aircraft that at ground level. Furthermore, its intensity depends on solar activity and eruptions. Due to their professional activity, flight crews and frequent flyers may receive an annual dose of some milli-sieverts. This is why the European directive adopted in 1996 requires the aircraft operators to assess the dose and to inform their flight crews about the risk. The effective dose is to be estimated using various experimental and calculation means. In France, the computerized system for flight assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation in air transport (SIEVERT) is delivered to airlines for assisting them in the application of the European directive. This dose assessment tool was developed by the French General Directorate of Civil Aviation (DGAC) and partners: the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), the Paris Observatory and the French Institute for Polar Research - Paul-Emile Victor (IPEV). This professional service is available on an Internet server accessible to companies with a public section. The system provides doses that consider the routes flown by aircraft Various results obtained are presented. (authors)

  13. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Lisjak, I.; Vekic, B.; Poje, M.; Planinic, J.

    2008-01-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10 B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 μSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 μSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 μSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 μSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data

  14. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Lisjak, I. [Croatia Airlines, Zagreb (Croatia); Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Poje, M. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, Osijek, P.O. Box 125 (Croatia)], E-mail: planinic@ffos.hr

    2008-02-15

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or {sup 10}B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 {mu}Sv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 {mu}Sv or the average dose rate of 2.7 {mu}Sv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4 {mu}Sv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 {mu}Sv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  15. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  16. Physics through the 1990s: Gravitation, cosmology, and cosmic-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report reviews and highlights three areas of astrophysics; gravitation; cosmology; and cosmic-ray physics. Topics such as: gravitational collapse and black holes, gravitational waves, general relativity, nucleosynthesis, and the standard model are among the many topics highlighted

  17. Accelerator and radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  18. Cosmic Ray Physics with the KASCADE-Grande Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schoo, S.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    The existence of a knee at a few PeV in the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum has been well established by several experiments but its physical origin has eluded researches for a long time. It is believed that keys to disentangle the mystery could be found in the spectrum and the composition of cosmic rays between 1 PeV and 1 EeV. A first detailed look into the elemental chemical abundances of cosmic rays in this energy regime was provided by both the KASCADE and the KASCADE-Grande experiments. Their measurements opened the door to a wealth of new data on the subject, which led to the discovery of new structures in the all-particle energy spectrum and the confirmation of knee-like features in the spectra of individual mass groups, as well as the observation of an unexpected ankle-like structure at around 100 PeV in the flux of the light component of cosmic rays. In this contribution, early findings with the KASCADE-Grande experiment will be reviewed and then a short update on the analyses currently performed with the data of the observatory will be presented.

  19. Is cosmic radiation exposure of air crew amenable to control?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, A.C.

    1999-01-01

    ICRP Committee 4 currently has a Working Party on Cosmic Ray Exposure in Aircraft and Space Flight. It has assembled information on doses arising in aircraft and space flight and considered the appropriateness of the Commission's recommendations relating to air crew. A central issue is whether the exposures received should be considered amenable to control. Factors of relevance to the enhanced cosmic radiation exposure of air crew, and frequent fliers such as couriers, are doses to pregnant staff, the issue of controllability of doses, and the implementation of regulatory controls. It is concluded that while air crew in the current range of subsonic jet aircraft are exposed to enhanced levels of cosmic radiation, these exposures are not readily controllable nor likely to exceed about 6 mSv/y. The revised ICRP Recommendations in 1991 (ICRP 60) propose air crew be designated as occupationally exposed. However, none of the usual optimisation of dose actions associated with regulation of practices, such as classification of work areas and rules governing working procedures, can be implemented, and in practice the doses are not amenable to control. The International Basic Safety Standards therefore leave this designation to the judgement of national regulatory authorities. One requirement that stems from designation as occupational exposure is that of restriction of doses to pregnant women. Both from the points of view that it is questionable whether exposure of air crew can reasonably be considered to be amenable to control, and the magnitude of the risks from exposures incurred, there is little reason to invoke additional restrictions to limit exposures of pregnant air crew. Copyright (1999) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  20. Computation of cosmic radiation spectra and application to aircrew dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Song Jae

    2002-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA- 99, secondary cosmic radiation energy spectra and intensities of neutrons, protons, photons, electrons, and muons were calculated for different geographical latitude and longitude at the commercial jet's altitudes ranging from 27000 ft to 41000 ft. The Badhwar's proton model was used to construct the primary cosmic radiation spectrum and effect of the vertical cutoff rigidity was considered after spectra similar to those given in literature were resulted. By applying the effective dose conversion factors, a calculation tool for aircrew doses was developed. According to the resulting dose rate distribution, effective dose rate over North pole region is around three times of that over equator region due to the geomagnetical shielding effect. Illustrative assessments of aircrew doses were made for four distinctive routes of Korean airliners : Seoul - New York (USA), London (UK), Sydney (Australia) and Mumbai(India). The effective doses to aircrew incurred from a round trip were 0.047, 0.055, 0.018, and 0.018μSv, respectively. If aircrew work 500 hour s a year at the cruise altitude of a international airline, the individual dose would reach 2 mSv which is about the same size as the average annual dose of workers at a nuclear power plant

  1. Control of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation outside the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kazuaki; Kaneko, Masahito

    2000-01-01

    Japan is participating in the project of constructing ISS, International Space Station, and taking part of constructing JEM, Japan Experimental Module. It is expected that people working in this module upon completion should be controlled their exposure to cosmic radiation according to Japanese laws. Hence, the issue has been studied by a committee in NASDA, National Space Development Agency of Japan. In 1999, its interim report was released and public comments had been invited. In this presentation, following the introduction of the gist of the interim report as well as comments by the authors, countermeasures are proposed. (author)

  2. Generalized Chaplygin gas and cosmic microwave background radiation constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, M.C.; Bertolami, O.; Sen, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    We study the dependence of the location of the cosmic microwave background radiation peaks on the parameters of the generalized Chaplygin gas model, whose equation of state is given by p=-A/ρ α , where A is a positive constant and 0<α≤1. We find, in particular, that observational data arising from Archeops, BOOMERANG, supernova and high-redshift observations allow constraining significantly the parameter space of the model. Our analysis indicates that the emerging model is clearly distinguishable from the α=1 Chaplygin case and the ΛCDM model

  3. Early reionization by decaying particles and cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuya, S.; Kawasaki, M.

    2004-01-01

    We study the reionization scenario in which ionizing UV photons emitted from decaying particle, in addition to usual contributions from stars and quasars, ionize the universe. It is found that the scenario is consistent with both the first year data of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the fact that the universe is not fully ionized until z∼6 as observed by Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Likelihood analysis revealed that rather broad parameter space can be chosen. This scenario will be discriminated by future observations, especially by the EE polarization power spectrum of cosmic microwave background radiation

  4. Gravitational Collapse of Radiating Dyon Solution and Cosmic Censorship Hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, K. D.; Zade, S. S.; Mohod, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of cosmic censorship violation in the gravitational collapse of radiating dyon solution. It is shown that the final outcome of the collapse depends sensitively on the electric and magnetic charge parameters. The graphs of the outer apparent horizon, inner Cauchy horizon for different values of parameters are drawn. It is found that the electric and magnetic components push the apparent horizon towards the retarded time-coordinate axis, which in turn reduces the radius of the apparent horizon in Vaidya spacetime. Also, we extend the earlier work of Chamorro and Virbhadra [Pramana, J. Phys. 45 (1995) 181

  5. Towards the physical vacuum of cosmic inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been long debates about the initial conditions of inflationary perturbations. In this work we explicitly show the decay of excited states during inflation via interactions from the renormalization group point of view. For this purpose, we note that the folded shape non-Gaussianity can be interpreted as the decay of the non-Bunch–Davies initial condition. The one loop diagrams with non-Bunch–Davies propagators are calculated to uncover the decay of such excited states. We find that the decay of amplitude is contributed by the folded shape of loop momentum and is irrelevant to the UV part. The conformal decay rate is related to the strength of non-Gaussianity via Γ∼(fNLλ2Pζk5O(τ4,τ04. The observed smallness of non-Gaussianity keeps the window open for probing inflationary initial conditions and trans-Planckian physics.

  6. Basic ionizing physic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    To become an expert in this field, radiographer must first master in radiation physics. That why the second chapter discussed on radiation physic. The topic that must covered such as atom and molecule, atomic structure, proton, isotope, half life, types of radiation and some basic formula such as formula for shielding, half life, half value layer, tenth value layer and more. All of this must be mastered by radiographer if they want to know more detail on this technique because this technique was a combination of theory and practical. Once they failed the theory they cannot go further on this technique. And to master this technique, once cannot depend on theory only. So, for this technique theory and practical must walk together.

  7. LHCf experiment: forward physics at LHC for cosmic rays study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Prete M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment, optimized for the study of forward physics at LHC, completes its main physics program in this year 2015, with the proton-proton collisions at the energy of 13 TeV. LHCf gives important results on the study of neutral particles at extreme pseudo-rapidity, both for proton-proton and for proton-ion interactions. These results are an important reference for tuning the models of the hadronic interaction currently used for the simulation of the atmospheric showers induced by very high energy cosmic rays. The results of this analysis and the future perspective are presented in this paper.

  8. Hazards of cosmic radiation; Radiation cosmique: danger dans l'espace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J M; Dzitko, H

    2000-06-01

    The main limitations on long-distance space transport is neither the energy source nor the propulsion system but appears to be the protection of cosmonauts from radiation. Cosmic radiation is made up of protons (87%), alpha particles (12%) and heavy nuclei (1%), all these particles travel through interstellar space and come from the explosion of stars at the end of their life. The earth is protected from cosmic radiation by 3 natural shields: (i) the magnetic field generated by the solar wind, (ii) the earth magnetic field (magnetosphere), and (iii) the earth atmosphere, this elusive layer of air is equivalent to a 10 meter-high volume of water. Magnetosphere and atmosphere reduce the radiation dose by a factor 4000. According to a European directive (1996) air crews must be considered as radiation workers. (A.C.)

  9. Hazards of cosmic radiation; Radiation cosmique: danger dans l'espace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J.M.; Dzitko, H

    2000-06-01

    The main limitations on long-distance space transport is neither the energy source nor the propulsion system but appears to be the protection of cosmonauts from radiation. Cosmic radiation is made up of protons (87%), alpha particles (12%) and heavy nuclei (1%), all these particles travel through interstellar space and come from the explosion of stars at the end of their life. The earth is protected from cosmic radiation by 3 natural shields: (i) the magnetic field generated by the solar wind, (ii) the earth magnetic field (magnetosphere), and (iii) the earth atmosphere, this elusive layer of air is equivalent to a 10 meter-high volume of water. Magnetosphere and atmosphere reduce the radiation dose by a factor 4000. According to a European directive (1996) air crews must be considered as radiation workers. (A.C.)

  10. Radiation in the Einstein universe and the cosmic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, I.E.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the cosmic background radiation is not at all uniquely or scientifically relatively economically indicative of a ''big bang.'' Specifically, essentially any temporally homogeneous theory in the Einstein universe is consistent with the existence of a cosmic background radiation (CBR) conforming to the Planck law; in particular, the chronometric cosmology is such. It is noted that the Einstein universe appears particularly natural as a habitat for photons by virtue of the absence of infrared divergences and of the absolute convergence of the trace for associated Gibbs-state density matrices. These features are connected with the closed character of space in the Einstein universe, and facilitate the use of the latter in modeling local phenomena, in place of Minkowski space with periodic boundary conditions or the like, with minimal loss of covariance or effect on the wave functions. In particular, the Einstein universe may be used in the analysis of the perturbation of a Planck-law spectrum due to a local nonvanishing isotropic angular momentum of the CBR, of whatever origin. The estimated distortion of the spectrum due to such a kinematically admissible effect is in very good agreement with that observed by Woody and Richards, which is opposite in direction to those earlier predicted by big-bang theories. The theoretical analysis involves a preliminary treatment of equilibria of linear quantum fields with supplementary quasilinear constraints

  11. Air crew exposure to cosmic radiation. New analysis, recommendations EURADOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.; Votockova, I.

    1995-01-01

    Cosmic radiation on the board of an aircraft consist of two components: directly ionizing radiation (electron, proton - low LET) and neutrons (high LET). Neither composition nor the energy spectrum of usual on-Earth calibration sources ( 60 Co, 252 Cf) do not correspond to the field on a board. Therefore high energy reference fields behind shielding high energy accelerator at CERN and Dubna have been created and intensively studied. Their typical characteristics following from the results of our measurements were obtained. In-flight measurements on the board of commercial aircraft have been realized since 1991 during about 20 flights, Flight routes extended from the 1.3 grad N up to about 65 grad N, flying altitudes varied from 8.2 km to 12.5 km. The exposure level due to galactic cosmic radiation is inversely proportional to the solar activity. Some radiation protection aspects were concluded: (a) The usual limits of annual air crew flight hours correspond at 11.3 km to about 4 mSv per year, with new ICRP conversion factors to about 5 mSv per year; (b) Monthly flight hours limit does not exclude that the exposure of a pregnant women can exceed 1 mSv during this period; (c) The air crew exposure should therefore be checked, controlled a nd administered as conscientiously as for any other group of occupationally exposed persons. A Working group 11 of EURADOS 'Exposure of air crew to cosmic radiation' has been formed (1992-1995) to prepare basic analysis and recommendations concerning the topics. The basic recommendations are the following: (a) air crew flying routinely at altitudes over 8 km are deemed to be category B workers, it is therefore important to estimate, record, control and, where necessary, to limit the doses; (b) the preferred procedure in order to estimate doses to air crew or frequent flyers is to determine route doses and fold these data with data on staff rostering; (c) where doses may exceed the limit for category B workers (6 mSv per year), on

  12. Particle Physics at the Cosmic, Intensity, and Energy Frontiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Rouven

    2018-04-06

    Major efforts at the Intensity, Cosmic, and Energy frontiers of particle physics are rapidly furthering our understanding of the fundamental constituents of Nature and their interactions. The overall objectives of this research project are (1) to interpret and develop the theoretical implications of the data collected at these frontiers and (2) to provide the theoretical motivation, basis, and ideas for new experiments and for new analyses of experimental data. Within the Intensity Frontier, an experimental search for a new force mediated by a GeV-scale gauge boson will be carried out with the $A'$ Experiment (APEX) and the Heavy Photon Search (HPS), both at Jefferson Laboratory. Within the Cosmic Frontier, contributions are planned to the search for dark matter particles with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other instruments. A detailed exploration will also be performed of new direct detection strategies for dark matter particles with sub-GeV masses to facilitate the development of new experiments. In addition, the theoretical implications of existing and future dark matter-related anomalies will be examined. Within the Energy Frontier, the implications of the data from the Large Hadron Collider will be investigated. Novel search strategies will be developed to aid the search for new phenomena not described by the Standard Model of particle physics. By combining insights from all three particle physics frontiers, this research aims to increase our understanding of fundamental particle physics.

  13. Biotropic Effect of Radiation Conditions on Orbital Cosmic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsetlin, Vladimir; Ushakov, Igor; Gurieva, Tamar; Moisa, Svetlana; Zotin, Alexei; Lobanov, Alexei

    On the orbit of pilot orbital stations the crews undergo to low doses of chronic irradiation of cosmic radiation. The studying of radiobiological effects in different living systems were carried out in the ship’s side (OC “MIR” and ICS) and model surface experiments (power dose 200 mGy/day, density of neutron flow 30 particles/sm2 sec). It was shown that ionized radiation effects on embryonal development of Japanese quail embryo, inducing morphological disturbances in 12% of embryos. Many years ontogenesis (more 15 years of life in OC “MIR”) of microbial association evoked replacement of dominant types of micromycetes and bacterium and increasing of colony-formed units (CFU) in four orders. In laboratory low doses of γ-radiation induced the increasing of flight strain biomass of Aspergillus niger that corresponds to a radiation hormezis and also the increasing of radio-sensitivity. Moreover, under γ-neutron radiation were marked some deviations in morphology of supporting cell and numerous head falls of Aspergillus niger. The irradiation of Protozoa by low doses led to that spontaneous motion activity of spirostoms (Spirostomum ambiguum Ehbg.) accommodated in water processing by mixed γ-neutron radiation decreased twice that testified the fact that the definite factor of γ-neutron radiation effect is the changing of water medium state. In dry seeds of the highest plants wetting in water of preliminary low doses α-and γ-irradiation cells gradually decreased. In hypomagnetic camera the opposite tendency was observed. It is established the phenomena of stimulating effect of low doses of continuous γ-radiation (source of radiation Co60, period of radiation 10 days, average daily power dose 1,5-2,0 mGy, summary dose 15 mGy) on mezenchim stem cells of mice bone brain - a radiation hormezis which revealed in the intensifying of proliferative activity and increasing of number of colony-formed units-F in bone brain in 1,5-4,5 times. Regenerative capacity of

  14. Alteration of Organic Compounds in Small Bodies and Cosmic Dusts by Cosmic Rays and Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Obayashi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Sarker, Palash K.; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Okabe, Takuto; Eto, Midori; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-07-01

    A wide variety of complex organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies like carbonaceous chondrites and comets, and their roles in the generation of terrestrial life are discussed. It was suggested that organics in small bodies were originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts in dense cloud. Irradiation of frozen mixture of possible interstellar molecules including CO (or CH _{3}OH), NH _{3} and H _{2}O with high-energy particles gave complex amino acid precursors with high molecular weights [1]. Such complex organic molecules were taken in planetesimals or comets in the early solar system. In prior to the generation of the terrestrial life, extraterrestrial organics were delivered to the primitive Earth by such small bodies as meteorites, comets and space dusts. These organics would have been altered by cosmic rays and solar radiation (UV, X-rays) before the delivery to the Earth. We examined possible alteration of amino acids, their precursors and nucleic acid bases in interplanetary space by irradiation with high energy photons and heavy ions. A mixture of CO, NH _{3} and H _{2}O was irradiated with high-energy protons from a van de Graaff accelerator (TIT, Japan). The resulting products (hereafter referred to as CAW) are complex precursors of amino acids. CAW, amino acids (dl-Isovaline, glycine), hydantoins (amino acid precursors) and nucleic acid bases were irradiated with continuous emission (soft X-rays to IR; hereafter referred to as soft X-rays irradiation) from BL-6 of NewSUBARU synchrotron radiation facility (Univ. Hyogo). They were also irradiated with heavy ions (eg., 290 MeV/u C ^{6+}) from HIMAC accelerator (NIRS, Japan). After soft X-rays irradiation, water insoluble materials were formed. After irradiation with soft X-rays or heavy ions, amino acid precursors (CAW and hydantoins) gave higher ratio of amino acids were recovered after hydrolysis than free amino acids. Nucleic acid bases showed higher stability than free

  15. Effect of seeds of heavy charged particles of galactic cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimova, Y.N.

    1985-01-01

    The experiments were carried out on Lactuca sativa seeds exposed for 20, 66, 123 and 308 days in a biostack also containing physical detectors of heavy charged particles. The yield of aberrant cells and its dependence on the exposure time and the site where particles hit the object were measured. The cytogenetic examination demonstrated a significant difference between the seeds that were or were not hit by heavy charged particles. A significant contribution of galactic cosmic radiation to the radiobiological effect is indicated. The yield of aberrant cells as a function of the localization of heavy charged particles in the seed is established. The most sensitive target is the root meristem

  16. The cosmic code quantum physics as the language of nature

    CERN Document Server

    Pagels, Heinz R

    2012-01-01

    ""The Cosmic Code can be read by anyone. I heartily recommend it!"" - The New York Times Book Review""A reliable guide for the nonmathematical reader across the highest ridges of physical theory. Pagels is unfailingly lighthearted and confident."" - Scientific American""A sound, clear, vital work that deserves the attention of anyone who takes an interest in the relationship between material reality and the human mind."" - Science 82This is one of the most important books on quantum mechanics ever written for general readers. Heinz Pagels, an eminent physicist and science writer, discusses and

  17. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and new particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M.

    2001-02-28

    The current status of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHE CR) enigma and several proposed solutions involving particle physics beyond the standard model are discussed. Emphasis is given to top--down models, and as a main example, supermassive dark matter as galactic source for UHE CR and the status of its experimental signatures (galactic anisotropy, chemical composition and clustering) is reviewed. Then different approaches to calculate fragmentation spectra of supermassive particles are discussed. Finally, it is argued that UHE neutrinos cannot be - neither directly or indirectly - responsible for the observed vertical air showers.

  18. Comparison and application study on cosmic radiation dose calculation received by air crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qiang; Xu Cuihua; Ren Tianshan; Li Wenhong; Zhang Jing; Lu Xu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To facilitate evaluation on Cosmic radiation dose received by flight crew by developing a convenient and effective measuring method. Methods: In comparison with several commonly used evaluating methods, this research employs CARI-6 software issued by FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) to measure Cosmic radiation dose for flight crew members exposed to. Results: Compared with other methods, CARI-6 is capable of providing reliable calculating results on radiation dose and applicable to all flight crew of different airlines. Conclusion: Cosmic radiation received by flight crew is on the list of occupational radiation. For a smooth running of Standards for controlling exposure to cosmic radiation of air crew, CARI software may be a widely applied tool in radiation close estimation of for flight crew. (authors)

  19. Cosmic radiation monitoring at low-Earth orbit by means of thermoluminescence and plastic nuclear track detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrožová, Iva; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Kubančák, Ján; Šlegl, Jakub; Tolochek, R. V.; Ivanova, O. A.; Shurshakov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 12 (2017), s. 262-266 ISSN 1350-4487 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-16622Y Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : BION-M1 * cosmic radiation * low earth orbit * passive detector * thermoluminescent detector * plastic nuclear track detector Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  20. Autonomous low-noise system for broadband measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the digital side implementation of a new suborbital experiment for the measurement of broadband radiation emissions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy. The system has been used in campaign mode for initial mapping of the galactic radiation power received at a single frequency. The recorded galactic sky map images are subsequently being used to forecast the emitted radiation at neighboring frequencies. A planned second campaign will verify the prediction algorithms efficiency in an autonomous manner. The system has reached an advanced stage in terms of hardware and software combined operation and intelligence, where other Space Physics measurements are performed autonomously depending on the burst event under investigation. The system has been built in a modular manner to expedite hardware and software upgrades. Such an upgrade has recently occurred mainly to expand the frequency range of space observations.

  1. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  2. Interaction of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonyan, F.A.; Kanevskij, B.L.; Vardanyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of the bump and black-body cutoff in the cosmic-ray (CR) spectrum arising from the π-meson photoproduction reaction in collisions of CR protons with the microwave background radiation (MBR) photons is studied. A kinetic equation which describes CR proton propagation in MBR with account of a catastrophic of the π-meson photoproduction process is derived. The equilibrium CR proton spectrum obtained from the solution of the stationary kinetic equation is in general agreement with spectrum obtained under assumption of continuous energy loss approximation. However spectra from local sources especially for the times of propagation t>10 9 years differ noticeably from those obtained in the continuous loss approximation. 24 refs.; 5 figs

  3. On the anisotropies of cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The work gives a brief overview of the topic of cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies. Then is deals with the so-called Rees-Sciama affect; i.e. with the anisotropies arising between the last scattering surface and us due to transparent huge irregularities. Using the formulas of Special Theory of Relativity it is proven that in the neighbourhood of expanding spherical body the Meszaros calculation (Meszaros 1994) are correct; the inaccuracy is maximally of order 10 -12 . Then the profile of the blue shift of expansion caused by an expanding sphere is calculated for the case, when the radius of this sphere is much smaller that the relevant Hubble radius. Hence the profiles of the shifts of light periods through a void and through a supercluster are given in the most general cases. These cases contain all the three Friedmannian models and both the synchronous and asynchronous clusters. Then the obtained profiles are explicitly decomposed into the sum of the multipole terms, and it is shown that the observed difference between the measured direction of the maximum of dipole anisotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation and the result of Lauer and Postman (1994) is not explainable by the Rees-Sciama effect. This means that no alternative exists to the two possibilities for the explanation of the data of Lauer and Postman; either the either the huge system of Abell clusters is streaming, or the Friedmannian model is queried. The third possibility is, of course, that the data of observations of Lauer and Postman are incorrect. However, any of these three possibilities seem to be strange enough; hence, the problems coming from data of Lauer and Postman further holds. This is the key result of paper. As a further technical result it is also shown that in principle there is no upper limit of Rees-Sciama effect. (author)

  4. The physics of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Schuricht, V.; Steuer, J.

    1996-01-01

    The book is aimed at both practising specialists and scientists wishing to learn about the fundamental science of radiation protection. The first part of the book, 'Physical Fundamentals of Radiation Protection', presents a concise description of radiation sources and radiation fields, interaction of radiation with matter, radiation effects and radiation damage, basic concept of radiation protection, radiation exposure of man, radiation protection measuring techniques and physical fundamentals for limiting radiation exposure. The second part, 'Calculational Exercises for Radiation Protection' is intended to supplement the first part by carrying out relevant calculations, amending and adding special aspects and to give guidance in solving practical problems. The book is written for scientists as well as for students and staff working in nuclear facilities, hospitals and institutions responsible for radiation and environmental protection. (UK)

  5. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  6. Cosmic Radiation Exposure of Future Hypersonic Flight Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, L

    2017-06-15

    Cosmic radiation exposure in air traffic grows with flight altitude, geographical latitude and flight time. For future high-speed intercontinental point-to-point travel, the trade-off between reduced flight time and enhanced dose rate at higher flight altitudes is investigated. Various representative (partly) hypersonic cruise missions are considered and in dependence on solar activity the integral route dose is calculated for envisaged flight profiles and trajectories. Our results are compared to those for corresponding air connections served by present day subsonic airliners. During solar maximum, we find a significant reduction in route dose for all considered high-speed missions compared to the subsonic reference. However, during solar minimum, comparable or somewhat larger doses result on transpolar trajectories with (partly) hypersonic cruise at Mach 5. Both solar activity and routing are hence found to determine, whether passengers can profit from shorter flight times in terms of radiation exposure, despite of altitude-induced higher dose rates. Yet, aircrews with fixed number of block hours are always subject to larger annual doses, which in the considered cases take values up to five times the reference. We comment on the implications of our results for route planning and aviation decision-making in the absence of radiation shielding solutions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Cosmic radiation exposure of future hypersonic flight missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, L.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic radiation exposure in air traffic grows with flight altitude, geographical latitude and flight time. For future high-speed intercontinental point-to-point travel, the trade-off between reduced flight time and enhanced dose rate at higher flight altitudes is investigated. Various representative (partly) hypersonic cruise missions are considered and in dependence on solar activity the integral route dose is calculated for envisaged flight profiles and trajectories. Our results are compared to those for corresponding air connections served by present day subsonic airliners. During solar maximum, we find a significant reduction in route dose for all considered high-speed missions compared to the subsonic reference. However, during solar minimum, comparable or somewhat larger doses result on transpolar trajectories with (partly) hypersonic cruise at Mach 5. Both solar activity and routing are hence found to determine, whether passengers can profit from shorter flight times in terms of radiation exposure, despite of altitude-induced higher dose rates. Yet, air crews with fixed number of block hours are always subject to larger annual doses, which in the considered cases take values up to five times the reference. We comment on the implications of our results for route planning and aviation decision-making in the absence of radiation shielding solutions. (author)

  8. Galactic cosmic ray-induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra; Hariharan, B; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-10-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground- and space-based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets that reside in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Planetary systems around M dwarfs are considered to be prime candidates to search for life beyond the Solar System. Such planets are likely to be tidally locked and have close-in habitable zones. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in the case of super-Earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin that strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another factor governing the radiation dose is the depth of the planetary atmosphere. The higher the depth of the planetary atmosphere, the lower the flux of secondary particles will be on the surface. If the secondary particles are energetic enough, and their flux is sufficiently high, the radiation from muons can also impact the subsurface regions, such as in the case of Mars. If the radiation dose is too high, the chances of sustaining a long-term biosphere on the planet are very low. We have examined the dependence of the GCR-induced radiation dose on the strength of the planetary magnetic field and its atmospheric depth, and found that the latter is the decisive factor for the protection of a planetary biosphere.

  9. Cosmic shear as a probe of galaxy formation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, Simon; Becker, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we evaluate the potential for current and future cosmic shear measurements from large galaxy surveys to constrain the impact of baryonic physics on the matter power spectrum. We do so using a model-independent parametrization that describes deviations of the matter power spectrum from the dark-matter-only case as a set of principal components that are localized in wavenumber and redshift. We perform forecasts for a variety of current and future data sets, and find that at least ~90 per cent of the constraining power of these data sets is contained in no more than nine principal components. The constraining power of different surveys can be quantified using a figure of merit defined relative to currently available surveys. With this metric, we find that the final Dark Energy Survey data set (DES Y5) and the Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey will be roughly an order of magnitude more powerful than existing data in constraining baryonic effects. Upcoming Stage IV surveys (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) will improve upon this by a further factor of a few. We show that this conclusion is robust to marginalization over several key systematics. The ultimate power of cosmic shear to constrain galaxy formation is dependent on understanding systematics in the shear measurements at small (sub-arcminute) scales. Lastly, if these systematics can be sufficiently controlled, cosmic shear measurements from DES Y5 and other future surveys have the potential to provide a very clean probe of galaxy formation and to strongly constrain a wide range of predictions from modern hydrodynamical simulations.

  10. Radiation physics for medical physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-01-01

    This book summarizes the radiation physics knowledge that professionals working in medical physics need to master for efficient and safe dealings with ionizing radiation. It contains eight chapters, each chapter covering a specific group of subjects related to radiation physics and is intended as a textbook for a course in radiation physics in medical-physics graduate programs. However, the book may also be of interest to the large number of professionals, not only medical physicists, who in their daily occupations deal with various aspects of medical physics and find a need to improve their understanding of radiation physics. The main target audience for this book is graduate students studying for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in medical physics, who have to possess the necessary physics and mathematics background knowledge to be able to follow and master the complete textbook. Medical residents, technology students and biomedical engineering students may find certain sections too challenging or esoteric, yet they...

  11. Cosmic radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Facius, R.; Reitz, G.

    2003-01-01

    Since decades, elevated frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (DIC) in human lymphocytes have successfully been used as a biological dosimeter in cases of acute, often accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. As long as duration and time lags after exposure are small compared to the lifetime of DIC, their frequencies can also be used to assess doses from protracted, chronic irradiation. E.g., within the substantial range of uncertainties, the frequencies of DIC observed in cosmonauts are compatible with the frequencies expected from doses of low and high LET radiation to which they were exposed in low earth orbit (LEO). On the other hand, frequencies of DIC detected in lymphocytes of civilian aviation crewmembers rarely correlate with the doses accumulated all along their professional career. For such long duration exposures with relatively low induction rates, the concomitant decay of DIC frequencies due to the removal during exposure of lymphocytes carrying DIC has to be taken into account. We present temporal profiles of frequencies of DIC during the exposure calculated with a model of exponential decay of DIC for some scenarios of chronic exposure to cosmic radiation. E.g., even after a 'heavily' shielded Mars mission, the expected frequencies of DIC in lymphocytes of astronauts will be 10 to 40 times higher than the terrestrial control levels. For air flight personnel we calculated the time profiles of frequencies of DIC in lymphocytes of a 'typical' pilot, a male cabin attendant and a female cabin attendant whose professional radiation exposures were recalculated for the actual flight routes flown during their entire flight career as recorded in detailed duty logs. These results demonstrate that experimental (epidemiological) studies concerning DIC in air or space flight personnel must explicitly take into consideration the temporal exposure profiles in the prospective study population and that the point in time at which blood samples are to be drawn must

  12. Physics of charged cosmic rays with the AMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialle, J.P

    2001-01-01

    The electrically charged cosmic rays contain very important information about the mechanisms of stars and galaxies and about primordial universe which cannot be found elsewhere. The AMS experiment aims at searching for primordial antimatter, non-baryonic dark matter, and at measuring with high statistics and high accuracy the electrically charged cosmic ray particles and light nuclei in the extraterrestrial space beyond the atmosphere. AMS is the first magnetic spectrometer which will be flown in space. It will be installed for 3 years on the international space station (ISS) in 2003. A test flight with the space shuttle DISCOVERY took place in June 1998 with a first detector and gave many results: best limit on the existence of antinuclei, fluxes of protons, leptons, and helium nuclei above the geomagnetic threshold, existence of a secondary flux below the geomagnetic threshold. These results are described below. The physics goal and perspectives for AMS on the space station with an improved detector are described as well. (author)

  13. Cosmic radiation dosimetry onboard aircrafts at the brazilian airspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federico, Claudio Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is the establishment of a dosimetric system for the aircrew in the domestic territory. A technique to perform measurements of ambient dose equivalent in aircrafts was developed. An active detector was evaluated for onboard aircraft use, testing its adequacy to this specific type of measurement as well as its susceptibility to the magnetic and electromagnetic interferences. The equipment was calibrated in standard radiation beams and in a special field of the European Laboratory CERN, that reproduces with great proximity the real spectrum in aircraft flight altitudes; it was also tested in several flights, in an Brazilian Air Force's aircraft. The results were evaluated and compared with those obtained from several computational programs for cosmic radiation estimates, with respect to its adequacy for use in the South American region. The program CARI-6 was selected to evaluate the estimated averaged effective doses for the aircrew who operate in this region. A statistical distribution of aircrew effective doses in South America and Caribe was made, and the results show that a great part of this aircrew members are subjected to annual effective doses that exceed the dose limits for the members of the public. Additionally, a preliminary passive dosemeter, based in thermoluminescent detectors, was proposed; international collaborations with United Kingdom and Italy were established for joint measurements of the ambient equivalent doses in aircrafts. (author)

  14. Constraining the cosmic radiation density due to lepton number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Miele, Gennaro; Pastor, Sergio; Pisanti, Ofelia; Sarikas, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic energy density in the form of radiation before and during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is typically parameterized in terms of the effective number of neutrinos N eff , and it is a key parameters in cosmological models slightly more general than the successful minimal ΛCDM scenario. This quantity, in case of no extra degrees of freedom, depends upon the chemical potential and the temperature characterizing the three active neutrino distributions, as well as by their possible non-thermal features. We summarize here the results of a recent analysis to determine the BBN bound on N eff from primordial neutrino–antineutrino asymmetries, with a careful treatment of the dynamics of neutrino oscillations, and considering quite a wide range for the total lepton number in the neutrino sector, η ν =η ν e +η ν μ +η ν τ and the initial electron neutrino asymmetry η ν e in . Comparing these results with the forthcoming measurement of N eff by the Planck satellite will give insight on the nature of the radiation content of the universe

  15. Aircrew Exposure from Cosmic Radiation on Commercial Airline Routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.J.; McCall, M.J.; Green, A.R.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Pierre, M.; Schrewe, U.J.; O' Brien, K.; Felsberger, E

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the recent recommendations of the ICRP 60, and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of Canadian-based aircrew, an extensive study was carried out by the Royal Military College of Canada over a one-year period to measure the cosmic radiation at commercial jet altitudes. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter was used to measure the ambient total dose equivalent rate on 62 flight routes, resulting in over 20,000 data points at one-minute intervals at various altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes (i.e. which span the full cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field). These data were then compared to similar experimental work at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, using a different suite of equipment, to measure separately the low and high linear energy transfer components of the mixed radiation field, and to predictions with the LUIN transport code. All experimental and theoretical results were in excellent agreement. From these data, a semi-empirical model was developed to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position, altitude and date (i.e. heliocentric potential). Through integration of the dose rate function over a great circle flight path, a computer code was developed to provide an estimate of the total dose equivalent on any route worldwide at any period in the solar cycle. (author)

  16. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  17. Radiation dosimetry for crewmember exposure to cosmic radiation during astronaut training operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavers, M.R.; Gersey, B.B.; Wilkins, R.T.; Semones, E.J.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    'Atmospheric exposures' of astronauts to cosmic ions and secondary particles during air-flight training are being measured and analytically modeled for inclusion in the astronaut medical records database. For many of the ∼170 astronauts currently in the astronaut corps, their occupational radiation exposure history will be dominated by cosmic ion exposures during air-travel rather than short-duration spaceflight. Relatively low (usually <10 μSv hr -1 ) and uniform organ dose rates result from the penetrating mix of cosmic particles during atmospheric exposures at all altitudes, but at rates that vary greatly due to differences in flight profiles and the geomagnetic conditions at the time of flight. The precision and accuracy to which possible deleterious effects of the exposures can be assessed suffers from limitations that similarly impact assessment of human exposures in low-Earth orbit: uncertainties associated with the environmental measurements and their interpretation, uncertainties associated with the analytical tools that transport the cosmic radiation environment, and uncertain biological responses to low-dose-rate exposures to radiation fields of mixed radiation 'quality'. Lineal energy spectra will be measured using a Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter designed for training and operational sorties frequently flown in T-38, Space Shuttle Trainer, and high altitude WB-57 aircraft. Linear energy spectra will be measured over multiple flights using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors, as well. Flight records are available for nearly 200,000 sorties flown in NASA aircraft by astronauts and flight officers in the Johnson Space Center Aircraft Operations Division over the past 25 years, yet this database only partially documents the complete exposure histories. Age-dependent risk analysis indicates significant impact, particularly to young women who anticipate lengthy on-orbit careers

  18. Studying the high energy cosmic radiation: contributions to its detection and to the exploration of its origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamanna, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The Astro-particle Physics is a discipline where scientists from both the astrophysics and the particle physics communities meets to investigate the Universe aiming to answer to fundamental questions in the field of physics, cosmology and astrophysics. The high energy astrophysics domain, which explores the extremes sources where the larger collective transfer of energy take place, studies the most energetic cosmic radiation as privileged messengers of the history of the Universe. My research path, summarized in this work, is made of personal contributions in the development of new detection technologies, in the data analysis, perspectives and phenomenological studies about the scientific purposes of large experiments: e.g. AMS, ANTARES, HESS, CTA, POLAR. My contributions are the results of research activities in coherence with two main scientific goals in the context of the astro-particle physics domain: - The implication of the high energy cosmic radiation measurement for the investigation on the nature and distribution of the dark matter; - The investigation of the origin of the galactic cosmic radiation for the understanding of the most energetic processes in the Universe. (author)

  19. Radiation Physics for Medical Physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2010-01-01

    This well-received textbook and reference summarizes the basic knowledge of atomic, nuclear, and radiation physics that professionals working in medical physics and biomedical engineering need for efficient and safe use of ionizing radiation. Concentrating on the underlying principles of radiation physics, it covers the prerequisite knowledge for medical physics courses on the graduate and post-graduate levels in radiotherapy physics, radiation dosimetry, imaging physics, and health physics, thus providing the link between elementary physics on the one hand and the intricacies of the medical physics specialties on the other hand. This expanded and revised second edition offers reorganized and expanded coverage. Several of the original chapters have been split into two with new sections added for completeness and better flow. New chapters on Coulomb scattering; on energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions; and on waveguide theory have been added in recognition of their importance. Others tra...

  20. Physics of charged cosmic rays with the AMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialle, J.P

    2000-04-01

    The AMS experiment aims at searching for primordial antimatter, non-baryonic dark matter, and measuring with high statistics and high accuracy the electrically charged cosmic ray particles and light nuclei in the extraterrestrial space beyond the atmosphere. AMS is the first magnetic spectrometer which will be flown in space. It will be installed for 3 years on the international space station (ISS) in 2003. A test flight with the space shuttle DISCOVERY took place in June 1998 with a first detector and gave many results: best limit on the existence of antinuclei, fluxes of protons, leptons, and helium nuclei above the geomagnetic threshold, existence of a secondary flux below the geomagnetic threshold. These results are described below. The physics goal and perspectives for AMS on the space station with an improved detector are described as well. (author)

  1. Cosmic background radiation spectral distortion and radiative decays of relic neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, Z.G.; Doroshkevich, A.G.; Khlopov, M.Yu.; Yurov, V.P.; Vysotskij, M.I.

    1989-01-01

    The recently observed excess of photons on a short wavelength side of the peak of a cosmic background radiation spectrum can be described by radiative decays of relic neutral particles. The lifetime and mass of a decaying particle must satisfy the following conditions: 2x10 9 s 14 s, 0.4 eV -9 -8x10 -8 ) μ b , and the interaction of new particles with the usual matter must be rather strong. The generalization of the standard SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) model is presented which includes new particles with the desired properties. 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Physics of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    This chapter discusses the following topics: concept of atom and elements; molecules and compounds; basic principles of radiation; types of radiations; radioactivity, unit of radioactivity, specific activity, radioactive decay, ionisation and ions, interaction of radiation with matters, modes of interaction: photoelectric absorption: Compton scattering, pair-production; attenuation of x and gamma radiation; build-up factors

  3. Contribution gives the cosmic radiation to the doses for exhibition to the natural radiation in the Cuban population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomas Zerquera, J.; Peres Sanchez, D.; Prendes Alonso, M

    1998-01-01

    With the objective to specify the preponderant contribution the cosmic component the radiation in the dose that the Cuban population receives you carries out a program she gives mensurations she gives this component in the whole country

  4. The anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation from local dynamic density perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, C.C.; Ip, P.S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to the usual assumption, it is shown here that the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation need not be dominated by perturbations at the last scattering surface. The results of computer simulations are shown in which local dynamic density perturbations, in the form of Swiss cheese holes with finite, uniform density central lumps, are the main source of anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation. (author)

  5. Characterization of Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors using Cosmic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Favian; Castro, Juan; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Wedel, Zachary; Fan, Sewan; Ritt, Stefan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The silicon photomultiplier light detector has gained a lot of attention lately in fields such as particle physics, astrophysics, and medical physics. Its popularity stems from its lower cost, compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and its excellent ability to distinguish a quantized number of photons. They are normally operated at room temperature and biased above their breakdown voltages. As such, they may also exhibit properties that may hinder their optimal operation which include a thermally induced high dark count rate, after pulse effects, and cross talk from photons in nearby pixels. At this poster session, we describe our data analysis and our endeavor to characterize the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) detectors from Hamamatsu under different bias voltages and temperature conditions. Particularly, we describe our setup which uses cosmic rays to induce scintillation light delivered to the detector by wavelength shifting optical fibers and the use of a fast 1 GHz waveform sampler, the domino ring sampler (DRS4) digitizer board. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  6. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  7. Imprints of relic gravitational waves in cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Polnarev, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    A strong variable gravitational field of the very early Universe inevitably generates relic gravitational waves by amplifying their zero-point quantum oscillations. We begin our discussion by contrasting the concepts of relic gravitational waves and inflationary 'tensor modes'. We explain and summarize the properties of relic gravitational waves that are needed to derive their effects on cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies. The radiation field is characterized by four invariants I, V, E, B. We reduce the radiative transfer equations to a single integral equation of Voltairre type and solve it analytically and numerically. We formulate the correlation functions C l XX ' for X, X ' =T, E, B and derive their amplitudes, shapes and oscillatory features. Although all of our main conclusions are supported by exact numerical calculations, we obtain them, in effect, analytically by developing and using accurate approximations. We show that the TE correlation at lower l's must be negative (i.e. an anticorrelation), if it is caused by gravitational waves, and positive if it is caused by density perturbations. This difference in TE correlation may be a signature more valuable observationally than the lack or presence of the BB correlation, since the TE signal is about 100 times stronger than the expected BB signal. We discuss the detection by WMAP of the TE anticorrelation at l≅30 and show that such an anticorrelation is possible only in the presence of a significant amount of relic gravitational waves (within the framework of all other common assumptions). We propose models containing considerable amounts of relic gravitational waves that are consistent with the measured TT, TE and EE correlations

  8. Exposure to cosmic radiation: a developing major problem in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowder, W.M.; Hajnal, F.

    1992-01-01

    'Full Text:' Cosmic radiation at ground altitudes is usually a relatively minor contributor to human radiation exposure, producing a global collective dose equivalent that is about 10 percent of the total from all natural sources. However, more than a million people living at high altitudes receive annual dose equivalents in excess of 5 mSv. In recent years, there has been increasing concern about the exposure of aircraft flight crews and passengers, for whom annual dose equivalents of up to several mSv have been estimated. Recent EML results indicate the presence of an important high-energy neutron component at jet aircraft altitudes, perhaps producing dose equivalents of the order of 0.1. mSv/h at high latitudes. Finally, space agencies have been long concerned with the potential exposures of astronauts, especially from the rare massive solar flare events. As more people venture into space, this source of human radiation exposure will become increasingly important. Available date on those aspects of cosmic radiation exposure will be reviewed, along with current and anticipated future research activities that may yield and improve assessment of the problem. The question of how such exposures might be controlled will be addressed, but not answered. (author)

  9. Is Hawking radiation physically reasonable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1995-07-01

    Hawking radiation is observed in a general spacetime which includes all the black hole spacetimes as well as various types of other spacetimes which are not interesting form the physical point of view like black hole spacetimes. Even Hawking radiation is observed in NUT spacetime which is sometimes considered as unphysical. So naturally arises the question whether Hawking radiation is physically reasonable. (author). 22 refs

  10. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  11. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1991-05-01

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiotherapy. Current research topics include: oncogenic transformation assays, mutation studies involving interactions between radiation and environmental contaminants, isolation, characterization and sequencing of a human repair gene, characterization of a dominant transforming gene found in C3H 10T1/2 cells, characterize ab initio the interaction of DNA and radiation, refine estimates of the radiation quality factor Q, a new mechanistic model of oncogenesis showing the role of long-term low dose medium LET radiation, and time dependent modeling of radiation induced chromosome damage and subsequent repair or misrepair

  12. Ashra Neutrino Telescope Array (NTA): Combined Imaging Observation of Astroparticles — For Clear Identification of Cosmic Accelerators and Fundamental Physics Using Cosmic Beams —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Kifune, Tadashi

    In VHEPA (very high energy particle astronomy) 2014 workshop, focused on the next generation explorers for the origin of cosmic rays, held in Kashiwa, Japan, reviewing and discussions were presented on the status of the observation of GeV-TeV photons, TeV-PeV neutrinos, EeV-ZeV hadrons, test of interaction models with Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and theoretical aspects of astrophysics. The acceleration sites of hadrons, i.e., sources of PeV-EeV cosmic rays, should exist in the universe within the GZK-horizon even in the remotest case. We also affirmed that the hadron acceleration mechanism correlates with cosmic ray composition so that it is important to investigate the acceleration mechanism in relevance to the composition survey at PeV-EeV energy. We regard that LHC and astrophysics theories are ready to be used to probe into hadron acceleration mechanism in the universe. Recently, IceCube has reported detection of three events of neutrinos with energies around 1 PeV and additional events at lower energies, which significantly deviate from the expected level of background events. It is necessary to observe GeV-TeV photon, EeV-ZeV hadron and TeV-PeV neutrino all together, in order to understand hadronic interactions of cosmic rays in the PeV-EeV energy region. It is required to make a step further toward exploring the PeV-EeV universe with high accuracy and high statistics observations for both neutrinos and gamma rays simultaneously, by using the instrument such as Ashra Neutrino Telescope Array (NTA). Wide and fine survey of gamma-rays and neutrinos with simultaneously detecting Cherenkov and fluorescence light with NTA will guide us to a new intriguing stage of recognizing astronomical objects and non-thermal phenomena in ultra-high energy region, in addition, new aspect about the fundamental concepts of physics beyond our presently limited understanding; the longstanding problem of cosmic ray origin, the radiation mechanism of gamma-rays, neutrino and

  13. Ultra high energy cosmic rays above 10 GeV: Hints to new physics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays; physics beyond standard model. ... The origin of the observed cosmic ray (CR) events above 10ѕј eV — the so-called ex- .... to arise simply from decay of some supermassive particles (of mass> 10ѕЅ eV) ...

  14. Radiation physics for medical physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorsak, E.B.

    2006-01-01

    This book summarizes the radiation physics knowledge that professionals working in medical physics need to master for efficient and safe dealings with ionizing radiation. It contains eight chapters, each chapter covering a specific group of subjects related to radiation physics and is intended as a textbook for a course in radiation physics in medical-physics graduate programs. However, the book may also be of interest to the large number of professionals, not only medical physicists, who in their daily occupations deal with various aspects of medical physics and find a need to improve their understanding of radiation physics. The main target audience for this book is graduate students studying for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in medical physics, who have to possess the necessary physics and mathematics background knowledge to be able to follow and master the complete textbook. Medical residents, technology students and biomedical engineering students may find certain sections too challenging or esoteric, yet they will find many sections interesting and useful in their studies. Candidates preparing for professional certification exams in any of the medical physics subspecialties should find the material useful, and some of the material would also help candidates preparing for certification examinations in medical dosimetry or radiation-related medical specialties. Numerous textbooks are available covering the various subspecialties of medical physics but they generally make a transition from the elementary basic physics directly into the intricacies of the given medical physics subspecialty. The intent of this textbook is to provide the missing link between the elementary physics on the one hand and the physics of the subspecialties on the other hand. (orig.)

  15. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  16. Ribbons on the Cosmic Background Radiation Sky: A Powerful Test of a Baryon Symmetric Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, W.H.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Turner, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    If the Universe consists of domains of matter and antimatter, annihilations at domain interfaces leave a distinctive imprint on the cosmic background radiation (CBR) sky. The signature is anisotropies in the form of long, thin ribbons of width θ W ∼0.1 circ , separated by angle θ L ≅1 circ (L/100h -1 Mpc) (L is the characteristic domain size) and with distortion parameter y∼10 -6 . Such a pattern could potentially be detected by the high-resolution CBR anisotropy experiments planned for the next decade, and such experiments may finally settle the question of whether or not our Hubble volume is baryon symmetric. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Performance studies of the ATLAS transition radiation tracker barrel using SR1 cosmics data

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, R

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to measure Nature at the energy scale often associated with electroweak symmetry breaking. When it comes online in 2008, the LHC and ATLAS will work to discover, among other things, the Higgs boson and any other signatures for physics beyond the Standard Model. As part of the ATLAS Inner Detector, the Transition Radiation Tracker will be an important part of ATLAS’s ability to make precise measurements of particle properties. This paper summarizes work done to study and categorize the performance of the TRT, using a combination of cosmic ray test data from the SR1 facility and Monte Carlo. In general, it was found that the TRT is working well, with module-level eciencies around 90 % and module-level noise just above 2 %. Reasonably good agreement was observed with Monte Carlo, though there are some apparently pathological dierences between the two that deserve further attention.

  18. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies, cosmic microwave background radiation and cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Presence of the hot (kTe ~ 3 - 10 KeV) rarefied gas in the clusters of galaxies (most massive gravitationally bound objects in the Universe) leads to the appearance of  "shadows"  in the angular distribution of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation and permits to measure the peculiar velocities of these clusters relative to the unique coordinate frame where CMB is isotropic. I plan to describe the physics leading to these observational effects. Planck spacecraft, ground based South Pole and Atacama Cosmology Telescopes discovered recently more than two thousand of unknown before Clusters of Galaxies at high redshifts detecting these "shadows" and traces of kinematic effect, demonstrating the correlation of the hot gas velocities with mass concentrations on large scales. Giant ALMA interferometer in Atacama desert resolved recently strong shocks between merging clusters of galaxies. Newly discovered clusters of galaxies permit to study the rate of growth of the large scale structur...

  19. Effect of heavy charged particles of galactic cosmic radiation on seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimova, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    The experiments were carried out on Lactuca sativa seeds exposed for 20, 66, 123 and 308 days in a biostack also containing physical detectors of heavy charged particles. The puppose of the experiments was to measure the yield of abberrant cells and its dependence on the exposure time and the site where particles hit the object. The cytogenetic examination demonstrated a significant difference between the seeds that were or were not hit by heavy charged particles. This is indicative of a significant contribution of galactic cosmic radiation to the radiobiological effect. The yield of aberrant cells as a function of the localization of heavy charged particles in the seed was established. The most sensitive target was the root meristem

  20. Physical condition for the slowing down of cosmic acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jian Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The possible slowing down of cosmic acceleration was widely studied. However, judgment on this effect in different dark energy parameterizations was very ambiguous. Moreover, the reason of generating these uncertainties was still unknown. In the present paper, we analyze the derivative of deceleration parameter q′(z using the Gaussian processes. This model-independent reconstruction suggests that no slowing down of acceleration is presented within 95% C.L. from the Union2.1 and JLA supernova data. However, q′(z from the observational H(z data is a little smaller than zero at 95% C.L., which indicates that future H(z data may have a potential to test this effect. From the evolution of q′(z, we present an interesting constraint on the dark energy and observational data. The physical constraint clearly solves the problem of why some dark energy models cannot produce this effect in previous work. Comparison between the constraint and observational data also shows that most of current data are not in the allowed regions. This implies a reason of why current data cannot convincingly measure this effect.

  1. Physical condition for the slowing down of cosmic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Xia, Jun-Qing

    2018-04-01

    The possible slowing down of cosmic acceleration was widely studied. However, judgment on this effect in different dark energy parameterizations was very ambiguous. Moreover, the reason of generating these uncertainties was still unknown. In the present paper, we analyze the derivative of deceleration parameter q‧ (z) using the Gaussian processes. This model-independent reconstruction suggests that no slowing down of acceleration is presented within 95% C.L. from the Union2.1 and JLA supernova data. However, q‧ (z) from the observational H (z) data is a little smaller than zero at 95% C.L., which indicates that future H (z) data may have a potential to test this effect. From the evolution of q‧ (z), we present an interesting constraint on the dark energy and observational data. The physical constraint clearly solves the problem of why some dark energy models cannot produce this effect in previous work. Comparison between the constraint and observational data also shows that most of current data are not in the allowed regions. This implies a reason of why current data cannot convincingly measure this effect.

  2. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  3. Measurements at LHC and their relevance for cosmic ray physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Many LHC measurements are already used to improve hadronic interaction models used in cosmic ray analyses. This already had a positive effect on the model dependence of crucial data analyses. Some of the data and the model tuning is reviewed. However, the LHC still has a lot more potential to provide crucial information. Since the start of Run2 the highest accelerator beam energies are reached and no further increase can be expected for a long time. First data of Run2 are published and the fundamental performance of cosmic ray hadronic interaction models can be scrutinized. The relevance of LHC data in general for cosmic ray data analyses is demonstrated.

  4. Spectrum of the cosmic background radiation: early and recent measurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1985-09-01

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model

  5. Current trends in radiation physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A; Elbehay, A Z; Hassib, G M; Elnaggar, A M [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference details 11 papers, explain radiation physics. It discuss subjects of axial and spherical symmetry,accelerators,cyclotron laboratory and radon monitoring. contains figures,tables and data.

  6. Current trends in radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Elbehay, A.Z.; Hassib, G.M.; Elnaggar, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    This conference details 11 papers, explain radiation physics. It discuss subjects of axial and spherical symmetry,accelerators,cyclotron laboratory and radon monitoring. contains figures,tables and data

  7. Cosmic numbers: A physical classification for cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avelino, P.P.; Martins, C.J.A.P.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the notion of the cosmic numbers of a cosmological model, and discuss how they can be used to naturally classify models according to their ability to solve some of the problems of the standard cosmological model

  8. Laboratory Investigations of the Physical and Optical Properties of the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Microdsub-micron size cosmic dust grains play an important role in the physical and dynamical process in the galaxy, the interstellar medium, and the interplanetary and planetary environments. The dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged by a variety of mechanisms that include collisional process with electrons and ions, and photoelectric emissions with UV radiation. The photoelectric emission process is believed to be the dominant process in many astrophysical environments with nearby UV sources, such as the interstellar medium, diffuse clouds, the outer regions of the dense molecular clouds, interplanetary medium, dust in planetary environments and rings, cometary tails, etc. Also, the processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains are of great interest in view of the polarization of observed starlight as a probe for evaluation of the galactic magnetic field.

  9. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  10. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  11. Radiation physics for nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is expanding rapidly, with the development of exciting new diagnostic methods and treatments. This growth is closely associated with significant advances in radiation physics. In this book, acknowledged experts explain the basic principles of radiation physics in relation to nuclear medicine and examine important novel approaches in the field. The first section is devoted to what might be termed the "building blocks" of nuclear medicine, including the mechanisms of interaction between radiation and matter and Monte Carlo codes. In subsequent sections, radiation sources for medical applications, radiopharmaceutical development and production, and radiation detectors are discussed in detail. New frontiers are then explored, including improved algorithms for image reconstruction, biokinetic models, and voxel phantoms for internal dosimetry. Both trainees and experienced practitioners and researchers will find this book to be an invaluable source of up-to-date information.

  12. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos; Rayons cosmiques et rayonnement du cosmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizot, E

    2005-12-01

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  13. Cosmic neutrinos as a probe of TeV-scale physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, M.

    2007-02-15

    Ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos are versatile probes of astrophysics, astronomy, and particle physics. They represent the messengers of hadronic processes in cosmic accelerators and survive the propagation through the interstellar medium practically unscathed. We investigate the neutrino fluxes associated with optically thin proton sources which provide a diagnostic of the transition between galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. The center of mass energies in collisions of these cosmic neutrinos with atomic nuclei in the atmosphere or the Earth's interior easily exceed those so far reached in man-made accelerators. We discuss the prospects of observing supersymmetric neutrino interactions with Cherenkov telescopes and speculate about a neutrino component in extremely high energy cosmic rays from exotic interactions in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  14. Ageing effects on image sensors due to terrestrial cosmic radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nampoothiri, G.G.; Horemans, M.L.R.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the “ageing” effect on image sensors introduced by neutrons present in natural (terrestrial) cosmic environment. The results obtained at sea level are corroborated for the first time with accelerated neutron beam tests and for various image sensor operation conditions. The results reveal

  15. Food physics and radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    In the lecture information is given about food physics, which is a rather new, interdisciplinary field of science, connecting food science and applied physics. The topics of radioactivity of foodstuffs and radiation techniques in the food industry are important parts of food physics detailed information will be given about the main fields (e.g. radio stimulation, food preservation) of radiation techniques in the agro-food sector. Finally some special questions of radioactive contamination of foodstuffs in hungary and applicability of radioanalytical techniques (e.g. Inaa) for food investigation will be analyzed and discussed

  16. Inconstant sun: how solar evolution has affected cosmic and ultraviolet radiation exposure over the history of life on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, P Andrew

    2003-03-01

    Four billion years ago, sea-level UV exposure was more than 400 times as intense as today, the dose from solar cosmic rays was five times present levels, and galactic cosmic rays accounted for only about 10% their current contribution to sea-level radiation doses. Exposure to cosmic radiation accounts for about 10% of natural background radiation exposure today and includes dose from galactic cosmic rays and solar charged particles. There is little exposure to ionizing wavelengths of UV due to absorption by ozone. The sun has evolved significantly over its life; in the past there were higher levels of particulate radiation and lower UV emissions from the sun, and a stronger solar wind reduced radiation dose in the inner solar system from galactic cosmic rays. Finally, since the early atmosphere contained little to no oxygen, surface levels of UV radiation were far higher in the past.

  17. Cosmic ray modulation and radiation dose of aircrews during the solar cycle 24/25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Shoko; Kataoka, Ryuho; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Weak solar activity and high cosmic ray flux during the coming solar cycle are qualitatively anticipated by the recent observations that show the decline in the solar activity levels. We predict the cosmic ray modulation and resultant radiation exposure at flight altitude by using the time-dependent and three-dimensional model of the cosmic ray modulation. Our galactic cosmic ray (GCR) model is based on the variations of the solar wind speed, the strength of the heliospheric magnetic field, and the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet. We reproduce the 22 year variation of the cosmic ray modulation from 1980 to 2015 taking into account the gradient-curvature drift motion of GCRs. The energy spectra of GCR protons obtained by our model show good agreement with the observations by the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting magnetic rigidity Spectrometer (BESS) and the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) except for a discrepancy at the solar maximum. Five-year annual radiation dose around the solar minimum at the solar cycle 24/25 will be approximately 19% higher than that in the last cycle. This is caused by the charge sign dependence of the cosmic ray modulation, such as the flattop profiles in a positive polarity.

  18. A cosmic book. [of physics of early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P. J. E.; Silk, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A system of assigning odds to the basic elements of cosmological theories is proposed in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the theories. A figure of merit for the theories is obtained by counting and weighing the plausibility of each of the basic elements that is not substantially supported by observation or mature fundamental theory. The magnetized strong model is found to be the most probable. In order of decreasing probability, the ranking for the rest of the models is: (1) the magnetized string model with no exotic matter and the baryon adiabatic model; (2) the hot dark matter model and the model of cosmic string loops; (3) the canonical cold dark matter model, the cosmic string loops model with hot dark matter, and the baryonic isocurvature model; and (4) the cosmic string loops model with no exotic matter.

  19. Elucidation of the fluctuation history of cosmic radiation and global environmental using AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho

    2008-01-01

    Recently, accuracy of AMS has further been raised in trace amounts of sample. Besides application of 14 C to the age estimation, it has been able to restore in detail the past fluctuation of cosmic radiation strength using the other radioactive isotopes ( 10 Be, 36 Cl etc) in environmental samples and to elucidate the correlation of this with the fluctuation of climate and environment. In this report, the attempts to elucidate the fluctuation history of cosmic radiation and global environment with ice cores using AMS are presented. (M.H.)

  20. Air traffic and cosmic radiation. An epidemiological study among aircraft crews in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blettner, M.; Hammer, G.P.; Langner, I.; Zeeb, H.

    2003-01-01

    Airline pilots and cabin crew are exposed to cosmic ionizing radiation and other occupational factors that may influence their health status. The mortality of some 6,000 pilots and 20,000 cabin crew members was investigated in a cohort study. Overall a pronounced healthy worker effect was seen. The cancer mortality risk is slightly lower than in the general population. Currently there is no indication for an increase in cancer mortality due to cosmic radiation. A further follow-up is planned. (orig.) [de

  1. TEACHING PHYSICS: Demonstrating cosmic ray induced electromagnetic cascades in the A-level laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This article indicates how the study of sea-level cosmic ray phenomena can have a role in A-level physics. It describes a simple but far reaching particle physics experiment that can be carried out in the A-level physics laboratory. A simple model of electron-positron-photon cascades, suitable for use at A-level, is described.

  2. Radiation transport of cosmic ray nuclei in lunar material and radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C.H.; Adams, J.H. Jr.; Letaw, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation environment on the lunar surface is inhospitable. The permanent settlers may work ten hours per 24-hour interval for the two-week-long lunar day on the lunar surface, or 20 percent of the total time. At moderate depths below the lunar surface (less than 200 g/sq cm) the flux of secondary neutrons exceeds considerably that in the upper atmosphere of the earth, due to cosmic-ray interactions with lunar material. The annual dose equivalent due to neutrons is about 20 or 25 rem within the upper meter of the lunar surface. The dose equivalent due to gamma rays generated by nuclear interactions near the lunar surface is only on the order of 1 percent of that due to neutrons. However, gamma-ray line emission from excited nuclei and nuclear spallation products generated by cosmic rays near the lunar surface is of considerable interest: these lines permit the partial determination of lunar composition by gamma spectroscopy. 12 references

  3. Semiconductor radiation detectors. Device physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.

    2007-01-01

    Starting from basic principles, the author, whose own contributions to these developments have been significant, describes the rapidly growing field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This development was stimulated by requirements in elementary particle physics where it has led to important scientific discoveries. It has now spread to many other fields of science and technology. The book is written in a didactic way and includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. The working principles of semiconductor radiation detectors are explained in an intuitive way, followed by formal quantitative analysis. Broad coverage is also given to electronic signal readout and to the subject of radiation damage. The book is the first to comprehensively cover the semiconductor radiation detectors currently in use. It is useful as a teaching guide and as a reference work for research and applications. (orig.)

  4. Data processing in cosmic rays at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Masami

    1980-01-01

    Data processing performed by the World Data Center for Cosmic Rays, installed at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (IPCR) is reported. The Center was set up as a member of the World Data Center for Solar and Terrestrial Physics and performs assigned services. There are several C-level World Data Centers in Japan, and the DC for Cosmic Rays, IPCR, is described in detail, in the context of cosmic ray research itself. As to the future of the Center, IPCR, personal opinions and expectations are made. Thus a glimpse on a century of International Cooperative Observation and a quarter century of world data center operations are made from cosmic ray research side. (author)

  5. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ''biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  7. Beryllium isotopes in cosmic radiation measured with plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, K.; Enge, W.; Beaujean, R.

    1976-01-01

    Plastic stacks consisting of Daicel cellulose nitrate and Kodak cellulose nitrate were flown from Fort Churchill, Canada in 1971 for the study of isotopic components of light nuclei, especially beryllium, in primary cosmic rays. Tracks found in these detectors were analysed for charge and mass identification; the ratio between Be 7 and total Be is obtained as 0.64 +- 0.25 at detector level. (orig.) [de

  8. The cosmic background radiation circa ν2K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {ω b , ω cdm , Ω tot , Ω Λ , n s , τ C , σ 8 }. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Ω tot = 1.08 ± 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n s 1.03 ± 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (ω b -Ω b h 2 0.030 ± 0.005 cf. 0.019 ± 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range (ω cdm 0.17±0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant (Ω Λ = 0.66 ± 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos

  9. Qualtum cosmics-and-chaotics--the ultimate tortoise in physics and modern medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Qualtum cosmics is the qualitative opposite of quantum mechanics. The flip-side of qualtum cosmics is qualtum chaotics, the two governing much of what is seen as inscrutable in medicine. The Ultimate (Last Tortoise is close to Einsteinean idea of a Unified Theory, a single concept that can explain whatsoever there is in physics, (and in medicine, or what have you.

  10. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 4: Cosmic Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J. L. [MIT, LNS; Ritz, S. [UC, Santa Cruz; Beatty, J. J. [Ohio State U.; Buckley, J. [Washington U., Seattle; Cowen, D. F. [Penn State U.; Cushman, P. [Minnesota U.; Dodelson, S. [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Galbiati, C. [PNPI, CSTD; Honscheid, K. [Ohio State U.; Hooper, D. [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Kaplinghat, M. [UC, Irvine; Kusenko, A. [Unlisted; Matchev, K. [Florida U.; McKinsey, D. [Yale U.; Nelson, A. E. [Washington U., Seattle; Olinto, A. [Chicago U., EFI; Profumo, S. [UC, Santa Cruz; Robertson, H. [Washington U., Seattle; Rosenberg, L. [Unlisted; Sinnis, G. [Los Alamos; Tait, T. M.P. [UCLA

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 4, on the Cosmic Frontier, discusses the program of research relevant to cosmology and the early universe. This area includes the study of dark matter and the search for its particle nature, the study of dark energy and inflation, and cosmic probes of fundamental symmetries.

  11. Cosmic ray physics in space: the role of Sergey Vernov's scientific school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, M. I.

    2011-04-01

    Cosmic rays were discovered almost 100 years ago. Since then the scientific world has learned a lot from their nature: the particles nascent in the Universe, both in our Galaxy and outside, the basic mechanisms of their acceleration, transfer in the interstellar environment and the interaction of the primary cosmic rays with the atmosphere surrounding the Earth. Before 1957, i.e., the beginning of the Space Era, researchers' capabilities were limited to experiments performed on the ground, underground and in near-ground atmosphere to flight altitudes of aerostats, airplanes and rockets, i.e., where only secondary radiation is in existence, this is the result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the Earth's atmosphere. The launching of spacecraft allowed the scientists to commence exploring the Universe's primordial matter itself outside the atmosphere, i.e., the primary cosmic rays. Sergey Vernov, the Russian scientist, was among them.

  12. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established. Keywords: Particle physics, Computer science, Mathematics, Astrophysics

  13. Nuclear interactions between cosmic radiation and interstellar gas, and nucleosynthesis of lithium, beryllium, and boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneguzzi, Maurice.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of nuclear interactions between the nuclei of cosmic radiation and those of interstellar gas were studied. The variation in the chemical composition of cosmic radiation with energy shows that the quantity of matter it passes through decreases between 1 and 100GeV/nucleon from 6 to 1g/cm 2 approximately. The chemical and isotopic composition for C, N and O suggests that the relative abundances of these nuclei at the source are much the same as the universal abundances except for the ratio C/O, higher by about a factor 1.5 in cosmic radiation sources. The enrichment of interstellar gas in light elements Li, Be and B was calculated. The value obtained accounts well for the universal abundances of the four isotopes 6 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B independently of the model used. It may be assumed that large fluxes of low-energy cosmic rays exist in the remains of supernovae and that 7 Li is produced in these objects and then spread out in the galaxy. These objects could be extended sources of nuclear γ's, which are observable, but the same process proves unable to produce sufficient quantities of the very heavy proton-rich elements of dubious origin. Inelastic collisions or spallation reactions between cosmic and interstellar gas nuclei induce a quantity of nuclear γ ray emission not necessarily undetectable. The position flux of a few MeV from the β + disintegration of unstable spallation products is too low on the other hand to give an estimate of the low-energy cosmic radiation flux in the interstellar medium [fr

  14. Forward physics with the LHCf experiment: a LHC contribution to cosmic-ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonechi L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available LHCf is a small detector installed at LHC accelerator to measure neutral particle flow in the forward direction of proton -proton (p - p and proton -nucleus (p - A interactions. Thanks to the optimal performance that has characterized the last years’ running of the LHC collider, several measurements have been taken since 2009 in different running conditions. After data taking for p - p interactions at √s = 900 GeV, 2.76 TeV and 7 TeV and proton - Lead nucleus (p -Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV (energy of a couple of projectile and target nucleons in their center of mass reference frame, LHCf is now going to complete its physics program with the 13 TeV p - p run foreseen in 2015. The complete set of results will become a reference data set of forward physics for the calibration and tuning of the hadronic interaction models currently used for the simulation of the atmospheric showers induced by very high energy cosmic rays. For this reason we think that LHCf is giving an important contribution for the study of cosmic rays at the highest energies. In this paper the experiment, the published results and the current status are reviewed.

  15. Medical radiation physics in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, V.; Vasileva, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Bulgaria medical radiation physics in not yet on a world level. The number of medical physicists working in diagnostic and therapeutic centres is low. Comparatively good is the situation of medical physics in the areas of therapy and radiation protection. But the role of physics in medicine is underestimated as a whole, because of subjective reasons. At the other hand the education in this area is good and very professional. Since 1992 there has been established a specialty 'medical physics' in University of Shoumen and since 1997 the same specialty exists in Sofia University. The situation is expected to be approved with reorganization of the Health System in Bulgaria with compliance with the European standards

  16. Irradiation of the Bulgarian population with secondary cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, G.

    1983-01-01

    The radiation of the Bulgarian population was estimated, the former being due to secondary space radiation. A method of calculation was applied using the values for dose powers at different heights, proposed by the Research Committee on Atomic Radiation Action (UNO, 1976). Parallelly with that comparative measurements were taken using counters for space radiation VA-Z-232. The stay of the population in different type buildings was taken into account. The mean annual dose of radiation of the Bulgarian population from the secondary space radiation is 245μGy, and the collective effective equivalent dose is 2, 2.10 3 hum sv. (authors)

  17. Cosmic Radiation Dose Measurements from the RaD-X Flight Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Hayes, Bryan M.; Lusby, Terry C.; Straume, Tore; Tobiska, W. Kent; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Benton, Eric; hide

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission obtained measurements for improving the understanding of cosmic radiation transport in the atmosphere and human exposure to this ionizing radiation field in the aircraft environment. The value of dosimetric measurements from the balloon platform is that they can be used to characterize cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. The RaD-X balloon was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5 degrees North, 104.2 degrees West) on 25 September 2015. Over 18 hours of flight data were obtained from each of the four different science instruments at altitudes above 20 kilometers. The RaD-X balloon flight was supplemented by contemporaneous aircraft measurements. Flight-averaged dosimetric quantities are reported at seven altitudes to provide benchmark measurements for improving aviation radiation models. The altitude range of the flight data extends from commercial aircraft altitudes to above the Pfotzer maximum where the dosimetric quantities are influenced by cosmic ray primaries. The RaD-X balloon flight observed an absence of the Pfotzer maximum in the measurements of dose equivalent rate.

  18. Optimised polarimeter configurations for measuring the Stokes parameters of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Couchot, F.; Delabrouille, J.; Kaplan, J.; Revenu, B.

    1998-01-01

    We present configurations of polarimeters which measure the three linear Stokes parameters of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation with a nearly diagonal error matrix, independent of the global orientation of the polarimeters in the focal plane. These configurations also provide the smallest possible error box volume.

  19. New limits to the small scale fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, K.I.; Fomalont, E.B.; Wall, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    The VLA has been used at 4.9 GHz to observe a small region of sky in order to extend the radio source count to low flux density (Fomalont et al., these proceedings) and to look for small scale fluctuations in the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. (Auth.)

  20. Cosmic radiation during air travel: trends in exposure of aircrews and airline passengers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer RO; LSO

    2004-01-01

    An unfavourable effect of flying is the enhanced exposure of both passengers and aircrew to cosmic radiation at high altitudes. On the basis of a detailed survey on passengers arriving at or departing from Amsterdam Schiphol Airport in the 1988-1997 period, estimates of individual effective dose for

  1. Distortions in the Rayleigh-Jeans region of the cosmic background radiation spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Zotti, G.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of the origin and evolution of distortions in the Rayleigh-Jeans region of the cosmic background radiation spectrum is reviewed. Some proposed experiments, designed to substantially improve our knowledge of that portion of the spectrum, are briefly described. (author)

  2. Superposition of Planckian spectra and the distortions of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexanian, M.

    1982-01-01

    A fit of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) by means of a positive linear superposition of Planckian spectra implies an upper bound to the photon spectrum. The observed spectrum of the CMB gives a weighting function with a normalization greater than unity

  3. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 6.3 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandolesi, N.; Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Morigi, G.

    1984-01-01

    We present results of a measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at a wavelength of 6.3 cm. We obtained the value T/sub CBR/ = 2.71 +- 0.20 K. This is in good agreement with, and has a smaller error than, any previous measurement at equal or longer wavelengths

  4. Sensitiveness to cosmic radiation: on some aspects of data collection and their representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leray, J.L.; Musseau, O.; Marti, A.; Coic, Y.

    1987-07-01

    During simulation of cosmic radiation effects, the energy deposition by length unit is altered because of energy lowering along the range. This mechanism is illustrated by exhaustive data got from the microprocessor type 2901. Wrong conclusions may be deduced concerning behavior in space field. New representations of cross sections are presented; they lead to safer predictions on behavior in space environment [fr

  5. Application of Apollo cosmic radiation dosimetry to lunar colonization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, R.A.; Bailey, J.V.; Brown, R.D.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation data gathered from the lunar landing missions of Apollo 11 through Apollo 15 are presented. These data have been analyzed to provide dosimetry evaluation of the ambient radiation and radiation from potential solar particle events for the planning of safe, long-term stays of relatively large numbers of individuals upon the moon. (U.S.)

  6. INCA project for investigation of primary cosmic radiation spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, K.V.; Erlykin, A.D.; Zhdanov, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    The scientific purposes of the INCA project and application of the ionization-neutron calorimeter for direct measurements of the cosmic rays spectrum and composition in the knee area and the primary electrons spectrum by 10 14 - 10 13 eV are discussed. The new effective method for the primary electrons and protons separation with the complex rejection coefficient of 10 -5 - 10 -6 is proposed for studying the primary electrons spectrum by E e > 1 TeV. The experimental and calculation data are in good agreement [ru

  7. Attempt to measure the cosmic background radiation at high altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeyrie, Jacques; Le Boiteux, Henri

    1959-01-01

    Results are given of the measurement by G.M. tubes of hard component of cosmic background between o and 60 km of altitude, at 43 deg. N latitude, on january 27, 1959 (17 h. GMT). The counting rate starts at 0.3 pulses per second (sea level) reaches a maximum value of 15.6 (18 km) and remains constant at 5.7 above 40 km. Reprint of a paper published in Le Journal de Physique et le Radium, t. 20, p. 573, may 1959

  8. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  9. Synchrotron radiation in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1998-01-01

    Much of present understanding of atomic and molecular structure and dynamics was gained through studies of photon-atom interactions. In particular, observations of the emission, absorption, and scattering of X rays have complemented particle-collision experiments in elucidating the physics of atomic inner shells. Grounded on Max von Laue's theoretical insight and the invention of the Bragg spectrometer, the field's potential underwent a step function with the development of synchrotron-radiation sources. Notably current third-generation sources have opened new horizons in atomic and molecular physics by producing radiation of wide tunability and exceedingly high intensity and polarization, narrow energy bandwidth, and sharp time structure. In this review, recent advances in synchrotron-radiation studies in atomic and molecular science are outlined. Some tempting opportunities are surveyed that arise for future studies of atomic processes, including many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interactions, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. (author)

  10. Natural environmental radioactivity with particular regard to radon gas and cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowder, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    A paper given at the previous workshop described the growth of our knowledge of the nature and sources of human exposure to naturally-occurring radiation and radionuclides, and summarized assessments of the individual components of this exposure. Here, some recent developments relevant to the earlier conclusions are described, and a closer look is taken at the increasingly important human exposure contribution of cosmic radiation, especially at aircraft altitudes. (author). 21 refs, 1 tab

  11. [A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper

  12. Radiation applications of physical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talrose, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many chemical energy problems have a physical chemistry nature connected with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. In our country, the development in this field is associated with the name N.N. Semenov, who was involved in a large number of fundamental and applied physical chemistry problems.Energy development during the last decades created or sharpened new problems. Our new Institute, the Institute of Energy problems of Chemical Physics, USSR Academy of Sciences, is dealing with some of them. The present article is an overview of our work on radiation applications. Examples of the use of radiation in power industry (such as coal gasification), tire production, mechanical joints, metal powder production and sterilization of pharmaceutical products are given. Methods and problems involved in these applications are discussed and the great potential for vast utilization is demonstrated. (authors)

  13. Statistical methods in radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E; Bogard, James S

    2012-01-01

    This statistics textbook, with particular emphasis on radiation protection and dosimetry, deals with statistical solutions to problems inherent in health physics measurements and decision making. The authors begin with a description of our current understanding of the statistical nature of physical processes at the atomic level, including radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. Examples are taken from problems encountered in health physics, and the material is presented such that health physicists and most other nuclear professionals will more readily understand the application of statistical principles in the familiar context of the examples. Problems are presented at the end of each chapter, with solutions to selected problems provided online. In addition, numerous worked examples are included throughout the text.

  14. Biological effects of single HZE-particles of the cosmic radiation: Free Flyer Biostack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Free Flyer Biostack is designed as a passive, longer term experiment for investigations into the dosimetry of cosmic HZE particles (high-charge energetic particles), the effects of single HZE particles on isolated biological samples, and the synergistic effects of conditions in space, as e.g. zero gravity and presence of a permanent, weakly ionizing component of the cosmic radiation. For the experiments summarized in this project report, the AgCl detector type developed in Frankfurt has been used, consisting of monocrystalline AgCl films, about 130-150 μm thick, and doped with 5000 ppm of Cd. (DG) With 9 figs [de

  15. A Cherenkov imager for the charge measurement of the elements of nuclear cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallaz-Damaz, Y.

    2008-10-01

    A Cherenkov imager, CHERCAM (Cherenkov Camera) has been designed and built for the CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass) balloon-borne experiment. The instrument will perform charge measurements of nuclear cosmic-ray over a range extending from proton to iron in the energy domain from 10 10 to 10 15 eV. This work has focused on the development of CHERCAM by creating a simulation of the detector and on the aerogel plan characterization for the radiator. But it has also expanded on the technical aspects of the construction of the detector and its various tests, as well as the development of calibration software and data analysis. (author)

  16. Second dip as a signature of ultrahigh energy proton interactions with cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, V; Gazizov, A; Kachelrieb, M

    2006-12-08

    We discuss as a new signature for the interaction of extragalactic ultrahigh energy protons with cosmic microwave background radiation a spectral feature located at E= 6.3 x 10(19) eV in the form of a narrow and shallow dip. It is produced by the interference of e+e(-)-pair and pion production. We show that this dip and, in particular, its position are almost model-independent. Its observation by future ultrahigh energy cosmic ray detectors may give the conclusive confirmation that an observed steepening of the spectrum is caused by the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect.

  17. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  18. Natural radiation doses for cosmic and terrestrial components in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Patricia; Picado, Esteban; Minato, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    A study of external natural radiation, cosmic and terrestrial components, was carried out with in situ measurements using NaI scintillation counters while driving along the roads in Costa Rica for the period July 2003-July 2005. The geographical distribution of the terrestrial air-absorbed dose rates and the total effective dose rates (including cosmic) are represented on contour maps. Information on the population density of the country permitted the calculation of the per capita doses. The average effective dose for the total cosmic component was 46.88±18.06 nSv h -1 and the average air-absorbed dose for the terrestrial component was 29.52±14.46 nGy h -1 . The average total effective dose rate (cosmic plus terrestrial components) was 0.60±0.18 mSv per year. The effective dose rate per capita was found to be 83.97 nSv h -1 which gives an annual dose of 0.74 mSv. Assuming the world average for the internal radiation component, the natural radiation dose for Costa Rica will be 2.29 mSv annually

  19. Radiation -- A Cosmic Hazard to Human Habitation in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ruthan; Pellish, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Radiation exposure is one of the greatest environmental threats to the performance and success of human and robotic space missions. Radiation permeates all space and aeronautical systems, challenges optimal and reliable performance, and tests survival and survivability. We will discuss the broad scope of research, technological, and operational considerations to forecast and mitigate the effects of the radiation environment for deep space and planetary exploration.

  20. Medical radiation physics training EMERALD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabakov, S.; Roberts, C.; Lamm, I.L.; Milano, F.; Lewis, C.; Smith, D.; Litchev, A.; Jonsson, B.A.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.; Jonsson, L.; Riccardi, L.; Benini, A.; Silva, G. da; Teixeira, N.; Pascoal, A.; Noel, A.; Smith, P.; Musilek, L.; Sheahan, N.

    2001-01-01

    Training of young medical physicists is an essential part of the framework of measures for Radiological Protection of Patients. The paper describes the Medical Radiation Physics Training Scheme EMERALD, developed by an European Project Consortium. EMERALD Training covers the Physics of X-ray Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy. Each of these 3 modules covers 4 months training period. The EMERALD training materials are 3 Workbooks with tasks and a Teachers' Guide (total volume approx 700 pages) and 3 CD-ROMs with image database. (author)

  1. Aerosols, cloud physics and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twomey, S.

    1990-01-01

    Some aspects of climate physics are discussed with special attention given to cases where cloud physics is relevant for the phase and microstructure of clouds and, therefore, in the optical properties of the planet. It is argued that aerosol particles, through their strong effect on cloud microphysics, influence the shortwave energy input to earth, and that cloud microphysics strongly influence rain formation. Therefore, through their influence on microphysics, the aerosols play a central role in the atmospheric water cycle and, thus, on the planet's outgoing radiation. 20 refs

  2. Simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We present two simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy in inflationary models; one method uses a time-dependent transfer function, the other methods uses an approximate gravity-mode function which is a simple combination of the lowest order spherical Bessel functions. We compare the CBR anisotropy tensor multipole spectrum computed using our methods with the previous result of the highly accurate numerical method, the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote method. Our time-dependent transfer function is more accurate than the time-independent transfer function found by Turner, White, and Lindsey; however, we find that the transfer function method is only good for l approx-lt 120. Using our approximate gravity-wave mode function, we obtain much better accuracy; the tensor multipole spectrum we find differs by less than 2% for l approx-lt 50, less than 10% for l approx-lt 120, and less than 20% for l≤300 from the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote result. Our approximate graviton mode function should be quite useful in studying tensor perturbations from inflationary models. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Dose limits for cosmic radiation during space flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draaisma, F.S.

    1991-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to raised levels of ionizing radiation, which may cause biologic effects during space flights. Insights in these effects should lead to doselimits for astronauts during their full career. (author). 4 refs.; 4 tabs

  4. The HZE radiation problem. [highly-charged energetic galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Radiation-exposure limits have yet to be established for missions envisioned in the framework of the Space Exploration Initiative. The radiation threat outside the earth's magnetosphere encompasses protons from solar particle events and the highly charged energetic particles constituting galactic cosmic rays; radiation biology entails careful consideration of the extremely nonuniform patterns of such particles' energy deposition. The ability to project such biological consequences of exposure to energetic particles as carcinogenicity currently involves great uncertainties from: (1) different regions of space; (2) the effects of spacecraft structures; and (3) the dose-effect relationships of single traversals of energetic particles.

  5. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.; Delegianis, M.J.

    1989-07-01

    An important event of the year was the designation of our Laboratory as a Center for Radiological Research by the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and Vice-President for Health Sciences. Center status acknowledges the size and importance of the research efforts in this area, and allows a greater measure of independence in administrative matters. While the name has changed from a Laboratory to a Center within the Medical School, the mission and charge remain the same. The efforts of the Center are a multidisciplinary mix of physics, chemistry, and biology, mostly at a basic level, with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection or radiation therapy. About a quarter of our funding, mostly individual research awards, could be regarded as in direct support of radiotherapy, with the remainder (an NCI program project grant and DOE grants) being in support of research addressing more basic issues. An important effort currently underway concerns ab-initio calculations of the dielectric response function of condensed water. This investigation has received the coveted designation, ''Grand Challenge Project,'' awarded by DOE to research work which represents ''distinct advance on a major scientific or engineering problem that is broadly recognized as important within the mission of the Department.''

  6. Cosmic radiation dosimetry in international flights argentine airlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciancio, Vicente R.; Oliveri, Pedro V.; Di Giovan B, Gustavo; Ciancio, Vanina L.; Lewis, Brent J.; Green, Anna R.; Bennet, L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In commercial aviation the most important determinants of radiation exposure in humans are the altitude, latitude, flight duration and the solar cycle's period. This study was conducted to address this type of exposure trough radiation dosimetry. Method: The study was performed in the business-class cabin of an Airbus 340-200 aircraft, provided by Argentine Airlines, during 2 flights routes: New York-Miami-Buenos Aires (trans equatorial) and Buenos Aires-Auckland (circumpolar). Measurements addressed the electromagnetic spectrum or low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) and corpuscular radiation (High LET). The instruments used were an Ion Chamber (IC), to measure the ionizing component of radiation (i.e., gamma radiation), the SWENDI, to measure only the neutron component, and the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) for measuring all radiation types. Results: The routes' dose rates are presented in the table. TEPC rates agreed with the LET findings. The total dose rates of high latitude flights were higher than those of low latitude flights. The SWENDI (High LET) results for the flights over the equator, at low latitude, represented only 1/3 of the total radiation. The New York-Miami and Buenos Aires-Auckland flights, at high latitude, represented just under 1/2 of the Total radiation (-45%). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the annual dose rates of radiation exposure of air crew personnel serving on international flights offered by Argentine Airlines is between 3 and 7 mSv. This rate is higher than the maximum recommended for the general population by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which is 1 milli Sv./y. Therefore, these personnel must be officially considered 'Occupationally Exposed to Radiation' in way to provide the appropriate measures that must be implemented for their protection in accordance to ICRP guidelines. Dose(uSv): Route N Y-Miami, IC 6.07, SWENDI 5.07, TEPC 11.04; Route

  7. Cosmic microwave background, where next?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based, balloon-borne and space-based experiments will observe the Cosmic Microwave Background in greater details to address open questions about the origin and the evolution of the Universe. In particular, detailed observations the polarization pattern of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation have the potential to directly probe physics at the GUT scale and illuminate aspects of the physics of the very early Universe.

  8. Investigation of energy spectrum and nuclear interactions of primary cosmic radiation; Badanie widma energetycznego i oddzialywan jadrowych pierwotnego promieniowania kosmicznego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczynski, H. [Dept. of High Energy Physics, The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    In the paper the JACEE experiment data analysis: energy spectra in the energy range 10{sup 12} - 10{sup 15} eV of different nuclides in cosmic radiation and some aspects of nuclear interactions at energy above 10{sup 12} eV/nucleon is presented. The data were compared with results of theory of cosmic radiation acceleration by striking waves arises from supernova stars explosions. In the interactions of cosmic radiation nuclei the short-lived particles production has been observed what agrees with long-distance component of cascades initiated by cosmic radiation interactions. In one case an interaction with asymmetric photons emission were observed 72 refs, 33 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Experiments on studying solar cosmic radiation nuclear composition and energy spectra on the Prognoz-9 sattelite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, S.A.; Gordeev, Yu.P.; Denisov, Yu.I.; Kolesov, G.Ya; Podorol'skij, A.N.; Nikitin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Performances of the SKI-1 device installed on board the artificial satellite of the Earth ''Prognoz-9'' and intended for measurements of a nuclear component of solar cosmic radiation are considered. The device permits to determine intensites of proton fluxes in the 10-30, 30-60, 60-90 and 90-120 MeV energy ranges and nuclei with charges z=1-30 and the following energies: 5-20 MeV for 1 H and 4 He nuclei, 10-26 MeV for C nuclei, 12-42 MeV for O nuclei, 23-80 MeV for Fe nuclei. The SKI-1 comprises two similar telescopes. The telescope includes 4 silicon semiconducting detectors. Energy spectra of solar cosmic radiation and data characterizing time dependence of their intensity are given

  10. Exploring the Large Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at 170 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Kenneth Matthew

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, data from the Far Infra-Red Survey (FIRS), a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the large scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation, are analyzed. The FIRS operates in four frequency bands at 170, 280, 480, and 670 GHz, using an approximately Gaussian beam with a 3.8 deg full-width-at-half-maximum. A cross-correlation with the COBE/DMR first-year maps yields significant results, confirming the DMR detection of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Analysis of the FIRS data alone sets bounds on the amplitude of anisotropy under the assumption that the fluctuations are described by a Harrison-Peebles-Zel'dovich spectrum and further analysis sets limits on the index of the primordial density fluctuations for an Einstein-DeSitter universe. Galactic dust emission is discussed and limits are set on the magnitude of possible systematic errors in the measurement.

  11. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer–Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables. - Highlights: • Perturbation methodology is applied to Radiation Physics. • Layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC are proposed for contact materials. • Perturbed linear attenuation coefficient is proposed. • Perturbed mass attenuation coefficient (PMAC) is proposed. • Perturbed cross-section is proposed

  12. A Robust Algorithm to Determine the Topology of Space from the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, Jeffrey R.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the cosmic microwave back-ground radiation will soon provide an opportunity to test whether the universe is multiply connected. This paper presents a new algorithm for deducing the topology of the universe from the microwave background data. Unlike an older algorithm, the new algorithm gives the curvature of space and the radius of the last scattering surface as outputs, rather than requiring them as inputs. The new algorithm is also more tolerant of erro...

  13. Distortions in the cosmic background radiation and big-bang 4He nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Alhassid, Y.; Fuller, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    The observed distortion of the cosmic background radiation is analyzed in the framework of information theory to derive a simple form of the photon occupation probability. Taking this distribution function as indicative of the Lagrange parameters which might characterize the era of nucleosynthesis during the big bang, and assuming equilibrium among the constituents present, we find that the primordial 4 He abundance may be reduced by as much as 15% from the standard big-bang prediction

  14. CRaTER: The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Heine, T.; Larsen, B. A.; Blake, J. B.; Caranza, P.; Crain, W. R.; George, J.; Lalic, M.; Lin, A.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Salvaggio, D.; Kasper, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) characterizes the radiation environment to be experienced by humans during future lunar missions. CRaTER measures the effects of ionizing energy loss in matter due to penetrating solar energetic protons (SEP) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR), specifically in silicon solid-state detectors and after interactions with tissue-equivalent plastic (TEP), a synthetic analog of human tissue. The CRaT...

  15. Radiation physics as a new science discipline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Ram, K.

    1987-01-01

    After tracing the evolution of radiation physics teaching at the university level in U.S.A., the current status of teaching of radiation physics in Indian Universities is reviewed. It is noted that parts of radiation physics are taught in some Indian academic institutions. Only Madras University offers an M.Sc. programme in radiation physics. Its curriculum is critically examined and it is noted that more emphasis is required on practical and applied aspects of radiation physics. Closer interaction between academic and R and D institutions is required. (M.G.B.)

  16. Cosmic Ray Modulation and Radiation Dose of Aircrews During Possible Grand Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, S.; Kataoka, R.; Sato, T.; Imada, S.; Miyahara, H.; Shiota, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Ueno, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Sun is exhibiting low solar activity levels since the descending phase of the last solar cycle, and it is likely to be continued as well as in the case of the past grand solar minima. The cosmic-ray modulation, which is the variation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectrum caused by the heliospheric environmental change, is basically anti-correlated with the solar activity. In the recent weak solar cycle, we thus expect that the flux of GCRs is getting higher than that in the previous solar cycles, leading to the increase in the radiation exposure in the space and atmosphere. In order to quantitatively evaluate the possible solar modulation of GCRs and resultant radiation exposure at flight altitude, we have developed the time-dependent and three-dimensional model of the cosmic-ray modulation. Our model can give the flux of GCRs anywhere in the heliosphere by assuming the variation of the solar wind speed, the strength of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), and its tilt angle. We solve the gradient-curvature drift motion of GCRs in the HMF, and therefore reproduce the 22-year variation of the cosmic-ray modulation. We also calculate the neutron monitor counting rate and the radiation dose of aircrews at flight altitude, by the air-shower simulation performed by PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System). In our previous study [1], we calculated the radiation dose at a flight altitude during the coming solar cycle by assuming the variation of the solar wind speed and the strength of the HMF expressed by sinusoidal curve, and obtained that an annual radiation dose of aircrews in 5 years around the next solar minimum will be up to 19% higher than that at the last cycle. In this study, we predict the new model of the heliospheric environmental change on the basis of a prediction model for the sunspot number. The quantitative predictions of the cosmic-ray modulation and the radiation dose at a flight altitude during possible Grand Minimum considering

  17. Are there persistent physical atmospheric responses to galactic cosmic rays?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benestad, Rasmus E

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the annual mean of the galactic cosmic ray flux (GCR) are compared with annual variations in the most common meteorological variables: temperature, mean sea-level barometric pressure, and precipitation statistics. A multiple regression analysis was used to explore the potential for a GCR response on timescales longer than a year and to identify ‘fingerprint’ patterns in time and space associated with GCR as well as greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The response pattern associated with GCR consisted of a negative temperature anomaly that was limited to parts of eastern Europe, and a weak anomaly in the sea-level pressure (SLP), but coincided with higher pressure over the Norwegian Sea. It had a similarity to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the northern hemisphere and a wave train in the southern hemisphere. A set of Monte Carlo simulations nevertheless indicated that the weak amplitude of the global mean temperature response associated with GCR could easily be due to chance (p-value = 0.6), and there has been no trend in the GCR. Hence, there is little empirical evidence that links GCR to the recent global warming. (letter)

  18. 14. European cosmic ray symposium. Symposium program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The abstracts of the 14. European Cosmic Ray Symposium are presented. The papers cover a large variety of topics in cosmic ray physics, both from the theoretical and the experimental point of view. Sun physics, and the effects on the inner heliosphere, the composition, and the properties of the primary and secondary cosmic radiation, galactic acceleration and the results of accelerator physics relevant to cosmic radiation physics, and the description and the results of large detector systems are presented. 63 items are indexed for INIS database. (K.A.)

  19. What is cosmic radiation?; Qu'est ce-que le rayonnement cosmique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The earth was indeed receiving ionizing radiations from the heavens. This cosmic radiation consists of particles travelling near the speed of light. It consists of two components, the first of which is permanent and of galactic origin, while the other is more sporadic, depending on the sun's activities. Natural land-based sources expose each of us to an average total dose of 2.4 mSv per year (source UNSCEAR). In addition, the human activities using ionizing radiation contribute to an average annual exposure of 1.4 mSv, originating primarily with medical activities ( radiodiagnostic and radiation therapy). Members of flights crew are subject to exposure. The total dose of cosmic radiation received is is directly proportional with the duration of exposure, and thus with the duration of the flight. Measurement taken on board aircraft during the 1990's showed that flight personnel (on long haul flights) receive an average dose of approximately the same magnitude as the one due to exposure to natural radioactivity in France. The damage caused by ionizing radiation depends on the quantity of energy released by radiation into the cells of each organ or tissue of the human body(exposure dose). For a given quantity of absorbed energy (dose expressed in Gray), the damage will vary according to the nature of the radiation and the affected organ. These effects are of two types: acute effects and deferred effects. Two measurements are essential for radiation protection: the measurements of the dose of radiation absorbed by the body and the assessment of the risk associated with the absorbed dose. Two units were thus created: the gray and the sievert. (N.C.)

  20. Track-etched detectors for the dosimetry of the radiation of cosmic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.; Turek, K.

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays contribute to the exposure on the Earth's surface as well as in its surroundings. At the surface and/or at aviation altitudes, there are mostly secondary particles created through the cosmic rays interaction in the atmosphere, which contribute to this type of exposure. Onboard a spacecraft, the exposure comes mostly from primary cosmic rays. Track-etched detectors (TED) are able to characterise both these types of exposure. The contribution of neutrons, of cosmic origin, on the Earth's surface was studied at altitudes from few hundreds to 3000 m using TED in a moderator sphere. The results obtained are compared with other data on this type of natural radiation background. The results of studies performed onboard aircraft and/or spacecraft are presented afterwards. We used TED-based neutron dosemeter, as well as a spectrometer of linear energy transfer based on a chemically etched TED. The results of studies performed onboard aircraft, as well as spacecraft, are presented and discussed, including an attempt to estimate a neutron component onboard the spacecraft. It was found that they correlate with the results of other independent investigations. (authors)

  1. Radiative transfer calculations of the diffuse ionized gas in disc galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert; Wood, Kenneth; Girichidis, Philipp; Hill, Alex S.; Peters, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    The large vertical scale heights of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in disc galaxies are challenging to model, as hydrodynamical models including only thermal feedback seem to be unable to support gas at these heights. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transfer code to post-process disc simulations of the Simulating the Life-Cycle of Molecular Clouds project that include feedback by cosmic rays. We show that the more extended discs in simulations including cosmic ray feedback naturally lead to larger scale heights for the DIG which are more in line with observed scale heights. We also show that including a fiducial cosmic ray heating term in our model can help to increase the temperature as a function of disc scale height, but fails to reproduce observed DIG nitrogen and sulphur forbidden line intensities. We show that, to reproduce these line emissions, we require a heating mechanism that affects gas over a larger density range than is achieved by cosmic ray heating, which can be achieved by fine tuning the total luminosity of ionizing sources to get an appropriate ionizing spectrum as a function of scale height. This result sheds a new light on the relation between forbidden line emissions and temperature profiles for realistic DIG gas distributions.

  2. Dosimetric significance of cosmic radiation in the altitude of SST and in free space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allkofer, O C [Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Reine und Angewandte Kernphysik

    1977-01-01

    The integral cosmic-ray flux, and hence the dose rate, increases with altitude. At the cruising altitude of the subsonic jets, about 10 km, the dose rate is already about a factor 70 higher than at sea level. At the higher altitudes of SST the situation is different because the composition of the galactic component differs from that at the subsonic level, the solar flares are more efficient, and a small number of heavy nuclei are still present. In free space an additional radiation hazard appears when the radiation belts have to be crossed.

  3. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  4. STARLIFE - An International Campaign to Study the Role of Galactic Cosmic Radiation in Astrobiological Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Raguse, Marina; Leuko, Stefan; Berger, Thomas; Hellweg, Christine Elisabeth; Fujimori, Akira; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Horneck, Gerda

    2017-02-01

    In-depth knowledge regarding the biological effects of the radiation field in space is required for assessing the radiation risks in space. To obtain this knowledge, a set of different astrobiological model systems has been studied within the STARLIFE radiation campaign during six irradiation campaigns (2013-2015). The STARLIFE group is an international consortium with the aim to investigate the responses of different astrobiological model systems to the different types of ionizing radiation (X-rays, γ rays, heavy ions) representing major parts of the galactic cosmic radiation spectrum. Low- and high-energy charged particle radiation experiments have been conducted at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan. X-rays or γ rays were used as reference radiation at the German Aerospace Center (DLR, Cologne, Germany) or Beta-Gamma-Service GmbH (BGS, Wiehl, Germany) to derive the biological efficiency of different radiation qualities. All samples were exposed under identical conditions to the same dose and qualities of ionizing radiation (i) allowing a direct comparison between the tested specimens and (ii) providing information on the impact of the space radiation environment on currently used astrobiological model organisms.

  5. Evaluation of exposure to cosmic radiation of flight crews of Lithuanian Airlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morkunas, G.; Pilkyte, L.; Ereminas, D.

    2003-01-01

    In Lithuania the average annual effective dose due to cosmic radiation at the sea level is 0.38 mSv. The dose rate caused by cosmic radiation increases with altitude due to the decrease in attenuation of cosmic radiation by atmosphere. Dose rates altitudes of commercial flights are tens times higher than those at the sea level. For this reason people who frequently fly receive higher doses which might even be subject to legal regulations. The European Council Directive (96/29 EURATOM) on basic radiation safety standards requires that doses of air crews members be assessed and appropriate measures taken, depending on the assessment results. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential doses, which can be received by members of air crews of Lithuania Airlines. The assessment was done by performing measurements and calculations. Measurements were performed in flying aircraft by thermoluminescent detectors, Geiger Muller counters and neutron rem counter. Such an approach lead to evaluation of doses due to directly ionizing particles and neutrons. Calculations were done with the help of the code CARI-6M. Such parameters as flight route, solar activity, duration and altitudes of flight were taken into account. Doses received during different flights and in different air crafts were assessed. The results of measurements and calculations were compared and differences discussed. The results were also compared with the data obtained in other similar studies. It was found that the highest doses are received in flights to Paris, London, Amsterdam, and Frankfurt by aircraft B737. A number of flights causing annual doses higher than 1 mSv was estimated. Despite the fact that only European flights are operated by Lithuanian Airlines the dose of 1 mSv may be exceeded under some circumstances. If it happens some radiation protection measures shall be taken. These measures are also discussed. (author)

  6. Measurements and simulations of the radiation exposure to aircraft crew workplaces due to cosmic radiation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, P.; Latocha, M.; Dorman, L.; Pelliccioni, M.; Rollet, S.

    2007-01-01

    As required by the European Directive 96/29/Euratom, radiation exposure due to natural ionizing radiation has to be taken into account at workplaces if the effective dose could become more than 1 mSv per year. An example of workers concerned by this directive is aircraft crew due to cosmic radiation exposure in the atmosphere. Extensive measurement campaigns on board aircraft have been carried out to assess ambient dose equivalent. A consortium of European dosimetry institutes within EURADOS WG5 summarized experimental data and results of calculations, together with detailed descriptions of the methods for measurements and calculations. The radiation protection quantity of interest is the effective dose, E (ISO). The comparison of results by measurements and calculations is done in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H*(10). This paper gives an overview of the EURADOS Aircraft Crew In-Flight Database and it presents a new empirical model describing fitting functions for this data. Furthermore, it describes numerical simulations performed with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA-2005 using an updated version of the cosmic radiation primary spectra. The ratio between ambient dose equivalent and effective dose at commercial flight altitudes, calculated with FLUKA-2005, is discussed. Finally, it presents the aviation dosimetry model AVIDOS based on FLUKA-2005 simulations for routine dose assessment. The code has been developed by Austrian Research Centers (ARC) for the public usage (http://avidos.healthphysics.at. (authors)

  7. Proceedings of the Ninth Radiation Physics and Protection Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the Radiation Physics and Protection conference, the conference contains of the following subjects: Radiation Sources and Radioactive Waste; Theoretical Radiation Physics; Experimental Radiation Physics; Radiation and Nuclear Emergency; Non Ionizing Radiation; Medical Physics; Environment; Natural Radioactivity; Radiation Effect; Dosimetry; Elemental Analysis; Radiation Instruments. This conference consists of one volume and 459 pages., figs., tabs., refs

  8. Track-etched detectors for the dosimetry of the radiation of cosmic origin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spurný, František; Turek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 4 (2004), s. 375-381 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Grant - others:EC project(XE) FIGM-CT2000-00068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : track-etched detectors * cosmic rays * aircraft Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  9. Bursts of gravitational radiation from superconducting cosmic strings and the neutrino mass spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.

    2001-02-01

    Berezinsky, Hnatyk and Vilenkin showed that superconducting cosmic strings could be central engines for cosmological gamma-ray bursts and for producing the neutrino component of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A consequence of this mechanism would be that a detectable cusp-triggered gravitational wave burst should be release simultaneously with the γ-ray surge. If contemporary measurements of both γ and ν radiation could be made for any particular source, then the cosmological time-delay between them might be useful for putting unprecedently tight bounds on the neutrino mass spectrum. Such measurements could consistently verify or rule out the model since strictly correlated behaviour is expected for the duration of the event and for the time variability of the spectra. (author)

  10. A method of simulation of large air showers of cosmic radiation. Application to High Energy Physics and to Astrophysics (10"1"3 - 10"2"1 eV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevielle, Jean-Noel

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of large air showers and the field of high energy physics and of astrophysics. The author discusses fluctuations undergone by large showers, and reports the development of a simulation method which is used for the determination of the morphology of these large air showers, that is their longitudinal and lateral development. Simulation results are compared with experimental results, and the influence of fluctuations is discussed. The author reports the application of the simulation method to high energy physics and to astrophysics, notably through an example of use of the simulation method in application to the Kiel Group experiment performed at the Pic du Midi. Possible developments are then discussed [fr

  11. Cosmic radiation exposure on Canadian-based commercial airline routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.J.; Tume, P.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Pierre, M.; Green, A.R

    1998-07-01

    As a result of the recent recommendations of the ICRP-60 and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of commercial aircrew, a two-phase investigation was carried out over a one-year period to determine the total dose equivalent on representative Canadian-based flight routes. In the first phase of the study, dedicated scientific flights on a Northern round-trip route between Ottawa and Resolute Bay provided the opportunity to characterize the complex mixed-radiation field, and to intercompare various instrumentation using both a conventional suite of powered detectors and passive dosimetry. In the second phase, volunteer aircrew carried (passive) neutron bubble detectors during their routine flight duties. From these measurements, the total dose equivalent was derived for a given route with a knowledge of the neutron fraction as determined from the scientific flights and computer code (CART-LF) calculations. This study has yielded an extensive database of over 3100 measurements providing the total dose equivalent for 385 different routes. By folding in flight frequency information and the accumulated flight hours, the annual occupational exposures of 26 flight crew have been determined. This study has indicated that most Canadian-based domestic and international aircrew will exceed the proposed annual ICRP-60 public limit of 1 mSv y{sup -1} but will be well below the occupational limit of 20 mSv y{sup -1}. (author)

  12. Cosmic Radiation Exposure on Canadian-Based Commercial Airline Routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.J.; Tume, P.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Pierre, M.; Green, A.R.; Cousins, T.; Hoffarth, B.E.; Jones, T.A.; Brisson, J.R

    1999-07-01

    As a result of the recent recommendations of ICRP 60 and in anticipation of possible regulation on occupational exposure of commercial aircrew, a two-part investigation was carried out over a one-year period to determine the total dose equivalent on representative Canadian-based flight routes. As part of the study, a dedicated scientific measurement flight (using both a conventional suite of powered detectors and passive dosimetry) was used to characterise the complex mixed radiation field and to intercompare the various instrumentation. In the other part of the study, volunteer aircrew carried (passive) neutron bubble detectors during their routine flight duties. From these measurements, the total dose equivalent was derived for a given route with a knowledge of the neutron fraction as determined from the scientific flight and computer code (CARI-LF) calculations. This investigation has yielded an extensive database of over 3100 measurements providing the total dose equivalent for 385 different routes. By folding in flight frequency information and the accumulated flight hours, the annual occupational exposures of 26 flight crew have also been determined. This study has indicated that most Canadian-based domestic and international aircrew will exceed the proposed annual ICRP 60 public limit of 1 mSv.y{sup -1}, but will be below the occupational limit of 20 mSv.y{sup -1}. (author)

  13. 3.International conference 'Nuclear and Radiation Physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 3-rd International Conference 'Nuclear and Radiation Physics' was held in Almaty (Kazakhstan) 4-7 June 2001. The primary purpose of the conference is consolidation of the scientists efforts in the area of fundamental and applied investigations on nuclear physics, radiation physics of solids and radioecology. In the conference more than 350 papers were presented by participants from 17 countries

  14. Cherenkov Water Detectors in Particle Physics and Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A. A.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-12-01

    Among various types of Cherenkov detectors (solid, liquid and gaseous) created for different studies, the most impressive development was gained by water detectors: from the first detector with a volume of several liters in which the Cherenkov radiation was discovered, to the IceCube detector with a volume of one cubic kilometer. The review of the development of Cherenkov water detectors for various purposes and having different locations - ground-based, underground and underwater-is presented in the paper. The prospects of their further development are also discussed.

  15. Investigations of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation - results, conclusions and suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; Horwacik, T; Marczewska, B; Ochab, E; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    In frame of a research project undertaken in collaboration with Polish airlines LOT, analysis of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation has been performed. The applied methods included measurements of radiation doses with thermoluminescent detectors (MTS-N, MCP-N) and track detectors (CR-39) and also calculations of route doses with the CARI computer code. The obtained results indicate that aircrews of nearly all airplanes, with exception of these flying only on ATR aircraft, exceed regularly or may exceed in some conditions, effective doses of 1 mSv. In case of Boeing-767 aircrews such exceeding occurs always, independently of solar activity. Investigations revealed, that during these periods of the solar cycle, when intensity of cosmic radiation is high, exceeding of 6 mSv level is also possible. These results indicate, that according to Polish and European regulations it is necessary for airlines to provide regular estimations of radiation exposure of aircrews. Basing on the obtained results a system for pe...

  16. Introduction to ionizing radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.

    1979-01-01

    Basic properties are described of the atom, atomic nucleus and of ionizing radiation particles; nuclear reactions, ionizing radiation sources and ionizing radiation interaction with matter are explained. (J.P.)

  17. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  18. Physics and engineering of radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Syed Naeem

    2015-01-01

    Physics and Engineering of Radiation Detection presents an overview of the physics of radiation detection and its applications. It covers the origins and properties of different kinds of ionizing radiation, their detection and measurement, and the procedures used to protect people and the environment from their potentially harmful effects. The second edition is fully revised and provides the latest developments in detector technology and analyses software. Also, more material related to measurements in particle physics and a complete solutions manual have been added.

  19. Simulating the physical properties of dark matter and gas inside the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolag, K.; Meneghetti, M.; Moscardini, L.; Rasia, E.; Bonaldi, A.

    2006-08-01

    Using the results of a high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamical re-simulation of a supercluster-like region, we investigate the physical properties of the gas located along the filaments and bridges which constitute the so-called cosmic web. First, we analyse the main characteristics of the density, temperature and velocity fields, which have quite different distributions, reflecting the complex dynamics of the structure-formation process. Then we quantify the signals which originate from the matter in the filaments by considering different observables. Inside the cosmic web, we find that the halo density is about 10-14 times larger than cosmic mean; the bremsstrahlung X-ray surface brightness reaches at most 10-16 erg s-1 cm-2 arcmin-2 the Compton-y parameter due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is about 10-6 the reduced shear produced by the weak lensing effect is ~0.01-0.02. These results confirm the difficulty of an observational detection of the cosmic web. Finally, we find that projection effects of the filamentary network can affect the estimates of the properties of single clusters, increasing their X-ray luminosity by less than 10 per cent and their central Compton-y parameter by up to 30 per cent.

  20. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability......A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role...... in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...

  1. Non-Gaussian signatures in the cosmic background radiation from warm inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Heavens, A.F.; Berera, A.; Matarrese, S.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the bispectrum of the gravitational field fluctuations generated during warm inflation, where dissipation of the vacuum potential during inflation is the mechanism for structure formation. The bispectrum is nonzero because of the self-interaction of the scalar field. We compare the predictions with those of standard, or 'supercooled', inflationary models, and consider the detectability of these levels of non-Gaussianity in the bispectrum of the cosmic microwave background. We find that the levels of non-Gaussianity for warm and supercooled inflation are comparable, and overridden by the contribution to the bispectrum due to other physical effects. We also conclude that the resulting bispectrum values will be undetectable in the cosmic microwave background for both the MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites

  2. Chapter 1: A little of Radiation Physics and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 1 presents the subjects: 1) quantities and units of radiation physics which includes: the electron volt (eV); Exposure (X); Absorbed dose (D); Dose equivalent (H); Activity (A); Half-life; Radioactive decay; 2) Radiation protection which includes: irradiation and radioactive contamination; irradiation; contamination; background radiation; dose limits for individual occupationally exposed (IOE) and for the general public.

  3. Southern Hemisphere Measurement of the Anisotropy in the CosmicMicrowave Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George F.; Lubin, Phil M.

    1979-06-01

    A recent measurement of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation from the southern hemisphere (Lima, Peru) is essentially in agreement with previous measurements from the northern hemisphere. The net anisotropy can be described as a first order spherical harmonic (Doppler) anisotropy of amplitude 3.1 {+-} 0.4 m{sup o}K with a quadrupole anisotropy of less than 1 m{sup o}K. In addition, measurements of the linear polarization yield an upper limit of 1 m{sup o}K, or one part in 3000, at 95% C.L. for the amplitudes of any spherical harmonic through third order.

  4. Production of positron annihilation radiation by cosmic-rays near sea level

    CERN Document Server

    Puzovic, J M

    2002-01-01

    Production of positron annihilation radiation by cosmic-rays in Al, Fe, Sn and Pb is measured by means of a triggered HPGe detector. The equipment is located in Belgrade, at an absolute height of 125 m a.s.l. The production rate per unit mass is found to be proportional to the square of the atomic number of the material divided by its mass number, with the proportionality constant equal to 8.1(3)x10 sup - sup 6 s sup - sup 1 g sup - sup 1.

  5. Dynamics of voids and clusters and fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salpeter, E.E.

    1983-01-01

    The author summarizes briefly calculations on spherically symmetric models without dissipation for the dynamical development of large voids and galaxy (super)clusters from small underdensities and overdensities, respectively, at the recombination era. Implications are mentioned and conjectures for more complex geometries are discussed. He infers the density fluctuations which must have been present just after the recombination era to produce some present-day configuration. Fluctuations in the present-day cosmic background radiation are related to this and their inferred amplitude depends very strongly on the present-day value of the cosmological density parameter. The relation to observed upper limits on these fluctuations are discussed. (Auth.)

  6. Snow measurement by cosmic radiation; Mesure de la neige par rayonnement cosmique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The knowledge of the water content equivalence of the snow cover is an important element for the improvement of the water resource management. It allows in particular to evaluate and foresee the filling up supplies of big seasonal reservoirs. Electricite de France (EdF), in collaboration with the national center of scientific research (CNRS) and Meteo France, has developed a new generation of sensors, the cosmic radiation snow gauge, allowing the automatic monitoring of the status of snow stocks by the measurement of the water value of the snow cover. (J.S.)

  7. Determination of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of background radiation counting system, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is the third report of the progress report series on studies of cosmic ray produced radionuclides by means of low background radiation counting system. In Part I some characteristics of a low beta-gamma coincidence spectrometer are described -- counter system, electronics, background spectra, counting efficiencies -- and studies on radioactive impurities in materials for scientific research are also described. In Part II, suitable solvents for a large scale liquid scintillation counter were examined and best combinations of solvents, solutes and naphthalene are shown. In Part III, miscellaneous topics are reported. (auth.)

  8. Theoretical investigations of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    In this work, the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation is calculated within the context of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The results of the calculations for different initial conditions are compared to the observational data available in order to try to learn more about conditions in the early universe. It is found that a model which has isothermal fluctuations superimposed on the standard model can explain all of the observations so far. In fact, a range of models with different initial densities can explain the observations. There is not enough information at present to choose among these models, but more data should be available in the near future

  9. Ralph A. Alpher, Robert C. Herman, and the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpher, Victor S.

    2012-09-01

    Much of the literature on the history of the prediction and discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) is incorrect in some respects. I focus on the early history of the CMBR, from its prediction in 1948 to its measurement in 1964, basing my discussion on the published literature, the private papers of Ralph A. Alpher, and interviews with several of the major figures involved in the prediction and measurement of the CMBR. I show that the early prediction of the CMBR continues to be widely misunderstood.

  10. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent

  11. Proceedings of the Tenth Radiation Physics and Protection Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the Radiation Physics and Protection Conference.. The conference consists Natural Radiation Sources; Radiation Detection and Measurements; Applied Radiation Physics; Radiation Medical Physics and Biophysics; Radiation Dosimetry; Operational Radiation Protection; Radiation Shielding; Transport of Radioactive Materials; Nuclear and Radiation Physics; Medical Physics and Public Protection Against Radiological Attack. This conference consists of 402 p., figs., tabs., refs.

  12. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero; Fragos, Tassos

    2017-05-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior to and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z ≲ 4. Together with an updated empirical determination of the cosmic history of star formation, recent modeling of the stellar mass-metallicity relation, and a scheme for absorption by the IGM that accounts for the presence of ionized H II bubbles during the epoch of reionization, our detailed calculations provide refined predictions of the X-ray volume emissivity and filtered radiation background from “normal” galaxies at z ≳ 6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. Because of the energy dependence of photoabsorption, soft X-ray photons are produced by local sources, while more energetic radiation arrives unattenuated from larger cosmological volumes. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct He I photoionizations are the main source of IGM heating, and the temperature of the largely neutral medium in between H II cavities increases above the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) only at z ≲ 10, when the volume filling factor of H II bubbles is already ≳0.1. Therefore, in this scenario, it is only at relatively late epochs that neutral intergalactic hydrogen

  13. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fragos, Tassos [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Chemin des Maillettes 51, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)

    2017-05-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior to and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z ≲ 4. Together with an updated empirical determination of the cosmic history of star formation, recent modeling of the stellar mass–metallicity relation, and a scheme for absorption by the IGM that accounts for the presence of ionized H ii bubbles during the epoch of reionization, our detailed calculations provide refined predictions of the X-ray volume emissivity and filtered radiation background from “normal” galaxies at z ≳ 6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. Because of the energy dependence of photoabsorption, soft X-ray photons are produced by local sources, while more energetic radiation arrives unattenuated from larger cosmological volumes. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct He i photoionizations are the main source of IGM heating, and the temperature of the largely neutral medium in between H ii cavities increases above the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) only at z ≲ 10, when the volume filling factor of H ii bubbles is already ≳0.1. Therefore, in this scenario, it is only at relatively late epochs that neutral intergalactic

  14. Basic radiation physics and chemistry of composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybytniak, G.; Zagorski, Z.P.

    2006-01-01

    Composites are increasingly more important in the applied and fundamental polymer science, and the participation of radiation processing of these systems increase. In presented paper the newest achievements of radiation physics and chemistry of composites are reviewed. It is stressed, that although main experimental effort is directed towards the development of composites as such, and investigation of their specific properties, mechanical, physicochemical and physical, the radiation processing will enter the field on the wider scale, especially as concerns specialized plastics

  15. Comparison of cosmic rays radiation detectors on-board commercial jet aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubančák, Ján; Ambrožová, Iva; Brabcová, Kateřina Pachnerová; Jakůbek, Jan; Kyselová, Dagmar; Ploc, Ondřej; Bemš, Július; Štěpán, Václav; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-06-01

    Aircrew members and passengers are exposed to increased rates of cosmic radiation on-board commercial jet aircraft. The annual effective doses of crew members often exceed limits for public, thus it is recommended to monitor them. In general, the doses are estimated via various computer codes and in some countries also verified by measurements. This paper describes a comparison of three cosmic rays detectors, namely of the (a) HAWK Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter; (b) Liulin semiconductor energy deposit spectrometer and (c) TIMEPIX silicon semiconductor pixel detector, exposed to radiation fields on-board commercial Czech Airlines company jet aircraft. Measurements were performed during passenger flights from Prague to Madrid, Oslo, Tbilisi, Yekaterinburg and Almaty, and back in July and August 2011. For all flights, energy deposit spectra and absorbed doses are presented. Measured absorbed dose and dose equivalent are compared with the EPCARD code calculations. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of all detectors are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  17. Aircrew Exposure To Cosmic Radiation Evaluated By Means Of Several Methods; Results Obtained In 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploc, Ondrej; Spurny, Frantisek; Jadrnickova, Iva; Turek, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Routine evaluation of aircraft crew exposure to cosmic radiation in the Czech Republic is performed by means of calculation method. Measurements onboard aircraft work as a control tool of the routine method, as well as a possibility of comparison of results measured by means of several methods. The following methods were used in 2006: (1) mobile dosimetry unit (MDU) type Liulin--a spectrometer of energy deposited in Si-detector; (2) two types of LET spectrometers based on the chemically etched track detectors (TED); (3) two types of thermoluminescent detectors; and (4) two calculation methods. MDU represents currently one of the most reliable equipments for evaluation of the aircraft crew exposure to cosmic radiation. It is an active device which measures total energy depositions (E dep ) in the semiconductor unit, and, after appropriate calibration, is able to give a separate estimation for non-neutron and neutron-like components of H*(10). This contribution consists mostly of results acquired by means of this equipment; measurements with passive detectors and calculations are mentioned because of comparison. Reasonably good agreement of all data sets could be stated

  18. Ionising radiation - physical and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holter, Oe.; Ingebretsen, F.; Parr, H.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of ionising radiation is briefly presented. The effects of ionising radiation on biological cells, cell repair and radiosensitivity are briefly treated, where after the effects on man and mammals are discussed and related to radiation doses. Dose limits are briefly discussed. The genetic effects are discussed separately. Radioecology is also briefly treated and a table of radionuclides deriving from reactors, and their radiation is given. (JIW)

  19. Cosmic Radiation and Aircrew Exposure: Implementation of European Requirements in Civil Aviation, Dublin, 1-3 July 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lee

    1999-03-01

    The European Union's Basic Safety Standards Directive (96/29/Euratom) lays down safety standards for the protection of workers and the general public against the effects of ionising radiations. Article 42 of the Directive deals with the protection of aircrew. It states that for crew of jet aircraft who are likely to be subject to exposure to more than 1 mSv y-1 appropriate measures must be taken, in particular: to assess the exposure of the crew concerned, to take into account the assessed exposure when organising working schedules with a view to reducing the doses of highly exposed aircrew, to inform concerned workers of the health risks involved in their work, to apply Article 10 to female aircrew. (The unborn child shall be treated like a member of the public.) This Directive must be transformed into national law of the 15 member states of the European Union by 13 May 2000. The European Commission and the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland sponsored this International Conference. The objective of this conference was to assist both the airline industry and the national regulatory organisations in identifying the means available to comply with the requirements of the Directive. Over 200 delegates attended the conference from more than 25 countries. The welcoming addresses were made by Mary Upton (Director of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland), Joe Jacob (Minister for State responsible for Nuclear Safety) and James Currie (Director-General for the Environment, Nuclear Safety and Civil Protection). Mr Currie stated that there was a need for political decisions to be based on good science, and that technological trends will lead to higher and longer flights, and therefore higher radiation doses. The first day concentrated on the scientific basis of measurement, calculation and monitoring of cosmic radiation. The first speaker, Dr Heinrich from the University of Siegen, Germany, talked about the physics of cosmic radiation fields. He pointed

  20. Cosmic-ray-induced radiation environment and dose to man for low-orbit space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandmeier, H.A.; Hansen, G.E.; Battat, M.E.; O'Brien, K.

    1981-09-01

    Neutrons and photons resulting from the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the material of an orbiting satellite or an orbiting space station at an altitude of some few hundreds of kilometers, and below the level of the radiation belts, have been calculated as a function of geomagnetic latitude and solar activity level. The photon and neutron leakage currents from the top of the atmosphere have been computed. The radiation dose-equivalent rate to an unshielded astronaut has also been calculated. The maximum dose-equivalent rate, near the magnetic poles, was 2 mrem/h. In deep space this would amount to 18 rem/y, indicating that for a prolonged stay in space, shielding would be needed

  1. Isotropization of the cosmic background radiation due to galactic gravitational screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Kenji.

    1988-04-01

    The primordial objects with the masses of galaxies or their clusters formed at early stages such as z > 10 can play a powerful role of gravitational lenses and their random multiple scattering brings an effective screening for the cosmic background radiation. In a cold-dark-matter dominant model with the white-noise spectrum of initial density perturbations, it is shown that, if the primordial objects with the masses 10 12 h -1 (solar mass) are in the nonlinear stage at the epochs 1 + z = 10 ∼ 20, the objects with 6 x 10 14 h -1 (solar mass) are in the nonlinear stage at 1 + z = 6.3 ∼ 14, and accordingly the small-scale anisotropy of the radiation may be smoothed-out within 13 ∼ 28 minutes by this gravitational screening, where the Hubble constant H o = 100 h km s -1 Mpc -1 . (author)

  2. Charge-equilibrium and radiation of low-energy cosmic rays passing through interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, D. W.; Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    The charge equilibrium and radiation of an oxygen and an iron beam in the MeV per nucleon energy range, representing a typical beam of low-energy cosmic rays passing through the interstellar medium, is considered. Electron loss of the beam has been taken into account by means of the First Born approximation allowing for the target atom to remain unexcited, or to be excited to all possible states. Electron capture cross sections have been calculated by means of the scaled Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers approximation, taking into account all atomic shells of the target atoms. Radiation of the beam due to electron capture into the excited states of the ion, collisional excitation and collisional inner-shell ionization of the ions has been considered. Effective X-ray production cross sections and multiplicities for the most energetic X-ray lines emitted by the Fe and O beams have been calculated.

  3. Measurements of the Cosmic Radiation Doses at Board of Aircraft of Polish Airlines LOT. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilski, P.; Budzanowski, M.; Horwacik, T.; Marczewska, B.; Olko, P.

    2000-12-01

    Radiation doses received by a group of 30 pilots of the Polish Airlines LOT were investigated between July and October 2000. The measurement of the low-LET component of the cosmic radiation, lasting in average 2 months, was performed with 7 LiF:Mg,Ti and 7 L iF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent detectors. The neutron component was measured with the thermoluminescent albedo cassettes. Additionally for all flights, records of altitude profiles were kept and effective doses were then calculated with the CARI-6 computer code. In total, about 560 flights were included in the calculations. The highest obtained dose was about 0.8 mSv in 2 months. Results of calculations are mostly consistent with the results of measurements. (author)

  4. Physics and engineering of radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Syed Naeem

    2007-01-01

    Physics and Engineering of Radiation Detection presents an overview of basic physics of radiation and its applications and covers the origins and properties of different kinds of ionizing radiation, their detection and measurement, and the procedures used to protect people and the environment from their potentially harmful effects. Covering both the basic physics of radiation and its applications, it will provide an up-to-date and coherent account of the origins and properties of the different kinds of ionizing radiation, and their detection and measurement. This book will illustrate the basic physical principles with an abundance of practical, worked-out examples, numerical problems, real world applications, and data, including biological effects, radon, risk assessment, and statistics.

  5. Evaluation of Differences in Response of DOD Portable Instruments and Solid-State Detectors used by MEXT for Measurement of External Radiations with Attention to the Cosmic Radiation Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Defense Threat Reduction Agency 8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201...Attention to the Cosmic Radiation Component DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution is unlimited March 2014...Portable Instruments and Solid-State Detectors used by MEXT for Measurement of External Radiations with Attention to the Cosmic Radiation Component 5a

  6. High-energy cosmic rays and tests of basic principles of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the present understanding of data, the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above 4.1019 eV can be a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or be related to a similar mechanism. But it may also correspond, for instance, to the maximum energies available at the relevant sources. In both cases, violations of special relativity modifying cosmic-ray propagation or acceleration at very high energy can potentially play a role. Other violations of fundamental principles of standard particle physics (quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum homogeneity and “static” properties, effective space dimensions, quark confinement… can also be relevant at these energies. In particular, UHECR data would in principle allow to set bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV in patterns incorporating a privileged local reference frame (the “vacuum rest frame”, VRF. But the precise analysis is far from trivial, and other effects can also be present. The effective parameters can be related to Planckscale physics, or even to physics beyond Planck scale, as well as to the dynamics and effective symmetries of LSV for nucleons, quarks, leptons and the photon. LSV can also be at the origin of GZK-like effects. In the presence of a VRF, and contrary to a “grand unification” view, LSV and other violations of standard principles can modify the internal structure of particles at very high energy and conventional symmetries may cease to be valid at energies close to the Planck scale. We present an updated discussion of these topics, including experimental prospects, new potentialities for high-energy cosmic ray phenomenology and the possible link with unconventional pre-Big Bang scenarios, superbradyon (superluminal preon patterns… The subject of a possible superluminal propagation of neutrinos at accelerator energies is also dealt with.

  7. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Rock Formation and Cosmic Radiation Exposure Ages in Gale Crater Mudstones from the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Farley, Ken; Malespin, Charles; Gellert, Ralph; Grotzinger, John

    2014-05-01

    The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been utilized to secure abundances of 3He, 21Ne, 36Ar, and 40Ar thermally evolved from the mudstone in the stratified Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. As reported by Farley et al. [1] these measurements of cosmogenic and radiogenic noble gases together with Cl and K abundances measured by MSL's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer enable a K-Ar rock formation age of 4.21+0.35 Ga to be established as well as a surface exposure age to cosmic radiation of 78+30 Ma. Understanding surface exposures to cosmic radiation is relevant to the MSL search for organic compounds since even the limited set of studies carried out, to date, indicate that even 10's to 100's of millions of years of near surface (1-3 meter) exposure may transform a significant fraction of the organic compounds exposed to this radiation [2,3,4]. Transformation of potential biosignatures and even loss of molecular structural information in compounds that could point to exogenous or endogenous sources suggests a new paradigm in the search for near surface organics that incorporates a search for the most recently exposed outcrops through erosional processes. The K-Ar rock formation age determination shows promise for more precise in situ measurements that may help calibrate the martian cratering record that currently relies on extrapolation from the lunar record with its ground truth chronology with returned samples. We will discuss the protocol for the in situ noble gas measurements secured with SAM and ongoing studies to optimize these measurements using the SAM testbed. References: [1] Farley, K.A.M Science Magazine, 342, (2013). [2] G. Kminek et al., Earth Planet Sc Lett 245, 1 (2006). [3] Dartnell, L.R., Biogeosciences 4, 545 (2007). [4] Pavlov, A. A., et al. Geophys Res Lett 39, 13202 (2012).

  9. University of Arizona High Energy Physics Program at the Cosmic Frontier 2014-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    abate, alex [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); cheu, elliott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-10-24

    This is the final technical report from the University of Arizona High Energy Physics program at the Cosmic Frontier covering the period 2014-2016. The work aims to advance the understanding of dark energy using the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Progress on the engineering design of the power supplies for the LSST camera is discussed. A variety of contributions to photometric redshift measurement uncertainties were studied. The effect of the intergalactic medium on the photometric redshift of very distant galaxies was evaluated. Computer code was developed realizing the full chain of calculations needed to accurately and efficiently run large-scale simulations.

  10. University of Arizona High Energy Physics Program at the Cosmic Frontier 2014-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abate, Alex; Cheu, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    This is the final technical report from the University of Arizona High Energy Physics program at the Cosmic Frontier covering the period 2014-2016. The work aims to advance the understanding of dark energy using the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Progress on the engineering design of the power supplies for the LSST camera is discussed. A variety of contributions to photometric redshift measurement uncertainties were studied. The effect of the intergalactic medium on the photometric redshift of very distant galaxies was evaluated. Computer code was developed realizing the full chain of calculations needed to accurately and efficiently run large-scale simulations.

  11. Cosmic neutrino pevatrons: A brand new pathway to astronomy, astrophysics, and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Barger, Vernon; Cholis, Ilias; Goldberg, Haim; Hooper, Dan; Kusenko, Alexander; Learned, John G.; Marfatia, Danny; Pakvasa, Sandip; Paul, Thomas C.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2014-05-01

    The announcement by the IceCube Collaboration of the observation of 28 cosmic neutrino candidates has been greeted with a great deal of justified excitement. The data reported so far depart by 4.3σ from the expected atmospheric neutrino background, which raises the obvious question: “Where in the Cosmos are these neutrinos coming from?” We review the many possibilities which have been explored in the literature to address this question, including origins at either Galactic or extragalactic celestial objects. For completeness, we also briefly discuss new physical processes which may either explain or be constrained by IceCube data.

  12. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian pilots flying aircraft not used by SAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-05-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots flying a great diversity of different aircrafts. Aircrafts that appear in the time-tables of the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) have been treated in an earlier report. The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircrafts in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for the work in this report is information provided by several active pilots, members of the Pilots Associations, along with calculations performed using US Federal Aviation Administration's computer code CARI-3N. 2 refs

  13. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-02-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project, be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found in the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Associations

  14. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian pilots flying aircraft not used by SAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-05-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots flying a great diversity of different aircrafts. Aircrafts that appear in the time-tables of the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) have been treated in an earlier report. The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircrafts in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for the work in this report is information provided by several active pilots, members of the Pilots Associations, along with calculations performed using US Federal Aviation Administration`s computer code CARI-3N. 2 refs.

  15. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-02-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project, be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found in the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Associations.

  16. Dosemetry for exposures to cosmic radiation in civilian aircraft - Part 1: Conceptual basis for measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Aircraft crew are exposed to elevated levels of cosmic radiation of galactic and solar origin and secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere, the aircraft structure and its contents. Following recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in Publication 60, the European Union (EU) introduced a revised Basic Safety Standards Directive, which included exposure to natural sources of ionizing radiation, including cosmic radiation, as occupational exposure. The Directive requires account to be taken of the exposure of aircraft crew liable to receive more than 1 mSv per year. It then identifies the following four protection measures: (i) to assess the exposure of the crew concerned; (ii) to take into account the assessed exposure, when organizing working schedules with a view to reducing the doses of highly exposed crew; (iii) to inform the workers concerned of the health risks their work involves; and (iv) to apply the same special protection during pregnancy to female crew in respect of the 'child to be born' as to other female workers. The EU Council Directive has already been incorporated into laws and regulations of EU Member States and is being included in the aviation safety standards and procedures of the Joint Aviation Authorities and the European Air Safety Agency. For regulatory and legislative purposes, the radiation protection quantities of interest are equivalent dose (to the foetus) and effective dose. The cosmic radiation exposure of the body is essentially uniform and the maternal abdomen provides no effective shielding to the foetus. As a result, the magnitude of equivalent dose to the foetus can be put equal to that of the effective dose received by the mother. Doses on board aircraft are generally predictable, and events comparable to unplanned exposure in other radiological workplaces cannot normally occur (with the rare exceptions of extremely intense and energetic solar particle events). Personal dosemeters for

  17. Measurement of secondary cosmic radiation and calculation of associated dose conversion coefficients for humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Due to secondary cosmic radiation (SCR), pilots and flight attendants receive elevated effective doses at flight altitudes. For this reason, since 2003 aircrew members are considered as occupationally exposed, in Germany. This work deals with the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCC) for protons, neutrons, electrons, positrons, photons and myons, which are crucial for estimation of effective dose from SCR. For the first time, calculations were performed combining Geant4 - a Monte Carlo code developed at CERN - with the voxel phantoms for the reference female and male published in 2008 by ICRP and ICRU. Furthermore, measurements of neutron fluence spectra - which contribute the major part to the effective dose of SCR - were carried out at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (UFS) located at 2650 m above sea level nearby the Zugspitze mountain, Germany. These measured neutron spectra, and additionally available calculated spectra, were then folded with the DCC calculated in this work, and effective dose rates for different heights were calculated.

  18. Non-primordial origin of the cosmic background radiation and pregalactic density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, H.E.; Mueller, V.; Oleak, H.

    1984-01-01

    Assumptions of a tepid Universe and a smaller primordial contribution to the 3 K background are made to show that Pop III stars may be responsible for the 3 K background and cosmic ray entropy. The 3 K background would be caused by thermalized stellar radiation produced by metallized intergalactic dust formed in first generation stars. A range of mass scales and amplification factors of density perturbations in the early Universe is examined below the Jeans mass for gravitational instabilities. The density perturbations that could have been present at small enough mass scales could have survived and generated sonic modes that propagated through the plasma era and, when combined with additional gravitationally unstable entropy disturbances after recombination, triggered the formation of Pop III stars. 13 references

  19. The cosmic microwave background radiation and the dog in the night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, R. B.

    The spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are characterized, summarizing the results of recent observations. The emphasis is on null experiments which have established upper limits on anisotropies and spectral distortion. The benefits and pitfalls of null experiments are recalled; the generally observed isotropy of the CMBR and the possible ways anisotropy could be introduced are discussed; and data from searches for anisotropy on arcmin, degree, and arcsec scales are presented in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail. The observed CMBR spectrum is shown to be generally consistent with a black body at temperature 2.75 + or - 0.04 K at wavelengths from 0.1 to 12 cm, although some recent data (Kogut et al., 1988) seem to confirm the presence of distortion due to the Suniaev-Zel'dovich effect at wavelength 3.0 cm.

  20. Measurement of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation at 3.0 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) has been measured at a wavelength of 3.0 cm as part of a program to measure th Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths between 0.33 cm and 12 cm. The instrument used is a dual-antenna Dicke-switched radiometer with a double-sideband noise temperature of 490 K and a sensitivity of 46 mK/Hz/sup 1/2/. The entire radiometer is mounted on bearings. The atmospheric emission was measured by rotating the radiometer, and thus directing one antenna to zenith angles of +- 30 0 and +- 40 0 . 61 references, 24 figures, 18 tables

  1. A flat Universe from high-resolution maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernardis P; Ade; Bock; Bond; Borrill; Boscaleri; Coble; Crill; De Gasperis G; Farese; Ferreira; Ganga; Giacometti; Hivon; Hristov; Iacoangeli; Jaffe; Lange; Martinis; Masi; Mason; Mauskopf; Melchiorri; Miglio; Montroy; Netterfield

    2000-04-27

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K cosmic microwave background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the Universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole Ipeak = (197 +/- 6), with an amplitude delta T200 = (69 +/- 8) microK. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favoured by standard inflationary models.

  2. Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation on Large and Medium Angular Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Anthony; Timbie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This grant has supported work at Brown University on measurements of the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB). The goal has been to characterize the spatial variations in the temperature of the CMB in order to understand the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. We have concurrently pursued two measurements using millimeter-wave telescopes carried aloft by scientific balloons. Both systems operate over a range of wavelengths, chosen to allow spectral removal of foreground sources such as the atmosphere, Galaxy, etc. The angular resolution of approx. 25 arcminutes is near the angular scale at which the most structure is predicted by current models to be visible in the CMB angular power spectrum. The main goal is to determine the angular scale of this structure; in turn we can infer the density parameter, Omega, for the universe as well as other cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant.

  3. Constraints on nonconformal couplings from the properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Morrice, Jack; Vu, Susan

    2013-10-18

    Certain modified gravity theories predict the existence of an additional, nonconformally coupled scalar field. A disformal coupling of the field to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is shown to affect the evolution of the energy density in the radiation fluid and produces a modification of the distribution function of the CMB, which vanishes if photons and baryons couple in the same way to the scalar. We find the constraints on the couplings to matter and photons coming from the measurement of the CMB temperature evolution and from current upper limits on the μ distortion of the CMB spectrum. We also point out that the measured equation of state of photons differs from w(γ)=1/3 in the presence of disformal couplings.

  4. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7 0 +- 1.8 0 declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables

  5. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  6. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babich, L. P., E-mail: babich@elph.vniief.ru; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  7. New physical model calculates airline crews' radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-12-01

    Airline pilots and crews, who spend hundreds of hours each year flying at high altitude, are exposed to increased doses of radiation from galactic cosmic rays and solar energy particles, enough that airline crew members are actually considered radiation workers by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  8. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics. Charming the cosmic snake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity - the Cosmos - is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest - the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. ''Charming the Cosmic Snake'' takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world's largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matter. The book provides the material honestly without misrepresenting the science for the sake of excitement or glossing over difficult notions. The principles behind each type of accelerator is made accessible to the undergraduate student and even to a lay reader with cartoons, illustrations and metaphors. Simultaneously, the book also caters to different levels of reader's background and provides additional materials for the more interested or diligent reader. (orig.)

  9. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics. Charming the cosmic snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-07-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity - the Cosmos - is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest - the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. ''Charming the Cosmic Snake'' takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world's largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matter. The book provides the material honestly without misrepresenting the science for the sake of excitement or glossing over difficult notions. The principles behind each type of accelerator is made accessible to the undergraduate student and even to a lay reader with cartoons, illustrations and metaphors. Simultaneously, the book also caters to different levels of reader's background and provides additional materials for the more interested or diligent reader. (orig.)

  10. Muon Reconstruction and Physics Commissioning of the CMS Experiment with Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    In this thesis, the first physics measurements using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are presented. These physics measurements were performed using cosmic ray muons traversing the CMS detector. The CMS detector is optimized for the detection of muons and the results presented here also have a purpose of helping in the commissioning of the detector for the LHC collisions. Two analyses were conducted; the first is a measurement of the charge ratio of positive to negative muons, and the second is a measurement of the differential and absolute flux of incident cosmic rays. The charge ratio measurement was made using both the muon and tracking detectors and is highlighted by its data-driven method. The charge ratio over the momentum range starting from 10 GeV were measured at the detector center and then transferred to the earth's surface. The flux measurement was performed using the muon system only. The flux was measured over the momentum range from 15 GeV to over 1 TeV at the...

  11. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics charming the cosmic snake

    CERN Document Server

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity – the Cosmos – is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest – the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. “Charming the Cosmic Snake” takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world’s largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matt...

  12. Semiconductor radiation detectors: device physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    ..., including nuclear physics, elementary particle physics, optical and x-ray astronomy, medicine, and materials testing - and the number of applications is growing continually. Closely related, and initiated by the application of semiconductors, is the development of low-noise low-power integrated electronics for signal readout. The success of semicond...

  13. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  14. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-01-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  15. PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND RESCATTERED ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon [Basic Science Research Institute, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760 (Korea, Republic of); Trippe, Sascha, E-mail: ki13130@gmail.com, E-mail: trippe@astro.snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-20

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  16. Cosmic radiation and mortality from cancer among male German airline pilots: extended cohort follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Gaël Paul; Blettner, Maria; Langner, Ingo; Zeeb, Hajo

    2012-01-01

    Commercial airline pilots are exposed to cosmic radiation and other specific occupational factors, potentially leading to increased cancer mortality. This was analysed in a cohort of 6,000 German cockpit crew members. A mortality follow-up for the years 1960–2004 was performed and occupational and dosimetry data were collected for this period. 405 deaths, including 127 cancer deaths, occurred in the cohort. The mortality from all causes and all cancers was significantly lower than in the German population. Total mortality decreased with increasing radiation doses (rate ratio (RR) per 10 mSv: 0.85, 95 % CI: 0.79, 0.93), contrasting with a non-significant increase of cancer mortality (RR per 10 mSv: 1.05, 95 % CI: 0.91, 1.20), which was restricted to the group of cancers not categorized as radiogenic in categorical analyses. While the total and cancer mortality of cockpit crew is low, a positive trend of all cancer with radiation dose is observed. Incomplete adjustment for age, other exposures correlated with duration of employment and a healthy worker survivor effect may contribute to this finding. More information is expected from a pooled analysis of updated international aircrew studies.

  17. Nuclear and atomic physics governing changes in the composition of relativistic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, L.W.

    1978-05-01

    Many quantitative studies of relativistic cosmic ray propagation exist in which ''standard'' values for the input quantities are adopted in an uncritical manner. In contrast, the major emphasis of this study is on developing the proper set of formulae and error estimates for each of the atomic and nuclear processes that govern the composition of the cosmic rays between lithium and nickel. In particular, it is shown that errors of approximately a factor of two exist in the standard (Bohr) cross sections for stripping, that the correction function from high energy photoionization needs to be introduced into the standard cross section for radiative attachment, and that because the half-life of a fast nucleus with at most one K-shell electron can differ from the half-life of a neutral atom, several laboratory-based values need correction. The framework used to assemble and correct these quantities is a matrix formalism for the leaky box model similar to that used by Cowsik and Wilson in their ''nested leaky box'' model. It is shown that once the assumption of species-independent leakage is introduced, the matrix formalism becomes virtually identical with the standard exponential path length formalism. 87 references

  18. Applied physics of external radiation exposure dosimetry and radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the interaction of living matter with photons, neutrons, charged particles, electrons and ions. The authors are specialists in the field of radiation protection. The book synthesizes many years of experiments with external radiation exposure in the fields of dosimetry and radiation shielding in medical, industrial and research fields. It presents the basic physical concepts including dosimetry and offers a number of tools to be used by students, engineers and technicians to assess the radiological risk and the means to avoid them by calculating the appropriate shields. The theory of radiation interaction in matter is presented together with empirical formulas and abacus. Numerous numerical applications are treated to illustrate the different topics. The state of the art in radiation protection and dosimetry is presented in detail, especially in the field of simulation codes for external exposure to radiation, medical projects and advanced research. Moreover, important data spread in differ...

  19. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J.; Weckert, E.

    2001-01-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  20. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J M; Chavanne, J [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  1. Multichannel readout ASIC design flow for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronin, A; Malankin, E

    2016-01-01

    In the large-scale high energy physics and astrophysics experiments multi-channel readout application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are widely used. The ASICs for such experiments are complicated systems, which usually include both analog and digital building blocks. The complexity and large number of channels in such ASICs require the proper methodological approach to their design. The paper represents the mixed-signal design flow of the ASICs for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments. This flow was successfully embedded to the development of the read-out ASIC prototype for the muon chambers of the CBM experiment. The approach was approved in UMC CMOS MMRF 180 nm process. The design flow enable to analyse the mixed-signal system operation on the different levels: functional, behavioural, schematic and post layout including parasitic elements. The proposed design flow allows reducing the simulation period and eliminating the functionality mismatches on the very early stage of the design. (paper)

  2. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  3. Radiation and risk in physics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eijkelhof, H.M.C.

    1990-01-01

    The study reported in this thesis deals with physics education, particularly with the teaching and learning of radioactivity and ionizing radiation. It is a follow up of earlier research and development work in the Dutch Physics Curriculum Development Project (PLON) on a unit called Ionizing Radiation. The central theme of this unit was the acceptability of the risks of ionizing radiation. Preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness of the PLON-unit showed that pupils appear to have lay-ideas which seem to be resistant to change. In this study the nature and persistence of these lay-ideas have been explored and a set of recommendations have been developed for writing curriculum materials and for teaching strategies, for physics lessons in secondary high school, in order to promote thoughtful risk analysis and assessment as regards applications of ionizing radiation. (H.W.). 225 refs.; 3 figs.; 41 tabs

  4. Progress in Medical Radiation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    In-depth reviews of the advances and concepts in the application of radiation to medicine are presented in six comprehensive review articles which help to bridge the communications gap between the international research community and the medical physicists and physicians whose responsibility it is to put these advances into clinical use. Topics include techniques used both for the diagnosis of disease, such as computerized tomography, digital radiography, ultrasonography, computerized nuclear medicine scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and for its treatment, such as the radiotherapeutic utilization of high-LET radiations, and the widespread application of computers to perform dosimetry calculations from 3-D treatment planning and imaging. Each chapter has extensive references and the collection is indexed

  5. Dust in cosmic plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Cosmic dust is invariably immersed in a plasma and a radiative environment. Consequently, it is charged to some electrostatic potential which depends on the properties of the environment as well as the nature of the dust. This charging affects the physical and dynamical properties of the dust. In this paper the basic aspects of this dust-plasma interaction in several cosmic environments - including planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere and the interstellar medium - are discussed. The physical and dynamical consequences of the interaction, as well as the pertinent observational evidence, are reviewed. Finally, the importance of the surface charge during the condensation process in plasma environments is stressed. (Auth.)

  6. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots: Exposure pattern as a function of aircraft type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.; Haldorsen, T.; Reitan, J.

    2000-01-01

    The project presented here has been carried out as part of an epidemiological project on Norwegian aircraft personnel, entitled 'Exposure to low level ionising radiation and incidence of cancer in airline pilots and crew'. The purpose of the main project is to determine if there may be a relationship between exposure to cosmic radiation at aircraft cruising altitudes and the incidence of cancer. The methodology used as basis for estimating the radiation exposures is presented. The information used as basis for the dose estimations comes from a variety of sources: the files at the Personnel Licensing Section and the Aviation Medical Section of Norwegian Aviation Administration, the route tables of Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS), large amounts of expert information contributed by members of the Pilot's Associations in Norway and a couple of non-Norwegian pilots and from other members of the staff of SAS and other airlines. The estimation for each pilot was based on individual information of annual block hours and an estimated dose rate for each type of aircraft. The latter was estimated as a weighted average of CARI-estimated doses on a selection of routes flown by the airplanes in the different time periods. The project includes all pilots that have been licensed in Norway since 1946. These pilots have been flying a large variety of different types of aircraft and routes. The cosmic radiation intensity is a function of altitude in the atmosphere and, less markedly, of geographical latitude and of the intensity of the radiation from the sun (quantified as the heliocentric potential). Different types of aircraft fly at different altitudes and are used for different purposes (passenger traffic, cargo, air photography, preparation of maps etc) and used on different routes. The end results of the project described in this article are radiation exposures per block hour for each type of aircraft, and for each individual year (the differences between years reflect the

  7. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots: Exposure pattern as a function of aircraft type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.; Haldorsen, T.; Reitan, J

    2000-07-01

    The project presented here has been carried out as part of an epidemiological project on Norwegian aircraft personnel, entitled 'Exposure to low level ionising radiation and incidence of cancer in airline pilots and crew'. The purpose of the main project is to determine if there may be a relationship between exposure to cosmic radiation at aircraft cruising altitudes and the incidence of cancer. The methodology used as basis for estimating the radiation exposures is presented. The information used as basis for the dose estimations comes from a variety of sources: the files at the Personnel Licensing Section and the Aviation Medical Section of Norwegian Aviation Administration, the route tables of Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS), large amounts of expert information contributed by members of the Pilot's Associations in Norway and a couple of non-Norwegian pilots and from other members of the staff of SAS and other airlines. The estimation for each pilot was based on individual information of annual block hours and an estimated doserate for each type of aircraft. The latter was estimated as a weighted average of CARI-estimated doses on a selection of routes flown by the airplanes in the different time periods. The project includes all pilots that have been licensed in Norway since 1946. These pilots have been flying a large variety of different types of aircraft and routes. The cosmic radiation intensity is a function of altitude in the atmosphere and, less markedly, of geographical latitude and of the intensity of the radiation from the sun (quantified as the heliocentric potential). Different types of aircraft fly at different altitudes and are used for different purposes (passenger traffic, cargo, air photography, preparation of maps etc) and used on different routes. The end results of the project described in this article are radiation exposures per block hour for each type of aircraft, and for each individual year (the differences between years

  8. On the connection between particle physics and properties of cosmic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes Leite, Natacha Violante

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation reflects the significance of particle physics to the problem of understanding magnetic fields in the cosmos, and vice versa, by focusing on astroparticle systems where the interrelatedness of both plays a major role. The chiral magnetic effect in the context of magnetohydrodynamics was investigated both in an astrophysical and in a cosmological setting. This effect was found to lead to maximally helical fields and to seed magnetic field amplification in the core of protoneutron stars, contributing to reach up to 10 14 G at small length and time scales, depending on the temperature and density fluctuations of the core. It is, therefore, unlikely that for a protoneutron star that evolves into a magnetar the chiral magnetic instability is at the root of the magnetic fields observed at its surface. In the early Universe, around the electroweak symmetry breaking, the chiral magnetic effect was found to generate magnetic helicity from initially non-helical fields and to lead to a slowing down of the cosmological magnetic field resistive decay. Cosmic rays originated in the first supernovae might have played a crucial role at the epoch of reionization by diffusing in the intergalactic medium and in the corresponding magnetic field. Analysing the details of this epoch together with the propagation and energy losses of cosmic rays, it is concluded that cosmic rays of energy cosmic ray injection spectrum. This heating up of the medium is expected to be detected by neutral hydrogen 21 cm observations and its spatial distribution can reveal details of the structure and strength of early intergalatic magnetic fields. Synchrotron emission is one of the methods through which vestiges of dark matter could reach us. The radio emission associated with dark matter annihilations into e ± from a subgalactic high velocity cloud, the Smith Cloud, was

  9. Investigating cosmic rays and air shower physics with IceCube/IceTop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Hans

    2017-06-01

    IceCube is a cubic-kilometer detector in the deep ice at South Pole. Its square-kilometer surface array, IceTop, is located at 2800 m altitude. IceTop is large and dense enough to cover the cosmic-ray energy spectrum from PeV to EeV energies with a remarkably small systematic uncertainty, thanks to being close to the shower maximum. The experiment offers new insights into hadronic physics of air showers by observing three components: the electromagnetic signal at the surface, GeV muons in the periphery of the showers, and TeV muons in the deep ice. The cosmic-ray flux is measured with the surface signal. The mass composition is extracted from the energy loss of TeV muons observed in the deep ice in coincidence with signals at the surface. The muon lateral distribution is obtained from GeV muons identified in surface signals in the periphery of the shower. The energy spectrum of the most energetic TeV muons is also under study, as well as special events with laterally separated TeV muon tracks which originate from high-pT TeV muons. A combination of all these measurements opens the possibility to perform powerful new tests of hadronic interaction models used to simulate air showers. The latest results will be reviewed from this perspective.

  10. Investigating cosmic rays and air shower physics with IceCube/IceTop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembinski Hans

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube is a cubic-kilometer detector in the deep ice at South Pole. Its square-kilometer surface array, IceTop, is located at 2800 m altitude. IceTop is large and dense enough to cover the cosmic-ray energy spectrum from PeV to EeV energies with a remarkably small systematic uncertainty, thanks to being close to the shower maximum. The experiment offers new insights into hadronic physics of air showers by observing three components: the electromagnetic signal at the surface, GeV muons in the periphery of the showers, and TeV muons in the deep ice. The cosmic-ray flux is measured with the surface signal. The mass composition is extracted from the energy loss of TeV muons observed in the deep ice in coincidence with signals at the surface. The muon lateral distribution is obtained from GeV muons identified in surface signals in the periphery of the shower. The energy spectrum of the most energetic TeV muons is also under study, as well as special events with laterally separated TeV muon tracks which originate from high-pT TeV muons. A combination of all these measurements opens the possibility to perform powerful new tests of hadronic interaction models used to simulate air showers. The latest results will be reviewed from this perspective.

  11. Initial state effects on the cosmic microwave background and trans-Planckian physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, Kevin; Lowe, David A.

    2003-01-01

    There exists a one complex parameter family of de Sitter invariant vacua, known as α vacua. In the context of slow roll inflation, we show that all but the Bunch-Davies vacuum generates unacceptable production of high energy particles at the end of inflation. As a simple model for the effects of trans-Planckian physics, we go on to consider non-de Sitter invariant vacua obtained by patching modes in the Bunch-Davies vacuum above some momentum scale M c , with modes in an α vacuum below M c . Choosing M c near the Planck scale M Pl , we find acceptable levels of hard particle production, and corrections to the cosmic microwave perturbations at the level of HM Pl /M c 2 , where H is the Hubble parameter during inflation. More general initial states of this type with H c Pl can give corrections to the spectrum of cosmic microwave background perturbations at order 1. The parameter characterizing the α vacuum during inflation is a new cosmological observable

  12. Inflation Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, K.N.; Arnold,K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B.A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Buder, I.; Burke, D.L.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments---the theory of cosmic inflation---and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1 of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5-sigma measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. LSS experiments, particularly spectroscopic surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will complement the CMB effort by improving current constraints on running of the spectral index by up to a factor of four, improving constraints on curvature by a factor of ten, and providing non-Gaussianity constraints that are competitive with the current CMB bounds.

  13. Gravitational perturbation of the cosmic background radiation by density concentrations. [Swiss cheese model universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, C C [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Theoretical Astronomy

    1976-05-01

    The gravitational effect of density concentrations in the Universe on the temperature distribution of the cosmic blackbody background radiation is considered, using the Swiss cheese model universe, and supposing each hole to contain an expanding, homogeneous dust sphere at its centre. The temperature profile across such a hole differs in an essential way from that obtained earlier by Rees et al (Nature; 217:511 (1968)). The evolution of this effect with the expansion of the Universe is considered for 'relatively increasing' density contrasts emerging from the same initial singular state as the rest of the Universe. This effect becomes comparable to the bremsstrahlung and Compton effects on the isotropy of the background radiation for masses of about 10/sup 19/ times the mass of the sun, and exceeds these other effects as about Msup(2/3) for larger masses. If large-scale condensations of the Universe can be found for z approximately 1 to 5, delineated, maybe, by the clustering of quasars, etc., then this effect may be observable.

  14. Effect of the Great Attractor on the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertschinger, E [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics; Gorski, K M [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Dekel, A [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Inst. of Physics

    1990-06-07

    ANISOTROPY in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) is expected as a result of fluctuations in gravitational potential caused by large-scale structure in the Universe. The background radiation is redshifted as it climbs out of gravitational wells. Here we present a map of the anisotropy in CMB temperature {Delta}T/T of our region of the Universe as viewed by a distant observer, predicted on the basis of the gravitational potential field. We calculate this field in the vicinity of the Local Group of galaxies from the observed peculiar (non-Hubble) velocities of galaxies, under the assumption that the peculiar motions are induced by gravity. If the cosmological density parameter {Omega} is 1, the gravitational potential field of the Great Attractor and surrounding regions produces a maximum Sachs-Wolfe anisotropy of {Delta}T/T=(1.7{plus minus}0.3) x 10{sup -5} on an angular scale of 1deg. Doppler and adiabatic contributions to this anisotropy are expected to be somewhat larger. If similar fluctuations in the gravitational potential are present elsewhere in the Universe, the anisotropy present when the CMB was last scattered should be visible from the Earth, and should be detectable in current experiments. A fundamental test of whether gravity is responsible for the generation of structure in the Universe can be made by looking for the imprint in the CMB of deep potential wells similar to those found in our neighbourhood, (author).

  15. The excess flux in the cosmic submillimeter background radiation and the primordial deuterium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Guessoum, N.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) show an enhanced flux in the submillimeter regime, compared to the spectrum of a 2.7 K blackbody. Thermal Comptonization of the relic radiation by a hot nonrelativistic plasma has long been known to produce distortions in the CBR spectrum, similar to what has now been observed. Heating of the primeval plasma to temperatures T ∼ 10 6 - 10 8 K could result from the injection of subcosmic ray protons at epoch z ∼ 10--100. The intensity of the subcosmic ray flux that provide conditions needed to explain the submillimeter excess by thermal Comptonization also leads to the production of cosmologically significant amounts of deuterium in collisions between subcosmic ray protons and primordial protons and α-particles. However, the amount of lithium produced through α-α reactions is in conflict with the observed Li abundance. If lithium is depleted, for example, by processing through Population II stars, arguments for the baryon content of the universe based on primordial deuterium and He abundances are weakened. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Charge equilibrium and radiation of low-energy cosmic rays passing through interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rule, D.W.; Omidvar, K.

    1979-01-01

    The charge equilibrium and radiation an oxygen and an iron beam in the MeV per nucleon energy range, representing a typical beam of low-energy cosmic rays passing through the interstellar medium, are considered. Electron loss of the beam has been taken into account by means of the first Born approximation allowing for the target atom to remain unexcited, or to be excited to all possible states. Electron-capture cross sections have been calculated by means of the scaled Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers approximation, taking into account of atomic shells of the target atoms and capture into all excited states of the projectile. The capture and loss cross sections are found to be within 20%--30% of the existing experimental values for most of the cases considered. Radiation of the beam due to electron capture into the excited states of the ion, collisional excitation, and collisional inner-shell ionization, taking into account the fluorescence yield of the ions has been considered. Effective X-ray production cross sections and mutliplicities for the most energetic X-ray lines emitted by the Fe and O beams have been calculated, and error estimates made for the results

  17. Charge equilibrium and radiation of low-energy cosmic rays passing through interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, D. W.; Omidvar, K.

    1979-01-01

    The charge equilibrium and radiation of an oxygen and an iron beam in the MeV per nucleon energy range, representing a typical beam of low-energy cosmic rays passing through the interstellar medium, are considered. Electron loss of the beam has been taken into account by means of the first Born approximation, allowing for the target atom to remain unexcited or to be excited to all possible states. Electron-capture cross sections have been calculated by means of the scaled Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers approximation, taking into account all atomic shells of the target atoms and capture into all excited states of the projectile. The capture and loss cross sections are found to be within 20%-30% of the existing experimental values for most of the cases considered. Radiation of the beam due to electron capture into the excited states of the ion, collisional excitation, and collisional inner-shell ionization, taking into account the fluorescence yield of the ions, has been considered. Effective X-ray production cross sections and multiplicities for the most energetic X-ray lines emitted by the Fe and O beams have been calculated, and error estimates made for the results.

  18. Case study on the effect of cosmic radiation in embedded systems in aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Adriane C.M.; Pereira, Marlon A.; Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy neutrons generated from the interaction of cosmic radiation with atoms of the atmosphere, can cause adverse effects on avionics devices. These effects are referred to as 'Single Event Effects' (SEE) and may occur especially in aircraft onboard computers, from change the logic state of memory cells or functional interruptions, which could compromise flight safety. The effects of the SEE must first be evaluated and entered into the safety analysis process in order to determine the susceptibility to failures by SEE devices. SEE rate can be evaluated separately for thermal neutrons and fast neutrons with energy above 10 MeV. This paper presents an exploratory study of susceptibility to radiation to a specific type of SRAM memory, during periods of maximum and minimum solar, in situations of equatorial and polar flight in the typical flight altitude of existing aircraft and, at higher altitudes, near the maximum of Pfotzer. This study was conducted using estimates of particle flows employing the EXPACS QARM codes and evaluating the expected rate of SEE due to thermal neutrons and fast neutrons separately. The distribution in energy and the flow of neutrons inside the airplane are influenced by the total mass of the aircraft and this influence are also discussed

  19. Radiation Protection Concepts and Quantities for the Occupational Exposure to Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    For the purposes of dose limitation and dose control, the harm, or detriment, of exposure to radiation is assessed by the quantity effective dose. Effective dose is evaluated by the application of factors to the averaged absorbed dose in the organs and tissues of the body. Radiation monitoring instruments are generally calibrated in terms of the quantity ambient dose equivalent which is defined in a simple spherical phantom. The relationship of these quantities is described. Requirements for the radiation protection of aircraft crew are given in the European Union Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM. There are requirements to assess the exposure of aircraft crew, to inform them of health risks, to reduce higher doses, and to control the dose to the foetus. There are no explicit dose limits, other than a dose objective to be applied to the exposure of the foetus, and no requirements for designation of areas or classification of workers. There are significant differences between the exposure condition of aircraft crew and workers in most other industries where there is occupational exposure to radiation. There are greater ranges of radiation types and energy, and there are different dose distributions and characteristics of the working populations. However, the field intensity is predictable and, with the exception of rare solar events, there is no risk of significant unexpected exposures. Dose assessment is anticipated to be by folding staff roster information with estimates of route doses, since there is little variability of dose rate within an aircraft. Route doses, which may be either an agreed average value for a given airport pairing and aircraft type, or be flight specific, will be closely linked to measured values. Requirements as to the accuracy of dose assessment should be applied which are broadly similar to those used in individual monitoring generally. (author)

  20. Constraints on cosmic opacity and beyond the standard model physics from cosmological distance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avgoustidis, Anastasios [Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, DAMTP, CMS, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Redondo, Javier [Max Planck Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805, Munich (Germany); Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul, E-mail: a.avgoustidis@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: clare.burrage@desy.de, E-mail: redondo@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: raul.jimenez@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and Institute for Sciences of the Cosmos (ICC), University of Barcelona, IEEC, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2010-10-01

    We update constraints on cosmic opacity by combining recent SN Type Ia data with the latest measurements of the Hubble expansion at redshifts between 0 and 2. The new constraint on the parameter ε parametrising deviations from the luminosity-angular diameter distance relation (d{sub L} = d{sub A}(1+z){sup 2+ε}), is ε = −0.04{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08} (2-σ). For the redshift range between 0.2 and 0.35 this corresponds to an opacity Δτ < 0.012 (95% C.L.), a factor of 2 stronger than the previous constraint. Various models of beyond the standard model physics that predict violation of photon number conservation contribute to the opacity and can be equally constrained. In this paper we put new limits on axion-like particles, including chameleons, and mini-charged particles.

  1. Constraints on cosmic opacity and beyond the standard model physics from cosmological distance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avgoustidis, Anastasios [DAMTP, CMS, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Centre for Theoretical Cosmology; Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul [Barcelona Univ., IEEC (ES). ICREA and Inst. for Sciences of the Cosmos (ICC)

    2010-04-15

    We update constraints on cosmic opacity by combining recent SN Type Ia data compilation with the latest measurements of the Hubble expansion at redshifts between 0 and 2. The new constraint on the parameter {epsilon} parametrising deviations from the luminosity-angular diameter distance relation (d{sub L}=d{sub A}(1+z){sup 2+{epsilon}}), is {epsilon}=-0.04{sub -0.07}{sup +0.08} (2-{sigma}). For the redshift range between 0.2 and 0.35 this corresponds to an opacity {delta}{tau}<0.012 (95% C.L.), a factor of 2 stronger than the previous constraint. Various models of beyond the standard model physics that predict violation of photon number conservation contribute to the opacity and can be equally constrained. In this paper we put new limits on axion-like particles, including chameleons, and minicharged particles. (orig.)

  2. Constraints on cosmic opacity and beyond the standard model physics from cosmological distance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avgoustidis, Anastasios; Redondo, Javier; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2010-04-01

    We update constraints on cosmic opacity by combining recent SN Type Ia data compilation with the latest measurements of the Hubble expansion at redshifts between 0 and 2. The new constraint on the parameter ε parametrising deviations from the luminosity-angular diameter distance relation (d L =d A (1+z) 2+ε ), is ε=-0.04 -0.07 +0.08 (2-σ). For the redshift range between 0.2 and 0.35 this corresponds to an opacity Δτ<0.012 (95% C.L.), a factor of 2 stronger than the previous constraint. Various models of beyond the standard model physics that predict violation of photon number conservation contribute to the opacity and can be equally constrained. In this paper we put new limits on axion-like particles, including chameleons, and minicharged particles. (orig.)

  3. Double radio sources and the new approach to cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1977-08-01

    The methodology of cosmic plasma physics is discussed. A summary is given of laboratory investigations of electric double layers, a phenomenon which is known to be very important in laboratory discharges. The importance of electric double layers in the Earth's surrounding is established. The scaling laws between laboratory and magnetospheric double layers are studied. A further extrapolation to galactic phenomena leads to a theory of double radio sources. From analogy with laboratory and magnetospheric current systems it is argued that the galactic current might produce double layers where a large energy dissipation takes place. This leads to a theory of the double radio sources which within the necessary wide limits of uncertainty is quantitatively reconcilable with observations. (author)

  4. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  5. Some aspects of vacuum ultraviolet radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Damany, Nicole; Vodar, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Some Aspects of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics presents some data on the state of research in vacuum ultraviolet radiation in association with areas of physics. Organized into four parts, this book begins by elucidating the optical properties of solids in the vacuum ultraviolet region (v.u.v.), particularly the specific methods of determination of optical constants in v.u.v., the properties of metals, and those of ionic insulators. Part II deals with molecular spectroscopy, with emphasis on the spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules, paraffins, and condensed phases. Part III

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmic Microwave Background Timeline 1934 : Richard Tolman shows that blackbody radiation in an will have a blackbody cosmic microwave background with temperature about 5 K 1955: Tigran Shmaonov anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, this strongly supports the big bang model with gravitational

  7. Gamma radiation associated to stellar formation in the galaxy (cosmic ray astronomy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, Michel.

    1980-05-01

    The gamma ray sky revealed by the COS-B satellite is very peculiar: a few 'gamma ray stars' lying along the galactic plane emerge from a bright milky way. A possible interpretation of this sky is to invoke the existence of regions in which stars, cosmic rays and interstellar matter are very concentrated. A genetic link is established between clouds, stars and cosmic rays: the partial fragmentation of a cloud give birth to stars, the most massive stars accelerate cosmic rays through their supersonic stellar winds, cosmic ray interact in turn with the cloud material to copiously produce high energy gamma rays: a gamma ray source is born

  8. Cosmic radiation monitoring equipment for the Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications; Yuseisho muke uchu denpa kanshi shisetsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The equipment analyzes radio waves transmitted by a geostationary satellite toward the earth and collates the received waves to the registered satellite data for the exposure of illegality or unlawfulness, if any. A feature of the equipment is that it operates only one antenna to catch waves belonging in three different frequency bands, that is, L, Ku, and Ka. Another feature is that it follows a procedure which is automatically executed by computers, the procedure including the analysis of the spectrum of the continuously arriving waves for the isolation of the carrier wave for the determination of the position where the satellite rests and for the extraction of wave data. Cosmic radiation monitoring is manually performed in Germany, Britain, etc., and the equipment introduced here is the first computer-aided automatic cosmic radiation monitoring system in the world. (translated by NEDO)

  9. Origins and early days of the Bristol school of cosmic-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, W.O.

    1990-01-01

    The founder of the Bristol School was Cecil Frank Powell, Nobel Laureate for Physics in 1950 for his discovery of the pi-meson and sometimes called the father of meson physics. The article describes first his early life and his many years of systematic work to perfect the nuclear emulsion technique. This is followed by a brief description of the circumstances of the discovery of the pi-meson and of the so-called 'strange particles'. An attempt is made to give a portrait of Powell and to explain his success in building up one of the first post-war international research teams, which paved the way for large international laboratories such as CERN. The account concludes with some personal memories of the award of the Nobel Prize and of the happy and creative atmosphere which Powell created around him at one of the most exciting times in the physics of cosmic rays since their discovery just after the beginning of the century. (author)

  10. The cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum as a random bit generator for symmetric- and asymmetric-key cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey S; Cleaver, Gerald B

    2017-10-01

    In this note, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation is shown to be capable of functioning as a Random Bit Generator, and constitutes an effectively infinite supply of truly random one-time pad values of arbitrary length. It is further argued that the CMB power spectrum potentially conforms to the FIPS 140-2 standard. Additionally, its applicability to the generation of a (n × n) random key matrix for a Vernam cipher is established.

  11. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  12. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Cosmic Reionization With Pop II and III Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trac, Hy; Cen, Renyue

    2008-03-01

    We have simulated 3 large volume, high resolution realizations of cosmic reionization using a hybrid code that combines a N-body algorithm for dark matter, prescriptions for baryons and star formation, and a radiative transfer algorithm for ionizing photons. Our largest simulation, with 24 billion particles in a 100 Mpc/h box, simultaneously provides (1) the mass resolution needed to resolve dark matter halos down to a virial temperatures of 104 K and (2) the volume needed to fairly sample highly biased sources and large HII regions. We model the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by following the spatially dependent gas metallicity evolution, and distinguish between the first generation (Population III) stars and the second generation (Population II) stars. The Population III stars, with a top-heavy IMF, produce an order of magnitude more ionizing photons at high redshifts z>~10, resulting in a more extended reionization. In our simulations, complete overlap of HII regions occurs at z~6.5 and the computed mass and volume weighted residual HI fractions at 5measurements from SDSS. The values for the Thomson optical depth are consistent within 1-σ of the current best-fit value from the WMAP Year 3 data release.

  13. Cosmic evolution of AGN with moderate-to-high radiative luminosity in the COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraj, L.; Smolčić, V.; Delvecchio, I.; Delhaize, J.; Novak, M.

    2018-05-01

    We study the moderate-to-high radiative luminosity active galactic nuclei (HLAGN) within the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. The survey covers 2.6 square degrees centered on the COSMOS field with a 1σ sensitivity of 2.3 μJy/beam across the field. This provides the simultaneously largest and deepest radio continuum survey available to date with exquisite multi-wavelength coverage. The survey yields 10,830 radio sources with signal-to-noise ratios >=5. A subsample of 1,604 HLAGN is analyzed here. These were selected via a combination of X-ray luminosity and mid-infrared colors. We derive luminosity functions for these AGN and constrain their cosmic evolution out to a redshift of z ~ 6, for the first time decomposing the star formation and AGN contributions to the radio continuum emission in the AGN. We study the evolution of number density and luminosity density finding a peak at z ~ 1.5 followed by a decrease out to a redshift z ~ 6.

  14. A measurement of the medium-scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Inman, C. A.; Kowitt, M. S.; Meyer, S. S.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J. L.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Observations from the first flight of the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM) are analyzed to place limits on Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). This instrument chops a 30 min beam in a three-position pattern with a throw of +/- 40 min; the resulting data is analyzed in statistically independent single- and double-difference sets. We observe in four spectral channels at 5.6, 9.0, 16.5, and 22.5/cm, allowing the separation of interstellar dust emission from CMBR fluctuations. The dust component is correlated with the IRAS 100 micron map. The CMBR component has two regions where the signature of an unresolved source is seen. Rejecting these two source regions, we obtain a detection of fluctuations which match CMBR in our spectral bands of 0.6 x 10(exp -5) is less than Delta (T)/T is less than 2.2 x 10(exp -5) (90% CL interval) for total rms Gaussian fluctuations with correlation angle 0.5 deg, using the single-difference demodulation. Fore the double difference demodulation, the result is 1.1 x 10(exp -5) is less than Delta(T)/T is less than 3.1 x 10(exp -5) (90% CL interval) at a correlation angle of 0.3 deg.

  15. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  16. The physical principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokan, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    This lecture reviews the production of ionising radiation from the naturally occurring radioactive decay chains and introduces the mathematical expressions relating to secular equilibrium and the calculation of the activity of daughter products. The absorption of α, β and γ radiation is discussed from the point of view of the physical processes which occur, e.g. the photoelectric, Compton and pair production processes for γ-rays. Linear energy transfer and range-energy relationships are discussed for α and β particles. Units of measurement for ionising radiation, relative biological effectiveness, dose equivalence and quality factors for each type of radiation are reviewed. the behaviour and properties of radon, thoron and their daughter products are described, and units used in the assessments of effective dose from radon daughters are discussed. 16 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs

  17. The physical principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokan, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The production of ionising radiation from the naturally occurring radioactive decay chains is reviewed and mathematical expressions relating to secular equilibrium and the calculation of the activity of daughter products are introduced. The absorption of α, β and γ radiation is discussed from the point of view of the physical processes which occur, e.g. the photoelectric, Compton and pair production processes for γ-rays. Linear energy transfer (LET) and range-energy relationships are discussed for α and β particles. Units of measurement for ionising radiation, relative biological effectiveness, dose equivalence and quality factors for each type of radiation are reviewed. The behaviour and properties of radon, thoron and their daughter products are described, and the definition of the Working Level introduced

  18. The PAMELA Mission: Heralding a new era in precision cosmic ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.C.; Bazilevskaya, G.A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.

    2014-01-01

    On the 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) satellite-borne experiment was launched onboard the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite by a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur space centre. The satellite was placed in a quasi-polar 70°inclination orbit at an altitude varying between 350 km and 600 km. New results on the antiparticle component of the cosmic radiation were obtained. The positron energy spectrum and positron fraction were measured from 400 MeV up to 200 GeV revealing a positron excess over the predictions of commonly used propagation models. This can be interpreted either as evidence that the propagation models should be revised or in terms of dark matter annihilation or a pulsar contribution. The antiproton spectrum was measured over the energy range from 60 MeV to 350 GeV. The antiproton spectrum is consistent with secondary production and significantly constrains dark matter models. The energy spectra of protons and helium nuclei were measured up to 1.2 TV. The spectral shapes of these two species are different and cannot be described well by a single power law. For the first time the electron spectrum was measured up to 600 GeV complementing the information obtained from the positron data. Nuclear and isotopic composition was obtained with unprecedented precision. The variation of the low energy proton, electron and positron energy spectra was measured from July 2006 until December 2009 accurately sampling the unusual conditions of the most recent solar minimum activity period (2006–2009). Low energy particle spectra were accurately measured also for various solar events that occurred during the PAMELA mission. The Earth’s magnetosphere was studied measuring the particle radiation in different regions of the magnetosphere. Energy spectra and composition of sub-cutoff and trapped particles were obtained. For the first time a belt of trapped antiprotons was detected in the South Atlantic

  19. The PAMELA Mission: Heralding a new era in precision cosmic ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G.C. [University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Physics, I-80126 Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E.A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bruno, A. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M. [INFN, Sezione di Rome “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); and others

    2014-11-30

    On the 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) satellite-borne experiment was launched onboard the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite by a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur space centre. The satellite was placed in a quasi-polar 70°inclination orbit at an altitude varying between 350 km and 600 km. New results on the antiparticle component of the cosmic radiation were obtained. The positron energy spectrum and positron fraction were measured from 400 MeV up to 200 GeV revealing a positron excess over the predictions of commonly used propagation models. This can be interpreted either as evidence that the propagation models should be revised or in terms of dark matter annihilation or a pulsar contribution. The antiproton spectrum was measured over the energy range from 60 MeV to 350 GeV. The antiproton spectrum is consistent with secondary production and significantly constrains dark matter models. The energy spectra of protons and helium nuclei were measured up to 1.2 TV. The spectral shapes of these two species are different and cannot be described well by a single power law. For the first time the electron spectrum was measured up to 600 GeV complementing the information obtained from the positron data. Nuclear and isotopic composition was obtained with unprecedented precision. The variation of the low energy proton, electron and positron energy spectra was measured from July 2006 until December 2009 accurately sampling the unusual conditions of the most recent solar minimum activity period (2006–2009). Low energy particle spectra were accurately measured also for various solar events that occurred during the PAMELA mission. The Earth’s magnetosphere was studied measuring the particle radiation in different regions of the magnetosphere. Energy spectra and composition of sub-cutoff and trapped particles were obtained. For the first time a belt of trapped antiprotons was detected in the South Atlantic

  20. Integration of radiation and physical safety in large radiator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, P.P.M.; Benedito, A.M.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Growing international concern about radioactive sources after the Sept. 11, 2001 event has led to a strengthening of physical safety. There is evidence that the illicit use of radioactive sources is a real possibility and may result in harmful radiological consequences for the population and the environment. In Brazil there are about 2000 medical, industrial and research facilities with radioactive sources, of which 400 are Category 1 and 2 classified by the - International Atomic Energy Agency - AIEA, where large irradiators occupy a prominent position due to the very high cobalt-60 activities. The radiological safety is well established in these facilities, due to the intense work of the authorities in the Country. In the paper the main aspects on radiological and physical safety applied in the large radiators are presented, in order to integrate both concepts for the benefit of the safety as a whole. The research showed that the items related to radiation safety are well defined, for example, the tests on the access control devices to the irradiation room. On the other hand, items related to physical security, such as effective control of access to the company, use of safety cameras throughout the company, are not yet fully incorporated. Integration of radiation and physical safety is fundamental for total safety. The elaboration of a Brazilian regulation on the subject is of extreme importance

  1. Measurement of anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation on a large angular scale at 33 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M.V.

    1978-11-01

    Results of a measurement of anisotropy in the 3 0 K cosmic background radiation on a large-angular-scale are presented. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern celestial hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of +- 46m 0 K/√Hz. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the motion of the earth relative to the sources of the radiation; the anisotropy is well fit by a cosine distribution of amplitude 3.61 +- 0.54 millireverse arrowreverse arrow-degrees Kelvin (m 0 K), one part in 800 of 3 0 K, implying a velocity of 361 +- 54 km/sec toward the direction 11.23 +- 0.46 hours right ascension, and 19.0 +- 7.5 0 declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole (cos theta) and quadrupole (cos 2 theta) angular distributions places a 1 m 0 K limit on the amplitude of most components of quadruple anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 m 0 K limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 0 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 0 . This thesis describes the equipment development through three engineering flights and the data acquisition in eleven additional flights. The astrophysical results are then presented from the statistical analysis of the reduced data

  2. Constraining the cosmic radiation density due to lepton number with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Miele, Gennaro; Pisanti, Ofelia; Sarikas, Srdjan; Pastor, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    The cosmic energy density in the form of radiation before and during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) is typically parameterized in terms of the effective number of neutrinos N eff . This quantity, in case of no extra degrees of freedom, depends upon the chemical potential and the temperature characterizing the three active neutrino distributions, as well as by their possible non-thermal features. In the present analysis we determine the upper bounds that BBN places on N eff from primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries, with a careful treatment of the dynamics of neutrino oscillations. We consider quite a wide range for the total lepton number in the neutrino sector, η ν = η ν e +η ν μ +η ν τ and the initial electron neutrino asymmetry η ν e in , solving the corresponding kinetic equations which rule the dynamics of neutrino (antineutrino) distributions in phase space due to collisions, pair processes and flavor oscillations. New bounds on both the total lepton number in the neutrino sector and the ν e −ν-bar e asymmetry at the onset of BBN are obtained fully exploiting the time evolution of neutrino distributions, as well as the most recent determinations of primordial 2 H/H density ratio and 4 He mass fraction. Note that taking the baryon fraction as measured by WMAP, the 2 H/H abundance plays a relevant role in constraining the allowed regions in the η ν −η ν e in plane. These bounds fix the maximum contribution of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries to N eff as a function of the mixing parameter θ 13 , and point out the upper bound N eff ∼ eff by the Planck satellite will likely provide insight on the nature of the radiation content of the universe

  3. Constraining the cosmic radiation density due to lepton number with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Miele, Gennaro; Pastor, Sergio; Pisanti, Ofelia; Sarikas, Srdjan

    2011-03-01

    The cosmic energy density in the form of radiation before and during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) is typically parameterized in terms of the effective number of neutrinos Neff. This quantity, in case of no extra degrees of freedom, depends upon the chemical potential and the temperature characterizing the three active neutrino distributions, as well as by their possible non-thermal features. In the present analysis we determine the upper bounds that BBN places on Neff from primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries, with a careful treatment of the dynamics of neutrino oscillations. We consider quite a wide range for the total lepton number in the neutrino sector, ην = ηνe+ηνμ+ηντ and the initial electron neutrino asymmetry ηνein, solving the corresponding kinetic equations which rule the dynamics of neutrino (antineutrino) distributions in phase space due to collisions, pair processes and flavor oscillations. New bounds on both the total lepton number in the neutrino sector and the νe-bar nue asymmetry at the onset of BBN are obtained fully exploiting the time evolution of neutrino distributions, as well as the most recent determinations of primordial 2H/H density ratio and 4He mass fraction. Note that taking the baryon fraction as measured by WMAP, the 2H/H abundance plays a relevant role in constraining the allowed regions in the ην-ηνein plane. These bounds fix the maximum contribution of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries to Neff as a function of the mixing parameter θ13, and point out the upper bound Nefflesssim3.4. Comparing these results with the forthcoming measurement of Neff by the Planck satellite will likely provide insight on the nature of the radiation content of the universe.

  4. Influence of clouds on the cosmic radiation dose rate on aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazianotto, Mauricio T.; Carlson, Brett V.; Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L.; Cortes-Giraldo, Miguel A.; Quesada, Jose Manuel M.; Palomo, Francisco R.; Pinto, Marcos Luiz de A.

    2014-01-01

    Flight missions were made in Brazilian territory in 2009 and 2011 with the aim of measuring the cosmic radiation dose rate incident on aircraft in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly and to compare it with Monte Carlo simulations. During one of these flights, small fluctuations were observed in the vicinity of the aircraft with formation of Cumulonimbus clouds. Motivated by these observations, in this work, the authors investigated the relationship between the presence of clouds and the neutron flux and dose rate incident on aircraft using computational simulation. The Monte Carlo simulations were made using the MCNPX and Geant4 codes, considering the incident proton flux at the top of the atmosphere and its propagation and neutron production through several vertically arranged slabs, which were modelled according to the ISO specifications. The paper presents first-order calculation about the influence of Cumulonimbus clouds on the flux and dose rate due to cosmic neutrons in the atmosphere, at aircraft flight altitudes. The simulations show variations of the order of 5.5 % in the neutrons flux and 3.6 % of the dose rate due to the presence of the cloud. Such variations can extend up to ∼1.5 km from the edge of the cloud. The spectrum of neutrons within a cloud formation was observed undergo changes due to the neutron absorption and scattering processes with the water content inside the cloud. To accomplish these simulations, it is important to have a proper knowledge of the data libraries and nuclear models to be applied, since the simulation processes are strongly dependent on these factors. These results emphasise the importance of conducting more detailed studies on this topic, since the influence of clouds can change the dose and flux on aircraft overflying such formations, as well as could explain some of the fluctuations in the experimental dose rate data obtained in aircraft flights. Future studies should extend such simulations to different types of

  5. Introduction to radiological physics and radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Attix, Frank Herbert

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward presentation of the broad concepts underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level student. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged particles with matter, radiotherapy dosimetry, as well as photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Includes many new derivations, such as Kramers X-ray spectrum, as well as topics that have not been thoroughly analyzed in other texts, such as broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem

  6. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  7. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs

  8. Nuclear physics meets the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    We study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic-ray astrophysics, which involves the photodisintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that data on photo-absorption cross sections are sparse in that mass range by screening nuclear databases, such as EXFOR; these cross sections are needed to compute the photodisintegration rates. We also test the prediction power of models, such as TALYS, and find uncertainties of the order of a factor two. If however the radiation fields are strong enough such that the nuclear cascade in the astrophysical source can develop, we find that differences among different models average out -- unless there is a systematic offset in the interaction model. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions, supported by simulating the entire disintegration chain in a gamma-ray burst. We also point out that a first consistency check may be the measurement of the absorption cross section for different isobars.

  9. Nuclear physics meets the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-15

    We study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic-ray astrophysics, which involves the photodisintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that data on photo-absorption cross sections are sparse in that mass range by screening nuclear databases, such as EXFOR; these cross sections are needed to compute the photodisintegration rates. We also test the prediction power of models, such as TALYS, and find uncertainties of the order of a factor two. If however the radiation fields are strong enough such that the nuclear cascade in the astrophysical source can develop, we find that differences among different models average out -- unless there is a systematic offset in the interaction model. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions, supported by simulating the entire disintegration chain in a gamma-ray burst. We also point out that a first consistency check may be the measurement of the absorption cross section for different isobars.

  10. Italian Physical Society DAMPE: A gamma and cosmic ray observatory in space

    CERN Document Server

    D'Urso, D

    2017-01-01

    DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is one of the five satellite missions in the framework of the Strategic Pioneer Research Program in Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Launched on December 17th 2015 at 08:12 Beijing time, it is taking data into a sun-synchronous orbit, at the altitude of 500 km. The main scientific objective of DAMPE is to detect electrons and photons in the range 5 GeV–10TeV with unprecedented energy resolution, in order to identify possible Dark Matter signatures. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100TeV with excellent energy resolution. The satellite is equipped with a powerful space telescope for high energy gamma-ray, electron and cosmic rays detection. It consists of a plastic scintillator strips detector (PSD) that serves as anticoincidence detector, a silicon-tungsten tracker (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter of about 32 radiation lengths, and a neutron detector. With its excellent photon detection capability and its detector performances (at 100...

  11. 1020eV cosmic ray and particle physics with IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Halzen, F.

    2001-01-01

    We show that a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory, though optimized for detecting neutrinos of TeV to PeV energy, can reveal the science associated with the enigmatic super-EeV radiation in the Universe. Speculations regarding its origin include heavy relics from the early Universe, particle interactions associated with the Greisen cutoff, and topological defects which are remnant cosmic structures associated with phase transitions in grand unified gauge theories. We show that it is a misconception that new instruments optimized to EeV energy can exclusively do this important science. Because kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes such as IceCube can reject the atmospheric neutrino background by identifying the very high energy of the signal events, they have sensitivity over the full solid angle, including the horizon where most of the signal is concentrated. This is critical because upgoing neutrino-induced muons, considered in previous calculations, are absorbed by the Earth. Previous calculations have underestimated the event rates of IceCube for EeV signals by over one order of magnitude

  12. Analytic solutions in the dyon black hole with a cosmic string: Scalar fields, Hawking radiation and energy flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, H.S., E-mail: horacio.santana.vieira@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Centro de Ciências, Tecnologia e Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, CEP 58233-000, Araruna, PB (Brazil); Bezerra, V.B., E-mail: valdir@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Silva, G.V., E-mail: gislainevs@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Charged massive scalar fields are considered in the gravitational and electromagnetic field produced by a dyonic black hole with a cosmic string along its axis of symmetry. Exact solutions of both angular and radial parts of the covariant Klein–Gordon equation in this background are obtained, and are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. The role of the presence of the cosmic string in these solutions is showed up. From the radial solution, we obtain the exact wave solutions near the exterior horizon of the black hole, and discuss the Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux. -- Highlights: •A cosmic string is introduced along the axis of symmetry of the dyonic black hole. •The covariant Klein–Gordon equation for a charged massive scalar field in this background is analyzed. •Both angular and radial parts are transformed to a confluent Heun equation. •The resulting Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux are obtained.

  13. Study of the contribution of the different components of atmospheric cosmic radiation in dose received by the aircraft crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Marlon A.; Prado, Adriane C.M.; Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L.

    2014-01-01

    The crews and aircraft passengers are exposed to atmospheric cosmic radiation. The flow of this radiation is modulated by the solar cycle and space weather, varying with the geomagnetic latitude and altitude. This paper presents a study of the contributions of radiation in total ambient dose equivalent of the crews depending on flight altitude up to 20 km, during maximum and minimum solar and in equatorial and polar regions. The results of calculations of the particle flows generated by the EXPACS and QARM codes are used. The particles evaluated that contributing significantly in the ambient dose equivalent are neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons, alphas, photons, muons and charged pions. This review allows us to characterize the origin of the dose received by crews and also support a project of a dosimetric system suitable for this ionizing radiation field in aircraft and on the ground

  14. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  15. Probing the cosmic x-ray and MeV gamma ray background radiation through the anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve a sensitivity better than 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV—although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors—angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  16. Exercises with solutions in radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Bo N

    2015-01-01

    The textbook begins with exercises related to radioactive sources and decay schemes. The problems covered include series decay and how to determine the frequency and energy of emitted particles in disintegrations. The next chapter deals with the interaction of ionizing radiation, including the treatment of photons and charged particles. The main focus is on applications based on the knowledge of interaction, to be used in subsequent work and courses. The textbook then examines detectors and measurements, including both counting statistics and properties of pulse detectors. The chapter that follows is dedicated to dosimetry, which is a major subject in medical radiation physics. It covers theoretical applications, such as different equilibrium situations and cavity theories, as well as experimental dosimetry, including ionization chambers and solid state and liquid dosimeters. A shorter chapter deals with radiobiology, where different cell survival models are considered. The last chapter concerns radiation pro...

  17. Progress in medical radiation physics. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    This book is the first of a series that will provide in-depth reviews of new developments in medical radiation physics. This volume is directed toward application scientists who are involved with research in this field. Six chapters review current topics in medical radiation physics. The first chapter reviews neutron dosimetry for biomedical applications. The second chapter briefly surveys current tissue inhomogeneity corrections in proton-beam treatment planning. Chapter three deals with anthropomorphic phantom materials. It includes a useful table of recommended tissue substitutes and information on manufacturing. The fourth chapter reviews applications of computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy treatment planning. Chapter five is a short introduction to positron imaging. The last chapter describes optical methods for radiograph storage

  18. Abstracts of 21. International Symposium Radiation Protection Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    45 papers are presented as titles with abstracts which are processed individually for the INIS data base. They deal with general aspects of radiation protection physics, chiefly problems of radiation detection and measuring techniques in radiation protection

  19. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure in Portuguese airline pilots: study of a possible correlation with oxidative biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo; Folgosa, Filipe; Soares, Paulo; Pereira, Alice S; Garcia, Raquel; Gestal-Otero, Juan Jesus; Tavares, Pedro; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have sought to understand the health effects of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. However, only few biologic markers or associations with disease outcomes have so far been identified. In the present study, 22 long- and 26 medium-haul male Portuguese airline pilots and 36 factory workers who did not fly regularly were investigated. The two groups were comparable in age and diet, were non-smokers, never treated with ionizing radiation and other factors. Cosmic radiation exposure in pilots was quantified based on direct monitoring of 51 flights within Europe, and from Europe to North and South America, and to Africa. Indirect dose estimates in pilots were performed based on the SIEVERT (Système informatisé d'évaluation par vol de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aériens) software for 6,039 medium- and 1,366 long-haul flights. Medium-haul pilots had a higher cosmic radiation dose rate than long-haul pilots, that is, 3.3 ± 0.2 μSv/h and 2.7 ± 0.3 μSv/h, respectively. Biological tests for oxidative stress on blood and urine, as appropriate, at two time periods separated by 1 year, included measurements of antioxidant capacity, total protein, ferritin, hemoglobin, creatinine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Principal components analysis was used to discriminate between the exposed and unexposed groups based on all the biological tests. According to this analysis, creatinine and 8OHdG levels were different for the pilots and the unexposed group, but no distinctions could be made among the medium- and the long-haul pilots. While hemoglobin levels seem to be comparable between the studied groups, they were directly correlated with ferritin values, which were lower for the airline pilots.

  20. Foundations of radiation physics and radiation protection. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Hanno

    2017-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Types of radiation and radiation fields, the atomic structure, radioactive decays, decay law, natural and artificial radioactivity, interactions of ionizing photon radiation, attenuation of neutral-particle beams, interactions of neutron radiation, interactions of charged particles, ionization and energy transfer, radiation doses, radiation protection phantoms, foundations of the radiation biology of cells, effects and risks of ionizing radiation, radiation expositions of men with ionizing radiation, radiation protection law, practical radiation protection against ionizing radiations, radiation eposures in medical radiology. (HSI)

  1. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chiang, H. C.; Dawson, K. S.; Halverson, N. W.; Hubmayr, J.; Knox, L.; Kuo, C.-L.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Wu, W.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.

    2014-01-01

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve σ(σmν) = 16 meV and σ(N eff ) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero σmν, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics - the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of N eff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that N eff = 3.046

  2. Double radio sources and the new approach to cosmical plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1978-01-01

    The methodology of cosmic plasma physics is discussed. It is hazardous to try to describe plasma phenomena by theories which have not been carefully tested experimentally. One present approach is to rely on laboratory measurements and in situ measurements in the magnetosphere and heliosphere, and to approach galactic phenomena by scaling up the wellknown phenomena to galactic dimensions. A summary is given of laboratory investigations of electric double layers, a phenomenon which is known to be very important in laboratory discharges. A summary is also given of the in situ measurements in the magnetosphere by which the importance of electric double layers in the Earth's surrounding is established. The scaling laws between laboratory and magnetospheric double layers are studied. The successful scaling between laboratory and magnetospheric phenomena encourages an extrapolation to heliospheric phenomena. A further extrapolation to galactic phenomena leads to a theory of double radio sources. In analogy with the Sun which, acting as a homopolar inductor, energizes the heliospheric current system, a rotating magnetized galaxy should produce a similar current system. From analogy with laboratory and magnetospheric current systems it is argued that the galactic current might produce double layers where a large energy dissipation takes place. This leads to a theory of the double radio sources which, within the necessary wide limits of uncertainty, is quantitatively reconcilable with observations. (Auth.)

  3. Proceedings of the third Radiation Physics Conference. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; El-Behay, A.Z.; Hassib, G.M.; El-Naggar, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The conference of radiation physics was held in 13-17 Nov. 1996 in cairo. The specialists of atomic energy authority and Al-Minia University discussed the biological radiation effects,radiation protection, applied radiation physics and material shielding studies were discussed at the meeting more than 400 page were presented

  4. Proceedings of the 4. International Symposium on Radiation Physics - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The studies on: fundamental processes in radiation physics; radiation sources and detectors; physical, chemical and biological radiation effects; plasma technology; radioisotope application in medicine and agriculture; environment; use of radiation in material science and; reactor technology, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Proceedings of the third Radiation Physics Conference. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A; El-Behay, A Z; Hassib, G M; El-Naggar, A M [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The conference of radiation physics was held in 13-17 Nov. 1996 in cairo. The specialists of atomic energy authority and Al-Minia University discussed the biological radiation effects,radiation protection, applied radiation physics and material shielding studies were discussed at the meeting more than 400 page were presented.

  6. Constraining the cosmic radiation density due to lepton number with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Miele, Gennaro; Pisanti, Ofelia; Sarikas, Srdjan [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pastor, Sergio, E-mail: mangano@na.infn.it, E-mail: miele@na.infn.it, E-mail: pastor@ific.uv.es, E-mail: pisanti@na.infn.it, E-mail: sarikas@na.infn.it [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de València), Ed. Institutos de Investigación, Apdo. correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-01

    The cosmic energy density in the form of radiation before and during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) is typically parameterized in terms of the effective number of neutrinos N{sub eff}. This quantity, in case of no extra degrees of freedom, depends upon the chemical potential and the temperature characterizing the three active neutrino distributions, as well as by their possible non-thermal features. In the present analysis we determine the upper bounds that BBN places on N{sub eff} from primordial neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries, with a careful treatment of the dynamics of neutrino oscillations. We consider quite a wide range for the total lepton number in the neutrino sector, η{sub ν} = η{sub ν{sub e}}+η{sub ν{sub μ}}+η{sub ν{sub τ}} and the initial electron neutrino asymmetry η{sub ν{sub e}{sup in}}, solving the corresponding kinetic equations which rule the dynamics of neutrino (antineutrino) distributions in phase space due to collisions, pair processes and flavor oscillations. New bounds on both the total lepton number in the neutrino sector and the ν{sub e}−ν-bar {sub e} asymmetry at the onset of BBN are obtained fully exploiting the time evolution of neutrino distributions, as well as the most recent determinations of primordial {sup 2}H/H density ratio and {sup 4}He mass fraction. Note that taking the baryon fraction as measured by WMAP, the {sup 2}H/H abundance plays a relevant role in constraining the allowed regions in the η{sub ν}−η{sub ν{sub e}{sup in}} plane. These bounds fix the maximum contribution of neutrinos with primordial asymmetries to N{sub eff} as a function of the mixing parameter θ{sub 13}, and point out the upper bound N{sub eff}∼<3.4. Comparing these results with the forthcoming measurement of N{sub eff} by the Planck satellite will likely provide insight on the nature of the radiation content of the universe.

  7. Detecting non-relativistic cosmic neutrinos by capture on tritium: phenomenology and physics potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Andrew J.; Lunardini, Cecilia; Sabancilar, Eray, E-mail: andrewjlong@asu.edu, E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu, E-mail: Eray.Sabancilar@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We study the physics potential of the detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background via neutrino capture on tritium, taking the proposed PTOLEMY experiment as a case study. With the projected energy resolution of Δ ∼ 0.15 eV, the experiment will be sensitive to neutrino masses with degenerate spectrum, m{sub 1} ≅ m{sub 2} ≅ m{sub 3} = m{sub ν} ∼> 0.1 eV. These neutrinos are non-relativistic today; detecting them would be a unique opportunity to probe this unexplored kinematical regime. The signature of neutrino capture is a peak in the electron spectrum that is displaced by 2 m{sub ν} above the beta decay endpoint. The signal would exceed the background from beta decay if the energy resolution is Δ ∼< 0.7 m{sub ν} . Interestingly, the total capture rate depends on the origin of the neutrino mass, being Γ{sup D} ≅ 4 and Γ{sup M} ≅ 8 events per year (for a 100 g tritium target) for unclustered Dirac and Majorana neutrinos, respectively. An enhancement of the rate of up to O(1) is expected due to gravitational clustering, with the unique potential to probe the local overdensity of neutrinos. Turning to more exotic neutrino physics, PTOLEMY could be sensitive to a lepton asymmetry, and reveal the eV-scale sterile neutrino that is favored by short baseline oscillation searches. The experiment would also be sensitive to a neutrino lifetime on the order of the age of the universe and break the degeneracy between neutrino mass and lifetime which affects existing bounds.

  8. High energy physics above 10 TeV: a review of recent cosmic ray results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodh, G.B.

    In cosmic rays the very high energy events and their interpretation are reviewed in a critical fashion so as to bring into focus the interesting aspects related to the behavior of high energy interactions

  9. EMERALD - Vocational training in medical radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.A.; Tabakov, S.D.; Roberts, V.C.

    2000-01-01

    EMERALD (European MEdiation RAdiation Learning Development) is a project funded by the European Union under the Leonardo da Vinci programme. It involves a collaboration between Universities and Hospitals from the UK, Sweden, Italy and Portugal. The aim of the EMERALD project is to develop and deliver three common transnational vocational training modules in Medical Radiation Physics in the specific areas of Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy. These modules are intended to be used in the training programme for young professionals involved in medical radiation physics. Each module is developed from a series of competencies. The competencies are acquired by undertaking practical tasks described in a workbook given to each trainee. Once the task has been completed the trainee discusses the results and observations with his supervisor to ensure that the appropriate competency has been achieved. In addition to the workbook, each trainee receives a CD-ROM containing a series of images to help describe each task. The workbooks for each subject area have been completed and students from Sweden have undertaken Diagnostic Radiology training in the United Kingdom using this approach. The project is now entering the next phase; to develop a multimedia version of the workbook. (author)

  10. Cosmic vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernin, Artur D

    2001-01-01

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. Cosmic vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernin, Artur D [P.K. Shternberg State Astronomical Institute at the M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-30

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered. (reviews of topical problems)

  12. Cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.P.

    1988-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects that are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation that are based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characteristic microwave background anistropy. It has recently been discovered by F. Bouchet and myself that details of cosmic string evolution are very different from the so-called ''standard model'' that has been assumed in most of the string induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain. 29 refs., 9 figs

  13. Physical and biomedical countermeasures for space radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure represents a serious hindrance for long-term interplanetary missions because of the high uncertainty on risk coefficients, and to the lack of simple countermeasures. Even if uncertainties in risk assessment will he reduced in the next few years, there is little doubt that appropriate countermeasures have to be taken to reduce the exposure or the biological damage produced by cosmic radiation. In addition, it is necessary to provide effective countermeasures against solar particle events, which can produce acute effects, even life threatening, for inadequately protected crews. Strategies that may prove to he effective in reducing exposure, or the effects of the irradiation, include shielding, administration of drugs or dietary supplements to reduce the radiation effects, crew selection based on a screening of individual radiation sensitivity. It is foreseeable that research in passive and active radiation shielding, radioprotective chemicals, and individual susceptibility will boost in the next years to provide efficient countermeasures to the space radiation threat. (orig.)

  14. Physics for radiation protection. 3. upd. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E.

    2013-09-01

    A highly practical resource for health physicists and other professionals in radiation protection. This third edition has been completely revised and updated with an emphasis on basic concepts as they apply to radiation issues such as the incident at the Fukushima-Daichi plant in Japan. Designed for readers with limited as well as basic science backgrounds, the book presents thorough and up-to-date explanations of radiation physics and the major concepts that underpin it. Extensive discussion is provided of radioactivity, including sources, materials and decay schemes for about 100 of the most common radionuclides encountered by practitioners. The text emphasizes practical calculations for radiation sources and levels in the workplace and the environment, and presents methods, including shielding, for modifying them. Comprehensive appendices and more than 400 figures are provided for such calculations; these are based on current resource data. Excerpts from the Chart of the Nuclides, activation cross sections, fission yields, fission-product chains, photon attenuation coefficients, and nuclear masses are also provided. Real-world examples and exercises demonstrate concepts and their use.

  15. Acceleration and propagation of cosmic radiation. Production, oscillation and detection of neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.-O.

    1987-06-01

    In recent years, the old problem of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation has become alive again, with the discovery of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, and with the first measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux, which appears to be higher than expected. I have shown that the new acceleration mechanism was slow and I have calculated the maximum energy that can be reached by particles accelerated in various astrophysical sites. I have also studied in detail a cosmic-ray propagation model which takes into account the antiproton measurements. Neutrino astronomy is a field much more recent and in rapid expansion, thanks to a convergence of interests between astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Several large neutrino detectors already exist; really huge ones are in project. I have studied the possible impact of the high energy (> 1 TeV) neutrino astronomy on models of cosmic-ray sources such as Cygnus X3. Comparing the low energy (∼ 10 MeV) cosmic-ray antineutrinos with other sources of neutrinos and antineutrinos (sun, supernova, earth...), I have pointed out that the antineutrino background resulting from all the nuclear power-stations of the planet was sizeable. This background is a nuisance for some astrophysical applications but could be useful for studies on vacuum or matter neutrino oscillations (MSW effect). I have also examined the MSW effect in another context: the travel through the earth of neutrinos from the supernova explosion SN1987a [fr

  16. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Wilson, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Dicello, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/μm. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used

  17. Radiative and Excited State Charmonium Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-07-30

    Renewed interest in the spectroscopy of charmonium has arisen from recent unexpected observations at $e^+e^-$ colliders. Here we report on a series of works from the previous two years examining the radiative physics of charmonium states as well as the mass spectrum of states of higher spin and internal excitation. Using new techniques applied to Domain-Wall and Clover quark actions on quenched isotropic and anisotropic lattices, radiative transitions and two-photon decays are considered for the first time. Comparisons are made with experimental results and with model approaches. Forthcoming application to the light-quark sector of relevance to experiments like Jefferson Lab's GlueX is discussed.

  18. Human radiation experimentation: a health physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper observes ethical human experimentation can be considered in terms of two basic principles or tests: informed, willing and knowledgeable subjects; and expectation of benefits. A number of human experiments are evaluated in terms of these principles, including a sixteenth century toxicology experiment, the deliberate exposure by an x-ray pioneer, and the plutonium injection cases of the 1940's. The following rational ethic is proposed for the practice of health physics with respect to human radiation experimentation: At all levels, the health physicist has a professional as well as personal obligation to ensure that proper human requirements, including proper informed consent and willing subjects, arc carried out with respect to human radiation experimentation, and must be convinced that the real or potential benefits to be derived from the experiment clearly exceed the potential detriment and risk. (author)

  19. 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 24 October 2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled ''100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays'', was held on 24 October 2012 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda of the session announced on the RAS Physical Sciences Division website www.gpad.ac.ru included the following reports: (1) Panasyuk M I (Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov State University, Moscow) T he contribution of Russian scientists to the centennial history of the development of the physics of cosmic rays ; (2) Ryazhskaya O G (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) O n experiments in underground physics ; (3) Krymskii G F, Berezhko E G (Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk) T he origin of cosmic rays ; (4) Stozhkov Yu I (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) C osmic rays in the heliosphere ; (5) Troitsky S V (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) ''Cosmic particles of energies >10 19 eV: a short review of results''. Papers based on reports 2 and 5 are presented below. . On experiments in Underground Physics, O G Ryazhskaya Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 296–304 . Cosmic particles with energies above 10 19 eV: a brief summary of results, S V Troitsky Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 304–310 (conferences and symposia)

  20. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos and Cosmic Origins programs manage Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thai; Thronson, Harley; Seery, Bernard; Ganel, Opher

    2016-07-01

    The strategic astrophysics missions of the coming decades will help answer the questions "How did our universe begin and evolve?" "How did galaxies, stars, and planets come to be?" and "Are we alone?" Enabling these missions requires advances in key technologies far beyond the current state of the art. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos2 (PCOS), Cosmic Origins3 (COR), and Exoplanet Exploration Program4 (ExEP) Program Offices manage technology maturation projects funded through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to accomplish such advances. The PCOS and COR Program Offices, residing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), were established in 2011, and serve as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. We present an overview of the Programs' technology development activities and the current technology investment portfolio of 23 technology advancements. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology gaps and Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations that inform the SAT program. The process improves the transparency and relevance of our technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and promotes targeted external technology investments by defining needs and identifying customers. The Programs' priorities are driven by strategic direction from the Astrophysics Division, which is informed by the National Research Council's (NRC) "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" (NWNH) 2010 Decadal Survey report [1], the Astrophysics Implementation Plan (AIP) [2] as updated, and the Astrophysics Roadmap "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions" [3]. These priorities include technology development for missions to study dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray and inflation probe science, and large far-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)/optical/IR telescopes to conduct imaging and spectroscopy studies. The SAT program is the

  1. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos and Cosmic Origins Technology Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thai; Seery, Bernard; Ganel, Opher

    2016-01-01

    The strategic astrophysics missions of the coming decades will help answer the questions "How did our universe begin and evolve?" and "How did galaxies, stars, and planets come to be?" Enabling these missions requires advances in key technologies far beyond the current state of the art. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) and Cosmic Origins (COR) Program Offices manage technology maturation projects funded through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to accomplish such advances. The PCOS and COR Program Offices, residing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), were established in 2011, and serve as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. We present an overview of the Programs' technology development activities and the current technology investment portfolio of 23 technology advancements. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology gaps and Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations that inform the SAT program. The process improves the transparency and relevance of our technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and promotes targeted external technology investments by defining needs and identifying customers. The Programs' priorities are driven by strategic direction from the Astrophysics Division, which is informed by the National Research Council's (NRC) "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" (NWNH) 2010 Decadal Survey report [1], the Astrophysics Implementation Plan (AIP) [2] as updated, and the Astrophysics Roadmap "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions" [3]. These priorities include technology development for missions to study dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray and inflation probe science, and large far-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)/optical/IR telescopes to conduct imaging and spectroscopy studies. The SAT program is the Astrophysics Division's main investment method to mature technologies

  2. Study of production by cosmic radiation of krypton and xenon in the Saint-Severin meteorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavielle, B.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of Kr and Xe isotropes have been measured by a high sensitivity mass spectrometry technique in 11 samples from a core of the Saint-Severin meteorite. On the basis of our results, we were able to show the role of the shielding depth on the production of Kr and Xe by cosmic ray bombardment. More-over, the experimental results for krypton were compared with calculated values obtained by the Reedy and Arnold model (1972) adapted to cosmic ray irradiation of small spherical objects. Our elaboration of a new systematics of nuclear reactions has lead to a good agreement between experiments and calculations within this model [fr

  3. Optimisation and symmetry in experimental radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, A.

    1988-01-01

    The present monograph is concerned with the optimisation of geometric factors in radiation physics experiments. The discussions are essentially confined to those systems in which optimisation is equivalent to symmetrical configurations of the measurement systems. They include, measurements of interaction cross section of diverse types, determination of polarisations, development of detectors with almost ideal characteristics, production of radiations with continuously variable energies and development of high efficiency spectrometers etc. The monograph is intended for use by experimental physicists investigating primary interactions of radiations with matter and associated technologies. We have illustrated the various optimisation procedures by considering the cases of the so-called ''14 MeV'' on d-t neutrons and gamma rays with energies less than 3 MeV. Developments in fusion technology are critically dependent on the availability accurate cross sections of nuclei for fast neutrons of energies at least as high as d-t neutrons. In this monograph we have discussed various techniques which can be used to improve the accuracy of such measurements and have also presented a method for generating almost monoenergetic neutrons in the 8 MeV to 13 MeV energy range which can be used to measure cross sections in this sparingly investigated region

  4. A Macroscopic Description of Coherent Geo-Magnetic Radiation from Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Caballero, Rogelio; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Nellen, Lukas; Sánchez, Federico A.; Valdés-Galicia, José F.

    2008-01-01

    In an air shower induced by a cosmic ray, due to the high velocities, most of the particles are concentrated in the relatively thin shower front, which, for obvious reasons, is called the 'pancake'. This pancake, which for the present discussion is assumed to be charge neutral, contains large

  5. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 ...

  6. Proceedings of the third Radiation Physics Conference. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A; El-Behay, A Z; Hassib, G M; El-Naggar, A M [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The conference of radiation physics was held in 13-17 Nov. 1996 in Cairo. The specialists of Atomic energy authority and Al-Minia University disscused the biological radiation effects, applied radiation physics, radon measurements and material shielding. Studies were discussed at the meeting more than 300 pag. were presented.

  7. Prospective Physics Teachers' Awareness of Radiation and Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoglu, Aslihan Kartal; Ates, Özlem; Bakaç, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate prospective physics teachers' knowledge of and attitude towards radiation and radioactivity. Participants of this study are 56 prospective physics teachers. A questionnaire related with the knowledge about radiation and radiation fear was conducted. The results of this study showed that most of the…

  8. Proceedings of the third Radiation Physics Conference. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; El-Behay, A.Z.; Hassib, G.M.; El-Naggar, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The conference of radiation physics was held in 13-17 Nov. 1996 in Cairo. The specialists of Atomic energy authority and Al-Minia University disscused the biological radiation effects, applied radiation physics, radon measurements and material shielding. Studies were discussed at the meeting more than 300 pag. were presented

  9. THE BORON-TO-CARBON ABUNDANCE RATIO AND GALACTIC PROPAGATION OF COSMIC RADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermeier, A.; Boyle, P.; Müller, D.; Hörandel, J.

    2012-01-01

    In two long-duration balloon flights in 2003 and 2006, the TRACER cosmic-ray detector has measured the energy spectra and the absolute intensities of the cosmic-ray nuclei from boron (Z = 5) to iron (Z = 26) up to very high energies. In particular, the second flight has led to results on the energy spectrum of the secondary boron nuclei, and on the boron abundance relative to that of the heavier primary parent nuclei, commonly quantified as the 'B/C abundance ratio'. The energy dependence of this ratio, now available up to about 2 TeV amu –1 , provides a measure for the energy dependence of cosmic-ray propagation through the Galaxy, and for the shape of the cosmic-ray source energy spectrum. We use a Leaky-Box approximation of cosmic-ray propagation to obtain constraints on the relevant parameters on the basis of the results of TRACER and of other measurements. This analysis suggests that the source energy spectrum is a relatively soft power law in energy E –α , with spectral exponent α = 2.37 ± 0.12, and that the propagation path length Λ(E) is described by a power law in energy with exponent δ = 0.53 ± 0.06, but may assume a constant residual value Λ 0 at high energy. The value of Λ 0 is not well constrained but should be less than about 0.8 g cm –2 . Finally, we compare the data with numerical solutions of a diffusive reacceleration model, which also indicates a soft source spectrum.

  10. Abstracts of 20. International Symposium Radiation Protection Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    51 papers are presented as titles with abstracts which are processed individually for the INIS data base. They deal with general aspects of radiation protection physics, international activities in radiation protection, solid state dosimetry, models and calculation methods in radiation protection, and measuring techniques in radiation protection

  11. Proceedings of the Seventh Radiation Physics and Protection Conference (RPC-2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The Conference of radiation physics and protection was held on 27-30 November, 2004 in Egypt. the specialists discussed radiation physics and protection, fundamental radiation physics and application, Natural and man made radiation sources and radiation measurements, radiation protection and environmental, applied radiation physics, physics in medicine and biology were disscused at the conference. More than 800 papers were presented in the conference

  12. Cosmic antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarle, G.; Swordy, S.

    1998-01-01

    In 1928 Paul Dirac forecasted the existence of antimatter and 4 years later Carl Anderson detected the first antiparticle: the positron in a cloud chamber while studying cosmic radiation. Antiprotons were more difficult to find but in 1955 physicists from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory got some in a particle accelerator. In 1995 a team from the CERN synthesized atoms of anti-hydrogen by binding positrons to antiprotons in a particle accelerator. Astrophysicists have built more and more complex detectors to study cosmic rays. The detector HEAT (high energy antimatter telescope) has been designed to study positrons above the atmosphere. This detector has been launched for the first time in 1994 and has measured cosmic radiation for 32 hours at an altitude of 37000 meters. The results were challenging: whereas the number of low energy positrons detected agrees with the theory, the number of high energy positrons is too important. It suggests the existence of unknown sources of positrons somewhere in the universe. The massive particles that interact weakly (WIMP) could be such sources. This article draws the history of the quest for antimatter and its implications in cosmology, the detector HEAT is described. (A.C.)

  13. Some method for teaching physics to residents in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.B.

    A method is presented for teaching physics to residents in radiation therapy. Some of the various responsabilities of a hospital physicist are listed, with particular reference to radiation therapy departments [pt

  14. Annama H chondrite-Mineralogy, physical properties, cosmic ray exposure, and parent body history

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, Tomáš; Haloda, J.; Halodová, P.; Meiner, M. M. M.; Maden, C.; Busemann, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K.C.; Hopp, J.; Trieloff, M.; Mahajan, R. R.; Naik, S.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J.M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Maksimova, A. A.; Chukin, A. V.; Semionkin, V. A.; Karabanalov, M. S.; Felner, I.; Petrova, E. V.; Brusnitsyna, E. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Yakovlev, G. A.; Gritsevich, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Moilanen, J.; Kruglikov, N. A.; Ishchenko, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 8 (2017), s. 1525-1541 ISSN 1086-9379 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Annama * chondrite * cosmic-ray exposure * radionuclide Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2016

  15. Cosmic rays on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted. (GSCH)

  16. An update on the correlation between the cosmic radiation intensity and the geomagnetic AA index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical study between the cosmic ray intensity, as observed by a neutron monitor, and of the geomagnetic aa index, as representative of perturbations in the plasma and interplanetary magnetic field in the heliosphere, has been updated to specifically exclude time periods around the reversal of the solar magnetic field. The results of this study show a strong negative correlation for the period 1960 through 1968 with a correlation coefficient of approximately -0.86. However, there is essentially no correlation between the cosmic ray intensity and the aa index for the period 1972-1979 (i.e. correlation coefficient less than 0.16). These results would appear to support the theory of preferential particle propagation into the heliosphere vis the ecliptic during the period 1960-1968 and via the solar polar regions during 1972-1979.

  17. Update on the correlation between the cosmic radiation intensity and the geomagnetic AA index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, M.A.; Smart, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical study between the cosmic ray intensity, as observed by a neutron monitor, and of the geomagnetic aa index, as representative of perturbations in the plasma and interplanetary magnetic field in the heliosphere, has been updated to specifically exclude time periods around the reversal of the solar magnetic field. The results of this study show a strong negative correlation for the period 1960 through 1968 with a correlation coefficient of approximately -0.86. However, there is essentially no correlation between the cosmic ray intensity and the aa index for the period 1972-1979 (i.e. correlation coefficient less than 0.16). These results would appear to support the theory of preferential particle propagation into the heliosphere vis the ecliptic during the period 1960-1968 and via the solar polar regions during 1972-1979

  18. A measurement of the carbon isotopic composition in primary cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjarle, C.; Herrstroem, N.Y.; Jacobsson, L.; Joensson, G.; Kristiansson, K.

    1975-01-01

    The isotopic composition is measured in a stack of nuclear emulsions exposed in a balloon flight from Fort Churchill. The masses of the carbon nuclei have been determined from photometric track width measurements in the residual range interval 1 13 C/( 12 C + 13 C) = 0.10 +- 0.04 at the measuring point. The result indicates that 13 C will only be present in the cosmic ray source matter in small amounts. (orig./BJ) [de

  19. Radiobiological studies on eggs of the rice weevil (Tribolium confusum) after exposure to heavy primary particles of the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, B.

    1982-01-01

    The thesis explains the radiation effects observed during the holometabolism of Tribolium confusum after exposure of the eggs to heavy primary particles of cosmic radiation, i.e. to atomic nuclei of relatively high energy with a mass greater than helium atoms. The first section describes the technical layout of the BIOSTACK experiment and the fixation of the Tribolium eggs and the positioning of the nuclear track detectors. This part is followed by the description of methods used to detect the eggs hit by the heavy nuclei, and their isolation and subsequent growth. Terrestrial irradiation of eggs with x-rays served as a control, as well as unirradiated egg cultures. The amount of larvae produced from incubated eggs hit by heavy nuclei was 66%, that of eggs exposed to cosmic background radiation was 69%, and that produced by the control culture kept on the earth was 87%. Investigations of egg samples during various stages of embryogenesis showed differences in the histological findings of the various groups, especially between the two groups of the BIOSTACK experiment. The letality of larvae in the period from emergence up to pupal stage was relatively high (50%) in the group hit by heavy nuclei, especially when compared to the other BIOSTACK experimental group, where this percentage was 10%, and to the terrestrial control group (3%). Also, vitality of larvae of the first group was considerably reduced. In the pupal stage, the letality observed in all three test groups was relatively low with 2-4%. From the animals produced from eggs hit by heavy nuclei, only 25% were still alive after 4 months, from the other space flight group these were 75%, and from the terrestrial control group 93%. Also, the animals from the first group showed a significant increase in bodily anomalies. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Cosmic Accelerators: An Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbach, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    High energy, relativistic, particles are an essential component of the Universe and play a major role in astrophysics. In a few years we will reach the centennial of the discovery of cosmic rays; all through this century the properties, origin, and effects of this radiation have intrigued researchers in astrophysics and elementary particles alike. We briefly review the history, current status, and future perspectives of cosmic ray research. Emphasis will be placed on the multitude of cosmic accelerators, direct observations of these objects, and the effects of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and beyond

  1. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, T. A.; Moskalenko, I. V. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Jóhannesson, G., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ -rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ -ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  2. Some unsung heroines (and a few heroes) of cosmic ray physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2013-02-01

    The women physicists whose work will be featured are Marietta Blau, Madelaine Forro Barnothy, Phyllis Freier, and Connie Dilworth. The "gluons" that connected their lives to each other (and to the author) included Georges Lemaitre, Manuel Sandoval Vallarta, Cecil Powell, Guiseppi Occhialini, Ken Greisen, Beatrice Tinsley, Hannelore Sexl, and perhaps Elizabeth Rona. Most of the stories are not entirely happy ones. For instance it was Sandoval Vallarta who offered Blau (and her mother) refuge in Mexico when they had to leave Vienna. Vallarta was also Lemaitre's collaborator in calculations of how cosmic rays got to us through the earth's magnetic field. The sad part there is that somehow Lemaitre was never disabused of the view that cosmic rays were direct remnants of his primordial atom and not primarily protons. The result was his gradual exile from main-stream scientific communities.

  3. Preliminary test Results for a 25K Sorption Cryocooler Designed for the UCSB Long Duration Balloon Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, L. A.; Levy, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous operation, vibration-free, long-life 25K sorption cryocooler has been built and is now in final integration and performance testing. This cooler wil be flown on the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) Long Duration Balloon (LDB) Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment.

  4. Calculation codes in radiation protection, radiation physics and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    These scientific days had for objective to draw up the situation of calculation codes of radiation transport, of sources estimation, of radiation doses managements and to draw the future perspectives. (N.C.)

  5. Physics of nuclear radiations concepts, techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rangacharyulu, Chary

    2013-01-01

    Physics of Nuclear Radiations: Concepts, Techniques and Applications makes the physics of nuclear radiations accessible to students with a basic background in physics and mathematics. Rather than convince students one way or the other about the hazards of nuclear radiations, the text empowers them with tools to calculate and assess nuclear radiations and their impact. It discusses the meaning behind mathematical formulae as well as the areas in which the equations can be applied. After reviewing the physics preliminaries, the author addresses the growth and decay of nuclear radiations, the stability of nuclei or particles against radioactive transformations, and the behavior of heavy charged particles, electrons, photons, and neutrons. He then presents the nomenclature and physics reasoning of dosimetry, covers typical nuclear facilities (such as medical x-ray machines and particle accelerators), and describes the physics principles of diverse detectors. The book also discusses methods for measuring energy a...

  6. Beryllium isotopes in primary cosmic radiation and light nuclei fragmentation observed in plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Katsura.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic sheets consisting of 50 layers of Daicel and Kodak cellulose nitrate were flown from Fort Churchill, Canada in 1971 for the study of isotopic components of light nuclei, especially beryllium, in primary cosmic rays. In this plastic stack, 59 Be normals and 24 Be albedos as well as 109 Li normals and 53 Li albedos were identified. The center of mass and the standard deviation for Be 7 and Be 9+10 may be derived from the mass spectrum. (orig./WL) [de

  7. A bolometric millimeter-wave system for observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on medium angular scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M. L.; Alsop, D. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Clapp, A. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Gundersen, J. O.; Koch, T. C.; Kreysa, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Lange, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the performance of a bolometric system designed to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales from 0 deg 3 min to 3 deg. The system represents a collaborative effort combining a low-background 1 m diameter balloon-borne telescope with new multimode feed optics, a beam modulation mechanism with high stability, and a four-channel bolometric receiver with passbands centered near frequencies of 3 (90), 6 (180), 9 (270), and 12 (360) cm(exp -1) (GHz). The telescope was flown three times with the bolometric receiver and has demonstrated detector noise limited performance capable of reaching sensitivity levels of Delta(T)/T(sub CMB) is approximately equal to 10(exp -5) with detectors operated at T = 0.3 K.

  8. The evaluation and use of a portable TEPC system for measuring in-flight exposure to cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.C.; Bentley, R.D.; Conroy, T.J.; Hunter, R.; Jones, J.B.L.; Pond, A.; Thomas, D.J

    2002-07-01

    A recent EC directive has called for all member states to introduce legislation covering the assessment and restriction of air crew exposure to cosmic radiation. In the UK the Civil Aviation Authority, in conjunction with the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions issued guidelines suggesting the use of a predictive code such as CARI for this purpose. In order to validate the use of calculated route doses, an extensive programme of measurements is being carried out in conjunction with Virgin Atlantic Airways, using a prototype HAWK TEPC developed by Far West Technology. This programme began in January 2000 and by the end of February 2001 had resulted in the accumulation of data from 74 flights. In this paper the instrument design is discussed, together with the calibration program. An overview of the in-flight results is also presented, including comparisons between measurements and calculations, which indicates that CARI under-predicts the route doses by approximately 20%. (author)

  9. The evaluation and use of a portable TEPC system for measuring in-flight exposure to cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.C.; Bentley, R.D.; Conroy, T.J.; Hunter, R.; Jones, J.B.L.; Pond, A.; Thomas, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    A recent EC directive has called for all member states to introduce legislation covering the assessment and restriction of air crew exposure to cosmic radiation. In the UK the Civil Aviation Authority, in conjunction with the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions issued guidelines suggesting the use of a predictive code such as CARI for this purpose. In order to validate the use of calculated route doses, an extensive programme of measurements is being carried out in conjunction with Virgin Atlantic Airways, using a prototype HAWK TEPC developed by Far West Technology. This programme began in January 2000 and by the end of February 2001 had resulted in the accumulation of data from 74 flights. In this paper the instrument design is discussed, together with the calibration program. An overview of the in-flight results is also presented, including comparisons between measurements and calculations, which indicates that CARI under-predicts the route doses by approximately 20%. (author)

  10. Measurements of Background Gamma Radiation on Some Localities of North-East Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    , G. Hodolli; , Y. Halimi; , R. Gashi; , Se. Kadiri; , B. Xhafa; , A. Jonuzaj

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of natural environmental radiations is one of the most important subjects in health physics. The main sources of background radiation are cosmic, terrestrial and cosmogenic radiation produced by reactions with cosmic rays and atmospheric nuclei. Terrestrial radiation varies in different regions in the world. Generally the background dose rate from cosmic rays depends on the latitude and altitude. The dose rate range obtained in some northeast Kosovo, the dose rate varies from ...

  11. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertschinger, E.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings have become increasingly popular candidates as seeds for the formation of structure in the universe. This scenario, remains a serious cosmogonical model despite close scrutiny. In constrast, magnetic monopoles and domain walls - relic topological defects as are cosmic strings - are disastrous for cosmology if they are left over from the early universe. The production of heavy cosmic strings is speculative, as it depends on the details of ultrahigh energy physics. Fortunately, speculation about cosmic strings is not entirely idle because, if they exist and are heavy enough to seed galaxy formation, cosmic strings can be detected astronomically. Failure to detect cosmic strings would impose some constraints on grand unified theories (GUTs); their discovery would have exciting consequences for high energy physics and cosmology. This article reviews the basic physics of nonsuperconducting cosmic strings, highlighting the field theory aspects, and provides a progress report on calculations of structure formation with cosmic strings

  12. Proceedings of the Eleventh Radiation Physics and Protection Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The proceeding contains of 404 pages, the available maertial of 35 contributions: and covering of conference topics: Plenary, Invited, Keynote Talks. Nuclear Power Plant Accident. Cosmogenic Radionuclides. Waste Storage and Disposal Solutions. Radiation Medical Physics. Radiation Detection and Measurements. Radioactive in Building Materials. Radiation Protection Regulations and public Protection. Environmental Radioactivity.

  13. Comparison of the response of various TLDs to cosmic radiation and ion beams: Current results of the HAMLET project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilski, P.; Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Reitz, G.

    2011-01-01

    HAMLET is an European Commission research project aiming at optimal scientific exploitation of the data produced within the space experiment MATROSHKA. During phase 1 of this experiment a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors (mainly TLDs) was exposed outside the International Space Station for 1.5 years. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project includes also a ground-based program of intercomparison of detector response to high-energy ion beams. Within the paper, the relative response of main glow-curve peaks of various TLDs (mostly based on LiF) used in frame of the MATROSHKA experiment by three laboratories (DLR Cologne, ATI Vienna and IFJ Krakow) for radiation in space and several ion beams, has been compared. For LiF:Mg,Ti detectors a very good agreement between results obtained by the three laboratories was observed, both for space and accelerator-based exposures. This should be considered a remarkable result, taking into account that the studied TLDs originated from six different batches, manufactured by two producers exploiting different production techniques and were processed by three laboratories, using significantly different protocols (annealing, readout, calibration, glow-curve analysis). Another type of TL detectors, LiF:Mg,Cu,P, was found to show response to cosmic radiation lower than that of LiF:Mg,Ti by 5%–18%.

  14. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994. Revised Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1999-02-01

    The present report is a revised version of an earlier report (IFE/KR/E-96/008). The revision has been carried out since a completely new version of the computational tool has recently been released. All calculations have been redone. The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institute for Energy Technology (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS). The result presented in this report (radiation dose rates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) were calculated with the most recent computer program for this purpose, the CARI-5E from the United States Civil Aviation Authority. The other major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found the the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Association in Norway

  15. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994. Revised Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U

    1999-02-01

    The present report is a revised version of an earlier report (IFE/KR/E-96/008). The revision has been carried out since a completely new version of the computational tool has recently been released. All calculations have been redone. The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institute for Energy Technology (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS). The result presented in this report (radiation dose rates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) were calculated with the most recent computer program for this purpose, the CARI-5E from the United States Civil Aviation Authority. The other major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found the the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Association in Norway.

  16. Radiation oncology physics: A handbook for teachers and students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorsak, E.B.

    2005-07-01

    Radiotherapy, also referred to as radiation therapy, radiation oncology or therapeutic radiology, is one of the three principal modalities used in the treatment of malignant disease (cancer), the other two being surgery and chemotherapy. In contrast to other medical specialties that rely mainly on the clinical knowledge and experience of medical specialists, radiotherapy, with its use of ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer, relies heavily on modern technology and the collaborative efforts of several professionals whose coordinated team approach greatly influences the outcome of the treatment. The radiotherapy team consists of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists and radiation therapy technologists: all professionals characterized by widely differing educational backgrounds and one common link - the need to understand the basic elements of radiation physics, and the interaction of ionizing radiation with human tissue in particular. This specialized area of physics is referred to as radiation oncology physics, and proficiency in this branch of physics is an absolute necessity for anyone who aspires to achieve excellence in any of the four professions constituting the radiotherapy team. Current advances in radiation oncology are driven mainly by technological development of equipment for radiotherapy procedures and imaging; however, as in the past, these advances rely heavily on the underlying physics. This book is dedicated to students and teachers involved in programmes that train professionals for work in radiation oncology. It provides a compilation of facts on the physics as applied to radiation oncology and as such will be useful to graduate students and residents in medical physics programmes, to residents in radiation oncology, and to students in dosimetry and radiotherapy technology programmes. The level of understanding of the material covered will, of course, be different for the various student groups; however, the basic

  17. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  18. Cosmic Ether

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1998-01-01

    A prerelativistic approach to particle dynamics is explored in an expanding Robertson-Walker cosmology. The receding galactic background provides a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time. In this context the relativistic, purely geometric space-time concept is criticized. Physical space is regarded as a permeable medium, the cosmic ether, which effects the world-lines of particles and rays. We study in detail a Robertson-Walker universe with linear expansion factor and negatively curved, open three-space; we choose the permeability tensor of the ether in such a way that the semiclassical approximation is exact. Galactic red-shifts depend on the refractive index of the ether. In the local Minkowskian limit the ether causes a time variation of mass, which scales inversely proportional to cosmic time. In the globally geodesic rest frames of galactic observers the ether manifests itself in an unbounded speed of signal transfer, in bifurcations of world-lines, and in time inversion effects.

  19. Measurement and calculation of cosmic radiation exposure during a pole-to-pole flight sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Graeme C.; Ojjeh, Captain Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Cosmic ray dosimetry measurements were carried out on board a Global Express business jet operated by TAG Aviation (UK) during a pole-to-pole flight sequence that took place in November 2008. One Hawk TEPC and two EPDN2s were flown, and the TEPC measurements compared to calculated values from the route dose codes AVIDOS, CARI 6M, EPCARD versions 3.2 and 3.34, QARM and SIEVERT (online version). The largest difference between measured and calculated doses for the total flight sequence was found to be 13%. Agreement between the readings of the TEPC and the EPDN2s (once a calibration factor from the CERN High Energy Reference Field had been applied) was reasonably good given the relatively large uncertainties associated with the EPDN2 measurements.

  20. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-03

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone.

  1. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  2. Measurement of the isotopic composition of the primary cosmic radiation for the elements B-Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjarle, C.; Herrstroem, N-Y.; Jacobsson, L.; Joensson, G.; Kristiansson, K.

    1977-05-01

    The results are given from an investigation of the isotopic composition of primary cosmic ray B, C, N and O. Preliminary result is also given from an investigation of Ne. The mass measurements are made in nuclear emulsions exposed at about 3 g/cm 2 atmospheric depth. The results for B-O represented as quotients extrapolated to the top of the atmosphere, are: 11 B/B=0.61+-0.10; 13 C/C=0.06+-0.03; 15 N/N=0.33+-0.09; 17 O/O=0.05+-0.03; 18 O/O=0.08+-0.03. The preliminary result from the Ne-measurements shows that nuclei with masses larger than 20 exist among the primary neon nuclei. (Auth.)

  3. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Dadhich, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Exact nonstatic spherically symmetric black-hole solutions of the higher dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills equations for a null dust with Yang-Mills gauge charge are obtained by employing Wu-Yang ansatz, namely, HD-EYM Vaidya solution. It is interesting to note that gravitational contribution of Yang-Mills (YM) gauge charge for this ansatz is indeed opposite (attractive rather than repulsive) that of Maxwell charge. It turns out that the gravitational collapse of null dust with YM gauge charge admits strong curvature shell focusing naked singularities violating cosmic censorship. However, there is significant shrinkage of the initial data space for a naked singularity of the HD-Vaidya collapse due to presence of YM gauge charge. The effect of YM gauge charge on structure and location of the apparent and event horizons is also discussed.

  4. A NIRS's product. Japanese internet system for the calculation of aviation route doses 'JISCARD'. The program which informs us of cosmic radiation doses in an aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The radiation dose during one round aviation from Japan to Western countries is about 0.1 mSv. A web tool called JISCARD (Japanese Internet System for the Calculation of Aviation Route Doses) has been developed by National Institute of Radiological Sciences for giving the information on the irradiation of cosmic ray during the aviation. 'Route dose' (the effective dose by cosmic ray irradiation) of going and coming each can be shown for major international airlines from/to Japan. 'JISCARD Mobile' for mobile phones is also available. Global distribution of daily cosmic ray intensity at cruising altitude (11 km) of aircrafts is shown on the page 'Related Information'. Explanation of the terminology is also compiled. (K.Y.)

  5. Cosmic and terrestrial single-event radiation effects in dynamic random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massengill, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    A review of the literature on single-event radiation effects (SEE) on MOS integrated-circuit dynamic random access memories (DRAM's) is presented. The sources of single-event (SE) radiation particles, causes of circuit information loss, experimental observations of SE information upset, technological developments for error mitigation, and relationships of developmental trends to SE vulnerability are discussed

  6. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008–2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  7. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, J., E-mail: julianna.szabo@energia.mta.hu [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Palfalvi, J.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  8. Radiation physics in medicine and veterinary medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, D.; Djuric, G.

    2000-01-01

    Medical and veterinary medicine staff and specialists represent an important decision making group in national administration and institutions dealing with radiation protection and environmental protection matters in general. Still, their education in physics, especially in radiation physics is fragmentary and loose, both from technical and theoretical point of view. Within medicine and veterinary medicine studies as well as within other biomedical sciences (biology, pharmacology, biotechnology) radiation physics is usually incorporated in the first year curricula as a part of general physics or biophysics course. Some segments of radiation physics mainly as a technical base for different instrumentation methods and techniques could be also found within different graduate and post-graduate courses of radiology, physical therapy, radiation hygiene, environmental protection, etc. But the traditional approach in presenting the matter and inflexibility of the educational system strongly confront the growing public concern for the environmental problems dealing with radiation and demands for better informing and technical education for those involved in informing and administration. This paper considers some of these problems presenting a new approach in education in radiation physics for medical and veterinary medicine students based on education through student projects and work in the field, as well as on the strong collaboration among administration, universities and professional societies on the national and international level. (author)

  9. International scientific cooperation during the 1930s. Bruno Rossi and the development of the status of cosmic rays into a branch of physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2014-07-01

    During the 1920s and 1930s, Italian physicists established strong relationships with scientists from other European countries and the United States. The career of Bruno Rossi, a leading personality in the study of cosmic rays and an Italian pioneer of this field of research, provides a prominent example of this kind of international cooperation. Physics underwent major changes during these turbulent years, and the traditional internationalism of physics assumed a more institutionalized character. Against this backdrop, Rossi's early work was crucial in transforming the study of cosmic rays into a branch of modern physics. His friendly relationships with eminent scientists--notably Enrico Fermi, Walther Bothe, Werner Heisenberg, Hans Bethe, and Homi Bhabha--were instrumental both for the exchange of knowledge about experimental practices and theoretical discussions, and for attracting the attention of physicists such as Arthur Compton, Louis Leprince-Ringuet, Pierre Auger and Patrick Blackett to the problem of cosmic rays. Relying on material from different archives in Europe and the United States, this case study aims to provide a glimpse of the intersection between national and international dimensions during the 1930s, at a time when the study of cosmic rays was still very much in its infancy, strongly interlaced with nuclear physics, and full of uncertain, contradictory, and puzzling results. Nevertheless, as a source of high-energy particles it became a proving ground for testing the validity of the laws of quantum electrodynamics, and made a fundamental contribution to the origins of particle physics.

  10. Cosmic Connections

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2003-01-01

    A National Research Council study on connecting quarks with the cosmos has recently posed a number of the more important open questions at the interface between particle physics and cosmology. These questions include the nature of dark matter and dark energy, how the Universe began, modifications to gravity, the effects of neutrinos on the Universe, how cosmic accelerators work, and whether there are new states of matter at high density and pressure. These questions are discussed in the context of the talks presented at this Summer Institute.

  11. Radiation physics for medical physicists. 2. enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2010-01-01

    This well-received textbook and reference summarizes the basic knowledge of atomic, nuclear, and radiation physics that professionals working in medical physics and biomedical engineering need for efficient and safe use of ionizing radiation. Concentrating on the underlying principles of radiation physics, it covers the prerequisite knowledge for medical physics courses on the graduate and post-graduate levels in radiotherapy physics, radiation dosimetry, imaging physics, and health physics, thus providing the link between elementary physics on the one hand and the intricacies of the medical physics specialties on the other hand. This expanded and revised second edition offers reorganized and expanded coverage. Several of the original chapters have been split into two with new sections added for completeness and better flow. New chapters on Coulomb scattering; on energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions; and on waveguide theory have been added in recognition of their importance. Others training for professions that deal with ionizing radiation in diagnosis and treatment as well as medical residents, students of technology and dosimetry,and biomedical engineering will find many sections interesting and useful for their studies. It also serves as excellent preparatory materials for candidates taking professional certification examinations in medical physics, medical dosimetry, and in medical specialties such as radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology, and nuclear medicine. (orig.)

  12. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements

  13. Effects of cosmic radiation on devices and embedded systems in aircrafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Adriane C.M.; Federico, Claudio A.; Pereira Junior, Evaldo C.F.; Goncalez, Odair L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: odairlelisgoncalez@gmail.com, E-mail: adriane.acm@hotmail.com, E-mail: evaldocarlosjr@gmail.com [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Modern avionics systems use new electronic technologies devices that, due to their high degree of sophistication and miniaturization, are more susceptible to the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly the effect called 'Single Event Effect' (SEE) produced by neutron. Studies regarding the effects of radiation on electronic systems for space applications, such as satellites and orbital stations, have already been in progress for several years. However, tolerance requirements and specific studies, focusing on testing dedicated to avionics, have caused concern and gained importance in the last decade as a result of the accidents attributed to SEE in aircraft. Due to the development of a higher ceiling, an increase in airflow and a greater autonomy of certain aircrafts, the problem regarding the control of ionizing radiation dose received by the pilots, the crew and sensitive equipment became important in the areas of occupational health, radiation protection and flight safety. This paper presents an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on devices and embedded systems in aircrafts, identifying and classifying these effects in relation to their potential risks in each device class. The assessment of these effects in avionics is a very important and emerging issue nowadays, which is being discussed by groups of the international scientific community; however, in South America, groups working in this area are still unknown. Consequently, this work is a great contribution and significantly valuable to the area of aeronautical engineering and flight safety associated to the effects of radiation on electronic components embedded in aircraft. (author)

  14. Effects of cosmic radiation on devices and embedded systems in aircrafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Adriane C.M.; Federico, Claudio A.; Pereira Junior, Evaldo C.F.; Goncalez, Odair L.

    2013-01-01

    Modern avionics systems use new electronic technologies devices that, due to their high degree of sophistication and miniaturization, are more susceptible to the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly the effect called 'Single Event Effect' (SEE) produced by neutron. Studies regarding the effects of radiation on electronic systems for space applications, such as satellites and orbital stations, have already been in progress for several years. However, tolerance requirements and specific studies, focusing on testing dedicated to avionics, have caused concern and gained importance in the last decade as a result of the accidents attributed to SEE in aircraft. Due to the development of a higher ceiling, an increase in airflow and a greater autonomy of certain aircrafts, the problem regarding the control of ionizing radiation dose received by the pilots, the crew and sensitive equipment became important in the areas of occupational health, radiation protection and flight safety. This paper presents an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on devices and embedded systems in aircrafts, identifying and classifying these effects in relation to their potential risks in each device class. The assessment of these effects in avionics is a very important and emerging issue nowadays, which is being discussed by groups of the international scientific community; however, in South America, groups working in this area are still unknown. Consequently, this work is a great contribution and significantly valuable to the area of aeronautical engineering and flight safety associated to the effects of radiation on electronic components embedded in aircraft. (author)

  15. 1020 eV cosmic-ray and particle physics with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Halzen, F.

    2001-01-01

    We show that a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory, though optimized for TeV to PeV energy, is sensitive to the neutrinos associated with super-EeV sources. These include super-heavy relics, neutrinos associated with the Greisen cutoff, and topological defects which are remnant cosmic structures associated with phase transitions in grand unified gauge theories. It is a misconception that new instruments optimized to EeV energy are required to do this important science, although this is not their primary goal. Because kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes can reject atmospheric backgrounds by establishing the very high energy of the signal events, they have sensitivity over the full solid angle, including the horizon where most of the signal is concentrated. This is important because up-going neutrino-induced muons, routinely considered in previous calculations, are absorbed by the Earth

  16. REVEALING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PHYSICS WITH COSMIC RATES AND NUCLEAR GAMMA RAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remain mysterious despite their central importance in cosmology and their rapidly increasing discovery rate. The progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by the delay time between progenitor birth and explosion as SNe Ia. The explosions and progenitors of SNe Ia can be probed by MeV nuclear gamma rays emitted in the decays of radioactive nickel and cobalt into iron. We compare the cosmic star formation and SN Ia rates, finding that their different redshift evolution requires a large fraction of SNe Ia to have large delay times. A delay-time distribution of the form t -α with α = 1.0 ± 0.3 provides a good fit, implying that 50% of SNe Ia explode more than ∼1 Gyr after progenitor birth. The extrapolation of the cosmic SN Ia rate to z = 0 agrees with the rate we deduce from catalogs of local SNe Ia. We investigate prospects for gamma-ray telescopes to exploit the facts that escaping gamma rays directly reveal the power source of SNe Ia and uniquely provide tomography of the expanding ejecta. We find large improvements relative to earlier studies by Gehrels et al. in 1987 and Timmes and Woosley in 1997 due to larger and more certain SN Ia rates and advances in gamma-ray detectors. The proposed Advanced Compton Telescope, with a narrow-line sensitivity ∼60 times better than that of current satellites, would, on an annual basis, detect up to ∼100 SNe Ia (3σ) and provide revolutionary model discrimination for SNe Ia within 20 Mpc, with gamma-ray light curves measured with ∼10σ significance daily for ∼100 days. Even more modest improvements in detector sensitivity would open a new and invaluable astronomy with frequent SN Ia gamma-ray detections.

  17. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniceto, Pedro; Pani, Paolo; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-01-01

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a=1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a=1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a=1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a≠1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  18. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniceto, Pedro [CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Pani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, “Sapienza” Università di Roma & Sezione INFN Roma 1,Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, Jorge V. [Departament de Física Fonamental, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-05-19

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a=1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a=1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a=1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a≠1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  19. An introduction to the atomic and radiation physics of plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tallents, G J

    2018-01-01

    Plasmas comprise more than 99% of the observable universe. They are important in many technologies and are key potential sources for fusion power. Atomic and radiation physics is critical for the diagnosis, observation and simulation of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, and plasma physicists working in a range of areas from astrophysics, magnetic fusion, and inertial fusion utilise atomic and radiation physics to interpret measurements. This text develops the physics of emission, absorption and interaction of light in astrophysics and in laboratory plasmas from first principles using the physics of various fields of study including quantum mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and statistical physics. Linking undergraduate level atomic and radiation physics with the advanced material required for postgraduate study and research, this text adopts a highly pedagogical approach and includes numerous exercises within each chapter for students to reinforce their understanding of the key concepts.

  20. Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere: Requirements for Future Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Since the publication of Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere in 1998 there has been great progress in understanding how and why cosmic rays vary in space and time. This paper discusses measurements that are needed to continue advances in relating cosmic ray variations to changes in solar and interplanetary activity and variations in the local interstellar environment. Cosmic ray acceleration and transport is an important discipline in space physics and astrophysics, but it also plays a critical role in defining the radiation environment for humans and hardware in space, and is critical to efforts to unravel the history of solar activity. Cosmic rays are measured directly by balloon-borne and space instruments, and indirectly by ground-based neutron, muon and neutrino detectors, and by measurements of cosmogenic isotopes in ice cores, tree-rings, sediments, and meteorites. The topics covered here include: what we can learn from the deep 2008-2009 solar minimum, when cosmic rays reached the highest intensities of the space era; the implications of 10Be and 14C isotope archives for past and future solar activity; the effects of variations in the size of the heliosphere; opportunities provided by the Voyagers for discovering the origin of anomalous cosmic rays and measuring cosmic-ray spectra in interstellar space; and future space missions that can continue the exciting exploration of the heliosphere that has occurred over the past 50 years.