WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmic magnetic fields

  1. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  2. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    The first significant cosmic fields, and the seed field for galactic dynamos probably developed after the formation of the first non-linear structures. The history of star formation and the intergalactic medium is controlled, at least in part, by how and when galaxies and their precursors acquired their fields. The amplification of fields behind shocks, and the diffusivity of the magnetic flux, are crucial to the interpretation of radio sources, gamma ray burst afterglows, and other energetic cosmic phenomena. The build-up of magnetic fields is an important aspect of the overall cosmogonic process.

  3. Cosmic Ray transport in turbulent magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Huirong

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) transport and acceleration is determined by the properties of magnetic turbulence. Recent advances in MHD turbulence call for revisions in the paradigm of cosmic ray transport. We use the models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that were tested in numerical simulation, in which turbulence is injected at large scale and cascades to to small scales. We shall address the issue of the transport of CRs, both parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. We shall demonstrate compressible fast modes are dominant cosmic ray scatterer from both quasilinear and nonlinear theories. We shall also show that the self-generated wave growth by CRs are constrained by preexisting turbulence and discuss the process in detail in the context of shock acceleration at supernova remnants and their implications. In addition, we shall dwell on the nonlinear growth of kinetic gyroresonance instability of cosmic rays induced by large scale compressible turbulence. This gyroresonance of cosmic rays on turbulence is d...

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic experiments on cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    It is widely known that cosmic magnetic fields, including the fields of planets, stars, and galaxies, are produced by the hydromagnetic dynamo effect in moving electrically conducting fluids. It is less well known that cosmic magnetic fields play also an active role in cosmic structure formation by enabling outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Considerable theoretical and computational progress has been made in understanding both processes. In addition to this, the last ten years have seen tremendous efforts in studying both effects in liquid metal experiments. In 1999, magnetic field self-excitation was observed in the large scale liquid sodium facilities in Riga and Karlsruhe. Recently, self-excitation was also obtained in the French "von Karman sodium" (VKS) experiment. An MRI-like mode was found on the background of a turbulent spherical Couette flow at the University of Maryland. Evidence for MRI as the first instability of an hydrodynamica...

  5. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, R. K.; Sloth, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields. DOI...

  6. A Holographic Bound on Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields large enough to be observable are ubiquitous in astrophysics, even at extremely large length scales. This has led to the suggestion that such fields are seeded at very early (inflationary) times, and subsequently amplified by various processes involving, for example, dynamo effects. Many such mechanisms give rise to extremely large magnetic fields at the end of inflationary reheating, and therefore also during the quark-gluon plasma epoch of the early universe. Such plasmas have a well-known holographic description. We show that holography imposes an upper bound on the intensity of magnetic fields (scaled by the squared temperature) in these circumstances, and that the values expected in some models of cosmic magnetism come close to attaining that bound.

  7. Cosmic Magnetic Fields: Observations and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation at radio frequencies of 0.2-10 GHz are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields. The observational results are reviewed for spiral, barred and flocculent galaxies, the Milky Way, halos and relics of galaxy clusters, and for the intergalactic medium. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields and will help to understand their origin. At low frequencies, LOFAR (10-250 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), as observed with the EVLA, ASKAP, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of nearby galaxies in unprecedented detail. Surveys of Faraday rotation measures of pulsars will map the Milky Way's magnetic field with high precision. All-sky sur...

  8. A holographic bound on cosmic magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fields large enough to be observable are ubiquitous in astrophysics, even at extremely large length scales. This has led to the suggestion that such fields are seeded at very early (inflationary times, and subsequently amplified by various processes involving, for example, dynamo effects. Many such mechanisms give rise to extremely large magnetic fields at the end of inflationary reheating, and therefore also during the quark–gluon plasma epoch of the early universe. Such plasmas have a well-known holographic description in terms of a thermal asymptotically AdS black hole. We show that holography imposes an upper bound on the intensity of magnetic fields (≈3.6×1018gauss at the hadronization temperature in these circumstances; this is above, but not far above, the values expected in some models of cosmic magnetogenesis.

  9. Generation of Cosmic Magnetic Fields at Recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, C J

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the standard cosmological model predicts ab initio generation of large-scale cosmic magnetic fields at the epoch of recombination of the primeval plasma. Matter velocities dominated by coherent flows on a scale $L\\approx 50h^{-1}(1+z)^{-1}$ Mpc lead to a dipole of radiation flux in the frame of the moving matter. Thomson scattering of the radiation differentially accelerates the electrons and ions, creating large-scale coherent electric currents and magnetic fields. This process is analyzed using magnetohydrodynamic equations which include a modification of Ohm's law describing the effect of Thomson drag on the electrons. The field strength saturates near equipartition with the baryon kinetic energy density at $B\\simeq 5\\times 10^{-5}$G. Magnetic stresses significantly damp baryonic motions at the epoch of last scattering, reducing the predicted background radiation anisotropy at small angles and changing estimates of fitted cosmological parameters. The field at late times retains its large-s...

  10. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2008-04-01

    We review the extensive and controversial literature concerning how the cosmic magnetic fields pervading nearly all galaxies and clusters of galaxies actually got started. Some observational evidence supports a hypothesis that the field is already moderately strong at the beginning of the life of a galaxy and its disc. One argument involves the chemical abundance of the light elements Be and B, while a second one is based on the detection of strong magnetic fields in very young high red shift galaxies. Since this problem of initial amplification of cosmic magnetic fields involves important plasma problems it is obvious that one must know the plasma in which the amplification occurs. Most of this review is devoted to this basic problem and for this it is necessary to devote ourselves to reviewing studies that take place in environments in which the plasma properties are most clearly understood. For this reason the authors have chosen to restrict themselves almost completely to studies of dynamos in our Galaxy. It is true that one can get a much better idea of the grand scope of galactic fields in extragalactic systems. However, most mature galaxies share the same dilemma as ours of overcoming important plasma problems. Since the authors are both trained in plasma physics we may be biased in pursuing this approach, but we feel it is justified by the above argument. In addition we feel we can produce a better review by staying close to that which we know best. In addition we have chosen not to consider the saturation problem of the galactic magnetic field since if the original dynamo amplification fails the saturation question does not arise. It is generally accepted that seed fields, whose strength is of order 10-20 G, easily spring up in the era preceding galaxy formation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to amplify these seed magnetic fields to a coherent structure with the microgauss strengths of the currently observed galactic magnetic fields. The standard

  11. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  12. Cosmic magnetic fields from velocity perturbations in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Betschart, G; Marklund, M; Betschart, Gerold; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Marklund, Mattias

    2004-01-01

    We show, using a covariant and gauge-invariant charged multifluid perturbation scheme, that velocity perturbations of the matter-dominated dust Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model can lead to the generation of cosmic magnetic fields. Moreover, using cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints, it is argued that these fields can reach strengths of between 10^{-28} and 10^{-29} G at the time the dynamo mechanism sets in, making them plausible seed field candidates.

  13. Cosmic Ray Small Scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Xu, S; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments. However, a comprehensive and satisfactory explanation has been elusive for over a decade now. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays on Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium and small angular scale structure could be an effect of non diffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation of the observed small scale anisotropy observed at TeV energy scale, may come from the effect of particle scattering in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-$\\beta$ compressible mag...

  14. First measurements of cosmic muons with magnetic field in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biallass, P; Hebbeker, T; Hoepfner, K [Physics Institute IIIA, RWTH Aachen, Physikzentrum, 52056 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: biallass@cern.ch

    2008-05-15

    The reconstruction of cosmic muons is important for testing and aligning the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS). In this context the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) with its comprehensive cosmic data taking periods including the presence of the 4 Tesla magnetic field has been like a dress rehearsal of detector hardware and software for the upcoming startup of the CMS detector. In addition to data taking also the comparison with simulated events is a crucial part of physics analyses. With respect to these tasks a dedicated cosmic muon generator, CMSCGEN, has been developed and compared with data from MTCC. As an example results from a reconstruction study using the barrel muon system are shown, comparing data and Monte Carlo prediction at the level of single chambers up to reconstructed tracks including momentum measurements.

  15. Extragalactic Cosmic Rays and Magnetic Fields: Facts and Fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Ensslin, T A

    2005-01-01

    A critical discussion of our knowledge about extragalactic cosmic rays and magnetic fields is attempted. What do we know for sure? What are our prejudices? How do we confront our models with the observations? How can we assess the uncertainties in our modeling and in our observations? Unfortunately, perfect answers to these questions can not be given. Instead, I describe efforts I am involved in to gain reliable information about relativistic particles and magnetic fields in extragalactic space.

  16. Milestones in the Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic fields are observed everywhere in the universe. In this review,we concentrate on the observational aspects of the magnetic fields of Galactic and extragalactic objects. Readers can follow the milestones in the observations of cosmic magnetic fields obtained from the most important tracers of magnetic fields,namely, the star-light polarization, the Zeeman effect, the rotation measures (RMs,hereafter) of extragalactic radio sources, the pulsar RMs, radio polarization observations, as well as the newly implemented sub-mm and mm polarization capabilities.The magnetic field of the Galaxy was first discovered in 1949 by optical polarization observations. The local magnetic fields within one or two kpc have been well delineated by starlight polarization data. The polarization observations of diffuse Galactic radio background emission in 1962 confirmed unequivocally the existence of a Galactic magnetic field. The bulk of the present information about the magnetic fields in the Galaxy comes from analysis of rotation measures of extragalactic radio sources and pulsars, which can be used to construct the 3-D magnetic field structure in the Galactic halo and Galactic disk. Radio synchrotron spurs in the Galactic center show a poloidal field, and the polarization mapping of dust emission and Zeeman observation in the central molecular zone reveal a toroidal magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. For nearby galaxies, both optical polarization and multifrequency radio polarization data clearly show the large-scale magnetic field following the spiral arms or dust lanes. For more distant objects, radio polarization is the only approach available to show the magnetic fields in the jets or lobes of radio galaxies or quasars. Clusters of galaxies also contain widely distributed magnetic fields, which are reflected by radio halos or the RM distribution of background objects. The intergalactic space could have been magnetized by outflows or galactic superwinds even in

  17. POLARBEAR constraints on cosmic birefringence and primordial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Peter A. R.; Arnold, Kam; Atlas, Matt; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Boettger, David; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Dobbs, Matt; Ducout, Anne; Dunner, Rolando; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Feng, Chang; Gilbert, Adam; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Halverson, Nils W.; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Holzapfel, William L.; Hori, Yasuto; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaehnig, Gregory C.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kaufman, Jonathan P.; Keating, Brian; Kermish, Zigmund; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Le Jeune, Maude; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Leon, David; Li, Yun; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Matsumura, Tomotake; Miller, Nathan; Montgomery, Josh; Myers, Michael J.; Navaroli, Martin; Nishino, Haruki; Okamura, Takahiro; Paar, Hans; Peloton, Julien; Pogosian, Levon; Poletti, Davide; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Christopher; Rebeiz, Gabriel; Reichardt, Christian L.; Richards, Paul L.; Ross, Colin; Rotermund, Kaja M.; Schenck, David E.; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shimon, Meir; Shirley, Ian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smecher, Graeme; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Suzuki, Aritoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Tikhomirov, Alexei; Tomaru, Takayuki; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wilson, Brandon; Yadav, Amit; Zahn, Alex; Zahn, Oliver; Polarbear Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity E -mode and odd-parity B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARization of the Background Radiation (POLARBEAR) experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity-violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. The POLARBEAR nondetection translates into a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit of 93 nanogauss (nG) on the amplitude of an equivalent primordial magnetic field inclusive of systematic uncertainties. This four-point correlation constraint on Faraday rotation is about 15 times tighter than the upper limit of 1380 nG inferred from constraining the contribution of Faraday rotation to two-point correlations of B -modes measured by Planck in 2015. Metric perturbations sourced by primordial magnetic fields would also contribute to the B -mode power spectrum. Using the POLARBEAR measurements of the B -mode power spectrum (two-point correlation), we set a 95% C.L. upper limit of 3.9 nG on primordial magnetic fields assuming a flat prior on the field amplitude. This limit is comparable to what was found in the Planck 2015 two-point correlation analysis with both temperature and polarization. We perform a set of systematic error tests and find no evidence for contamination. This work marks the first time that anisotropic cosmic birefringence or primordial magnetic fields have been constrained from the ground at subdegree scales.

  18. POLARBEAR Constraints on Cosmic Birefringence and Primordial Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, Peter A R; Atlas, Matt; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Boettger, David; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Dobbs, Matt; Ducout, Anne; Dunner, Rolando; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Feng, Chang; Gilbert, Adam; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Halverson, Nils W; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Holzapfel, William L; Hori, Yasuto; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaehnig, Gregory C; Jaffe, Andrew H; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kaufman, Jonathan P; Keating, Brian; Kermish, Zigmund; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Jeune, Maude Le; Lee, Adrian T; Leitch, Erik M; Leon, David; Li, Yun; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Matsumura, Tomotake; Miller, Nathan; Montgomery, Josh; Myers, Michael J; Navaroli, Martin; Nishino, Haruki; Okamura, Takahiro; Paar, Hans; Peloton, Julien; Pogosian, Levon; Poletti, Davide; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Christopher; Rebeiz, Gabriel; Reichardt, Christian L; Richards, Paul L; Ross, Colin; Rotermund, Kaja M; Schenck, David E; Sherwin, Blake D; Shimon, Meir; Shirley, Ian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smecher, Graeme; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Suzuki, Aritoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Tikhomirov, Alexei; Tomaru, Takayuki; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wilson, Brandon; Yadav, Amit; Zahn, Alex; Zahn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity $E$-mode and odd-parity $B$-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARBEAR experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. The POLARBEAR non-detection translates into a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit of 93 nano-Gauss (nG) on the amplitude of an equivalent primordial magnetic field inclusive of systematic uncertainties. This four-point correlation constraint on Faraday rotation is about 15 times tighter than the upper limit of 1380 nG inferred from constraining the contribution of Faraday rotation to two-point correlations of $B$-modes measured by Planck in 2015. Metric perturbations sourced by pri...

  19. Transport of Cosmic Rays in Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, F; Pelletier, G; Casse, Fabien; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The transport of charged particles in disorganised magnetic fields is an important issue which concerns the propagation of cosmic rays of all energies in a variety of astrophysical environments, such as the interplanetary, interstellar and even extra-galactic media, as well as the efficiency of Fermi acceleration processes. We have performed detailed numerical experiments using Monte-Carlo simulations of particle propagation in stochastic magnetic fields in order to measure the parallel and transverse spatial diffusion coefficients and the pitch angle scattering time as a function of rigidity and strength of the turbulent magnetic component. We confirm the extrapolation to high turbulence levels of the scaling predicted by the quasi-linear approximation for the scattering frequency and parallel diffusion coefficient at low rigidity. We show that the widely used Bohm diffusion coefficient does not provide a satisfactory approximation to diffusion even in the extreme case where the mean field vanishes. We find ...

  20. Novel computational approaches for the analysis of cosmic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saveliev, Andrey [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Keldysh Institut, Moskau (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    In order to give a consistent picture of cosmic, i.e. galactic and extragalactic, magnetic fields, different approaches are possible and often even necessary. Here we present three of them: First, a semianalytic analysis of the time evolution of primordial magnetic fields from which their properties and, subsequently, the nature of present-day intergalactic magnetic fields may be deduced. Second, the use of high-performance computing infrastructure by developing powerful algorithms for (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations and applying them to astrophysical problems. We are currently developing a code which applies kinetic schemes in massive parallel computing on high performance multiprocessor systems in a new way to calculate both hydro- and electrodynamic quantities. Finally, as a third approach, astroparticle physics might be used as magnetic fields leave imprints of their properties on charged particles transversing them. Here we focus on electromagnetic cascades by developing a software based on CRPropa which simulates the propagation of particles from such cascades through the intergalactic medium in three dimensions. This may in particular be used to obtain information about the helicity of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  1. Study on the Contribution of the Galactic Cosmic Rays to the Galactic Halo Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo

    2011-01-01

    Based on the measured cosmic ray anisotropy, a model was built to calculate the Galactic cosmic ray's contribution to the large scale Galactic magnetic field. The general agreement in the large scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field between the calculation and the observations is obtained. This result shows that the model is in the right approach in understanding the cosmic ray's contribution to the Galactic magnetic field, and in the mean while, it indicates that the observed anisotropy of cosmic rays on the earth is not just a local behavior in solar vicinity but represents a microcosm of the global anisotropy of the Galactic cosmic rays.

  2. Zero modes on cosmic strings in an external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer, F; Starkman, G D; Vachaspati, T; Ferrer, Francesc; Mathur, Harsh; Starkman, Glenn D.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2006-01-01

    A classical analysis suggests that an external magnetic field can cause trajectories of charge carriers on a superconducting domain wall or cosmic string to bend, thus expelling charge carriers with energy above the mass threshold into the bulk. We study this process by solving the Dirac equation for a fermion of mass $m_f$ and charge $e$, in the background of a domain wall and a magnetic field of strength $B$. We find that the modes of the charge carriers get shifted into the bulk, in agreement with classical expectations. However the dispersion relation for the zero modes changes dramatically -- instead of the usual linear dispersion relation, $\\omega_k =k$, the new dispersion relation is well fit by $\\omega \\approx m_f tanh(k/k_*)$ where $k_*=m_f$ for a thin wall in the weak field limit, and $k_*=eBw$ for a thick wall of width $w$. This result shows that the energy of the charge carriers on the domain wall remains below the threshold for expulsion even in the presence of an external magnetic field. If char...

  3. Magnetic fields and cosmic rays in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the observed correlation between the radio luminosity and the X-ray luminosity in radio emitting galaxy clusters implies that the radio emission is due to secondary electrons that are produced by p-p interactions and lose their energy by emitting synchrotron radiation in a strong magnetic field, B>(8\\pi a T_{CMB}^4)^{1/2}\\simeq 3\\muG. We construct a simple model that naturally explains the correlation, and show that the observations provide stringent constraints on cluster magnetic fields and cosmic rays (CRs): Within the cores of clusters, the ratio beta_{core} between the CR energy (per logarithmic particle energy interval) and the thermal energy is beta_{core}\\sim 10^{-4}; The source of these CRs is most likely the cluster accretion shock, which is inferred to deposit in CRs ~ a few percent of the thermal energy it generates; The diffusion time of 100 GeV CRs over scales \\gtrsim100 kpc is not short compared to the Hubble time; Cluster magnetic fields are enhanced by mergers to \\gtrsim 1 % of ...

  4. Nonlinear evolution of cosmic magnetic fields and cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Banerjee, Robi

    2006-01-01

    In this work we investigate the effects of primordial magnetic fields on cosmic microwave background anisotropies (CMB). Based on cosmological magneto-hydro dynamic (MHD) simulations [R. Banerjee and K. Jedamzik, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 70, 123003 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.70.123003] we calculate the CMB anisotropy spectra and polarization induced by fluid fluctuations (Alfvén modes) generated by primordial magnetic fields. The strongest effect on the CMB spectra comes from the transition epoch from a turbulent regime to a viscous regime. The balance between magnetic and kinetic energy until the onset of the viscous regime provides a one to one relation between the comoving coherence length L and the comoving magnetic field strength B, such as L˜30(B/10-9Gauss)3pc. The resulting CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies for the initial power law index of the magnetic fields n>3/2 are somewhat different from the ones previously obtained by using linear perturbation theory. In particular, differences can appear on intermediate scales l20000. On scales l0.7Mpc for the most extreme case, or B0.8Mpc for the most conservative case. We may also expect higher signals on large scales of the polarization spectra compared to linear calculations. The signal may even exceed the B-mode polarization from gravitational lensing depending on the strength of the primordial magnetic fields. On very small scales, the diffusion damping scale of nonlinear calculations turns out to be much smaller than the one of linear calculations if the comoving magnetic field strength B>16nGauss. If the magnetic field strength is smaller, the diffusion scales become smaller too. Therefore we expect to have both, temperature and polarization anisotropies, even beyond l>10000 regardless of the strength of the magnetic fields. The peak values of the temperature anisotropy and the B-mode polarization spectra are approximately 40μK and a few μK, respectively.

  5. From the Gyration of Electrons to Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Employing Bohr's quantum theory, the author deduces three limits, which correspond to the magnetic fields of white dwarfs, neutron stars and the strongest in the universe. The author discusses the possible origins of magnetic fields due to collapse of stars, which produces a magnetic field of 10[superscript 8] T. Although the complete analysis…

  6. Electron Heating, Magnetic Field Amplification, and Cosmic Ray Precursor Length at Supernova Remnant Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin; Ghavamian, Parviz; Rakowski, Cara

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the observability, by direct and indirect means, of a shock precursor arising from magnetic field amplification by cosmic rays. We estimate the depth of such a precursor under conditions of nonresonant amplification, which can provide magnetic field strengths comparable to those inferred for supernova remnants. Magnetic field generation occurs as the streaming cosmic rays induce a plasma return current, and may be quenched either by nonresonant or resonant channels. In the case of nonresonant saturation, the cosmic rays become magnetized and amplification saturates at higher magnetic fields. The precursor can extend out to $10^{17} - 10^{18}$ cm and is potentially detectable. If resonant saturation occurs, the cosmic rays are scattered by turbulence and the precursor length will likely be much smaller. The dependence of precursor length on shock velocity has implications for electron heating. In the case of resonant saturation, this dependence is similar to that in the more familiar resonantly ...

  7. X-Ray Emission from Star-Forming Galaxies - Signatures of Cosmic Rays and Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies is still an open problem in astrophysics. In nearby galaxies the far-infrared-radio correlation indicates the coupling between magnetic fields and star formation. The correlation arises from the synchrotron emission of cosmic ray electrons traveling through the interstellar magnetic fields. However, with an increase of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), inverse Compton scattering becomes the dominant energy loss mechanism of cosmic ray electrons with a typical emission frequency in the X-ray regime. The ISRF depends on the one hand on the star formation rate and becomes stronger in starburst galaxies, and on the other hand increases with redshift due to the evolution of the cosmic microwave background. With a model for the star formation rate of galaxies, the ISRF, and the cosmic ray spectrum, we can calculate the expected X-ray luminosity resulting from the inverse Compton emission. Except for galaxies with an active galactic nucleus the main additional cont...

  8. The large-scale properties of simulated cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Marinacci, Federico; Mocz, Philip; Pakmor, Ruediger

    2015-01-01

    We perform uniformly sampled large-scale cosmological simulations including magnetic fields with the moving mesh code AREPO. We run two sets of MHD simulations: one including adiabatic gas physics only; the other featuring the fiducial feedback model of the Illustris simulation. In the adiabatic case, the magnetic field amplification follows the $B \\propto \\rho^{2/3}$ scaling derived from `flux-freezing' arguments, with the seed field strength providing an overall normalisation factor. At high baryon overdensities the amplification is enhanced by shear flows and turbulence. Feedback physics and the inclusion of radiative cooling change this picture dramatically. Gas collapses to much larger densities and the magnetic field is amplified strongly, reaching saturation and losing memory of the initial seed field. At lower densities a dependence on the seed field strength and orientation, which in principle can be used to constrain models of cosmological magnetogenesis, is still present. Inside the most massive ha...

  9. Cosmic-Ray Small-scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barquero, V.; Farber, R.; Xu, S.; Desiati, P.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic-ray anisotropy has been observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments over the past decade. However, no comprehensive or satisfactory explanation has been put forth to date. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays at Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium- and small-scale angular structure could be an effect of nondiffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation for the observed small-scale anisotropy observed at the TeV energy scale may be the effect of particle propagation in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-β compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to study how the cosmic rays’ arrival direction distribution is perturbed when they stream along the local turbulent magnetic field. We utilize Liouville’s theorem for obtaining the anisotropy at Earth and provide the theoretical framework for the application of the theorem in the specific case of cosmic-ray arrival distribution. In this work, we discuss the effects on the anisotropy arising from propagation in this inhomogeneous and turbulent interstellar magnetic field.

  10. Cosmic-ray diffusion in a sectored magnetic field in the distant heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Florinski, V; Kota, J; Guo, X; 10.1088/0004-637X/754/1/31

    2013-01-01

    Very high intensities of galactic cosmic rays measured by Voyager 1 in the heliosheath appear to be incompatible with the presence of a modulation "wall" near the heliopause produced by a pile up of the heliospheric magnetic field. We propose that the modulation wall is a structure permeable to cosmic rays as a result of a sectored magnetic field topology compressed by plasma slowdown on approach to the heliopause and stretched to high latitudes by latitudinal flows in the heliosheath. The tightly folded warped current sheet permits efficient cosmic-ray transport in the radial direction via a drift-like mechanism. We show that when stochastic variations in the sector widths are taken into account, particle transport becomes predominantly diffusive both along and across the magnetic sectors. Using a test-particle model for cosmic rays in the heliosheath we investigate the dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the properties of the sector structure and on particle energy.

  11. COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN A SECTORED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE DISTANT HELIOSHEATH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florinski, V. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Alouani-Bibi, F.; Guo, X. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Kota, J. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Very high intensities of galactic cosmic rays measured by Voyager 1 in the heliosheath appear to be incompatible with the presence of a modulation 'wall' near the heliopause produced by a pile up of the heliospheric magnetic field. We propose that the modulation wall is a structure permeable to cosmic rays as a result of a sectored magnetic field topology compressed by plasma slowdown on approach to the heliopause and stretched to high latitudes by latitudinal flows in the heliosheath. The tightly folded warped current sheet permits efficient cosmic-ray transport in the radial direction via a drift-like mechanism. We show that when stochastic variations in the sector widths are taken into account, particle transport becomes predominantly diffusive both along and across the magnetic sectors. Using a test-particle model for cosmic rays in the heliosheath we investigate the dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the properties of the sector structure and on particle energy.

  12. Viscosity and inertia in cosmic-ray transport - Effects of an average magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. L.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A generalized transport equation is introduced which describes the transport and propagation of cosmic rays in a magnetized, collisionless medium. The equation is valid if the cosmic-ray distribution function is nearly isotropic in momentum, if the ratio of fluid speed to fluid-flow particle speed is small, and if the ratio of collision time to time for change in the macroscopic flow is small. Five independent cosmic-ray viscosity coefficients are found, and the ralationship of this viscosity to particle orbits in a magnetic field is presented.

  13. X-ray emission from star-forming galaxies - signatures of cosmic rays and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies is still an open problem in astrophysics. In nearby galaxies the far-infrared-radio correlation indicates the coupling between magnetic fields and star formation. The correlation arises from the synchrotron emission of cosmic ray electrons travelling through the interstellar magnetic fields. However, with an increase of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), inverse Compton scattering becomes the dominant energy loss mechanism of cosmic ray electrons with a typical emission frequency in the X-ray regime. The ISRF depends on the one hand on the star formation rate and becomes stronger in starburst galaxies, and on the other hand increases with redshift due to the higher temperature of the cosmic microwave background. With a model for the star formation rate of galaxies, the ISRF, and the cosmic ray spectrum, we can calculate the expected X-ray luminosity resulting from the inverse Compton emission. Except for galaxies with an active galactic nucleus the main additional contribution to the X-ray luminosity comes from X-ray binaries. We estimate this contribution with an analytical model as well as with an observational relation, and compare it to the pure inverse Compton luminosity. Using data from the Chandra Deep Field Survey and far-infrared observations from Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we then determine upper limits for the cosmic ray energy. Assuming that the magnetic energy in a galaxy is in equipartition with the energy density of the cosmic rays, we obtain upper limits for the magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that the mean magnetic energy of young galaxies is similar to the one in local galaxies. This points towards an early generation of galactic magnetic fields, which is in agreement with current dynamo evolution models.

  14. Features of the galactic magnetic field regarding deflections of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Marcus; Erdmann, Martin; Mueller, Gero; Urban, Martin [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Most recent models of the galactic magnetic field have been derived from Faraday rotation measurements and imply strong deflections even for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We investigate the characteristics of the different field parametrizations and point out similarities and interesting features. Among them are extragalactic regions which are invisible for an Earth bound observation and the transition from diffuse to ballistic behaviour in the 1 EeV energy regime. Applying this knowledge to a directional analysis, there are indications for deflection patterns by the galactic magnetic field in cosmic ray arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in extragalactic magnetic fields: a view from cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackstein, S.; Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Sigl, G.; Dundovic, A.

    2016-11-01

    We use the CRPROPA code to simulate the propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (with energy ≥1018eV and pure proton composition) through extragalactic magnetic fields that have been simulated with the cosmological ENZO code. We test both primordial and astrophysical magnetogenesis scenarios in order to investigate the impact of different magnetic field strengths in clusters, filaments and voids on the deflection of cosmic rays propagating across cosmological distances. We also study the effect of different source distributions of cosmic rays around simulated Milky Way-like observers. Our analysis shows that the arrival spectra and anisotropy of events are rather insensitive to the distribution of extragalactic magnetic fields, while they are more affected by the clustering of sources within an ˜50 Mpc distance to observers. Finally, we find that in order to reproduce the observed degree of isotropy of cosmic rays at ˜EeV energies, the average magnetic fields in cosmic voids must be ˜ 0.1 nG, providing limits on the strength of primordial seed fields.

  16. Propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in Extragalactic Magnetic Fields: A view from cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hackstein, Stefan; Brueggen, Marcus; Sigl, Guenter; Dundovic, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    We use the CRPropa code to simulate the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (with energy $\\geq 10^{18} \\rm eV$ and pure proton composition) through extragalactic magnetic fields that have been simulated with the cosmological ENZO code.We test both primordial and astrophysical magnetogenesis scenarios in order to investigate the impact of different magnetic field strengths in clusters, filaments and voids on the deflection of cosmic rays propagating across cosmological distances. We also study the effect of different source distributions of cosmic rays around simulated Milky-Way like observers. Our analysis shows that the arrival spectra and anisotropy of events are rather insensitive to the distribution of extragalactic magnetic fields, while they are more affected by the clustering of sources within a $\\sim 50$ Mpc distance to observers. Finally, we find that in order to reproduce the observed degree of isotropy of cosmic rays at $\\sim $ EeV energies, the average magnetic fields in cosmic voids must...

  17. Primordial magnetic field from non-inflationary cosmic expansion in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Satoshi; Shiromizu, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    The origin of large-scale magnetic field in the universe is one of the greatest mysteries in modern cosmology. We present a new mechanism for generation of large-scale magnetic field, based on the power-counting renormalizable theory of gravitation recently proposed by Horava. Contrary to the usual case in general relativity, the U(1) gauge symmetry of a Maxwell action in this theory permits terms breaking conformal invariance in the ultraviolet. Moreover, for high frequency modes, the anisotropic scaling intrinsic to the theory inevitably makes the sound horizon far outside the Hubble horizon. Consequently, non-inflationary cosmic expansion in the early universe naturally generates super-horizon quantum fluctuations of the magnetic field. Specializing our consideration to the case with the dynamical critical exponent $z=3$, we show an explicit set of parameters for which (i) the amplitude of generated magnetic field is large enough as a seed for the dynamo mechanism; (ii) backreaction to the cosmic expansion...

  18. Small-scale primordial magnetic fields and anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedamzik, Karsten [Laboratoire de Univers et Particules, UMR5299-CNRS, Université de Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Abel, Tom, E-mail: karsten.jedamzik@um2.fr, E-mail: tabel@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC/Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    It is shown that small-scale magnetic fields present before recombination induce baryonic density inhomogeneities of appreciable magnitude. The presence of such inhomogeneities changes the ionization history of the Universe, which in turn decreases the angular scale of the Doppler peaks and increases Silk damping by photon diffusion. This unique signature could be used to (dis)prove the existence of primordial magnetic fields of strength as small as B ≅ 10{sup −11} Gauss by cosmic microwave background observations.

  19. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary-Magnetic-Field Polar Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Bobik, P; Boschini, M J; Consolandi, C; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Kudela, K; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Tacconi, M

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2-D (radius and colatitude) Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0), was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1\\,AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton...

  20. Probing Solar Magnetic Field with the "Cosmic-Ray Shadow" of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Chen, T L; Chen, W Y; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; Hakamada, K; He, H H; He, Z T; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H J; Li, W J; Liu, C; Liu, J S; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ozawa, S; Qian, X L; Qu, X B; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shao, J; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, H; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yang, Z; Yasue, S; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhai, L M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2013-01-01

    We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun's shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun's shadow, using the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model and the Current Sheet Source Surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun's shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun's shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun's shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux.

  1. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  2. Cosmic magnetic fields and dark energy in extended electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran Jimenez, Jose; Maroto, Antonio L, E-mail: Jose.Beltran@unige.ch, E-mail: maroto@fis.ucm.es [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    We discuss an extended version of electromagnetism in which the usual gauge fixing term is promoted into a physical contribution that introduces a new scalar state in the theory. This new state can be generated from vacuum quantum fluctuations during an inflationary era and, on super-Hubble scales, gives rise to an effective cosmological constant. The value of such a cosmological constant coincides with the one inferred from observations as long as inflation took place at the electroweak scale. On the other hand, the new state also generates an effective electric charge density on sub-Hubble scales that produces both vorticity and magnetic fields with coherent lengths as large as the present Hubble horizon.

  3. Effects of magnetic fields on the cosmic-ray ionization of molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy cosmic rays are the dominant source of ionization for molecular cloud cores. The ionization fraction, in turn, controls the coupling of the magnetic field to the gas and hence the dynamical evolution of the cores. The purpose of this work is to compute the attenuation of the cosmic-ray flux rate in a cloud core taking into account magnetic focusing, magnetic mirroring, and all relevant energy loss processes. We adopt a standard cloud model characterized by a mass-to-flux ratio supercritical by a factor of about 2 to describe the density and magnetic field distribution of a low-mass starless core, and we follow the propagation of cosmic rays through the core along flux tubes enclosing different amount of mass. We then extend our analysis to cores with different mass-to-flux ratios. We find that mirroring always dominates over focusing, implying a reduction of the cosmic-ray ionization rate by a factor of about 2-3 over most of a solar-mass core with respect to the value in the intercloud medium outs...

  4. Cosmic radiation and magnetic fields: Exposure assessment and health outcomes among airline flight crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Joyce Shealy

    Airline flight crews are chronically exposed to cosmic radiation and to magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical system. Potential disease risks have been identified in health studies among commercial flight crews outside of the United States and among military pilots within the United States. The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify exposure to both cosmic radiation and magnetic fields onboard aircraft, (2) to develop a methodology for estimating career cosmic radiation doses to individual crew members, and (3) to compare mortality among United States commercial pilots and navigators with that of all occupational groups. Cosmic radiation equivalent doses to bone marrow and skeletal tissue were calculated on a flight-by-flight basis. Flight-by-flight calculations were used to develop an estimation methodology for cumulative (career) cosmic radiation doses. Magnetic fields were measured directly onboard aircraft during flight. Health outcomes among United States commercial pilots and navigators were investigated using proportional mortality ratios, proportional cancer mortality ratios, and mortality odds ratios. Based on the sample used in this study, the cosmic radiation equivalent dose to bone marrow and skeletal tissue associated with air travel ranges from 30 to 570 microsieverts per 100 flight hours (not including ground time) depending on altitude, latitude, phase of solar cycle, and flight duration. Magnetic field exposure appears to be characterized by frequencies between 100 and 800 hertz and varies in strength depending on stages of flight, location within the aircraft, and aircraft type. Based on limited measurements, maximum field strengths may increase from 0.6 microtesla in economy class to 1.2 microtesla in first class, suggesting that cockpit exposures may be higher. Potential synergistic effects of cosmic radiation and magnetic fields may be associated with certain cancers found in excess among flight crews, in particular

  5. A new probe of the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    Establishing the properties of magnetic fields on scales larger than galaxy clusters is critical for resolving the unknown origin and evolution of galactic and cluster magnetism. More generally, observations of magnetic fields on cosmic scales are needed for assessing the impacts of magnetism on cosmology, particle physics, and structure formation over the full history of the Universe. However, firm observational evidence for magnetic fields in large scale structure remains elusive. In an effort to address this problem, we have developed a novel statistical method to infer the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments using observation of the two-point correlation of Faraday rotation measures from a dense grid of extragalactic radio sources. Here we describe our approach, which embeds and extends the pioneering work of Kolatt (1998) within the context of Information Field Theory (a statistical theory for Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals; Enfllin et al., 2009). We describe prospects for observation, for example with forthcoming data from the ultra-deep JVLA CHILES Con Pol survey and future surveys with the SKA.

  6. Future Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields with LOFAR, SKA and Its Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission from the Milky Way, galaxies and galaxy clusters, observed with the new Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA), traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons and allows us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in halos and relics of clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the SKA and its precursors Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the South African MeerKAT telescopes, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies and in cluster relics in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP (project POSSUM) and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields in intervening galaxies, clusters and intergalactic filaments, and will be used to model the overall structure and strength of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Cosmic magnetism is "key science" for LOFAR, ASKAP and the SKA.

  7. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E., E-mail: harari@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: roulet@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  8. Slow decay of cosmic magnetic fields superadiabatically in curvature-torsion scales

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Recently Barrow, and Tsagas [Phys Rev D 77: 107302, (2008)] have shown that slow decay of cosmological magnetic slowly decay in FRW universes on curvature scales as $B\\sim{a^{-1}}$ in the context of general relativity (GR). This helps possible amplification of cosmic magnetic fields. In this paper starting from dynamo equations in spacetimes with torsion we obtain also slow decay of magnetic fields naturally on curvature-torsion scales of Riemann-Cartan spacetime on a de Sitter universe. In this case the constant of proportionality between the magnetic field and the curvature scale is the torsion in the present universe. Thus the B-field becomes $B\\sim{\\frac{{\\eta}}{H_{0}}Ta^{-1}}$ where T is torsion vector modulus, $H_{0}$ is the Hubble constant and $\\eta$ is the diffusive scale.

  9. The role of cosmic rays on magnetic field diffusion and the formation of protostellar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco; Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Joos, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The formation of protostellar discs is severely hampered by magnetic braking, as long as magnetic fields remain frozen in the gas. The latter condition depends on the levels of ionisation that characterise the innermost regions of a collapsing cloud. The chemistry of dense cloud cores and, in particular, the ionisation fraction is largely controlled by cosmic rays. The aim of this paper is to evaluate whether the attenuation of the flux of cosmic rays expected in the regions around a forming protostar is sufficient to decouple the field from the gas, thereby influencing the formation of centrifugally supported disc. We adopted the method developed in a former study to compute the attenuation of the cosmic-ray flux as a function of the column density and the field strength in clouds threaded by poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields. We applied this formalism to models of low- and high-mass star formation extracted from numerical simulations of gravitational collapse that include rotation and turbulence. For ea...

  10. Turbulent magnetic field amplification driven by cosmic-ray pressure gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Drury, Luke O'C

    2012-01-01

    Observations of non-thermal emission from several supernova remnants suggest that magnetic fields close to the blastwave are much stronger than would be naively expected from simple shock compression of the field permeating the interstellar medium (ISM). We present a simple model which is capable of achieving sufficient magnetic field amplification to explain the observations. We propose that the cosmic-ray pressure gradient acting on the inhomogeneous ISM upstream of the supernova blastwave induces strong turbulence upstream of the supernova blastwave. The turbulence is generated through the differential acceleration of the upstream ISM which occurs as a result of density inhomogeneities in the ISM. This turbulence then amplifies the pre-existing magnetic field. Numerical simulations are presented which demonstrate that amplification factors of 20 or more are easily achievable by this mechanism when reasonable parameters for the ISM and supernova blastwave are assumed. The length scale over which this amplif...

  11. Dynamical effects of self-generated magnetic fields in cosmic ray modified shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Caprioli, Damiano; Amato, Elena; Vietri, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations of greatly amplified magnetic fields ($\\delta B/B\\sim 100$) around supernova shocks are consistent with the predictions of the non-linear theory of particle acceleration (NLT), if the field is generated upstream of the shock by cosmic ray induced streaming instability. The high acceleration efficiencies and large shock modifications predicted by NLT need however to be mitigated to confront observations, and this is usually assumed to be accomplished by some form of turbulent heating. We show here that magnetic fields with the strength inferred from observations have an important dynamical role on the shock, and imply a shock modification substantially reduced with respect to the naive unmagnetized case. The effect appears as soon as the pressure in the turbulent magnetic field becomes comparable with the pressure of the thermal gas. The relative importance of this unavoidable effect and of the poorly known turbulent heating is assessed. More specifically we conclude that even in the cases ...

  12. On the angular distribution of cosmic rays from an individual source in a turbulent magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Harari, Diego; Roulet, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the angular distribution of the cosmic rays reaching an observer from an individual source and after propagation through a turbulent magnetic field, for different ratios between the source distance and the diffusion length. We study both the high-energy quasi-rectilinear regime as well as the transition towards the diffusive regime at lower energies where the deflections become large. We consider the impact of energy losses, showing that they tend to enhance the anisotropy of the source at a given energy. We also discuss lensing effects, in particular those that could result from the regular galactic magnetic field component, and show that the effect of the turbulent extragalactic magnetic fields can smooth out the divergent magnification peaks that would result for point-like sources in the limit of no turbulent deflections.

  13. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Polar Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bobik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2D (radius and colatitude Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift, and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0, was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1 AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton intensities, observed in the inner heliosphere with the Ulysses spacecraft during 1995, can be affected by the modification of the IMF in the polar regions.

  14. Precise Mapping of the Magnetic Field in the CMS Barrel Yoke using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; 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    2010-01-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  15. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  16. Precise Mapping of the Magnetic Field in the CMS Barrel Yoke using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  17. Inhomogeneous extragalactic magnetic fields and the second knee in the cosmic ray spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kotera, Kumiko

    2007-01-01

    Various experiments indicate the existence of a second knee around energy E=3 10^{17} eV in the cosmic ray spectrum. This feature could be the signature of the end of the galactic component and of the emergence of the extragalactic one, provided that the latter cuts off at low energies. Recent analytical calculations have shown that this cut-off could be a consequence of the existence of extragalactic magnetic fields: low energy protons diffuse on extragalactic magnetic fields and cannot reach the observer within a given time. We study the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields on the magnetic horizon, using a newly written original semi-analytical propagation code. Our results indicate that, at a fixed value of the volume averaged magnetic field , the amplitude of the low energy cut-off is mainly controled by the strength of magnetic fields in the voids of the large scale structure distribution. Our simulations also enable us to constrain some crucial parameters: should be greater than 0.3 nG and not ex...

  18. Cosmic microwave background bispectrum of tensor passive modes induced from primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2011-01-01

    If the seed magnetic fields exist in the early Universe, tensor components of their anisotropic stresses are not compensated prior to neutrino decoupling and the tensor metric perturbations generated from them survive passively. Consequently, due to the decay of these metric perturbations after recombination, so-called, integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, the large-scale fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are significantly boosted. This kind of the CMB anisotropy is called "tensor passive mode". Because these fluctuations deviate largely from the Gaussian statistics due to the quadratic dependence on the strength of the Gaussian magnetic field, not only the power spectrum but also the higher-order correlations have reasonable signals. With these motives, we compute the CMB bispectrum induced by this mode. When the magnetic spectrum obeys a nearly scale-invariant shape, we obtain an estimation of a typical value of the normalized reduced bispectrum as $\\ell_1(\\ell_1 + 1)\\ell_3(\\ell_3+1)...

  19. TeV Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy from the Magnetic Field at the Heliospheric Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A; Pogorelov, N V; Yan, H

    2016-01-01

    We performed numerical calculations to test the suggestion by Desiati & Lazarian (2013) that the anisotropies of TeV cosmic rays may arise from their interactions with the heliosphere. For this purpose, we used a magnetic field model of the heliosphere and performed direct numerical calculations of particle trajectories. Unlike earlier papers testing the idea, we did not employ time-reversible techniques that are based on Liouville's theorem. We showed numerically that for scattering by the heliosphere the conditions of Liouville's theorem are not satisfied and the adiabatic approximation and time-reversibility of the particle trajectories are not valid. Our results indicate sensitivity to the magnetic structure of the heliospheric magnetic field, and we expect that this will be useful for probing this structure in future research.

  20. Future Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields with the SKA and its Precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is an open problem in astrophysics and fundamental physics. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes, especially the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will open a new era in the observation of magnetic fields and should help to understand their origin. Low-frequency radio synchrotron emission, to be observed with LOFAR, MWA and the SKA, traces low-energy cosmic ray electrons and allows us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in halos and relics of galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), to be observed with the SKA and its precursors ASKAP and MeerKAT, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies and in cluster relics in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures towards a dense grid of polarized background sources with ASKAP (project POSSUM) and the SKA are dedicated to measure magnetic fields ...

  1. Dynamical Feedback of Self-generated Magnetic Fields in Cosmic Rays Modified Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, D.; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore; Blasi, P.; /Arcetri Observ. /Fermilab; Amato, E.; /Arcetri Observ.; Vietri, M.; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2008-07-01

    We present a semi-analytical kinetic calculation of the process of non-linear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) which includes magnetic field amplification due to cosmic ray induced streaming instability, the dynamical reaction of the amplified magnetic field and the possible effects of turbulent heating. This kinetic calculation allows us to show that the net effect of the amplified magnetic field is to enhance the maximum momentum of accelerated particles while reducing the concavity of the spectra, with respect to the standard predictions of NLDSA. This is mainly due to the dynamical reaction of the amplified field on the shock, which smoothens the shock precursor. The total compression factors which are obtained for parameters typical of supernova remnants are R{sub tot} {approx} 7-10, in good agreement with the values inferred from observations. The strength of the magnetic field produced through excitation of streaming instability is found in good agreement with the values inferred for several remnants if the thickness of the X-ray rims are interpreted as due to severe synchrotron losses of high energy electrons. We also discuss the relative role of turbulent heating and magnetic dynamical reaction in smoothening the shock precursor.

  2. On the possible origin of the large scale cosmic magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coroniti, F. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    The possibility that the large scale cosmic magnetic field is directly generated at microgauss, equipartition levels during the reionization epoch by collisionless shocks that are forced to satisfy a downstream shear flow boundary condition is investigated through the development of two models—the accretion of an ionized plasma onto a weakly ionized cool galactic disk and onto a cool filament of the cosmic web. The dynamical structure and the physical parameters of the models are synthesized from recent cosmological simulations of the early reionization era after the formation of the first stars. The collisionless shock stands upstream of the disk and filament, and its dissipation is determined by ion inertial length Weibel turbulence. The downstream shear boundary condition is determined by the rotational neutral gas flow in the disk and the inward accretion flow along the filament. The shocked plasma is accelerated to the downstream shear flow velocity by the Weibel turbulence, and the relative shearing motion between the electrons and ions produces a strong, ion inertial scale current sheet that generates an equipartition strength, large scale downstream magnetic field, ∼10{sup –6} G for the disk and ∼6 × 10{sup –8} G for the filament. By assumption, hydrodynamic turbulence transports the shear-shock generated magnetic flux throughout the disk and filament volume.

  3. Cosmic magnetization: from spontaneously emitted aperiodic turbulent to ordered equipartition fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R

    2012-12-28

    It is shown that an unmagnetized nonrelativistic thermal electron-proton plasma spontaneously emits aperiodic turbulent magnetic field fluctuations of strength |δB|=3.5β(e)g(1/3)W(e)(1/2)  G, where β(e) is the normalized thermal electron temperature, W(e) the thermal plasma energy density, and g the plasma parameter. For the unmagnetized intergalactic medium, immediately after the reionization onset, the field strengths from this mechanism are about 2×10(-16)  G in cosmic voids and 2×10(-10)  G in protogalaxies, both too weak to affect the dynamics of the plasma. Accounting for simultaneous viscous damping reduces these estimates to 2×10(-21)  G in cosmic voids and 2×10(-12)  G in protogalaxies. The shear and/or compression of the intergalactic and protogalactic medium exerted by the first supernova explosions locally amplify these seed fields and make them anisotropic, until the magnetic restoring forces affect the gas dynamics at ordered plasma betas near unity.

  4. Propagation of high-energy cosmic rays in extragalactic turbulent magnetic fields: resulting energy spectrum and composition

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, N; Parizot, E

    2007-01-01

    We extend previous studies of mixed-composition extragalactic cosmic-ray source models, by investigating the influence of a non-negligible extragalactic magnetic field on the propagated cosmic-ray spectrum and composition. We study the transport of charged particles in turbulent fields and the transition from a ballistic to a diffusive propagation regime. We introduce a method allowing a fast integration of the particle trajectories, which allows us to calculate extragalactic cosmic-ray spectra in the general case, without using either the diffusive or the rectilinear approximation. We find that the main features of the mixed-composition models -- regarding the interpretation of the ankle and the non-monotonous evolution of the average cosmic-ray mass -- remain essentially unchanged as long as the magnetic field intensity does not exceed a few nG.

  5. Voyager Observations of Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Rays in the Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Stone, E.; McDonald, F. B.

    2011-01-01

    The major features of the profile of greater than 70 MeV/nuc cosmic ray intensity (CRI) observed by Voyager 1 (VI) in the heliosheath from 2005.8-2010.24 are described by the empirical "CR-B" relation as the cumulative effect of variations of the magnetic field strength B. The CRI profile observed by Voyager 2 (V2) from 2008.60 to 2010.28 in the heliosheath is also described by the CR-B relation. On a smaller scale, of the order of a hundred days, a sequence on CRI decreases observed by V 1 during 2006 was interpreted as the effect of a propagating interplanetary shock first interacting with the termination shock, then moving past V1, and finally reflecting from the heliopause and propagating back to V1. Our observations show that the second CRI decrease in this sequence began during the passage of a "Global Merged Interaction Region" (GMIR), 40 days after the arrival of the GMIR and its possible shock. The first and third CRI decreases in the sequence were associated with local enhancements of B. The magnetic field observations associated with the second sequence of 3 cosmic ray intensity decreases observed by V 1 in 2007/2008 are more difficult to reconcile with the scenario of Webber et al. (2009) and the CR-B relation. The discrepancy might indicate the importance of latitudinal effects

  6. Amplification of perpendicular and parallel magnetic fields by cosmic ray currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. H.; Bell, A. R.; Blundell, K. M.; Araudo, A. T.

    2017-08-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) currents through magnetized plasma drive strong instabilities producing amplification of the magnetic field. This amplification helps explain the CR energy spectrum as well as observations of supernova remnants and radio galaxy hotspots. Using magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study the behaviour of the non-resonant hybrid (NRH) instability (also known as the Bell instability) in the case of CR currents perpendicular and parallel to the initial magnetic field. We demonstrate that extending simulations of the perpendicular case to 3D reveals a different character to the turbulence from that observed in 2D. Despite these differences, in 3D the perpendicular NRH instability still grows exponentially far into the non-linear regime with a similar growth rate to both the 2D perpendicular and 3D parallel situations. We introduce some simple analytical models to elucidate the physical behaviour, using them to demonstrate that the transition to the non-linear regime is governed by the growth of thermal pressure inside dense filaments at the edges of the expanding loops. We discuss our results in the context of supernova remnants and jets in radio galaxies. Our work shows that the NRH instability can amplify magnetic fields to many times their initial value in parallel and perpendicular shocks.

  7. Evolution of Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Schure, K M; Achterberg, A; Keppens, R

    2009-01-01

    Observations show that the magnetic field in young supernova remnants (SNRs) is significantly stronger than can be expected from the compression of the circumstellar medium (CSM) by a factor of four expected for strong blast waves. Additionally, the polarization is mainly radial, which is also contrary to expectation from compression of the CSM magnetic field. Cosmic rays (CRs) may help to explain these two observed features. They can increase the compression ratio to factors well over those of regular strong shocks by adding a relativistic plasma component to the pressure, and by draining the shock of energy when CRs escape from the region. The higher compression ratio will also allow for the contact discontinuity, which is subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability, to reach much further out to the forward shock. This could create a preferred radial polarization of the magnetic field. With an adaptive mesh refinement MHD code (AMRVAC), we simulate the evolution of SNRs with three different configurati...

  8. Extra-galactic magnetic fields and the second knee in the cosmic-ray spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, M

    2004-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the cosmic ray spectrum may be dominated by Galactic sources up to ~10^{17.5} eV, and by an extra-Galactic component beyond, provided this latter cuts off below the transition energy. Here it is shown that this cut-off could be interpreted as a signature of extra-galactic magnetic fields with equivalent average strength B and coherence length l_c such that B\\sqrt{l_c}~2.10^{-10} G.Mpc^{1/2}, assuming l_c < r_L (Larmor radius at 10^{17} eV) and continuously emitting sources with density 10^{-5}/Mpc^3. The extra-Galactic flux is suppressed below 10^{17} eV as the diffusive propagation time from the source to the detector becomes larger than the age of the Universe.

  9. Effects of a primordial magnetic field with log-normal distribution on the cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Dai G; Takahashi, Keitaro; 10.1103/PhysRevD.84.123006

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) on the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We assume the spectrum of PMFs is described by log-normal distribution which has a characteristic scale, rather than power-law spectrum. This scale is expected to reflect the generation mechanisms and our analysis is complementary to previous studies with power-law spectrum. We calculate power spectra of energy density and Lorentz force of the log-normal PMFs, and then calculate CMB temperature and polarization angular power spectra from scalar, vector, and tensor modes of perturbations generated from such PMFs. By comparing these spectra with WMAP7, QUaD, CBI, Boomerang, and ACBAR data sets, we find that the current CMB data set places the strongest constraint at $k\\simeq 10^{-2.5}$ Mpc$^{-1}$ with the upper limit $B\\lesssim 3$ nG.

  10. Searching for high energy cosmic ray electrons using the Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, S.; Bower, C.; Coutu, S.; Duvernois, M.; Martell, A.; Muller, D.; Musser, J.; Schubnell, M.; Tarle, G.; Yagi, A.

    2006-04-01

    The Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) instrument is a balloon payload designed to measure the flux of primary cosmic ray electrons at energies greater than 2 TeV. Because electrons at these energies lose energy rapidly during propagation through the interstellar medium, their detection would indicate the existence of sources which are within a few kiloparsecs. In order to obtain the needed large exposure time and aperture of the detector, we use an approach that depends on the detection of synchrotron photons emitted when the electrons travel through the earth's magnetic field. Such photons have energies in the x-ray and gamma-ray region, hence CREST incorporates an array of inorganic scintillators. Since the primary electrons do not need to pass through the detector, the effective detection area is much larger than the actual detector array size. To verify the technique and to determine background count rates, a prototype array of BGO and BaF2 crystals was flown on high altitude balloon from Ft. Sumner, N.M. in autumn 2005. The full detector system is currently under construction. It will consist of a 1600 crystal array, and will be carried on Long-Duration Balloons on circumpolar trajectory.

  11. Theorem: A Static Magnetic N-pole Becomes an Oscillating Electric N-pole in a Cosmic Axion Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Christopher T. [Fermilab

    2016-06-15

    We show for the classical Maxwell equations, including the axion electromagnetic anomaly source term, that a cosmic axion field induces an oscillating electric N-moment for any static magnetic N-moment. This is a straightforward result, accessible to anyone who has taken a first year graduate course in electrodynamics.

  12. A method for establishing constraints on galactic magnetic field models using ultra high energy cosmic rays and results from the data of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Michael Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The Galactic magnetic field is poorly understood. Essentially the only reliable measurements of its properties are the local orientation and field strength. Its behavior at galactic scales is unknown. Historically, magnetic field measurements have been performed using radio astronomy techniques which are sensitive to certain regions of the Galaxy and rely upon models of the distribution of gas and dust within the disk. However, the deflection of trajectories of ultra high energy cosmic rays arriving from extragalactic sources depends only on the properties of the magnetic field. In this work, a method is developed for determining acceptable global models of the Galactic magnetic field by backtracking cosmic rays through the field model. This method constrains the parameter space of magnetic field models by comparing a test statistic between backtracked cosmic rays and isotropic expectations for assumed cosmic ray source and composition hypotheses. Constraints on Galactic magnetic field models are established using data from the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory under various source distribution and cosmic ray composition hypotheses. Field models possessing structure similar to the stellar spiral arms are found to be inconsistent with hypotheses of an iron cosmic ray composition and sources selected from catalogs tracing the local matter distribution in the universe. These field models are consistent with hypothesis combinations of proton composition and sources tracing the local matter distribution. In particular, strong constraints are found on the parameter space of bisymmetric magnetic field models scanned under hypotheses of proton composition and sources selected from the 2MRS-VS, Swift 39-month, and VCV catalogs. Assuming that the Galactic magnetic field is well-described by a bisymmetric model under these hypotheses, the magnetic field strength near the Sun is less than 3-4 muG and magnetic pitch angle is less than -8°. These results comprise

  13. Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2015-01-01

    Damping of magnetic fields via ambipolar diffusion and decay of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in the post decoupling era heats the intergalactic medium (IGM). Collisional ionization weakly ionizes the IGM, producing an optical depth to scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The optical depth generated at $z\\gg 10$ does not affect the "reionization bump" of the CMB polarization power spectrum at low multipoles, but affects the temperature and polarization power spectra at high multipoles. Using the Planck 2013 temperature and lensing data together with the WMAP 9-year polarization data, we constrain the present-day field strength, $B_0$, smoothed over the damping length at the decoupling epoch as a function of the spectral index, $n_B$. We find the 95% upper bounds of $B_0<0.56$, 0.31, and 0.14 nG for $n_B=-2.9$, $-2.5$, and $-1.5$, respectively. For these spectral indices, the optical depth is dominated by dissipation of the decaying MHD turbulence that occurs shortly after the decou...

  14. Does Galactic Magnetic Field Disturb the Correlation of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays with their Sources?

    CERN Document Server

    Takami, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    The propagation trajectories of the highest energy cosmic rays can be deflected by Galactic magnetic field (GMF) and expected correlation between their arrival directions and the positions of their sources can be disturbed. In order to explore whether the possible correlation is disturbed or not, we simulate the arrival distribution of the highest energy protons (HEPs) with energies above $6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV taking 4 different GMF models into account and investigate the cross-correlation between the protons and sources assumed in the simulation. We show that the error of cross-correlation function adopted in this study is sufficiently small by accumulating 200 events. We also find that the correlation is not disturbed largely in many cases after 200 events accumulation and positive signals of the correlation are significantly expected at angular scale of 3-5$^{\\circ}$. Only in the cases of the northern sky with axisymmetric spiral structures of GMF, the cross-correlation functions are consistent with no cor...

  15. High Energy Particle Acceleration And Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification In Shell-type Supernova Remnants (cosmic Rays, Cas A)

    CERN Document Server

    Keohane, J W

    1998-01-01

    This thesis contains observational studies of shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs), primarily using the ROSAT and ASCA X-ray observatories. These results include: (1) evidence for turbulent magnetic field amplification in the young supernova remnant Cas A, (2) upper limits on the maximum energy which SNRs accelerate cosmic rays. (1) When inhomogeneous absorption is taken into account, the soft X- ray and radio morphologies of the young SNR, Cas A, are strikingly similar. We conclude from the slope of the X-ray/radio surface brightness correlation, that the density of gas (traced by the X-ray) is proportional to the square of the magnetic field (traced by the radio). This implies that Cas A's magnetic field is continuously being amplified on small scales, as would be expected in a turbulent plasma. (2) SNRs are known to accelerate cosmic rays to GeV range energies, and they are generally assumed to produce the majority of Galactic cosmic rays with energies below 1,000 TeV (the "knee"). We investigate X-ray syn...

  16. The cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum from scalar perturbations induced by primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara; Paoletti, Daniela; Riotto, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the angular bispectrum of the CMB temperature anisotropy at large angular scale due to a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields. The shape of non-Gaussianity depends on the spectral index of the magnetic field power spectrum and is peaked in the squeezed configuration for a scale-invariant magnetic spectrum. By using the large angular part of the bispectrum generated by magnetic fields, the present bounds on non-Gaussianity set a limit on the amplitude of the primordial magnetic field of the order of 10 nGauss for the scale-invariant case and 20 nGauss for the other spectral indexes.

  17. Measuring cosmic magnetic fields by rotation measure-galaxy cross-correlations in cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Stasyszyn, F; Dolag, K; Beck, R; Donnert, J

    2010-01-01

    Using cosmological MHD simulations of the magnetic field in galaxy clusters and filaments we evaluate the possibility to infer the magnetic field strength in filaments by measuring cross-correlation functions between Faraday Rotation Measures (RM) and the galaxy density field. We also test the reliability of recent estimates considering the problem of data quality and Galactic foreground (GF) removal in current datasets. Besides the two self-consistent simulations of cosmological magnetic fields based on primordial seed fields and galactic outflows analyzed here, we also explore a larger range of models scaling up the resulting magnetic fields of one of the simulations. We find that, if an unnormalized estimator for the cross-correlation functions and a GF removal procedure is used, the detectability of the cosmological signal is only possible for future instruments (e.g. SKA and ASKAP). However, mapping of the observed RM signal to the underlying magnetization of the Universe (both in space and time) is an e...

  18. The magnetic field and turbulence of the cosmic web measured using a brilliant fast radio burst

    CERN Document Server

    Ravi, V; Bailes, M; Bannister, K; Bhandari, S; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keane, E F; Kerr, M; Tiburzi, C; Tuntsov, A V; Vedantham, H K

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration events thought to originate beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Uncertainty surrounding the burst sources, and their propagation through intervening plasma, has limited their use as cosmological probes. We report on a mildly dispersed (dispersion measure 266.5+-0.1 pc cm^-3), exceptionally intense (120+-30 Jy), linearly polarized, scintillating burst (FRB 150807) that we directly localize to 9 arcmin^2. Based on a low Faraday rotation (12.0+-0.7 rad m^-2), we infer negligible magnetization in the circum-burst plasma and constrain the net magnetization of the cosmic web along this sightline to <21 nG, parallel to the line-of-sight. The burst scintillation suggests weak turbulence in the ionized intergalactic medium.

  19. Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on nearly all scales in the universe, from stars and galaxies upto galaxy clusters and even beyond. The origin of cosmic magnetic fields is still an open question, however a large class of models puts its origin in the very early universe. A magnetic dynamo amplifying an initial seed magnetic field could explain the present day strength of the galactic magnetic field. However, it is still an open problem how and when this initial magnetic field was created. Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a window to the early universe and might therefore be able to tell us whether cosmic magnetic fields are of primordial, cosmological origin and at the same time constrain its parameters. We will give an overview of the observational evidence of large scale magnetic fields, describe generation mechanisms of primordial magnetic fields and possible imprints in the CMB.

  20. Magnetic field amplification in nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration including resonant and non-resonant cosmic-ray driven instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Andrei M; Osipov, Sergei M; Vladimirov, Andrey E

    2014-01-01

    We present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of efficient diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) where the magnetic turbulence responsible for particle diffusion is calculated self-consistently from the resonant cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instability, together with non-resonant short- and long-wavelength CR-current-driven instabilities. We include the backpressure from CRs interacting with the strongly amplified magnetic turbulence which decelerates and heats the super-alfvenic flow in the extended shock precursor. Uniquely, in our plane-parallel, steady-state, multi-scale model, the full range of particles, from thermal (~eV) injected at the viscous subshock, to the escape of the highest energy CRs (~PeV) from the shock precursor, are calculated consistently with the shock structure, precursor heating, magnetic field amplification (MFA), and scattering center drift relative to the background plasma. In addition, we show how the cascade of turbulence to shorter wavelengths influences the total shock compression, the d...

  1. Cosmic dynamo analogue and decay of magnetic fields in 3D Ricci flows

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic curvature effects, investigated by Barrow and Tsagas (BT) [Phys Rev D \\textbf{77},(2008)],as a mechanism for magnetic field decay in open Friedmann universes (${\\Lambda}<0$), are applied to dynamo geometric Ricci flows in 3D curved substrate in laboratory. By simple derivation, a covariant three-dimensional magnetic self-induced equation, presence of these curvature effects, indicates that de Sitter cosmological constant (${\\Lambda}\\ge{0}$), leads to enhancement in the fast kinematic dynamo action which adds to stretching of plasma flows. From the magnetic growth rate, the strong shear case, anti-de Sitter case (${\\Lambda}<0$) BT magnetic decaying fields are possible while for weak shear, fast dynamos are possible. The self-induced equation in Ricci flows is similar to the equation derived by BT in $(3+1)$-spacetime continuum. Lyapunov-de Sitter metric is obtained from Ricci flow eigenvalue problem. In de Sitter analogue there is a decay rate of ${\\gamma}\\approx{-{\\Lambda}}\\approx{-10^{-35}s^{-...

  2. Magnetic fields in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Most of the visible matter in the Universe is ionized, so that cosmic magnetic fields are quite easy to generate and due to the lack of magnetic monopoles hard to destroy. Magnetic fields have been measured in or around practically all celestial objects, either by in-situ measurements of spacecrafts or by the electromagnetic radiation of embedded cosmic rays, gas or dust. The Earth, the Sun, solar planets, stars, pulsars, the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, more distant (radio) galaxies, quasars and even intergalactic space in clusters of galaxies have significant magnetic fields, and even larger volumes of the Universe may be permeated by "dark" magnetic fields. Information on cosmic magnetic fields has increased enormously as the result of the rapid development of observational methods, especially in radio astronomy. In the Milky Way, a wealth of magnetic phenomena was discovered, which are only partly related to objects visible in other spectral ranges. The large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic fie...

  3. Evidence for Helical Magnetic fields in Kiloparsec-Scale AGN Jets and the Action of a Cosmic Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabuzda, D. C.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Contopulos, I.; Kazanas, D.

    2012-01-01

    A search for transverse kiloparsec-scale gradients in Faraday rotation-measure (RM) maps of extragalactic radio sources in the literature has yielded 6 AGNs displaying continuous, monotonic RM gradients across their jets, oriented roughly orthogonal to the local jet direction. The most natural interpretation of such transverse RM gradients is that they are caused by the systematic change in the line-of-sight components of helical magnetic fields associated with these jets. All the identified transverse RM gradients increase in the counterclockwise (CCW) direction on the sky relative to the centers of these AGNs. Taken together with the results of Contopoulos et al. who found evidence for a predominance of clockwise (CW) transverse RM gradients across parsec-scale (VLBI) jets, this provides new evidence for preferred orientations of RM gradients due to helical jet magnetic fields, with a reversal from CW in the inner jets to CCW farther from the centers of activity. This can be explained by the "Poynting-Robertson cosmic-battery" mechanism, which can generate helical magnetic fields with a. characteristic "twist," which are expelled with the jet outflows. If the Poynting-Robertson battery mechanism is not operating, an alternative mechanism must be identified, which is able to explain the 'predominance of CW /CCW RM gradients on parsec/kiloparsec scales.

  4. Acoustic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background bispectrum from primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zhang, Hong-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Using the full radiation transfer function, we numerically calculate the CMB angular bispectrum seeded by the compensated magnetic scalar density mode. We find that, for the primordial magnetic fields characterized by index $n_B=-2.9$ and mean-field amplitude $B_{\\lam}=9{\\rm~nG}$, the angular bispectrum is dominated by two primordial magnetic shapes. For the reduced bispectrum $b^{(1)}_{l_1l_2l_3}$ seeded by primordial shape $f^{(1)}(k,q,p)$, both the profile and amplitude look similar to those of the primary CMB anisotropies. However, for different parameters ($l_1,l_2$), the bispectrum $b^{(1)}_{l_1l_2l_3}$ oscillate around different asymptotic values in the high-$l_3$ regime. This feature is different from the standard case where all modes approach to zero asymptotically in the high-$l$ limit. On the other hand, the behaviors of reduced bispectrum $b^{(2)}_{l_1l_2l_3}$ sourced by the shape $f^{(2)}(k,q,p)$ are quite different from those of the primary curvature perturbations. In the low-$l$ regime, its amp...

  5. The connection of the interplanetary magnetic field turbulence and rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease of the galactic cosmic ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynczak, A.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease (Fd) of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed in November 2004. We compute the rigidity spectrum in two energy ranges based on the daily data from the worldwide network of neutron monitors and Nagoya ground muon telescope. We demonstrate that the changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fd are linked to the evolution/decay of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) turbulence during various phases of the Fd. We analyze the time-evolution of the state of the turbulence of the IMF in various frequency ranges during the Fd. Performed analysis show that the decrease of the exponent ν of the Power Spectral Density (PSD ∝ f-ν, where f is frequency) of the IMF turbulence with decreasing frequency lead to the soft rigidity spectrum of Fd for GCR particles with relatively higher energies.

  6. First observational constraints on tensor non-Gaussianity sourced by primordial magnetic fields from cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2013-01-01

    Primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) create a large squeezed-type non-Gaussianity in tensor perturbation, which generates non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We for the first time derive an observational constraint on such tensor non-Gaussianity from observed CMB maps. Analyzing temperature maps of the WMAP 7-year data, we find such tensor non-Gaussianity is consistent with zero. This gives an upper bound on PMF strength smoothed on $1 ~ {\\rm Mpc}$ as $B_{1 ~ \\rm Mpc} < 3.2 {\\rm nG}$ at 95% CL. We discuss some difficulties in constraining tensor non-Gaussianity due to spin and angle dependence of resultant CMB bispectrum.

  7. Revealing Cosmic Magnetism with Radio Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, Bryan M

    2007-01-01

    While gravitation sustains the on-going evolution of the cosmos, it is magnetism that breaks gravity's symmetry and that provides the pathway to the non-thermal Universe. By enabling processes such as anisotropic pressure support, particle acceleration, and jet collimation, magnetism has for billions of years regulated the feedback vital for returning matter to the interstellar and intergalactic medium. After reviewing recent results that demonstrate the unique view of magnetic fields provided by radio astronomy, I explain how the Square Kilometre Array will provide data that will reveal what cosmic magnets look like, how they formed, and what role they have played in the evolving Universe.

  8. Destroying a near-extremal Kerr black hole with a charged particle: Can a test magnetic field serve as a cosmic censor?

    CERN Document Server

    Shaymatov, Sanjar; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Joshi, Pankaj S

    2014-01-01

    We investigate effect of a test magnetic field on the process of destroying near-extremal Kerr black hole with a charged test particle. It has been shown that it would be possible to throw a charged test particle into the near extremal rotating black hole and make it go past the extremality i.e. turn Kerr black hole into the Kerr-Newmann naked singularity. Typically in an astrophysical scenario black holes are believed to be surrounded by a magnetic field. Magnetic field although small, affects motion of charged particles drastically due to the large Lorentz force, as the electromagnetic force is much stronger that the gravity. Thus a test magnetic field can affect the process of destroying black holes and restore the cosmic censorship in the astrophysical context. We show that a test magnetic field would act as a cosmic censor beyond a certain threshold value. We try to gauge the magnitude of the magnetic field by comparing its energy density with that of the change in the curvature induced by the test parti...

  9. X-ray Hotspot Flares and Implications for Cosmic Ray Acceleration and Magnetic Field amplification in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Yousaf; Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2008-01-01

    For more than fifty years, it has been believed that cosmic ray (CR) nuclei are accelerated to high energies in the rapidly expanding shockwaves created by powerful supernova explosions. Yet observational proof of this conjecture is still lacking. Recently, Uchiyama and collaborators reported the detection of small-scale X-ray flares in one such supernova remnant, dubbed 'RX J1713-3946' (a.k.a. G347.3-0.5), which also emits very energetic, TeV (10^12 eV) range, gamma-rays. They contend that the variability of these X-ray 'hotspots' implies that the magnetic field in the remnant is about a hundred times larger than normally assumed; and this, they say, means that the detected TeV range photons were produced in energetic nuclear interactions, providing 'a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10^15 eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.' We point out here that the existing multiwavelength data on this object certainly do not support such conclusions. Though intriguing...

  10. A new mechanism for the generation of primordial seeds for the cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gasperini, M

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the inflationary production of magnetic seeds for the galactic dynamo through the photon-graviphoton mixing typical of extended models of local supersymmetry. An analisys of the allowed region in parameter space shows that such a mechanism is compatible with existing phenomenological bounds on the vector mass and on the mixing parameter.

  11. Magnetic Visions: Mapping Cosmic Magnetism with LOFAR and SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.

    2009-08-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is an open problem in astrophysics and fundamental physics. ``Cosmic Magnetism'' has been accepted as Key Science Project both for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR, under construction) and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). At low frequencies LOFAR and SKA will allow to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. High-resolution polarization observations at high frequencies with the SKA will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures (RM) towards polarized background sources will be used to model the structure and strength of the magnetic fields in the Milky Way, the interstellar medium of galaxies and the intergalactic medium. The new method of ``RM Synthesis'', applied to spectro-polarimetric data cubes, will separate RM components from different distances and allow 3-D ``Faraday tomography''. Magnetic fields in distant galaxies and clusters and in intergalactic filaments will be searched for by deep imaging of weak synchrotron emission and of RM towards background sources. This will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields.

  12. MAGNETIC VISIONS: MAPPING COSMIC MAGNETISM WITH LOFAR AND SKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Beck

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is an open problem in astrophysics and fundamental physics. "Cosmic Magnetism" has been accepted as Key Science Project both for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR, under construction and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA. At low frequencies LOFAR and SKA will allow to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. High-resolution polarization observations at high frequencies with the SKA will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures (RM towards polarized background sources will be used to model the structure and strength of the magnetic fields in the Milky Way, the interstellar medium of galaxies and the intergalactic medium. The new method of "RM Synthesis", applied to spectro-polarimetric data cubes, will separate RM components from different distances and allow 3-D "Faraday tomography". Magnetic fields in distant galaxies and clusters and in intergalactic filaments will be searched for by deep imaging of weak synchrotron emission and of RM towards background sources. This will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields.

  13. Constraining cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the Perseus galaxy cluster with TeV observations by the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Caneva, G.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Pfrommer, C.; Pinzke, A.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy clusters are being assembled today in the most energetic phase of hierarchical structure formation which manifests itself in powerful shocks that contribute to a substantial energy density of cosmic rays (CRs). Hence, clusters are expected to be luminous gamma-ray emitters since they also act as energy reservoirs for additional CR sources, such as active galactic nuclei and supernova-driven galactic winds. To detect the gamma-ray emission from CR interactions with the ambient cluster gas, we conducted the deepest to date observational campaign targeting a galaxy cluster at very high-energy gamma-rays and observed the Perseus cluster with the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes for a total of ~85 h of effective observing time. This campaign resulted in the detection of the central radio galaxy NGC 1275 at energies E > 100 GeV with a very steep energy spectrum. Here, we restrict our analysis to energies E > 630 GeV and detect no significant gamma-ray excess. This constrains the average CR-to-thermal pressure ratio to be ≲1-2%, depending on assumptions and the model for CR emission. Comparing these gamma-ray upper limits to models inferred from cosmological cluster simulations that include CRs constrains the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 4-9 μG, depending on the rate of decline of the magnetic field strength toward larger radii. This range is well below field strengths inferred from Faraday rotation measurements in cool cores. Hence, the hadronic model remains a plausible explanation of the Perseus radio mini-halo.

  14. Cosmic ray decreases and magnetic clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, H.V. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1993-03-01

    A study has been made of energetic particle data, obtained from IMP 8, in conjunction with solar wind field and plasma data at the times of reported magnetic clouds. It is shown that magnetic clouds can cause a depression of the cosmic ray flux but high fields are required. A depression of 3% in a neutron monitor requires a field of about 25 nT. Such high fields are found only in a subset of coronal ejecta. The principal cause for Forbush decreases associated with energetic shocks is probably turbulence in the postshock region, although some shocks will be followed by an ejecta with a high field. Each event is different. The lower-energy particles can help in identifying the dominant processes in individual events. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    CERN Document Server

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  16. The Transport of Cosmic Rays Across Magnetic Fieldlines

    CERN Document Server

    Desiati, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The long residence times and small anisotropies of cosmic rays suggest that they are well confined and well scattered by the Galactic magnetic field. Due to the disklike shape of the confinement volume, transport in the vertical direction, perpendicular to the mean Galactic magnetic field, is key to cosmic ray escape. It has long been recognized that this vertical transport depends both on the vertical component of the fieldlines themselves and on the extent to which the cosmic rays are tied to the fieldlines. In this paper we use magnetic fields with very simple spatial and temporal structure to isolate some important features of cross field transport. We show that even simple magnetic nonuniformities combined with pitch angle scattering can enhance cross field transport by several orders of magnitude, while pitch angle scattering is unnecessary for enhanced transport if the field is chaotic. Nevertheless, perpendicular transport is much less than parallel transport in all the cases we study. We apply the re...

  17. Cosmic decoherence: massive fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Junyu [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); School of the Gifted Young, University of Science and Technology of China,Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sou, Chon-Man; Wang, Yi [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-10-14

    We study the decoherence of massive fields during inflation based on the Zurek’s density matrix approach. With the cubic interaction between inflaton and massive fields, the reduced density matrix for the massive fields can be calculated in the Schrödinger picture which is related to the variance of the non-Gaussian exponent in the wave functional. The decoherence rate is computed in the one-loop form from functional integration. For heavy fields with m≳O(H), quantum fluctuations will easily stay in the quantum state and decoherence is unlikely. While for light fields with mass smaller than O(H), quantum fluctuations are easily decohered within 5∼10 e-folds after Hubble crossing. Thus heavy fields can play a key role in studying problems involving inflationary quantum information.

  18. Cosmic Decoherence: Massive Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Junyu; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the decoherence of massive fields during inflation based on the Zurek's density matrix approach. With the cubic interaction between inflaton and massive fields, the reduced density matrix for the massive fields can be calculated in the Schr\\"odinger picture which is related to the variance of the non-Gaussian exponent in the wave functional. The decoherence rate is computed in the one-loop form from functional integration. For heavy fields with $m\\gtrsim \\mathcal{O}(H)$, quantum fluctuations will easily stay in the quantum state and decoherence is unlikely. While for light fields with mass smaller than $\\mathcal{O}(H)$, quantum fluctuations are easily decohered within $5\\sim10$ e-folds after Hubble crossing. Thus heavy fields can play a key role in studying problems involving inflationary quantum information.

  19. Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on the Cosmic Ray Penetration into an Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Rope

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. Next, we pe...

  20. Electromagnetic field and cosmic censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Düztaş, Koray

    2013-01-01

    We construct a gedanken experiment in which an extremal Kerr black hole interacts with a test electromagnetic field. Using Teukolsky's solutions for electromagnetic perturbations in Kerr spacetime, and the conservation laws imposed by the energy momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field and the Killing vectors of the spacetime, we prove that this interaction cannot convert the black hole into a naked singularity, thus cosmic censorship conjecture is not violated in this case.

  1. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  2. Powerful sources, extragalactic magnetic fields, astro-particles: astrophysical puzzles seen through ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectacles; Sources energetiques, champs magnetiques extra-galactiques, astroparticules: enigmes astrophysiques vues par les rayons cosmiques de ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotera, K.

    2009-09-15

    This work explores the relationships between powerful sources in the Universe, extragalactic magnetic fields and secondary cosmos particles (neutrinos and gamma rays), through the study of the propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. In this manuscript, I first review the experimental and theoretical status of the cosmic ray field. I then present a detailed review of the secondary particle emission mechanisms during cosmic ray propagation, and on the current knowledge of the extragalactic magnetic fields. In regards of all the uncertainties on the distribution of those field and the complexity of the existing models, I introduce parametrized semi-analytical and analytical modeling of cosmic ray transport in these fields. These models enables one to take into account key phenomena that are often neglected in the literature (for example the effects of the magnetic enrichment from astrophysical sources or of the small scale turbulence). I also developed a numerical tool that combines and improve existing codes, in order to treat interaction processes during cosmic ray propagation. I make use of these techniques to consider many paramount problems concerning ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, like the effect of the extragalactic magnetic field in the region of the second knee, the interpretation of the anisotropy detected by the Auger Observatory and multi-messenger aspects from sources located in magnetized environments. (author)

  3. Field Independent Cosmic Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayem Sk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown earlier that Noether symmetry does not admit a form of corresponding to an action in which is coupled to scalar-tensor theory of gravity or even for pure theory of gravity taking anisotropic model into account. Here, we prove that theory of gravity does not admit Noether symmetry even if it is coupled to tachyonic field and considering a gauge in addition. To handle such a theory, a general conserved current has been constructed under a condition which decouples higher-order curvature part from the field part. This condition, in principle, solves for the scale-factor independently. Thus, cosmological evolution remains independent of the form of the chosen field, whether it is a scalar or a tachyon.

  4. A mechanism for inducing climatic variations through ozone destruction: Screening of galactic cosmic rays by solar and terrestrial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A perturbation analysis, allowing for temperature and opacity feedbacks, is developed to calculate depletions in the O3 abundance and reductions of stratospheric solar heating that result from increases in NOx concentration. A pair of perturbation coefficients give the reduction in O3 and temperature through the stratosphere for a specified NOx increase. This type of analysis illustrates the tendency for various levels to self-heal when a perturbation occurs. Physical arguments indicate that the expected sign of the climatic effect is correct, with colder surface temperatures produced by reduced magnetic shielding. In addition, four qualitative reasons are suggested for thinking that significant ozone reductions by cosmic ray influxes will lead to an increased terrestrial albedo from stratospheric condensation. In this view, long-term (approximately 10,000 years) climatic changes have resulted from secular geomagnetic variations while shorter (approximately 100 years) excursions are related to changes in solar activity.

  5. The connection between supernova remnants and the Galactic magnetic field: An analysis of quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular cosmic ray acceleration for the axisymmetric sample

    CERN Document Server

    West, J L; Ferrand, G

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism for acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova remnants (SNRs) is an outstanding question in the field. We model a sample of 32 axisymmetric SNRs using the quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel cosmic-ray-electron (CRE) acceleration cases. The axisymmetric sample is defined to include SNRs with a double-sided, bilateral morphology, and also those with a one-sided morphology where one limb is much brighter than the other. Using a coordinate transformation technique, we insert a bubble-like model SNR into a model of the Galactic magnetic field. Since radio emission of SNRs is dominated by synchrotron emission and since this emission depends on the magnetic field and CRE distribution, we are able to simulate the SNRs emission and compare this to data. We find that the quasi-perpendicular CRE acceleration case is much more consistent with the data than the quasi-parallel CRE acceleration case, with G327.6+14.6 (SN1006) being a notable exception. We propose that SN1006 may be a case where both quasi-p...

  6. Magnetic Amplification by Magnetized Cosmic Rays in SNR Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Riquelme, Mario A

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) X-ray observations of synchrotron rims in supernova remnant (SNR) shocks show evidence of strong magnetic field amplification (a factor of ~100 between the upstream and downstream medium). This amplification may be due to plasma instabilities driven by shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs). One candidate is the cosmic ray current-driven (CRCD) instability (Bell 2004), caused by the electric current of large Larmor radii CRs propagating parallel to the upstream magnetic field. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the back-reaction of the amplified field on CRs would limit the amplification factor of this instability to less than ~10 in galactic SNRs. In this paper, we study the possibility of further amplification driven near shocks by "magnetized" CRs, whose Larmor radii are smaller than the length scale of the field that was previously amplified by the CRCD instability. We find that additional amplification can occur due to a new instability, driven by the CR current perpendicular to t...

  7. Magnetic fields in diffuse media

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, Elisabete; Melioli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the current knowledge of magnetic fields in diffuse astrophysical media. Starting with an overview of 21st century instrumentation to observe astrophysical magnetic fields, the chapters cover observational techniques, origin of magnetic fields, magnetic turbulence, basic processes in magnetized fluids, the role of magnetic fields for cosmic rays, in the interstellar medium and for star formation. Written by a group of leading experts the book represents an excellent overview of the field. Nonspecialists will find sufficient background to enter the field and be able to appreciate the state of the art.

  8. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced......he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  9. Magnetic Visions: Mapping Cosmic Magnetism with LOFAR and SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is an open problem in astrophysics and fundamental physics. "Cosmic Magnetism" has been accepted as Key Science Project both for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR, under construction) and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). At low frequencies LOFAR and SKA will allow to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. High-resolution polarization observations at high frequencies with the SKA will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures (RM) towards polarized background sources will be used to model the structure and strength of the magnetic fields in the Milky Way, the interstellar medium of galaxies and the intergalactic medium. The new method of "RM Synthesis", applied to spectro-polarimetric data cubes, will separate RM components from different distances and allow 3-D "Faraday tomograp...

  10. Limits for primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A possible explanation for the origin of the magnetic fields observed today in matter structures is that they were generated in the primordial universe. After briefly revising the model of a primordial stochastic magnetic field and sketching the main features of its time evolution in the primordial plasma, we illustrate the current upper bounds on the magnetic field amplitude and spectral index from Cosmic Microwave Background observations and gravitational wave production. We conclude that a primordial magnetic field generated by a non-causal process such as inflation with a red spectrum seems to be favoured as a seed for the magnetic fields observed today in structures.

  11. Strong magnetic fields and SGRs/AXPs as white dwarf pulsar: a source of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of highest energy cosmic rays still remains a mystery in Astrophysics. In this work we consider the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) as possible sources of ultra-high cosmic rays. These stars described as white dwarfs pulsars can achieved large electric potential differences in their surface and accelerate particles up to Lorentz factors γ ∼ 1010. Pulsars offer favorable sites for the injection of electrons and heavy nuclei, and accelerate them to ultrahigh energies. Once accelerated in the pulsar this particles can escape from the magnetosphere and produce the radiation observed. Here, we discuss the possibility of SGRs/AXPs as white dwarf pulsars to be possible sources of ultra-high energetic photons with E ∼ 1021eV.

  12. Constraints on the multi-lognormal magnetic fields from the observations of the cosmic microwave background and the matter power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Dai G; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2013-01-01

    Primordial magnetic fields (PMFs), which were generated in the early universe before recombination, affect the motion of plasma and then the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the matter power spectrum (MPS). We consider constraints on PMFs with a characteristic correlation length from the observations of the anisotropies of CMB (WMAP, QUAD, ACT, SPT, and ACBAR) and MPS. The spectrum of PMFs is modeled with multi-lognormal distributions (MLND), rather than power-law distribution, and we derive constraints on the strength $|\\mathbf{B}_k|$ at each wavenumber $k$ along with the standard cosmological parameters in the flat Universe and the foreground sources. We obtain upper bounds on the field strengths at $k=10^{-1}, 10^{-2},10^{-4}$ and $10^{-5}$ Mpc$^{-1}$ as 4.7 nG, 2.1 nG, 5.3 nG and 10.9 nG ($2\\sigma$ C.L.) respectively, while the field strength at $k=10^{-3} $Mpc$^{-1}$ turns out to have a finite value as $|\\mathbf{B}_{k = 10^{-3}}| = 6.2 \\pm 1.3 $ nG ($1\\sigma$ C.L.). This finite value is attributed t...

  13. Cosmic-ray diffusion in magnetized turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tautz, R C

    2015-01-01

    The problem of cosmic-ray scattering in the turbulent electromagnetic fields of the interstellar medium and the solar wind is of great importance due to the variety of applications of the resulting diffusion coefficients. Examples are diffusive shock acceleration, cosmic-ray observations, and, in the solar system, the propagation of coronal mass ejections. In recent years, it was found that the simple diffusive motion that had been assumed for decades is often in disagreement both with numerical and observational results. Here, an overview is given of the interaction processes of cosmic rays and turbulent electromagnetic fields. First, the formation of turbulent fields due to plasma instabilities is treated, where especially the non-linear behavior of the resulting unstable wave modes is discussed. Second, the analytical and the numerical side of high-energy particle propagation will be reviewed by presenting non-linear analytical theories and Monte-Carlo simulations. For the example of the solar wind, the im...

  14. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  15. Cosmic rays and stochastic magnetic reconnection in the heliotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Desiati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be generated by diffusive shock acceleration processes in Supernova Remnants, and the arrival direction is likely determined by the distribution of their sources throughout the Galaxy, in particular by the nearest and youngest ones. Transport to Earth through the interstellar medium is expected to affect the cosmic ray properties as well. However, the observed anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays and its energy dependence cannot be explained with diffusion models of particle propagation in the Galaxy. Within a distance of a few parsec, diffusion regime is not valid and particles with energy below about 100 TeV must be influenced by the heliosphere and its elongated tail. The observation of a highly significant localized excess region of cosmic rays from the apparent direction of the downstream interstellar flow at 1–10 TeV energies might provide the first experimental evidence that the heliotail can affect the transport of energetic particles. In particular, TeV cosmic rays propagating through the heliotail interact with the 100–300 AU wide magnetic field polarity domains generated by the 11 yr cycles. Since the strength of non-linear convective processes is expected to be larger than viscous damping, the plasma in the heliotail is turbulent. Where magnetic field domains converge on each other due to solar wind gradient, stochastic magnetic reconnection likely occurs. Such processes may be efficient enough to re-accelerate a fraction of TeV particles as long as scattering processes are not strong. Therefore, the fractional excess of TeV cosmic rays from the narrow region toward the heliotail direction traces sightlines with the lowest smearing scattering effects, that can also explain the observation of a harder than average energy spectrum.

  16. Constraining primordial magnetic fields with distortions of the black-body spectrum of the cosmic microwave background: pre- and post-decoupling contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kerstin E.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Primordial magnetic fields that exist before the photon-baryon decoupling epoch are damped on length scales below the photon diffusion and free-streaming scales. The energy injected into the plasma by dissipation of magnetosonic and Alfv&aposen waves heats photons, creating a y-type distortion of the black-body spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. This y-type distortion is converted into a μ-type distortion when elastic Compton scattering is efficient. Therefore, we can use observational limits on y- and μ-type distortions to constrain properties of magnetic fields in the early universe. Assuming a Gaussian, random, and non-helical field, we calculate μ and y as a function of the present-day strength of the field, B0, smoothed over a certain Gaussian width, kc-1, as well as of the spectral index of the power spectrum of fields, nB, defined by PB(k)proptoknB. For a nearly scale-invariant spectrum with nB = -2.9 and a Gaussian smoothing width of kc-1 = 1Mpc, the existing COBE/FIRAS limit on μ yields B0 FIRAS limit on μ excludes a wide range of spectral indices given by nB > -2.6. After decoupling, energy dissipation is due to ambipolar diffusion and decaying MHD turbulence, creating a y-type distortion. The distortion is completely dominated by decaying MHD turbulence, and is of order y ≈ 10-7 for a few nG field smoothed over the damping scale at the decoupling epoch, kd, dec ≈ 290(B0/1nG)-1Mpc-1. The projected PIXIE limit on y would exclude B0 > 1.0 and 0.6 nG for nB = -2.9 and -2.3, respectively, and B0 > 0.6 nG for nB >= 2. Finally, we find that the current limits on the optical depth to Thomson scattering restrict the predicted y-type distortion to be ylesssim10-8.

  17. New type scalar fields for cosmic acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehagias, A; Pakis, S [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, GR-15773, Zografou, Athens (Greece)

    2007-05-15

    We present a model where a non-conventional scalar field may act like dark energy and leads to cosmic acceleration. The latter is driven by an appropriate field configuration, which result in an effective cosmological constant. The potential role of such a scalar in the cosmological constant problem is also discussed.

  18. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and FERMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E greater than100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99 confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) x 10(sup -8) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (VERITAS,greater than 220 GeV) and approximately 2 x 10(sup -6) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be less than 16% from VERITAS data and less than 1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 50. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of approximately (2-5.5)microG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark

  19. Galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible.In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later c

  20. Constraining Cosmic Rays and Magnetic Fields in the Perseus Galaxy Cluster with TeV observations by the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; Backes, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Kellermann, H; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Niedzwiecki, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Paiano, S; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Gimenez, I Puerto; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A

    2011-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are being assembled today in the most energetic phase of hierarchical structure formation which manifests itself in powerful shocks that contribute to a substantial energy density of cosmic rays (CRs). Hence, clusters are expected to be luminous gamma-ray emitters since they also act as energy reservoirs for additional CR sources, such as active galactic nuclei and supernova-driven galactic winds. To detect the gamma-ray emission from CR interactions with the ambient cluster gas, we conducted the deepest to date observational campaign targeting a galaxy cluster at very high-energy gamma-rays and observed the Perseus cluster with the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes for a total of ~85 hr of effective observing time. This campaign resulted in the detection of the central radio galaxy NGC 1275 at energies E > 100 GeV with a very steep energy spectrum. Here, we restrict our analysis to energies E > 630 GeV and detect no significant gamma-ray excess. This constrains the average CR-to-thermal pressure rat...

  1. Acceleration and Particle Field Interactions of Cosmic Rays II: Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A; Ghoneim, M T; Hady, A

    2010-01-01

    Based on the generic acceleration model, which suggests different types of electromagnetic interactions between the cosmic charged particles and the different configurations of the electromagnetic (plasma) fields, the ultra high energy cosmic rays are studied. The plasma fields are assumed to vary, spatially and temporally. The well-known Fermi accelerations are excluded. Seeking for simplicity, it is assumed that the energy loss due to different physical processes is negligibly small. The energy available to the plasma sector is calculated in four types of electromagnetic fields. It has been found that the drift in a time--varying magnetic field is extremely energetic. The energy scale widely exceeds the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff. The polarization drift in a time--varying electric field is also able to raise the energy of cosmic rays to an extreme value. It can be compared with the Hillas mechanism. The drift in a spatially--varying magnetic field is almost as strong as the polarization drift. The...

  2. Measurements of Cosmic Magnetism with LOFAR and SKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Beck

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The origin of magnetic fields in stars, galaxies and clusters is an open problem in astrophysics. The next-generation radio telescopes Low Frequency Array (LOFAR and Square Kilometre Array (SKA will revolutionize the study of cosmic magnetism. "The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetism" is a key science project for SKA. The planned all-sky survey of Faraday rotation measures (RM at 1.4 GHz will be used to model the structure and strength of the magnetic fields in the intergalactic medium, the interstellar medium of intervening galaxies, and in the Milky Way. A complementary survey of selected regions at around 200 MHz is planned as a key project for LOFAR. Spectro-polarimetry applied to the large number of spectral channels available for LOFAR and SKA will allow to separate RM components from distinct foreground and background regions and to perform 3-D Faraday tomography of the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. – Deep polarization mapping with LOFAR and SKA will open a new era also in the observation of synchrotron emission from magnetic fields. LOFAR's sensitivity will allow to map the structure of weak, extended magnetic fields in the halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters, and possibly in the intergalactic medium. Polarization observations with SKA at higher frequencies (1–10 GHz will show the detailed magnetic field structure within the disks and central regions of galaxies, with much higher angular resolution than present-day radio telescopes.

  3. Cosmic rays, geomagnetic field and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M.; Smart, D.

    The possibility of a connection between cosmic radiation and climate has intrigued scientists for the past several decades. The recent studies of Friis -Christensen and Svensmark has shown an observed variation of 3-4% of the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be directly correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. However, in studies of this type, not only the solar cycle modulation of cosmic radiation must be considered, but also the changes in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the long term evolution of the geomagnetic field. We present preliminary results of an on-going study of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities over a 400-year interval. These results show (1) the change in cutoff rigidity is sufficient large so that the change in cosmic radiation flux impacting the earth is approximately equal to the relative change in flux over a solar cycle, and (2) the changes in cutoff rigidity are non- uniform over the globe with both significant increases and decreases at mid-latitude locations.

  4. A cosmic ray muon going through CMS with the magnet at full field. The line shows the path of the muon reconstructed from information recorded in the various detectors.

    CERN Multimedia

    Ianna, Osborne

    2007-01-01

    The event display of the event 3981 from the MTCC run 2605. The data has been taken with a magnetic field of 3.8 T. A detailed model of the magnetic field corresponding to 4T is shown as a color gradient from 4T in the center (red) to 0 T outside of the detector (blue). The cosmic muon has been detected by all four detectors participating in the run: the drift tubes, the HCAL, the tracker and the ECAL subdetectors and it has been reconstructed online. The event display shows the reconstructed 4D segments in the drift tubes (magenta), the reconstructed hits in HCAL (blue), the locally reconstructed track in the tracker (green), the uncalibrated rec hits in ECAL (light green). A muon track was reconstructed in the drift tubes and extrapolated back into the detector taking the magnetic field into account (green).

  5. A small-scale dynamo in feedback-dominated galaxies as the origin of cosmic magnetic fields. I-the kinematic phase

    CERN Document Server

    Rieder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical dynamo theories provide various mechanisms for magnetic field amplification inside galaxies, where weak initial fields grow exponentially on various timescales. We investigate the particular role played by stellar feedback mechanisms in creating strong fluid turbulence, allowing for a magnetic dynamo to emerge. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated cooling halos, for both dwarf and Milky Way sized objects, we compare the magnetic field evolution for various initial field topologies and various stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that feedback can indeed drive strong gas turbulence which gives rise to a fast exponential magnetic field growth. Our simulations feature typical properties of Kolmogorov turbulence with a $k ^{-5/3}$ kinetic energy spectrum, as well as the characteristic properties of a small-scale dynamo, with a $k^{3/2}$ magnetic energy spectrum as predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. In these feedback-dominated galaxies, stellar feedback provides forcing on large ...

  6. Earth's magnetic field as a radiator to detect cosmic ray electrons of energy greater than 10 to the 12th eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Stephens, S. A.

    1983-10-01

    Synchrotron emission by a high-energy electron in the geomagnetic field and its dependence upon different arrival directions over Palestine, Texas, where major balloon-borne experiments are being conducted, is studied. The dependence of detector response on the arrival direction of electron, the different criteria which are adopted to identify an electron event, the area of the detector, and the energy of the electron are discussed. An omnidirectional circular detector is used to examine whether it is possible to determine the energy of an electron without knowing its arrival direction. The collecting power of a detector is estimated as a function of the energy of electrons for different detector areas with different selection criteria, and this information is used to calculate the event rates expected by folding in the energy spectrum of cosmic ray electrons to show the viability of detecting cosmic ray electrons at energies greater than a few TeV.

  7. Cosmic electrodynamics electrodynamics and magnetic hydrodynamics of cosmic plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    This volume offers a deep and detailed overview of plasma behavior in diverse astrophysical conditions. The presentation is based on a solid science foundation that includes well established physical laws of electromagnetism, hydrodynamics, classical and quantum mechanics and other relevant fields of science. Qualitative ideas and descriptions are followed by quantitative derivations and estimates of key physical quantities, and the results of theories and models are confronted with modern observational data obtained from numerous international science programs. Fundamental astrophysical phenomena, such as charged particle acceleration and magnetic field generation, are presented along with spectacular phenomena, such as stellar winds (including ultra-relativistic pulsar wind), supernova explosions and evolution of its remnants, and solar flares.

  8. Kriging Interpolating Cosmic Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yu; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01

    [abridge] Volume-weighted statistics of large scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in mass-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number $n_k$ of the nearby particles to interpolate and the density $n_P$ of the observed sample are investigated. (1) We find that Kriging induces $1\\%$ and $3\\%$ systematics at $k\\sim 0.1h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ when $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-2} ({\\rm Mpc}/h)^{-3}$ and $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-3} ({\\rm Mpc...

  9. A small-scale dynamo in feedback-dominated galaxies as the origin of cosmic magnetic fields - I. The kinematic phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Michael; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-04-01

    The origin and evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe is still an open question. Their observations in galaxies suggest strong magnetic fields already at high redshift as well as at present time. However, neither primordial magnetic fields nor battery processes can account for such high field strengths, which implies the presence of a dynamo process with rapid growth rates in high-redshift galaxies and subsequent maintenance against decay. We investigate the particular role played by feedback mechanisms in creating strong fluid turbulence, allowing for a magnetic dynamo to emerge. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of isolated cooling gas haloes, we compare the magnetic field evolution for various initial field topologies and various stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that feedback can indeed drive strong gas turbulence and dynamo action. We see typical properties of Kolmogorov turbulence with a k-5/3 kinetic energy spectrum, as well as a small-scale dynamo, with a k3/2 magnetic energy spectrum predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. We also investigate simulations with a final quiescent phase. As turbulence decreases, the galactic fountain settles into a thin, rotationally supported disc. The magnetic field develops a large-scale well-ordered structure with even symmetry, which is in good agreement with magnetic field observations of nearby spirals. Our findings suggest that weak initial seed fields were first amplified by a small-scale dynamo during a violent feedback-dominated early phase in the galaxy formation history, followed by a more quiescent evolution, where the fields have slowly decayed or were maintained via large-scale dynamo action.

  10. Acceleration and Particle Field Interactions of Cosmic Rays I: Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A; Ghoneim, M T; Hady, A A

    2010-01-01

    The acceleration of cosmic rays is conjectured to be the output from various interactions with the electromagnetic fields in astrophysical bodies, like magnetic matter clumps, and from the well-known shock and stochastic Fermi mechanism. The latter apparently does not depend on the particle's charge, quantitatively. Therefore, the motion of the charged particle parallel to magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$ and under the influence of the force $\\mathbf{F}$. is assumed to be composed in an acceleration by non-magnetic force $\\mathbf{F}_{\\parallel}$ and gyromotion along $\\mathbf{B}$, plus a drift in direction of $\\mathbf{F}_{\\perp}$. In this letter, the model and its formalism are introduced. Also various examples for drift and accelerating forces are studied.

  11. Concerning the statistics of cosmic magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Iain A

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic fields appear to be a generic feature of the early universe and are a natural source of secondary CMB non-Gaussianity. In recent years the statistical nature of the stresses of a primordial magnetic field has been well studied. In this paper we confirm and extend these studies at one- and two-point level, and present analytical results for a wide range of power-law spectra. We also consider two non-power law cases of interest: a blue spectrum with an extended damping tail on small scales, which could be generated by the non-linear mixing of density and vorticity; and a red spectrum with a damping tail on large scales. We then briefly consider the CMB impacts that result from such fields. While this paper focuses on the one- and two-point moments, the techniques we employ are designed to ease the analysis of the full bispectra induced by primordial magnetic fields.

  12. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  13. Primordial Magnetic Fields and Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Caprini, Chiara

    2003-01-01

    In this letter we discuss the implications of causality on a primordial magnetic field. We show that the residual field on large scales is much stronger suppressed than usually assumed and that a helical component is even suppressed even more than the parity even part. We show that due to this strong suppression, even maximal primordial fields generated at the electroweak phase transition can just marginally seed the fields in galaxies and clusters, but they cannot leave any detectable imprint on the cosmic microwave background.

  14. Maxwell-Kostelecky electromagnetism and cosmic magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanelli, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)], E-mail: leonardo.campanelli@ba.infn.it; Cea, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.cea@ba.infn.it

    2009-05-11

    The Lorentz violating term in the photon sector of Standard Model Extension, L{sub K}=-1/4 (k{sub F}){sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}F{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}F{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} (here referred to as the Kostelecky term), breaks conformal invariance of electromagnetism and enables a superadiabatic amplification of magnetic vacuum fluctuations during inflation. For a wide range of values of parameters defining Lorentz symmetry violation and inflation, the present-day magnetic field can have an intensity of order of nanogauss on megaparsec scales and then could explain the large-scale magnetization of the universe.

  15. Searching for signals of magnetic lensing in ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golup, Geraldina; Harari, Diego; Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban, E-mail: golupg@ib.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: harari@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: roulet@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET and Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400, S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays are mostly charged particles and they are therefore deflected by magnetic fields on their path from their sources to Earth. An interesting phenomenon arising from these deflections is the appearance of multiple images of a source, i.e. cosmic rays with the same energy coming from the same source that can arrive to the Earth from different directions. In this work we present a technique to identify secondary images, produced by the regular component of the galactic magnetic field, benefiting from the fact that near caustics the flux is significantly magnified.

  16. Turbulence-induced magnetic fields in shock precursors

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, Maria Victoria; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be mostly accelerated at supernova shocks. However, the interstellar magnetic field is too weak to efficiently accelerate galactic cosmic rays up to the highest energies, i.e. $10^{15}$ eV. A stronger magnetic field in the pre-shock region could provide the efficiency required. Bell's cosmic-ray nonresonant streaming instability has been claimed to be responsible for the amplification of precursor magnetic fields. However, an alternative mechanism has been proposed in which the cosmic-ray pressure gradient forms the shock precursor and drives turbulence, amplifying the magnetic field via the small-scale dynamo. A key ingredient for the mechanism to operate are the inhomogeneities present in the interstellar medium (ISM). These inhomogeneities are the consequence of turbulence. In this work we explore the magnetic field amplification in different ISM conditions through 3D MHD numerical simulations.

  17. SKA Deep Polarization and Cosmic Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, A R; Akahori, Takuya; Beck, Rainer; Gaensler, Bryan; Heald, George; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Langer, Mathieu; Rudnick, Lawrence; Ryu, Dongsu; Scaife, Anna; Schleicher, Dominik; Stil, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Deep surveys with the SKA1-MID array offer for the first time the opportunity to systematically explore the polarization properties of the microJy source population. Our knowledge of the polarized sky approaching these levels is still very limited. In total intensity the population will be dominated by star-forming and normal galaxies to intermediate redshifts ($z \\sim1-2$), and low-luminosity AGN to high redshift. The polarized emission from these objects is a powerful probe of their intrinsic magnetic fields and of their magnetic environments. For redshift of order 1 and above the broad bandwidth of the mid-bands span the Faraday thick and thin regimes allowing study of the intrinsic polarization properties of these objects as well as depolarization from embedded and foreground plasmas. The deep field polarization images will provide Rotation Measures data with very high solid angle density allowing a sensitive statistical analysis of the angular variation of RM on critical arc-minute scales from a magnetic...

  18. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  19. Earth's magnetic field as a radiator to detect cosmic ray electrons of energy greater than 10 to the 12th power eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, S. A.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1983-07-01

    The synchrotron emission by electrons of energy greater than a few TeV in Earth's magnetic field was examined. An omnidirectional detector, it is shown, can be satisfactorily used to estimate the energy. The collecting power of the detector, it is also shown, is a sensitive function of the area of the detector, the energy of electron, and the number of photons required to identify an electron. The event rate expected was calculated using an ideal balloon-borne detector.

  20. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  1. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and Faraday rotation of the polarization angle are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \\upmu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \\upmu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \\upmu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium.—Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, in particular their first occurrence in young galaxies and their dynamical importance during galaxy evolution, will be studied with

  2. Thermodynamic properties of neutral particle in presence of Topological defects in Magnetic Cosmic String Background

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the covariant form of the non-relativistic Schrodinger-Pauli equation in the space-time generated by a cosmic string and discuss the solutions of this equation in present of interaction between the magnetic dipole momentum and electromagnetic field. We study the influence of the topology on this system. We obtain the solution of radial part as well as the energy levels. We consider all thermodynamic properties of neutral particle in magnetic cosmic string background by using an approach based on the partition function method.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of neutral particle in the presence of topological defects in magnetic cosmic string background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanabadi, H.; Hosseinpour, M. [Shahrood University of Technology, Physics Department, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we study the covariant form of the non-relativistic Schroedinger-Pauli equation in the space-time generated by a cosmic string and discuss the solutions of this equation in the presence of interaction between the magnetic dipole momentum and electromagnetic field. We study the influence of the topology on this system. We obtain the solution of radial part as well as the energy levels. We consider all thermodynamic properties of a neutral particle in a magnetic cosmic string background by using an approach based on the partition function method. (orig.)

  4. New knowledge of the Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of our Milky Way galaxy are the main agent for cosmic rays to transport. In the last decade, much new knowledge has been gained from measurements of the Galactic magnetic fields. In the Galactic disk, from the RMs of a large number of newly discovered pulsars, the large-scale magnetic fields along the spiral arms have been delineated in a much larger region than ever before, with alternating directions in the arm and interarm regions. The toroidal fields in the Galactic halo were revealed to have opposite directions below and above the Galactic plane, which is an indication of an A0 mode dynamo operating in the halo. The strength of large-scale fields obtained from pulsar RM data has been found to increase exponentially towards the Galactic center. Compared to the steep Kolmogorov spectrum of magnetic energy at small scales, the large-scale magnetic fields show a shallow broken spatial magnetic energy spectrum.

  5. A macroscopic description of coherent geo-magnetic radiation from cosmic-ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Rusydi, F.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electromagnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays due to the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers it simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower a

  6. Production of Magnetic Turbulence by Cosmic Rays Drifting Upstream of Supernova Remnant Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Niemiec, Jacek; Stroman, Thomas; Nishikawa, and Ken-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    We present results of 2D and 3D PIC simulations of magnetic turbulence production by isotropic cosmic-ray ions drifting upstream of SNR shocks. The studies aim at testing recent predictions of a strong amplification of short wavelength non-resonant wave modes and at studying the evolution of the magnetic turbulence and its backreaction on cosmic rays. We confirm the generation of the turbulent magnetic field due to the drift of cosmic rays in the upstream plasma, but show that an oblique filamentary mode grows more rapidly than the non resonant parallel modes found in analytical theory. The growth rate of the field perturbations is much slower than is estimated using a quasi-linear approach, and the amplitude of the turbulence saturates at about dB/B~1. The backreaction of the turbulence on the particles leads to an alignment of the bulk-flow velocities of the cosmic rays and the background medium, which is an essential characteristic of cosmic-ray modified shocks. It accounts for the saturation of the instab...

  7. The Cosmic Large-Scale Structure in X-rays (CLASSIX) Cluster Survey I: Probing galaxy cluster magnetic fields with line of sight rotation measures

    CERN Document Server

    Boehringer, Hans; Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    To search for a signature of an intracluster magnetic field, we compare measurements of Faraday rotation of polarised extragalactic radio sources in the line of sight of galaxy clusters with those outside. We correlated a catalogue of 1383 rotation measures (RM) of extragalactic polarised radio sources with X-ray luminous galaxy clusters from the CLASSIX survey (combining REFLEX II and NORAS II). We compared the RM in the line of sight of clusters within their projected radii of r_500 with those outside and found a significant excess of the dispersion of the RM in the cluster regions. Since the observed RM is the result of Faraday rotation in several presumably uncorrelated magnetised cells of the intracluster medium, the observations correspond to quantities averaged over several magnetic field directions and strengths. Therefore the interesting quantity is the standard deviation of the RM for an ensemble of clusters. We found a standard deviation of the RM inside r_500 of about 120 +- 21 rad m^-2. This comp...

  8. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  9. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  10. The First Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Widrow, Lawrence M; Schleicher, Dominik; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Tsagas, Christos G; Treumann, Rudolf A

    2011-01-01

    We review current ideas on the origin of galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. We begin by summarizing observations of magnetic fields at cosmological redshifts and on cosmological scales. These observations translate into constraints on the strength and scale magnetic fields must have during the early stages of galaxy formation in order to seed the galactic dynamo. We examine mechanisms for the generation of magnetic fields that operate prior during inflation and during subsequent phase transitions such as electroweak symmetry breaking and the quark-hadron phase transition. The implications of strong primordial magnetic fields for the reionization epoch as well as the first generation of stars is discussed in detail. The exotic, early-Universe mechanisms are contrasted with astrophysical processes that generate fields after recombination. For example, a Biermann-type battery can operate in a proto-galaxy during the early stages of structure formation. Moreover, magnetic fields in either an early genera...

  11. Constraining primordial magnetic fields with distortions of the black-body spectrum of the cosmic microwave background: pre- and post-decoupling contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2014-01-01

    Observational limits on $y$- and $\\mu$-type distortions can constrain properties of magnetic fields in the early universe. For a Gaussian, random, and non-helical field, $\\mu$ and $y$ are calculated a function of the present-day strength of the field, $B_0$, smoothed over a certain Gaussian width, $k_c^{-1}$, and spectral index, $n_B$, defined by $P_B(k)\\propto k^{n_B}$. For $n_B=-2.9$ and $k_c^{-1}=1 {\\rm Mpc}$, the COBE/FIRAS limit on $\\mu$ yields $B_0-2.6$. After decoupling, energy dissipation is due to ambipolar diffusion and decaying MHD turbulence, creating a $y$-type distortion. The distortion is completely dominated by decaying MHD turbulence, and is of order $y\\approx 10^{-7}$ for a few nG field smoothed over the damping scale at the decoupling epoch, $k_{d,dec}\\approx 290 (B_0/1 {\\rm nG})^{-1} {\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. This contribution is as large as those of the known contributions such as reionization and virialized objects at lower redshifts. The projected PIXIE limit on $y$ would exclude $B_0>1.0$ and 0...

  12. Solar-diurnal variations of Cosmic rays (CR), connected with the passage of the Earth through the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Fields (IMF) and the earthquake problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaradze, N.; Vanishvili, G.; Bakradze, T.; Kordzadze, L.; Bazerashvili, E.; Elizbarashvili, M.

    2013-02-01

    Key explanation on effect of Fundamental Law of Momentum Conservation is given on the basis of Cosmo-Physical processes, which can be connected with all kinds of recently known geo-effective phenomena. Many works have been devoted to searches of extraterrestrial sources of generation of earthquake initiation preconditions. There is a direct indication on the fact in these works that all kinds of geo-active fluxes of plasma, which goes ahead of strong geomagnetic storms, concomitant to the earthquakes, may be served as favourable conditions for earthquake appearance. If in one group of works, the increase of seismic activity during geo-active solar flare is reported, then in the other group of works, there is the direct indication on the fact, that it is necessary to study the mechanism of generation of electro-magnetic emanation in the seismically active regions of Earth. Certain strong destructive earthquakes are putting in touch by some authors with the outburst of cosmic rays in distant regions of Universe during stellar explosion of supernovae. It's impossible to avoid our attention from announcement of 100% increase of hard component of cosmic radiation above Yerevan 30 minutes ahead of 1988 Spitak Earthquake. And finally, the data on article, in which is shown that about 75% of earthquakes with magnitude M>=6 takes place during traverse of neutral layer of Interplanetary Magnetic Field by the Earth, in the presence of good correlation with 11-years cycle of Solar Activity. Above mentioned geo-effective phenomena, with an increasable amount, can be reviewed in frame of the Law of Momentum Conservation, if we take into account the peculiarities of its development for a given specific cases.

  13. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  14. Fermionic vacuum polarization by an Abelian magnetic tube in the cosmic string spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maior de Sousa, M. S.; Ribeiro, R. F.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a charged massive fermionic quantum field in the idealized cosmic string spacetime and in the presence of a magnetic field confined in a cylindrical tube of finite radius. Three distinct configurations for the magnetic fields are taken into account: (i) a cylindrical shell of radius a , (ii) a magnetic field proportional to 1 /r , and (iii) a constant magnetic field. In these three cases, the axis of the infinitely long tube of radius a coincides with the cosmic string. Our main objectives in this paper are to analyze the fermionic condensate (FC) and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the fermionic energy-momentum tensor. In order to do that, we explicitly construct the complete set of normalized wave functions for each configuration of the magnetic field. We show that in the region outside the tube, the FC and the VEV of the energy-momentum tensor are decomposed into two parts: The first ones correspond to the zero-thickness magnetic flux contributions, and the second ones are induced by the nontrivial structure of the magnetic field, named core-induced contributions. The latter present specific forms depending on the magnetic field configuration considered. We also show that the VEV of the energy-momentum tensor is diagonal and obeys the conservation condition, and its trace is expressed in terms of the fermionic condensate. The zero-thickness contributions to the FC and VEV of the energy-momentum tensor depend only on the fractional part of the ration of the magnetic flux inside the tube by the quantum one. As to the core-induced contributions, they depend on the total magnetic flux inside the tube and, consequently, in general, are not a periodic function of the magnetic flux.

  15. Fermionic vacuum polarization by a magnetic tube in the cosmic string spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, M S Maior; de Mello, E R Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a charged massive fermionic quantum field in the idealized cosmic string spacetime and in the presence of a magnetic field confined in a cylindrical tube of finite radius. Three distinct configurations for the magnetic fields are taken into account: (i) a cylindrical shell of radius $a$, (ii) a magnetic field proportional to $1/r$ and (iii) a constant magnetic field. In these three cases, the axis of the infinitely long tube of radius $a$ coincides with the cosmic string. Our main objectives in this paper are to analyze the fermionic condensat (FC) e and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the fermionic energy-momentum tensor. In order to do that, we explicitly construct the complete set of normalized wave-functions for each configuration of magnetic field. We show that in the region outside the tube, the FC and the VEV of the energy-momentum tensor are decomposed into two parts: the first ones correspond to the zero-thickness magnetic flux contributions, and the seconds are induc...

  16. UHECR propagation in the Galactic Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobiov, Serguei; Veberič, Darko

    2009-01-01

    Extensive simulations of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) propagation in the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) have been performed, and the results are presented. The use of different available models of the large-scale GMF and/or primary particle assumptions leads to distinctly different deflection patterns of the highest energy cosmic rays (CR). The lensing effects of the Galactic field modify the exposure of an UHECR experiment to the extragalactic sky. To quantify these effects for the Pierre Auger experiment, we performed a correlation analysis of the simulated cosmic ray event samples, backtracked from the Earth to the Galactic border, with the active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the 12th edition of the V\\'eron-Cetty and V\\'eron catalogue. Further forward-tracking studies under plausible UHECR sources scenarios are needed to allow for direct comparison with the observed correlation between the nearby AGN and the highest energy Auger events.

  17. Electro- and Magnetostatics of a Cosmic Pseudoscalar Field Coupled to Electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Robert; Motta, Leonardo dias da [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    A spatially-inhomogeneous, time-varying cosmic pseudoscalar field coupled to electromagnetism via the Chern-Simons invariant F{sub m}u{sub n}uF-tilde{sup m}u{sup n}u acts as a new source of charge and current for electromagnetic fields. We evaluate the magnetic field produced by a static electric charge, and the electric field resulting from a stationary current. We show that the pseudoscalar exerts a torque on objects carrying both electric charge and a magnetic moment.

  18. De Magnete et Meteorite: Cosmically Motivated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, LH; Pinkerton, FE; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Poirier, E; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2014-01-01

    Meteorites, likely the oldest source of magnetic material known to mankind, are attracting renewed interest in the science and engineering community. Worldwide focus is on tetrataenite, a uniaxial ferromagnetic compound with the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure comprised of nominally equiatomic Fe-Ni that is found naturally in meteorites subjected to extraordinarily slow cooling rates, as low as 0.3 K per million years. Here, the favorable permanent magnetic properties of bulk tetrataenite derived from the meteorite NWA 6259 are quantified. The measured magnetization approaches that of Nd-Fe-B (1.42 T) and is coupled with substantial anisotropy (1.0-1.3 MJ/m(3)) that implies the prospect for realization of technologically useful coercivity. A highly robust temperature dependence of the technical magnetic properties at an elevated temperature (20-200 degrees C) is confirmed, with a measured temperature coefficient of coercivity of -0.005%/ K, over one hundred times smaller than that of Nd-Fe-B in the same temperature range. These results quantify the extrinsic magnetic behavior of chemically ordered tetrataenite and are technologically and industrially significant in the current context of global supply chain limitations of rare-earth metals required for present-day high-performance permanent magnets that enable operation of a myriad of advanced devices and machines.

  19. Forbush decrease in the intensity of cosmic rays in a toroidal model of a magnetic cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The time dynamics of the particle distribution function in a magnetic cloud with the shape of a toroidal segment with the characteristic (forceless) structure of a magnetic field has been calculated. The shape of the cloud at the subsequent propagation in the interplanetary space has been determined by the kinematic model. The magnetic field of the cloud is calculated using the freezing-in condition. A significant effect of regions connecting the magnetic cloud with the Sun on the propagation of particles in the region of perturbation has been revealed. The calculation of the particle density and anisotropy of the intensity demonstrates reasonable agreement with the measurements. The results indicate the decisive role of the characteristic structure of the magnetic field in the time dynamics of the Forbush decrease in the intensity of cosmic rays.

  20. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar-, vector-, and tensor-type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as aB(k,z)~4×10Gμ/1k)3.5 gauss on super-horizon scales, and aB(k,z)~2.4×10Gμ/1k)2.5 gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, and has a final amplitude of approximately B~10Gμ gauss at the k~1 Mpc scale today. This field might serve as a seed for cosmological magnetic fields.

  1. Induced fermionic current by a magnetic tube in the cosmic spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, M S Maior; de Mello, E R Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a charged massive fermionic quantum field in the space-time of an idealized cosmic string, in the presence of a magnetic field confined in a cylindrical tube of finite radius. Three distinct configurations for the magnetic field is taken into account: (i) a cylindrical shell of radius $a$, (ii) a magnetic field proportional to $1/r$ and (iii) a constant magnetic field. In these three cases, the axis of the infinitely long tube of radius $a$ coincides with the cosmic string. Our main objective is to analyze the induced vacuum fermionic current densities outside the tube. In order to do that, we explicitly construct the wave-functions inside and outside the tube for each case. Having the complete set of normalized wave-functions, we use the summation method to develop our analysis. We show that in the region outside the tube, the induced currents are decomposed into a parts corresponding to a zero-thickness magnetic flux in addition to a core-induced contributions. The latter presents...

  2. Cosmic Electromagnetic Fields due to Perturbations in the Gravitational Field

    CERN Document Server

    Mongwane, Bishop; Osano, Bob

    2012-01-01

    We use non-linear gauge-invariant perturbation theory to study the interaction of an inflation produced seed magnetic field with density and gravitational wave perturbations in an almost Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We compare the effects of this coupling under the assumptions of poor conductivity, infinite conductivity and the case where the electric field is sourced via the coupling of velocity perturbations to the seed field in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime, thus generalizing, improving on and correcting previous results. We solve our equations for long wavelength limits and numerically integrate the resulting equations to generate power spectra for the electromagnetic field variables, showing where the modes cross the horizon. We find that the rotation of the electric field dominates the power spectrum on small scales, in agreement with previous arguments.

  3. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, M; Fassbender, J; Hillebrands, B

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization ...

  4. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  5. Magnetic field amplification in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in astrophysical accretion discs, and in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. They drive jets, suppress fragmentation in star-forming clouds and can have a significant impact on the accretion rate of stars. However, the exact amplification mechanisms of cosmic magnetic fields remain relatively poorly understood. Here I start by reviewing recent advances in the numerical and theoretical modelling of the 'turbulent dynamo', which may explain the origin of galactic and inter-galactic magnetic fields. While dynamo action was previously investigated in great detail for incompressible plasmas, I here place particular emphasis on highly compressible astrophysical plasmas, which are characterised by strong density fluctuations and shocks, such as the interstellar medium. I find that dynamo action works not only in subsonic plasmas, but also in highly supersonic, compressible plasmas, as well as for low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers. I further present new numerical simu...

  6. Exclusion of Cosmic Rays in Protoplanetary Disks: Stellar and Magnetic Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) Cosmic rays (CRs) are thought to provide an important source of ionization in the outermost and densest regions of protoplanetary disks; however, it is unknown to what degree they are physically present. As is observed in the Solar System, stellar winds can inhibit the propagation of cosmic rays within the circumstellar environment and subsequently into the disk. In this work, we explore the hitherto neglected effects of cosmic ray modulation by both stellar winds and magnetic field structures and study how these processes act to reduce disk ionization rates. We construct a two-dimensional protoplanetary disk model of a T-Tauri star system, focusing on ionization from stellar and interstellar FUV, stellar X-ray photons, and cosmic rays. We show that stellar winds can power a Heliosphere-like analogue, i.e., a "T-Tauriosphere," diminishing cosmic ray ionization rates by several orders of magnitude at low to moderate CR energies (E_CR<1 GeV). We explore models of both the observed solar wind cosmi...

  7. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, K; Mulrey, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T C; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R J; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2016-04-08

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  8. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, K.; Mulrey, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Wissel, S. A.; Zilles, A.; Bechtol, K.; Borch, K.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Hyneman, R.; Jobe, K.; Kuwatani, K.; Lam, J.; Liu, T. C.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C.; Nichol, R. J.; Rauch, B. F.; Rotter, B.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Seckel, D.; Strutt, B.; Vieregg, A. G.; Williams, C.; T-510 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  9. Regional cosmic ray induced ionization and geomagnetic field changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kovaltsov

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII is an important factor of outer space influences on atmospheric properties. Variations of CRII are caused by two different processes – solar activity variations, which modulate the cosmic ray flux in interplanetary space, and changes of the geomagnetic field, which affects the cosmic ray access to Earth. Migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may greatly alter CRII in some regions on a time scale of centuries and longer. Here we present a study of CRII regional effects of the geomagnetic field changes during the last millennium for two regions: Europe and the Far East. We show that regional effects of the migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may overcome global changes due to solar activity variations.

  10. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  11. Cosmic expansion from boson and fermion fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, Rudinei C; Kremer, Gilberto M, E-mail: rudijantsch@gmail.com, E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2011-06-21

    This paper consists in analyzing an action that describes boson and fermion fields minimally coupled to the gravity and a common matter field. The self-interaction potentials of the fields are not chosen a priori but from the Noether symmetry approach. The Noether forms of the potentials allow the boson field to play the role of dark energy and matter and the fermion field to behave as standard matter. The constant of motion and the cyclic variable associated with the Noether symmetry allow the complete integration of the field equations, whose solution produces a universe with alternated periods of accelerated and decelerated expansion.

  12. Cosmic expansion from boson and fermion fields

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza, Rudinei C

    2011-01-01

    This paper consists in analyzing an action that describes boson and fermion fields minimally coupled to the gravity and a common matter field. The self-interaction potentials of the fields are not chosen a priori but from the Noether symmetry approach. The Noether forms of the potentials allow the boson field to play the role of dark energy and matter and the fermion field to behave as standard matter. The constant of motion and the cyclic variable associated with the Noether symmetry allow the complete integration of the field equations, whose solution produces a Universe with alternated periods of accelerated and decelerated expansion.

  13. A non-parametric model for the cosmic velocity field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branchini, E; Teodoro, L; Frenk, CS; Schmoldt, [No Value; Efstathiou, G; White, SDM; Saunders, W; Sutherland, W; Rowan-Robinson, M; Keeble, O; Tadros, H; Maddox, S; Oliver, S

    1999-01-01

    We present a self-consistent non-parametric model of the local cosmic velocity field derived from the distribution of IRAS galaxies in the PSCz redshift survey. The survey has been analysed using two independent methods, both based on the assumptions of gravitational instability and linear biasing.

  14. Magnetic field contribution to the last electron-photon scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    When the cosmic microwave photons scatter electrons just prior to the decoupling of matter and radiation, magnetic fields do contribute to the Stokes matrix as well as to the scalar, vector and tensor components of the transport equations for the brightness perturbations. The magnetized electron-photon scattering is hereby discussed in general terms by including, for the first time, the contribution of magnetic fields with arbitrary direction and in the presence of the scalar, vector and tens...

  15. Cosmic Radiation Fields: Sources in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Martin; Kneiske, Tanja; Horns, Dieter; Elsaesser, Dominik; Hauschildt, Peter

    The workshop "Cosmic Radiation Fields - Sources in the Early Universe" (CRF 2010) focuses on the connection between the extragalactic infrared background and sources in the early universe, in particular stars powered by dark matter burning (Dark Stars; DS). The workshop covers the following topics: the cosmic infrared background, formation of early stars, dark stars, effect of dark matter in the early universe, dark matter halos, primordial star formation rate, and reionization. Further information can be found on the conference webpage: http://www.desy.de/crf2010/. Organizing committee: Tanja Kneiske, Martin Raue, Dominik Elsaesser, Alexander Gewering-Peine, Peter Hausschildt, Dieter Horns, and Andreas Maurer.

  16. The evolution of primordial magnetic fields since their generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Brandenburg, Axel; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2016-10-01

    We study the evolution of primordial magnetic fields in an expanding cosmic plasma. For this purpose we present a comprehensive theoretical model to consider the evolution of MHD turbulence that can be used over a wide range of physical conditions, including cosmological and astrophysical applications. We model different types of decaying cosmic MHD turbulence in the expanding Universe and characterize the large-scale magnetic fields in such a medium. Direct numerical simulations of freely decaying MHD turbulence are performed for different magnetogenesis scenarios: magnetic fields generated during cosmic inflation as well as electroweak and QCD phase transitions in the early Universe. Magnetic fields and fluid motions are strongly coupled due to the high Reynolds number in the early Universe. Hence, we abandon the simple adiabatic dilution model to estimate magnetic field amplitudes in the expanding Universe and include turbulent mixing effects on the large-scale magnetic field evolution. Numerical simulations have been carried out for non-helical and helical magnetic field configurations. The numerical results show the possibility of inverse transfer of energy in magnetically dominated non-helical MHD turbulence. On the other hand, decay properties of helical turbulence depend on whether the turbulent magnetic field is in a weakly or a fully helical state. Our results show that primordial magnetic fields can be considered as a seed for the observed large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies and clusters. Bounds on the magnetic field strength are obtained and are consistent with the upper and lower limits set by observations of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  17. Forbush decreases in cosmic-ray intensity and large-scale magnetic configuration of interplanetary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badruddin [Aligarth Muslim Univ., Aligarth (India). Dept. of Physics

    2000-06-01

    The paper presents the results of an analysis to study the effects of shock front, sheath region and driver gas (ejecta) on the transient decreases of cosmic-ray intensity. In this work interplanetary plasma and field data along with hourly neutron monitor cosmic-ray intensity records have been subjected to superposed epoch analysis. The variations in interplanetary plasma/field parameters (viz. solar wind speed, magnetic field strength and its variance) and cosmic-ray intensity during the passage of individual transient interplanetary structures have also studied. The sudden decrease in intensity starts after the arrival of certain shocks. The shock front itself is not sufficient for the Forbush decreases but the turbulence generated in sheath region appears to be its main cause. A shock structure is that the extent of the shock front is much more than the ejecta and magnetic turbulence is usually present in the limited region of sheath. Based on this, the reason behind the observation that all the shock-associated disturbances do not produce Forbush decreases on reaching the Earth is discussed.

  18. Solar Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2008-03-01

    Since the structuring and variability of the Sun and other stars are governed by magnetic fields, much of present-day stellar physics centers around the measurement and understanding of the magnetic fields and their interactions. The Sun, being a prototypical star, plays a unique role in astrophysics, since its proximity allows the fundamental processes to be explored in detail. The PRL anniversary gives us an opportunity to look back at past milestones and try to identify the main unsolved issues that will be addressed in the future.

  19. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    CERN Document Server

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar--, vector-- and tensor--type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as $a^2B(k,z)\\sim4\\times10^{-16}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{4.25}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{3.5}$ Gauss on super-horizon scales, and $a^2B(k,z)\\sim2.4\\times10^{-17}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{3.5}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{2.5}$ Gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, ...

  20. Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-01-01

    A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by $B\\sim{10^{-9}}{((1+z)/10^3)^{-2.5}}({v}/{m_{\\rm pl}})^2({k}/{\\rm Mpc^{-1}})^{3.5}/{\\sqrt{N}}$ Gauss in the radiation dominated era for $k\\lesssim 1$ Mpc$^{-1}$, with $v$ being the vacuum ...

  1. Solar Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hood, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an introduction to the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field, summarising both observational evidence and theoretical models. The eleven year solar cycle, which is well known from a variety of observed quantities, strongly supports the idea of a large-scale solar dynamo. Current theoretical ideas on the location and mechanism of this dynamo are presented. The solar cycle influences the behaviour of the global coronal magnetic field and it is the eruptions of this field that can impact on the Earth's environment. These global coronal variations can be modelled to a surprising degree of accuracy. Recent high resolution observations of the Sun's magnetic field in quiet regions, away from sunspots, show that there is a continual evolution of a small-scale magnetic field, presumably produced by small-scale dynamo action in the solar interior. Sunspots, a natural consequence of the large-scale dynamo, emerge, evolve and disperse over a period of several days. Numerical simulation...

  2. The interaction of a very large interplanetary magnetic cloud with the magnetosphere and with cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepping, R.P.; Burlaga, L.F.; Ogilvie, K.W. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA)); Tsurutani, B.T. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA)); Lazarus, A.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA)); Evans, D.S. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., Inc., Palo Alto, CA (USA)); Klein, L.W. (Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD (USA))

    1991-06-01

    A large interplanetary magnetic cloud has been observed in the mid-December 1982 data from ISEE 3. It is estimated to have a heliocentric radial extent of {approx gt} 0.4 AU, making it one of the largest magnetic clouds yet observed at 1 AU. The magnetic field measured throughout the main portion of the cloud was fairly tightly confined to a plane as it changed direction by 174 {degree} while varying only moderately in magnitude. Throughout nearly the entire duration of the cloud's passage, IMP 8 was located in the Earth's dawn magnetosheath providing observations of this cloud's interaction with the bow shock and magnetopause; the cloud is shown to maintain its solar wind characteristics during the interaction. Near the end of the cloud passage, at 0806 UT on December 17, ISEE 3 (and IMP 8 at nearly the same time) observed an oblique fast forward interplanetary shock closely coincident in time with a geomagnetic storm sudden commencement. The shock, moving much faster than the cloud (radial speeds of 700 and 390 km/s, respectively, on the average), was in the process of overtaking the cloud. The index Dst decreased monotonically by {approx} 130 nT during the 2-day cloud passage by the Earth and was well correlated with the B{sub z}component of the interplanetary magnetic field. There was no significant decrease in the cosmic ray intensity recorded by ground-based neutron monitors at this time of rather strong, smoothly changing fields. However, a Forbush decrease did occur immediately after the interplanetary shock, during a period of significant field turbulence. Thus a large, smooth, interplanetary helical magnetic field configuration engulfing the Earth does not necessarily deflect cosmic rays sufficiently to cause a Forbush decrease, but there is a suggestion that such a decrease may be caused by particle scattering by turbulent magnetic fields.

  3. Solar wind induced magnetic field around the unmagnetized Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Birk, G T; Konz, C

    2004-01-01

    The Earth is a planet with a dipolar magnetic field which is agitated by a magnetized plasma wind streaming from the Sun. The magnetic field shields the Earth's surface from penetrating high energy solar wind particles, as well as interstellar cosmic rays. The magnetic dipole has reversed sign some hundreds of times over the last 400 million years. These polarity reversals correspond to drastic breakdowns of the dynamo action. The question arises what the consequences for the Earth's atmosphere, climate, and, in particular, biosphere are. It is shown by kinematic estimates and three-dimensional plasma-neutral gas simulations that the solar wind can induce very fast a magnetic field in the previously completely unmagnetized Earth's ionosphere that is strong enough to protect Earth from cosmic radiations comparable to the case of an intact magnetic dynamo.

  4. CAPRICE98: A balloon borne magnetic spectrometer to study cosmic ray antimatter and composition at different atmospheric depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriola, M.L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bartalucci, S.; Basini, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bergstroem, D.; Bocciolini, M.; Boezio, M.; Bravar, U.; Cafagna, F.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellano, M.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; De Pascale, M.P.; Finetti, N.; Francke, T.; Hof, M.; Kremer, J.; Menn, W.; Mitchell, J.W.; Morselli, A.; Ormes, J.F.; Papini, P.; Perego, A.; Piccardi, S.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Schiavon, P.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stephens, S.A.; Stochaj, S.J.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suffert, M.; Vacchi, A.; Weber, N.; Zampa, N

    1999-08-01

    CAPRICE98 is a superconducting magnetic spectrometer built by the WiZard collaboration. It was launched from Ft. Sumner, NM, USA on the 28th of May 1998. For the first time a gas RICH detector has been flown together with a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter. The instrument configuration included a time of flight detector and a drift chamber stack, which were placed in the region of a magnet field, for rigidity measurement. Science objectives for this experiment include the study of antimatter in cosmic rays and that of cosmic ray composition in the atmosphere with special focus on muons.

  5. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  6. Cosmic Web of Galaxies in the COMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Behnam; Martin, Christopher D.; Mobasher, Bahram; Scoville, Nicholas; Sobral, David; COSMOS science Team

    2017-01-01

    We use a mass complete sample of galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field to estimate the density field and to extract the components of the cosmic web. The comic web extraction algorithm relies on the signs and the ratio of eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix and is enable to integrate the density field into clusters, filaments and the field. We show that at z 0.8, the trend flattens out. For star-forming galaxies only, the median star-formation rate declines by ~ 0.3-0.4 dex from the field to clusters for both satellites and centrals, only at z < 0.5. We argue that for satellite galaxies, the main role of the cosmic web environment is to control their star-forming/quiescent fraction, whereas for centrals, it is mainly to control their overall star-formation rate. Given these, we suggest that most satellite galaxies experience a rapid quenching mechanism as they fall from the field into clusters through the channel of filaments, whereas for central galaxies, it is mostly due to a slow quenching process. Our preliminary results highlight the importance of the large-scale cosmic web on the evolution of galaxies.

  7. Cosmic Ray Acceleration by E-Parallel Reconnection of Force-Free Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui

    2004-01-01

    We propose that nearly every accelerated CR was part of the parallel current that maintains all force-free (f-f) magnetic fields. Charged particles are accelerated by the E-parallel (to the magnetic filed B) produced by reconnection. The inferred total energy in extra-galactic cosmic rays is 10^(60) ergs per galaxy spacing volume, provided that acceleration mechanisms assumed do not preferentially only accelerate ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). This total energy is about 10^5 times the parent galactic CR or magnetic energy. The formation energy of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at galaxy centers, 10^(62) ergs, becomes the only feasible source. An efficient dynamo process converts gravitational free energy into magnetic energy in an accretion disk around a SMBH. Aided by Keplerian winding, this dynamo converts a poloidal seed field into f-f fields, which are transported into the general inter-galactic medium (IGM). This magnetic energy is also efficiently converted into particle energies, as evidence...

  8. Cosmic string interactions induced by gauge and scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kabat, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction between two parallel cosmic strings induced by gauge fields and by scalar fields with non-minimal couplings to curvature. For small deficit angles the gauge field behaves like a collection of non-minimal scalars with a specific value for the non-minimal coupling. We check this equivalence by computing the interaction energy between strings at first order in the deficit angles. This result provides another physical context for the "contact terms" which play an important role in the renormalization of black hole entropy due to a spin-1 field.

  9. Discovery at Young Star Hints Magnetism Common to All Cosmic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Astronomers have found the first evidence of a magnetic field in a jet of material ejected from a young star, a discovery that points toward future breakthroughs in understanding the nature of all types of cosmic jets and of the role of magnetic fields in star formation. Throughout the Universe, jets of subatomic particles are ejected by three phenomena: the supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies, smaller black holes or neutron stars consuming material from companion stars, and young stars still in the process of gathering mass from their surroundings. Previously, magnetic fields were detected in the jets of the first two, but until now, magnetic fields had not been confirmed in the jets from young stars. "Our discovery gives a strong hint that all three types of jets originate through a common process," said Carlos Carrasco-Gonzalez, of the Astrophysical Institute of Andalucia Spanish National Research Council (IAA-CSIC) and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to study a young star some 5,500 light-years from Earth, called IRAS 18162-2048. This star, possibly as massive as 10 Suns, is ejecting a jet 17 light-years long. Observing this object for 12 hours with the VLA, the scientists found that radio waves from the jet have a characteristic indicating they arose when fast-moving electrons interacted with magnetic fields. This characteristic, called polarization, gives a preferential alignment to the electric and magnetic fields of the radio waves. "We see for the first time that a jet from a young star shares this common characteristic with the other types of cosmic jets," said Luis Rodriguez, of UNAM. The discovery, the astronomers say, may allow them to gain an improved understanding of the physics of the jets as well as of the role magnetic fields play in forming new stars. The jets from young stars, unlike the other types, emit radiation

  10. Simulating magnetic fields in the Antennae galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kotarba, H; Naab, T; Johansson, P H; Dolag, K; Lesch, H

    2009-01-01

    We present self-consistent high-resolution simulations of NGC4038/4039 (the "Antennae galaxies") including star formation, supernova feedback and magnetic fields performed with the N-body/SPH code Gadget, in which hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics are followed with the SPH method. We vary the initial magnetic field in the progenitor disks from 1 nG to 1 muG. At the time of the best match with the central region of the Antennae system the magnetic field has been amplified by compression and shear flows to an equilibrium field of approximately 10 muG, independent of the initial seed field. This simulations are a proof of the principle that galaxy mergers are efficient drivers for the cosmic evolution of magnetic fields. We present a detailed analysis of the magnetic field structure in the central overlap region. Simulated radio and polarization maps are in good morphological and quantitative agreement with the observations. In particular, the two cores with the highest synchrotron intensity and ridges of r...

  11. Enhanced interplanetary magnetic fields as the cause of Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1975-01-01

    A strong correlation is observed between neutron monitor variations and variations in the interplanetary magnetic field intensity. It is thought that the cosmic ray intensity depressions are caused by perpendicular gradient drifts. The perpendicular gradient drift velocity for particles with energies exceeding 500 MeV in a magnetic field configuration produced by a representative stream is at least a few times the solar wind velocity. Thus particles can be swept away from the ecliptic by such a blob faster than the blob advances. It is suggested that this mechanism might be the cause of Forbush decreases and other cosmic ray variations near 1 AU.

  12. Skewon field and cosmic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2013-01-01

    For the study of the gravitational coupling of electromagnetism and the equivalence principle, we have used the spacetime constitutive tensor density {chi}ijkl, and discovered the nonmetric (axion) part (A){chi}ijkl (equal to {phi}eijkl) of {chi}ijkl worthy investigation. Since we have used Lagrangian formalism, {chi}ijkl is effectively symmetric under the interchange of index pairs, ij and kl, and has 21 independent degrees of freedom. Hehl, Obukhov and Rubilar have started from charge-flux formalism to study electromagnetism, discovered the antisymmetric part (Sk){chi}ijkl (15 degrees of freedom) of {chi}ijkl under the interchange of index pairs ij and kl worthy investigation, and called it skewon field. In this paper, we study the propagation of the Hehl-Obukhov-Rubilar skewon field in weak gravity field/dilute matter or with weak violation of the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP), and further classify it into Type I and Type II skewons. From the dispersion relation we show that no dissipation/no amplif...

  13. Weak cosmic censorship, dyonic Kerr-Newman black holes and Dirac fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsolt Tóth, Gábor

    2016-06-01

    It was investigated recently, with the aim of testing the weak cosmic censorship conjecture, whether an extremal Kerr black hole can be converted into a naked singularity by interaction with a massless classical Dirac test field, and it was found that this is possible. We generalize this result to electrically and magnetically charged rotating extremal black holes (i.e. extremal dyonic Kerr-Newman black holes) and massive Dirac test fields, allowing magnetically or electrically uncharged or nonrotating black holes and the massless Dirac field as special cases. We show that the possibility of the conversion is a direct consequence of the fact that the Einstein-Hilbert energy-momentum tensor of the classical Dirac field does not satisfy the null energy condition, and is therefore not in contradiction with the weak cosmic censorship conjecture. We give a derivation of the absence of superradiance of the Dirac field without making use of the complete separability of the Dirac equation in the dyonic Kerr-Newman background, and we determine the range of superradiant frequencies of the scalar field. The range of frequencies of the Dirac field that can be used to convert a black hole into a naked singularity partially coincides with the superradiant range of the scalar field. We apply horizon-penetrating coordinates, as our arguments involve calculating quantities at the event horizon. We describe the separation of variables for the Dirac equation in these coordinates, although we mostly avoid using it.

  14. On the Magnetic Evolution in Friedmann Universes and the Question of Cosmic Magnetogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos G. Tsagas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the evolution of primordial magnetic fields in spatially flat Friedmann universes and reconsider the belief that, after inflation, these fields decay adiabatically on all scales. Without abandoning classical electromagnetism or standard cosmology, we demonstrate that this is not necessarily the case for superhorizon-sized magnetic fields. The underlying reason for this is causality, which confines the post-inflationary process of electric-current formation, electric-field elimination and magnetic-flux freezing within the horizon. As a result, the adiabatic magnetic decay is not a priori guaranteed on super-Hubble scales. Instead, after inflation, large-scale magnetic fields obey a power-law solution, where one of the modes drops at a rate slower than the adiabatic. Whether this slowly decaying mode can dominate and dictate the post-inflationary magnetic evolution depends on the initial conditions. These are determined by the evolution of the field during inflation and by the nature of the transition from the de Sitter phase to the reheating era and then to the subsequent epochs of radiation and dust. We discuss two alternative and complementary scenarios to illustrate the role and the implications of the initial conditions for cosmic magnetogenesis. Our main claim is that magnetic fields can be superadiabatically amplified after inflation, as long as they remain outside the horizon. This means that inflation-produced fields can reach astrophysically relevant residual strengths without breaking away from standard physics. Moreover, using the same causality arguments, one can constrain (or in some cases assist the non-conventional scenarios of primordial magnetogenesis that amplify their fields during inflation. Finally, we show that our results extend naturally to the marginally open and the marginally closed Friedmann universes.

  15. Assessing the Structure of Isotropic and Anisotropic Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Holden, Lisa; Grayson, Lindsay; Wallace, Kirk

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields permeate our universe, impacting a wide range of astronomical phenomena across all cosmic scales. A clear example is the magnetic field that threads the interstellar medium (ISM), which impacts the motion of cosmic rays through that medium. Understanding the structure of magnetic turbulence within the ISM and how it relates to the physical quantities that characterize it can thus inform our analysis of particle transport within these regions. Toward that end, we probe the structure of magentic turbulence through the use of Lyapunov exponents for a suite of isotropic and nonisotropic Alfvénic turbulence profiles. Our results provide a means of calculating a “turbulence lengthscale” that can then be connected to how cosmic rays propagate through magentically turbulent environments, and we perform such an analysis for molecular cloud environments.

  16. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  17. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  18. Forbush decreases and interplanetary magnetic field disturbances: Association with magnetic clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, J.A.; Webber, W.R. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (USA)); Debrunner, H. (Univ. of Bern (Switzerland))

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic clouds have been proposed as a mechanism to produce Forbush decreases in the cosmic radiation. The authors have examined the temporal association of magnetic clouds and Forbush decreases and find practically no association of the main phase of the Forbush decrease with the arrival of a magnetic cloud. On the other hand, Forbush decreases generally follow the strong interplanetary shocks which sometimes precede magnetic clouds. The main phase of the cosmic ray decrease occurs 2-5 hours after the shock and during the passage of the region in which the magnetic field is disturbed. It appears that a Forbush decrease is more likely to occur following a shock in which the magnetic field and plasma parameters are strongly enhanced. These results indicate that the decrease of the cosmic ray intensity may be produced by the smaller diffusion coefficient in the region behind the shock. The sweeping effect of the enhanced magnetic field associated with the fast shock also probably contributes to the rapid depression of the cosmic ray intensity seen in some decreases.

  19. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  20. Experimental model of topological defects in Minkowski spacetime based on disordered ferrofluid: magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the spacetime cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I; Smolyaninov, Alexei I

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid in the presence of external magnetic field forms a self-assembled hyperbolic metamaterial. Wave equation describing propagation of extraordinary light inside the ferrofluid exhibits 2+1 dimensional Lorentz symmetry. The role of time in the corresponding effective 3D Minkowski spacetime is played by the spatial coordinate directed along the periodic nanoparticle chains aligned by the magnetic field. Here we present a microscopic study of point, linear and volume defects of the nanoparticle chain structure and demonstrate that they may exhibit strong similarities with such Minkowski spacetime defects as magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the recently proposed spacetime cloaks. Experimental observations of such defects are described.

  1. Circular dichroism, magnetic knots and the spectropolarimetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    When the last electron-photon scattering takes place in a magnetized environment, the degree of circular polarization of the outgoing radiation depends upon the magnetic field strength. After deriving the scattering matrix of the process, the generalized radiative transfer equations are deduced in the presence of the relativistic fluctuations of the geometry and for all the four brightness perturbations. The new system of equations is solved under the assumption that the incident radiation is not polarized. The induced V-mode polarization is analyzed both analytically and numerically. The corresponding angular power spectra are calculated and compared with the measured (or purported) values of the linear polarizations (i.e. E-mode and B-mode) as they arise in the concordance model and in its neighboring extensions. Possible connections between the V-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave background and the topological properties of the magnetic flux lines prior to equality are outlined and briefly explored...

  2. The Unified First law in "Cosmic Triad" Vector Field Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we try to apply the unified first law to the "cosmic triad" vector field scenario both in the minimal coupling case and in the non-minimalcoupling case. After transferring the non-minimally coupling action in Jordan frame to Einstein frame, the correct dynamical equation (Friedmann equation) is gotten in a thermal equilibrium process by using the already existing entropy while the entropy in the non-minimal coupled "cosmic triad" scenario has not been derived. And after transferring the variables back to Jordan frame, the corresponding Friedmann equation is demonstrated to be correct. For complete arguments, we also calculate the related Misner-Sharp energy in Jordan and Einstein frames.

  3. Accelerator measurements of magnetically-induced radio emission from particle cascades with applications to cosmic-ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Belov, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2015-01-01

    An experiment at SLAC provides the first beam test of radio-frequency (RF) radiation from a charged particle cascade in the presence of a magnetic field (up to $\\sim$1~kG), a model system for RF emission from a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of RF emission, which are relied upon in ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm recent predictions that the magnetically induced emission forms a beam that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  4. Weak cosmic censorship, dyonic Kerr-Newman black holes and Dirac fields

    CERN Document Server

    Toth, Gabor Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    It was investigated recently, with the aim of testing the weak cosmic censorship conjecture, whether an extremal Kerr black hole can be converted into a naked singularity by interaction with a massless classical Dirac test field, and it was found that this is possible. We generalize this result to electrically and magnetically charged rotating extremal black holes (i.e. extremal dyonic Kerr-Newman black holes) and massive Dirac test fields, allowing magnetically or electrically uncharged or nonrotating black holes and the massless Dirac field as special cases. We show that the possibility of the conversion is a direct consequence of the fact that the Einstein-Hilbert energy-momentum tensor of the classical Dirac field does not satisfy the null energy condition, and is therefore not in contradiction with the weak cosmic censorship conjecture. We give a derivation of the absence of superradiance of the Dirac field without making use of the complete separability of the Dirac equation in dyonic Kerr-Newman backgr...

  5. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wavenumber $k$ evolves, after inflation, according to the values of $k\\eta_e$, $n_{\\mathbf{k}}$, and $\\Omega_k$, where $\\eta_e$ is the conformal time at the end of inflation, $n_{\\mathbf{k}}$ is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and $\\Omega_k$ is the phase difference between the two Bogolubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that $n_{\\mathbf{k}}^{-1} \\ll |k\\eta_e| \\ll 1$, and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: ($i$) $|\\Omega_k \\mp \\pi| = \\mathcal{O}(1)$, in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum $B_k(\\eta)$ is adiabatic, $a^2B_k(\\eta) = \\mbox{const}$, with $a$ being the expansion parameter; ($ii$) $|\\Omega_k \\mp \\pi| \\ll |k\\eta_e|$,...

  6. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alexander M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on all scales in the Universe (see e.g. Kronberg 1994), but little is known about the origin and evolution of those fields with cosmic time. Seed fields of arbitrary source must be amplified to present-day values and distributed among cosmic structures. Therefore, the emergence of cosmic magnetic fields and corresponding dynamo processes (see e.g. Zel'dovich et al. 1983; Kulsrud et al. 1997) can only be jointly understood with the very basic processes of structure and galaxy formation (see e.g. Mo et al. 2010).

  7. Magnetic Fields in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The Milky Way is magnetized. Invisible magnetic fields thread the Galaxy on all scales and play a vital but still poorly understood role in regulating flows of gas in the interstellar medium and the formation of stars. I will present highlights from my thesis work on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas and in accretion disks. At high Galactic latitudes, diffuse neutral hydrogen is organized into an intricate network of slender linear features. I will show that these neutral hydrogen “fibers” are extremely well aligned with the ambient magnetic field as traced by both starlight polarization (Clark et al. 2014) and Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission (Clark et al. 2015). The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. Because the orientation of neutral hydrogen is an independent predictor of the local dust polarization angle, our work provides a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. Magnetic fields also drive accretion in astrophysical disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). I analytically derive the behavior of this instability in the weakly nonlinear regime and show that the saturated state of the instability depends on the geometry of the background magnetic field. The analytical model describes the behavior of the MRI in a Taylor-Couette flow, a set-up used by experimentalists in the ongoing quest to observe MRI in the laboratory (Clark & Oishi 2016a, 2016b).

  8. SCUPOL Magnetic Field Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Poidevin, Frederick; Kowal, Grzegorz; Pino, Elisabete de Gouveia Dal; Magalhaes, Antonio-Mario

    2013-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis of the 850 microns polarization maps of the SCUPOL Catalog produced by Matthews et al. (2009), focusing exclusively on the molecular clouds and star-forming regions. For the sufficiently sampled regions, we characterize the depolarization properties and the turbulent-to-mean magnetic field ratio of each region. Similar sets of parameters are calculated from 2D synthetic maps of dust emission polarization produced with 3D MHD numerical simulations scaled to the S106, OMC-2/3, W49 and DR21 molecular clouds polarization maps. For these specific regions the turbulent MHD regimes retrieved from the simulations, as described by the turbulent Alfv\\`en and sonic Mach numbers, are consistent within a factor 1 to 2 with the values of the same turbulent regimes estimated from the analysis of Zeeman measurements data provided by Crutcher (1999). Constraints on the values of the inclination angle of the mean magnetic field with respect to the LOS are also given. The values obtained from th...

  9. Magnetic field contribution to the last electron-photon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    When the cosmic microwave photons scatter electrons just prior to the decoupling of matter and radiation, magnetic fields do contribute to the Stokes matrix as well as to the scalar, vector and tensor components of the transport equations for the brightness perturbations. The magnetized electron-photon scattering is hereby discussed in general terms by including, for the first time, the contribution of magnetic fields with arbitrary direction and in the presence of the scalar, vector and tensor modes of the geometry. The propagation of relic vectors and relic gravitons is discussed for a varying magnetic field orientation and for different photon directions. The source terms of the transport equations in the presence of the relativistic fluctuations of the geometry are also explicitly averaged over the magnetic field orientations and the problem of a consistent account of the small-scale and large-scale magnetic field is briefly outlined.

  10. Magnetic field contribution to the last electron-photon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannini, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.giovannini@cern.c [Department of Physics, Theory Division, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); INFN, Section of Milan-Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy)

    2010-11-21

    When the cosmic microwave photons scatter electrons just prior to the decoupling of matter and radiation, magnetic fields do contribute to the Stokes matrix as well as to the scalar, vector and tensor components of the transport equations for the brightness perturbations. The magnetized electron-photon scattering is hereby discussed in general terms by including, for the first time, the contribution of magnetic fields with arbitrary direction and in the presence of the scalar, vector and tensor modes of the geometry. The propagation of relic vectors and relic gravitons is discussed for a varying magnetic field orientation and for different photon directions. The source terms of the transport equations in the presence of the relativistic fluctuations of the geometry are also explicitly averaged over the magnetic field orientations and the problem of a consistent account of the small-scale and large-scale magnetic field is briefly outlined.

  11. Magnetic field contribution to the last electron-photon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2010-11-01

    When the cosmic microwave photons scatter electrons just prior to the decoupling of matter and radiation, magnetic fields do contribute to the Stokes matrix as well as to the scalar, vector and tensor components of the transport equations for the brightness perturbations. The magnetized electron-photon scattering is hereby discussed in general terms by including, for the first time, the contribution of magnetic fields with arbitrary direction and in the presence of the scalar, vector and tensor modes of the geometry. The propagation of relic vectors and relic gravitons is discussed for a varying magnetic field orientation and for different photon directions. The source terms of the transport equations in the presence of the relativistic fluctuations of the geometry are also explicitly averaged over the magnetic field orientations and the problem of a consistent account of the small-scale and large-scale magnetic field is briefly outlined.

  12. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  13. Detection of Cosmic Microwave Background Structure in a Second Field with the Cosmic Anisotropy Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, J C; Hobson, M P; Jones, M E; Kneissl, R; Lasenby, A N; O'Sullivan, C M M; Pooley, G G; Rocha, G; Saunders, R; Scott, P F; Waldram, E M; Baker, Joanne C.; Grainge, Keith; Jones, Michael E.; Pooley, Guy; Saunders, Richard

    1999-01-01

    We describe observations at frequencies near 15 GHz of the second 2x2 degree field imaged with the Cambridge Cosmic Anisotropy Telescope (CAT). After the removal of discrete radio sources, structure is detected in the images on characteristic scales of about half a degree, corresponding to spherical harmonic multipoles in the approximate range l= 330--680. A Bayesian analysis confirms that the signal arises predominantly from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation for multipoles in the lower half of this range; the average broad-band power in a bin with centroid l=422 (theta = 51') is estimated to be Delta_T/T=2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.5} x 10^{-5}. For multipoles centred on l=615 (theta =35'), we find contamination from Galactic emission is significant, and constrain the CMB contribution to the measured power in this bin to be Delta_T/T <2.0 x 10^{-5} (1-sigma upper limit). These new results are consistent with the first detection made by CAT in a completely different area of sky. Together with data from ot...

  14. On the Physics of Primordial Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E

    2000-01-01

    There are at present more then 30 theories about the origin of cosmic magnetic fields at galactic and intergalactic scales. Most of them rely on concepts of elementary particle physics, like phase transitions in the early Universe, string theory and processes during the inflationary epoch. Here we present some more astrophysical arguments to provide some guidance through this large number and variety of models. Especially the fact that the evolution of magnetic fields depends on the spatial coherence scale of the fields leds to some interesting conclusions, which may rule out the majority of the theoretical scenarios. In principle one has to distinguish between the large-scale and small-scale magnetic fields. Large scale fields are defined as those as becoming sub-horizon at that redshift at which the mass energy density becomes equal to the photon energy density, which we name as equality. Small scale fields which are sub-horizon even before equality, i.e. with scales lower than (present) few Mpc cannot surv...

  15. Oscillations in the open solar magnetic flux with a period of 1.68 years: imprint on galactic cosmic rays and implications for heliospheric shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rouillard

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of how the heliosphere modulates galactic cosmic ray (GCR fluxes and spectra is important, not only for studies of their origin, acceleration and propagation in our galaxy, but also for predicting their effects (on technology and on the Earth's environment and organisms and for interpreting abundances of cosmogenic isotopes in meteorites and terrestrial reservoirs. In contrast to the early interplanetary measurements, there is growing evidence for a dominant role in GCR shielding of the total open magnetic flux, which emerges from the solar atmosphere and enters the heliosphere. In this paper, we relate a strong 1.68-year oscillation in GCR fluxes to a corresponding oscillation in the open solar magnetic flux and infer cosmic-ray propagation paths confirming the predictions of theories in which drift is important in modulating the cosmic ray flux.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (Cosmic rays, Interplanetary magnetic fields

  16. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Priest, E. R.

    2007-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1.1 The Sun E. R. Priest; 1.2 Earth's magnetosphere J. Birn; Part II. Basic Theory of MHD Reconnection: 2.1 Classical theory of two-dimensional reconnection T. G. Forbes; 2.2 Fundamental concepts G. Hornig; 2.3 Three-dimensional reconnection in the absence of magnetic null points G. Hornig; 2.4 Three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic null points D. Pontin; 2.5 Three-dimensional flux tube reconnection M. Linton; Part III. Basic Theory of Collisionless Reconnection: 3.1 Fundamentals of collisionless reconnection J. Drake; 3.2 Diffusion region physics M. Hesse; 3.3 Onset of magnetic reconnection P. Pritchett; 3.4 Hall-MHD reconnection A. Bhattacharjee and J. Dorelli; 3.5 Role of current-aligned instabilities J. Büchner and W. Daughton; 3.6 Nonthermal particle acceleration M. Hoshino; Part IV. Reconnection in the Magnetosphere: 4.1 Reconnection at the magnetopause: concepts and models J. G. Dorelli and A. Bhattacharjee; 4.2 Observations of magnetopause reconnection K.-H. Trattner; 4.3 On the stability of the magnetotail K. Schindler; 4.4 Simulations of reconnection in the magnetotail J. Birn; 4.5 Observations of tail reconnection W. Baumjohann and R. Nakamura; 4.6 Remote sensing of reconnection M. Freeman; Part V. Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere: 5.1 Coronal heating E. R. Priest; 5.2 Separator reconnection D. Longcope; 5.3 Pinching of coronal fields V. Titov; 5.4 Numerical experiments on coronal heating K. Galsgaard; 5.5 Solar flares K. Kusano; 5.6 Particle acceleration in flares: theory T. Neukirch; 5.7 Fast particles in flares: observations L. Fletcher; 6. Open problems J. Birn and E. R. Priest; Bibliography; Index.

  17. A class of effective field theory models of cosmic acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Flanagan, Éanna É., E-mail: jkb84@cornell.edu, E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Space Science Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We explore a class of effective field theory models of cosmic acceleration involving a metric and a single scalar field. These models can be obtained by starting with a set of ultralight pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons whose couplings to matter satisfy the weak equivalence principle, assuming that one boson is lighter than all the others, and integrating out the heavier fields. The result is a quintessence model with matter coupling, together with a series of correction terms in the action in a covariant derivative expansion, with specific scalings for the coefficients. After eliminating higher derivative terms and exploiting the field redefinition freedom, we show that the resulting theory contains nine independent free functions of the scalar field when truncated at four derivatives. This is in contrast to the four free functions found in similar theories of single-field inflation, where matter is not present. We discuss several different representations of the theory that can be obtained using the field redefinition freedom. For perturbations to the quintessence field today on subhorizon lengthscales larger than the Compton wavelength of the heavy fields, the theory is weakly coupled and natural in the sense of t'Hooft. The theory admits a regime where the perturbations become modestly nonlinear, but very strong nonlinearities lie outside its domain of validity.

  18. Planck intermediate results. XLII. Large-scale Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Alves, M I R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Doré, O; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Masi, S; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Oppermann, N; Orlando, E; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Strong, A W; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent models for the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields in the literature were largely constrained by synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation measures. We select three different but representative models and compare their predicted polarized synchrotron and dust emission with that measured by the Planck satellite. We first update these models to match the Planck synchrotron products using a common model for the cosmic-ray leptons. We discuss the impact on this analysis of the ongoing problems of component separation in the Planck microwave bands and of the uncertain cosmic-ray spectrum. In particular, the inferred degree of ordering in the magnetic fields is sensitive to these systematic uncertainties. We then compare the resulting simulated emission to the observed dust emission and find that the dust predictions do not match the morphology in the Planck data, particularly the vertical profile in latitude. We show how the dust data can then be used to further improve these magnetic field models, particu...

  19. Cosmological Implications of the Effective Field Theory of Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Eva-Maria; Watson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    We consider cosmological constraints arising from the background expansion history on the ef- fective field theory of cosmic acceleration, a theoretical framework that allows for a unified way to classify both models of dark energy and modified gravity within the linear regime. In the Einstein frame, the most general action for the background can be written in terms of a canonical scalar field which is non-minimally coupled to matter. The leading corrections to the action are expressible through a quartic kinetic term, and scalar couplings to a Gauss-Bonnet curvature term and the Einstein tensor. We determine the implications of the terms in this general action for the predicted expansion history in the context of dynamical attractors. We find that each modifies the matter dominated and/or accelerative eras in ways that allow us to place cosmological constraints on them. We present current constraints on the effective action using the latest Type Ia supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, and Baryonic Acoust...

  20. Magnetic Field Amplification and Rapid Time Variations in SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating suggesting that collisionless shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs) can amplify the interstellar magnetic field to hundreds of microgauss or even milli-gauss levels, as recently claimed for SNR RX J1713.7-3946. If these fields exist, they are almost certainly created by magnetic field amplification (MFA) associated with the efficient production of cosmic rays by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and their existence strengthens the case for SNRs being the primary source of galactic cosmic ray ions to the `knee' and beyond. However, the high magnetic field values in SNRs are obtained exclusively from the interpretation of observations of radiation from relativistic electrons and if MFA via nonlinear DSA produces these fields the magnetic field that determines the maximum ion energy will be substantially less than the field that determines the maximum electron energy. We use results of a steady-state Monte Carlo simulation to show how nonlinear effects from efficient cosmic ray production...

  1. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  2. Spectator fields and their imprints on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingfei

    2016-01-01

    When a subdominant light scalar field ends slow roll during inflation, but well after the Hubble exit of the pivot scales, it may determine the cosmological perturbations. This thesis investigates how such a scalar field, the spectator, may leave its impact on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation and be consequently constrained. We first introduce the observables of the CMB, namely the power spectrum $P_\\zeta$, spectral index $n_s$ and its running $dn_s/d\\ln k$, the non-Gaussianities $f_{NL}$, $g_{NL}$ and $\\tau_{NL}$, and the lack of isocurvature and polarization modes. Based on these studies, we derive the cosmological predictions for the spectator scenario, revealing its consistency with the CMB for inflection point potentials, hyperbolic tangent potentials, and those with a sudden phase transition. In the end, we utilize the spectator scenario to explain the CMB power asymmetry, with a brief tachyonic fast-roll phase.

  3. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Andreas; Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst; Effenberger, Frederic; Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd; Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S.

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  4. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, T.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); University of Florida, Department of Physics, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gitman, D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shabad, A.E. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to the simple example of a spherically symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space; the pattern of the lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E

    2014-01-01

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to a simple example of a spherically-symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space, the pattern of lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics.

  6. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10(-16) Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  7. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ˜  10-16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  8. The local Galactic magnetic field in the direction of Geminga

    CERN Document Server

    Salvati, M

    2010-01-01

    The Milagro hot spot A, close to the Galactic anticenter direction, has been tentatively attributed to cosmic rays from a local reservoir (at a distance ~100 pc), freely streaming along diverging and smooth magnetic field lines. This is at variance with the geometry of the ~kpc scale Galactic magnetic field, which is known to be aligned with the spiral arms. We investigate the information available on the geometry of the magnetic field on the scales (~100 pc) of relevance here. The magnetic field immediately upstream of the heliosphere has been investigated by previous authors by modeling the interaction of this field with the solar wind. At larger distances, we use the dispersion measure and the rotation measure of nearby pulsars (especially towards the third Galactic quadrant). Additional information about the local field towards the North Polar Spur is taken from previous studies of the diffuse radio emission and the polarization of starlight. The asymmetry of the heliosphere with respect to the incoming i...

  9. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  10. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  11. Spontaneous current sheets in magnetic fields with applications to stellar X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Eugene N

    1994-01-01

    Expanding upon the ideas first proposed in his seminal book Cosmical Magnetic Fields, Eugene N. Parker here offers the first in-depth treatment of the magnetohydrodynamic theory of spontaneous magnetic discontinuities. In detailing his theory of the spontaneous formation of tangential discontinuities (current sheets) in a magnetic field embedded in highly conducting plasma, Parker shows how it can be used to explain the activity of the external magnetic fields of planets, stars, interstellar gas clouds, and galaxies, as well as the magnetic fields in laboratory plasmas. Provocative and fascinating, Spontaneous Current Sheets in Magnetic Fields presents a bold new theory that will excite interest and discussion throughout the space physics community.

  12. NM counts in relation to CMEs and Magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rekha

    2016-07-01

    The global network of neutron monitors (NMs) have provided data to the heliophysics community for over sixty years to study the time variations of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity. Simpson recommended a standard NM for worldwide use during the International Geophysical Year (IGY, 1957-58). NM data have been used extensively for the time variation studies ranging from minutes to decades. Coronal Mass Ejections are vast structures of plasma and magnetic fields that are expelled from the sun into the heliosphere, which is detected by remote sensing and in-situ spacecraft observations. The present study is related with behaviour of four types of CMEs namely Asymmetric 'Full' Halo CMEs, Partial Halo CMEs, Asymmetric and Complex 'Full' Halo CMEs and 'Full' Halo CMEs on cosmic ray neutron monitor intensity. The data of two different ground based neutron monitors having different cutoff rigidity threshold and CME events observed with instruments onboard and Wind spacecraft have been used in the present work. The superposed epoch (Chree) analysis has been applied to the arrival times of these CMEs. The occurrence frequency of three different types of CMEs used in the present analysis shows complex behavior. Significant fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity is observed few days after the onset of asymmetric full halo and few days after the onset of full halo CMEs. The fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity are more prior to the onset of both types of the CMEs. However, during Partial Halo CMEs the cosmic ray intensity peaks, 8- 9 days prior to the onset of CMEs and depressed 3 days prior to the onset of CMEs, whereas in case of asymmetric and complex full CMEs, the intensity depressed 2 days prior to the onset of CMEs and enhanced 2 days after the onset of CMEs. The deviations in cosmic ray intensity are more pronounced in case for asymmetric and complex full halo CMEs compared to other CMEs. The cosmic ray intensity shows nearly good anti-correlation with interplanetary

  13. Detecting the orientation of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pfrommer, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies, filled with hot, magnetised plasma, are the largest bound objects in existence and an important touchstone in understanding the formation of structures in our Universe. Because in clusters, thermal conduction follows field lines, magnetic fields strongly shape the cluster's thermal history, which remains mysterious; some should have long since cooled and collapsed. In a seemingly unrelated puzzle, recent observations of Virgo cluster spiral galaxies imply ridges of strong, coherent magnetic fields offset from their centre. Here we demonstrate, using 3D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations, that such ridges are easily explained by galaxies sweeping up field lines as they orbit inside the cluster. This magnetic drape is then literally lit up with cosmic rays from the galaxies' stars, generating coherent polarised emission at the galaxies' leading edges. This immediately presents a first technique for probing local orientations and characteristic length scales of cluster magnetic fields. The ...

  14. Dirac's æther in curved spacetime-II: the geometric amplification of the cosmic magnetic induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carvalho

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We search for an amplification mechanism of the seed cosmic magnetic induction by studying a new version of the Dirac's æther in a curved cosmological background. We find that the variation of the scale factor R(t with cosmic time brings to the magnetic field the desired effect of amplification, that we call geometric amplification.Procuramos por um mecanismo de amplificação das sementes do campo de indução magnética cósmico através do estudo de uma nova versão do æ ther de Dirac em uma arena cosmológica curva. Encontramos uma amplificação que ocorre se o fator de escala R(t varia com o tempo cósmico, acarretando um efeito o qual chamamos de amplificação geométrica do campo magnético.

  15. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Silchenko, O; Sokoloff, D; Horellou, C; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\\alpha-\\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where th...

  16. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  17. Noncommutative double scalar fields in FRW cosmology as cosmical oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malekolkalami, Behrooz; Farhoudi, Mehrdad, E-mail: b_malekolkalami@sbu.ac.i, E-mail: m-farhoudi@sbu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-21

    We investigate the effects caused by noncommutativity of the phase space generated by two scalar fields that have non-minimal conformal couplings to the background curvature in the FRW cosmology. We restrict deformation of the minisuperspace to noncommutativity between the scalar fields and between their canonical conjugate momenta. Then, the investigation is carried out by means of a comparative analysis of the mathematical properties (supplemented with some diagrams) of the time evolution of variables in a classical model and the wavefunction of the universe in a quantum perspective, both in the commutative and noncommutative frames. We find that the imposition of noncommutativity causes more ability in tuning time solutions of the scalar fields and, hence, has important implications in the evolution of the Universe. We find that the noncommutative parameter in the momenta sector is the only responsible parameter for the noncommutative effects in the spatially flat universes. A distinguishing feature of the noncommutative solutions of the scalar fields is that they can be simulated with the well-known three harmonic oscillators depending on three values of the spatial curvature, namely the free, forced and damped harmonic oscillators corresponding to the flat, closed and open universes, respectively. In this respect, we call them cosmical oscillators. In particular, in closed universes, when the noncommutative parameters are small, the cosmical oscillators have an analogous effect with the familiar beating effect in the sound phenomena. Some of the special solutions in the classical model and the allowed wavefunctions in the quantum model make bounds on the values of the noncommutative parameters. The existence of a non-zero constant potential (i.e. a cosmological constant) does not change time evolutions of the scalar fields, but modifies the scale factor. An interesting feature of the well-behaved solutions of the wavefunctions is that the functional form of

  18. Low Cost Magnetic Field Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Malafronte, Alexandre A

    2005-01-01

    The Physics Institute of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP) is building a continuous wave (cw) racetrack microtron. This machine has several dipole magnets, like the first and second stage recirculators, and a number of smaller ones in the transport line. These magnets must produce very stable magnetic fields to allow the beam to recirculate along very precise orbits and paths. Furthermore, the fields must be reproducible with great accuracy to allow an easier setup of the machine, though the effects of hysteresis tend to jeopardize the reproducibility. If the magnetic field is chosen by setting the current in the coils, temperature effects over the magnet and power supply tend to change the field. This work describes an inexpensive magnetic field controller that allows a direct measure of the magnetic field through an Hall probe. It includes a microcontroller running a feedback algorithm to control the power supply, in order to keep the field stable and reproducible. The controller can also execu...

  19. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  20. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  1. Does Local Structure Within Shock-sheath and Magnetic Cloud Affect Cosmic Ray Decrease?

    OpenAIRE

    Raghav, Anil; Shaikh, Zubair; Bhaskar, Ankush; Datar, Gauri; Vichare, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    The sudden short duration decrease in cosmic ray flux is known as Forbush decrease which is mainly caused by interplanetary disturbances. Generally accepted view is that the first step of Forbush decrease is due to shock sheath and second step is due to Magnetic Cloud (MC) of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME). However, there are few questions which needs detail investigation. (i) Does the complete (or part of) ICME shock or MC contribute in cosmic ray decrease? (ii) Is there any int...

  2. Galactic magnetic fields and the large-scale anisotropy at MILAGRO

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Masip, M

    2009-01-01

    The air-shower observatory Milagro has detected a large-scale anisotropy of unknown origin in the flux of TeV cosmic rays. We propose that this anisotropy is caused by galactic magnetic fields, in particular, that it results from the combined effects of the regular and the turbulent (fluctuating) magnetic fields in our vicinity. Instead of a diffusion equation, we integrate Boltzmann's equation to show that the turbulence may define a preferred direction in the cosmic-ray propagation that is orthogonal to the local regular magnetic field. The approximate dipole anisotropy that we obtain explains well Milagro's data.

  3. History of Solar Magnetic Fields Since George Ellery Hale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2017-09-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  4. History of Solar Magnetic Fields Since George Ellery Hale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2015-09-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  5. History of Solar Magnetic Fields since George Ellery Hale

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, Jan

    2015-01-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  6. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  7. ISR split-field magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  8. Cosmic Rays and Stochastic Magnetic Reconnection in the Heliotail

    CERN Document Server

    Desiati, P

    2012-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be generated by diffusive shock acceleration processes in Supernova Remnants, and the arrival direction is likely determined by the distribution of their sources throughout the Galaxy, in particular by the nearest and youngest ones. Transport to Earth through the interstellar medium is expected to affect the cosmic ray properties as well. However, the observed anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays and its energy dependence cannot be explained with diffusion models of particle propagation in the Galaxy. Within a distance of a few parsec, diffusion regime is not valid and particles with energy below about 100 TeV must be influenced by the heliosphere and its elongated tail. The observation of a highly significant localized excess region of cosmic rays from the apparent direction of the downstream interstellar flow at 1-10 TeV energies might provide the first experimental evidence that the heliotail can affect the transport of energetic particles. In particular, TeV cosmic rays propa...

  9. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take for granted. What are electric and magnetic fields? Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) are invisible lines of ... humans. AC electric power produces electric and magnetic fields that create weak electric currents in humans. Being exposed to some kinds ...

  10. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Smith, E. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to ˜20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 × 106 nT per axis) with a resolution of ˜0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (±1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through the imager field of

  11. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benna, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to approx. 20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 x 10(exp. 6) nT per axis) with a resolution of approx. 0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (+/-1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through

  12. Magnetic-Field Hazards Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    produced during pulsed- magnetic-field therapy for non-union of the tibia." Med. Biol. Eng. Comput., Vol. 20, pp. 501-511 (1982). 32. Miller, D. A...Phenum Publishing Co. (1983). 40. Topper, R. F., "Electromagnetic shielding feasibility study," ASD -TDR-63-194 (Armour Research Foundation, Chicago...mammalian cells by strong magnetic fields (1976). 93. Malins, D. C., and Collier, T. K., "Xenobiotic interactions in aquatic organisms-effects on

  13. Magnetic Fields in High-Mass Infrared Dark Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pillai, Thushara; Tan, Jonathan; Goldsmith, Paul; Carey, Sean; Menten, Karl

    2014-01-01

    High-mass Stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11-0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11-0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other ...

  14. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN HIGH-MASS INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tan, J. C. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Carey, S. J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Menten, K. M., E-mail: tpillai.astro@gmail.com [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-01-20

    High-mass stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11–0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11–0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other mechanisms reducing fragmentation, such as the entrapment of heating from young stars via high-mass surface densities, are not required to facilitate HMSF.

  15. Generation of magnetic fields in Einstein-aether gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Shohei; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recently the lower bounds of the intergalactic magnetic fields 10-16˜10-20G are set by gamma-ray observations while it is unlikely to generate such large scale magnetic fields through astrophysical processes. It is known that large scale magnetic fields could be generated if there exist cosmological vector-mode perturbations in the primordial plasma. The vector mode, however, has only a decaying solution in general relativity if the plasma consists of perfect fluids. In order to investigate a possible mechanism of magnetogenesis in the primordial plasma, here we consider cosmological perturbations in the Einstein-aether gravity model, in which the aether field can act as a new source of vector metric perturbations. The vector metric perturbations induce the velocity difference between baryons and photons which then generate magnetic fields. This velocity difference arises from effects at the second order in the tight-coupling approximation. We estimate the angular power spectra of temperature and B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in this model and put a rough constraint on the aether field parameters from latest observations. We then estimate the power spectrum of associated magnetic fields around the recombination epoch within this limit. It is found that the spectrum has a characteristic peak at k=0.1hMpc-1, and at that scale the amplitude can be as large as B˜10-22G where the upper bound comes from cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. The magnetic fields with this amplitude can be seeds of large scale magnetic fields observed today if the sufficient dynamo mechanism takes place. Analytic interpretation for the power spectra is also given.

  16. Nanometric alternating magnetic field generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, A P; Tejo, F; Vidal-Silva, N; Escrig, J

    2017-07-05

    In this work we introduce an alternating magnetic field generator in a cylindrical nanostructure. This field appears due to the rotation of a magnetic domain wall located at some position, generating a magnetic region that varies its direction of magnetization alternately, thus inducing an alternating magnetic flux in its vicinity. This phenomenon occurs due to the competition between a spin-polarized current and a magnetic field, which allows to control both the angular velocity and the pinning position of the domain wall. As proof of concept, we study the particular case of a diameter-modulated nanowire with a spin-polarized current along its axis and the demagnetizing field produced by its modulation. This inhomogeneous field allows one to control the angular velocity of the domain wall as a function of its position along the nanowire allowing frequencies in the GHz range to be achieved. This generator could be used in telecommunications for devices in the range of radiofrequencies or, following Faraday's induction law, could also induce an electromotive force and be used as a movable alternate voltage source in future nanodevices.

  17. Anomalous Cosmic Rays as Probes of Magnetic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-20

    study of Forbush decreases in the intensity of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) at MCs, Zhang & Burlaga (1988) noted that these decreases were much...from the sweeping effect of the turbulent sheath of the shock and its downstream compression region that dominates the Forbush decreases in GCR

  18. Are cosmic rays effective for ionization of the solar nebula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolginov, A. Z.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that the effectiveness of cosmic rays to ionize the bulk of the nebular gas may be further impaired by the influence of the magnetic field on the propagation of cosmic rays. When cosmic rays enter the nebular disk they ionize the gas and make the dynamo generation of magnetic fields possible. However, once magnetic fields are embedded in the nebular gas, the upcoming cosmic rays can no longer penetrate directly into the nebular disk because they start to interact with the magnetic field and lose their energy before propagating significantly toward the midplane. That, in turn, undercuts the ionization source within the bulk of the gas stopping the dynamo action. Nebular dynamo models ignored this back reaction of magnetic fields on cosmic rays. We calculate this back reaction effect, but for the sake of mathematical simplicity, we ignore the effect of magnetic field weakening due to diminishing ionization by cosmic rays.

  19. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, Lilia; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence,in the generation and stability of neutron star fields. Independent information on the internal magnetic field of neutron stars will come from future gravitational wave detections. Thus we maybe at the dawn of a ...

  20. Magnetic fields in cosmological simulations of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pakmor, R; Springel, V

    2013-01-01

    Observationally, magnetic fields reach equipartition with thermal energy and cosmic rays in the interstellar medium of disk galaxies such as the Milky Way. However, thus far cosmological simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxies have usually neglected magnetic fields. We employ the moving-mesh code \\textsc{Arepo} to follow for the first time the formation and evolution of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy in its full cosmological context while taking into account magnetic fields. We find that a prescribed tiny magnetic seed field grows exponentially by a small-scale dynamo until it saturates around $z=4$ with a magnetic energy of about $10\\%$ of the kinetic energy in the center of the galaxy's main progenitor halo. By $z=2$, a well-defined gaseous disk forms in which the magnetic field is further amplified by differential rotation, until it saturates at an average field strength of $\\sim 6 \\mu \\mathrm{G}$ in the disk plane. In this phase, the magnetic field is transformed from a chaotic small-scale fi...

  1. Mean Interplanetary Magnetic Field Measurement Using the ARGO-YBJ Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Bartoli, B; Bernardini, P; Bi, X J; Bleve, C; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bussino, S; Melcarne, A K Calabrese; Camarri, P; Cao, Z; Cappa, A; Cardarelli, R; Catalanotti, S; Cattaneo, C; Celio, P; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Chen, Y; Creti, P; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; Staiti, G D'Alí; Danzengluobu,; Dattoli, M; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; De Vincenzi, M; Di Girolamo, T; Ding, X H; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Z Y; Feng, Zhenyong; Galeazzi, F; Galeotti, P; Gargana, R; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Huang, Q; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; James, I; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Li, J Y; Li, X X; Liberti, B; Liguori, G; Liu, C; Liu, C Q; Liu, M Y; Liu, J; Lu, H; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari, S M; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Mastroianni, S; Meng, X R; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Pagliaro, A; Panareo, M; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Qu, X B; Rossi, E; Ruggieri, F; Saggese, L; Salvini, P; Santonico, R; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Stanescu, C; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Yao, Z G; Xu, B; Xue, L; Yan, Y X; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, JiLong; Zhang, JianLi; Zhang, L; Zhang, P; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhaxiciren,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q; Zizzi, G

    2011-01-01

    The sun blocks cosmic ray particles from outside the solar system, forming a detectable shadow in the sky map of cosmic rays detected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in Tibet. Because the cosmic ray particles are positive charged, the magnetic field between the sun and the earth deflects them from straight trajectories and results in a shift of the shadow from the true location of the sun. Here we show that the shift measures the intensity of the field which is transported by the solar wind from the sun to the earth.

  2. Magnetic Fields in Supernova Remnants and Pulsar-Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Gaensler, B. M.; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2012-05-01

    We review the observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe) that give information on the strength and orientation of magnetic fields. Radio polarimetry gives the degree of order of magnetic fields, and the orientation of the ordered component. Many young shell supernova remnants show evidence for synchrotron X-ray emission. The spatial analysis of this emission suggests that magnetic fields are amplified by one to two orders of magnitude in strong shocks. Detection of several remnants in TeV gamma rays implies a lower limit on the magnetic-field strength (or a measurement, if the emission process is inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons). Upper limits to GeV emission similarly provide lower limits on magnetic-field strengths. In the historical shell remnants, lower limits on B range from 25 to 1000 μG. Two remnants show variability of synchrotron X-ray emission with a timescale of years. If this timescale is the electron-acceleration or radiative loss timescale, magnetic fields of order 1 mG are also implied. In pulsar-wind nebulae, equipartition arguments and dynamical modeling can be used to infer magnetic-field strengths anywhere from ˜5 μG to 1 mG. Polarized fractions are considerably higher than in SNRs, ranging to 50 or 60% in some cases; magnetic-field geometries often suggest a toroidal structure around the pulsar, but this is not universal. Viewing-angle effects undoubtedly play a role. MHD models of radio emission in shell SNRs show that different orientations of upstream magnetic field, and different assumptions about electron acceleration, predict different radio morphology. In the remnant of SN 1006, such comparisons imply a magnetic-field orientation connecting the bright limbs, with a substantial density gradient across the remnant.

  3. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  4. Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Radio synchrotron emission is a powerful tool to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30\\mu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100\\mu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15\\mu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the interg...

  5. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  6. Analysis of geomagnetic data and cosmic ray variations in periods of magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Zalyaev, Timur; Solovev, Igor; Shevtsov, Boris

    magnetic storms. Using the combination of the wavelet transform and neural networks, we have developed a technique of approximating the time variation of cosmic-ray data. This technique allows us to perform detailed analysis of geomagnetic data and detect anomalies in periods of high solar activity. Approximations of large-scale time variation components of cosmic-ray data have been obtained in the following form: [ c_{j,n+1}(t)=\\varphi^3_m Biggl (sum_i omega^3_{mi}\\varphi^2_i biggl (sum_l omega^2_{il}\\varphi^1_lBigl(sum_n omega^1_{ln}c_{j,n}(t)Bigr )biggr ) Biggr ) ] where c_{j,n}= ;phi_{j,n}=2(j/2) phi(2(j(t)-n)) is the scaling function, omega(1_{ln}) are the weights of the neurons of the network input layer l,omega(2_{il}) are the weights of the neurons of the network hidden layer i, omega(3_{mi}) are the weights of the neurons of the network output layer m, varphi(1_l(z)=varphi^2_i(z)=(2)/(1+exp(-2z))-1) ,varphi(3_m(z)) =a*z+b. Coefficients c_{j,n} are the result of transforming of the original function y to the space with the scale j. Analysis of long geomagnetic data from the Paratunka observatory (Kamchatka region, Russia) provided quantitative estimates of the storminess degree of the geomagnetic field before and during magnetic storms. Furthermore, we have managed to identify local weak increases of the field perturbations prior to the main phase of storms. The intensity of field perturbations rises on average 2.5 days before the onset of a storm. Abnormal time periods connected with increased solar activity have been detected in the flow of cosmic rays. Comparison of the results with the geomagnetic data has shown that the anomalies in the cosmic ray variations occur in periods of strong geomagnetic perturbations. The tools and techniques suggested in the present work, together with other methods of data -analysis will help forecast space weather, estimate more accurately the condition of the Earth’s magnetic field, and identify periods when the intensity of

  7. Magnetic fields of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Reisenegger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. In this paper, I discuss briefly how these magnetic fields are inferred from observations, as well as the evidence for their time-evolution. I show how these extremely strong fields are actually weak in terms of their effects on the stellar structure, as is also the case for magnetic stars on the upper main sequence and magnetic white dwarfs, which have similar total magnetic fluxes. I propose a scenario in which a stable hydromagnetic equilibrium (containing a poloidal and a toroidal field component) is established soon after the birth of the neutron star, aided by the strong compositional stratification of neutron star matter, and this state is slowly eroded by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic processes such as beta decays and ambipolar diffusion in the core of the star and Hall drift and breaking of the solid in its crust. Over sufficiently long time scales, the fluid in the neutron star core will behave as if it were barotropic, becau...

  8. Magnetic fields during galaxy mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Rodenbeck, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are expected to play a central role for the evolution of galaxies, and may have a strong impact on their magnetic fields. We present the first grid-based 3D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations investigating the evolution of magnetic fields during merger events. For this purpose, we employ a simplified model considering the merger event of magnetized gaseous disks in the absence of stellar feedback and without a stellar or dark matter component. We show that our model naturally leads to the production of two peaks in the evolution of the average magnetic field strength within 5 kpc, within 25 kpc and on scales in between 5 and 25 kpc. The latter is consistent with the peak in the magnetic field strength reported by Drzazga et al. (2011) in a merger sequence of observed galaxies. We show that the peak on the galactic scale and in the outer regions is likely due to geometrical effects, as the core of one galaxy enters the outskirts of the other one. In addition, there is a physical enhancement of t...

  9. Magnetic Fields Around the Heliosphere: Theory vs Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Voyager in situ measurements of the magnetic field around the heliosphere are the source of invaluable information about the interface between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). On the other hand, they are quite challenging for theoretical analysis unless accompanied by remote observations of neutral atoms the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and Ulysses missions. Of particular interest is the fine structure of the heliopause due to its instability and possible magnetic reconnection. Both phenomena may have contributed to the remarkable changes in the galactic and anomalous cosmic ray fluxes observed by Voyager 1 within a one-month period of 2012 after which the spacecraft penetrated into the LISM. Draping of the heliopause by the interstellar magnetic field affects the position of the bright ribbon of enhanced ENA flux observed by IBEX on the celestial sphere and 2-3 kHz radio emission caused by shock propagation through the outer heliosheath observed by Voyager 1. Interstellar magnetic field determines the structure of the bow wave in front of the heliopause. Moreover, magnetic fields define the orientation and shape of the heliotail, the features of which have been observed by IBEX. Recent numerical simulations show that the details of the large-scale interstellar magnetic field modification caused by the presence of the heliotail may be the source of the observed 1-10 TeV cosmic ray anisotropy studied in detail in numerous air shower measurements around the world. In this paper, an overview will be given of the recent theoretical and simulations results describing the magnetic field distribution around the heliosphere. The objective of the talk is to connect observational and theoretical results, and outline challenges that are going to inspire the heliospheric community in the coming years.

  10. Zero magnetic field type magnetic field sensor. Reijikaigata jikai sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, T.; Ueda, R. (Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-11-20

    It is shown in this paper that a new type of sensor with excellent characteristics can be made by demagnetizing the sensor core toward a zero field state and then detecting an unknown field to be detected by the demagnetizing current. The core operates equivalently in a zero magnetic field so that the detection sensitivity is determined by the coil constant including the number of turns of the solenoid for demagnetization required to offset the field to be detected. Therefore the detection sensitivity does not depend on its configuration and magnetization characteristics and does not depend on the temperature. It is thereby considered that these characteristics can largely reduce such problems at present as the aging deterioration of magnetic materials or the quality control accompanied by manufacturing. In addition, the following points have been clarified: (1) The upper limit of the detectable range does not exist in principle. (2) The accuracy of the detection is 0.02% to the full scale 20kA/m. (3) The magnetization property required to the core used as a sensor is that it has a rectangular B-H loop which is as sharp as possible. 14 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. New Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Cosmic Ray Positron Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergström, L.; Bringmann, T.; Cholis, I.; Hooper, D.; Weniger, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with

  12. New Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Cosmic Ray Positron Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergström, L.; Bringmann, T.; Cholis, I.; Hooper, D.; Weniger, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with

  13. Mind the Gap on IceCube: Cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Araki, T; Konishi, Y; Ota, T; Sato, J; Shimomura, T

    2015-01-01

    Introducing a leptonic U(1) gauge symmetry, we try to reproduce the gap in the cosmic neutrino spectrum reported by the IceCube collaboration, and at the same time, make an additional contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, which fills the gap between the standard model prediction and the experimental observation.

  14. Plasma transport in the interplanetary space: Percolation and anomalous diffusion of magnetic-field lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbardo, G.; Veltri, P. [Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Univ. della Calabria (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1997-11-01

    The magnetic fluctuations due to, e.g., magnetohydrodynamic turbulence cause a magnetic-field line random walk that influences many cosmic plasma phenomena. The results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of a turbulent magnetic field in plane geometry are presented here. Magnetic percolation, Levy flights, and non-Gaussian random walk of the magnetic-field lines are found for moderate perturbation levels. In such a case plasma transport can be anomalous, i.e., either super diffusive or sub diffusive. Increasing the perturbation level a Gaussian diffusion regime is attained. The implications on the structure of the electron fore shock and of planetary magneto pauses are discussed.

  15. Diffusive shock acceleration with magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We explore how wave-particle interactions affect diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at astrophysical shocks by performing time-dependent kinetic simulations, in which phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvenic drift, thermal leakage injection, Bohm-like diffusion, and a free escape boundary are implemented. If the injection fraction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles is greater than 2x10^{-4}, for the shock parameters relevant for young supernova remnants, DSA is efficient enough to develop a significant shock precursor due to CR feedback, and magnetic field can be amplified up to a factor of 20 via CR streaming instability in the upstream region. If scattering centers drift with Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum can be steepened significantly and the acceleration efficiency is reduced. Nonlinear DSA with self-consistent MFA and Alfvenic drift predicts that the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at 10 % of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks...

  16. TRIANGULATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Richardson, J. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Determining the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF) is important for understanding the heliosphere’s global structure, the properties of the interstellar medium, and the propagation of cosmic rays in the local galactic medium. Measurements of interstellar neutral atoms by Ulysses for He and by SOHO/SWAN for H provided some of the first observational insights into the LISMF direction. Because secondary neutral H is partially deflected by the interstellar flow in the outer heliosheath and this deflection is influenced by the LISMF, the relative deflection of H versus He provides a plane—the so-called B–V plane in which the LISMF direction should lie. Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) subsequently discovered a ribbon, the center of which is conjectured to be the LISMF direction. The most recent He velocity measurements from IBEX and those from Ulysses yield a B–V plane with uncertainty limits that contain the centers of the IBEX ribbon at 0.7–2.7 keV. The possibility that Voyager 1 has moved into the outer heliosheath now suggests that Voyager 1's direct observations provide another independent determination of the LISMF. We show that LISMF direction measured by Voyager 1 is >40° off from the IBEX ribbon center and the B–V plane. Taking into account the temporal gradient of the field direction measured by Voyager 1, we extrapolate to a field direction that passes directly through the IBEX ribbon center (0.7–2.7 keV) and the B–V plane, allowing us to triangulate the LISMF direction and estimate the gradient scale size of the magnetic field.

  17. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  18. Effects of simulated cosmological magnetic fields on the galaxy population

    CERN Document Server

    Marinacci, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of varying the intensity of the primordial magnetic seed field on the global properties of the galaxy population in ideal MHD cosmological simulations performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We vary the seed field in our calculations in a range of values still compatible with the current cosmological upper limits. We show that above a critical intensity of $\\simeq 10^{-9}\\,{\\rm G}$ the additional pressure arising from the field strongly affects the evolution of gaseous structures, leading to a suppression of the cosmic star formation history. The suppression is stronger for larger seed fields, and directly reflects into a lower galaxy number density at fixed stellar mass and a less massive stellar component at fixed virial mass at all mass scales. These signatures may be used, in addition to the existing methods, to derive tighter constraints on primordial magnetic seed field intensities.

  19. Chiral transition with magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia; Rojas, Juan Cristobal; Villavicencio, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    We study the nature of the chiral transition for an effective theory with spontaneous breaking of symmetry, where charged bosons and fermions are subject to the effects of a constant external magnetic field. The problem is studied in terms of the relative intensity of the magnetic field with respect to the mass and the temperature. When the former is the smallest of the scales, we present a suitable method to obtain magnetic and thermal corrections up to ring order at high temperature. By these means, we solve the problem of the instability in the boson sector for these theories, where the squared masses, taken as functions of the order parameter, can vanish and even become negative. The solution is found by considering the screening properties of the plasma, encoded in the resummation of the ring diagrams at high temperature. We also study the case where the magnetic field is the intermediate of the three scales and explore the nature of the chiral transition as we vary the field strength, the coupling const...

  20. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-01

    This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in neutron stars, which basically defines the evolutionary pathways between different observational classes of neutron stars. The emphasis here is on the evolution in binary systems and the newly emergent classes of millisecond pulsars.

  1. The effects of near null magnetic field upon the leucocyte response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofteiu, M; Morariu, V V; Marina, C; Zirbo, M

    1995-01-01

    Wistar rats were kept for 2 and 4 weeks in conditions of near null magnetic field. The total serum proteins, lipids and glucides, as well as the leucocyte and neutrophil counts showed no significant changes against controls kept in natural magnetic field conditions. A significant monocytosis, a decrease in the circulating phagocyte count and in the phagocytic activity was noticed in null magnetic field. These results suggest that the natural magnetic field significantly influences health both on the ground and possibly in cosmic conditions.

  2. Secondary CMB anisotropies from bulk motions in the presence of stochastic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2013-01-01

    Bulk motions of electrons along the line of sight induce secondary temperature fluctuations in the post-decoupling, reionized universe. In the presence of a magnetic field not only the scalar mode but also the vector mode act as a source for the bulk motion. The resulting angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background is calculated assuming a simple model of reionization.Contributions from the standard adiabatic, curvature mode and a non helical magnetic field are included. The contribution due to magnetic fields with field strengths of order nG and negative magnetic spectral indices dominates for multipoles larger than $\\ell \\sim 10^4$.

  3. Primordial Magnetic Fields that Last?

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, S M; Carroll, Sean M.; Field, George B.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today may have their origins in the very early universe. While a number of mechanisms have been proposed which lead to an appreciable field amplitude at early times, the subsequent evolution of the field is of crucial importance, especially whether the correlation length of the field can grow as large as the size of a protogalaxy. This talk is a report on work in progress, in which we consider the fate of one specific primordial field scenario, driven by pseudoscalar effects near the electroweak phase transition. We argue that such a scenario has a number of attractive features, although it is still uncertain whether a field of appropriate size can survive until late times.

  4. Magnetic Properties of Erbium Gallium Gallate under High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xijuan; Cheng Haiying; Yang Cuihong; Wang Wei

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical investigation on the magnetic properties of rare-earth Er3+ in Er3 Ga5 O12 was reported. The average magnetic moments(M) for applied magnetic field H parallel to the [001 ], [ 100], [ 110], [ 111 ] direction was studied based on the quantum theory. Temperature dependence of the magnetic properties is analyzed for H applied parallel to the [ 100] and [ 111 ] crystallographic directions. The magnetization decreases with increasing temperature,showing good agreement with thermal effect. A strong anisotropy of the magnetization is found under high magnetic field, but when the magnetic field is small, M and H are proportional.

  5. Modeling and analysis of magnetic dipoles in weak magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic leakage field distribution resulting from linear defects of a tube sample in the geomagnetic field is modeled according to the magnetic dipole theory.The formula to compute the normal component of the weak magnetic field is deduced based on the spatial distribution of the magnetic dipole.The shape and characteristics of the zero line (an important criterion for magnetic memory testing) of the normal field is analyzed under different longitudinal magnetizations.Results show that the characteristics of the zero line should be considered when the metal magnetic memory testing method is used to find and locate the defect.

  6. The magnetic field structure in NGC 253 in presence of a galactic wind

    CERN Document Server

    Heesen, V; Beck, R; Dettmar, R J

    2008-01-01

    We present radio continuum polarimetry observations of the nearby edge-on galaxy NGC 253 which possesses a very bright radio halo. Using the vertical synchrotron emission profiles and the lifetimes of cosmic-ray electrons, we determined the cosmic-ray bulk speed as (300+/-30) km/s, indicating the presence of a galactic wind in this galaxy. The large-scale magnetic field was decomposed into a toroidal axisymmetric component in the disk and a poloidal component in the halo. The poloidal component shows a prominent X-shaped magnetic field structure centered on the nucleus, similar to the magnetic field observed in other edge-on galaxies. Faraday rotation measures indicate that the poloidal field has an odd parity (antisymmetric). NGC 253 offers the possibility to compare the magnetic field structure with models of galactic dynamos and/or galactic wind flows.

  7. Magnetic reconnection as the cause of cosmic ray excess from the heliospheric tail

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2010-01-01

    The observation of a broad excess of sub-TeV cosmic rays compatible with the direction of the heliospheric tail (Nagashima et al. 1998) and the discovery of two significant localized excess regions of multi-TeV cosmic rays by the MILAGRO collaboration (Abdo et al. 2008), also from the same region of the sky, have raised questions on their origin. In particular, the coincidence of the most significant localized region with the direction of the heliospheric tail and the small angular scale of the observed anisotropy (~ 10deg) is suggestive a local origin and of a possible connection to the low energy broad excess. Cosmic ray acceleration from magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail is proposed as a possible source of the energetic particles.

  8. Stress Field of Straight Edge Dislocation in Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-long; HU Hai-yun; FAN Tian-you

    2007-01-01

    To study the changes in mechanical properties of materials within magnetic fields and the motion of dislocations,stress fields of dislocation in magnetic field need to be calculated.The straight edge dislocation is of basic importance in various defects.The stress field of straight edge dislocation in an external static magnetic field is determined by the theory of elasticity and electrodynamics according to the Volterra dislocation model for continuous media.This reduces to the known stress field when the magnet field is zero.The results can be used for further study on the strain energy of dislocations and the interactions between dislocations in magnetic fields.

  9. Changes in cosmic ray cut-off rigidities due to secular variations of the geomagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available An analytical expression is derived for the cutoff rigidity of cosmic rays arriving at a point in an arbitrary direction, when the main geomagnetic field is approximated by that of an eccentric dipole. This expression is used to determine changes in geomagnetic cutoffs due to secular variation of the geomagnetic field since 1835. Effects of westward drift of the quadrupole field and decrease in the effective dipole moment are seen in the isorigidity contours. On account of the immense computer time required to determine the cutoff rigidities more accurately using the particle trajectory tracing technique, the present formulation may be useful in estimating the transmission factor of the geomagnetic field in cosmic ray studies, modulation of cosmogenic isotope production by geomagnetic secular variation, and the contribution of geomagnetic field variation to long term changes in climate through cosmic ray related modulation of the current flow in the global electric circuit.

  10. Diagnosis of solar chromospheric magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hongqi(张洪起)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurements of the chromospheric magnetic field and the spatial configuration of the field at the lower solar atmosphere inferred by the distribution of the solar photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields. Some questions in the study of the chromospheric magnetic field are also presented.

  11. The HMI Magnetic Field Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Y.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P.; HMI Science Team

    2009-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) will provide frequent full-disk magnetic field data after launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), currently scheduled for fall 2009. 16 megapixel line-of-sight magnetograms (Blos) will be recorded every 45 seconds. A full set of polarized filtergrams needed to determine the vector magnetic field requires 90 seconds. Quick-look data will be available within a few minutes of observation. Quick-look space weather and browse products must have identified users, and the list currently includes full disk magnetograms, feature identification and movies, 12-minute disambiguated vector fields in active region patches, time evolution of AR indices, synoptic synchronic frames, potential and MHD model results, and 1 AU predictions. A more complete set of definitive science data products will be offered about a day later and come in three types. "Pipeline” products, such as full disk vector magnetograms, will be computed for all data on an appropriate cadence. A larger menu of "On Demand” products, such as Non-Linear Force Free Field snapshots of an evolving active region, will be produced whenever a user wants them. Less commonly needed "On Request” products that require significant project resources, such as a high resolution MHD simulation of the global corona, will be created subject to availability of resources. Further information can be found at the SDO Joint Science Operations Center web page, jsoc.stanford.edu

  12. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  13. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Violation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff: a tempest in a (magnetic) Teapot? Why cosmic ray energies above 10(20) eV may not require new physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, G R; Piran, T

    2000-04-17

    The apparent lack of suitable astrophysical sources for the observed highest energy cosmic rays within approximately 20 Mpc is the "Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) paradox." We constrain representative models of the extragalactic magnetic field structure by Faraday rotation measurements; limits are at the microG level rather than the nG level usually assumed. In such fields, even the highest energy cosmic rays experience large deflections. This allows nearby active galactic nuclei (possibly quiet today) or gamma ray bursts to be the source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays without contradicting the GZK distance limit.

  15. Magnetic field of a combined plasma trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenko, V. G.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Ågren, O.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations performed on the structure of a magnetic field created by the magnetic system of a combined plasma trap. The magnetic system includes the stellarator-type magnetic system and one of the mirror-type. For the stellarator type magnetic system the numeric model contains a magnetic system of an l=2 torsatron with the coils of an additional toroidal magnetic field. The mirror-type magnetic system element is considered as being single current-carrying turn enveloping the region of existence of closed magnetic surfaces of the torsatron. The calculations indicate the existence of a vast area of the values of the additional magnetic field magnitude and magnetic field of the single turn where, in principle, the implementation of the closed magnetic surface configuration is quite feasible.

  16. Zero-frequency magnetic fluctuations in homogeneous cosmic plasma revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluctuations in a non-magnetized gaseous plasma is revisited and calculated without approximations, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is argued that the present results are qualitative and quantitative different form previous one based on the same theorem. In particular, it is shown that it is not correct that the spectral intensity does not vary sensitively with $k_{cut}$. Also the simultaneous dependence of this intensity on the plasma and on the collisional frequencies are discussed.

  17. Zero-frequency magnetic fluctuations in homogeneous cosmic plasma revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Francisco; Oguri, Vitor

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluctuations in a non-magnetized gaseous plasma is revisited and calculated without approximations, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is argued that the present results are qualitative and quantitative different form previous one based on the same theorem. In particular, it is shown that it is not correct that the spectral intensity does not vary sensitively with $k_{cut}$. Also the simultaneous dependence of this intensity on the plasma and on the collisional frequenc...

  18. ANALYTIC EXPRESSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION OF RECTANGULAR PERMANENT MAGNETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟晓凡; 杨勇; 郑晓静

    2004-01-01

    From the molecular current viewpoint,an analytic expression exactly describing magnetic field distribution of rectangular permanent magnets magnetized sufficiently in one direction was derived from the Biot-Savart's law. This expression is useful not only for the case of one rectangular permanent magnet bulk, but also for that of several rectangular permanent magnet bulks. By using this expression,the relations between magnetic field distribution and the size of rectangular permanent magnets as well as the magnitude of magnetic field and the distance from the point in the space to the top (or bottom) surface of rectangular permanent magnets were discussed in detail. All the calculating results are consistent with experimental ones. For transverse magnetic field which is a main magnetic field of rectangular permanent magnets,in order to describe its distribution,two quantities,one is the uniformity in magnitude and the other is the uniformity in distribution of magnetic field,were defined. Furthermore, the relations between them and the geometric size of the magnet as well as the distance from the surface of permanent magnets were investigated by these formulas. The numerical results show that the geometric size and the distance have a visible influence on the uniformity in magnitude and the uniformity in distribution of the magnetic field.

  19. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  20. Field and Thermal Characteristics of Magnetizing Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes field modeling and thermal modeling for magnetizing fixture. As the detailed characteristics of magnetizing fixture can be obtained, the efficient design of magnetizer which produce desired magnet will be possible using our modeling. For field modeling finite-element analysis is used as part of the design and analysis process for magnetizing fixture. The thermal modeling method of magnetizing fixture resistor uses multi-lumped model with equivalent thermal resistance and thermal capacitance.

  1. Formation of spectrum of accelerated particles and the hydromagnetic turbulence in the variable magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Savane, Y S; Faza-Barry, M; Lomonossov, V

    2002-01-01

    We study the acceleration of charged particles by the variable magnetic field. The study is based on the determination of spectrum of accelerated particles and the spectrum of hydro magnetic turbulence. We plan the self-consistent system of equation and we also find out the solution of the system for the spectrum of particles and hydro magnetic turbulence with the conditions of effective acceleration in the cosmic space of solar system.

  2. Magnetic fields for fluid motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Melissa C; Gerner, Matthew D; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Three forces induced by magnetic fields offer unique control of fluid motion and new opportunities in microfluidics. This article describes magnetoconvective phenomena in terms of the theory and controversy, tuning by redox processes at electrodes, early-stage applications in analytical chemistry, mature applications in disciplines far afield, and future directions for micro total analysis systems. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  3. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-03-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects,1,2 researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields,3-5 which was given the name "The Moses Effect."5 Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary were produced by superconducting magnets.

  4. Passive Magnetic Shielding in Gradient Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bidinosti, C P

    2013-01-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields clos...

  5. Fireballs from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Thermalized fireballs should be created by cusp events on superconducting cosmic strings. This simple notion allows to reliably estimate particle emission from the cusps in a given background magnetic field. With plausible assumptions about intergalactic magnetic fields, the cusp events can produce observable fluxes of high-energy photons and neutrinos with unique signatures.

  6. Fireballs from superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Thermalized fireballs should be created by cusp events on superconducting cosmic strings. This simple notion allows to reliably estimate particle emission from the cusps in a given background magnetic field. With plausible assumptions about intergalactic magnetic fields, the cusp events can produce observable fluxes of high-energy photons and neutrinos with unique signatures.

  7. Testing of Photomultiplier Tubes in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Zachary; A1 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The A1 collaboration at MAMI in Mainz, Germany has designed a neutron detector that can be used in experiments to measure the electric form factor of the neutron. They will measure elastic scattering from the neutron, using the polarized electron beam from MAMI at A1's experimental hall. The detector will be composed of two walls of staggered scintillator bars which will be read out by photomultiplier tubes (PMT), connected to both ends of each scintillator via light guides. The experiment requires a magnetic field with strength of 1 Tesla, 2m away from the first scintillator wall. The resulting fringe field is sufficient to disrupt the PMTs, despite the addition of Mu Metal shielding. The effects of the fringe field on these PMTs was tested to optimize the amplification of the PMTs. A Helmholtz Coil was designed to generate a controlled magnetic field with equivalent strength to the field that the PMTs will encounter. The PMTs were read out using a multi-channel analyzer, were tested at various angles relative to the magnetic field in order to determine the optimal orientation to minimize signal disruption. Tests were also performed to determine: the neutron detector response to cosmic radiation; and the best method for measuring a magnetic field's strength in two dimensions. National Science Foundation Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  8. On the slow time geomagnetic field modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Kingsley

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic rays of galactic origin are modulated by both heliospheric and geomagnetic conditions. The mutual (and mutually exclusive) contribution of both heliospheric and geomagnetic conditions to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) modulation is still an open question. While the rapid-time association of the galactic cosmic ray variation with different heliophysical and geophysical phenomena has been well studied, not so much attention has been paid to slow-time variations especially with regards to local effects. In this work, we employed monthly means of cosmic ray count rates from two mid latitude (Hermanus and Rome), and two higher latitude (Inuvik and Oulu) neutron monitors (NM), and compared their variability with geomagnetic stations that are in close proximity to the NMs. The data spans 1966 to 2008 and covers four (4) solar cycles. The difference (DeltaCR)between the mean count rate of all days and the mean of the five quietest days for each month was compared with the Dst-related disturbance (DeltaH) derived from the nearby geomagnetic stations. Zeroth- and First- correlation between the cosmic ray parameters and geomagnetic parameters was performed to ascertain statistical association and test for spurious association. Our results show that solar activity is generally strongly correlated (>0.75) with mean strength of GCR count rate and geomagnetic field during individual solar cycles. The correlation between mean strength of cosmic ray intensity and Geomagnetic field strength is spurious and is basically moderated by the solar activity. The signature of convection driven disturbances at high latitude geomagnetic stations was evident during the declining phase of the solar cycles close to the solar minimum. The absence of this feature in the slow-time varying cosmic ray count rates in all stations, and especially in the mid latitude geomagnetic stations suggest that the local geomagnetic disturbance contributes much less in modulating the cosmic ray flux.

  9. Magnetic field generation, Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks, and magnetic reconnection in colliding laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.

    2016-10-01

    Colliding plasmas are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments and allow conversion of kinetic energy into heat and, most importantly, the acceleration of particles to extremely high energies to form the cosmic ray spectrum. In collisionless astrophysical plasmas, kinetic plasma processes govern the interaction and particle acceleration processes, including shock formation, self-generation of magnetic fields by kinetic plasma instabilities, and magnetic field compression and reconnection. How each of these contribute to the observed spectra of cosmic rays is not fully understood, in particular both shock acceleration processes and magnetic reconnection have been proposed. We will review recent results of laboratory astrophysics experiments conducted at high-power, inertial-fusion-class laser facilities, which have uncovered significant results relevant to these processes. Recent experiments have now observed the long-sought Weibel instability between two interpenetrating high temperature plasma plumes, which has been proposed to generate the magnetic field necessary for shock formation in unmagnetized regimes. Secondly, magnetic reconnection has been studied in systems of colliding plasmas using either self-generated magnetic fields or externally applied magnetic fields, and show extremely fast reconnection rates, indicating fast destruction of magnetic energy and further possibilities to accelerate particles. Finally, we highlight kinetic plasma simulations, which have proven to be essential tools in the design and interpretation of these experiments.

  10. Magnetic fields in supernova remnants and pulsar-wind nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, S P; Bocchino, F

    2011-01-01

    We review the observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe) that give information on the strength and orientation of magnetic fields. Radio polarimetry gives the degree of order of magnetic fields, and the orientation of the ordered component. Many young shell supernova remnants show evidence for synchrotron X-ray emission. The spatial analysis of this emission suggests that magnetic fields are amplified by one to two orders of magnitude in strong shocks. Detection of several remnants in TeV gamma rays implies a lower limit on the magnetic-field strength (or a measurement, if the emission process is inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons). Upper limits to GeV emission similarly provide lower limits on magnetic-field strengths. In the historical shell remnants, lower limits on B range from 25 to 1000 microGauss. Two remnants show variability of synchrotron X-ray emission with a timescale of years. If this timescale is the electron-acceleration or radiativ...

  11. Using rotation measure grids to detect cosmological magnetic fields: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, V.; Oppermann, N.; Enßlin, T.; Jasche, J.; Selig, M.; Greiner, M.; Junklewitz, H.; Reinecke, M.; Brüggen, M.; Carretti, E.; Feretti, L.; Ferrari, C.; Hales, C. A.; Horellou, C.; Ideguchi, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pizzo, R. F.; Röttgering, H.; Shimwell, T. W.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-06-01

    Determining magnetic field properties in different environments of the cosmic large-scale structure as well as their evolution over redshift is a fundamental step toward uncovering the origin of cosmic magnetic fields. Radio observations permit the study of extragalactic magnetic fields via measurements of the Faraday depth of extragalactic radio sources. Our aim is to investigate how much different extragalactic environments contribute to the Faraday depth variance of these sources. We develop a Bayesian algorithm to distinguish statistically Faraday depth variance contributions intrinsic to the source from those due to the medium between the source and the observer. In our algorithm the Galactic foreground and measurement noise are taken into account as the uncertainty correlations of the Galactic model. Additionally, our algorithm allows for the investigation of possible redshift evolution of the extragalactic contribution. This work presents the derivation of the algorithm and tests performed on mock observations. Because cosmic magnetism is one of the key science projects of the new generation of radio interferometers, we have predicted the performance of our algorithm on mock data collected with these instruments. According to our tests, high-quality catalogs of a few thousands of sources should already enable us to investigate magnetic fields in the cosmic structure.

  12. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  13. Calibration approaches of cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture measurement in cropped fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Rivera Villarreyes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose-zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. This study evaluates the applicability of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture in cropped fields. Measurements of cosmic-ray neutrons (fast neutrons were performed at a lowland farmland in Bornim (Brandenburg, Germany cropped with sunflower and winter rye. Three field calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for cosmic-ray neutron sensing were evaluated in this study. The cosmic-ray sensing (CRS probe was calibrated against a network of classical point-scale soil moisture measurements. A large CRS parameter variability was observed by choosing calibration periods within the different growing stages of sunflower and winter rye. Therefore, it was not possible to identify a single set of parameters perfectly estimating soil moisture for both sunflower and winter rye periods. On the other hand, CRS signal and its parameter variability could be understood by some crop characteristics and by predicting the attenuated neutrons by crop presence. This study proves the potentiality of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing at the field scale; however, its calibration needs to be adapted for seasonal vegetation in cropped fields.

  14. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  15. ORIGIN OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM: PRIMORDIAL OR ASTROPHYSICAL?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jungyeon, E-mail: jcho@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-20

    The origin of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters is still an unsolved problem that is largely due to our poor understanding of initial seed magnetic fields. If the seed magnetic fields have primordial origins, it is likely that large-scale pervasive magnetic fields were present before the formation of the large-scale structure. On the other hand, if they were ejected from astrophysical bodies, then they were highly localized in space at the time of injection. In this paper, using turbulence dynamo models for high magnetic Prandtl number fluids, we find constraints on the seed magnetic fields. The hydrodynamic Reynolds number based on the Spitzer viscosity in the intracluster medium (ICM) is believed to be less than O(10{sup 2}), while the magnetic Reynolds number can be much larger. In this case, if the seed magnetic fields have primordial origins, they should be stronger than O(10{sup –11})G, which is very close to the upper limit of O(10{sup –9})G set by the cosmic microwave background observations. On the other hand, if the seed magnetic fields were ejected from astrophysical bodies, any seed magnetic fields stronger than O(10{sup –9})G can safely magnetize the ICM. Therefore, it is less likely that primordial magnetic fields are the direct origin of present-day magnetic fields in the ICM.

  16. Mind the gap on Icecube: Cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment in the gauged L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} model

    CERN Document Server

    Araki, Takeshi; Konishi, Yasufumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic neutrinos, which was recently reported by the IceCube collaboration, shows a gap between 400 TeV and 1 PeV. An unknown neutrino interaction mediated by a field with a mass of the MeV scale is one of the possible solutions to this gap. We examine if the leptonic gauge interaction L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} can simultaneously explain the two phenomena in the lepton sector: the gap in the cosmic neutrino spectrum and the unsettled disagreement in muon anomalous magnetic moment. We illustrate that there remains the regions in the model parameter space, which account for both the problems. Our results also provide a hint for the distance to the source of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  17. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Xiang Tian

    Full Text Available How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here, the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT, despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05. Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  18. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  19. Manifestations of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence Rudnick

    2011-12-01

    Both observations and simulations reveal large inhomogeneities in magnetic field distributions in diffuse plasmas. Incorporating these inhomogeneities into various calculations can significantly change the inferred physical conditions. In extragalactic sources, e.g., these can compromise analyses of spectral ageing, which I will illustrate with some current work on cluster relics. I also briefly re-examine the old issue of how inhomogeneous fields affect particle lifetimes; perhaps not surprisingly, the next generation of radio telescopes are unlikely to find many sources that can extend their lifetimes from putting relativistic electrons into a low-field ‘freezer’. Finally, I preview some new EVLA results on the complex relic in Abell 2256, with implications for the interspersing of its relativistic and thermal plasmas.

  20. Effects of magnetic field on fluidization properties of magnetic pearls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoming Fan; Zhenfu Luo; Yuemin Zhao; Qingru Chen; Daniel Tao; Xiuxiang Tao; Zhenqiang Chen

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external magnetic field on the fluidization behavior of magnetic pearls was carried out. Magnetic pearls are a magnetic form of iron oxide that mainly consists of Fe2O3 which are recovered from a high-volume power plant fly ash from pulverized coal combustion. Due to its abundance, low price and particular physical and chemical properties, magnetic pearls can be used as a heavy medium for minerals or solid waste dry separation based on density difference. This paper introduces the properties of magnetic pearls and compares the performance of magnetic pearls fluidised bed operation with or without an external magnetic field. Experimental results show that an external magnetic field significantly improves the fluidization performance of magnetic pearls such as uniformity and stability.

  1. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. H...

  2. Interaction between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Ku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new formula for the interaction force between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field is derived taking their mutual magnetic interaction into consideration and used to simulate their relative motion. Results show that when the angle β between the direction of external magnetic field and the centerline of two magnetic dipoles is 0 ° or 90 °, magnetic dipoles approach each other or move away from each other in a straight line, respectively. And the time required for them to contact each other from the initial position is related to the specific susceptibility and the diameter of magnetic particles, medium viscosity and magnetic field strength. When β is between 0 ° and 90 °, magnetic dipole pair performs approximate elliptical motion, and the motion trajectory is affected by the specific susceptibility, diameter and medium viscosity but not magnetic field strength. However, time required for magnetic dipoles to complete the same motion trajectory is shorter when adopting stronger magnetic field. Moreover, the subsequent motion trajectory of magnetic dipoles is ascertained once the initial position is set in a predetermined motion trajectory. Additionally, magnetic potential energy of magnetic dipole pairs is transformed into kinetic energy and friction energy during the motion.

  3. Magnetic fields in barred galaxies. V. Modelling NGC 1365

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Englmaier, P; Shukurov, A; Beck, R; Sokoloff, D D; 10.1051/0004-6361:20066222

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of the global magnetic field in the barred galaxy NGC 1365 based jointly on the large-scale velocity field of interstellar gas fitted to HI and CO observations of this galaxy and on mean-field dynamo theory. The aim of the paper is to present a detailed quantitative comparison of a galactic dynamo model with independent radio observations. We consider several gas dynamical and nonlinear dynamo models that include plausible variations of parameters that are poorly known. Models of cosmic ray distribution in the galaxy are introduced to produce synthetic radio polarization maps allowing direct comparison with those observed at 3.5cm and 6.2cm. We show that the dynamo model is robust in that the most important magnetic features are controlled by the relatively well established properties of the density distribution and gas velocity field. The optimal agreement between the synthetic polarization maps and observations is obtained when a uniform cosmic ray distribution is adopted. We find some in...

  4. Generation of the Primordial Magnetic Fields during Cosmological Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, N Yu; Zweibel, E G; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Ferrara, Andrea; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the generation of magnetic field by the Biermann battery in cosmological ionization fronts, using new simulations of the reionization of the universe by stars in protogalaxies. Two mechanisms are primarily responsible for magnetogenesis: i) the breakout of I-fronts from protogalaxies, and ii) the propagation of I-fronts through the high density neutral filaments which are part of the cosmic web. The first mechanism is dominant prior to overlapping of ionized regions (z ~ 7), whereas the second continues to operate even after that epoch. However, after overlap the field strength increase is largely due to the gas compression occurring as cosmic structures form. As a consequence, the magnetic field at z ~ 5 closely traces the gas density, and it is highly ordered on megaparsec scales. The mean mass-weighted field strength is B_0 ~ 10^{-19} G in the simulation box. There is a relatively well-defined, nearly linear correlation between B_0 and the baryonic mass of virialized objects, with B_0 ~ 10^{...

  5. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, A; Masood, S S; Gaitan, R; Rodríguez, S

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  6. Generation of magnetic fields in Einstein-Aether gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently the lower bounds of the intergalactic magnetic fields $10^{-16} \\sim 10^{-20}$ Gauss are set by gamma-ray observations while it is unlikely to generate such large scale magnetic fields through astrophysical processes. It is known that large scale magnetic fields could be generated if there exist cosmological vector mode perturbations in the primordial plasma. The vector mode, however, has only a decaying solution in General Relativity if the plasma consists of perfect fluids. In order to investigate a possible mechanism of magnetogenesis in the primordial plasma, here we consider cosmological perturbations in the Einstein-Aether gravity model, in which the aether field can act as a new source of vector metric perturbations and thus of magnetic fields. We estimate the angular power spectra of temperature and B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies in this model and put a rough constraint on the aether field parameters from latest observations. We then estimate the pow...

  7. Pulsar Pair Cascades in a Distorted Magnetic Dipole Field

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Alice K

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a distorted neutron star dipole magnetic field on pulsar pair cascade multiplicity and pair death lines. Using a simple model for a distorted dipole field that produces an offset polar cap, we derive the accelerating electric field above the polar cap in space charge limited flow. We find that even a modest azimuthally asymmetric distortion can significantly increase the accelerating electric field on one side of the polar cap and, combined with a smaller field line radius of curvature, leads to larger pair multiplicity. The death line for producing pairs by curvature radiation moves downward in the P-Pdot diagram, allowing high pair multiplicities in a larger percentage of the radio pulsar population. These results could have important implications for the radio pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons.

  8. The effect of a southward interplanetary magnetic field on St\\"ormer's allowed regions

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a charged particle in a magnetic dipole has first been studied by Stormer. The different applications of Stormer's theory to aurorae, cosmic rays and Van Allen radiation belt particles are recalled in an historical perspective. In this paper, we expand the Stormer theory in order to take into account the effects produced by an additional uniform and stationary interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) whose orientation is parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic moment of the dipole. A new expression is derived for the Stormer potential taking into account the additional IMF component. It is shown how Stormer's allowed and forbidden zones are influenced by the implementation of a northward or a southward IMF, and how a southward turning of the IMF orientation makes it easier for Solar Energetic Particle and Galactic Cosmic Rays to enter into the inner part of the geomagnetic field along interconnected magnetic field lines.

  9. Magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rodney J.; Jones, Michael E.; Grossmann, John M.; Ottinger, Paul F.

    1988-10-01

    Computer simulations demonstrate that the entrainment (or advection) of magnetic field with the flow of cathode-emitted electrons can constitute a dominant mechanism for the magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas. Cross-field drift in the accelerating electric field near the cathode starts the penetration process. Plasma erosion propagates the point for emission and magnetic field injection along the cathode toward the load-for the possibility of rapid switch opening.

  10. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  11. Statistical Perturbation Theory of Cosmic Fields; 1, Basic Formalism and Second-order Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubara, T

    2000-01-01

    We formulate a general method for perturbative evaluations of statistics of smoothed cosmic fields, which we call as ``Statistical Perturbation Theory''. The formalism is an extensive generalization of the method used by Matsubara (1994) who derived a weakly nonlinear formula of the genus statistic in a 3D density field. After describing the general method, we apply the formalism especially to analyses of more general genus statistics, level-crossing statistics, Minkowski functionals, and a density extrema statistic, regardless of the dimensions in which each statistic is defined. The relation between the Minkowski functionals and other geometrical statistics is clearly described. These examples are applied to some cosmic fields, including 3D density field, 3D velocity field, 2D projected density field, and 2D weak lensing field. The results are detailed for second order theory of the formalism. The reason why the genus curves etc. in CDM-like models exhibit smaller deviations from Gaussian predictions when t...

  12. In situ evidence of cosmic ray acceleration via magnetic re-connection of magnetic islands/fluxrope

    CERN Document Server

    Raghav, Anil

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical processes of magnetic re-connection and turbulence are the cause of magnetic islands/flux-ropes generation. Moreover, the charged particle acceleration keV to MeV energy range is observed via in-situ measurement at various location of interplanetary space e.g. near helio-spheric current sheets, magnetopause, Earths magnetotail etc. The acceleration phenomena is explained on the basis of contraction or coalescence process of magnetic islands through magnetic re-connection. The numerical simulation performed support this acceleration mechanism. However, the most fundamental question raise here is, whether this mechanism contributes to the cosmic rays acceleration? To answer this, we report, in-situ evidence of flux-ropes formation, their re-connection and its manifestation as cosmic ray (GeV charged particle) acceleration in shock-sheath of interplanetary counterpart of coronal mass ejection(ICME). This study extend the implication of accelerating process via merging and/or contraction of magnetic...

  13. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  14. Heliospheric Magnetic Fields, Energetic Particles, and the Solar Cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Kiraly

    2000-09-01

    The heliosphere is the region filled with magnetized plasma of mainly solar origin. It extends from the solar corona to well beyond the planets, and is separated from the interstellar medium by the heliopause. The latter is embedded in a complex and still unexplored boundary region. The characteristics of heliospheric plasma, fields, and energetic particles depend on highly variable internal boundary conditions, and also on quasi-stationary external ones. Both galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles of solar and heliospheric origin are subject to intensity variations over individual solar cycles and also from cycle to cycle. Particle propagation is controlled by spatially and temporally varying interplanetary magnetic fields, frozen into the solar wind. An overview is presented of the main heliospheric components and processes, and also of the relevant missions and data sets. Particular attention is given to flux variations over the last few solar cycles, and to extrapolated effects on the terrestrial environment.

  15. Magnetic Fields from the Electroweak Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Törnkvist, O

    1998-01-01

    I review some of the mechanisms through which primordial magnetic fields may be created in the electroweak phase transition. I show that no magnetic fields are produced initially from two-bubble collisions in a first-order transition. The initial field produced in a three-bubble collision is computed. The evolution of fields at later times is discussed.

  16. Turbulent amplification of supernova magnetic fields in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    X-ray and radio observations of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A reveal the presence of magnetic fields about 100 times stronger than those in the surrounding interstellar medium. Field coincident with the outer shock probably arises through a non-linear feedback process involving cosmic rays. The origin of the large magnetic field in the interior of the remnant is less clear but it is probably stretched and amplified by turbulent motions. Turbulence may be generated by hydrodynamic instability at the contact discontinuity between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar gas. However, optical observations of Cassiopeia A indicate that the ejecta are interacting with a highly inhomogeneous, dense circumstellar cloud bank formed prior to the supernova explosion. We have conducted a series of laboratory experiments using high power laser facilities in order to reproduce the essential features of the supernova shock interacting with strong density perturbations. Our results indicate the magnetic field is amplified when the shock interacts with a plastic grid. We show that our experimental results can explain the observed synchrotron emission in the interior of the remnant. These experiments provide an example of magnetic field amplification by turbulence in plasmas, a physical process thought to occur in many astrophysical phenomena.

  17. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  18. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  19. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  20. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  1. The Magnetic Field Effect on Planetary Nebulae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. R. Khesali; K. Kokabi

    2006-01-01

    In our previous work on the 3-dimensional dynamical structure of planetary nebulae the effect of magnetic field was not considered. Recently Jordan et al. have directly detected magnetic fields in the central stars of some planetary nebulae. This discovery supports the hypothesis that the non-spherical shape of most planetary nebulae is caused by magnetic fields in AGB stars. In this study we focus on the role of initially weak toroidal magnetic fields embedded in a stellar wind in altering the shape of the PN. We found that magnetic pressure is probably influential on the observed shape of most PNe.

  2. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-06

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials.

  3. Electrolytic tiltmeters inside magnetic fields: Some observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Arce, P. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Luque, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Garcia-Moral, L.A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gomez, G. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Rivero, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Rodrigo, T. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Ruiz-Arbol, P. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scodellaro, L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Vila, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2007-04-21

    We present observations of the electrolytic clinometers behaviour inside magnetic field environments introducing phenomenological expressions to account for the measured output voltage variations as functions of field gradients and field strengths.

  4. Cosmic inflation in a landscape of heavy-fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cespedes, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Heavy isocurvature fields may have a strong influence on the low energy dynamics of curvature perturbations during inflation, as long as the inflationary trajectory becomes non-geodesic in the multi-field target space (the landscape). If fields orthogonal to the inflationary trajectory are sufficiently heavy, one expects a reliable effective field theory describing the low energy dynamics of curvature perturbations, with self-interactions determined by the shape of the inflationary trajectory. Previous work analyzing the role of heavy-fields during inflation have mostly focused in the effects on curvature perturbations due to a single heavy-field. In this article we extend the results of these works by studying models of inflation in which curvature perturbations interact with two heavy-fields. We show that the second heavy-field (orthogonal to both tangent and normal directions of the inflationary trajectory) may significantly affect the evolution of curvature modes. We compute the effective field theory for...

  5. Primordial magnetic fields from second-order cosmological perturbations:Tight coupling approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shiromizu, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    We explore the possibility of generating large-scale magnetic fields from second-order cosmological perturbations during the pre-recombination era. The key process for this is Thomson scattering between the photons and the charged particles within the cosmic plasma. To tame the multi-component interacting fluid system, we employ the tight coupling approximation. It is shown that the source term for the magnetic field is given by the product of the first order perturbations and so the intrinsically second-order quantities do not contribute to magnetogenesis. The magnetic fields generated by this process are estimated to be \\sim 10^{-26},Gauss on the horizon scale.

  6. A Limit on Primordial Small-Scale Magnetic Fields from CMB Distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Jedamzik, K; Olinto, A V

    2000-01-01

    Spatially varying primordial magnetic fields may be efficiently dissipated prior to the epoch of recombination due to the large viscosity of the baryon-photon fluid. We show that this dissipation may result in observable chemical potential mu and Compton y distortions in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) spectrum. Current upper limits on mu and y from FIRAS constrain magnetic fields to have strength B_0 < 3\\times 10^{-8}Gauss (scaled to the present) between comoving coherence length \\approx 400 pc and primordial magnetic fields to date.

  7. From Inverse to Delayed Magnetic Catalysis in Strong Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We study magnetic field effect on chiral phase transition in a Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. In comparison with mean field approximation containing quarks only, including mesons as quantum fluctuations in the model leads to a transition from inverse to delayed magnetic catalysis at finite temperature and delays the transition at finite baryon chemical potential. The location of the critical end point depends on the the magnetic field non-monotonously.

  8. Cosmic inflation in a landscape of heavy-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Sebastián; Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2013-10-01

    Heavy isocurvature fields may have a strong influence on the low energy dynamics of curvature perturbations during inflation, as long as the inflationary trajectory becomes non-geodesic in the multi-field target space (the landscape). If fields orthogonal to the inflationary trajectory are sufficiently heavy, one expects a reliable effective field theory describing the low energy dynamics of curvature perturbations, with self-interactions determined by the shape of the inflationary trajectory. Previous work analyzing the role of heavy-fields during inflation have mostly focused in the effects on curvature perturbations due to a single heavy-field. In this article we extend the results of these works by studying models of inflation in which curvature perturbations interact with two heavy-fields. We show that the second heavy-field (orthogonal to both tangent and normal directions of the inflationary trajectory) may significantly affect the evolution of curvature modes. We compute the effective field theory for the low energy curvature perturbations obtained by integrating out the two heavy-fields and show that the presence of the second heavy-field implies the existence of additional self-interactions not accounted for in the single heavy-field case. We conclude that future observations will be able to constrain the number of heavy fields interacting with curvature perturbations.

  9. Dynamic shielding of the magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAU, M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative study of the methods used to control and compensate the direct and alternative magnetic fields. Two frequently used methods in the electromagnetic compatibility of the complex biomagnetism installations were analyzed. The two methods refer to the use of inductive magnetic field sensors (only for alternative fields and of fluxgate magnetometers as active transducers which measures both the direct and alternative components of the magnetic field. The applications of the dynamic control of the magnetic field are: control of the magnetic field of the military ships, control of parasite magnetic field produced by power transformers and the electrical networks, protection of the mass spectrometers, electronic microscopes, SQUID and optical pumping magnetometers for applications in biomagnetism.

  10. Analysis of the nature of excessive cosmic radiation in the area of the Brazilian magnetic anomaly at altitudes 250-500km, from Kosmos-225 satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychenko, L. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the region of anomalous cosmic radiation in the area of the Brazilian magnetic anomaly at the altitudes 250-500 km, using data measurements taken on the Kosmos-225 satellite (14-29 June 1968). The existence of a stable intensity anomaly discovered in the experiments on the second and third Soviet spacecraft-satellites is confirmed. The total vector of the geomagnetic field at different altitudes was compared with isoline maps. An altitude profile of the South Atlantic anomaly of radiation intensity was obtained, using data from the same instrument. The nature of the anomalies in cosmic radiation intensity over the regions of negative magnetic anomalies is discussed.

  11. Field free line magnetic particle imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Erbe, Marlitt

    2014-01-01

    Marlitt Erbe provides a detailed introduction into the young research field of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and field free line (FFL) imaging in particular. She derives a mathematical description of magnetic field generation for FFL imaging in MPI. To substantiate the simulation studies on magnetic FFL generation with a proof-of-concept, the author introduces the FFL field demonstrator, which provides the world's first experimentally generated rotated and translated magnetic FFL field complying with the requirements for FFL reconstruction. Furthermore, she proposes a scanner design of consi

  12. Isotope selective photodissociation of N-2 by the interstellar radiation field and cosmic rays

    OpenAIRE

    Heays, Alan N.; Visser, Ruud; Gredel, Roland; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R.; Gibson, Stephen T.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-01-01

    Photodissociation of 14N2 and 14N15N occurs in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, protoplanetary discs, and other environments due to UV radiation from stellar sources and the presence of cosmic rays. This source of N atoms initiates the formation of complex N-bearing species and influences their isotopic composition. To study the photodissociation rates of 14N15N by UV continuum radiation and both isotopologues in a field of cosmic ray induced photons. To determine the effect of t...

  13. Isotope selective photodissociation of N2 by the interstellar radiation field and cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Heays, Alan N; Gredel, Roland; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R; Gibson, Stephen T; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01

    Photodissociation of 14N2 and 14N15N occurs in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, protoplanetary discs, and other environments due to UV radiation from stellar sources and the presence of cosmic rays. This source of N atoms initiates the formation of complex N-bearing species and influences their isotopic composition. To study the photodissociation rates of 14N15N by UV continuum radiation and both isotopologues in a field of cosmic ray induced photons. To determine the effect of these on the isotopic composition of more complex molecules. High-resolution photodissociation cross sections of N2 are used from an accurate and comprehensive quantum- mechanical model of the molecule based on laboratory experiments. A similarly high-resolution spectrum of H2 emission following interactions with cosmic rays has been constructed. The spectroscopic data are used to calculate dissociation rates which are input into isotopically differentiated chemical models, describing an interstellar cloud and a protoplane...

  14. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  15. Magnetic Fields and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, S; Falle, S A E G

    2012-01-01

    Research performed in the 1950s and 1960s by Leon Mestel on the roles of magnetic fields in star formation established the framework within which he and other key figures have conducted subsequent investigations on the subject. This short tribute to Leon contains a brief summary of some, but not all, of his ground breaking contributions in the area. It also mentions of some of the relevant problems that have received attention in the last few years. The coverage is not comprehensive, and the authors have drawn on their own results more and touched more briefly on those of others than they would in a normal review. Theirs is a personal contribution to the issue honouring Leon, one of the truly great gentlemen, wits, and most insightful of astrophysicists.

  16. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  17. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  18. High magnetic fields science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    This three-volume book provides a comprehensive review of experiments in very strong magnetic fields that can only be generated with very special magnets. The first volume is entirely devoted to the technology of laboratory magnets: permanent, superconducting, high-power water-cooled and hybrid; pulsed magnets, both nondestructive and destructive (megagauss fields). Volumes 2 and 3 contain reviews of the different areas of research where strong magnetic fields are an essential research tool. These volumes deal primarily with solid-state physics; other research areas covered are biological syst

  19. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Kimura, Yosuke [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. Technical Institute System Technology Development Centre 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Akashi-shi, Hyogo 673-8666 (Japan); Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: ida@hiroshima-cmt.ac.j [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  20. The alignment and measurement of the magnetic field for muon counter at BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Qing; Li, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Based on cosmic ray events taken without magnet filed during summer shutdown, we compare the coordinates of hits in muon counter with the expected interaction point of extrapolated tracks from the inner tracking system. By minimizing the difference, we align the muon counter with the inner tracking system. The muon counter is operating in magnetic return yoke and the magnetic field has never been measured before. The strength of the magnetic field of the muon counter is measured for the first time with $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ separately. After the alignment and magnetic field measurement, the offsets of hit-position for $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ are diminished. The alignment and magnetic field measurement are adopted in the latest BESIII offline software system. This makes physics analysis involving muon counter information more reliable.

  1. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M

    2016-01-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to be transmitted to the debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of $\\sim 10$. However, this valu...

  2. Synchrotron Applications of High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This workshop aims at discussing the scientific potential of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy in magnetic fields above 30 T. Pulsed magnetic fields in the range of 30 to 40 T have recently become available at Spring-8 and the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility). This document gathers the transparencies of the 6 following presentations: 1) pulsed magnetic fields at ESRF: first results; 2) X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction experiments by using mini-coils: applications to valence state transition and frustrated magnet; 3) R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}: an ideal system to be studied in X-ray under high magnetic field?; 4) high field studies at the Advanced Photon Source: present status and future plans; 5) synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies under extreme conditions; and 6) projects for pulsed and steady high magnetic fields at the ESRF.

  3. Demagnetizing fields in active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Smith, Anders

    2014-01-01

    is in general both a function of the overall shape of the regenerator and its morphology (packed particles, parallel plates etc.) as well as the magnetization of the material. Due to the pronounced temperature dependence of the magnetization near the Curie temperature, the demagnetization field is also......A magnetic material in an externally applied magnetic field will in general experience a spatially varying internal magnetic field due to demagnetizing effects. When the performance of active magnetic regenerators (AMRs) is evaluated using numerical models the internal field is often assumed...... temperature dependent. We propose a relatively straightforward method to correct sufficiently for the demagnetizing field in AMR models. We discuss how the demagnetizing field behaves in regenerators made of packed spheres under realistic operation conditions....

  4. Behaviour of ferrocholesterics under external magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Emil; Motoc, Cornelia

    2001-08-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the orientational behaviour of a ferrocholesteric with a positive magnetic anisotropy is investigated. Both the phenomena arising when the field was switched on or switched off are considered. It is found that the field needed for a ferrocholesteric-ferronematic transition BFC↑ is higher when compared to that obtained for the pure cholesteric ( BC↑). A similar result was obtained when estimating the critical field for the homeotropic ferronematic-ferrocholesteric (focal conic) transition, occurring when the magnetic field was decreased or switched off. We found that BFC↓> BC↓. These results are explained when considering that the magnetic moments of the magnetic powder are not oriented parallel to the liquid crystal molecular directors, therefore hindering their orientation under a magnetic field.

  5. Coulomb crystals in the magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Baiko, D A

    2009-01-01

    The body-centered cubic Coulomb crystal of ions in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is studied using the rigid electron background approximation. The phonon mode spectra are calculated for a wide range of magnetic field strengths and for several orientations of the field in the crystal. The phonon spectra are used to calculate the phonon contribution to the crystal energy, entropy, specific heat, Debye-Waller factor of ions, and the rms ion displacements from the lattice nodes for a broad range of densities, temperatures, chemical compositions, and magnetic fields. Strong magnetic field dramatically alters the properties of quantum crystals. The phonon specific heat increases by many orders of magnitude. The ion displacements from their equilibrium positions become strongly anisotropic. The results can be relevant for dusty plasmas, ion plasmas in Penning traps, and especially for the crust of magnetars (neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields $B \\gtrsim 10^{14}$ G). The effect of the magnetic ...

  6. Generating the optimal magnetic field for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    remanence distribution for any desired magnetic field. The method is based on the reciprocity theorem, which through the use of virtual magnets can be used to calculate the optimal remanence distribution. Furthermore, we present a method for segmenting a given magnet design that always results...

  7. The Equipartition Magnetic Field Formula in Starburst Galaxies: Accounting for Pionic Secondaries and Strong Energy Losses

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Equipartition arguments provide an easy way to find a characteristic scale for the magnetic field from radio emission, by assuming the energy densities in cosmic rays and magnetic fields are the same. Yet most of the cosmic ray content in star-forming galaxies is in protons, which are invisible in radio emission. Therefore, the argument needs assumptions about the proton spectrum, typically that of a constant proton/electron ratio. In some environments, particularly starburst galaxies, the reasoning behind these assumptions does not necessarily hold: secondary pionic positrons and electrons may be responsible for most of the radio emission, and strong energy losses can alter the proton/electron ratio. We derive an equipartition expression that should work in a hadronic loss-dominated environment like starburst galaxies. Surprisingly, despite the radically different assumptions from the classical equipartition formula, numerically the results for starburst magnetic fields are similar. We explain this fortuitou...

  8. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  9. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  10. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  11. Large-scale magnetic field in the accretion discs of young stars: the influence of magnetic diffusion, buoyancy and Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Khaibrakhmanov, Sergey A; Parfenov, Sergey Yu; Sobolev, Andrey M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the fossil magnetic field in the accretion and protoplanetary discs using the Shakura and Sunyaev approach. The distinguishing feature of this study is the accurate solution of the ionization balance equations and the induction equation with Ohmic diffusion, magnetic ambipolar diffusion, buoyancy and the Hall effect. We consider the ionization by cosmic rays, X-rays and radionuclides, radiative recombinations, recombinations onto dust grains, and also thermal ionization. The buoyancy appears as the additional mechanism of magnetic flux escape in the steady-state solution of the induction equation. Calculations show that Ohmic diffusion and magnetic ambipolar diffusion constraint the generation of the magnetic field inside the `dead' zones. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-vertical. The buoyancy constraints the toroidal magnetic field strength close to the disc inner edge. As a result, the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields become comparable. The Hall effect is important in the re...

  12. Magnetically modified bioсells in constant magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, E. G.; Panina, L. K.; Kolikov, V. A.; Bogomolova, E. V.; Snetov, V. N.; Cherepkova, I. A.; Kiselev, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell' size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  13. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  14. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Nießen, B; Petzoldt, G; Reisner, M; Stuiber, S; Sturm, M; Singh, J T; Taubenheim, B; Rohrer, H K; Schläpfer, U

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a linear improvement in the systematic reach and a 40 % improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  15. Chameleon-Photon Mixing in a Primordial Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Schelpe, Camilla A O

    2010-01-01

    We consider the non-resonant mixing between photons and scalar axion-like particles (ALPs) in a primordial magnetic field, with specific reference to the chameleon scalar field model. This mixing would affect the intensity and polarization state of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We find that the average modification to the CMB polarization modes is negligible. However the average modification to the CMB intensity spectrum is more significant and we compare this to high precision measurements of the CMB monopole made by the far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on board the COBE satellite. The resulting 95% confidence limit on the scalar-photon conversion probability in the primordial field (at 100 GHz) is P < 2.6x10^{-2}. This corresponds to a degenerate constraint on the photon-scalar coupling strength, g, and the magnitude of the primordial magnetic field. Taking the 95% confidence upper bound on the strength of the primordial magnetic field found by Kahniashvili et al., this ...

  16. A Generalization of Gauge Symmetry, Fourth-Order Gauge Field Equations and Accelerated Cosmic-Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A generalization of the usual gauge symmetry leads to fourth-order gauge field equations, which imply a new constant force independent of distances. The force associated with the new $U_1$ gauge symmetry is repulsive among baryons. Such a constant force based on baryon charge conservation gives a field-theoretic understanding of the accelerated cosmic-expansion in the observable portion of the universe dominated by baryon galaxies. In consistent with all conservation laws and known forces, a ...

  17. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Schellart, P; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  18. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerot, Clément; Price, Daniel J.; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M.

    2017-08-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to pervade its debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of ˜10. However, this value represents a lower limit since it increases with numerical resolution. For an initial field strength of 1 G, the magnetic field never becomes dynamically important. Instead, the disruption of a star with a strong 1 MG magnetic field produces a debris stream within which magnetic pressure becomes similar to gas pressure a few tens of hours after disruption. If the remnant of one or multiple partial disruptions is eventually fully disrupted, its magnetic field could be large enough to magnetically power the relativistic jet detected from Swift J1644+57. Magnetized streams could also be significantly thickened by magnetic pressure when it overcomes the confining effect of self-gravity.

  19. Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model

    CERN Document Server

    Bakry, A; Zhang, P M; Zou, L P

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of that phenomenon is conditioned by features of the electro-weak interaction, namely, there is mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected in experiment.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Level Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    According to Maxwell electromagnetic field theory and magnetic vector potential integral equation, a mathematical model of LMF (Level Magnetic Field) for EMBR (Electromagnetic brake) was proposed, and the reliable software for LMF calculation was developed. The distribution of magnetic flux density given by numerical simulation shows that the magnetic flux density is greater in the magnet and magnetic leakage is observed in the gap. The magnetic flux density is uniform in horizontal plane and a peak is observed in vertical plane. Furthermore, the effects of electromagnetic and structural parameters on magnetic flux density were discussed. The relationship between magnetic flux, electromagnetic parameters and structural parameters is obtained by dimensional analysis, simulation experiment and least square method.

  1. Results and Consequences of Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge of the CMS Barrel Muon Alignment System

    CERN Document Server

    Bencze, Gy L; Imrek, J; Molnàr, J; Novàk, D; Raics, P; Sass, V; Szabò, Zs; Svékely, G; Szillàsi, Z; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    In the last year - as part of the first test of the CMS experiment at CERN [1] called Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) - about 25% of the barrel muon position monitoring system was built and operated. The configuration enabled us to test all the elements of the system and its function in real conditions. The correct operation of the system has been demonstrated. About 500 full measurement cycles have been recorded. In the paper the setup –including the read-out and control - is described and the first preliminary results are presented.

  2. Rydberg EIT in High Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lu; Anderson, David; Miller, Stephanie; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards an all-optical approach for measurements of strong magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Rydberg atoms in an atomic vapor. Rydberg EIT spectroscopy is a promising technique for the development of atom-based, calibration- and drift-free technology for high magnetic field sensing. In this effort, Rydberg EIT is employed to spectroscopically investigate the response of Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields, in which Rydberg atoms are in the strong-field regime. In our setup, two neodymium block magnets are used to generate fields of about 0.8 Tesla, which strongly perturb the atoms. Information on the field strength and direction is obtained by a comparison of experimental spectra with calculated spectral maps. Investigations of magnetic-field inhomogeneities and other decoherence sources will be discussed.

  3. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays from a Magnetized Strange Star Central Engine for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been tried to be related to the most varied and powerful sources known in the universe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are natural candidates. Here, we argue that cosmic rays can be accelerated by large amplitude electromagnetic waves (LAEMWs) when the MHD approximation of the field in the wind generated by the GRB's magnetized central engine breaks down. The central engine considered here is a strange star born with differential rotation from the accretion induced conversion of a neutron star into a strange star in a low-mass X-ray binary system. The LAEMWs generated this way accelerate light ions to the highest energies $E = q\\eta\\Delta\\Phi_{max}$ with an efficiency $\\eta \\sim 10^{-1}$ that accounts for all plausible energy losses. Alternatively, we also consider the possibility that, once formed, the LAEMWs are unstable to creation of a relativistically strong electromagnetic turbulence due to an overturn instability. Under this assumption, a lower limit to the efficien...

  4. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N. E-mail: ntalijan@elab.tmf.bg.ac.yu; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo{sub 5} permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  5. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N.; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R.

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo5 permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  6. The simulation of TGF origin in lightning leader electric fields by cosmic ray shower electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, P. H.; Atri, D.

    2015-12-01

    With the TGF simulation package LEPTRACK we can easily create all kinds of electric field geometries and electron flux fields to simulate Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches - it is script driven, with the details of high energy scattering physics hidden from the user, and an easily accessible output database for each particle created or scattered. We will show the results of simulating a realistic scenario of TGF origin based on cosmic ray shower electron flux fields in the neighbourhood of electric field geometries expected around lightning leader tips. Electron fluxes are derived from simulations using the CORSIKA cosmic ray simulation package and leader electric field geometry from current models. Presuming a TGF observed at orbital altitudes must come from a lightning leader pointing "upwards", and that cosmic rays enter at angles pointing "downwards" to "horizontal", we will show which combinations allow the electron flux to curve into the compact electric field of the leader and gain sufficient acceleration to create a TGF photon flux observable in orbit.

  7. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  8. Anisotropy and Corotation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments.

  9. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  10. An Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We find that by a redshift z ~ 3, about 5-80% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density > 10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at ~ 10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the fields observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification.

  11. SLAC T-510: Radio emission from particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulrey, Katharine

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic ray induced particle cascades radiate in radio frequencies in the Earth's atmosphere. Geomagnetic and Askaryan emission provide an effective way to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The SLAC T-510 experiment was the first to measure magnetically induced radiation from particle cascades in a controlled laboratory setting. An electron beam incident upon a dense dielectric target produced a particle cascade in the presence of a variable magnetic field. Antennas covering a band of 30-3000 MHz sampled RF emission in vertical and horizontal polarizations. Results from T-510 are compared to particle-level RF-emission simulations which are critical for reconstructing the energy and composition of detected ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers. We discuss the experimental set up, the data processing, the systematic errors and the main results of the experiment, which we found in a good agreement with the simulations.

  12. A microscopic, non-equilibrium, statistical field theory for cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Fabis, Felix; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2016-04-01

    Building upon the recent pioneering work by Mazenko and by Das and Mazenko, we develop a microscopic, non-equilibrium, statistical field theory for initially correlated canonical ensembles of classical microscopic particles obeying Hamiltonian dynamics. Our primary target is cosmic structure formation, where initial Gaussian correlations in phase space are believed to be set by inflation. We give an exact expression for the generating functional of this theory and work out suitable approximations. We specify the initial correlations by a power spectrum and derive general expressions for the correlators of the density and the response field. We derive simple closed expressions for the lowest-order contributions to the nonlinear cosmological power spectrum, valid for arbitrary wave numbers. We further calculate the bispectrum expected in this theory within these approximations and the power spectrum of cosmic density fluctuations to first order in the gravitational interaction, using a recent improvement of the Zel’dovich approximation. We show that, with a modification motivated by the adhesion approximation, the nonlinear growth of the density power spectrum found in numerical simulations of cosmic structure evolution is reproduced well to redshift zero and for arbitrary wave numbers even within first-order perturbation theory. Our results present the first fully analytic calculation of the nonlinear power spectrum of cosmic structures.

  13. How are Forbush decreases related to interplanetary magnetic field enhancements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunbabu, K. P.; Antia, H. M.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Hayashi, Y.; Kawakami, S.; Mohanty, P. K.; Oshima, A.; Subramanian, P.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: A Forbush decrease (FD) is a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity. We seek to understand the relationship between the FDs and near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Methods: We used muon data at cutoff rigidities ranging from 14 to 24 GV from the GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope to identify FD events. We selected those FD events that have a reasonably clean profile, and magnitude >0.25%. We used IMF data from ACE/WIND spacecrafts. We looked for correlations between the FD profile and that of the one-hour averaged IMF. We wanted to find out whether if the diffusion of high-energy protons into the large scale magnetic field is the cause of the lag observed between the FD and the IMF. Results: The enhancement of the IMF associated with FDs occurs mainly in the shock-sheath region, and the turbulence level in the magnetic field is also enhanced in this region. The observed FD profiles look remarkably similar to the IMF enhancement profiles. The FDs typically lag behind the IMF enhancement by a few hours. The lag corresponds to the time taken by high-energy protons to diffuse into the magnetic field enhancement via cross-field diffusion. Conclusions: Our findings show that high-rigidity FDs associated with CMEs are caused primarily by the cumulative diffusion of protons across the magnetic field enhancement in the turbulent sheath region between the shock and the CME. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. MDI Synoptic Charts of Magnetic Field: Interpolation of Polar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Larson, R. M.

    2007-05-01

    In this poster, we compare various methods for interpolation of polar field for the MDI synoptic charts of magnetic field. By examining the coronal and heliospheric magnetic field computed from the synoptic charts based on a Potential Field Source Surface model (PFSS), and by comparing the heliospheric current sheets and footpoints of open fields with the observations, we conclude that the coronal and heliospheric fields calculated from the synoptic charts are sensitive to the polar field interpolation, and a time-dependent interpolation method using the observed polar fields is the best among the seven methods investigated.

  15. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Landreman, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The properties of curl-free magnetic fields allow magnetic field distributions to be ranked in order of their difficulty of production from a distance. Plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may be difficult to support, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may be efficiently supported by distant coils. Two measures of difficulty, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally-produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix y...

  16. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  17. Scalar-field quintessence by cosmic shear: CFHT data analysis and forecasts for DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Schimd, C; Schimd, Carlo; Tereno, Ismael

    2006-01-01

    A light scalar field, minimally or not-minimally coupled to the metric field, is a well-defined candidate for the dark energy, overcoming the coincidence problem intrinsic to the cosmological constant and avoiding the difficulties of parameterizations. We present a general description of the weak gravitational lensing valid for every metric theory of gravity, including vector and tensor perturbations for a non-flat spatial metric. Based on this description, we investigate two minimally-coupled scalar field quintessence models using VIRMOS-Descart and CFHTLS cosmic shear data, and forecast the constraints for the proposed space-borne wide-field imager DUNE.

  18. The Physics of Attraction and Repulsion: Magnetism and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakotte, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    The development of new materials with improved magnetic properties completely changed the modern world in the past decades. Recent progress is predominantly due to a better understanding of magnetism that has gone far beyond compass needles rotating in a magnetic field and bar magnets attracting or repelling each other. New magnetic materials are used to build smaller and smaller read/write heads and hard disks with increased storage capacity, developments that are responsible the revolution in the computer industry. Another example is the field of magnetic levitation that became feasible for commercial applications with the discovery of new superconducting materials, and a prototype train is under development in Japan. In medicine, the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative to other (destructive) radiation techniques.

  19. Assembly of magnetic spheres in strong homogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, René; Stanković, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The assembly in two dimensions of spherical magnets in strong magnetic field is addressed theoretically. It is shown that the attraction and assembly of parallel magnetic chains is the result of a delicate interplay of dipole-dipole interactions and short ranged excluded volume correlations. Minimal energy structures are obtained by numerical optimization procedure as well as analytical considerations. For a small number of constitutive magnets Ntot ≤ 26, a straight chain is found to be the ground state. In the regime of larger Ntot ≥ 27, the magnets form two touching chains with equally long tails at both ends. We succeed to identify the transition from two to three touching chains at Ntot = 129. Overall, this study sheds light on the mechanisms of the recently experimentally observed ribbon formation of superparamagnetic colloids via lateral aggregation of magnetic chains in magnetic field (Darras et al., 2016).

  20. Evolution of Neutron Star Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Bhattacharya

    2002-03-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the theoretical models of the evolution of the magnetic fields of neutron stars other than magnetars. It appears that the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay significantly only if they are in binary systems. Three major physical models for this, namely spindown-induced flux expulsion, ohmic evolution of crustal field and diamagnetic screening of the field by accreted plasma, are reviewed.

  1. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Aquino, D. [ERC Incorporated, Air Force Research Laboratory, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB, CA 93524 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given. - Highlights: • Rosensweig's model for SAR was extended to high fields. • The MRSh relaxation equation was used to predict SAR at high fields. • Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations were used to predict SAR. • The results of these models were compared. • Predictions of effect of size and field conditions on SAR are presented.

  2. Study of magnetic field expansion using a plasma generator for space radiation active protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiang-Hong; JIA Shao-Xia; XU Feng; BAI Yan-Qiang; WAN Jun; LIU Hong-Tao; JIANG Rui

    2013-01-01

    There are many active protecting methods including Electrostatic Fields,Confined Magnetic Field,Unconfined Magnetic Field and Plasma Shielding etc.for defending the high-energy solar particle events (SPE) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) in deep space exploration.The concept of using cold plasma to expand a magnetic field is the best one of all possible methods so far.The magnetic field expansion caused by plasma can improve its protective efficiency of space particles.One kind of plasma generator has been developed and installed into the cylindrical permanent magnet in the eccentric.A plasma stream is produced using a helical-shaped antenna driven by a radio-frequency (RF) power supply of 13.56 MHz,which exits from both sides of the magnet and makes the magnetic field expand on one side.The discharging belts phenomenon is similar to the Earth's radiation belt,but the mechanism has yet to be understood.A magnetic probe is used to measure the magnetic field expansion distributions,and the results indicate that the magnetic field intensity increases under higher increments of the discharge power.

  3. Symmetry breaking and cosmic acceleration in scalar field models

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, M Mohseni; Sepangi, H R

    2015-01-01

    We study the possible role of symmetry breaking in the onset of the acceleration of the Universe in a scalar field dark energy model. We propose a new scenario in which acceleration of the Universe is driven by a positive potential produced by means of symmetry breaking.

  4. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  5. Magnetic fields and rotation of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Florido, E

    1998-01-01

    We present a simplified model in which we suggest that two important galactic problems -the magnetic field configuration at large scales and the flat rotation curve- may be simultaneously explained. A highly convective disc produces a high turbulent magnetic diffusion in the vertical direction, stablishing a merging of extragalactic and galactic magnetic fields. The outer disc may then adquire a magnetic energy gradient very close to the gradient required to explain the rotation curve, without the hypothesis of galactic dark matter. Our model predicts symmetries of the galactic field in noticeable agreement with the large scale structure of our galaxy.

  6. Rotating artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lembessis, V E; Alshamari, S; Siddig, A; Aldossary, O M

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields created when a two-level atom interacts with an optical Ferris wheel light field.These fields have the spatial structure of the optical Ferris wheel field intensity profile. If this optical field pattern is made to rotate in space then we have the creation of artificial electromagnetic fields which propagate in closed paths. The properties of such fields are presented and discussed

  7. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  8. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  9. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; Gonzalez, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have fai...

  10. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Jeremiah A.

    The Earth's magnetic field has been the bedrock of navigation for centuries. The latest research highlights the uniqueness of magnetic field measurements based on position due to large scale variations as well as localized perturbations. These observable changes in the Earth's magnetic field as a function of position provide distinct information which can be used for navigation. This dissertation describes ground vehicle navigation exploiting variation in Earth's magnetic field using a self-contained navigation system consisting of only a magnetometer and magnetic field maps. In order to achieve navigation, effective calibration enables repeatable magnetic field measurements from different vehicles and facilitates mapping of the observable magnetic field as a function of position. A new modified ellipsoid calibration technique for strapdown magnetometers in large vehicles is described, as well as analysis of position measurement generation comparing a multitude of measurement compositions using existing and newly developed likelihood techniques. Finally, navigation solutions are presented using both a position measurement and direct incorporation of the magnetometer measurements via a particle filter to demonstrate road navigation in three different environments. Emphatically, the results affirm that navigation using magnetic field variation in ground vehicles is viable and achieves adequate performance for road level navigation.

  11. Lattice Planar QED in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo; Giudice, Pietro; Papa, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We investigate planar Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED) with two degenerate staggered fermions in an external magnetic field on the lattice. Our preliminary results indicate that in external magnetic fields there is dynamical generation of mass for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the weak coupling region. We comment on possible implications to the quantum Hall effect in graphene.

  12. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. Chen; G.-Y. Zhao; Z.-Q. Shen

    2014-09-01

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  13. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  14. Magnetic Fields in Stars: Origin and Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, N

    2013-01-01

    Various types of magnetic fields occur in stars: small scale fields, large scale fields, and internal toroidal fields. While the latter may be ubiquitous in stars due to differential rotation, small scale fields (spots) may be associated with envelop convection in all low and high mass stars. The stable large scale fields found in only about 10 per cent of intermediate mass and massive stars may be understood as a consequence of dynamical binary interaction, e.g., the merging of two stars in a binary. We relate these ideas to magnetic fields in white dwarfs and neutron stars, and to their role in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernova explosions.

  15. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  16. Pair annihilation in superstrong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Bussard, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The kinematical and dynamical aspects of the annihilation processes in superstrong magnetic fields are studied. The feasibility and potential significance of detecting from magnetic neutron stars are discussed. The discussion proceeds from the derivation of the fully relativistic differential cross sections and annihilation rates for both one- and two-photon emission from a ground-state gas of electrons and positrons in a static, uniform magnetic field.

  17. Mechanics of magnetic fluid column in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic-and magnetic properties of magnetic fluid confined by ponderomotive force in a tube fixed in horizontal position are considered. The system is placed in a strong magnetic field under the influence of external static and dynamic perturbations. An experimental setup has been developed. A theoretical basis of the processes of magnetic colloid elastic deformation has been proposed. The values of the static ponderomotive elasticity coefficient and the elasticity coefficient under dynamic action are experimentally determined. The calculations of the saturation magnetization for two magnetic fluid samples, carried out according to the equation containing the dynamic elasticity coefficient, are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest when studying magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic colloids.

  18. Structure, dynamical impact and origin of magnetic fields in nearby galaxies in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Ferrière, Katia; Fletcher, Andrew; Heald, George; Heesen, Volker; Horellou, Cathy; Krause, Marita; Lou, Yu-Qing; Mao, Sui Ann; Paladino, Rosita; Schinnerer, Eva; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Stil, Jeroen; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields are an important ingredient of the interstellar medium (ISM). Besides their importance for star formation, they govern the transport of cosmic rays, relevant to the launch and regulation of galactic outflows and winds, which in turn are pivotal in shaping the structure of halo magnetic fields. Mapping the small-scale structure of interstellar magnetic fields in many nearby galaxies is crucial to understand the interaction between gas and magnetic fields, in particular how gas flows are affected. Elucidation of the magnetic role in, e.g., triggering star formation, forming and stabilising spiral arms, driving outflows, gas heating by reconnection and magnetising the intergalactic medium has the potential to revolutionise our physical picture of the ISM and galaxy evolution in general. Radio polarisation observations in the very nearest galaxies at high frequencies (>= 3 GHz) and with high spatial resolution (<= 5") hold the key here. The galaxy survey with SKA1 that we propose will also be a...

  19. Cosmic Rays trajectory reconstruction in the Earth Magnetosphere: External Field models importance during the last solar active period (from 2011 to 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Davide; Della Torre, Stefano; Pensotti, Simonetta; Bobik, Pavol; Kudela, Karel; Rancoita, Pier Giorgio; Gervasi, Massimo; Jeroen Boschini, Matteo; Rozza, Davide; La vacca, Giuseppe; Tacconi, Mauro

    Geomagsphere is a backtracing code for Cosmic Rays trajectory reconstruction in the Earth Magnetosphere that has been developed with last models of Internal (IGRF-11) and External (Tsyganenko 1996 and 2005) field components. This backtracing technique was used to separate Primary Cosmic Rays Particles, in case of allowed trajectory, from Secondary particles, in case of forbidden trajectory. We compared Magnetic Field measurements with and without the external field model with satellite data in past periods, in particular GOES (1998) and CLUSTER (2004) data. For both periods TS05 reproduces the magnetc field components with good accuracy. The specificity of the TS05 model, designed for solar storms, was tested comparing it with data taken by CLUSTER during the last solar active period (from 2011 to 2013) During Solar Flares (occurred march and May 2012), the usage of such an external field has a relevavant impact on fraction of AMS-02 cosmic rays identified as trapped and secondary particles, especially in high geomagnetic latitudes, as was expecte by some previous simulations, in comparison with the Internal Field only.

  20. Cosmic-ray neutron transport at a forest field site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Desilets, Darin

    2017-01-01

    parameters describing the subsurface to match measured height profiles and time series of thermal and epithermal neutron intensities at a field site in Denmark. Overall, modeled thermal and epithermal neutron intensities are in satisfactory agreement with measurements; however, the choice of forest canopy...... conceptualization is found to be significant. Modeling results show that the effect of canopy interception, soil chemistry and dry bulk density of litter and mineral soil on neutron intensity is small. On the other hand, the neutron intensity decreases significantly with added litter-layer thickness, especially...... for epithermal neutron energies. Forest biomass also has a significant influence on the neutron intensity height profiles at the examined field site, altering both the shape of the profiles and the ground-level thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio. This ratio increases with increasing amounts of biomass...

  1. Detection of cosmic gamma-rays using a heliostat field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arqueros, F.; Ballestrin, J.; Borque, D. M.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Enriquez, R.; Gebauer, H.-J.; Plaga, R.

    2001-08-01

    Gamma-Ray telescopes based on a solar plant are able to accurately measure the spatial distribution and time structure of the Cherenkov shower front. Although this information should be sufficient for the reconstruction of several primary parameters, it will be shown that the restricted field of view of the optical detection system and the limited sampling of a realistic heliostat array impose severe limitations.

  2. Delayed quarkonium formation in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Formation time of heavy quarkonia in a homogeneous magnetic field is analyzed by using a phenomenological ansatz of the vector current correlator. Because the existence of a magnetic field mixes vector quarkonia ($J/\\psi$, $\\psi^\\prime$) and their pseudoscalar partners ($\\eta_c$, $\\eta_c^\\prime$), the properties of the quarkonia can be modified through such a spin mixing. This means that the formation time of quarkonia is also changed by the magnetic field. We show the formation time of vector quarkonia is delayed by an idealized constant magnetic field, where the formation time of the excited state becomes longer than that of the ground state. As a more realistic situation in heavy-ion collisions, effects by a time-dependent magnetic field are also discussed.

  3. Structure of magnetic fields in intracluster cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos Nektarios; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the AGN jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and evaluate the rotation measure for radiation traversing the bubble.

  4. Unavoidable strong magnetic fields in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wagstaff, Jacques M; Schleicher, Dominik; Sigl, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we show that the Universe is already strongly magnetised at very early epochs during cosmic evolution. Our calculations are based on the efficient amplification of weak magnetic seed fields, which are unavoidably present in the early Universe, by the turbulent small-scale dynamo (SSD). We identify at least one epoch during the radiation dominated regime where all the necessities for the SSD to work are fulfilled. Hence, at scales of $l_c\\sim0.3$ pc, the comoving field strength due to this mechanism will be $B_0\\sim0.35\\varepsilon^{1/2}$ nG at the present time, where $\\varepsilon$ is the saturation efficiency.

  5. An Empirical Relation Between The Large-Scale Magnetic Field And The Dynamical Mass In Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Knapen, J H; Beckman, J E; Koribalski, B; Elmegreen, B G

    2015-01-01

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic fields on the evolution of galaxies are unknown. Though not without challenges, the dynamo theory can explain the large-scale coherent magnetic fields which govern galaxies, but observational evidence for the theory is so far very scarce. Putting together the available data of non-interacting, non-cluster galaxies with known large-scale magnetic fields, we find a tight correlation between the integrated polarized flux density and the rotation speed, v(rot), of galaxies. This leads to an almost linear correlation between the large-scale magnetic field B and v(rot), assuming that the number of cosmic ray electrons is proportional to the star formation rate. This correlation cannot be attributed to an active linear dynamo processes, as no correlation holds with shear or angular speed. It indicates instead a coupling between the large-scale magnetic field and the dynamical mass of the galaxies, B~M(dyn)^{0.2-0.3}. Hence, f...

  6. Probing Magnetic Fields of Early Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    How do magnetic fields form and evolve in early galaxies? A new study has provided some clever observations to help us answer this question.The Puzzle of Growing FieldsDynamo theory is the primary model describing how magnetic fields develop in galaxies. In this picture, magnetic fields start out as weak seed fields that are small and unordered. These fields then become ordered and amplified by large-scale rotation and turbulence in galaxy disks and halos, eventually leading to the magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today.Schematic showinghow to indirectly measure protogalactic magnetic fields. The measured polarization of a background quasar is altered by the fields in a foreground protogalaxy. Click for a closer look! [Farnes et al. 2017/Adolf Schaller/STSCI/NRAO/AUI/NSF]To test this model, we need observations of the magnetic fields in young protogalaxies. Unfortunately, we dont have the sensitivity to be able to measure these fields directly but a team of scientists led by Jamie Farnes (Radboud University in the Netherlands) have come up with a creative alternative.The key is to find early protogalaxies that absorb the light of more distant background objects. If a protogalaxy lies between us and a distant quasar, then magnetic fields of the protogalaxy if present will affect the polarization measurements of the background quasar.Observing Galactic Building BlocksTop: Redshift distribution for the background quasars in the authors sample. Bottom: Redshift distribution for the foreground protogalaxies the authors are exploring. [Farnes et al. 2017]Farnes and collaborators examined two types of foreground protogalaxies: Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). They obtained polarimetric data for a sample of 114 distant quasars with nothing in the foreground (the control sample), 19 quasars with DLAs in the foreground, and 27 quasars with LLSs in the foreground. They then used statistical analysis techniques to draw conclusions about

  7. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  8. Formation of magnetically anisotropic composite films at low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi Zahedi, Maryam; Ennen, Inga; Marchi, Sophie; Barthel, Markus J.; Hütten, Andreas; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Fragouli, Despina

    2017-04-01

    We present a straightforward two-step technique for the fabrication of poly (methyl methacrylate) composites with embedded aligned magnetic chains. First, ferromagnetic microwires are realized in a poly (methyl methacrylate) solution by assembling iron nanoparticles in a methyl methacrylate solution under heat in an external magnetic field of 160 mT. The simultaneous thermal polymerization of the monomer throughout the wires is responsible for their permanent linkage and stability. Next, the polymer solution containing the randomly dispersed microwires is casted on a solid substrate in the presence of a low magnetic field (20–40 mT) which induces the final alignment of the microwires into long magnetic chains upon evaporation of the solvent. We prove that the presence of the nanoparticles assembled in the form of microwires is a key factor for the formation of the anisotropic films under low magnetic fields. In fact, such low fields are not capable of driving and assembling dispersed magnetic nanoparticles in the same type of polymer solutions. Hence, this innovative approach can be utilized for the synthesis of magnetically anisotropic nanocomposite films at low magnetic fields.

  9. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  10. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have...... failed to detect magnetic fields, indicating an upper limit on the longitudinal field between 8 and 15G. In these LSD studies, assumptions were made that all spectral lines are identical in shape and can be described by a scaled mean profile. Aims. We re-analyse the available spectropolarimetric material...

  11. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Piccinelli, Gabriella; Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales, which rises the possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger proper time method.

  12. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  13. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Meier Matthias M.; Trompier François; Ambrozova Iva; Kubancak Jan; Matthiä Daniel; Ploc Ondrej; Santen Nicole; Wirtz Michael

    2016-01-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign ...

  14. How are Forbush decreases related with interplanetary magnetic field enhancements ?

    CERN Document Server

    Arunbabu, K P; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K; Hayashi, Y; Kawakami, S; Mohanty, P K; Oshima, A; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Forbush decrease (FD) is a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity. We seek to understand the relationship between the FDs and near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Methods. We use muon data at cutoff rigidities ranging from 14 to 24 GV from the GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope to identify FD events. We select those FD events that have a reasonably clean profile, and magnitude > 0.25%. We use IMF data from ACE/WIND spacecrafts. We look for correlations between the FD profile and that of the one hour averaged IMF. We ask if the diffusion of high energy protons into the large scale magnetic field is the cause of the lag observed between the FD and the IMF. Results. The enhancement of the IMF associated with FDs occurs mainly in the shock-sheath region, and the turbulence level in the magnetic field is also enhanced in this region. The observed FD profiles look remarkably simil...

  15. Planck 2015 results. XIX. Constraints on primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T.S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Shiraishi, M.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    We predict and investigate four types of imprint of a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies: the impact of PMFs on the CMB spectra; the effect on CMB polarization induced by Faraday rotation; magnetically-induced non-Gaussianities; and the magnetically-induced breaking of statistical isotropy. Overall, Planck data constrain the amplitude of PMFs to less than a few nanogauss. In particular, individual limits coming from the analysis of the CMB angular power spectra, using the Planck likelihood, are $B_{1\\,\\mathrm{Mpc}}< 4.4$ nG (where $B_{1\\,\\mathrm{Mpc}}$ is the comoving field amplitude at a scale of 1 Mpc) at 95% confidence level, assuming zero helicity, and $B_{1\\,\\mathrm{Mpc}}< 5.6$ nG when we consider a maximally helical field. For nearly scale-invariant PMFs we obtain $B_{1\\,\\mathrm{Mpc}}<2.1$ nG and $B_{1\\,\\mathrm{Mpc}}<0.7$ nG if the impact of PMFs on the ionization history of the Universe is included in the analysis...

  16. Cosmic rays and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sloan, T. [Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A.W. [Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds could contribute to global warming. The argument is that the observed increased solar activity during the last century caused a decrease in the ionization due to cosmic rays since the lower energy cosmic particles are deflected by the magnetic field created by the increasing solar wind. This would lead to a decrease in cloud cover allowing more heating of the earth by the sun. Meteorological data combined to solar activity observations and simulations show that any effect of solar activity on clouds and the climate is likely to be through irradiance rather than cosmic rays. Since solar irradiance transfers 8 orders of magnitude more energy to the atmosphere than cosmic rays it is more plausible that this can produce a real effect. The total contribution of variable solar activity to global warming is shown to be less than 14% of the total temperature rise. (A.C.)

  17. Study of inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas for standard and tachyon scalar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-07-15

    We consider an inflationary universe model in the context of the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas by taking the matter field as standard and tachyon scalar fields. We evaluate the corresponding scalar fields and scalar potentials during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by modifying the first Friedmann equation. In each case, we evaluate the number of e-folds, scalar as well as tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index, and the important observational parameter, the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of this parameter shows that the model remains incompatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data in each case. (orig.)

  18. Study of Inflationary Generalized Cosmic Chaplygin Gas for Standard and Tachyon Scalar Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2014-01-01

    We consider an inflationary universe model in the context of generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas by taking matter field as standard and tachyon scalar fields. We evaluate the corresponding scalar fields and scalar potentials during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by modifying the first Friedmann equation. In each case, we evaluate the number of e-folds, scalar as well as tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and important observational parameter, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflatons. The graphical behavior of this parameter shows that the model remains incompatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data in each case.

  19. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  20. Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Taeyueb; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lim, Ju Young; Hong, Jinki; Song, Jin Dong; Chang, Joonyeon; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Rhie, Kungwon; Han, Suk Hee; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Johnson, Mark

    2013-02-07

    Logic devices based on magnetism show promise for increasing computational efficiency while decreasing consumed power. They offer zero quiescent power and yet combine novel functions such as programmable logic operation and non-volatile built-in memory. However, practical efforts to adapt a magnetic device to logic suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio and other performance attributes that are not adequate for logic gates. Rather than exploiting magnetoresistive effects that result from spin-dependent transport of carriers, we have approached the development of a magnetic logic device in a different way: we use the phenomenon of large magnetoresistance found in non-magnetic semiconductors in high electric fields. Here we report a device showing a strong diode characteristic that is highly sensitive to both the sign and the magnitude of an external magnetic field, offering a reversible change between two different characteristic states by the application of a magnetic field. This feature results from magnetic control of carrier generation and recombination in an InSb p-n bilayer channel. Simple circuits combining such elementary devices are fabricated and tested, and Boolean logic functions including AND, OR, NAND and NOR are performed. They are programmed dynamically by external electric or magnetic signals, demonstrating magnetic-field-controlled semiconductor reconfigurable logic at room temperature. This magnetic technology permits a new kind of spintronic device, characterized as a current switch rather than a voltage switch, and provides a simple and compact platform for non-volatile reconfigurable logic devices.

  1. Solar Force-free Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field. In most areas in the corona magnetic forces are so dominant that all non-magnetic forces like plasma pressure gradient and gravity can be neglected in the lowest order. This model assumption is called the force-free field assumption, as the Lorentz force vanishes. This can be obtained by either vanishing electric currents (leading to potential fields) or the currents are co-aligned with the magnetic field lines. First we discuss a mathematically simpler approach that the magnetic field and currents are proportional with one global constant, the so-called linear force-free field approximation. In the generic case, however, the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents is nonlinear and analytic solutions have been only found for special cases, like 1D or 2D configurations. For constructing realistic nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field models in 3D, sophisticated numerical computations are required and boundar...

  2. Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Béché, A; Van Tendeloo, G; Verbeeck, J

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles have provided a rich field of study, leading to a wide area of research in particle physics, solid state physics, ultra-cold gases, superconductors, cosmology, and gauge theory. So far, no true magnetic monopoles were found experimentally. Using the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the central results of quantum physics, shows however, that an effective monopole field can be produced. Understanding the effects of such a monopole field on its surroundings is crucial to its observation and provides a better grasp of fundamental physical theory. We realize the diffraction of fast electrons at a magnetic monopole field generated by a nanoscopic magnetized ferromagnetic needle. Previous studies have been limited to theoretical semiclassical optical calculations of the motion of electrons in such a monopole field. Solid state systems like the recently studied 'spin ice' provide a constrained system to study similar fields, but make it impossible to separate the monopole from the material. Free space ...

  3. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6 dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8 nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200 nm × 200 nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3 dB is achieved for 30 μl magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30 nm iron oxide particles, 1 mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  4. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  5. Polarized radiation diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, Gautier

    The main techniques used to diagnose magnetic fields in stars from polarimetric observations are presented. First, a summary of the physics of spectral line formation in the presence of a magnetic field is given. Departures from the simple case of linear Zeeman effect are briefly considered: partial Paschen-Back effect, contribution of hyperfine structure, and combined Stark and Zeeman effects. Important approximate solutions of the equation of transfer of polarized light in spectral lines are introduced. The procedure for disk-integration of emergent Stokes profiles, which is central to stellar magnetic field studies, is described, with special attention to the treatment of stellar rotation. This formalism is used to discuss the determination of the mean longitudinal magnetic field (through the photographic technique and through Balmer line photopolarimetry). This is done within the specific framework of Ap stars, which, with their unique large-scale organized magnetic fields, are an ideal laboratory for studies of stellar magnetism. Special attention is paid to those Ap stars whose magnetically split line components are resolved in high-dispersion Stokes I spectra, and to the determination of their mean magnetic field modulus. Various techniques of exploitation of the information contained in polarized spectral line profiles are reviewed: the moment technique (in particular, the determination of the crossover and of the mean quadratic field), Zeeman-Doppler imaging, and least-squares deconvolution. The prospects that these methods open for linear polarization studies are sketched. The way in which linear polarization diagnostics complement their Stokes I and V counterparts is emphasized by consideration of the results of broad band linear polarization measurements. Illustrations of the use of various diagnostics to derive properties of the magnetic fields of Ap stars are given. This is used to show the interest of deriving more physically realistic models of the

  6. Special electromagnetic fields in type D vacuum space-times and cosmic censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Düztaş, Koray

    2016-01-01

    We consider two test, null electromagnetic fields aligned with the two repeated principal null directions of the type D background, and a test, non-null field special in the sense that the principal null directions of the electromagnetic field lie along the repeated principal null directions of the space-time. We prove the existence of the non-null field in type D background. This field behaves as $1/r^2$ and its contribution to the energy and angular momentum fluxes vanishes in Kerr background. For that reason the special non-null field does not lead to any perturbation of black hole parameters of mass and angular momentum; thus it does not challenge the cosmic censorship conjecture. The conjecture also stays valid in the interaction of an extremal or a nearly extremal Kerr black hole with the null field directed along $n^a$. However, the null field directed along $l^a$ leads to a generic violation of cosmic censorship conjecture.

  7. Scattering in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Carey

    2002-08-19

    The fixed target program at Fermilab has come to an end. New projects are in the planning stage. Among them is a muon storage ring. Up to the present, all storage rings in high-energy physics have carried stable particles, namely the electron and proton and their antiparticles. The muon is unstable and decays with a mean lifetime of 2.0 x 10{sup -6} sec. Two types of cooling have been used in the past. One is stochastic cooling where an electrode is used to detect the positions of the particles and send a signal to another position across the ring. Through successive applications of this technique, the phase space is ultimately greatly reduced and beams can be made to collide with a useful event rate. The second type of cooling is electron cooling. Here protons and electrons are made to travel together for a short distance. Equipartition causes transfer of transverse energy of the protons to that of the electrons. Neither of these methods is fast enough to allow acceleration of a sufficient number of muons up to maximum energy before they decay. A new method known as ionization cooling has been proposed.[1] The muons are cooled by passing them through a container of liquid hydrogen. The energy loss reduces both transverse and longitudinal momentum. The longitudinal momentum is restored with RF cavities. The net result is to maintain the longitudinal momentum while cooling the transverse momentum. To minimize the total travel distance of the muons the liquid hydrogen is placed inside the focusing solenoids. The question arises as to whether the presence of the solenoids influences the phase space occupied by the muons. After the muon scatters it has transverse momentum. In a constant longitudinal magnetic field the trajectory wraps around the field lines and coincides in momentum and position with a particle which scatters one cycle later. Here we calculate the change in emittance for both a drift space and a solenoid. We find that the presence of the solenoid does

  8. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  9. Hyperfine magnetic fields in substituted Finemet alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzózka, K., E-mail: k.brzozka@uthrad.pl [University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, Department of Physics (Poland); Sovák, P. [P.J. Šafárik University, Institute of Physics (Slovakia); Szumiata, T.; Gawroński, M.; Górka, B. [University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, Department of Physics (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the hyperfine fields of Finemet-type alloys in form of ribbons, substituted alternatively by Mn, Ni, Co, Al, Zn, V or Ge of various concentration. The comparative analysis of magnetic hyperfine fields was carried out which enabled to understand the role of added elements in as-quenched as well as annealed samples. Moreover, the influence of the substitution on the mean direction of the local hyperfine magnetic field was examined.

  10. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    CERN Document Server

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T; Beck, Rainer; Bomans, Dominik J

    2011-01-01

    We clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and what is the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 and 4.85GHz. Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are three times weaker than in the normal spirals (6muG) are observed only in dwarfs of extreme characteristics while typical LG dwarfs are not suitable objects for efficient supply of magnetic fields to the intergalactic medium.

  11. Magnetic field homogeneity perturbations in finite Halbach dipole magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Krzysztof; Liszkowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Halbach hollow cylinder dipole magnets of a low or relatively low aspect ratio attract considerable attention due to their applications, among others, in compact NMR and MRI systems for investigating small objects. However, a complete mathematical framework for the analysis of magnetic fields in these magnets has been developed only for their infinitely long precursors. In such a case the analysis is reduced to two-dimensions (2D). The paper details the analysis of the 3D magnetic field in the Halbach dipole cylinders of a finite length. The analysis is based on three equations in which the components of the magnetic flux density Bx, By and Bz are expanded to infinite power series of the radial coordinate r. The zeroth term in the series corresponds to a homogeneous magnetic field Bc, which is perturbed by the higher order terms due to a finite magnet length. This set of equations is supplemented with an equation for the field profile B(z) along the magnet axis, presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the geometrical factors in the coefficients of particular powers of r, defined by intricate integrals are the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of the homogeneity profile (B(z)-Bc)/Bc. As a consequence, the components of B can be easily calculated with an arbitrary accuracy. In order to describe perturbations of the field due to segmentation, two additional equations are borrowed from the 2D theory. It is shown that the 2D approach to the perturbations generated by the segmentation can be applied to the 3D Halbach structures unless r is not too close to the inner radius of the cylinder ri. The mathematical framework presented in the paper was verified with great precision by computations of B by a highly accurate integration of the magnetostatic Coulomb law and utilized to analyze the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the magnet with the accuracy better than 1 ppm.

  12. Cosmic-ray source of runaway electrons in thundercloud electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    To increase an accuracy of numerical simulations of the high-altitude and high-energy electric phenomena in thunderstorm atmosphere basing on the electric breakdown combining the cosmic-ray effects and relativistic runaway electron (RE) avalanches it is necessary to have accurate source of seed REs produced by cosmic rays. We calculated the source using the Monte-Carlo technique. Actually a number of secondary electrons was calculated with energies above the runaway threshold depending on the field overvoltage relative to the minimum of the drag force affecting electrons. The cosmic radiation propagation through the atmosphere was simulated based on simplified model of the nuclear cascade: a cosmic proton was assumed to completely lose its energy in the first interaction with air nuclei, producing 15 pions with equal energies. The flux of primary radiation was divided into 20 angular groups containing equal number of particles. In view of the lack of the experimental data on the RE source it is impossible to directly estimate the accuracy of the obtained source. Therefore the model reliability was verified by comparing results of secondary radiation calculations with known experimental altitude variations in the secondary cosmic rays and their spectra. The source was calculated as the specific generation rate of the secondary electrons by cosmic radiation dependent on electric field overvoltage and the altitude above the Earth's surface. It is recommended as a source of relativistic runaway electron avalanches in numerical simulations of electric discharges in atmosphere controlled by REs in thunderstorm fields and their emissions: optical, gamma and neutrons. The source already was used to simulate the high-altitude discharge and its emissions. In particular, the calculated gamma-ray pulses (photon numbers and spectra, pulse duration) agree with detected terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). Conclusions of the published analyses (Cummer and Lyons, 2005; Cummer et

  13. Preliminary results of simulation of hypo magnetic conditions and variations in energetic range of cosmic rays in ground-based experiments on plant objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisheva, Natalia; Petrashova, Dina; Shchegolev, Boris

    The most dangerous for the astronauts and cosmonauts are the cosmic rays and drastic decrease of the tension of geomagnetic field (GMF) on the Earth orbit and in the open space. The tension in the interplanetary magnetic field is 10 nT, whereas the tension of GMF is 10 (4) nT on the Earth surface. We carried out the preliminary experiments for study the effects of hypo magnetic conditions and variations in energetic range of cosmic rays (CR) on the plant objects (Vigna radiata, Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa and A. fistulosum, Cucumis sativis). GMF was weakened by using special shielding chamber made on the basis of the amorphous alloy magnetic material. The camera is able to weaken the GMF from 48 μT till 0.192 μT. Modulation of the energetic range of the neutron component of secondary CR was performed with using of the shielding by graphite and by paraffin. The influence of hypo magnetic field and the neutron intensity were studied on the germination of seeds, the growth, the length and the side branches of the roots in the experimental samples. We found that the sensitivity to the hypo magnetic field and to the variations in energetic range of neutrons can vary from object to object. For instance, exposure of the hypo magnetic field on black bean and mung bean stimulated the growth of the roots while do not affect on the white bean. Likewise sensitivity of Phaseolus vulgaris (black and white bean) and Vigna radiata (mung bean) to exposure of nucleon component of cosmic rays on the Earth's surface are differed. It was found that modification of energetic range of CR by using graphite shielding leads to a change in sign of correlation between the length of roots in all experimental samples and the nucleon component of CR compared with the control samples. This is evidence that physiology of biological objects significantly are modified in hypo magnetic environment, as well as under exposure of the CR in different energetic ranges during the space flights. Our

  14. Instability of strong magnetic field and neutrino magnetic dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum instability of the strong electromagnetic field has been discussed since long time ago. The instability of the strong electric field due to creation of electron pairs is one of the examples, which is known as Schwinger process. What matters are the coupling of particles to the electromagnetic field and the mass of the particle to be produced. The critical electric field for electrons in the minimal coupling is ~ m^2/e . Spin 1/2 neutral particles but with magnetic dipole moments can interact with the electromagnetic field through Pauli coupling. The instability of the particular vacuum under the strong magnetic field can be formulated as the emergence of imaginary parts of the effective potential. In this talk, the development of the imaginary part in the effective potential as a function of the magnetic field strength is discussed for the configurations of the uniform magnetic field and the inhomogeneous magnetic field. Neutrinos are the lightest particle(if not photon or gluon) in the "standard model...

  15. Computation of magnetic fields in hysteretic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Gomez, R.D.; Burke, E.R. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States))

    1993-11-01

    A newly developed vector Preisach-type model of hysteresis is applied to the computation of static magnetic fields in media with hysteresis. Time stepping technique is used to trace the time evolution of local magnetic fields which form the history of magnetizing process. At each time step, the magnetostatic problem is formulated in terms of an integral equation and an efficient iterative algorithm is employed for solving this problem. The technique has been used to simulate some magnetic recording processes. Sample results of these simulations are given in the paper.

  16. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreman, Matt, E-mail: mattland@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  17. Accounting for Cosmic Variance in Studies of Gravitationally-Lensed High-Redshift Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Field Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Brant E; Dunlop, James S; McLure, Ross J; Stark, Daniel P; McLeod, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides a powerful means for studying faint galaxies in the distant universe. By magnifying the apparent brightness of background sources, massive clusters enable the detection of galaxies fainter than the usual sensitivity limit for blank fields. However, this gain in effective sensitivity comes at the cost of a reduced survey volume and, in this {\\it Letter}, we demonstrate there is an associated increase in the cosmic variance uncertainty. As an example, we show that the cosmic variance uncertainty of the high redshift population viewed through the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744 increases from ~35% at redshift z~7 to >~65% at z~10. Previous studies of high redshift galaxies identified in the Frontier Fields have underestimated the cosmic variance uncertainty that will affect the ultimate constraints on both the faint end slope of the high-redshift luminosity function and the cosmic star formation rate density, key goals of the Frontier Field program.

  18. Accounting for Cosmic Variance in Studies of Gravitationally Lensed High-redshift Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Field Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brant E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; Stark, Dan P.; McLeod, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides a powerful means for studying faint galaxies in the distant universe. By magnifying the apparent brightness of background sources, massive clusters enable the detection of galaxies fainter than the usual sensitivity limit for blank fields. However, this gain in effective sensitivity comes at the cost of a reduced survey volume and, in this Letter, we demonstrate that there is an associated increase in the cosmic variance uncertainty. As an example, we show that the cosmic variance uncertainty of the high-redshift population viewed through the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744 increases from ~35% at redshift z ~ 7 to >~ 65% at z ~ 10. Previous studies of high-redshift galaxies identified in the Frontier Fields have underestimated the cosmic variance uncertainty that will affect the ultimate constraints on both the faint-end slope of the high-redshift luminosity function and the cosmic star formation rate density, key goals of the Frontier Field program.

  19. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres Menezes, Debora [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Laercio Lopes, Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Campus VIII, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Varginha, MG (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    We revisit three of the mathematical formalisms used to describe magnetized quark matter in compact objects within the MIT and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models and then compare their results. The tree formalisms are based on 1) isotropic equations of state, 2) anisotropic equations of state with different parallel and perpendicular pressures and 3) the assumption of a chaotic field approximation that results in a truly isotropic equation of state. We have seen that the magnetization obtained with both models is very different: while the MIT model produces well-behaved curves that are always positive for large magnetic fields, the NJL model yields a magnetization with lots of spikes and negative values. This fact has strong consequences on the results based on the existence of anisotropic equations of state. We have also seen that, while the isotropic formalism results in maximum stellar masses that increase considerably when the magnetic fields increase, maximum masses obtained with the chaotic field approximation never vary more than 5.5%. The effect of the magnetic field on the radii is opposed in the MIT and NJL models: with both formalisms, isotropic and chaotic field approximation, for a fixed mass, the radii increase with the increase of the magnetic field in the MIT bag model and decrease in the NJL, the radii of quark stars described by the NJL model being smaller than the ones described by the MIT model. (orig.)

  20. Alignment of magnetic uniaxial particles in a magnetic field: Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovnia, O.A., E-mail: golovnya@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Str. S. Kovalevskoy, 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Popov, A.G [Institute of Metal Physics, Str. S. Kovalevskoy, 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sobolev, A.N. [South Ural State University (National Research University), av. Lenina, 76, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Hadjipanayis, G.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 Sharp Lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The numerical investigations of the process of alignment of magnetically uniaxial Nd–Fe–B powders in an applied magnetic field were carried out using the discrete element method (DEM). It is shown that magnetic alignment of ensemble of spherical particles provides extremely high degree of alignment, which is achieved in low magnetic fields. A model of formation of anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles is suggested. The influence of the shape anisotropy and friction coefficient on the alignment degree was analyzed. The increase in the friction coefficient leads to a decrease in the alignment degree; the simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental dependences. It is shown that in magnetic fields higher than 5 T, the calculated field dependences of the alignment degree quantitatively render the experimental data. The increase of about 6% in the alignment degree in the experiments with addition of internal lubricant can be explained by the decrease of 14% in friction coefficient. - Highlights: • We simulate the magnetic alignment of ensemble of Nd–Fe–B spherical uniaxial particles. • Anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles are constructed. • Influence of the particle shape anisotropy and friction on the alignment is analyzed. • We compare calculated and experimental data on field dependence of magnetic alignment. • The results render the experimental dependence.

  1. Model of Reconnection of Weakly Stochastic Magnetic Field and its Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the model of magnetic field reconnection in the presence of turbulence introduced by us approximately ten years ago. The model does not require any plasma effects to be involved in order to make the reconnection fast. In fact, it shows that the degree of magnetic field stochasticity controls the reconnection. The turbulence in the model is assumed to be subAlfvenic, with the magnetic field only slightly perturbed. This ensures that the reconnection happens in generic astrophysical environments and the model does not appeal to any unphysical concepts, similar to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity concept, which is employed in the kinematic magnetic dynamo. The interest to that model has recently increased due to successful numerical testings of the model predictions. In view of this, we discuss implications of the model, including the first-order Fermi acceleration of cosmic rays, that the model naturally entails, bursts of reconnection, that can be associated with Solar flares, as well as, removal ...

  2. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  3. Magnetic field in the primitive solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites have apparently been magnetized in their early history in magnetic fields with intensities of 0.1 to 10 G, but the origin of the magnetizing field has remained obscured. It is suggested that the magnetic field recorded in the remanence of carbonaceous chondrites may have been produced by a self-excited hydromagnetic dynamo in the gaseous preplanetary nebula from which the solar system is thought to have formed. Recently computed models for the evolution of the preplanetary nebula, consisting of turbulent and differentially rotating gaseous disks with characteristic radial scales of several AU, are used to demonstrate the feasibility of this hypothesis. The maximum field intensity that might be realized by the dynamo production process is estimated to be as high as 1 to 10 G, taking into account two dynamical mechanisms that limit the strength of the field (the Coriolis force and ambipolar diffusion).

  4. Magnetic field evolution in neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, F.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. Using numerical simulations restricted to axially symmetric geometry, we study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the interior of an isolated neutron star under the effect of ambipolar diffusion, i.e. the drift of the magnetic field and the charged particles relative to the neutrons. We model the stellar interior as an electrically neutral fluid composed of neutrons, protons and electrons; these species can be converted into each other by weak interactions (beta decays), suffer binary collisions, and be affected by each other's macroscopic electromagnetic fields. We show that, in the restricted case of pure ambipolar diffusion, neglecting weak interactions, the magnetic fields evolves towards a stable MHD equilibria configuration, in the timescales analytically expected.

  5. Magnetic field induced optical vortex beam rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has drawn a great deal of attention for its important applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. Here we adopt a method to study the rotation of a light beam, which is based on magnetic field induced circular birefringence in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. The dependence of the rotation angle to the intensity of the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurement. We derive a detail theoretical description that is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The experiment shows here provides a new method for precise measurement of magnetic field intensity and expands the application of OAM-carrying light.

  6. Quantum Electrodynamics in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J

    2005-01-01

    A systematic formalism for quantum electrodynamics in a classical uniform magnetic field is discussed. The first order radiative correction to the ground state energy of an electron is calculated. This then leads to the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron without divergent integrals. Thorough analyses of this problem are given for the weak magnetic field limit. A new expression for the radiative correction to the ground state energy is obtained. This contains only one integral with an additional summation with respect to each Landau level. The importance of this formalism is also addressed in order to deal with quantum electrodynamics in an intense external field.

  7. Hyperon Stars in Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, R O; Vasconcellos, C A Z

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the properties of hyperon stars. The matter is described by a hadronic model with parametric coupling. The matter is considered to be at zero temperature, charge neutral, beta-equilibrated, containing the baryonic octet, electrons and muons. The charged particles have their orbital motions Landau-quantized in the presence of strong magnetic fields (SMF). Two parametrisations of a chemical potential dependent static magnetic field are considered, reaching $1-2 \\times 10^{18}\\,G$ in the center of the star. Finally, the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relation and population of the stars.

  8. Magnetic fields from second-order interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that when two types of perturbations interact in cosmological perturbation theory, the interaction may lead to the generation of a third type. In this article we discuss the generation of magnetic fields from such interactions. We determine conditions under which the interaction of a first-order magnetic field with a first-order scalar-or vector-, or tensor-perturbations would lead to the generation of second order magnetic field. The analysis is done in a covariant-index-free approach, but could be done in the standard covariant indexed-approach.

  9. Dissipative charged fluid in a magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Abbasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the collective excitations in a dissipative charged fluid at zero chemical potential when an external magnetic field is present. While in the absence of magnetic field, four collective excitations appear in the fluid, we find five hydrodynamic modes here. This implies that the magnetic field splits the degeneracy between the transverse shear modes. Using linear response theory, we then compute the retarded response functions. In particular, it turns out that the correlation between charge and the energy fluctuations will no longer vanish, even at zero chemical potential. By use of the response functions, we also derive the relevant Kubo formulas for the transport coefficients.

  10. Magnetic fields from second-order interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Osano, Bob

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that when two types of perturbations interact in cosmological perturbation theory, the interaction may lead to the generation of a third type. In this article we discuss the generation of magnetic fields from such interactions. We determine conditions under which the interaction of a first-order magnetic field with a first-order scalar-or vector-, or tensor-perturbations would lead to the generation of second order magnetic field. The analysis is done in a covariant-index-fre...

  11. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    We review the main observational and theoretical facts about acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants, discussing the arguments in favor and against a connection between cosmic rays and supernova remnants, the so-called supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of 1) magnetic field amplification, 2) acceleration of nuclei heavier than hydrogen, 3) presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. The status of the supernova-cosmic ray connection in the time of Fermi-LAT and Cherenkov telescopes is also discussed.

  12. Magnetic Field Control of Combustion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, I.; Valdmanis, R.; Zake, M.; Kalis, H.; Marinaki, M.; Strautins, U.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical modelling of the effects of magnetic field on combustion dynamics at thermo-chemical conversion of biomass are carried out with the aim of providing control of the processes developing in the reaction zone of swirling flame. The joint research of the magnetic field effect on the combustion dynamics includes the estimation of this effect on the formation of the swirling flame dynamics, flame temperature and composition, providing analysis of the magnetic field effects on the flame characteristics. The results of experiments have shown that the magnetic field exerts the influence on the flow velocity components by enhancing a swirl motion in the flame reaction zone with swirl-enhanced mixing of the axial flow of volatiles with cold air swirl, by cooling the flame reaction zone and by limiting the thermo-chemical conversion of volatiles. Mathematical modelling of magnetic field effect on the formation of the flame dynamics confirms that the electromagnetic force, which is induced by the electric current surrounding the flame, leads to field-enhanced increase of flow vorticity by enhancing mixing of the reactants. The magnetic field effect on the flame temperature and rate of reactions leads to conclusion that field-enhanced increase of the flow vorticity results in flame cooling by limiting the chemical conversion of the reactants.

  13. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Istomin, Ya N

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting onto a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the super conducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of $r$ width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density $\\rho$, $r\\propto \\rho^{-1/4}$. Accordingly, the magnetic field $B$ in the tube increases with the depth, $B\\propto...

  14. Dispersion of Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrand, Roger H; Dotson, Jessie L; Houde, Martin; Vaillancourt, John E

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the dispersion of magnetic field vectors about local mean fields in turbulent molecular clouds. The method is designed to avoid inaccurate estimates of MHD or turbulent dispersion - and hence to avoid inaccurate estimates of field strengths - due to large-scale, non-turbulent field structure when using the well-known method of Chandrasekhar and Fermi. Our method also provides accurate, independent estimates of the turbulent to mean magnetic field strength ratio. We discuss applications to the molecular clouds Orion, M17, and DR21.

  15. Reversals of the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duene E.

    J.A. Jacobs of Cambridge University has written a concise, authoritative, and up-todate text on reversals of the earth's magnetic field. Chapter 1 is a concise summary of the basic attributes of the geomagnetic field and its behavior in different time frames. It explains spherical harmonic analysis of the field and presents the history of acquisition of the data that best represent the recent field. Lastly, it includes a short summary of the origin and electrodynamics of the magnetic field, outlining the current theoretical basis for its generation.

  16. Mechanism of Cyclically Polarity Reversing Solar Magnetic Cycle as a Cosmic Dynamo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hirokazu Yoshimura

    2000-09-01

    We briefly describe historical development of the concept of solar dynamo mechanism that generates electric current and magnetic field by plasma flows inside the solar convection zone. The dynamo is the driver of the cyclically polarity reversing solar magnetic cycle. The reversal process can easily and visually be understood in terms of magnetic field line stretching and twisting and folding in three-dimensional space by plasma flows of differential rotation and global convection under influence of Coriolis force. This process gives rise to formation of a series of huge magnetic flux tubes that propagate along iso-rotation surfaces inside the convection zone. Each of these flux tubes produces one solar cycle. We discuss general characteristics of any plasma flows that can generate magnetic field and reverse the polarity of the magnetic field in a rotating body in the Universe. We also mention a list of problems which are currently being disputed concerning the solar dynamo mechanism together with observational evidences that are to be constraints as well as verifications of any solar cycle dynamo theories of short and long term behaviors of the Sun, particularly time variations of its magnetic field, plasma flows, and luminosity.

  17. Magnetic field considerations in fusion power plant environs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liemohn, H.B.; Lessor, D.L.; Duane, B.H.

    1976-09-01

    A summary of magnetic field production mechanisms and effects is given. Discussions are included on the following areas: (1) stray magnetic and electric fields from tokamaks, (2) methods for reducing magnetic fields, (3) economics of magnetic field reductions, (4) forces on magnetizable objects near magnetic confinement fusion reactors, (5) electric field transients in tokamaks, (6) attenuation and decay of electromagnetic fields, and (7) magnetic field transients from tokamak malfunctions.

  18. Cosmic expansion history from SNe Ia data via information field theory: the charm code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porqueres, Natàlia; Enßlin, Torsten A.; Greiner, Maksim; Böhm, Vanessa; Dorn, Sebastian; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Manrique, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We present charm (cosmic history agnostic reconstruction method), a novel inference algorithm that reconstructs the cosmic expansion history as encoded in the Hubble parameter H(z) from SNe Ia data. The novelty of the approach lies in the usage of information field theory, a statistical field theory that is very well suited for the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. The charm algorithm infers non-parametrically s(a) = ln(ρ(a) /ρcrit0), the density evolution which determines H(z), without assuming an analytical form of ρ(a) but only its smoothness with the scale factor a = (1 + z)-1. The inference problem of recovering the signal s(a) from the data is formulated in a fully Bayesian way. In detail, we have rewritten the signal as the sum of a background cosmology and a perturbation. This allows us to determine the maximum a posteriory estimate of the signal by an iterative Wiener filter method. Applying charm to the Union2.1 supernova compilation, we have recovered a cosmic expansion history that is fully compatible with the standard ΛCDM cosmological expansion history with parameter values consistent with the results of the Planck mission.

  19. Magnetic fields in early protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    González-Casanova, Diego F; Lazarian, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe". In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M$_\\odot$ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, "reconnection diffusion", removes the magnetic flux from the disk, the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the a...

  20. Intergalactic Magnetic Fields from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function of size and magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We generically find that by a redshift z=3, about 5-20% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density >10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at T=10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the field strength observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification. The intergalactic magnetic field could also provide a nonthermal contribution to the pressure of the photo-ionized gas that may account for the claimed discrepancy between the simulated and observed Doppler width distributions of the Ly-al...

  1. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, VI; Sarycheva, L I; Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Amapane, N; Gerwig, H; Andreev, V; Cure, B; Mulders, M; Loveless, R; Karimaki, V; Popescu, S; Herve, A

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field ...

  2. Cosmology with hybrid expansion law: scalar field reconstruction of cosmic history and observational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarsu, Özgür [Department of Physics, Koç University, 34450 Sariyer, İstanbul (Turkey); Kumar, Suresh [Department of Mathematics, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, Rajasthan-333031 (India); Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M. [Centre of Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Xu, Lixin, E-mail: oakarsu@ku.edu.tr, E-mail: sukuyd@gmail.com, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com, E-mail: samijamia@gmail.com, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple form of expansion history of Universe referred to as the hybrid expansion law - a product of power-law and exponential type of functions. The ansatz by construction mimics the power-law and de Sitter cosmologies as special cases but also provides an elegant description of the transition from deceleration to cosmic acceleration. We point out the Brans-Dicke realization of the cosmic history under consideration. We construct potentials for quintessence, phantom and tachyon fields, which can give rise to the hybrid expansion law in general relativity. We investigate observational constraints on the model with hybrid expansion law applied to late time acceleration as well as to early Universe a la nucleosynthesis.

  3. The unified first law in 'cosmic triad' vector field scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yi, E-mail: zhangyia@cqupt.edu.cn [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Gong Yungui, E-mail: gongyg@cqupt.edu.cn [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Zhu Zonghong, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2011-06-13

    In this Letter, we try to apply the unified first law to the 'cosmic triad' vector field scenario both in the minimal coupling case and in the non-minimal coupling case. After transferring the non-minimally coupling action in the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame, the correct dynamical equation (Friedmann equation) is gotten in a thermal equilibrium process by using the already existing entropy while the entropy in the non-minimal coupled 'cosmic triad' scenario has not been derived. And after transferring the variables back to the Jordan frame, the corresponding Friedmann equation is demonstrated to be correct. For complete arguments, we also calculate the related Misner-Sharp energy in the Jordan and Einstein frames.

  4. Electric field of thunderclouds and cosmic rays: evidence for acceleration of particles (runaway electrons)

    CERN Document Server

    Khaerdinov, N S; Petkov, V B; 12th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    2004-01-01

    We present the data on correlations of the intensity of the soft component of cosmic rays with the local electric field of the near-earth atmosphere during thunderstorm periods at the Baksan Valley (North Caucasus, 1700 m a. s. l.). The large-area array for studying the extensive air showers of cosmic rays is used as a particle detector. An electric field meter of the "electric mill" type (rain-protected) is mounted on the roof of the building in the center of this array. The data were obtained in the summer seasons of 2000-2002. We observe strong enhancements of the soft component intensity before some lightning strokes. At the same time, the analysis of the regression curve "intensity versus field" discovers a bump at the field sign that is opposite to the field sign corresponding to acceleration of electrons. It is interpreted as a signature of runaway electrons from the region of the strong field (with opposite sign) overhead.

  5. Compact Electric- And Magnetic-Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Compact sensor measures both electric and magnetic fields. Includes both short electric-field dipole and search-coil magnetometer. Three mounted orthogonally providing triaxial measurements of electromagnetic field at frequencies ranging from near 0 to about 10 kHz.

  6. On distortions of TPC coordinates: inhomogeneities of electric and magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Dydak, F

    2003-01-01

    After a general discussion of electron drift in a gas volume with electric and magnetic fields, distortions in the r and r phi coordinates arising from inhomogeneities of the electric and magnetic fields in the HARP TPC are calculated. Inhomogeneities of the electric field arise from i) positive ions released by cosmic rays, ii) positive ions released by interaction secondaries, iii) positive ions released by beam muons, iv) positive ions released from beam particles downstream of the inner field cage, and v) a high voltage misalignment between the outer and inner field cages. Also, distortions arising from the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field are calculated. These effects resolve the controversy on unphysical numbers of 'wrong-charge' TPC tracks. The bad news are that effects are too big to be neglected. The good news are that, with enough sweat and tears, they can be adequately corrected.

  7. A generalization of gauge symmetry, fourth-order gauge field equations and accelerated cosmic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    2014-02-01

    A generalization of the usual gauge symmetry leads to fourth-order gauge field equations, which imply a new constant force independent of distances. The force associated with the new U1 gauge symmetry is repulsive among baryons. Such a constant force based on baryon charge conservation gives a field-theoretic understanding of the accelerated cosmic expansion in the observable portion of the universe dominated by baryon galaxies. In consistent with all conservation laws and known forces, a simple rotating "dumbbell model" of the universe is briefly discussed.

  8. A Generalization of Gauge Symmetry, Fourth-Order Gauge Field Equations and Accelerated Cosmic-Expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    A generalization of the usual gauge symmetry leads to fourth-order gauge field equations, which imply a new constant force independent of distances. The force associated with the new $U_1$ gauge symmetry is repulsive among baryons. Such a constant force based on baryon charge conservation gives a field-theoretic understanding of the accelerated cosmic-expansion in the observable portion of the universe dominated by baryon galaxies. In consistent with all conservation laws and known forces, a simple rotating `dumbbell model' of the universe is briefly discussed.

  9. Cosmic rays as regulators of molecular cloud properties

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco; Galli, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays are the main agents in controlling the chemical evolution and setting the ambipolar diffusion time of a molecular cloud. We summarise the processes causing the energy degradation of cosmic rays due to their interaction with molecular hydrogen, focusing on the magnetic effects that influence their propagation. Making use of magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations, we show that the increase of the field line density in the collapse region results in a reduction of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate. As a consequence the ionisation fraction decreases, facilitating the decoupling between the gas and the magnetic field.

  10. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  11. Estimating relic magnetic fields from CMB temperature correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and polarization inhomogeneities of the Cosmic Microwave Background might bear the mark of pre-decoupling magnetism. The parameters of a putative magnetized background are hereby estimated from the observed temperature autocorrelation as well as from the measured temperature-polarization cross-correlation.

  12. Persistence of magnetic field driven by relativistic electrons in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Flacco, A; Lifschitz, A; Sylla, F; Kahaly, S; Veltcheva, M; Silva, L O; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    The onset and evolution of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is determined by several mechanisms, including instabilities, dynamo effects and ultra-high energy particle flows through gas, plasma and interstellar-media. These processes are relevant over a wide range of conditions, from cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts to nuclear fusion in stars. The disparate temporal and spatial scales where each operates can be reconciled by scaling parameters that enable to recreate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Here we unveil a new mechanism by which the flow of ultra-energetic particles can strongly magnetize the boundary between the plasma and the non-ionized gas to magnetic fields up to 10-100 Tesla (micro Tesla in astrophysical conditions). The physics is observed from the first time-resolved large scale magnetic field measurements obtained in a laser wakefield accelerator. Particle-in-cell simulations capturing the global plasma and field dynamics over the full plasma le...

  13. Evolution of Cosmological Perturbations in the Presence of Primordial Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Possible existence of the primordial magnetic fields has affected the structure formation of the universe. In the numerical calculations for the evolution of density perturbations with primordial magnetic fields, there has been a difficulty in solving the Einstein-Boltzmann equations which arises due to the unwanted cancellation of contributions from the magnetic fields and primordial radiations. Here this problem is solved by newly taking into account a non-relativistic matter contribution in the radiation dominated era. A complete set of equations and appropriate initial conditions in the long wavelength limit are derived in a courteous manner in the covariant approach with CDM frame. By solving these equations numerically, we derive the angular spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the matter power spectrum with magnetic fields. We find that the amplitude of the angular power spectrum of CMB anisotropies can alter at most a order of magnitude at $l \\lesssim 3000$ compared with the previo...

  14. Fast magnetic field amplification in the early Universe: growth of collisionless plasma instabilities in turbulent media

    CERN Document Server

    Falceta-Goncalves, D

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report a numerical study of the cosmic magnetic field amplification due to collisionless plasma instabilities. The collisionless magnetohydrodynamic equations derived account for the pressure anisotropy that leads, in specific conditions, to the firehose and mirror instabilities. We study the time evolution of seed fields in turbulence under the influence of such instabilities. An approximate analytical time evolution of magnetic field is provided. The numerical simulations and the analytical predictions are compared. We found that i) amplification of magnetic field was efficient in firehose unstable turbulent regimes, but not in the mirror unstable models, ii) the growth rate of the magnetic energy density is much faster than the turbulent dynamo, iii) the efficient amplification occurs at small scales. The analytical prediction for the correlation between the growth timescales with pressure anisotropy ratio is confirmed by the numerical simulations. These results reinforce the idea that pres...

  15. Light Polarization Using Ferrofluids and Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Tufaile

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting an experimental setup based on polarized light, enabling the visualization of the magnetic field of magnetic assemblies using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with ferrofluids. We have simulated the observed patterns with hypergeometric polynomials.

  16. The magnetic field of zeta Orionis A

    CERN Document Server

    Blazère, A; Tkachenko, A; Bouret, J -C; Rivinius, Th

    2015-01-01

    Zeta Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in zeta Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field.Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) technique to extract the magnetic information. We confirm that zeta Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component zeta Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a per...

  17. Studies of Solar Vector Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report a few advances in the studies based on the solar vector magnetic field observations which were carried out mainly with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station in the 1990s. (1) We developed necessary methodology and concepts in vector magnetogram analysis (Wang et al. 1996). For the first time, we proposed to use the photospheric free magnetic energy to quantify the major flare productivity of solar active regions (ARs), and it had been proved to be the best parameter in representing the major flare activity. (2) We revealed that there was always a dominant sense of magnetic shear in a given AR (Wang 1994), which was taken as the premise of the helicity calculation in ARs; we made the first quantitative estimation of magnetic helicity evolution in ARs (Wang 1996). (3) We identified the first group of evidence of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere with vector magnetic field observations and proposed a two-step reconnection flare model to interpret the observed association of flux cancellation and flares (Wang and Shi 1993). Efforts to quantify the major flare productivity of super active regions with vector magnetic field observations have been also taken.

  18. High Field Magnetization of Tb Single Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeland, L. W.; Cock, G. J.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The magnetization of Tb single crystals was measured in magnetic fields to 34T along the hard direction at temperature of 1.8, 4.2, 65.5 and 77K, and along with easy direction at 4.2 and 77K. The data are compared with the results of a self-consistent spin wave calculation using a phenomenological...

  19. Global diffusion of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Snodin, A P; Sarson, G R; Bushby, P J; Rodrigues, L F S

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of charged particles, including cosmic rays, in a partially ordered magnetic field is characterized by a diffusion tensor whose components depend on the particle's Larmor radius $R_L$ and the degree of order in the magnetic field. This prescription relies explicitly on the assumption of a scale separation between random and mean magnetic fields, which usually applies in laboratory plasmas, but not in most astrophysical environments such as the interstellar medium (ISM). Direct estimates of the cosmic-ray diffusion tensor from test particle simulations have explored the range of particle energies corresponding to $10^{-2} \\lesssim R_L/l_c \\lesssim 10^{3}$, where $l_c$ is the magnetic correlation length. Modern simulations of the ISM have numerical resolution of order 1 pc, so the Larmor radius of the cosmic ray particles that dominate in their energy density is at least $10^{6}$ times smaller than the numerically resolved scales of the random magnetic field. Large-scale simulations of cosmic ra...

  20. New limits on dark matter annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer cosmic ray positron data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Weniger, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with proposed solutions ranging from local pulsars to TeV-scale dark matter. Here, we make use of this high quality data to place stringent limits on dark matter with masses below ~300 GeV, annihilating or decaying to leptonic final states, essentially independent of the origin of this rise. We significantly improve on existing constraints, in some cases by up to 2 orders of magnitude.