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Sample records for cortical collecting tubule

  1. Osmosis in Cortical Collecting Tubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, James A.; Troutman, Susan L.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of varying the osmolality of luminal solutions on the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-independent water and solute permeability properties of isolated rabbit cortical collecting tubules. In the absence of ADH, the osmotic water permeability coefficient (cm s–1) Pfl→b, computed from volume flows from hypotonic lumen to isotonic bath, was 20 ± 4 x 10–4 (SEM); the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, computed from volume flows from isotonic bath to hypertonic lumen, was 88 ± 15 x 10–4 cm s–1. We also measured apparent urea permeability coefficients (cm s–1) from 14C-urea fluxes from lumen to bath (P DDurea l→b) and from bath to lumen (P DDurea b→l). For hypotonic luminal solutions and isotonic bathing solutions, P DDurea l→b was 0.045 ± 0.004 x 10–4 and was unaffected by ADH. The ADH-independent values of P DDurea l→b and P urea b→l were, respectively, 0.216 ± 0.022 x 10–4 cm s–1 and 0.033 ± 0.002 x 10–4 cm s–1 for isotonic bathing solutions and luminal solutions made hypertonic with urea, i.e., there was an absolute increase in urea permeability and asymmetry of urea fluxes. Significantly, P DDurea l→b did not rise when luminal hypertonicity was produced by sucrose; and, bathing fluid hypertonicity did not alter tubular permeability to water or to urea. We interpret these data to indicate that luminal hypertonicity increased the leakiness of tight junctions to water and urea but not sucrose. Since the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, when tight junctions were open to urea, was approximately half of the value of Pfl→b in the presence of ADH, when tight junctions were closed to urea, we conclude that tight junctions are negligible paracellular shunts for lumen to bath osmosis with ADH. These findings, together with those in the preceding paper, are discussed in terms of a solubility-diffusion model for water permeation in which ADH increases water solubility in

  2. Prenatal programming of rat cortical collecting tubule sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Lozano, German; Baum, Michel

    2012-03-15

    Prenatal insults have been shown to lead to elevated blood pressure in offspring when they are studied as adults. Prenatal administration of dexamethasone and dietary protein deprivation have demonstrated that there is an increase in transporter abundance for a number of nephron segments but not the subunits of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the cortical collecting duct. Recent studies have shown that aldosterone is elevated in offspring of protein-deprived mothers when studied as adults, but the physiological importance of the increase in serum aldosterone is unknown. As an indirect measure of ENaC activity, we compared the natriuretic response to benzamil in offspring of mothers who ate a low-protein diet (6%) with those who ate a normal diet (20%) for the last half of pregnancy. The natriuretic response to benzamil was greater in the 6% group (821.1 ± 161.0 μmol/24 h) compared with the 20% group (279.1 ± 137.0 μmol/24 h), consistent with greater ENaC activity in vivo (P sodium transport (-1.9 ± 3.1 pmol·mm(-1)·min(-1)), the offspring of rats that ate a 6% protein diet during the last half of pregnancy had a net sodium flux of 10.7 ± 2.6 pmol·mm(-1)·min(-1) (P = 0.01) in tubules perfused in vitro. Sodium transport was measured using ion-selective electrodes, a novel technique allowing measurement of sodium in nanoliter quantities of fluid. Thus we directly demonstrate that there is prenatal programming of cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

  3. Early effects of aldosterone on Na-K pump in rat cortical collecting tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Takemoto, F.; Katz, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Sustained exposure to aldosterone (Aldo) increases the abundance and activity of the Na-K pump in cortical collecting tubules (CCT). However, the onset and mechanism of the early interaction of Aldo with the CCT pump, especially in adrenal-intact animals, are unclear. We evaluated the short-term effects of the hormone on Na-K-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity and on ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake, a measure of the transporting rate of the pump, in microdissected CCT from adrenal-intact rats. Incubation with Aldo (10(-8) M, 2 h) had no effect on Na-K-ATPase activity (Vmax), whereas it produced at least a twofold increase in 86Rb uptake. This effect was generated by physiological concentrations of the hormone (threshold 10(-10) M; apparent K1/2 approximately 10(-9) M), after a short lag of less than or equal to 30 min. Incubation with Aldo in the presence of amiloride or nystatin or in a Na-free medium (choline chloride) did not prevent the enhanced 86Rb uptake seen after Aldo alone; possible interpretations of these observations are discussed. We conclude that Aldo produces a rapid stimulation of pump function in CCT that precedes its induction of new pump synthesis; the physiological significance of this effect is suggested by its occurrence in tubules from adrenal-intact animals within the time frame and concentration range of the hormone's effects on electrolyte transport

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of kidney distal convoluted tubule and cortical collecting duct cells following long-term hormonal stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qi; Moller, Hanne; Rosenbaek, Lena Lindtoft

    2017-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and the cortical collecting ducts (CCD) are portions of renal tubule that are partly responsible for maintaining the systemic concentrations of potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium. Despite being structurally similar, DCT and CCD cells have different transpo...... FDR threshold in one cell type plus the unique proteins in this cell type. These 1025 mpkDCT specific proteins and 1211 mpkCCD specific proteins under the three conditions were subjected to further bioinformatics analyses including Panther and DAVID gene ontology analyses, E3 ligase...

  5. Effect of ADH on rubidium transport in isolated perfused rat cortical collecting tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafer, J.A.; Troutman, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Unidirectional fluxes of 86Rb+ were measured as an indicator of potassium transport in isolated rat cortical collecting tubules perfused and bathed at 38 degrees C with isotonic solutions in which Rb+ replaced K+. Under control conditions the lumen-to-bath flux (Jl----b) was significantly less than the bath-to-lumen flux (Jb----l), indicating net Rb+ secretion. Net secretion increased approximately 180% after addition of 100 microU/ml of arginine vasopressin (ADH) to the bathing solution, due to a rapid and reversible increase in Jb----l from 4.6 +/- 0.8 to 9.0 +/- 1.9 pmol X min-1 X mm-1 with no significant change in Jl----b. The ADH effect was completely inhibited by 2 mM luminal Ba2+. The average transepithelial voltage (Ve) was not significantly different from zero in the control period but became lumen negative (-5 to -10 mV) after ADH. With 10(-5) M amiloride in the lumen Ve was lumen positive (+2 to +4 mV) and was unaltered by ADH or Ba2+, yet ADH produced a significant but attentuated increase in Jb----l with no change in Jl----b. The results indicate that ADH augments net K+ secretion either by an increase in the Ba2+-sensitive conductance of the apical membrane or by an increase in the electrochemical potential driving force for net Rb+ secretion through this pathway

  6. Regulation of transport in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruschenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of this overview article is to summarize recent findings in renal epithelial transport, focusing chiefly on the connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Mammalian CCD and CNT are involved in fine tuning of electrolyte and fluid balance through reabsorption and secretion. Specific transporters and channels mediate vectorial movements of water and solutes in these segments. Although only a small percent of the glomerular filtrate reaches the CNT and CCD, these segments are critical for water and electrolyte homeostasis since several hormones, e.g. aldosterone and arginine vasopressin, exert their main effects in these nephron sites. Importantly, hormones regulate the function of the entire nephron and kidney by affecting channels and transporters in the CNT and CCD. Knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of transport in the CNT and CCD and particular roles of specific channels/transporters has increased tremendously over the last two decades. Recent studies shed new light on several key questions concerning the regulation of renal transport. Precise distribution patterns of transport proteins in the CCD and CNT will be reviewed, and their physiological roles and mechanisms mediating ion transport in these segments will be also covered. Special emphasis will be given to pathophysiological conditions appearing as a result of abnormalities in renal transport in the CNT and CCD. PMID:23227301

  7. Regulation of cyclic AMP metabolism by prostaglandins in rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenburg, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    In the rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT), prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) at 1 nM inhibit arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-induced water reabsorption, while 100 nM PGE 1 and PGE 2 alone stimulate water reabsorption. Reported here are studies designed to investigate the molecular basis for the biphasic physiological action of PGE 1 and PGE 2 in the collecting duct. In freshly isolated RCCT cells, PGE 1 , PGE 2 , and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE 2 (DM-PGE 2 ) stimulated cAMP synthesis at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 M. Other prostaglandins including the synthetic PGE 2 analogue, sulprostone, failed to stimulate cAMP synthesis. Moreover, sulprostone did not antagonize PGE 2 -stimulated cAMP formation. In contrast, PGE 2 and sulprostone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, inhibited AVP-induced cAMP accumulation in freshly isolated RCCT cells. PGE 2 , PGE 1 , DM-PGE 2 and sulprostone at 100 nM were equally effective in inhibiting AVP-induced cAMP formation. Moreover sulprostone inhibited AVP-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results suggest that PGE derivatives mediate either inhibition or activation of adenylate cyclase by stimulating different PGE receptors. To further test this concept, PGE 2 binding to freshly isolated RCCT cell membranes was characterized. Two different classes of PGE 2 binding were detected. / 3 H/PGE 2 binding to the high affinity class of sites was increased by the GTP-analogue, GTP S, while pertussis toxin pretreatment blocked the stimulatory action. In contrast, / 3 H/ PGE 2 binding to the low affinity class of sites was decreased by GTP S; this inhibitory effect was not blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment

  8. Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase-dependent sodium flux in cortical collecting tubule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blot-Chabaud, M.; Jaisser, F.; Gingold, M.; Bonvalet, J.P.; Farman, N. (CEntre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France))

    1988-10-01

    The instantaneous rate of efflux of intracellular Na was studied in rabbit isolated cortical collecting tubules (CCT) as a function of temperature and intracellular Na concentration ((Na){sub i}). (Na){sub i} of microdissected CCT was increased by cold and K-free exposure in the presence of {sup 22}Na and the extracellular tracer ({sup 3}H)sorbitol. (Na){sub i} rose rapidly to 40 mM at 30 min, after which it rose more slowly, reaching 120-140 mM at 6 h. Kinetics of Na efflux were studied after rapid rewarming, using a special device allowing measurements at 20-s intervals. Under control conditions, the total Na load was extruded in <8 min, whereas, in the presence of 10{sup {minus}4} M ouabain, only 50% of the load was extruded during this period of time. Ouabain-sensitive Na efflux was first evident at 13{degree}C and gradually increased between 13 and 35{degree}C. At 37{degree}C, Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase-dependent Na efflux was dependent on (Na){sub i}. This efflux gradually increased, from 0.05 to 0.5 peq{center dot}nl tubular volume{sup {minus}1}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1} as a function of (Na){sub i} and reached a plateau at 70 mM (Na){sub i}. It is concluded that (Na){sub i} is a major modulator of the pump activity in CCT; at normal levels of (Na){sub i}, the pump is operating at only a small fraction of its total capacity.

  9. Effects of vasopressin on the isolated perfused human collecting tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, N; Trizna, W; Bar-Khayim, Y; Fine, L G

    1981-05-01

    Cortical collecting tubules (CCT) were dissected from the surviving normal tissue of human kidneys removed at operation for either carcinoma or calculus. These CCT's were perfused in vitro shortly after the nephrectomy was performed. Transtubular potential differences in different tubules varied from +3.2 to -2.0 mV and were reduced towards zero by lowering the temperature or by adding ouabain to the bath. In the absence of vasopressin, tubules were essentially impermeable to water with extremely low net water fluxes even in the presence of a transtubular osmotic gradient. Addition of vasopressin to the bath caused the transtubular osmotic water permeability coefficient to increase to values of 125, 175, and 155 X 10(-4) cm/sec in three tubules thus studied. These results demonstrate close similarities between the human CCT and the more extensively studied rabbit CCT.

  10. Locally formed dopamine inhibits Na+-K+-ATPase activity in rat renal cortical tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seri, I.; Kone, B.C.; Gullans, S.R.; Aperia, A.; Brenner, B.M.; Ballermann, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Dopamine, generated locally from L-dopa, inhibits Na + -K + -ATPase in permeabilized rat proximal tubules under maximum transport rate conditions for sodium. To determine whether locally formed dopamine inhibits Na + -K + -ATPase activity in intact cortical tubule cells we studied the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive oxygen consumption rate (Qo 2 ) and 86 Rb uptake in renal cortical tubule cell suspensions. L-Dopa did not affect ouabain-insensitive Qo 2 or mitochondrial respiration. However, L-dopa inhibited ouabain-sensitive Qo 2 in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal inhibition (K 0.5 ) of 5 x 10 -7 M and a maximal inhibition of 14.1 ± 1.5% at 10 -4 M. L-Dopa also blunted the nystatin-stimulated Qo 2 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating the L-dopa directly inhibits Na + -K + -ATPase activity and not sodium entry. Ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb uptake was also inhibited by L-dopa. Carbidopa, an inhibitor of the conversion of L-dopa to dopamine, eliminated the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive Qo 2 and 86 Rb uptake, indicating that dopamine rather than L-dopa was the active agent. The finding that the L-dopa concentration-response curve was shifted to the left by one order of magnitude in the presence of nystatin suggests that the inhibitory effect is enhanced when the intracellular sodium concentration is increased. By studying the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive Qo 2 at increasing extracellular sodium concentrations in the presence of nystatin, the authors demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of locally formed dopamine on the Na + -K + -ATPase is indeed dependent on the sodium available for the enzyme and occurs in an uncompetitive manner

  11. Locally formed dopamine inhibits Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase activity in rat renal cortical tubule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seri, I.; Kone, B.C.; Gullans, S.R.; Aperia, A.; Brenner, B.M.; Ballermann, B.J. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA) Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1988-10-01

    Dopamine, generated locally from L-dopa, inhibits Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase in permeabilized rat proximal tubules under maximum transport rate conditions for sodium. To determine whether locally formed dopamine inhibits Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in intact cortical tubule cells we studied the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive oxygen consumption rate ({dot Q}o{sub 2}) and {sup 86}Rb uptake in renal cortical tubule cell suspensions. L-Dopa did not affect ouabain-insensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} or mitochondrial respiration. However, L-dopa inhibited ouabain-sensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal inhibition (K{sub 0.5}) of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M and a maximal inhibition of 14.1 {plus minus} 1.5% at 10{sup {minus}4}M. L-Dopa also blunted the nystatin-stimulated {dot Q}o{sub 2} in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating the L-dopa directly inhibits Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity and not sodium entry. Ouabain-sensitive {sup 86}Rb uptake was also inhibited by L-dopa. Carbidopa, an inhibitor of the conversion of L-dopa to dopamine, eliminated the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} and {sup 86}Rb uptake, indicating that dopamine rather than L-dopa was the active agent. The finding that the L-dopa concentration-response curve was shifted to the left by one order of magnitude in the presence of nystatin suggests that the inhibitory effect is enhanced when the intracellular sodium concentration is increased. By studying the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} at increasing extracellular sodium concentrations in the presence of nystatin, the authors demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of locally formed dopamine on the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase is indeed dependent on the sodium available for the enzyme and occurs in an uncompetitive manner.

  12. Differential patterns of injury to the proximal tubule of renal cortical slices following in vitro exposure to mercuric chloride, potassium dichromate, or hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, C E; Gandolfi, A J; Nagle, R B; Brendel, K

    1987-09-15

    The innate susceptibility of renal cell types to these agents was investigated using precision-cut rabbit renal cortical slices made perpendicular to the cortical-papillary axis. Slices were incubated in DME/F12 medium containing 10 microM, 100 microM, or 1 mM concentrations of either metal for 12 hr or in Krebs-Hepes buffer gassed with nitrogen (100%) for 0.75 to 5 hr of hypoxic exposure. To simulate postischemic reperfusion, some slices were transferred to vessels gassed with oxygen after an initial hypoxic period. Mercuric chloride (100 microM) exposure resulted in damage to the straight regions of proximal tubules by 12 hr leaving convoluted regions unaffected. Hypoxia (2.25 hr) and potassium dichromate (100 microM for 12 hr) both caused injury to the convoluted proximal tubules without affecting straight proximal tubular regions. Mercury concentrations of 10 microM and 1 mM had no effect or injured all cell types within the slice, respectively. Similar results were observed for hypoxic periods less than 1.5 hr or greater than 3 hr of exposure. Potassium dichromate had no measurable affect at 10 microM, but at 1 mM focal lesions were observed after 4 hr of exposure, and by 12 hr all cell types within the slice were affected. Intracellular potassium content normalized to DNA correlated well, but always preceded the pathological lesions observed. These results demonstrate that injury to specific regions of the proximal tubule by these agents relates to an innate susceptibility of the intoxicated cell type independent of physiologic feedback or blood delivery patterns proposed as mechanisms of selective injury from in vivo studies.

  13. N-domain angiotensin-I converting enzyme is expressed in immortalized mesangial, proximal tubule and collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei Wang, Pamella Huey; Andrade, Maria Claudina; Quinto, Beata Marie Redublo; Di Marco, Giovana; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Vio, Carlos P; Casarini, Dulce Elena

    2015-01-01

    Somatic ACE (sACE) is found in glomerulus, proximal tubule and excreted in urine. We hypothesized that N-domain ACE can also be found at these sites. ACE profile was analyzed in mesangial (IMC), proximal (LLC-PK1), distal tubule (MDCK) and collecting duct (IMCD) cells. Cell lysate and culture medium were submitted to gel filtration chromatography, which separated two peaks with ACE activity from cells and medium, except from distal tubule. The first had a high molecular weight and the second, a lower one (65 kDa; N-domain ACE). We focused on N-domain ACE purification and characterization from LLC-PK1. Total LLC-PK1 N-domain ACE purification was achieved by ion-exchange chromatography, which presented only one peak with ACE activity, denominated ACE(int2A). ACE(int2A) activity was influenced by pH, NaCl and temperature. The purified enzyme was inhibited by Captopril and hydrolyzed AngI, Ang1-7 and AcSDKP. Its ability to hydrolyze AcSDKP characterized it as an N-domain ACE. ACE(int2A) also presented high amino acid sequence homology with the N-terminal part of sACE from mouse, rat, human and rabbit. The presence of secreted and intracellular N-domain ACE and sACE in IMC, LLC-PK1 and IMCD cells confirmed our studies along the nephron. We identified, purified and characterized N-domain ACE from LLC-PK1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nifedipine-activated Ca(2+) permeability in newborn rat cortical collecting duct cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, L; Bidet, M; Martial, S; Sanchez, E; Melendez, E; Tauc, M; Poujeol, C; Martin, D; Namorado, M D; Reyes, J L; Poujeol, P

    2001-05-01

    To characterize Ca(2+) transport in newborn rat cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells, we used nifedipine, which in adult rat distal tubules inhibits the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increase in response to hormonal activation. We found that the dihydropyridine (DHP) nifedipine (20 microM) produced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) from 87.6 +/- 3.3 nM to 389.9 +/- 29.0 nM in 65% of the cells. Similar effects of other DHP (BAY K 8644, isradipine) were also observed. Conversely, DHPs did not induce any increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cells obtained from proximal convoluted tubule. In CCD cells, neither verapamil nor diltiazem induced any rise in [Ca(2+)](i). Experiments in the presence of EGTA showed that external Ca(2+) was required for the nifedipine effect, while lanthanum (20 microM), gadolinium (100 microM), and diltiazem (20 microM) inhibited the effect. Experiments done in the presence of valinomycin resulted in the same nifedipine effect, showing that K(+) channels were not involved in the nifedipine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. H(2)O(2) also triggered [Ca(2+)](i) rise. However, nifedipine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase was not affected by protamine. In conclusion, the present results indicate that 1) primary cultures of cells from terminal nephron of newborn rats are a useful tool for investigating Ca(2+) transport mechanisms during growth, and 2) newborn rat CCD cells in primary culture exhibit a new apical nifedipine-activated Ca(2+) channel of capacitive type (either transient receptor potential or leak channel).

  15. Ontogeny of flow-stimulated potassium secretion in rabbit cortical collecting duct: functional and molecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Craig B; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Ramalakshmi, Santhanam; Ramkumar, Mohan; Rojas, Raul; Zavilowitz, Beth; Kleyman, Thomas R; Satlin, Lisa M

    2003-10-01

    High urinary flow rates stimulate K secretion in the fully differentiated but not neonatal or weanling rabbit cortical collecting duct (CCD). Both small-conductance secretory K and high-conductance Ca2+/stretch-activated maxi-K channels have been identified in the apical membrane of the mature CCD by patch-clamp analysis. We reported that flow-stimulated net K secretion in the adult rabbit CCD is 1) blocked by TEA and charybdotoxin, inhibitors of intermediate- and high-conductance (maxi-K) Ca2+-activated K channels, and 2) associated with increases in net Na absorption and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The present study examined whether the absence of flow-stimulated K secretion early in life is due to a 1) limited flow-induced rise in net Na absorption and/or [Ca2+]i and/or 2) paucity of apical maxi-K channels. An approximately sixfold increase in tubular fluid flow rate in CCDs isolated from 4-wk-old rabbits and microperfused in vitro led to an increase in net Na absorption and [Ca2+]i, similar in magnitude to the response observed in 6-wk-old tubules, but it failed to generate an increase in net K secretion. By 5 wk of age, there was a small, but significant, flow-stimulated rise in net K secretion that increased further by 6 wk of life. Luminal perfusion with iberiotoxin blocked the flow stimulation of net K secretion in the adult CCD, confirming the identity of the maxi-K channel in this response. Maxi-K channel alpha-subunit message was consistently detected in single CCDs from animals >/=4 wk of age by RT-PCR. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies directed against the alpha-subunit revealed apical labeling of intercalated cells in cryosections from animals >/=5 wk of age; principal cell labeling was generally intracellular and punctate. We speculate that the postnatal appearance of flow-dependent K secretion is determined by the transcriptional/translational regulation of expression of maxi-K channels. Furthermore, our studies

  16. Arginine vasopressin increases cellular free calcium concentration and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate production in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, S.; Okada, K.; Saito, T.

    1988-01-01

    The role of calcium (Ca) in the cellular action of arginine vasopressin (AVP) was examined in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture. AVP increased both the cellular free Ca concentration ([Ca2+]i) using fura-2, and cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. AVP-induced cellular Ca mobilization was totally blocked by the antagonist to the antidiuretic action of AVP, and somewhat weakened by the antagonist to the vascular action of AVP. 1-Deamino-8-D-AVP (dDAVP). an antidiuretic analog of AVP, also increased [Ca2+] significantly. Cellular Ca mobilization was not obtained with cAMP, forskolin (a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase), or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. The early phase of [Ca2+]i depended on the intracellular Ca pool, since an AVP-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was obtained in cells pretreated with Ca-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA, verapamil, or cobalt, which blocked cellular Ca uptake. Also, AVP increased 45 Ca2+ influx during the initial 10 min, which initiated the sustained phase of cellular Ca mobilization. However, cellular cAMP production induced by AVP during the 10-min observation period was diminished in the cells pretreated with Ca-free medium, verapamil, or cobalt, but was still significantly higher than the basal level. This was also diminished by a high Ca concentration in medium. These results indicate that 1) AVP concomitantly regulates cellular free Ca as well as its second messenger cAMP production; 2) AVP-induced elevation of cellular free Ca is dependent on both the cellular Ca pool and extracellular Ca; and 3) there is an optimal level of extracellular Ca to modulate the AVP action in renal papillary collecting tubule cells

  17. [Anatomy, physiology and clinical relevance of the connecting tubule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, N; Simeoni, M A; Ciriana, E; Panico, C; Cappello, E; Capasso, G B

    2009-01-01

    The cortical distal nephron is the site of fine regulation of salt and water excretion by peptide and mineralocorticoid hormones and the site for specific actions of diuretics. Some data suggest that sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion in the distal convoluted tubule and the connecting tubule (CNT) are sufficient to maintain the sodium and potassium balance, with little or no contribution of the collecting duct. The homeostatic role of the sodium and potassium transport systems in the collecting duct can be questioned, especially in conditions where dietary sodium intake is high and potassium intake is low compared with the physiological needs of the organism. The functional expression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in the CNT is sufficient for furosemide-stimulated urinary acidification and identifies the CNT as a major segment in electrogenic urinary acidification. In the outer renal cortex, the CNT returns to the glomerular hilus and contacts the renal afferent arterioles (Af-Art). This morphology is compatible with a cross-talk between the CNT and Af-Art. This novel regulatory mechanism of the renal microcirculation may participate in the vasodilatation observed during high salt intake, perhaps by antagonizing tubuloglomerular feedback. In conclusion, the cortical distal nephron appears to be a complex site for several physiological mechanisms; it is mainly involved in salt and fluid homeostasis and in acid-base balance maintenance. Furthermore, the CNT segment appears to promote a CNT-Af-Art feedback loop.

  18. Active ion transport in the renal proximal tubule. II. Ionic dependence of the Na pump

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The dependence of Na pump activity on intracellular and extracellular Na+ and K+ was investigated using a suspension of rabbit cortical tubules that contained mostly (86%) proximal tubules. The ouabain- sensitive rate of respiration (QO2) was used to measure the Na pump activity of intact tubules, and the Na,K-ATPase hydrolytic activity was measured using lysed proximal tubule membranes. The dependence (K0.5) of the Na pump on intracellular Na+ was affected by the relative intracellular conce...

  19. Inhibitory effect of high [Mg2+] on the vasopressin-stimulated hydroosmotic permeability of the isolated perfused cortical collecting duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkenstein D.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available High magnesium concentration inhibits the effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP on smooth muscle contraction and platelet aggregation and also influences hepatocyte AVP receptor binding. The aim of this study was to determine the role of magnesium concentration [Mg2+] in AVP-stimulated water transport in the kidney collecting duct. The effect of low and high peritubular [Mg2+] on the AVP-stimulated osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf was evaluated in the isolated perfused rabbit cortical collecting duct (CCD. Control tubules bathed and perfused with standard Ringer bicarbonate solution containing 1 mM Mg2+ presented a Pf of 223.9 ± 27.2 µm/s. When Mg2+ was not added to the bathing solution, an increase in the AVP-stimulated Pf to 363.1 ± 57.2 µm/s (P<0.05 was observed. An elevation of Mg2+ to 5 mM resulted in a decrease in Pf to 202.9 ± 12.6 µm/s (P<0.05. This decrease in the AVP-stimulated Pf at 5 mM Mg2+ persisted when the CCDs were returned to 1 mM Mg2+, Pf = 130.2 ± 20.3 µm/s, and was not normalized by the addition of 8-[4-chlorophenylthio]-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, a cAMP analogue, to the preparation. These data indicate that magnesium may play a modulatory role in the action of AVP on CCD osmotic water permeability, as observed in other tissues.

  20. IGF-1 and insulin exert opposite actions on ClC-K2 activity in the cortical collecting ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    Despite similar stimulatory actions on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule, insulin promotes kaliuresis, whereas insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) causes a reduction in urinary potassium levels. The factors contributing to this phenomenon remain elusive. Electrogenic distal nephron ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport establishes driving force for Cl(-) reabsorption and K(+) secretion. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we document that a Cl(-) channel is highly abundant on the basolateral plasma membrane of intercalated cells in freshly isolated mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. The channel has characteristics attributable to the ClC-K2: slow gating kinetics, conductance ∼10 pS, voltage independence, Cl(-)>NO3 (-) anion selectivity, and inhibition/activation by low/high pH, respectively. IGF-1 (100 and 500 nM) acutely stimulates ClC-K2 activity in a reversible manner. Inhibition of PI3-kinase (PI3-K) with LY294002 (20 μM) abrogates activation of ClC-K2 by IGF-1. Interestingly, insulin (100 nM) reversibly decreases ClC-K2 activity in CCD cells. This inhibitory action is independent of PI3-K and is mediated by stimulation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent cascade. We propose that IGF-1, by stimulating ClC-K2 channels, promotes net Na(+) and Cl(-) reabsorption, thus reducing driving force for potassium secretion by the CCD. In contrast, inhibition of ClC-K2 by insulin favors coupling of Na(+) reabsorption with K(+) secretion at the apical membrane contributing to kaliuresis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. AVP-stimulated nucleotide secretion in perfused mouse medullary thick ascending limb and cortical collecting duct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Elvin V. P.; Prætorius, Helle; Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2009-01-01

    is stimulated remain elusive. Here, we investigate the phenomenon of nucleotide secretion in intact, perfused mouse medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) and cortical collecting duct (CCD). The nucleotide secretion was monitored by a biosensor adapted to register nucleotides in the tubular outflow...

  2. Cortical gluing and Ringer lactate solution inflation to avoid cortical mantle collapse and subdural fluid collections in pediatric neurosurgery: safety and feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Ruggiero, Claudio; Spennato, Pietro; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Subdural fluid collections following intraventricular and/or paraventricular procedures in pediatric neurosurgery are common and can be hard to treat. We describe our technique to close cortical defects by the aid of a fibrin adhesive and subsequent Ringer inflation with the aim to avoid cortical mantle collapse and to prevent the development of subdural fluid collections. We report the preliminary results of a prospective study on a consecutive series of 29 children who underwent 37 transcortical or transcallosal surgical procedures since 2008 in our department. In 17 procedures, we performed a transcortical approach on lesions, and in other 19 operations, we operated by a transcallosal. In 5/17 transcortical approaches (29%) and in 3/20 transcallosal approaches (15%), we observed a 5-mm-thick subdural fluid collection of the 5 patients with subdural fluid collections in the transcortical group, 3 patients (17%) underwent surgery for symptomatic or progressive subdural fluid collections. Of the 3 patients in the transcallosal group, a subduro-peritoneal shunt was necessary only for 1 patient (5%). At the very end of the treatment (including chemotherapy and radiotherapy), it was possible to remove the subduro-peritoneal shunt in all these patients because of disappearance of the subdural fluid collections. In pediatric patients after transcortical or transcallosal procedures, the use of a fibrin adhesive to seal surgical opening and subsequent inflation of the residual cavity with Ringer lactate solution to avoid cortical mantle collapse seems safe and appears to prevent the development of subdural fluid collections.

  3. RNA sequencing of kidney distal tubule cells reveals multiple mediators of chronic aldosterone action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Limbutara, Kavee; Fenton, Robert Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The renal aldosterone-sensitive distal tubule (ASDT) is crucial for sodium reabsorption and blood pressure regulation. The ASDT consists of the late distal convoluted tubule (DCT2), connecting tubule (CNT) and collecting duct. Due to difficulties in isolating epithelial cells from the ASDT in lar...

  4. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-01-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and 3 H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of 3 H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis

  5. Effects of luminal flow and nucleotides on [Ca(2+)](i) in rabbit cortical collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Craig B; Leite, Maurilo; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Satlin, Lisa M

    2002-09-01

    Nucleotide binding to purinergic P2 receptors contributes to the regulation of a variety of physiological functions in renal epithelial cells. Whereas P2 receptors have been functionally identified at the basolateral membrane of the cortical collecting duct (CCD), a final regulatory site of urinary Na(+), K(+), and acid-base excretion, controversy exists as to whether apical purinoceptors exist in this segment. Nor has the distribution of receptor subtypes present on the unique cell populations that constitute Ca(2+) the CCD been established. To examine this, we measured nucleotide-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in fura 2-loaded rabbit CCDs microperfused in vitro. Resting [Ca(2+)](i) did not differ between principal and intercalated cells, averaging approximately 120 nM. An acute increase in tubular fluid flow rate, associated with a 20% increase in tubular diameter, led to increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in both cell types. Luminal perfusion of 100 microM UTP or ATP-gamma-S, in the absence of change in flow rate, caused a rapid and transient approximately fourfold increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in both cell types (P < 0.05). Luminal suramin, a nonspecific P2 receptor antagonist, blocked the nucleotide- but not flow-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transients. Luminal perfusion with a P2X (alpha,beta-methylene-ATP), P2X(7) (benzoyl-benzoyl-ATP), P2Y(1) (2-methylthio-ATP), or P2Y(4)/P2Y(6) (UDP) receptor agonist had no effect on [Ca(2+)](i). The nucleotide-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transients were inhibited by the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, thapsigargin, which depletes internal Ca(2+) stores, luminal perfusion with a Ca(2+)-free perfusate, or the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine. These results suggest that luminal nucleotides activate apical P2Y(2) receptors in the CCD via pathways that require both internal Ca(2+) mobilization and extracellular Ca(2+) entry. The flow-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i) is

  6. Sex-specific patterns in cortical and trabecular bone microstructure in the Kirsten Skeletal Collection, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresheim, Amy C; Pfeiffer, Susan K; Grynpas, Marc D; Alblas, Amanda

    2018-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to provide bone histomorphometric reference data for South Africans of the Western Cape who likely dealt with health issues under the apartheid regime. The 206 adult individuals ( n female = 75, n male = 131, mean = 47.9 ± 15.8 years) from the Kirsten Skeletal Collection, U. Stellenbosch, lived in the Cape Town metropole from the late 1960s to the mid-1990s. To study age-related changes in cortical and trabecular bone microstructure, photomontages of mid-thoracic rib cross-sections were quantitatively examined. Variables include relative cortical area (Rt.Ct.Ar), osteon population density (OPD), osteon area (On.Ar), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp). All cortical variables demonstrated significant relationships with age in both sexes, with women showing stronger overall age associations. Peak bone mass was compromised in some men, possibly reflecting poor nutritional quality and/or substance abuse issues throughout adolescence and early adulthood. In women, greater predicted decrements in On.Ar and Rt.Ct.Ar suggest a structural disadvantage with age, consistent with postmenopausal bone loss. Age-related patterns in trabecular bone microarchitecture are variable and difficult to explain. Except for Tb.Th, there are no statistically significant relationships with age in women. Men demonstrate significant negative correlations between BV/TV, Tb.N, and age, and a significant positive correlation between Tb.Sp and age. This research highlights sex-specific differences in patterns of age-related bone loss, and provides context for discussion of contemporary South African bone health. While the study sample demonstrates indicators of poor bone quality, osteoporosis research continues to be under-prioritized in South Africa. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cortical atrophy rates in Alzheimer's patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment from the AddNeuroMed data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Westman, Eric; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida

    2010-01-01

    Background: The AddNeuroMed project is a multi-centre European project which aims to identify biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we measured the rate of cortical atrophy in AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC) using MRI. Methods...... quality control for both the acquisition and image processing were included in the study. Cortical thickness was measured using FACE (fast accurate cortex extraction) and averaged within main lobes using a stereotaxic atlas. Atrophy rates were calculated as percent decrease in cortical thickness and rate...

  8. Regulation of proximal tubule vacuolar H+-ATPase by PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-bataineh, Mohammad M.; Gong, Fan; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Myerburg, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) mediates ATP-driven H+ transport across membranes. This pump is present at the apical membrane of kidney proximal tubule cells and intercalated cells. Defects in the V-ATPase and in proximal tubule function can cause renal tubular acidosis. We examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the V-ATPase in the proximal tubule as these two kinases coregulate the V-ATPase in the collecting duct. As the proximal tubule V-ATPases have different subunit compositions from other nephron segments, we postulated that V-ATPase regulation in the proximal tubule could differ from other kidney tubule segments. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat ex vivo kidney slices revealed that the V-ATPase was present in the proximal tubule both at the apical pole, colocalizing with the brush-border marker wheat germ agglutinin, and in the cytosol when slices were incubated in buffer alone. When slices were incubated with a cAMP analog and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, the V-ATPase accumulated at the apical pole of S3 segment cells. These PKA activators also increased V-ATPase apical membrane expression as well as the rate of V-ATPase-dependent extracellular acidification in S3 cell monolayers relative to untreated cells. However, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased PKA-induced V-ATPase apical accumulation in proximal tubules of kidney slices and decreased V-ATPase activity in S3 cell monolayers. Our results suggest that in proximal tubule the V-ATPase subcellular localization and activity are acutely coregulated via PKA downstream of hormonal signals and via AMPK downstream of metabolic stress. PMID:24553431

  9. Dentine tubule infection and endodontic therapy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntebi, B R

    1994-07-01

    A critical review of the literature suggests that the microenvironment of dentinal tubules appears to favour the selection of relatively few bacterial types irrespective of the aetiology of the infection process; coronal dental caries or pulpar necrosis. These bacteria may constitute an important reservoir from which root canal infection and reinfection may occur following pulp necrosis or during and after endodontic treatment. Previous studies of this microflora have utilized microbiological culture techniques which need to be supplemented by those that allow in situ demonstration as well as identification of the bacteria. Newer treatment strategies that are designed to eliminate this microflora must include agents that can penetrate the dentinal tubules and destroy these microorganisms, since they are located in an area beyond the host defence mechanisms where they cannot be reached by systemically administered antimicrobial agents.

  10. Renal compensation to chronic hypoxic hypercapnia: downregulation of pendrin and adaptation of the proximal tubule.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seigneux, S. de; Malte, H.; Dimke, H.; Frokiaer, J.; Nielsen, S.; Frische, S.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis for the renal compensation to respiratory acidosis and specifically the role of pendrin in this condition are unclear. Therefore, we studied the adaptation of the proximal tubule and the collecting duct to respiratory acidosis. Male Wistar-Hannover rats were exposed to either

  11. Proximal Tubules Have the Capacity to Regulate Uptake of Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mark C; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Flores, Brittany; Lai, Xianyin; Myslinski, Jered; Pandit, Sweekar; Sandoval, Ruben M; Wean, Sarah E; Wei, Yuan; Satlin, Lisa M; Wiggins, Roger C; Witzmann, Frank A; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from multiple studies supports the concept that both glomerular filtration and proximal tubule (PT) reclamation affect urinary albumin excretion rate. To better understand these roles of glomerular filtration and PT uptake, we investigated these processes in two distinct animal models. In a rat model of acute exogenous albumin overload, we quantified glomerular sieving coefficients (GSC) and PT uptake of Texas Red-labeled rat serum albumin using two-photon intravital microscopy. No change in GSC was observed, but a significant decrease in PT albumin uptake was quantified. In a second model, loss of endogenous albumin was induced in rats by podocyte-specific transgenic expression of diphtheria toxin receptor. In these albumin-deficient rats, exposure to diphtheria toxin induced an increase in albumin GSC and albumin filtration, resulting in increased exposure of the PTs to endogenous albumin. In this case, PT albumin reabsorption was markedly increased. Analysis of known albumin receptors and assessment of cortical protein expression in the albumin overload model, conducted to identify potential proteins and pathways affected by acute protein overload, revealed changes in the expression levels of calreticulin, disabled homolog 2, NRF2, angiopoietin-2, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that a regulated PT cell albumin uptake system can respond rapidly to different physiologic conditions to minimize alterations in serum albumin level. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Role of delta-tubulin and the C-tubule in assembly of Paramecium basal bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisson Janine

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A breakthrough in the understanding of centriole assembly was provided by the characterization of the UNI3 gene in Chlamydomonas. Deletion of this gene, found to encode a novel member of the tubulin superfamily, delta-tubulin, results in the loss of the C-tubule, in the nine microtubule triplets which are the hallmark of centrioles and basal bodies. Delta-tubulin homologs have been identified in the genomes of mammals and protozoa, but their phylogenetic relationships are unclear and their function is not yet known. Results Using the method of gene-specific silencing, we have inactivated the Paramecium delta-tubulin gene, which was recently identified. This inactivation leads to loss of the C-tubule in all basal bodies, without any effect on ciliogenesis. This deficiency does not directly affect basal body duplication, but perturbs the cortical cytoskeleton, progressively leading to mislocalization and loss of basal bodies and to altered cell size and shape. Furthermore, additional loss of B- and even A-tubules at one or more triplet sites are observed: around these incomplete cylinders, the remaining doublets are nevertheless positioned according to the native ninefold symmetry. Conclusions The fact that in two distinct phyla, delta-tubulin plays a similar role provides a new basis for interpreting phylogenetic relationships among delta-tubulins. The role of delta-tubulin in C-tubule assembly reveals that tubulins contribute subtle specificities at microtubule nucleation sites. Our observations also demonstrate the existence of a prepattern for the ninefold symmetry of the organelle which is maintained even if less than 9 triplets develop.

  13. Malpighian Tubules as Novel Targets for Mosquito Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Piermarini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Malpighian tubules and hindgut are the renal excretory tissues of mosquitoes; they are essential to maintaining hemolymph water and solute homeostasis. Moreover, they make important contributions to detoxifying metabolic wastes and xenobiotics in the hemolymph. We have focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of Malpighian tubule function in adult female mosquitoes and developing chemical tools as prototypes for next-generation mosquitocides that would act via a novel mechanism of action (i.e., renal failure. To date, we have targeted inward rectifier potassium (Kir channels expressed in the Malpighian tubules of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Inhibition of these channels with small molecules inhibits transepithelial K+ and fluid secretion in Malpighian tubules, leading to a disruption of hemolymph K+ and fluid homeostasis in adult female mosquitoes. In addition, we have used next-generation sequencing to characterize the transcriptome of Malpighian tubules in the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, before and after blood meals, to reveal new molecular targets for potentially disrupting Malpighian tubule function. Within 24 h after a blood meal, the Malpighian tubules enhance the mRNA expression of genes encoding mechanisms involved with the detoxification of metabolic wastes produced during blood digestion (e.g., heme, NH3, reactive oxygen species. The development of chemical tools targeting these molecular mechanisms in Malpighian tubules may offer a promising avenue for the development of mosquitocides that are highly-selective against hematophagous females, which are the only life stage that transmits pathogens.

  14. Effect of dental materials on gluconeogenesis in rat kidney tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichl, F.X.; Durner, J.; Mückter, H.; Elsenhans, B.; Forth, W.; Kunzelmann, K.H.; Hickel, R.; Spahl, W.; Hume, W.R.; Moes, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dental composite components triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as well as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) on gluconeogenesis was investigated in isolated rat kidney tubules. From starved rats kidney tubules were

  15. Magnetic properties of permalloy-coated organic tubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Lubitz, P.; Harford, M. Z.; Baral, S.; Shashidar, R.; Ho, Y. S.; Chow, G. M.; Qadri, S.

    1991-11-01

    An initial investigation is presented of the ferromagnetic properties of a novel type of magnetic composite, viz., permalloy-coated submicron diameter hollow cylinders or tubules. The tubules form spontaneously from an organic material, a diacetylenic phosopholipid, and were used as templates on which the ferromagnetic material was deposited by electroless deposition. The permalloy-coated tubules were dispersed in an epoxy matrix to measure the magnetization and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) properties of individual tubules. The nature of the magnetic anisotropy and the FMR spectra observed confirmed that the tubules are well aligned by a magnetic field during the epoxy curing. The FMR spectra are interpreted in terms of a powder pattern distribution of thin-film spectra consistent with the large diameter-to-thickness ratio.

  16. Shape transitions in anisotropic multicomponent lipid tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eAtherton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ternary mixtures of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol can be induced to phase separate by photo-peroxidation into lipid-ordered Lo and lipid-disordered Ld domains. Because these have different mechanical properties, the phase separation is accompanied by dramatic changes in morphology. This work considers a tubule composed of Ld phase with Lo phase inclusions that possess greater rigidity; this system has been shown experimentally by Yuan and coworkers to spontaneously adopt either banded or disc configurations following phase separation. The static behaviour of inter-domain interactions is analyzed in each of these geometries by solving the linearized shape equations. These calculations suggest a possible mechanism by which the two structures form.

  17. Dentinal tubules revealed with X-ray tensor tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Christoph; Schaff, Florian; Zanette, Irene; Wolf, Johannes; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Dentin is a mineralized material making up most of the tooth bulk. A system of microtubules, so called dentinal tubules, transverses it radially from the pulp chamber to the outside. This highly oriented structure leads to anisotropic mechanical properties directly connected to the tubules orientation and density: the ultimate tensile strength as well as the fracture toughness and the shear strength are largest perpendicular to dentinal tubules. Consequently, the fatigue strength depends on the direction of dentinal tubules, too. However, none of the existing techniques used to investigate teeth provide access to orientation and density of dentinal tubules for an entire specimen in a non-destructive way. In this paper, we measure a third molar human tooth both with conventional micro-CT and X-ray tensor tomography (XTT). While the achievable resolution in micro-CT is too low to directly resolve the dentinal tubules, we provide strong evidence that the direction and density of dentinal tubules can be indirectly measured by XTT, which exploits small-angle X-ray scattering to retrieve a 3D map of scattering tensors. We show that the mean directions of scattering structures correlate to the orientation of dentinal tubules and that the mean effective scattering strength provides an estimation of the relative density of dentinal tubules. Thus, this method could be applied to investigate the connection between tubule orientation and fatigue or tensile properties of teeth for a full sample without cutting one, non-representative peace of tooth out of the full sample. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  19. Solo and keratin filaments regulate epithelial tubule morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ryosuke; Kato, Kagayaki; Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2018-04-28

    Epithelial tubules, consisting of the epithelial cell sheet with a central lumen, are the basic structure of many organs. Mechanical forces play an important role in epithelial tubulogenesis; however, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the mechanical forces during epithelial tubule morphogenesis. Solo (also known as ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine-nucleotide exchange factor that is involved in mechanical force-induced RhoA activation and stress fiber formation. Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) filaments, and this interaction plays a crucial role in mechanotransduction. In this study, we examined the roles of Solo and K8/K18 filaments in epithelial tubulogenesis using MDCK cells cultured in 3D collagen gels. Knockdown of either Solo or K18 resulted in rounder tubules with increased lumen size, indicating that Solo and K8/K18 filaments play critical roles in forming the elongated morphology of epithelial tubules. Moreover, knockdown of Solo or K18 decreased the level of diphosphorylated myosin light chain (a marker of contractile force) at the luminal and outer surfaces of tubules, suggesting that Solo and K8/K18 filaments are involved in the generation of the myosin II-mediated contractile force during epithelial tubule morphogenesis. In addition, K18 filaments were normally oriented along the long axis of the tubule, but knockdown of Solo perturbed their orientation. These results suggest that Solo plays crucial roles in forming the elongated morphology of epithelial tubules and in regulating myosin II activity and K18 filament organization during epithelial tubule formation.

  20. Objectives, Outlines, and Preparation for the Resist Tubule Space Experiment to Understand the Mechanism of Gravity Resistance in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Akamatsu, Haruhiko; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Yano, Sachiko; Omori, Katsunori; Ishioka, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Shohei; Kasahara, Haruo; Shimazu, Toru; A. Baba, Shoji; Hashimoto, Takashi

    Gravity resistance is a principal graviresponse in plants. In resistance to hypergravity, the gravity signal may be perceived by the mechanoreceptors located on the plasma membrane, and then transformed and transduced via the structural continuum or physiological continuity of cortical microtubules-plasma membrane-cell wall, leading to an increase in the cell wall rigidity as the final response. The Resist Tubule experiment, which will be conducted in the Kibo Module on the International Space Station, aims to confirm that this hypothesis is applicable to resistance to 1 G gravity. There are two major objectives in the Resist Tubule experiment. One is to quantify the contributions of cortical microtubules to gravity resistance using Arabidopsis tubulin mutants with different degrees of defects. Another objective is to analyze the modifications to dynamics of cortical microtubules and membrane rafts under microgravity conditions on-site by observing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Arabidopsis lines with the fluorescence microscope in the Kibo. We have selected suitable mutants, developed necessary hardware, and fixed operation procedure for the experiment.

  1. Genetic ablation of AQP2 in the mouse connecting tubules results in a mild urinary concentrating defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortenoeven, Marleen; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Miller, Lance

    Body water balance is regulated in the kidney via the vasopressin (AVP) regulated water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expressed in the connecting tubule (CNT) and the collecting duct (CD). Although crucial for the urinary concentrating mechanism, the relative role of AQP2 in the CNT and CD are not f...

  2. Reducing αENaC expression in kidney connecting tubule induces pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 symptoms during K+ loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Praetorius, Jeppe; Damkier, Helle H

    2015-01-01

    Genetic inactivation of the epithelial Na(+) channel α-subunit (αENaC) in the renal collecting duct (CD) does not interfere with Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis in mice. However, inactivation in the CD and a part of the connecting tubule (CNT) induces autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1...

  3. Study of the permeability of the various parts of the tubules to sodium and potassium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, F.; Falbriard, A.

    1959-01-01

    The method of stop flow analysis has been used in rabbits together with radioactive sodium and potassium injected in the middle of a six minutes period of arrest of urine flow during an osmotic diuresis. Urine was subsequently collected in 60 ta 80 mg samples. The specific activities of sodium and potassium suggest that both ions pass directly from the renal interstitial tissue into the urine at different and distinct areas in the tubules. The whole distal segment, including the area of active reabsorption of this ion, is impermeable to sodium in the direction interstitial tissue to lumen. The adjacent, more proximal tubule is, however, extremely permeable. The distal tubular impermeability to potassium is more limited. The specific activity already having reached a maximum at the level of active sodium reabsorption. Reprint of a paper published in 'Revue Francaise d'Etudes Cliniques et Biologiques', n. 5, vol IV, p. 471-474 [fr

  4. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic......Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...

  5. Sorting Tubules Regulate Blood-Brain Barrier Transcytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Villaseñor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcytosis across the blood-brain barrier (BBB regulates key processes of the brain, but the intracellular sorting mechanisms that determine successful receptor-mediated transcytosis in brain endothelial cells (BECs remain unidentified. Here, we used Transferrin receptor-based Brain Shuttle constructs to investigate intracellular transport in BECs, and we uncovered a pathway for the regulation of receptor-mediated transcytosis. By combining live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling in vitro with super-resolution microscopy of the BBB, we show that intracellular tubules promote transcytosis across the BBB. A monovalent construct (sFab sorted for transcytosis was localized to intracellular tubules, whereas a bivalent construct (dFab sorted for degradation formed clusters with impaired transport along tubules. Manipulating tubule biogenesis by overexpressing the small GTPase Rab17 increased dFab transport into tubules and induced its transcytosis in BECs. We propose that sorting tubules regulate transcytosis in BECs and may be a general mechanism for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB.

  6. Self-(Un)rolling Biopolymer Microstructures: Rings, Tubules, and Helical Tubules from the Same Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chunhong; Nikolov, Svetoslav V; Calabrese, Rossella; Dindar, Amir; Alexeev, Alexander; Kippelen, Bernard; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2015-07-13

    We have demonstrated the facile formation of reversible and fast self-rolling biopolymer microstructures from sandwiched active-passive, silk-on-silk materials. Both experimental and modeling results confirmed that the shape of individual sheets effectively controls biaxial stresses within these sheets, which can self-roll into distinct 3D structures including microscopic rings, tubules, and helical tubules. This is a unique example of tailoring self-rolled 3D geometries through shape design without changing the inner morphology of active bimorph biomaterials. In contrast to traditional organic-soluble synthetic materials, we utilized a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer that underwent a facile aqueous layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly process for the fabrication of 2D films. The resulting films can undergo reversible pH-triggered rolling/unrolling, with a variety of 3D structures forming from biopolymer structures that have identical morphology and composition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Direct physical contact between intercalated cells in the distal convoluted tubule and the afferent arteriole in mouse kidneys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ren

    Full Text Available Recent physiological studies in the kidney proposed the existence of a secondary feedback mechanism termed 'crosstalk' localized after the macula densa. This newly discovered crosstalk contact between the nephron tubule and its own afferent arteriole may potentially revolutionize our understanding of renal vascular resistance and electrolyte regulation. However, the nature of such a crosstalk mechanism is still debated due to a lack of direct and comprehensive morphological evidence. Its exact location along the nephron, its prevalence among the different types of nephrons, and the type of cells involved are yet unknown. To address these issues, computer assisted 3-dimensional nephron tracing was applied in combination with direct immunohistochemistry on plastic sections and electron microscopy. 'Random' contacts in the cortex were identified by the tracing and excluded. We investigated a total of 168 nephrons from all cortical regions. The results demonstrated that the crosstalk contact existed, and that it was only present in certain nephrons (90% of the short-looped and 75% of the long-looped nephrons. The crosstalk contacts always occurred at a specific position--the last 10% of the distal convoluted tubule. Importantly, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the cells found in the tubule wall at the contact site were always type nonA-nonB intercalated cells. In conclusion, the present work confirmed the existence of a post macula densa physical crosstalk contact.

  8. Direct physical contact between intercalated cells in the distal convoluted tubule and the afferent arteriole in mouse kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Liu, Ning-Yu; Andreasen, Arne; Thomsen, Jesper S; Cao, Liu; Christensen, Erik I; Zhai, Xiao-Yue

    2013-01-01

    Recent physiological studies in the kidney proposed the existence of a secondary feedback mechanism termed 'crosstalk' localized after the macula densa. This newly discovered crosstalk contact between the nephron tubule and its own afferent arteriole may potentially revolutionize our understanding of renal vascular resistance and electrolyte regulation. However, the nature of such a crosstalk mechanism is still debated due to a lack of direct and comprehensive morphological evidence. Its exact location along the nephron, its prevalence among the different types of nephrons, and the type of cells involved are yet unknown. To address these issues, computer assisted 3-dimensional nephron tracing was applied in combination with direct immunohistochemistry on plastic sections and electron microscopy. 'Random' contacts in the cortex were identified by the tracing and excluded. We investigated a total of 168 nephrons from all cortical regions. The results demonstrated that the crosstalk contact existed, and that it was only present in certain nephrons (90% of the short-looped and 75% of the long-looped nephrons). The crosstalk contacts always occurred at a specific position--the last 10% of the distal convoluted tubule. Importantly, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the cells found in the tubule wall at the contact site were always type nonA-nonB intercalated cells. In conclusion, the present work confirmed the existence of a post macula densa physical crosstalk contact.

  9. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI from truncated data in a theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.

  10. Insulin and IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channels in cortical collecting duct principal cells to control basolateral membrane voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Palygin, Oleg; Tomilin, Viktor; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2016-02-15

    Potassium Kir4.1/5.1 channels are abundantly expressed at the basolateral membrane of principal cells in the cortical collecting duct (CCD), where they are thought to modulate transport rates by controlling transepithelial voltage. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulate apically localized epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) to augment sodium reabsorption in the CCD. However, little is known about their actions on potassium channels localized at the basolateral membrane. In this study, we implemented patch-clamp analysis in freshly isolated murine CCD to assess the effect of these hormones on Kir4.1/5.1 at both single channel and cellular levels. We demonstrated that K(+)-selective conductance via Kir4.1/5.1 is the major contributor to the macroscopic current recorded from the basolateral side in principal cells. Acute treatment with 10 μM amiloride (ENaC blocker), 100 nM tertiapin-Q (TPNQ; ROMK inhibitor), and 100 μM ouabain (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker) failed to produce a measurable effect on the macroscopic current. In contrast, Kir4.1 inhibitor nortriptyline (100 μM), but not fluoxetine (100 μM), virtually abolished whole cell K(+)-selective conductance. Insulin (100 nM) markedly increased the open probability of Kir4.1/5.1 and nortriptyline-sensitive whole cell current, leading to significant hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase cascade with LY294002 (20 μM) abolished action of insulin on Kir4.1/5.1. IGF-1 had similar stimulatory actions on Kir4.1/5.1-mediated conductance only when applied at a higher (500 nM) concentration and was ineffective at 100 nM. We concluded that both insulin and, to a lesser extent, IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channel activity and open probability to hyperpolarize the basolateral membrane, thereby facilitating Na(+) reabsorption in the CCD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Secretory NaCl and volume flow in renal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyenbach, K W

    1986-05-01

    This review attempts to give a retrospective survey of the available evidence concerning the secretion of NaCl and fluid in renal tubules of the vertebrate kidney. In the absence of glomerular filtration, epithelial secretory mechanisms, which to this date have not been elucidated, are responsible for the renal excretion of NaCl and water in aglomerular fish. However, proximal tubules isolated from glomerular fish kidneys of the flounder, killifish, and the shark also have the capacity to secrete NaCl and fluid. In shark proximal tubules, fluid secretion appears to be driven via secondary active transport of Cl. In another marine vertebrate, the sea snake, secretion of Na (presumably NaCl) and fluid is observed in freshwater-adapted and water-loaded animals. Proximal tubules of mammals can be made to secrete NaCl in vitro together with secretion of aryl acids. An epithelial cell line derived from dog kidney exhibits secondary active secretion of Cl when stimulated with catecholamines. Tubular secretion of NaCl and fluid may serve a variety of renal functions, all of which are considered here. The occurrence of NaCl and fluid secretion in glomerular proximal tubules of teleosts, elasmobranchs, and reptiles and in mammalian renal tissue cultures suggests that the genetic potential for NaCl secretion is present in every vertebrate kidney.

  12. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic......Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...... summarize current knowledge on the development of the classical endocrinological and histological features of 47,XXY males from fetus to adulthood and review the literature concerning the degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in this syndrome....

  13. Chemically triggered ejection of membrane tubules controlled by intermonolayer friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, J-B; Khalifat, N; Puff, N; Angelova, M I

    2009-01-09

    We report a chemically driven membrane shape instability that triggers the ejection of a tubule growing exponentially toward a chemical source. The instability is initiated by a dilation of the exposed monolayer, which is coupled to the membrane spontaneous curvature and slowed down by intermonolayer friction. Our experiments are performed by local delivery of a basic pH solution to a giant vesicle. Quantitative fits of the data give an intermonolayer friction coefficient b approximately 2x10;{9} J s/m;{4}. The exponential growth of the tubule may be explained by a Marangoni stress yielding a pulling force proportional to its length.

  14. Hierarchically assembled DNA origami tubules with reconfigurable chirality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Haorong; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic reconfiguration of a hierarchically assembled tubular structure is demonstrated using the DNA origami technique. Short cylindrical DNA origami monomers are synthesized and linked into elongated tubules, which can then be disassembled via toehold-mediated strand displacement. The disassembled subunits are subsequently linked into tubules of a different chirality. The reconfiguration is performed with the subunits carrying dumbbell hairpin DNA oligonucleotides or gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reconfiguration of higher order origami structures presented here is useful for constructing dynamic nanostructures that exceed the size limit of single DNA origami and may facilitate the study of molecular or particle interactions by tuning their relative distance and organization. (paper)

  15. Masonry structures built with fictile tubules: Experimental and numerical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberti, Simone; Scuro, Carmelo; Codispoti, Rosamaria; Olivito, Renato S.; Milani, Gabriele

    2017-11-01

    Masonry structures with fictile tubules were a distinctive building technique of the Mediterranean area. This technique dates back to Roman and early Christian times, used to build vaulted constructions and domes with various geometrical forms by virtue of their modular structure. In the present work, experimental tests were carried out to identify the mechanical properties of hollow clay fictile tubules and a possible reinforcing technique for existing buildings employing such elements. The experimental results were then validated by devising and analyzing numerical models with the FE software Abaqus, also aimed at investigating the structural behavior of an arch via linear and nonlinear static analyses.

  16. Innervation of the renal proximal convoluted tubule of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barajas, L.; Powers, K.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data suggest the proximal tubule as a major site of neurogenic influence on tubular function. The functional and anatomical axial heterogeneity of the proximal tubule prompted this study of the distribution of innervation sites along the early, mid, and late proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) of the rat. Serial section autoradiograms, with tritiated norepinephrine serving as a marker for monoaminergic nerves, were used in this study. Freehand clay models and graphic reconstructions of proximal tubules permitted a rough estimation of the location of the innervation sites along the PCT. In the subcapsular nephrons, the early PCT (first third) was devoid of innervation sites with most of the innervation occurring in the mid (middle third) and in the late (last third) PCT. Innervation sites were found in the early PCT in nephrons located deeper in the cortex. In juxtamedullary nephrons, innervation sites could be observed on the PCT as it left the glomerulus. This gradient of PCT innervation can be explained by the different tubulovascular relationships of nephrons at different levels of the cortex. The absence of innervation sites in the early PCT of subcapsular nephrons suggests that any influence of the renal nerves on the early PCT might be due to an effect of neurotransmitter released from renal nerves reaching the early PCT via the interstitium and/or capillaries

  17. Cortical visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Koželj, Urša

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we discuss cortical visual impairment, diagnosis that is in the developed world in first place, since 20 percent of children with blindness or low vision are diagnosed with it. The objectives of the thesis are to define cortical visual impairment and the definition of characters suggestive of the cortical visual impairment as well as to search for causes that affect the growing diagnosis of cortical visual impairment. There are a lot of signs of cortical visual impairment. ...

  18. NMR-based urine analysis in rats: prediction of proximal tubule kidney toxicity and phospholipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienemann, Kai; Plötz, Thomas; Pestel, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    The aim of safety pharmacology is early detection of compound-induced side-effects. NMR-based urine analysis followed by multivariate data analysis (metabonomics) identifies efficiently differences between toxic and non-toxic compounds; but in most cases multiple administrations of the test compound are necessary. We tested the feasibility of detecting proximal tubule kidney toxicity and phospholipidosis with metabonomics techniques after single compound administration as an early safety pharmacology approach. Rats were treated orally, intravenously, inhalatively or intraperitoneally with different test compounds. Urine was collected at 0-8 h and 8-24 h after compound administration, and (1)H NMR-patterns were recorded from the samples. Variation of post-processing and feature extraction methods led to different views on the data. Support Vector Machines were trained on these different data sets and then aggregated as experts in an Ensemble. Finally, validity was monitored with a cross-validation study using a training, validation, and test data set. Proximal tubule kidney toxicity could be predicted with reasonable total classification accuracy (85%), specificity (88%) and sensitivity (78%). In comparison to alternative histological studies, results were obtained quicker, compound need was reduced, and very importantly fewer animals were needed. In contrast, the induction of phospholipidosis by the test compounds could not be predicted using NMR-based urine analysis or the previously published biomarker PAG. NMR-based urine analysis was shown to effectively predict proximal tubule kidney toxicity after single compound administration in rats. Thus, this experimental design allows early detection of toxicity risks with relatively low amounts of compound in a reasonably short period of time.

  19. Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection Induces VAP-Dependent Endosomal Tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqa, Abida; Massimi, Paola; Pim, David; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Banks, Lawrence

    2018-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection involves complex interactions with the endocytic transport machinery, which ultimately facilitates the entry of the incoming viral genomes into the trans -Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent nuclear entry during mitosis. The endosomal pathway is a highly dynamic intracellular transport system, which consists of vesicular compartments and tubular extensions, although it is currently unclear whether incoming viruses specifically alter the endocytic machinery. In this study, using MICAL-L1 as a marker for tubulating endosomes, we show that incoming HPV-16 virions induce a profound alteration in global levels of endocytic tubulation. In addition, we also show a critical requirement for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchored protein VAP in this process. VAP plays an essential role in actin nucleation and endosome-to-Golgi transport. Indeed, the loss of VAP results in a dramatic decrease in the level of endosomal tubulation induced by incoming HPV-16 virions. This is also accompanied by a marked reduction in virus infectivity. In VAP knockdown cells, we see that the defect in virus trafficking occurs after capsid disassembly but prior to localization at the trans -Golgi network, with the incoming virion-transduced DNA accumulating in Vps29/TGN46-positive hybrid vesicles. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that infection with HPV-16 virions induces marked alterations of endocytic transport pathways, some of which are VAP dependent and required for the endosome-to-Golgi transport of the incoming viral L2/DNA complex. IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus infectious entry involves multiple interactions with the endocytic transport machinery. In this study, we show that incoming HPV-16 virions induce a dramatic increase in endocytic tubulation. This tubulation requires ER-associated VAP, which plays a critical role in ensuring the delivery of cargoes from the endocytic compartments to the trans -Golgi network. Indeed, the loss of

  20. Paracellular transport and energy utilization in the renal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alan S L

    2017-09-01

    Paracellular transport across the tight junction is a general mechanism for transepithelial transport of solutes in epithelia, including the renal tubule. However, why paracellular transport evolved, given the existence of a highly versatile system for transcellular transport, is unknown. Recent studies have identified the paracellular channel, claudin-2, that is responsible for paracellular reabsorption of sodium in the proximal renal tubule. Knockout of claudin-2 in mice impairs proximal sodium and fluid reabsorption but is compensated by upregulation of sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle. This occurs at the expense of increased renal oxygen consumption, hypoxia of the outer medulla and increased susceptibility to ischemic kidney injury. Paracellular transport can be viewed as a mechanism to exploit the potential energy in existing electrochemical gradients to drive passive transepithelial transport without consuming additional energy. In this way, it enhances the efficiency of energy utilization by transporting epithelia.

  1. Sodium pumps in the Malpighian tubule of Rhodnius sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARUSO-NEVES CELSO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malpighian tubule of Rhodnius sp. express two sodium pumps: the classical ouabain-sensitive (Na+ + K+ATPase and an ouabain-insensitive, furosemide-sensitive Na+-ATPase. In insects, 5-hydroxitryptamine is a diuretic hormone released during meals. It inhibits the (Na+ + K+ATPase and Na+ -ATPase activities indicating that these enzymes are involved in fluid secretion. Furthermore, in Rhodnius neglectus, proximal cells of Malpighian tubule exposed to hyperosmotic medium, regulate their volume through a mechanism called regulatory volume increase. This regulatory response involves inhibition of the (Na+ + K+ATPase activity that could lead to accumulation of active osmotic solute inside the cell, influx of water and return to the normal cell volume. Adenosine, a compound produced in stress conditions, also inhibits the (Na+ + K+ATPase activity. Taken together these data indicate that (Na+ + K+ATPase is a target of the regulatory mechanisms of water and ions transport responsible for homeostasis in Rhodnius sp.

  2. Strontium effects on root dentin tubule occlusion and nanomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Kuniko; Marshall, Grayson W; Gansky, Stuart A; Parkinson, Charles R; Marshall, Sally J

    2016-02-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity often is treated by promotion of dentin tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study we evaluated nanomechanical properties and degree of tubule occlusion conferred to sound and demineralized human root dentin following treatment with a 10% (w/w) strontium acetate solution and its relation to the treatment duration and delivery method. 24 human cervical root dentin disks (8 groups of 3) were polished through 0.25 μm. 12 disks were subjected to an acid challenge (1% citric acid, pH 3.8) for 2 min. The specimens were incubated in artificial saliva, treated by soaking or brushing with deionized (DI) water or a solution of 10% strontium acetate for 2 min twice a day for 28 days. The occlusion percent and nanomechanical properties were determined at the baseline, 5, 14 and 28 days. Cross-sectioned specimens were prepared to evaluate the depth affected by strontium acetate / dentin interaction by SEM. Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed effects models. A 10% strontium acetate treatment over 5-28 days significantly increased tubule occlusion for normal root dentin and to a lesser extent for demineralized dentin and increased the AFM based nanomechanical properties of demineralized dentin. Brushing was more effective than soaking in recovery of properties of demineralized dentin when treated with strontium. No difference in tubuleocclusion was found between the two delivery methods. Strontium acetate itself proved to have the ability to occlude dentin tubules and result in small changes in the mechanical properties of dentin. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cyclophilin B expression in renal proximal tubules of hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainer, D B; Doris, P A

    2000-04-01

    Rat cyclophilin-like protein (Cy-LP) is a candidate hypertension gene initially identified by differential hybridization and implicated in renal mechanisms of salt retention and high blood pressure. We report the molecular characterization of rat cyclophilin B (CypB) and demonstrate, through sequence analysis and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction primer assay, that CypB but not Cy-LP is expressed in rat kidney. CypB is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized prolyl-isomerase that interacts with elongation initiation factor 2-beta, an important regulator of protein translation and a central component of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response to hypoxia or ATP depletion. Active renal transport of sodium is increased in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), and there is evidence that this coincides with hypoxia and ATP depletion in the renal cortex. In the present studies we have examined expression of CypB in rat proximal tubules, which contributes to the increased renal sodium reabsorption in this model of hypertension. We report that CypB transcript abundance is significantly elevated in proximal convoluted tubules from SHR compared with the control Wistar-Kyoto strain. This upregulation occurs in weanling animals and precedes the development of hypertension, indicating that it is not a simple response to hypertension in SHR. Further, CypB expression is also higher in a proximal tubule cell line derived from SHR compared with a similar line derived from Wistar-Kyoto rats, indicating that this difference is genetically determined. No sequence differences were observed in the CypB cDNA from these 2 strains. These observations suggest that a genetically determined alteration in proximal tubules from SHR occurs that leads to increased expression of CypB. In view of evidence linking CypB to the regulation of elongation initiation factor-2, the upregulation of CypB may result from metabolic stress.

  4. Reduced Insulin Receptor Expression Enhances Proximal Tubule Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Shankar, Kripa; Makhija, Ekta; Gaikwad, Anil; Ecelbarger, Carolyn; Mandhani, Anil; Srivastava, Aneesh; Tiwari, Swasti

    2017-02-01

    Reduced insulin receptor protein levels have been reported in the kidney cortex from diabetic humans and animals. We recently reported that, targeted deletion of insulin receptor (IR) from proximal tubules (PT) resulted in hyperglycemia in non-obese mice. To elucidate the mechanism, we examined human proximal tubule cells (hPTC) and C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat for 20 weeks). Immunoblotting revealed a significantly lower protein level of IR in HFD compare to normal chow diet (NCD). Furthermore, a blunted rise in p-AKT 308 levels in the kidney cortex of HFD mice was observed in response to acute insulin (0.75 IU/kg body weight, i.p) relative to NCD n = 8/group, P gluconeogenesis. Transcript levels of the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK were significantly increased in cAMP/DEXA-stimulated hPTC cells (n = 3, P gluconeogenesis and PEPCK induction was significantly attenuated in IR (siRNA) silenced hPTC (n = 3, P gluconeogenesis. Thus reduced insulin signaling of the proximal tubule may contribute to hyperglycemia in the metabolic syndrome via elevated gluconeogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 276-285, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resolves by one year of life. Is “cortical blindness” the same thing as CVI? Cortical blindness is ... What visual characteristics are associated with CVI? • Distinct color preferences • Variable level of vision loss, often demonstrating ...

  6. A Molecular Mechanism to Regulate Lysosome Motility for Lysosome Positioning and Tubulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    To mediate the degradation of bio-macromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca2+ channel TRPML1 cause lysosome storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca2+-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region, where autophagosomes accumulate, upon autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca2+ sensor that associates physically with the minus-end directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PI(3,5)P2, a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PI(3,5)P2-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signaling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Collectively, Ca2+ release from lysosomes provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning, and tubulation. PMID:26950892

  7. Effects of mercury on lysosomal protein digestion in the kidney proximal tubule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, K.M.; Christensen, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of mercury on renal lysosomal protein digestion was studied after administration of mercury in vitro and in vivo. Mercuric chloride or methylmercury chloride was added in vitro to lysosomal enzymes isolated from normal rats, and subsequently, digestion experiments were carried out using 125 I-labeled lysozyme or cytochrome c as substrate proteins. Both mercury compounds produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the degradation of the proteins, mercuric chloride being the strongest inhibitor. Mercuric chloride was also administered to rats in vivo for 5 to 8 months. Renal lysosomal enzymes from these animals also had a decreased ability to digest the two substrate proteins. Furthermore, the digestion of lysozyme intravenously injected into mercury-intoxicated rats was decreased in renal cortical slices incubated in vitro. Electron microscope autoradiography showed that intravenously injected labeled lysozyme was located primarily over lysosomes in proximal tubule cells 1 hour after injection in both control animals and mercury-intoxicated rats. These results suggest a decreased catabolism of low molecular weight proteins in the kidney during chronic mercury intoxication

  8. Diglycolic acid is the nephrotoxic metabolite in diethylene glycol poisoning inducing necrosis in human proximal tubule cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Greg M; Martin, Sarah; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2011-11-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG), a solvent and chemical intermediate, can produce an acute toxic syndrome, the hallmark of which is acute renal failure due to cortical tubular degeneration and proximal tubular necrosis. DEG is metabolized to two primary metabolites, 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2-HEAA) and diglycolic acid (DGA), which are believed to be the proximate toxicants. The precise mechanism of toxicity has yet to be elucidated, so these studies were designed to determine which metabolite was responsible for the proximal tubule cell death. Human proximal tubule (HPT) cells in culture, obtained from normal cortical tissue and passaged 3-6 times, were incubated with increasing concentrations of DEG, 2-HEAA, or DGA separately and in combination for 48 h at pH 6 or 7.4, and various parameters of necrotic and apoptotic cell death were measured. DEG and 2-HEAA did not produce any cell death. DGA produced dose-dependent necrosis at concentrations above 25 mmol/l. DGA did not affect caspase-3 activity and increased annexin V staining only in propidium iodide-stained cells. Hence, DGA induced necrosis, not apoptosis, as corroborated by severe depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. DGA is structurally similar to citric acid cycle intermediates that are taken up by specific transporters in kidney cells. HPT cells, incubated with N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid, a sodium dicarboxylate-1 transporter inhibitor showed significantly decreased cell death compared with DGA alone. These studies demonstrate that DGA is the toxic metabolite responsible for DEG-induced proximal tubular necrosis and suggest a possible transporter-mediated uptake of DGA leading to toxic accumulation and cellular dysfunction.

  9. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat kidney tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Rosa, J.; Stipanuk, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    In studies with rat hepatocytes, hypotaurine plus taurine production accounted for less than 5% of the total amount of cysteine (CYS) catabolized, whereas more than 90% of the metabolized cysteinesulfinate (CSA) was converted to taurine plus hypotaurine. Similar studies have been carried out with kidney tubules isolated from fed rats and incubated with 2 mM [1- 14 C]CYS or 25 mM [1- 14 C]CSA at 37 0 C for up to 40 min. The production of 14 CO 2 from CSA (3.1 +/- 1.3 nmol/sup ./ min -1 /sup ./ mg dry wt -1 ) was equivalent to the accumulation of N in NH 4 + plus glutamate. Substantial oxidation of CYS was observed (16 +/- 11 nmol CO 2 x min -1 x mg dry wt -1 ), but only 12% of the expected amount of N was recovered as NH 4 + plus glutamate. Accumulation of hypotaurine plus taurine was equivalent to 20% of the observed rate of 14 CO 2 production from CSA but accounted for only 2% of the observed rate of 14 CO 2 production from CYS. Addition of unlabeled CSA to incubations with varying levels of CYS had no effect on production of 14 CO 2 . Addition of 2 mM α-ketoglutarate to the incubation mixtures resulted in an increased in 14 CO 2 production from CSA to 290% of the control level but had no effect on CYS oxidation. In agreement with the authors findings for rat hepatocytes, these data suggest that most metabolism of CYS by the rat kidney tubule occurs by a CSA-independent pathway. However, in contrast to the metabolism of CSA almost entirely to taurine in the hepatocyte, kidney tubules appeared to metabolize CSA primarily by the transamination pathway

  10. Mechanisms of adaptation to chronic respiratory acidosis in the rabbit proximal tubule.

    OpenAIRE

    Krapf, R

    1989-01-01

    The hyperbicarbonatemia of chronic respiratory acidosis is maintained by enhanced bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule. To investigate the cellular mechanisms involved in this adaptation, cell and luminal pH were measured microfluorometrically using (2",7')-bis(carboxyethyl)-(5,6)-carboxyfluorescein in isolated, microperfused S2 proximal convoluted tubules from control and acidotic rabbits. Chronic respiratory acidosis was induced by exposure to 10% CO2 for 52-56 h. Tubules from ac...

  11. Digital three-dimensional reconstruction and ultrastructure of the mouse proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, X.Y.; Birn, H.; Jensen, K.B.

    2003-01-01

    . In the medullary rays, these are arranged in layers outside the clusters of more superficial tubules. In contrast to rat and human kidney, no major segmental variation in the ultrastructure of the proximal tubule was identified, and no parameters enabled definition of distinct segments in this strain of mice......, detailed analyses of normal mouse kidney structure and organization are lacking. This study describes the 3D organization and ultrastructural, segmental variation of the mouse kidney proximal tubule. A total of 160 proximal tubules in three C57/BL/6J mouse kidneys were analyzed on 800 serial sections from...

  12. Use of poly (amidoamine dendrimer for dentinal tubule occlusion: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianda Wang

    Full Text Available The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity, a significant health problem in dentistry and daily life. The in situ mineralization within dentinal tubules is a promising treatment for dentin hypersensitivity as it induces the formation of mineral on the sensitive regions and occludes the dentinal tubules. This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro effect of a whole generation poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer (G3.0 on dentinal tubule occlusion by inducing mineralization within dentinal tubules. Dentin discs were treated with PAMAM dendrimers using two methods, followed by the in vitro characterization using Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS. These results showed that G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers coated on dentin surface and infiltrated in dentinal tubules could induce hydroxyapatite formation and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, crosslinked PAMAM dendrimers could induce the remineralization of demineralized dentin and thus had the potential in dentinal tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study, dentinal tubules occlusion could be achieved by using PAMAM dendrimers. This could lead to the development of a new therapeutic technique for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

  13. Histological and three dimensional organizations of lymphoid tubules in normal lymphoid organ of Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangsuwan, Pornsawan; Phoungpetchara, Ittipon; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Sobhon, Prasert

    2008-04-01

    The normal lymphoid organ of Penaeus monodon (which tested negative for WSSV and YHV) was composed of two parts: lymphoid tubules and interstitial spaces, which were permeated with haemal sinuses filled with large numbers of haemocytes. There were three permanent types of cells present in the wall of lymphoid tubules: endothelial, stromal and capsular cells. Haemocytes penetrated the endothelium of the lymphoid tubule's wall to reside among the fixed cells. The outermost layer of the lymphoid tubule was covered by a network of fibers embedded in a PAS-positive extracellular matrix, which corresponded to a basket-like network that covered all the lymphoid tubules as visualized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Argyrophilic reticular fibers surrounded haemal sinuses and lymphoid tubules. Together they formed the scaffold that supported the lymphoid tubule. Using vascular cast and SEM, the three dimensional structure of the subgastric artery that supplies each lobe of the lymphoid organ was reconstructed. This artery branched into highly convoluted and blind-ending terminal capillaries, each forming the lumen of a lymphoid tubule around which haemocytes and other cells aggregated to form a cuff-like wall. Stromal cells which form part of the tubular scaffold were immunostained for vimentin. Examination of the whole-mounted lymphoid organ, immunostained for vimentin, by confocal microscopy exhibited the highly branching and convoluted lymphoid tubules matching the pattern of the vascular cast observed in SEM.

  14. Clinical Importance of Morphological Appearance of Seminiferous Tubules During MicroTESE in NOA Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Haliloglu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Design: Clinical study. Setting: Research Center on Infertility, Ankara University; and Urology Department. Patients: 65 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA.\tInterventions: Microscopical appearance of seminiferous tubules was recorded during TESE surgery. Differing from others, the largest opaque-white in color tubules were cut and removed. When all the tubules have no discriminating appearance, randomized biopsies were obtained. Removed tissue pieces were subjected to mechanical mincing under the stereomicroscope and then enzymatic digestion processes. Using inversion microscope (x32 magnification spermatozoa were searched. Main Outcome Measures: Morphological appearance of seminiferous tubules under optical magnification, spermatozoa recovery rates and histopathological findings were compared.\tRESULTS: In cases of Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS, maturation arrest, hypospermatogenesis and focal spermatogenesis TESE yielded at least one spermatozoon in 37%, 52%, 100% and 63% of the cases, respectively. When all the seminiferous tubules were homogenously swollen, histopathological diagnosis was hypospermatogenesis in 100% of the cases. Homogenously thin and transparent tubules corresponded to SCOS or maturation arrest in 90% and 10% of the cases, respectively. Mature spermatozoa recovery rates were 100% and zero in homogenously-swollen observed and homogenously-thin observed tubules, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Present data indicate that in cases of all tubules are homogenous in appearance and none of them can be discriminated from others, using microscope has no advantage in selection of the tubuli to be removed, but randomizely selection would also be sufficient. MicroTESE significantly increases the success in NOA cases with seminiferous tubules dispersed heterogeneously.

  15. Antioxidant Protection against Pathological Mycotoxins Alterations on Proximal Tubules in Rat Kidney

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    Susan Abdu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ochratoxin A (OTA was one of the mycotoxins and received attention worldwide because of the hazard it posed to human and animal health, where the kidney was the primary target organ for OTA toxicity. In the other hand, dates served as a good source of natural antioxidants and could potentially be considered as a functional food.Methods: The study was performed in the department of biology in King Abdulaziz University. Animals were gavage administrated and divided into four groups: first group received (sodium bicarbonate, second group received (289 µg OTA /kg B.W. /day, third group received (1mg Ajwa/kg B.W. / day and fourth group received (289 µg OTA /kg B.W./day+ 1mg Ajwa /kg B.W. / day. Serum (creatinine - urea levels were measured in each group at the time of tissue collection , some biopsies were fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution for light microscopy processing stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin (H& E., Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS and Masson´s Trichrome (M.T..Other biopsies were immediately collected into electron microscopy processing. Results: After 28 days, a significant decrease in body weight, kidney weight and relative weight was detected in OTA treated group. Also, Serum (creatinine - urea level were elevated .The normal cyto-architecture of proximal tubules were lost exhibiting damaged bruch border, degenerated, binucleated and karyomegalic cells. The most destructed ultra-structure was the mitochondria which severely swollen with disintegrated membranes. In Ajwa Date extract-group the proximal tubules were normal, whereas in Ajwa date extract + OTA -group the severity of the lesions was significantly reduced. Conclusion: The present results indicated that, Ajwa date have protective effects and ameliorated the lesions of Ochratoxin nepherotoxicity which might lead to kidney failure.

  16. Acid-base transport by the renal proximal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Lara A; Boron, Walter F; Zhou, Yuehan

    2010-01-01

    Each day, the kidneys filter 180 L of blood plasma, equating to some 4,300 mmol of the major blood buffer, bicarbonate (HCO3-). The glomerular filtrate enters the lumen of the proximal tubule (PT), and the majority of filtered HCO3- is reclaimed along the early (S1) and convoluted (S2) portions of the PT in a manner coupled to the secretion of H+ into the lumen. The PT also uses the secreted H+ to titrate non-HCO3- buffers in the lumen, in the process creating "new HCO3-" for transport into the blood. Thus, the PT - along with more distal renal segments - is largely responsible for regulating plasma [HCO3-]. In this review we first focus on the milestone discoveries over the past 50+ years that define the mechanism and regulation of acid-base transport by the proximal tubule. Further on in the review, we will summarize research still in progress from our laboratory, work that addresses the problem of how the PT is able to finely adapt to acid-base disturbances by rapidly sensing changes in basolateral levels of HCO3- and CO2 (but not pH), and thereby to exert tight control over the acid-base composition of the blood plasma.

  17. Wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa seminiferous tubules morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Sampaio Costa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this data was to analyze morphology and function of the seminiferous tubule in adult wild boars. Testes removed by unilateral castration of five animals were used. The testicular parenchyma was composed by 82.1±2.2% of seminiferous tubule and 17.9±2.2% of intertubular tissue. The tubular diameter was 249.2±33.0 µm and the seminiferous tubule lenght per gram of testis was 19.3±4.9m. The spermatogonial mitoses efficiency coefficient, meiotic index and spermatogenesis efficiency were 10.34, 2.71 and 30.5 respectively. Each Sertoli cell supported about 13 germinatives cells. The hystometric parameters studied were very similar to those related for domestic boars, however, the wild boars intrinsic efficiency of spermatogenesis and Sertoli cells indexes were smaller than in domestic boars.Objetivou-se com esta pesquisa estudar as características morfométricas e funcionais dos túbulos seminíferos de javalis adultos. Utilizaram-se testículos de cinco animais submetidos a orquiectomia unilateral. O parênquima testicular foi composto por 82,1 ± 2,2% de túbulos seminíferos e 17,9 ± 2,2% de tecido intertubular. O diâmetro tubular foi de 249,2 ± 33,0µm e o comprimento dos túbulos seminíferos por grama de testículo foi de 19,3 ± 4,9m. O coeficiente de eficiência das mitoses espermatogônias, o rendimento meiótico e o rendimento geral da espermatogênese foram, respectivamente, 10,34, 2,71 e 30,50. Cada célula de Sértoli suportou cerca de 13 células germinativas. Conclui-se que os parâmetros histométricos estudados nesta pesquisa foram muito semelhantes aos valores relatados para suínos domésticos, entretanto, o rendimento intrínseco da espermatogênese e os índices de células de Sértoli de javalis foram relativamente baixos quando comparados com aqueles animais.

  18. Proximal Tubule Cell Hypothesis for Cardiorenal Syndrome in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Saito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD is remarkably high among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, even in the early microalbuminuric stages with normal glomerular filtration rates. Proximal tubule cells (PTCs mediate metabolism and urinary excretion of vasculotoxic substances via apical and basolateral receptors and transporters. These cells also retrieve vasculoprotective substances from circulation or synthesize them for release into the circulation. PTCs are also involved in the uptake of sodium and phosphate, which are critical for hemodynamic regulation and maintaining the mineral balance, respectively. Dysregulation of PTC functions in CKD is likely to be associated with the development of CVD and is linked to the progression to end-stage renal disease. In particular, PTC dysfunction occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, a leading cause of CKD. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms of PTC dysfunction to develop therapeutic strategies for treating cardiorenal syndrome in diabetes.

  19. Reversible effects of acute hypertension on proximal tubule sodium transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y; Magyar, C E; Norian, J M

    1998-01-01

    Acute hypertension provokes a rapid decrease in proximal tubule sodium reabsorption with a decrease in basolateral membrane sodium-potassium-ATPase activity and an increase in the density of membranes containing apical membrane sodium/hydrogen exchangers (NHE3) [Y. Zhang, A. K. Mircheff, C. B....... Renal cortex lysate was fractionated on sorbitol gradients. Basolateral membrane sodium-potassium-ATPase activity (but not subunit immunoreactivity) decreased one-third to one-half after BP was elevated and recovered after BP was normalized. After BP was elevated, 55% of the apical NHE3 immunoreactivity......, smaller fractions of sodium-phosphate cotransporter immunoreactivity, and apical alkaline phosphatase and dipeptidyl-peptidase redistributed to membranes of higher density enriched in markers of the intermicrovillar cleft (megalin) and endosomes (Rab 4 and Rab 5), whereas density distributions...

  20. A microfluidic renal proximal tubule with active reabsorptive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else M Vedula

    Full Text Available In the kidney, the renal proximal tubule (PT reabsorbs solutes into the peritubular capillaries through active transport. Here, we replicate this reabsorptive function in vitro by engineering a microfluidic PT. The microfluidic PT architecture comprises a porous membrane with user-defined submicron surface topography separating two microchannels representing a PT filtrate lumen and a peritubular capillary lumen. Human PT epithelial cells and microvascular endothelial cells in respective microchannels created a PT-like reabsorptive barrier. Co-culturing epithelial and endothelial cells in the microfluidic architecture enhanced viability, metabolic activity, and compactness of the epithelial layer. The resulting tissue expressed tight junctions, kidney-specific morphology, and polarized expression of kidney markers. The microfluidic PT actively performed sodium-coupled glucose transport, which could be modulated by administration of a sodium-transport inhibiting drug. The microfluidic PT reproduces human physiology at the cellular and tissue levels, and measurable tissue function which can quantify kidney pharmaceutical efficacy and toxicity.

  1. Photoelectrochemical reactivity of polyoxophosphotungstates embedded in titania tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yibing

    2006-01-01

    A highly ordered and crystallized titania (TiO 2 ) nanotube array is fabricated by a low-voltage anodization plus a post-embedding calcination process. Polyoxophosphotungstate-titania (POPTA-TiO 2 ) composite catalyst is synthesized by embedding POPTA in TiO 2 tubule channels to improve the photoelectrochemical properties. The morphological characteristics and crystal behaviour of POPTA-TiO 2 are examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The stability of the chemical structure has been analysed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. The photoelectrochemical properties are investigated by means of the polarization current response. Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic reactivities for the degradation of an endocrine disrupting chemical have also been investigated to examine the photoelectrochemical reaction efficiency of POPTA-TiO 2 composite catalyst

  2. Effect of dental materials on gluconeogenesis in rat kidney tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, F.X.; Durner, J.; Mueckter, H.; Elsenhans, B.; Forth, W. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Walter-Straub-Institut fuer Pharmakologie und Toxikologie; Kunzelmann, K.H.; Hickel, R. [Department of Operative/Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology and Pedodontics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Spahl, W. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Hume, W.R. [Dental Research Institute, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moes, G.W. [TNO Prins-Maurits-Laboratorium, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    1999-09-01

    The effect of dental composite components triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as well as mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) and methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) on gluconeogenesis was investigated in isolated rat kidney tubules. From starved rats kidney tubules were prepared and isolated by digestion with collagenase. Every 10 min up to 60 min 1-ml samples were drawn from the cell suspension for quantitating the glucose content. Glucose formation in controls was 3.3 {+-} 0.2 nmol/mg . per min (mean {+-} SEM, n=21). Relative rates of glucose formation were obtained by expressing individual rates as a percentage of the corresponding control. X-Y concentration curves (effective concentration, EC) of the substances were calculated by fitting a four-parametric sigmoid function to the relative rates of glucose formation at various test concentrations. At the end of the incubation period cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion. Cell viability decreased within the 60 min interval from 90 to approx. 80% (controls), <25 (HEMA), <20 (TEGDMA), <10 (MeHgCl), and <10% (HgCl{sub 2}). Values of 50% effective concentration (EC{sub 50}) were calculated from fitted curves. EC{sub 50} values were (mmol; mean {+-} SEM; n=4): HEMA, 17.7 {+-} 2.9; TEGDMA, 1.8 {+-} 0.2; MeHgCl, 0.018 {+-} 0.0005; and HgCl{sub 2}, 0.0016 {+-} 0.0005. The toxic effect of HgCl{sub 2} was {proportional{underscore}to}1000 or 10 000 higher than that of the dental composite components TEGDMA or HEMA, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Cortical bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.M. Jr.; Rogers, L.F.; Hendrix, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five cases of bone metastases involving the cortex alone are reviewed. Seven patients had primary lung carcinoma, while 18 had primary tumors not previously reported to produce cortical bone metastases (tumors of the breast, kidney, pancreas, adenocarcinoma of unknown origin, multiple myeloma). Radiographically, these cortical lesions were well circumscribed, osteolytic, and produced soft-tissue swelling and occasional periosteal reaction. A recurrent pattern of metadiaphyseal involvement of the long bones of the lower extremity (particularly the femur) was noted, and is discussed. Findings reported in the literature, review, pathophysiology, and the role of skeletal radiographs, bone scans, and CT scans in evaluating cortical bone metastases are addressed

  4. 3D variations in human crown dentin tubule orientation: a phase-contrast microtomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslansky, Paul; Zabler, Simon; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tubules dominate the microstructure of dentin, and in crowns of human teeth they are surrounded by thick mineralized peritubular cuffs of high stiffness. Here we examine the three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of tubules in relation to enamel on the buccal and lingual aspects of intact premolars and molars. Specifically we investigate the angular orientation of tubules relative to the plane of the junction of dentin with enamel (DEJ) by means of wet, non-destructive and high-resolution phase-contrast (coherent) tomography. Enamel capped dentin samples (n=16), cut from the buccal and lingual surfaces of upper and lower premolar and molar teeth, were imaged in water by high-resolution synchrotron-based phase-contrast X-ray radiography. Reconstructed 3D virtual images were co-aligned with respect to the DEJ plane. The average tubule orientation was determined at increasing distances from the DEJ, based on integrated projections onto orthogonal virtual planes. The angle and curl of the tubules were determined every 100 microm to a depth of 1.4mm beneath the DEJ. Most tubules do not extend at right angles from the DEJ. Even when they do, tubules always change their orientations substantially within the first half-millimeter zone beneath the DEJ, both on the buccal and lingual aspects of premolar and molar teeth. Tubules also tend to curl and twist within this zone. Student t-tests indicate that lower teeth seem to have greater tilts in the tubule orientations relative to the DEJ normal with an average angle of 42 degrees (+/-2.0 degrees), whereas upper teeth exhibit a smaller change of orientation, with an average of 32 degrees (+/-2.1 degrees). Tubules are a central characteristic of dentin, with important implications on how it is arranged and what the properties are. Knowing about the path that tubules follow is important for various reasons, ranging form improving control over restorative procedures to understanding or simulating the mechanical properties of teeth

  5. Luminal uptake and intracellular transport of insulin in renal proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellfritzsch, M.; Christensen, E.I.; Sonne, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is generally accepted that proteins taken up from the renal tubular fluid are transported into lysosomes in proximal tubule cells. Recently, however, it has been postulated that insulin in isolated perfused rat kidneys did not accumulate in lysosomes but to a certain degree in the Golgi region. The present study was undertaken to investigate the intracellular handling of biologically unaltered insulin in rat renal proximal tubule cells. Rats were prepared for in vivo micropuncture and either a colloidal gold insulin complex or insulin monoiodinated in the A-14 position ( 125 I-insulin) was microinfused into proximal tubules. After 5, 10, 25 or 60 min the tubules were fixed by microinfusion of glutaraldehyde and processed for electron microscopy or electron microscope autoradiography. A qualitative analysis of tubules infused with colloidal gold insulin or 125 I-insulin showed that insulin was taken up by endocytosis and transported to lysosomes, and a quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the 125 I-insulin microinfused tubules showed that the grain density after five min was significantly increased for endocytic vacuoles and for lysosomes. After 60 min the grain density was still significant over lysosomes. The accumulation of grains was non-significant over all other areas analyzed at any time. This study shows that insulin is taken up from the luminal side of the proximal tubule by endocytosis and transported to the lysosomes. There was no significant transport to the Golgi region

  6. Puerarin Facilitates T-Tubule Development of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ES-CM is one of the promising cell sources for repopulation of damaged myocardium. However, ES-CMs present immature structure, which impairs their integration with host tissue and functional regeneration. This study used murine ES-CMs as an in vitro model of cardiomyogenesis to elucidate the effect of puerarin, the main compound found in the traditional Chinese medicine the herb Radix puerariae, on t-tubule development of murine ES-CMs. Methods: Electron microscope was employed to examine the ultrastructure. The investigation of transverse-tubules (t-tubules was performed by Di-8-ANEPPS staining. Quantitative real-time PCR was utilized to study the transcript level of genes related to t-tubule development. Results: We found that long-term application of puerarin throughout cardiac differentiation improved myofibril array and sarcomeres formation, and significantly facilitated t-tubules development of ES-CMs. The transcript levels of caveolin-3, amphiphysin-2 and junctophinlin-2, which are crucial for the formation and development of t-tubules, were significantly upregulated by puerarin treatment. Furthermore, puerarin repressed the expression of miR-22, which targets to caveolin-3. Conclusion: Our data showed that puerarin facilitates t-tubule development of murine ES-CMs. This might be related to the repression of miR-22 by puerarin and upregulation of Cav3, Bin1 and JP2 transcripts.

  7. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane L. BRITTAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF. DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0 to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine.

  8. Annexin IV (Xanx-4) has a functional role in the formation of pronephric tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seville, Rachel A; Nijjar, Sarbjit; Barnett, Mark W; Massé, Karine; Jones, Elizabeth A

    2002-04-01

    Vertebrate kidney organogenesis is characterised by the successive formation of the pronephros, the mesonephros and the metanephros. The pronephros is the first to form and is the functional embryonic kidney of lower vertebrates; although it is vestigial in higher vertebrates, it is a necessary precursor for the other kidney types. The Xenopus pronephros is a simple paired organ; each nephron consists of a single large glomus, one set of tubules and a single duct. The simple organisation of the pronephros and the amenability of Xenopus laevis embryos to manipulation make the Xenopus pronephros an attractive system in which to study organogenesis. It has been shown that pronephric tubules can be induced to form in presumptive ectodermal tissue by treatment with RA and activin. We have used this system in a subtractive hybridisation screen that resulted in the cloning of Xenopus laevis annexin IV (Xanx-4). Xanx-4 transcripts are specifically located to the developing pronephric tubules, and the protein to the luminal surface of these tubules. Temporal expression shows zygotic transcription is upregulated at the time of pronephric tubule specification and persists throughout pronephric development. The temporal and spatial expression pattern of Xanx-4 suggests it may have a role in pronephric tubule development. Overexpression of Xanx-4 yields no apparent phenotype, but Xanx-4 depletion, using morpholinos, produces a shortened, enlarged tubule phenotype. The phenotype observed can be rescued by co-injection of Xanx-4 mRNA. Although the function of annexins is not yet clear, studies have suggested a role for annexins in a number of cellular processes. Annexin IV has been shown to have an inhibitory role in the regulation of epithelial calcium-activated chloride ion conductance. The enlarged pronephric tubule phenotype observed may be attributed to incorrect modulation of exocytosis, membrane plasticity or ion channels and/or water homeostasis. In this study, we

  9. Functionally induced changes in water transport in the proximal tubule segment of rat kidneys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faarup, Poul; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nørgaard, Tove

    2011-01-01

    To eliminate freezing artifacts in the proximal tubule cells, two cryotechniques were applied to normal rat kidneys, ie, freeze substitution and special freeze drying. In addition, salt depletion and salt loading were applied to groups of rats to evaluate whether the segmental structure of the pr......To eliminate freezing artifacts in the proximal tubule cells, two cryotechniques were applied to normal rat kidneys, ie, freeze substitution and special freeze drying. In addition, salt depletion and salt loading were applied to groups of rats to evaluate whether the segmental structure...... segment, representing a structural background for the essential transport of water from the proximal tubules to the peritubular capillaries....

  10. Scattering of neutrons by catalase: a study of molecules, subunits, and tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, J.; Starling, D.; Baldwin, J.P.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with small-angle scattering of neutrons by catalase tetramers, dimers, and monomers and with neutron diffraction by helical assemblies of tetramers in the form of tubules. A preliminary study of catalase is described

  11. The development of enamel tubules during the formation of enamel in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    OpenAIRE

    Sasagawa, I; Ferguson, M W

    1991-01-01

    In Monodelphis domestica, although both processes from odontoblasts and projections from ameloblasts were found in developing enamel, the majority of the contents of enamel tubules were probably processes that originated from odontoblasts. Processes from odontoblasts penetrating into enamel touched part of the ameloblasts in the stage of enamel formation. No specialised cell junctions were seen at the adherence between the two. There were no enamel tubules in the aprismatic and pseudoprismati...

  12. Effect of theobromine-containing toothpaste on dentin tubule occlusion in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T; Mathews, Sapna M; Mensinkai, Poornima K

    2015-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DH) is treated by either occlusion of dentin tubules or nerve desensitization. This in situ study compared dentin tubules occlusion by theobromine-containing dentifrices with (Theodent-classic-F®, TCF) and without (Theodent-classic®, TC) fluoride with 1,500 ppm fluoride toothpaste, Colgate®-Regular (Fluoride) and Novamin®-containing toothpaste, Sensodyne®-5000-Nupro (Novamin®). Each subject wore four intraoral appliances bearing dentin blocks while using one of four test dentifrices (n = 20/dentifrice) twice daily for 7 days. The four appliances were removed successively after 1, 2, 3, and 7 days. Treated blocks and their control (untreated) blocks were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Effects were compared statistically (ANOVA/Tukey's) based on percentage of surface area covered by deposited precipitate layer (%DPL) and percentage of fully open (%FOT), partially occluded (%POT), and completely occluded (%COT) tubules in each block calculated relative to the number of tubules in their control blocks. SEM observation indicated an increased %COT and %DPL over time. After 1 and 2 days, %COT was comparable with TC and TCF, and significantly (p Theobromine-containing toothpastes with and without fluoride have equal potential in occluding dentin tubules within a shorter time period than Novamin®-containing toothpaste; however, the three demonstrated equal potential after 1 week, but not the fluoride toothpaste. Theobromine-containing toothpaste promoted dentin tubule occlusion thus shows potential to relief DH.

  13. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew Cn; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-02-04

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps.

  14. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  15. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Thom, M.; Ellison, D. W.; Wilkins, P.; Barnes, D.; Thompson, P. D.; Brown, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. BACKGROUND: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  16. Proteomic changes in response to crystal formation in Drosophila Malpighian tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Vera Y; Konietzny, Rebecca; Charles, Philip; Kessler, Benedikt; Fischer, Roman; Turney, Benjamin W

    2016-04-02

    Kidney stone disease is a major health burden with a complex and poorly understood pathophysiology. Drosophila Malpighian tubules have been shown to resemble human renal tubules in their physiological function. Herein, we have used Drosophila as a model to study the proteomic response to crystal formation induced by dietary manipulation in Malpighian tubules. Wild-type male flies were reared in parallel groups on standard medium supplemented with lithogenic agents: control, Sodium Oxalate (NaOx) and Ethylene Glycol (EG). Malpighian tubules were dissected after 2 weeks to visualize crystals with polarized light microscopy. The parallel group was dissected for protein extraction. A new method of Gel Assisted Sample Preparation (GASP) was used for protein extraction. Differentially abundant proteins (p<0.05) were identified by label-free quantitative proteomic analysis in flies fed with NaOx and EG diet compared with control. Their molecular functions were further screened for transmembrane ion transporter, calcium or zinc ion binder. Among these, 11 candidate proteins were shortlisted in NaOx diet and 16 proteins in EG diet. We concluded that GASP is a proteomic sample preparation method that can be applied to individual Drosophila Malpighian tubules. Our results may further increase the understanding of the pathophysiology of human kidney stone disease.

  17. Palladium nanotubes formed by lipid tubule templating and their application in ethanol electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Ma, Shenghua; Su, Yingchun; Han, Xiaojun

    2015-04-13

    Palladium nanotubes were fabricated by using lipid tubules as templates for the first time in a controlled manner. The positively charged lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammoniumpropane (DOTAP) was doped into lipid tubules to adsorb PdCl4 (2-) on the tubule surfaces for further reduction. The lipid tubule formation was optimized by studying the growing dynamics and ethanol/water ratio. The DOTAP-doped tubules showed pH stability from 0 to 14, which makes them ideal templates for metal plating. The Pd nanotubes are open-ended with a tunable wall thickness. They exhibited good electrocatalytic performance in ethanol. Their electrochemically active surface areas were 6.5, 10.6, and 83.2 m(2)  g(-1) for Pd nanotubes with 77, 101, and 150 nm wall thickness, respectively. These Pd nanotubes have great potential in fuel cells. The method demonstrated also opens up a way to synthesize hollow metal nanotubes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Numerical Analysis of the Effect of T-tubule Location on Calcium Transient in Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Uduak Z.; Wang, Jun; Yu, Zeyun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signaling in cardiac myocytes is vital for proper functioning of the heart. Understanding the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics would give an insight into the functions of normal and diseased hearts. In the current study, spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics is investigated in ventricular myocytes by considering Ca2+ release and re-uptake via sarcolemma and transverse tubules (T-tubules), Ca2+ diffusion and buffering in the cytosol, and the blockade of Ca2+ activities associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study is carried out using a three dimensional (3D) geometric model of a branch of T-tubule extracted from the electron microscopy (EM) images of a partial ventricular myocyte. Mathematical modeling is done by using a system of partial differential equations involving Ca2+ , buffers, and membrane channels. Numerical simulation results suggest that a lack of T-tubule structure at the vicinity of the cell surface could increase the peak time of Ca2+ concentration in myocytes. The results also show that T-tubules and mobile buffers play an important role in the regulation of Ca2+ transient in ventricular myocytes. PMID:24212025

  19. Jellyfish stinging is driven by the moving front of the nematocyst's tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Uri; Park, Sinwook; Piriatinskiy, Gadi; Yossifon, Gilad; Lotan, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Nematocysts are ultra-fast stinging organelles that are utilized by the Cnidaria phylum for prey capture, defense and locomotion. They consist of a capsule and a tubule and exert high pressure and acceleration to penetrate the target organism. Previous studies report that the ejection and elongation of the tubule are driven by a buildup of osmotic potential in the capsule. We question this explanation using a microfluidic system that controls the osmotic potential by directing the tubule through oil, where no osmotic potential can develop, while keeping the capsule in water. It was found that the time needed for elongation through oil is orders of magnitude larger than through water. Our mathematical model shows that the p γGlu concentration in the tubule is higher than in the capsule and the internal pressure that develops there serves as the elongation driving force. These findings imply that modifications of the environment along the tubule route have the potential to slow down the process and reduce its impact. This may shed light on prey defense strategies, human protection against jellyfish stinging, the use of nematocysts for drug delivery and exploration of osmotic based methods for nanotubes production and elongation.

  20. Structural and functional alterations in Malpighian tubules as biomarkers of environmental pollution: synopsis and prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Anita; Brandmayr, Pietro

    2017-08-01

    Although a number of biomarkers of pollutant exposure have been identified in invertebrate species, little is known about the effect on Malpighian tubules playing an essential role in excretion and osmoregulation. Analyses of structural and functional alterations on this organ can be useful to predict the effects at the organism and population level in monitoring studies of environmental pollution. The aim of the present review is to provide a synthesis of existing knowledge on cellular damages induced by xenobiotics in Malpighian tubules both under laboratory and field conditions. We compared studies of exposure to pesticides and heavy metals as mainly environmental contaminants from anthropogenic activities. This report provided evidence that the exposure to xenobiotics has an effect on this organ and reinforces the need for further research integrating molecular biomarkers with analysis on Malpighian tubules. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Bioprinting of 3D Convoluted Renal Proximal Tubules on Perfusable Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kimberly A.; Kolesky, David B.; Skylar-Scott, Mark A.; Herrmann, Jessica; Obuobi, Humphrey; Moisan, Annie; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional models of kidney tissue that recapitulate human responses are needed for drug screening, disease modeling, and, ultimately, kidney organ engineering. Here, we report a bioprinting method for creating 3D human renal proximal tubules in vitro that are fully embedded within an extracellular matrix and housed in perfusable tissue chips, allowing them to be maintained for greater than two months. Their convoluted tubular architecture is circumscribed by proximal tubule epithelial cells and actively perfused through the open lumen. These engineered 3D proximal tubules on chip exhibit significantly enhanced epithelial morphology and functional properties relative to the same cells grown on 2D controls with or without perfusion. Upon introducing the nephrotoxin, Cyclosporine A, the epithelial barrier is disrupted in a dose-dependent manner. Our bioprinting method provides a new route for programmably fabricating advanced human kidney tissue models on demand.

  2. Fluid transport and ion fluxes in mammalian kidney proximal tubule: a model analysis of isotonic transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E.H.; Møbjerg, N.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2006-01-01

    transport similar to rat proximal tubule. Na+ recirculation is required for truly isotonic transport. The tonicity of the absorbate and the recirculation flux depend critically on ion permeabilities of interspace basement membrane. Conclusion: Our model based on solute-solvent coupling in lateral space......Aim: By mathematical modelling, we analyse conditions for near-isotonic and isotonic transport by mammalian kidney proximal tubule. Methods: The model comprises compliant lateral intercellular space (lis) and cells, and infinitely large luminal and peritubular compartments with diffusible species......: Na+, K+, Cl and an intracellular non-diffusible anion. Unknown model variables are solute concentrations, electrical potentials, volumes and hydrostatic pressures in cell and lis, and transepithelial potential. We used data mainly from rat proximal tubule to model epithelial cells and interspace...

  3. Cellular localization of uranium in the renal proximal tubules during acute renal uranium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kitahara, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kyoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Suya, Noriyoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Terada, Yasuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-12-01

    Renal toxicity is a hallmark of uranium exposure, with uranium accumulating specifically in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules causing tubular damage. As the distribution, concentration and dynamics of accumulated uranium at the cellular level is not well understood, here, we report on high-resolution quantitative in situ measurements by high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis in renal sections from a rat model of uranium-induced acute renal toxicity. One day after subcutaneous administration of uranium acetate to male Wistar rats at a dose of 0.5 mg uranium kg(-1) body weight, uranium concentration in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules was 64.9 ± 18.2 µg g(-1) , sevenfold higher than the mean renal uranium concentration (9.7 ± 2.4 µg g(-1) ). Uranium distributed into the epithelium of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and highly concentrated uranium (50-fold above mean renal concentration) in micro-regions was found near the nuclei. These uranium levels were maintained up to 8 days post-administration, despite more rapid reductions in mean renal concentration. Two weeks after uranium administration, damaged areas were filled with regenerating tubules and morphological signs of tissue recovery, but areas of high uranium concentration (100-fold above mean renal concentration) were still found in the epithelium of regenerating tubules. These data indicate that site-specific accumulation of uranium in micro-regions of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and retention of uranium in concentrated areas during recovery are characteristics of uranium behavior in the kidney. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Fluoride-associated ultrastructural changes and apoptosis in human renal tubule: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, J A; Sarwar, S; Sinha, A; Kalaivani, M; Dinda, A K; Bagga, A; Roy, T S; Das, T K; Shariff, A

    2018-01-01

    The susceptibility of the kidneys to fluoride toxicity can largely be attributed to its anatomy and function. As the filtrate moves along the complex tubular structure of each nephron, it is concentrated in the proximal and distal tubules and collecting duct. It has been frequently observed that the children suffering from renal impairments also have some symptoms of dental and skeletal fluorosis. The findings suggest that fluoride somehow interferes with renal anatomy and physiology, which may lead to renal pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride-associated nephrotoxicity. A total of 156 patients with childhood nephrotic syndrome were screened and it was observed that 32 of them had significantly high levels ( p ≤ 0.05) of fluoride in urine (4.01 ± 1.83 ppm) and serum (0.1 ± 0.013 ppm). On the basis of urinary fluoride concentration, patients were divided into two groups, namely group 1 (G-1) ( n = 32) containing normal urine fluoride (0.61 ± 0.17 ppm) and group 2 (G-2) ( n = 32) having high urine fluoride concentration (4.01 ± 1.83 ppm). Age-matched healthy subjects ( n = 33) having normal levels of urinary fluoride (0.56 ± 0.15 ppm) were included in the study as control (group 0 (G-0)). Kidney biopsies were taken from G-1 and G-2 only, who were subjected to ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) and apoptotic (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling) analysis. Various subcellular ultrastructural changes including nuclear disintegration, chromosome condensation, cytoplasmic ground substance lysis, and endoplasmic reticulum blebbing were observed. Increased levels of apoptosis were observed in high fluoride group (G-2) compared to normal fluoride group (G-1). Various degrees of fluoride-associated damages to the architecture of tubular epithelia, such as cell swelling and lysis, cytoplasmic vacuolation, nuclear condensation, apoptosis, and necrosis, were observed.

  5. Antimicrobial Effect of Citrus Aurantifolia Extract on Enterococcus Faecalis Within the Dentinal Tubules in The Presence of Smear Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifian MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Instrumentation of the root canals results in formation of smear layer which covers the dentinal tubules. In infected teeth, it is ideal to achieve a material that has the ability to remove the smear layer besides antimicrobial activity. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of Citrus aurantifolia extracts (lime juice and rind extract on Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules in the presence of smear layer.Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty dentin tubes were prepared from bovine incisors. After removal the smear layer, the specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Then, the smear layer was reformed. Test solutions were used as the irrigants in study roups as follows: group 1: 5.25% NaOCl; group 2: 17% EDTA; group 3: NaOCl+EDTA; group 4: Lime juice; group 5: ethanolic rind extract of C.aurantifolia; group 6: 96% ethanol. Dentin chips were collected from inner and outer layers of dentinal walls and optical density was measured. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests.Results: In outer layer of dentin, the efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. Also Lime juice was less effective than EDTA, NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. In inner layer of dentin, Lime juice was significantly less effective than NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. The efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the presence of smear layer, the antimicrobial activity of Lime juice was less than that of NaOCl but the efficacy of rind extract was similar to that of NaOCl.

  6. Studies on the origin and structure of tubules made by the movement protein of Cowpea mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, J.; Velden, van der T.; Willemse, J.; Borst, J.W.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Bisseling, T.; Wellink, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) moves from cell to cell by transporting virus particles via tubules formed through plasmodesmata by the movement protein (MP). On the surface of protoplasts, a fusion between the MP and the green fluorescent protein forms similar tubules and peripheral punctate spots. Here

  7. Tubulation of Class II MHC Compartments Is Microtubule Dependent and Involves Multiple Endolysosomal Membrane Proteins in Primary Dendritic Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Jatin M.; Kim, You-Me; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Katerina; Love, J. Christopher; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2009-01-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) capture exogenous Ags in the periphery for eventual processing in endolysosomes. Upon maturation by TLR agonists, DCs deliver peptide-loaded class II MHC molecules from these compartments to the cell surface via long tubular structures (endolysosomal tubules). The nature and rules that govern the movement of these DC compartments are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the tubules contain multiple proteins including the class II MHC molecules and LAMP1, a lysosomal resident protein, as well as CD63 and CD82, members of the tetraspanin family. Endolysosomal tubules can be stained with acidotropic dyes, indicating that they are extensions of lysosomes. However, the proper trafficking of class II MHC molecules themselves is not necessary for endolysosomal tubule formation. DCs lacking MyD88 can also form endolysosomal tubules, demonstrating that MyD88-dependent TLR activation is not necessary for the formation of this compartment. Endolysosomal tubules in DCs exhibit dynamic and saltatory movement, including bidirectional travel. Measured velocities are consistent with motor-based movement along microtubules. Indeed, nocodazole causes the collapse of endolysosomal tubules. In addition to its association with microtubules, endolysosomal tubules follow the plus ends of microtubules as visualized in primary DCs expressing end binding protein 1 (EB1)-enhanced GFP. PMID:17513769

  8. Tubulation of class II MHC compartments is microtubule dependent and involves multiple endolysosomal membrane proteins in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Jatin M; Kim, You-Me; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Katerina; Love, J Christopher; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2007-06-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) capture exogenous Ags in the periphery for eventual processing in endolysosomes. Upon maturation by TLR agonists, DCs deliver peptide-loaded class II MHC molecules from these compartments to the cell surface via long tubular structures (endolysosomal tubules). The nature and rules that govern the movement of these DC compartments are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the tubules contain multiple proteins including the class II MHC molecules and LAMP1, a lysosomal resident protein, as well as CD63 and CD82, members of the tetraspanin family. Endolysosomal tubules can be stained with acidotropic dyes, indicating that they are extensions of lysosomes. However, the proper trafficking of class II MHC molecules themselves is not necessary for endolysosomal tubule formation. DCs lacking MyD88 can also form endolysosomal tubules, demonstrating that MyD88-dependent TLR activation is not necessary for the formation of this compartment. Endolysosomal tubules in DCs exhibit dynamic and saltatory movement, including bidirectional travel. Measured velocities are consistent with motor-based movement along microtubules. Indeed, nocodazole causes the collapse of endolysosomal tubules. In addition to its association with microtubules, endolysosomal tubules follow the plus ends of microtubules as visualized in primary DCs expressing end binding protein 1 (EB1)-enhanced GFP.

  9. The Single Kinin Receptor Signals to Separate and Independent Physiological Pathways in Malpighian Tubules of the Yellow Fever Mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    mortar and pestle . On the day of the experiment a female mosquito, 4-7 days post-eclosion, was cold anesthetized and decapitated. Malpighian tubules...tubules was analyzed with the electron probe as described previously (7, 62), except that we used the JEOL JXA 8900 EPMA Microprobe (Tokyo, Japan

  10. Developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 is required for stabilization of Rac1-positive membrane tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Muralidharan; Lee, Unn Hwa; Yoon, Nal Ae; Yoon, Eun Hye; Lee, Byung Ju; Cho, Wha Ja; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-11-04

    Previously we have reported that developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 (DRG2) localizes on Rab5 endosomes and plays an important role in transferrin (Tfn) recycling. We here identified DRG2 as a key regulator of membrane tubule stability. At 30 min after Tfn treatment, DRG2 localized to membrane tubules which were enriched with phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate [PI(4)P] and did not contain Rab5. DRG2 interacted with Rac1 more strongly with GTP-bound Rac1 and tubular localization of DRG2 depended on Rac1 activity. DRG2 depletion led to destabilization of membrane tubules, while ectopic expression of DRG2 rescued the stability of the membrane tubules in DRG2-depleted cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for regulation of membrane tubule stability mediated by DRG2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of CAP350 in centriolar tubule stability and centriole assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Le Clech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Centrioles are microtubule-based cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet tubules and are required for the formation of the centrosome, flagella and cilia. Despite theirs importance, centriole biogenesis is poorly understood. Centrosome duplication is initiated at the G1/S transition by the sequential recruitment of a set of conserved proteins under the control of the kinase Plk4. Subsequently, the procentriole is assembled by the polymerization of centriolar tubules via an unknown mechanism involving several tubulin paralogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we developed a cellular assay to study centrosome duplication and procentriole stability based on its sensitivity to the microtubule-depolymerizing drug nocodazole. By using RNA interference experiments, we show that the stability of growing procentrioles is regulated by the microtubule-stabilizing protein CAP350, independently of hSAS-6 and CPAP which initiate procentriole growth. Furthermore, our analysis reveals the critical role of centriolar tubule stability for an efficient procentriole growth. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CAP350 belongs to a new class of proteins which associate and stabilize centriolar tubules to control centriole duplication.

  12. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Glucotoxicity and Tumorigenesis Downstream the Renal Proximal Tubule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    At present, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end-stage renal disease. Effective glycaemic management is the most powerful tool to delay the establishment of diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease. Together with reducing blood glucose levels, new anti-diabetic agents are expected not only to control the progression but also to restore known defects of the diabetic kidney. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are promising anti-diabetic agents that reduce hyperglycaemia by impairing glucose reabsorption in proximal tubule of the kidney and increasing glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors have shown to reduce glucotoxicity in isolated proximal tubule cells and also to attenuate expression of markers of overall kidney damage in experimental animal models of diabetes, but the actual renoprotective effect for downstream nephron segments is still unknown and deserves further attention. Here, we briefly discuss possible undesired effects of enhanced glucosuria and albuminuria in nephron segments beyond the proximal tubule after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment, offering new lines of research to further understand the renoprotective action of these anti-diabetic agents. Strategies blocking glucose reabsorption by renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) may be protective for RPTEC, but downstream nephron segments will still be exposed to high glucose and albumin levels through the luminal face. The actual effect of constant enhanced glucosuria over distal nephron segments remains to be established. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1635-1637, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. P-glycoprotein-deficient mice have proximal tubule dysfunction but are protected against ischemic renal injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Kramers, C.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug resistance gene 1 product, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is expressed in several excretory organs, including the apical membrane of proximal tubules. After inducing acute renal failure, P-gp expression is upregulated and this might be a protective function by pumping out toxicants and harmful

  14. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.; Weiner, I. David

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of

  15. The adult Drosophila malphigian tubules are maintained by multipotent stem cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    All animals must excrete the waste products of metabolism. Excretion is performed by the kidney in vertebrates and by the Malpighian tubules in Drosophila. The mammalian kidney has an inherent ability for recovery and regeneration after ischemic injury. Stem cells and progenitor cells have been proposed to be responsible for repair and regeneration of injured renal tissue.

  16. X radiation effect in the proximal contorted renal tubules of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, I.P.

    1977-01-01

    Exposing C 57B1, 100 days old, mice to X-ray radiation in doses of 150, 300 and 400 R was observed in the proximal contorted renal tubules. An early appearance of unspecific alterations which are peculiar to ageing [pt

  17. Revealing t-tubules in striated muscle with new optical super-resolution microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru D. Jayasinghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The t-tubular system plays a central role in the synchronisation of calcium signalling and excitation-contraction coupling in most striated muscle cells. Light microscopy has been used for imaging t-tubules for well over 100 years and together with electron microscopy (EM, has revealed the three-dimensional complexities of the t-system topology within cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres from a range of species. The emerging super-resolution single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM techniques are offering a near 10-fold improvement over the resolution of conventional fluorescence light microscopy methods, with the ability to spectrally resolve nanometre scale distributions of multiple molecular targets. In conjunction with the next generation of electron microscopy, SMLM has allowed the visualisation and quantification of intricate t-tubule morphologies within large areas of muscle cells at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, we review recent advancements in the t-tubule structural biology with the utility of various microscopy techniques. We outline the technical considerations in adapting SMLM to study t-tubules and its potential to further our understanding of the molecular processes that underlie the sub-micron scale structural alterations observed in a range of muscle pathologies.

  18. Regulation of MRP2-mediated transport in shark rectal salt gland tubules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, D.S.; Masereeuw, R.; Karnaky Jr, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    We examined endothelin-1 (ET-1) regulation of the xenobiotic efflux pump, multidrug resistance-associated protein isoform 2 (MRP2), in intact dogfish shark rectal salt gland tubules using a fluorescent substrate sulforhodamine 101 and confocal microscopy. Subnanomolar to nanomolar concentrations of

  19. In Vitro Evaluation of Dentin Tubule Occlusion for Novel Calcium Lactate Phosphate (CLP Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chang Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this in vitro study is to evaluate the effective and long-term occlusion of dentinal tubules using a novel calcium lactate phosphate (CLP based desensitizing agent. Methods: Dentin disks (n = 9 were pre-etched using 1 M lactic acid for 30 s and individually treated with Colgate® Pro-Relief™ paste, CLP paste, and double distilled water (ddH2O by a rubber-cupped handpiece. Dentin disks were analyzed under optical micrographs for pre-treatment, directly after treatment, and 14 days post-treatment. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s test were used to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences in dentinal tubule diameter. Results: A significant decrease occurred in the mean tubule diameter for dentin disks treated with CLP paste. A decrease was observed from 3.52 ± 0.83 µm to 2.62 ± 0.42 µm right after treatment, further decreasing to 1.71 ± 0.45 µm after immersion in artificial saliva for 14 days (p < 0.05. Conclusions: The results suggest that the CLP based desensitizing paste has remineralization properties and provides instant and lasting effectiveness in dentinal tubule occlusion.

  20. Mechanism of cisplatin proximal tubule toxicity revealed by integrating transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and biokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmes, Anja; Bielow, Chris; Ranninger, Christina; Bellwon, Patricia; Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Chassaigne, Hubert; Kristl, Theresa; Aiche, Stephan; Huber, Christian G; Guillou, Claude; Hewitt, Philipp; Leonard, Martin O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Bois, Frederic Y; Jennings, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of solid tumours. The major dose-limiting factor is nephrotoxicity, in particular in the proximal tubule. Here, we use an integrated omics approach, including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics coupled to

  1. Disruption of Core Planar Cell Polarity Signaling Regulates Renal Tubule Morphogenesis but Is Not Cystogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Koshi; Bayly, Roy D; Vladar, Eszter K; Vonderfecht, Tyson; Gallagher, Anna-Rachel; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2017-10-23

    Oriented cell division (OCD) and convergent extension (CE) shape developing renal tubules, and their disruption has been associated with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) genes, the majority of which encode proteins that localize to primary cilia. Core planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling controls OCD and CE in other contexts, leading to the hypothesis that disruption of PCP signaling interferes with CE and/or OCD to produce PKD. Nonetheless, the contribution of PCP to tubulogenesis and cystogenesis is uncertain, and two major questions remain unanswered. Specifically, the inference that mutation of PKD genes interferes with PCP signaling is untested, and the importance of PCP signaling for cystogenic PKD phenotypes has not been examined. We show that, during proliferative stages, PCP signaling polarizes renal tubules to control OCD. However, we find that, contrary to the prevailing model, PKD mutations do not disrupt PCP signaling but instead act independently and in parallel with PCP signaling to affect OCD. Indeed, PCP signaling that is normally downregulated once development is completed is retained in cystic adult kidneys. Disrupting PCP signaling results in inaccurate control of tubule diameter, a tightly regulated parameter with important physiological ramifications. However, we show that disruption of PCP signaling is not cystogenic. Our results suggest that regulating tubule diameter is a key function of PCP signaling but that loss of this control does not induce cysts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tubule urate and PAH transport: sensitivity and specificity of serum protein inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, J.J.; Kennedy, J.; Cowley, B.

    1987-01-01

    Macromolecules in rabbit serum inhibit the cellular uptake and transepithelial secretion of [ 14 C]urate and p-[ 3 H]aminohippurate ([ 3 H]PAH) in rabbit S 2 proximal tubule segments. To understand better the potential role these inhibitors may have in the regulation of renal organic anion excretion, the authors examined the specificity and relative inhibitory effects on tubule urate and PAH transport of albumin and γ-globulin, the major inhibitory proteins in rabbit serum. Native rabbit serum markedly inhibited the cellular accumulation or urate and PAH by isolated nonperfused segments. Urate and PAH transport was also inhibited by bovine serum, human serum, Cohn-fractionated rabbit albumin, and rabbit γ-globulin, but not by Cohn-fractionated bovine serum albumin. α-Lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, derived from milk, also inhibited urate and PAH transport, but to a lesser extent than albumin and γ-globulin. The transport inhibitory effects of proteins were independent of their binding to urate and PAH. Unidirectional influx and the steady-state intracellular accumulation of urate and PAH in suspensions of proximal tubules were decreased by rabbit serum proteins, suggesting that these inhibitors act on the external face of the cells to diminish the uptake of the organic anions. These studies indicate that the principal plasma proteins (albumin and γ-globulin) significantly inhibit urate and PAH transporters in the basolateral membranes of S 2 proximal tubules. They suggest that circulating plasma proteins that can penetrate the basement membrane of proximal tubules may directly modulate the renal excretion of urate and PAH

  3. Plasticity of cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froemke, Robert C

    2015-07-08

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior.

  4. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  5. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

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    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  6. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  7. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  8. Proximal tubule proteins are significantly elevated in bladder urine of patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction and may represent novel biomarkers: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Claire; Harel, Miriam; Lynch, Miranda L; Herbst, Katherine W; Ferrer, Fernando A; Shapiro, Linda H

    2016-04-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the major cause of hydronephrosis in children and may lead to renal injury and early renal dysfunction. However, diagnosis of the degree of obstruction and severity of renal injury relies on invasive and often inconclusive renal scans. Biomarkers from voided urine that detect early renal injury are highly desirable because of their noninvasive collection and their potential to assist in earlier and more reliable diagnosis of the severity of obstruction. Early in response to UPJO, increased intrarenal pressure directly impacts the proximal tubule brush border. We hypothesize that single-pass, apically expressed proximal tubule brush border proteins will be shed into the urine early and rapidly and will be reliable noninvasive urinary biomarkers, providing the tools for a more reliable stratification of UPJO patients. We performed a prospective cohort study at Connecticut Children's Medical Center. Bladder urine samples from 12 UPJO patients were obtained prior to surgical intervention. Control urine samples were collected from healthy pediatric patients presenting with primary nocturnal enuresis. We determined levels of NGAL, KIM-1 (previously identified biomarkers), CD10, CD13, and CD26 (potentially novel biomarkers) by ELISA in control and experimental urine samples. Urinary creatinine levels were used to normalize the urinary protein levels measured by ELISA. Each of the proximal tubule proteins outperformed the previously published biomarkers. No differences in urinary NGAL and KIM-1 levels were observed between control and obstructed patients (p = 0.932 and p = 0.799, respectively). However, levels of CD10, CD13, and CD26 were significantly higher in the voided urine of obstructed individuals when compared with controls (p = 0.002, p = 0.024, and p = 0.007, respectively) (Figure). Targeted identification of reliable, noninvasive biomarkers of renal injury is critical to aid in diagnosing patients at risk, guiding

  9. Cortical activity in tinnitus patients and its modification by phonostimulation

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    Katarzyna Pawlak-Osińska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to observe spontaneous cortical activity and cortical activity modulated by tinnitus-matched sound in tinnitus patients and healthy subjects with no otoneurologic symptoms. METHOD: Data were prospectively collected from 50 tinnitus patients and 25 healthy subjects. Cortical activity was recorded in all subjects with eyes closed and open and during photostimulation, hyperventilation and acoustic stimulation using 19-channel quantitative electroencephalography. The sound applied in the tinnitus patients was individually matched with the ability to mask or equal the tinnitus. The maximal and mean amplitude of the delta, theta, alpha and beta waves and the type and amount of the pathologic EEG patterns were noted during each recording. Differences in cortical localization and the influence of sound stimuli on spontaneous cortical activity were evaluated between the groups. RESULTS: The tinnitus group exhibited decreased delta activity and increased alpha and beta activity. Hyperventilation increased the intensity of the differences. The tinnitus patients had more sharp-slow waves and increased slow wave amplitude. Sound stimuli modified the EEG recordings; the delta and beta wave amplitudes were increased, whereas the alpha-1 wave amplitude was decreased. Acoustic stimulation only slightly affected the temporal region. CONCLUSION: Cortical activity in the tinnitus patients clearly differed from that in healthy subjects, i.e., tinnitus is not a “phantom” sign. The changes in cortical activity included decreased delta wave amplitudes, increased alpha-1, beta-1 and beta-h wave amplitudes and pathologic patterns. Cortical activity modifications occurred predominantly in the temporal region. Acoustic stimulation affected spontaneous cortical activity only in tinnitus patients, and although the applied sound was individually matched, the pathologic changes were only slightly improved.

  10. Immortalization of canine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their seminiferous tubule transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jia; Wei, Yudong; Teng, Xin; Zhao, Shanting; Hua, Jinlian

    2018-04-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) are proven to provide good effects in numerous tissue engineering application and other cell-based therapies. However, the difficulty in the proliferation of ADSCs, known as the "Hayflick limit" in vitro, limits their clinical application. Here, we immortalized canine ADSCs (cADSCs) with SV40 gene and transplanted them into busulfan-induced seminiferous tubules of infertile mice. The proliferation of these immortalized cells was improved significantly. Then, cellular differentiation assays showed that the immortalized cADSCs could differentiate into three-germ-layer cells, osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis phenotypes, and primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs). In addition, the immortalized cADSCs can proliferate in the busulfan-induced seminiferous tubules of infertile mice. These findings confirmed that the immortalized cADSCs maintain the criteria of cADSCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Local pH domains regulate NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James L.; McDonough, Alicia A.; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2014-01-01

    The proximal tubule Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), located in the apical dense microvilli (brush border), plays a major role in the reabsorption of NaCl and water in the renal proximal tubule. In response to a rise in blood pressure NHE3 redistributes in the plane of the plasma membrane to the base of the brush border, where NHE3 activity is reduced. This NHE3 redistribution is assumed to provoke pressure natriuresis; however, it is unclear how NHE3 redistribution per se reduces NHE3 activity. To investigate if the distribution of NHE3 in the brush border can change the reabsorption rate, we constructed a spatiotemporal mathematical model of NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption across a proximal tubule cell and compared the model results with in vivo experiments in rats. The model predicts that when NHE3 is localized exclusively at the base of the brush border, it creates local pH microdomains that reduce NHE3 activity by >30%. We tested the model's prediction experimentally: the rat kidney cortex was loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and cells of the proximal tubule were imaged in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy before and after an increase of blood pressure by ∼50 mmHg. The experimental results supported the model by demonstrating that a rise of blood pressure induces the development of pH microdomains near the bottom of the brush border. These local changes in pH reduce NHE3 activity, which may explain the pressure natriuresis response to NHE3 redistribution. PMID:25298526

  12. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    OpenAIRE

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (C...

  13. Ribavirin exposure induces histopathological changes in the seminiferous tubules of testes in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, A.

    2013-01-01

    Study objectives: The objectives of the study are to describe and compare histopathological changes in the seminiferous tubules of testes of rat, with different doses of Ribavirin at different time intervals. Introduction: The chemical disturbances may affect a vast number of potential sites in male reproductive system as well as its complex hormonal regulation. Testicular toxicity may reduce the fertility of the male. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Ribavirin on the histological structure of seminiferous tubules in the testes of albino rats. Materials and Methods: Seventy two sexually mature adult male albino rats weighing 180-200gms were divided into four groups: A, B, C and D; each group having 18 rats. Ribavirin was administered intraperitoneally in different doses to these groups that were 20mg, 100mg and 200mg/kg body weight, while group A was control. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to three time points which were selected for sacrifice that were 20th, 40th and 60th day from the last exposure to drug. Six randomly selected rats from each group were sacrificed on every sacrifice time. Results and Conclusion: The seminiferous tubules with degenerative changes like appearance of vacuole and necrotic material were observed in comparison to control groups, on 20th day of sacrifice in all groups. In rats sacrificed on day 40th and 60th, the sign of recovery in the form of regeneration of seminiferous epithelium was observed that was more marked in low dose groups than high dose groups which showed late recovery. We conclude that ribavirin being used as antiviral drug induces reversible degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules of testes of albino rats. (author)

  14. Passive permeability of salicylic acid in renal proximal S2 and S3 tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatton, J.Y.; Roch-Ramel, F.

    1991-01-01

    The role of nonionic diffusion in the transport of salicylic acid across rabbit proximal S2 and S3 segments was investigated using the in vitro isolated perfused tubule technique. The [ 14 C] salicylic acid apparent reabsorptive permeability (P'I-b, 10(-5) cm/s) was measured at 19 degrees C with luminal solutions kept at different pH and bath maintained at pH 7.4. In S2 tubules, P'I-b was 25.0 +/- 3.5 when luminal pH was 6.0; P'I-b decreased to 8.1 +/- 1.4 and to 4.4 +/- 1.2 at a luminal pH of 6.5 and 7.0, respectively. In S3 tubules, P'I-b was 17.6 +/- 2.4, 5.3 +/- 1.1 and 3.4 +/- 1.1 at a luminal pH of 6.0, 6.5 and 7.0, respectively. There was a close correlation between P'I-b and the calculated proportion of nonionized salicylic acid present at each pH, indicating that only the nonionized molecule could diffuse in our conditions. We calculated the apparent permeability of nonionic salicylic acid and found 0.248 +/- 0.032 cm/s for S2 and 0.176 +/- 0.022 cm/s for S3 tubules. These calculated permeabilities were independent of pH

  15. Antioxidant Effects of Selenium on Seminiferous Tubules of Immature Mice Testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Kushki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The freezing of immature testis tissue and then the transplant of it can be considered as a major step in fertility preservation for young boys with cancer, the survival of animal generation exposed to extinction and cloning animalistic desirable species. One of the most prevalent of damages in during the freezing-thawing process is oxidative stress. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of selenium compound (Na2SeO3 on rate of seminiferous tubules injury in during of cryopreservation. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 8 BALB/c immature male mice (6 - 8 days old were randomly selected, and the testes removed surgically (n = 16. The testes divided into 2 groups: experimental group, control group (opposite testes. For each of the two experimental and control groups, two types of soluble (freezing solution and thawing solution were prepared. These solutions, which contain 2 mg/mL solution of Na2SeO3 and control solution, were prepared in the DMEM (Dulbecco’s modified eagle medium base medium. Of each group were 4 testes into fast freezing-thawing procedure and 4 testes were into slow freezing-thawing procedure. Then this testis for analyzing injury, after preparatory process, was stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results: At the slow freezing-thawing procedure, seminiferous tubules injury significantly reduced in experimental group compared to control group. At the fast freezing-thawing procedure, seminiferous tubules injury significantly reduced in experimental group compared with of control group. Conclusions: It seems that Se due to its antioxidant properties, the harmful effects of freezing-thawing process reduces and protects seminiferous tubules from oxidative injury.

  16. Classification of Cortical Brain Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, radiological, and genetic classifications of 113 cases of malformations of cortical development (MCD were evaluated at the Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  17. Minicollagen-15, a novel minicollagen isolated from Hydra, forms tubule structures in nematocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Patrizia; Meier, Sebastian; Gross, Thomas; Hobmayer, Bert; Grzesiek, Stephan; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Holstein, Thomas W; Ozbek, Suat

    2008-02-29

    Minicollagens constitute a family of unusually short collagen molecules isolated from cnidarians. They are restricted to the nematocyst, a cylindrical explosive organelle serving in defense and capture of prey. The nematocyst capsule contains a long tubule inside of its matrix, which is expelled and everted during an ultrafast discharge process. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a novel minicollagen in Hydra, designated minicollagen-15 (NCol-15). NCol-15, like NCol-3 and NCol-4, shows deviations from the canonical cysteine pattern in its terminal cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Minicollagens share common domain architectures with a central collagen sequence flanked by polyproline stretches and short N- and C-terminal CRDs. The CRDs are involved in the formation of a highly resistant cysteine network, which constitutes the basic structure of the nematocyst capsule. Unlike NCol-1, which is part of the capsule wall, NCol-15 is localized to tubules, arguing for a functional differentiation of minicollagens within the nematocyst architecture. NMR analysis of the altered C-terminal CRD of NCol-15 showed a novel disulfide-linked structure within the cysteine-containing region exhibiting similar folding kinetics and stability as the canonical CRDs. Our data provide evidence for evolutionary diversification among minicollagens, which probably facilitated alterations in the morphology of the nematocyst wall and tubule.

  18. Effects of bioactive glass with and without mesoporous structures on desensitization in dentinal tubule occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Kung, Jung-Chang [Department of Family Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Chen, Cheng-Hwei [School of Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Yu-Cheng [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chi-Jen, E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chien, Chi-Sheng, E-mail: jannie.gissing@msa.hinet.net [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Chi Mei Foundation Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Bioactive glass (BG) is a potential material for treating dentin hypersensitivity due to its high ability of dissolution. In this study, conventional BG and BG with well-ordered mesopore structures (MBG) were applied for dentinal tubule occlusion. We used X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) to investigate the physiochemical properties and the dentinal tubule occlusion ability of BG and MBG groups. The results showed that the major crystallite phase of MBG and BG agents was monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. MBG pastes, mixed with 30 and 40 wt% phosphoric acid hardening solutions, had the ability to create a penetration depth greater than 50 μm. These results showed that BG with mesoporous structures turned the pastes mixed with suitable phosphoric acid solution into a material with great ability for occluding dentinal tubules; it has a short reaction time and good operability, and these agents have better potential for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity than BG without mesoporous structures.

  19. The Lowe syndrome protein OCRL1 is required for endocytosis in the zebrafish pronephric tubule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Oltrabella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease are caused by mutation of the inositol 5-phosphatase OCRL1. Despite our increased understanding of the cellular functions of OCRL1, the underlying basis for the renal tubulopathy seen in both human disorders, of which a hallmark is low molecular weight proteinuria, is currently unknown. Here, we show that deficiency in OCRL1 causes a defect in endocytosis in the zebrafish pronephric tubule, a model for the mammalian renal tubule. This coincides with a reduction in levels of the scavenger receptor megalin and its accumulation in endocytic compartments, consistent with reduced recycling within the endocytic pathway. We also observe reduced numbers of early endocytic compartments and enlarged vacuolar endosomes in the sub-apical region of pronephric cells. Cell polarity within the pronephric tubule is unaffected in mutant embryos. The OCRL1-deficient embryos exhibit a mild ciliogenesis defect, but this cannot account for the observed impairment of endocytosis. Catalytic activity of OCRL1 is required for renal tubular endocytosis and the endocytic defect can be rescued by suppression of PIP5K. These results indicate for the first time that OCRL1 is required for endocytic trafficking in vivo, and strongly support the hypothesis that endocytic defects are responsible for the renal tubulopathy in Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Moreover, our results reveal PIP5K as a potential therapeutic target for Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease.

  20. 50 Years of renal physiology from one man and the perfused tubule: Maurice B. Burg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kirk L; Moore, Antoni B

    2016-08-01

    Technical advancements in research techniques in science are made in slow increments. Even so, large advances from insight and hard work of an individual with a single technique can have astonishing ramifications. Here, we examine the impact of Dr. Maurice B. Burg and the isolated perfused renal tubule technique and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication by Dr. Burg and his colleagues of their landmark paper in the American Journal of Physiology in 1966. In this study, we have taken a scientific visualization approach to study the scientific contributions of Dr. Burg and the isolated perfused tubule preparation as determining research impact by the number of research students, postdoctoral fellows, visiting scientists, and national and international collaborators. Additionally, we have examined the research collaborations (first and second generation scientists), established the migrational visualization of the first generation scientists who worked directly with Dr. Burg, quantified the metrics indices, identified and quantified the network of coauthorship of the first generation scientists with their second generation links, and determined the citations analyses of outputs of Dr. Burg and/or his first generation collaborators as coauthors. We also review the major advances in kidney physiology that have been made with the isolated perfused tubule technique. Finally, we are all waiting for the discoveries that the isolated perfused preparation technique will bring during the next 50 years. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the "zone of dead bacteria" (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules.

  2. Visualizing the origins of selfish de novo mutations in individual seminiferous tubules of human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Geoffrey J; McGowan, Simon J; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Verrill, Clare; Goriely, Anne; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2016-03-01

    De novo point mutations arise predominantly in the male germline and increase in frequency with age, but it has not previously been possible to locate specific, identifiable mutations directly within the seminiferous tubules of human testes. Using microdissection of tubules exhibiting altered expression of the spermatogonial markers MAGEA4, FGFR3, and phospho-AKT, whole genome amplification, and DNA sequencing, we establish an in situ strategy for discovery and analysis of pathogenic de novo mutations. In 14 testes from men aged 39-90 y, we identified 11 distinct gain-of-function mutations in five genes (fibroblast growth factor receptors FGFR2 and FGFR3, tyrosine phosphatase PTPN11, and RAS oncogene homologs HRAS and KRAS) from 16 of 22 tubules analyzed; all mutations have known associations with severe diseases, ranging from congenital or perinatal lethal disorders to somatically acquired cancers. These results support proposed selfish selection of spermatogonial mutations affecting growth factor receptor-RAS signaling, highlight its prevalence in older men, and enable direct visualization of the microscopic anatomy of elongated mutant clones.

  3. Cadmium transport by the gut and Malpighian tubules of Chironomus riparius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Erin M.; Pierce, Laura M.; Gillis, Patricia L.; Wood, Chris M.; O'Donnell, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Many aquatic insects are very insensitive to cadmium in short-term laboratory studies. LC50 values for larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius are over 25,000 times the Criterion Maximum Concentration in the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA (2000)) species sensitivity distribution (SSD). Excretion or sequestration of cadmium may contribute to insensitivity and we have therefore examined cadmium transport by isolated guts and renal tissues of C. riparius larvae. Regional differences of Cd transport along the gut were identified using a Cd 2+ -selective microelectrode in conjunction with the Scanning Ion-Selective Electrode Technique (SIET). Cd is transported into the anterior midgut (AMG) cells from the lumen and out of the cells into the hemolymph. The transport of Cd from the gut lumen to the hemolymph exposes other tissues such as the nervous system and muscles to Cd. The gut segments which remove Cd from the hemolymph at the highest rate are the posterior midgut (PMG) and the ileum. In addition, assays using an isolated Malpighian (renal) tubule preparation have shown that the Malpighian tubules (MT) both sequester and secrete Cd. For larvae bathed in 10 μmol l -1 Cd, the tubules can secrete the entire hemolymph burden of Cd in ∼15 h.

  4. Effects of bioactive glass with and without mesoporous structures on desensitization in dentinal tubule occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Kung, Jung-Chang; Chen, Cheng-Hwei; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Chi-Jen; Chien, Chi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) is a potential material for treating dentin hypersensitivity due to its high ability of dissolution. In this study, conventional BG and BG with well-ordered mesopore structures (MBG) were applied for dentinal tubule occlusion. We used X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) to investigate the physiochemical properties and the dentinal tubule occlusion ability of BG and MBG groups. The results showed that the major crystallite phase of MBG and BG agents was monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. MBG pastes, mixed with 30 and 40 wt% phosphoric acid hardening solutions, had the ability to create a penetration depth greater than 50 μm. These results showed that BG with mesoporous structures turned the pastes mixed with suitable phosphoric acid solution into a material with great ability for occluding dentinal tubules; it has a short reaction time and good operability, and these agents have better potential for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity than BG without mesoporous structures.

  5. Tubule-Derived Wnts Are Required for Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Fu, Haiyan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Ke; Min, Yali; Xiao, Liangxiang; Lin, Lin; Bastacky, Sheldon I; Liu, Youhua

    2017-08-01

    Cell-cell communication via Wnt ligands is necessary in regulating embryonic development and has been implicated in CKD. Because Wnt ligands are ubiquitously expressed, the exact cellular source of the Wnts involved in CKD remains undefined. To address this issue, we generated two conditional knockout mouse lines in which Wntless (Wls), a dedicated cargo receptor that is obligatory for Wnt secretion, was selectively ablated in tubular epithelial cells or interstitial fibroblasts. Blockade of Wnt secretion by genetic deletion of Wls in renal tubules markedly inhibited myofibroblast activation and reduced renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction. This effect associated with decreased activation of β -catenin and downstream gene expression and preserved tubular epithelial integrity. In contrast, fibroblast-specific deletion of Wls exhibited little effect on the severity of renal fibrosis after obstructive or ischemia-reperfusion injury. In vitro , incubation of normal rat kidney fibroblasts with tubule-derived Wnts promoted fibroblast proliferation and activation. Furthermore, compared with kidney specimens from patients without CKD, biopsy specimens from patients with CKD also displayed increased expression of multiple Wnt proteins, predominantly in renal tubular epithelium. These results illustrate that tubule-derived Wnts have an essential role in promoting fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis via epithelial-mesenchymal communication. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Deep-apical tubules: dynamic lipid-raft microdomains in the brush-border region of enterocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Pedersen, Jens; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte

    2003-01-01

    microdomains. Deep-apical tubules were positioned close to the actin rootlets of adjacent microvilli in the terminal web region, which had a diameter of 50-100 nm, and penetrated up to 1 microm into the cytoplasm. Markers for transcytosis, IgA and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, as well as the resident...... lipid raft-containing compartments, but little is otherwise known about these raft microdomains. We therefore studied in closer detail apical lipid-raft compartments in enterocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and biochemical analyses. Novel membrane structures, deep-apical tubules, were visualized...... brush-border enzyme aminopeptidase N, were present in these deep-apical tubules. We propose that deep-apical tubules are a specialized lipid-raft microdomain in the brush-border region functioning as a hub in membrane trafficking at the brush border. In addition, the sensitivity to cholesterol depletion...

  7. Auto-regeneration of mice testicle seminiferous tubules due to malnutrition based on stem cells mobilization using honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erma Safitri

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Results of this study revealed a significantly different of C34 and CD45 expressions between groups, also an increase SSCs expression and testicle seminiferous tubules cells regeneration as well.

  8. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both

  9. Spatial integration and cortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C D; Das, A; Ito, M; Kapadia, M; Westheimer, G

    1996-01-23

    Cells in adult primary visual cortex are capable of integrating information over much larger portions of the visual field than was originally thought. Moreover, their receptive field properties can be altered by the context within which local features are presented and by changes in visual experience. The substrate for both spatial integration and cortical plasticity is likely to be found in a plexus of long-range horizontal connections, formed by cortical pyramidal cells, which link cells within each cortical area over distances of 6-8 mm. The relationship between horizontal connections and cortical functional architecture suggests a role in visual segmentation and spatial integration. The distribution of lateral interactions within striate cortex was visualized with optical recording, and their functional consequences were explored by using comparable stimuli in human psychophysical experiments and in recordings from alert monkeys. They may represent the substrate for perceptual phenomena such as illusory contours, surface fill-in, and contour saliency. The dynamic nature of receptive field properties and cortical architecture has been seen over time scales ranging from seconds to months. One can induce a remapping of the topography of visual cortex by making focal binocular retinal lesions. Shorter-term plasticity of cortical receptive fields was observed following brief periods of visual stimulation. The mechanisms involved entailed, for the short-term changes, altering the effectiveness of existing cortical connections, and for the long-term changes, sprouting of axon collaterals and synaptogenesis. The mutability of cortical function implies a continual process of calibration and normalization of the perception of visual attributes that is dependent on sensory experience throughout adulthood and might further represent the mechanism of perceptual learning.

  10. Spatial integration and cortical dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, C D; Das, A; Ito, M; Kapadia, M; Westheimer, G

    1996-01-01

    Cells in adult primary visual cortex are capable of integrating information over much larger portions of the visual field than was originally thought. Moreover, their receptive field properties can be altered by the context within which local features are presented and by changes in visual experience. The substrate for both spatial integration and cortical plasticity is likely to be found in a plexus of long-range horizontal connections, formed by cortical pyramidal cells, which link cells wi...

  11. Destruction and regeneration of seminiferous tubules after local x-irradiation of testes of the adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnosova, T.R.; Rajtsina, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    It was established that the local X-irradiation (1000 R) of testes of the adult rats results in a total destruction of seminiferous tubules. The restitution of the organ structure proceeds via formation of new seminiferous tubules in which spermatogenic epithelium later develops. Rete testis and germ cells preserved in its epithelium from embryogenesis are a source of regeneration material. The results obtained favour the suggestion about the dynamic structure of mammalian testis

  12. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco meses de edad, atendido en el Hospital Pediátrico Provincial “Mártires de Las Tunas” con este diagnóstico, quien ingresó en el servicio de miscelánea B por una celulitis facial. Presentaba aumento de volumen en la región geniana izquierda, febrícola e inapetencia. Se impuso tratamiento con cefazolina y se egresó a los siete días. Acudió nuevamente con tumefacción blanda y difusa de ambas hemicaras, irritabilidad y fiebre. Se interconsultó con cirugía maxilofacial, se indicaron estudios sanguíneos y radiológicos. Se diagnosticó como enfermedad de Caffey, basado en la edad del niño, tumefacción facial sin signos inflamatorios agudos e hiperostosis en ambas corticales mandibulares a la radiografía AP mandíbula; unido a anemia ligera, leucocitosis y eritrosedimentación acelerada. El paciente se trató sintomáticamente y con antinflamatorios no esteroideos. Esta rara entidad se debe tener presente en casos de niños y lactantes con irritabilidad y fiebre inespecífica

  13. The cortical signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Agosta

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the pattern of regional cortical thickness in patients with non-familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and to investigate whether cortical thinning is associated with disease progression rate. Cortical thickness analysis was performed in 44 ALS patients and 26 healthy controls. Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models. The discriminatory ability of MRI variables in distinguishing patients from controls was estimated using the Concordance Statistics (C-statistic within logistic regression analyses. Correlations between cortical thickness measures and disease progression rate were tested using the Pearson coefficient. Relative to controls, ALS patients showed a bilateral cortical thinning of the primary motor, prefrontal and ventral frontal cortices, cingulate gyrus, insula, superior and inferior temporal and parietal regions, and medial and lateral occipital areas. There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls. The mean cortical thickness of the sensorimotor cortices distinguished patients with ALS from controls (C-statistic ≥ 0.74. Cortical thinning of the left sensorimotor cortices was related to a faster clinical progression (r = -0.33, p = 0.03. Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS. Cortical thinning of the precentral gyrus might offer a marker of upper motor neuron involvement and disease progression.

  14. The cortical signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Valsasina, Paola; Riva, Nilo; Copetti, Massimiliano; Messina, Maria Josè; Prelle, Alessandro; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the pattern of regional cortical thickness in patients with non-familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to investigate whether cortical thinning is associated with disease progression rate. Cortical thickness analysis was performed in 44 ALS patients and 26 healthy controls. Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models. The discriminatory ability of MRI variables in distinguishing patients from controls was estimated using the Concordance Statistics (C-statistic) within logistic regression analyses. Correlations between cortical thickness measures and disease progression rate were tested using the Pearson coefficient. Relative to controls, ALS patients showed a bilateral cortical thinning of the primary motor, prefrontal and ventral frontal cortices, cingulate gyrus, insula, superior and inferior temporal and parietal regions, and medial and lateral occipital areas. There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls. The mean cortical thickness of the sensorimotor cortices distinguished patients with ALS from controls (C-statistic ≥ 0.74). Cortical thinning of the left sensorimotor cortices was related to a faster clinical progression (r = -0.33, p = 0.03). Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS. Cortical thinning of the precentral gyrus might offer a marker of upper motor neuron involvement and disease progression.

  15. Cortical tremor: a variant of cortical reflex myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, A; Kakigi, R; Funai, N; Neshige, R; Kuroda, Y; Shibasaki, H

    1990-10-01

    Two patients with action tremor that was thought to originate in the cerebral cortex showed fine shivering-like finger twitching provoked mainly by action and posture. Surface EMG showed relatively rhythmic discharge at a rate of about 9 Hz, which resembled essential tremor. However, electrophysiologic studies revealed giant somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) with enhanced long-loop reflex and premovement cortical spike by the jerk-locked averaging method. Treatment with beta-blocker showed no effect, but anticonvulsants such as clonazepam, valproate, and primidone were effective to suppress the tremor and the amplitude of SEPs. We call this involuntary movement "cortical tremor," which is in fact a variant of cortical reflex myoclonus.

  16. Can zero-hour cortical biopsy predict early graft outcomes after living donor renal transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Ranjeet Singh; Mehta, Nisarg; Mehta, Sony Bhaskar; Babu, Manas; Bansal, Devesh; Pillai, Biju S; Sam, Mohan P; Krishnamoorthy, Hariharan

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify relevance of subclinical pathological findings in the kidneys of living donors and correlate these with early graft renal function. This was a prospective study on 84 living donor kidney transplant recipients over a period of two years. In all the donors, cortical wedge biopsy was taken and sent for assessment of glomerular, mesangial, and tubule status. The graft function of patients with normal histology was compared with those of abnormal histological findings at one, three, and six months, and one year post-surgery. Most abnormal histological findings were of mild degree. Glomerulosclerosis (GS, 25%), interstitial fibrosis (IF, 13%), acute tubular necrosis (ATN 5%), and focal tubal atrophy (FTA, 5%) were the commonly observed pathological findings in zero-hour biopsies. Only those donors who had histological changes of IF and ATN showed progressive deterioration of renal function at one month, three months, six months, and one year post-transplantation. In donors with other histological changes, no significant effect on graft function was observed. Zero-hour cortical biopsy gave us an idea of the general status of the donor kidney and presence or absence of subclinical pathological lesions. A mild degree of subclinical and pathological findings on zero-hour biopsy did not affect early graft renal function in living donor kidney transplantation. Zero-hour cortical biopsy could also help in discriminating donor-derived lesions from de novo alterations in the kidney that could happen subsequently.

  17. Far infrared radiation promotes rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and functional characteristics, and protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, I-Ni; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Young, Tai-Horng

    2017-01-01

    Far infrared radiation, a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum, is beneficial for long-term tissue healing, anti-inflammatory effects, growth promotion, sleep modulation, acceleration of microcirculation, and pain relief. We investigated if far infrared radiation is beneficial for renal proximal tubule cell cultivation and renal tissue engineering. We observed the effects of far infrared radiation on renal proximal tubules cells, including its effects on cell proliferation, gene and protein expression, and viability. We also examined the protective effects of far infrared radiation against cisplatin, a nephrotoxic agent, using the human proximal tubule cell line HK-2. We found that daily exposure to far infrared radiation for 30 min significantly increased rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation in vitro, as assessed by MTT assay. Far infrared radiation was not only beneficial to renal proximal tubule cell proliferation, it also increased the expression of ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1, as determined by western blotting. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that far infrared radiation enhanced CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK expression. In the proximal tubule cell line HK-2, far infrared radiation protected against cisplatin-mediated nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis. Renal proximal tubule cell cultivation with far infrared radiation exposure resulted in better cell proliferation, significantly higher ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1 expression, and significantly enhanced expression of CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK. These results suggest that far infrared radiation improves cell proliferation and differentiation. In HK-2 cells, far infrared radiation mediated protective effects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis, as indicated by flow cytometry and caspase-3 assay.

  18. The proximal straight tubule (PST) basolateral cell membrane water channel: selectivity characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, A M; González, E; Echevarría, M; Hernández, C S; Whittembury, G

    1995-02-01

    Proximal straight tubules (PST) were dissected from rabbit kidneys, held by crimping pipettes in a chamber and bathed in a buffered isosmotic (295 mOsm/kg) solution containing 200 mM mannitol (MBS). Changes in tubule diameter were monitored on line with an inverted microscope, TV camera and image processor. The PST were then challenged for 20 sec with MBS made 35 mOsm/kg hyperosmotic by addition of either NaCl, KCl, mannitol (M), glycerol (G), ethylene glycol (E), glycine (g), urea (U), acetamide (A) or formamide (F). With NaCl, KCl, M, G, E, g, U, and A, tubules shrunk osmometrically within 0.5 sec and remained shrunk for as long as 20 sec without recovering their original volume (sometimes A showed some recovery). PST barely shrunk with F and quickly recovered their original volume. The permeability coefficients were 0 microns/sec (NaCl, M, g, E and U), 1 micron/sec (A), 84 microns/sec (F) and 0.02 micron/sec (G). The reflection coefficients sigma = 1.0 (NaCl, KCl, M, G, E, g and U), 0.95 (A) and 0.62 (F). Similar sigma values were obtained by substituting 200 mOsm/kg M in MBS by either NaCl, KCl, G, E, g, U, a or F. The olive oil/water partition coefficients are 5 (M), 15 (U), 85 (A) and 75 (F) (all x 10(-5)). Thus, part of F permeates the cell membrane through the lipid bilayer. The probing molecules van der Waals diameters are 7.4 x 8.2 x 12.0 (M), 3.6 x 5.2 x 5.4 (U), 3.8 x 5.2 x 5.4 (A) and (3.4 x 4.5 x 5.4 (F) A.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Reconstruction of mouse testicular cellular microenvironments in long-term seminiferous tubule culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho-Antti Mäkelä

    Full Text Available Research on spermatogonia is hampered by complex architecture of the seminiferous tubule, poor viability of testicular tissue ex vivo and lack of physiologically relevant long-term culture systems. Therefore there is a need for an in vitro model that would enable long term survival and propagation of spermatogonia. We aimed at the most simplified approach to enable all different cell types within the seminiferous tubules to contribute to the creation of a niche for spermatogonia. In the present study we describe the establishment of a co-culture of mouse testicular cells that is based on proliferative and migratory activity of seminiferous tubule cells and does not involve separation, purification or differential plating of individual cell populations. The co-culture is composed of the constituents of testicular stem cell niche: Sertoli cells [identified by expression of Wilm's tumour antigen 1 (WT1 and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF], peritubular myoid cells (expressing alpha smooth muscle actin, αSMA and spermatogonia [expressing MAGE-B4, PLZF (promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger, LIN28, Gpr125 (G protein-coupled receptor 125, CD9, c-Kit and Nanog], and can be maintained for at least five weeks. GDNF was found in the medium at a sufficient concentration to support proliferating spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs that were able to start spermatogenic differentiation after transplantation to an experimentally sterile recipient testis. Gdnf mRNA levels were elevated by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH which shows that the Sertoli cells in the co-culture respond to physiological stimuli. After approximately 2-4 weeks of culture a spontaneous formation of cord-like structures was monitored. These structures can be more than 10 mm in length and branch. They are formed by peritubular myoid cells, Sertoli cells, fibroblasts and spermatogonia as assessed by gene expression profiling. In conclusion, we have managed to

  20. Horizontal integration and cortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C D

    1992-07-01

    We have discussed several results that lead to a view that cells in the visual system are endowed with dynamic properties, influenced by context, expectation, and long-term modifications of the cortical network. These observations will be important for understanding how neuronal ensembles produce a system that perceives, remembers, and adapts to injury. The advantage to being able to observe changes at early stages in a sensory pathway is that one may be able to understand the way in which neuronal ensembles encode and represent images at the level of their receptive field properties, of cortical topographies, and of the patterns of connections between cells participating in a network.

  1. Caveolin-3 is associated with the T-tubules of mature skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Ploug, Thorkil

    1999-01-01

    Caveolae are abundant in skeletal muscle and their coat contains a specific isoform of caveolin, caveolin-3. It has been suggested that during muscle development, caveolin-3 is associated with the T-tubules, but that in adult muscle it is found on the plasma membrane only. We have studied...... the distribution of caveolin-3 in single skeletal muscle fibers from adult rat soleus by confocal immunofluorescence and by immunogold electron microscopy. We found that caveolin-3 occurs at the highest density on the plasma membrane but is also present in the core of the fibers, at the I-band/A-band interface...

  2. Acute hypotension induced by aortic clamp vs. PTH provokes distinct proximal tubule Na+ transporter redistribution patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Patrick K K; Yang, Li E; Lin, Harrison W

    2004-01-01

    . This study aimed to determine the effects of acute hypotension, induced by aortic clamp or by high-dose PTH (100 microg PTH/kg), on renal hemodynamics and proximal tubule Na/H exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and type IIa Na-P(i) cotransporter protein (NaPi2) distribution. Subcellular distribution was analyzed...... clearance. There was, however, no significant change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or subcellular distribution of NHE3 and NaPi2. In contrast, high-dose PTH rapidly (

  3. Automated tubule nuclei quantification and correlation with oncotype DX risk categories in ER+ breast cancer whole slide images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Bucheli, David; Janowczyk, Andrew; Romero, Eduardo; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-03-01

    Early stage estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BCa) treatment is based on the presumed aggressiveness and likelihood of cancer recurrence. The primary conundrum in treatment and management of early stage ER+ BCa is identifying which of these cancers are candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy and which patients will respond to hormonal therapy alone. This decision could spare some patients the inherent toxicity associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Oncotype DX (ODX) and other gene expression tests have allowed for distinguishing the more aggressive ER+ BCa requiring adjuvant chemotherapy from the less aggressive cancers benefiting from hormonal therapy alone. However these gene expression tests tend to be expensive, tissue destructive and require physical shipping of tissue blocks for the test to be done. Interestingly breast cancer grade in these tumors has been shown to be highly correlated with the ODX risk score. Unfortunately studies have shown that Bloom-Richardson (BR) grade determined by pathologists can be highly variable. One of the constituent categories in BR grading is the quantification of tubules. The goal of this study was to develop a deep learning neural network classifier to automatically identify tubule nuclei from whole slide images (WSI) of ER+ BCa, the hypothesis being that the ratio of tubule nuclei to overall number of nuclei would correlate with the corresponding ODX risk categories. The performance of the tubule nuclei deep learning strategy was evaluated with a set of 61 high power fields. Under a 5-fold cross-validation, the average precision and recall measures were 0:72 and 0:56 respectively. In addition, the correlation with the ODX risk score was assessed in a set of 7513 high power fields extracted from 174 WSI, each from a different patient (At most 50 high power fields per patient study were used). The ratio between the number of tubule and non-tubule nuclei was computed for each WSI. The results suggests that for BCa

  4. Is cortical bone hip? What determines cortical bone properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Sol

    2007-07-01

    Increased bone turnover may produce a disturbance in bone structure which may result in fracture. In cortical bone, both reduction in turnover and increase in hip bone mineral density (BMD) may be necessary to decrease hip fracture risk and may require relatively greater proportionate changes than for trabecular bone. It should also be noted that increased porosity produces disproportionate reduction in bone strength, and studies have shown that increased cortical porosity and decreased cortical thickness are associated with hip fracture. Continued studies for determining the causes of bone strength and deterioration show distinct promise. Osteocyte viability has been observed to be an indicator of bone strength, with viability as the result of maintaining physiological levels of loading and osteocyte apoptosis as the result of a decrease in loading. Osteocyte apoptosis and decrease are major factors in the bone loss and fracture associated with aging. Both the osteocyte and periosteal cell layer are assuming greater importance in the process of maintaining skeletal integrity as our knowledge of these cells expand, as well being a target for pharmacological agents to reduce fracture especially in cortical bone. The bisphosphonate alendronate has been seen to have a positive effect on cortical bone by allowing customary periosteal growth, while reducing the rate of endocortical bone remodeling and slowing bone loss from the endocortical surface. Risedronate treatment effects were attributed to decrease in bone resorption and thus a decrease in fracture risk. Ibandronate has been seen to increase BMD as the spine and femur as well as a reduced incidence of new vertebral fractures and non vertebral on subset post hoc analysis. And treatment with the anabolic agent PTH(1-34) documented modeling and remodelling of quiescent and active bone surfaces. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) plays a key role in bone destruction, and the human monoclonal

  5. Spectrotemporal dynamics of auditory cortical synaptic receptive field plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froemke, Robert C; Martins, Ana Raquel O

    2011-09-01

    The nervous system must dynamically represent sensory information in order for animals to perceive and operate within a complex, changing environment. Receptive field plasticity in the auditory cortex allows cortical networks to organize around salient features of the sensory environment during postnatal development, and then subsequently refine these representations depending on behavioral context later in life. Here we review the major features of auditory cortical receptive field plasticity in young and adult animals, focusing on modifications to frequency tuning of synaptic inputs. Alteration in the patterns of acoustic input, including sensory deprivation and tonal exposure, leads to rapid adjustments of excitatory and inhibitory strengths that collectively determine the suprathreshold tuning curves of cortical neurons. Long-term cortical plasticity also requires co-activation of subcortical neuromodulatory control nuclei such as the cholinergic nucleus basalis, particularly in adults. Regardless of developmental stage, regulation of inhibition seems to be a general mechanism by which changes in sensory experience and neuromodulatory state can remodel cortical receptive fields. We discuss recent findings suggesting that the microdynamics of synaptic receptive field plasticity unfold as a multi-phase set of distinct phenomena, initiated by disrupting the balance between excitation and inhibition, and eventually leading to wide-scale changes to many synapses throughout the cortex. These changes are coordinated to enhance the representations of newly-significant stimuli, possibly for improved signal processing and language learning in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Adhesive Secretion from Cuvierian Tubules of Sea Cucumber Holothuria forskåli (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Baranowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea cucumber Holothuria forskåli possesses a specialized system called Cuvierian tubules. During mechanical stimulation white filaments (tubules are expelled and become sticky upon contact with any object. We isolated a protein with adhesive properties from protein extracts of Cuvierian tubules from H. forskåli. This protein was identified by antibodies against recombinant precollagen D which is located in the byssal threads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. To find out the optimal procedure for extraction and purification, the identified protein was isolated by several methods, including electroelution, binding to glass beads, immunoprecipitation, and gel filtration. Antibodies raised against the isolated protein were used for localization of the adhesive protein in Cuvierian tubules. Immunostaining and immunogold electron microscopical studies revealed the strongest immunoreactivity in the mesothelium; this tissue layer is involved in adhesion. Adhesion of Cuvierian tubule extracts was measured on the surface of various materials. The extracted protein showed the strongest adhesion to Teflon surface. Increased adhesion was observed in the presence of potassium and EDTA, while cadmium caused a decrease in adhesion. Addition of antibodies and trypsin abolished the adhesive properties of the extract.

  7. Diglycolic acid inhibits succinate dehydrogenase activity in human proximal tubule cells leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Greg M; Dunning, Cody L; Conrad, Taylor; Hitt, Mallory J; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2013-08-29

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) is a solvent used in consumer products allowing the increased risk for consumer exposure. DEG metabolism produces two primary metabolites, 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2-HEAA) and diglycolic acid (DGA). DGA has been shown to be the toxic metabolite responsible for the proximal tubule cell necrosis seen in DEG poisoning. The mechanism of DGA toxicity in the proximal tubule cell is not yet known. The chemical structure of DGA is very similar to citric acid cycle intermediates. Studies were designed to assess whether its mechanism of toxicity involves disruption of cellular metabolic pathways resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. First, DGA preferentially inhibited succinate dehydrogenase, including human kidney cell enzyme, but had no effect on other citric acid cycle enzyme activities. DGA produces a cellular ATP depletion that precedes cell death. Human proximal tubule (HPT) cells, pre-treated with increasing DGA concentrations, showed significantly decreased oxygen consumption. DGA did not increase lactate levels, indicating no effect on glycolytic activity. DGA increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in HPT cells in a concentration and time dependent manner. These results indicate that DGA produced proximal tubule cell dysfunction by specific inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase and oxygen consumption. Disruption of these processes results in decreased energy production and proximal tubule cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transport of water in proximal kidney tubules from whole tubules to single channels: length and section of the selectivity filter of aquaporin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittembury, G; González, E; Hernández, C S; Gutiérrez, A M; Echevarría, M

    1997-06-27

    Proximal straight tubule (PST) were dissected from rabbit kidneys, held with crimping pipettes in a chamber bathed in a buffered mannitol isosmotic solution (MBS, 295 mOsm/kg). Tubule cell volume changes with time (dV/Adt) after steps in MBS osmolality (delta Cs) were monitored on line with an inverted microscope, a TV camera and an image processor. Reflection coefficients sigma and osmotic permeability coefficients, Pos, for several solutes were measured using two methods. Method 1: sigma was calculated from the delta Csiso of impermeant and permeant solutes at which (dV/Adt)t-->0 = 0 (i.e., by a null point method). It is denoted as sigma 1. sigma 1 = 1.00 for mannitol (M), raffinose (R), sucrose (S), glycerol (G), acetamide (A) and urea (U). With formamide (F), sigma 1, Formamide = 0.62 +/- 0.05. These findings confirm our previous value of dp = 4.5 A for the diameter of the selectivity filter of the basolateral PST cell membrane water channel AQP1. Method 2: PST were exposed for 20 s to MBS made hyperosmotic by addition of a delta Cs of 35 mOsm/kg of R, S, M, G, A and U. Cells shrunk within 500 ms of t = 0 to their osmometric volume and remained shrunk for the 20 s of the osmotic challenge. Pos was measured from the shrinking curves. P(os) = 3000 +/- 25 microns/s with R, S, M, G, A and U. Method 2 also allowed to calculate sigma, denoted as sigma 2. sigma 2 = 1.00 for R, S, M, G, A and U. By contrast, the shrinking curve produced by a delta Cs of 35 mOsm/kg F was 1/5th to 1/6th slower and smaller (i.e., subosmometric) than that produced by a delta Cs of 35 mOsm/kg R, S, M, G, A and U. Furthermore, with F cells did not remain shrunk but recovered their original volume within 3 s. P(os) (measured with F) is denoted as P(os)*, P(os)* = 480 +/- 30 microns/s. sigma 2, Formamide = 0.16 +/- 0.01. Use of sigma 1, sigma 2 and P(os)* values in Hill's equations for the bimodal theory of osmosis leads to n = 2-9. Where n is the number of water molecules single filling

  9. Effect of Tamoxifen on Seminiferous Tubules Structure during Pregnancy in Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Soleimani Rad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tamoxifen is a nonsteroidal drug which mainly treats breast cancer. It is also applied for stimulation of ovulation and remedy of infertility. Regarding the tamoxifen binding to estrogen receptors and the possible role of estrogens in spermatogenesis, the present study aimed to histologically evaluate spermatogenesis in the seminiferous ducts of mice, whose mothers had received tamoxifen during pregnancy. Methods: In the present study, 30 female and 15 male mice of NMRI race were selected for mating. Since 13th day of pregnancy, the experimental group received tamoxifen with the dosage of 5 mg/kg intra-peritoneally for 7 days, wherease the control group received normal saline. After childbirth of the mated mice, male infants were selected and monitored in the standard laboratory conditions. After reaching the age of puberty (6-8Weeks, adult mice were sacrificed by the cervical dislocation, and the testes were removed for histological evaluation of spermatogenesis. After routine histological processing, the samples were studied by the light microscope. Results: Histological studies showed that spermatogenic and Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubules in control and experimental groups were significantly different, though no difference was observed in the number of Leydig cells in the both groups. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that tamoxifen exposure during development can cause histological changes in the seminiferous tubules, which can lead to infertility in the male rat.

  10. A bioartificial renal tubule device embedding human renal stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Giovanna Sciancalepore

    Full Text Available We present a bio-inspired renal microdevice that resembles the in vivo structure of a kidney proximal tubule. For the first time, a population of tubular adult renal stem/progenitor cells (ARPCs was embedded into a microsystem to create a bioengineered renal tubule. These cells have both multipotent differentiation abilities and an extraordinary capacity for injured renal cell regeneration. Therefore, ARPCs may be considered a promising tool for promoting regenerative processes in the kidney to treat acute and chronic renal injury. Here ARPCs were grown to confluence and exposed to a laminar fluid shear stress into the chip, in order to induce a functional cell polarization. Exposing ARPCs to fluid shear stress in the chip led the aquaporin-2 transporter to localize at their apical region and the Na(+K(+ATPase pump at their basolateral portion, in contrast to statically cultured ARPCs. A recovery of urea and creatinine of (20±5% and (13±5%, respectively, was obtained by the device. The microengineered biochip here-proposed might be an innovative "lab-on-a-chip" platform to investigate in vitro ARPCs behaviour or to test drugs for therapeutic and toxicological responses.

  11. Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide in MHC Class II tubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Li Stephen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are virulence factors and are considered T cell-independent antigens. However, the capsular polysaccharide Sp1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 has been shown to activate CD4(+ T cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II-dependent manner. The mechanism of carbohydrate presentation to CD4(+ T cells is unknown. We show in live murine dendritic cells (DCs that Sp1 translocates from lysosomal compartments to the plasma membrane in MHCII-positive tubules. Sp1 cell surface presentation results in reduction of self-peptide presentation without alteration of the MHCII self peptide repertoire. In DM-deficient mice, retrograde transport of Sp1/MHCII complexes resulting in T cell-dependent immune responses to the polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate the capacity of a bacterial capsular polysaccharide antigen to use DC tubules as a vehicle for its transport as an MHCII/saccharide complex to the cell surface for the induction of T cell activation. Furthermore, retrograde transport requires the functional role of DM in self peptide-carbohydrate exchange. These observations open new opportunities for the design of vaccines against microbial encapsulated pathogens.

  12. Effects of angiotensin II and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption in the rat proximal tubule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatsudthipong, V.; Chan, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    Microperfusion of proximal convoluted tubule(PCT) and peritubular capillaries was performed to examine the effects of angiotensin II(Ang II) and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption. Bicarbonate was determined by microcalorimetry and C-14 inulin was used as a volume marker. The rates of bicarbonate absorption (JHCO 3 ) was 143 peq/min x mm and fluid absorption(Jv) was 2.70 nl/min x mm, when PCT and capillary perfusate contained normal Ringer solution. Addition of Ang II (10 -6 M) to the capillary perfusate caused reductions of JHCO 3 and Jv by 35%. A similar effect was observed when ionomycin was added to the capillary perfusate. Ang II antagonist, (Sar 1 , Ile 8 )-Angiotensin II(10 -6 M), completely blocked the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO 3 . Removal of calcium from both luminal and capillary perfusate did not change the effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO 3 . Our results indicate that Ang II inhibits the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the proximal tubule via interacting with angiotensin receptor. The mechanism of Ang II action may involve mobilization of intracellular calcium

  13. Role of calcium in the dopaminergic effect on the proximal convoluted tubule of rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Y.L.; Chatsudthipong, V.; Su-Tsai, S.M.; von Riotte, A.

    1986-01-01

    Microperfusion studies have shown that dopamine inhibits fluid and bicarbonate absorption in the rate proximal tubule. These studies are designed to examine the cellular mechanism underlying the proximal cellular response to dopamine action. In the isolated proximal cells, dopamine, in the concentration of 10 -6 M or less, had no effect on cAMP production. However, dopamine could increase cytosolic calcium concentration (from 90 nM to 210 nM) as measured by fluorospectrometry with fura-2 as a calcium indicator. Ca-45 flux studies have shown that dopamine could increase initial influx but not the steady state uptake of Ca. Dopamine could also increase efflux of Ca. In situ microperfusion of proximal tubule and peritubular capillaries has demonstrated that Ca ionophore, A23187 (10 -6 M), could simulate the inhibitory effects of dopamine on fluid and biocarbonate absorption. There was no additive effect observed when both agents were added together in the capillary perfusate. Removal of calcium from the perfusate could partially blunt the effect of dopamine. These results suggest that intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in the dopaminergic regulation of proximal tubular transport

  14. Cystogenesis and elongated primary cilia in Tsc1-deficient distal convoluted tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Eric A; Carson, Robert P; Ess, Kevin C

    2012-08-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan hamartomatous disease caused by loss of function mutations of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Neurological symptoms of TSC predominate in younger patients, but renal pathologies are a serious aspect of the disease in older children and adults. To study TSC pathogenesis in the kidney, we inactivated the mouse Tsc1 gene in the distal convoluted tubules (DCT). At young ages, Tsc1 conditional knockout (CKO) mice have enlarged kidneys and mild cystogenesis with increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)1 but decreased mTORC2 signaling. Treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduces kidney size and cystogenesis. Rapamycin withdrawal led to massive cystogenesis involving both distal as well as proximal tubules. To assess the contribution of decreased mTORC2 signaling in kidney pathogenesis, we also generated Rictor CKO mice. These animals did not have any detectable kidney pathology. Finally, we examined primary cilia in the DCT. Cilia were longer in Tsc1 CKO mice, and rapamycin treatment returned cilia length to normal. Rictor CKO mice had normal cilia in the DCT. Overall, our findings suggest that loss of the Tsc1 gene in the DCT is sufficient for renal cystogenesis. This cytogenesis appears to be mTORC1 but not mTORC2 dependent. Intriguingly, the mechanism may be cell autonomous as well as non-cell autonomous and possibly involves the length and function of primary cilia.

  15. Effect of a novel bioactive glass-ceramic on dentinal tubule occlusion: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y; Liu, J; Li, X; Yin, W; He, T; Hu, D; Liao, Y; Yao, X; Wang, Y

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study aimed to assess the ability and efficacy of HX-BGC, a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (SiO2-P2 O5-CaO-Na2 O-SrO), to reduce dentine tubule permeability. Dentine discs from human third molars were etched and randomly allocated into five groups: Group 1--distilled water; Group 2--Sensodyne Repair toothpaste (containing NovaMin®); Group 3--HX-BGC toothpaste (containing 7.5% HX-BGC); Group 4--control toothpaste (without HX-BGC); and Group 5--HX-BGC powder. Specimens were treated daily by brushing with an electric toothbrush for 20 seconds. Between daily treatments (7 days total), specimens were immersed in artificial saliva for 24 hours. Dentine permeability was measured at baseline, after the first treatment, after the first 24-hour immersion in artificial saliva and at the end of day 7. Dentine morphology and surface deposits were observed by scanning electron microscopy after one day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Sensodyne Repair and bioactive glass-ceramic toothpaste significantly and immediately lowered dentine permeability. The HX-BGC powder group showed the highest reduction in dentine permeability after 7 days of treatment. The novel bioactive glass-ceramic material HX-BGC is effective in reducing dentine permeability by occluding open dentine tubules, indicating that HX-BGC may be a potential treatment for dentine hypersensitivity. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  16. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of 3 H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells

  17. Effects of lead intoxication on intercellular junctions and biochemical alterations of the renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Moreno, L G; Quintanar-Escorza, M A; González, S; Mondragón, R; Cerbón-Solorzáno, J; Valdés, J; Calderón-Salinas, J V

    2009-10-01

    Lead intoxication is a worldwide health problem which frequently affects the kidney. In this work, we studied the effects of chronic lead intoxication (500 ppm of Pb in drinking water during seven months) on the structure, function and biochemical properties of rat proximal tubule cells. Lead-exposed animals showed increased lead concentration in kidney, reduction of calcium and amino acids uptake, oxidative damage and glucosuria, proteinuria, hematuria and reduced urinary pH. These biochemical and physiological alterations were related to striking morphological modifications in the structure of tubule epithelial cells and in the morphology of their mitochondria, nuclei, lysosomes, basal and apical membranes. Interestingly, in addition to the nuclei, inclusion bodies were found in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria. The epithelial cell structure modifications included an early loss of the apical microvillae, followed by a decrement of the luminal space and the respective apposition and proximity of apical membranes, resulting in the formation of atypical intercellular contacts and adhesion structures. Similar but less marked alterations were observed in subacute lead intoxication as well. Our work contributes in the understanding of the physiopathology of lead intoxication on the structure of renal tubular epithelial cell-cell contacts in vivo.

  18. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of lysozyme in renal proximal tubules of the frog Rana temporaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Seliverstova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of protein reabsorption in the kidney of lower vertebrates remains insufficiently investigated in spite of raising interest to the amphibian and fish kidneys as a useful model for physiological and pathophysiological examinations. In the present study, we examined the renal tubular uptake and the internalization rote of lysozyme after its intravenous injection in the wintering frog Rana temporaria using immunohisto- and immunocytochemistry and specific markers for some endocytic compartments. The distinct expression of megalin and cubilin in the proximal tubule cells of lysozyme-injected frogs was revealed whereas kidney tissue of control animals showed no positive immunoreactivity. Lysozyme was detected in the apical endocytic compartment of the tubular cells and colocalized with clathrin 10 min after injection. After 20 min, lysozyme was located in the subapical compartment negative to clathrin (endosomes, and intracellular trafficking of lysozyme was coincided with the distribution of megalin and cubilin. However, internalized protein was retained in the endosomes and did not reach lysosomes within 30 min after treatment that may indicate the inhibition of intracellular trafficking in hibernating frogs. For the first time, we provided the evidence that lysozyme is filtered through the glomeruli and absorbed by receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent endocytosis in the frog proximal tubule cells. Thus, the protein uptake in the amphibian mesonephros is mediated by megalin and cubilin that confirms a critical role of endocytic receptors in the renal reabsorption of proteins in amphibians as in mammals.

  19. Cystogenesis and elongated primary cilia in Tsc1-deficient distal convoluted tubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Eric A.; Carson, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan hamartomatous disease caused by loss of function mutations of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Neurological symptoms of TSC predominate in younger patients, but renal pathologies are a serious aspect of the disease in older children and adults. To study TSC pathogenesis in the kidney, we inactivated the mouse Tsc1 gene in the distal convoluted tubules (DCT). At young ages, Tsc1 conditional knockout (CKO) mice have enlarged kidneys and mild cystogenesis with increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)1 but decreased mTORC2 signaling. Treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduces kidney size and cystogenesis. Rapamycin withdrawal led to massive cystogenesis involving both distal as well as proximal tubules. To assess the contribution of decreased mTORC2 signaling in kidney pathogenesis, we also generated Rictor CKO mice. These animals did not have any detectable kidney pathology. Finally, we examined primary cilia in the DCT. Cilia were longer in Tsc1 CKO mice, and rapamycin treatment returned cilia length to normal. Rictor CKO mice had normal cilia in the DCT. Overall, our findings suggest that loss of the Tsc1 gene in the DCT is sufficient for renal cystogenesis. This cytogenesis appears to be mTORC1 but not mTORC2 dependent. Intriguingly, the mechanism may be cell autonomous as well as non-cell autonomous and possibly involves the length and function of primary cilia. PMID:22674026

  20. Cystine uptake by cultured cells originating from dog proximal tubule segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    States, B.; Reynolds, R.; Lee, J.; Segal, S.

    1990-01-01

    Large numbers of kidney epithelial cells were cultured successfully from isolated dog proximal tubule segments. Cells in primary culture and in first passage retained the cystine-dibasic amino acid co-transporter system which is found in vivo and in freshly isolated proximal tubule segments. In contrast to other cultured cells, the cystine-glutamate anti-porter was absent in primary cultures. However, this anti-porter system seemed to be developing in cells in first passage. The intracellular ratio of cysteine:reduced glutathione (CSH:GSH) was maintained at 1:36 in both primary cultures and in low passage cells. Incubation of cells in primary culture for 5 min at 37 degrees C with 0.025 mM [ 35 S]L-cystine resulted in incorporation of approximately 36 and 8.5% of the label into intracellular CSH and GSH, respectively. These cultured cells, therefore, seem to be an excellent model system for the eventual elucidation of (a) the inticacies of cystine metabolism and (b) regulation of (1) the cystine-dibasic amino acid co-transporter system and (2) the development of the cysteine-glutamate anti-porter system

  1. A telomerase immortalized human proximal tubule cell line with a truncation mutation (Q4004X in polycystin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney-Shea Herbert

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is associated with a variety of cellular phenotypes in renal epithelial cells. Cystic epithelia are secretory as opposed to absorptive, have higher proliferation rates in cell culture and have some characteristics of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. In this communication we describe a telomerase immortalized cell line that expresses proximal tubule markers and is derived from renal cysts of an ADPKD kidney. These cells have a single detectable truncating mutation (Q4004X in polycystin-1. These cells make normal appearing but shorter cilia and fail to assemble polycystin-1 in the cilia, and less uncleaved polycystin-1 in membrane fractions. This cell line has been maintained in continuous passage for over 35 passages without going into senescence. Nephron segment specific markers suggest a proximal tubule origin for these cells and the cell line will be useful to study mechanistic details of cyst formation in proximal tubule cells.

  2. Collective cell migration drives morphogenesis of the kidney nephron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasilyev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue organization in epithelial organs is achieved during development by the combined processes of cell differentiation and morphogenetic cell movements. In the kidney, the nephron is the functional organ unit. Each nephron is an epithelial tubule that is subdivided into discrete segments with specific transport functions. Little is known about how nephron segments are defined or how segments acquire their distinctive morphology and cell shape. Using live, in vivo cell imaging of the forming zebrafish pronephric nephron, we found that the migration of fully differentiated epithelial cells accounts for both the final position of nephron segment boundaries and the characteristic convolution of the proximal tubule. Pronephric cells maintain adherens junctions and polarized apical brush border membranes while they migrate collectively. Individual tubule cells exhibit basal membrane protrusions in the direction of movement and appear to establish transient, phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase-positive adhesions to the basement membrane. Cell migration continued in the presence of camptothecin, indicating that cell division does not drive migration. Lengthening of the nephron was, however, accompanied by an increase in tubule cell number, specifically in the most distal, ret1-positive nephron segment. The initiation of cell migration coincided with the onset of fluid flow in the pronephros. Complete blockade of pronephric fluid flow prevented cell migration and proximal nephron convolution. Selective blockade of proximal, filtration-driven fluid flow shifted the position of tubule convolution distally and revealed a role for cilia-driven fluid flow in persistent migration of distal nephron cells. We conclude that nephron morphogenesis is driven by fluid flow-dependent, collective epithelial cell migration within the confines of the tubule basement membrane. Our results establish intimate links between nephron function, fluid flow, and morphogenesis.

  3. Effects of two desensitizing dentifrices on dentinal tubule occlusion with citric acid challenge: Confocal laser scanning microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Anil Rajguru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentin hypersensitivity results when patent tubules are exposed to pain-inducing external stimuli. Aim: This study aims to compare the effects of two desensitizing dentifrices containing NovaMin and arginine on dentinal tubule occlusion with and without citric acid challenge in vitro using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Materials and Methods: Forty dentin discs were randomly divided into Groups I and II containing twenty specimens each, treated with NovaMin and arginine-containing dentifrices, respectively. Groups I and II were divided into subgroups A and B where IA and IIA underwent CLSM analysis to determine the percentage of tubule occlusion while IB and IIB underwent 0.3% citric acid challenge and CLSM analysis. A novel grading system was devised to categorize tubule occlusion. Results: In Group II, the percentage of occluded tubules was highest for IIA (72.25% ± 10.57% and least for IIB (42.55% ± 8.65% having statistical significance (P < 0.0005. In Group I, the difference between IA (49.9% ± 12.96% and IB (43.15% ± 12.43% was statistically insignificant (P = 0.249. On the comparison between IB and IIB statistically indifferent result was obtained (P = 0.901, whereas the difference between IA and IIA was statistically significant (P < 0.001. The results of grading system were for IA 50% of samples belonged to Grade 2, for IIA 60% - Grade 3, and for IB 70% and for IIB 90% - Grade 2. Conclusion: Dentinal tubule occlusion with arginine-containing dentifrice was significantly higher than NovaMin. However, it could not resist citric acid challenge as effectively as NovaMin. The effects of NovaMin were more sustainable as compared to arginine-containing dentifrice, thus proving to be a better desensitizing agent.

  4. Cortical-Cortical Interactions And Sensory Information Processing in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-30

    significant development for disseminating the results of biomedical research in our lifetime." Sir Paul Nurse , Cancer Research UK Your research papers...of the evidence for local cortical over-connectivity is anecdotal. Belmonte and colleagues suggested the co-morbidity with epilepsy that is highly...Tomma-Halme J, Lahti-Nuuttila P, Service E, Virsu V: Rate of information segregation in developmentally dyslexic children . Brain Lang 2000, 75:66-81

  5. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Novel Hg2+-Induced Nephropathy in Rats and Mice Lacking Mrp2: Evidence of Axial Heterogeneity in the Handling of Hg2+ Along the Proximal Tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Joshee, Lucy; Bridges, Christy C.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the multi-resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) in the nephropathy induced by inorganic mercuric mercury (Hg2+) was studied in rats (TR−) and mice (Mrp2−/−), which lack functional Mrp2, and control animals. Animals were exposed to nephrotoxic doses of HgCl2. Forty-eight or 24 hours after exposure, tissues were harvested and analyzed for Hg content and markers of injury. Histological analyses revealed that the proximal tubular segments affected pathologically by Hg2+ were significantly different between Mrp2-deficient animals and controls. In the absence of Mrp2, cellular injury localized almost exclusively in proximal tubular segments in the subcapsular (S1) to midcortical regions (early S2) of the kidney. In control animals, cellular death occurred mainly in the proximal tubular segments in the inner cortex (late S2) and outer stripe of the outer medulla (S3). These differences in renal pathology indicate that axial heterogeneity exists along the proximal tubule with respect to how mercuric ions are handled. Total renal and hepatic accumulation of mercury was also greater in animals lacking Mrp2 than in controls, indicating that Mrp2 normally plays a significant role in eliminating mercuric ions from within proximal tubular cells and hepatocytes. Analyses of plasma creatinine, BUN, and renal expression of Kim-1 and Ngal tend to support the severity of the nephropathies detected histologically. Collectively, our findings indicate that a fraction of mercuric ions is normally secreted by Mrp2 in early portions of proximal tubules into the lumen and then is absorbed downstream in straight portions, where mercuric species typically induce toxic effects. PMID:25145654

  7. [Schizophrenia and cortical GABA neurotransmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takanori; Matsubara, Takuro; Lewis, David A

    2010-01-01

    -synaptic GABA-A receptors. Our recent analyses demonstrated that this pattern exists across diverse cortical areas including the prefrontal, anterior cingulate, primary motor, and primary visual cortices. GABA neurotransmission by PV-containing and SST-containing neurons is important for the generation of cortical oscillatory activities in the gamma (30-100 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) bands, respectively. These oscillatory activities have been proposed to play critical roles in regulating the efficiency of information transfer between neurons and neuronal networks in the cortex. Altered cortical GABA neurotransmission appears to contribute to disturbances in diverse functions through affecting the generation of cortical oscillations in schizophrenia.

  8. Self-organization of engineered epithelial tubules by differential cellular motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Inman, Jamie L; Bissell, Mina J; Nelson, Celeste M

    2009-02-04

    Patterning of developing tissues arises from a number of mechanisms, including cell shape change, cell proliferation, and cell sorting from differential cohesion or tension. Here, we reveal that differences in cell motility can also lead to cell sorting within tissues. Using mosaic engineered mammary epithelial tubules, we found that cells sorted depending on their expression level of the membrane-anchored collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14. These rearrangements were independent of the catalytic activity of MMP14 but absolutely required the hemopexin domain. We describe a signaling cascade downstream of MMP14 through Rho kinase that allows cells to sort within the model tissues. Cell speed and persistence time were enhanced by MMP14 expression, but only the latter motility parameter was required for sorting. These results indicate that differential directional persistence can give rise to patterns within model developing tissues.

  9. Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A polymers bind, but do not tubulate, liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backues, Steven K.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A (AtDRP1A) is involved in endocytosis and cell plate maturation in Arabidopsis. Unlike dynamin, AtDRP1A does not have any recognized membrane binding or protein-protein interaction domains. We report that GTPase active AtDRP1A purified from Escherichia coli as a fusion to maltose binding protein forms homopolymers visible by negative staining electron microscopy. These polymers interact with protein-free liposomes whose lipid composition mimics that of the inner leaflet of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, suggesting that lipid-binding may play a role in AtDRP1A function. However, AtDRP1A polymers do not appear to assemble and disassemble in a dynamic fashion and do not have the ability to tubulate liposomes in vitro, suggesting that additional factors or modifications are necessary for AtDRP1A's in vivo function.

  10. Human kidney proximal tubule cells are vulnerable to the effects of Rauwolfia serpentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoba, Miriam E; Flynn, Thomas J; Vohra, Sanah; Wiesenfeld, Paddy L; Sprando, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina (or Snake root plant) is a botanical dietary supplement marketed in the USA for maintaining blood pressure. Very few studies have addressed the safety of this herb, despite its wide availability to consumers. Its reported pleiotropic effects underscore the necessity for evaluating its safety. We used a human kidney cell line to investigate the possible negative effects of R. serpentina on the renal system in vitro, with a specific focus on the renal proximal tubules. We evaluated cellular and mitochondrial toxicity, along with a variety of other kidney-specific toxicology biomarkers. We found that R. serpentina was capable of producing highly detrimental effects in our in vitro renal cell system. These results suggest more studies are needed to investigate the safety of this dietary supplement in both kidney and other target organ systems.

  11. Caulimoviridae Tubule-Guided Transport Is Dictated by Movement Protein Properties ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fajardo, Thor; Zicca, Stefania; Pallás, Vicente; Stavolone, Livia

    2010-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata (PD) either as nucleoprotein complexes (NPCs) or as tubule-guided encapsidated particles with the help of movement proteins (MPs). To explore how and why MPs specialize in one mechanism or the other, we tested the exchangeability of MPs encoded by DNA and RNA virus genomes by means of an engineered alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) system. We show that Caulimoviridae (DNA genome virus) MPs are competent for RNA virus particle transport but are unable to mediate NPC movement, and we discuss this restriction in terms of the evolution of DNA virus MPs as a means of mediating DNA viral genome entry into the RNA-trafficking PD pathway. PMID:20130061

  12. Proteomic-based insight into Malpighian tubules of silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-wu Zhong

    Full Text Available Malpighian tubules (MTs are highly specific organs of arthropods (Insecta, Myriapoda and Arachnida for excretion and osmoregulation. In order to highlight the important genes and pathways involved in multi-functions of MTs, we performed a systematic proteomic analysis of silkworm MTs in the present work. Totally, 1,367 proteins were identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and as well as by Trans Proteomic Pipeline (TPP and Absolute protein expression (APEX analyses. Forty-one proteins were further identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some proteins were revealed to be significantly associated with various metabolic processes, organic solute transport, detoxification and innate immunity. Our results might lay a good foundation for future functional studies of MTs in silkworm and other lepidoptera.

  13. Proximal tubule Na transporter responses are the same during acute and chronic hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyar, C E; Zhang, Y; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    2000-01-01

    Acute hypertension in Sprague-Dawley rats (SD) provokes a decrease in renal proximal tubule (PT) salt and fluid reabsorption, redistribution of apical Na/H exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and Na-P(i) cotransporter type 2 (NaPi2) out of the brush border into higher density membranes, and inhibition...... to persistent adaptive changes in NHE3 and NaPi2 distribution and/or NKA activity. Renal cortex Na transporter protein density distributions and activities were compared by subcellular fractionation in 1) adult SHR with an acute increase or decrease in arterial pressure and 2) young SD (YSD) and young SHR (YSHR......) vs. adult SD and SHR. In adult hypertensive SHR NHE3 was shifted to membranes of higher densities, analogous to SD with acute hypertension, and there were no further changes with a further increase or decrease in arterial pressure. There was no change in total pool size of NHE3 in cortex in YSHR vs...

  14. Effects of phospho- and calciotropic hormones on electrolyte transport in the proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Justin J; Plain, Allein; Beggs, Megan R

    2017-01-01

    ), active vitamin D 3, and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). The organs central to this are the kidneys, intestine, and bone. In the kidney, the proximal tubule reabsorbs the majority of filtered calcium and phosphate, which amounts to more than 60% and 90%, respectively. The basic molecular mechanisms......Calcium and phosphate are critical for a myriad of physiological and cellular processes within the organism. Consequently, plasma levels of calcium and phosphate are tightly regulated. This occurs through the combined effects of the phospho- and calciotropic hormones, parathyroid hormone (PTH...... as their regulation of active vitamin D 3 synthesis in this nephron segment. The integrative effects of both phospho- and calciotropic hormones on proximal tubular solute transport and subsequently whole body calcium-phosphate balance thus have been further complicated. Here, we first review the molecular mechanisms...

  15. Dentinal tubule occluding capability of nano-hydroxyapatite; The in-vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglar, Serdar; Erdem, Umit; Dogan, Mustafa; Turkoz, Mustafa

    2018-04-29

    In this in-vitro study, the effectiveness of experimental pure nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAP) and 1%, 2%, and 3% F¯ doped nano-HAp on dentine tubule occlusion was investigated. And also, the cytotoxicity of materials used in the experiment was evaluated. Nano-HAp types were synthesized by the precipitation method. Forty dentin specimens were randomly divided into five groups of; 1-no treatment (control), 2-specimens treated with 10% pure nano-HAp and 3, 4, 5 specimens treated with 1%, 2%, and 3% F - doped 10% nano-HAp, respectively. To evaluate the effectiveness of the materials used; pH, FTIR, and scanning electron microscopy evaluations were performed before and after degredation in simulated body fluid. To determine cytotoxicity of the materials, MTT assay was performed. Statistical evaluations were performed with F and t tests. All of the nano-HAp materials used in this study built up an effective covering layer on the dentin surfaces even with plugs in tubules. It was found that this layer had also a resistance to degradation. None of the evaluated nano-HAp types were have toxicity. Fluoride doping showed a positive effect on physical and chemical stability until a critical value of 1% F - . The all evaluated nano-HAp types may be effectively used in dentin hypersensitivity treatment. The formed nano-HAp layers were seem to resistant to hydrolic deletion. The pure and 1% F - doped nano-HAp showed the highest biocompatibility thus it was assessed that pure and 1% F - doped materials may be used as an active ingredient in dentin hypersensitivity agents. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Efficacy of Modified Bioactive Glass for Dentin Remineralization and Obstruction of Dentinal Tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Saffarpour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study assessed the efficacy of modified bioactive glass (MBG for dentin remineralization and obstruction of dentinal tubules.Materials and Methods: Thirty-six dentin discs were made from 20 third molars and were stored in 12% lactic acid solution for two weeks to induce demineralization. The samples were divided into three groups (n=12: 1- BG, 2- BG modified with 5% strontium (Sr and 3- BG modified with 10% Sr. After applying the BG, the samples were stored in artificial saliva for 7, 14 and 21 days. Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, X-ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis were used to assess remineralization. Also, 6 dentin discs were divided into three groups of BG, BG modified with 5% Sr and BG modified with 10% Sr, to examine tubular occlusion. The discs were etched using 0.5M of EDTA for two minutes and were stored in artificial saliva for 7 days. Changes in dentin surface morphology were evaluated under SEM.Results: Group 3 showed high rates of remineralization at days 7 and 14, although the rate decreased at day 21. Group 2 exhibited high rates of remineralization at days 7, 14 and 21. Dentinal tubules were partially occluded by BG and BG modified with 5% Sr, while they were almost completely obstructed after the use of BG modified with 10% Sr.Conclusions: Strontium increases remineralization. Addition of 10% Sr to BG enhances apatite formation; however, the apatite dissolves over time. Addition of 5% Sr to BG stabilizes the apatite lattice and increases the remineralization.

  17. Role of diacylglycerol in adrenergic-stimulated sup 86 Rb uptake by proximal tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baines, A.D.; Drangova, R.; Ho, P. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    We used rat proximal tubule fragments purified by Percoll centrifugation to examine the role of diacylglycerol (DAG) in noradrenergic-stimulated Na+ reabsorption. Tubular DAG concentration and ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb uptake increased within 30 s after adding norepinephrine (NE) and remained elevated for at least 5 min. NE (1 microM) increased DAG content 17% and ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb uptake 23%. Cirazoline-stimulated 86Rb uptake was not inhibited by BaCl, quinidine, or bumetanide (1-10 microM) or by the omission of HCO3- or Cl- from the medium, but it was completely inhibited by ouabain and furosemide. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol, L-alpha-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, and L-alpha-1,2-dioleoylglycerol (DOG) increased total 86Rb uptake 8-11%. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (5 nM) increased uptake by only 4%. Staurosporine at 5 nM inhibited DOG stimulation completely, whereas 50 nM staurosporine was required to inhibit NE stimulation completely. Sphingosine inhibited DOG stimulation by 66% but did not inhibit NE stimulation. Amiloride (1 mM) completely blocked DOG stimulation. Monensin increased 86Rb uptake 31% and completely blocked the DOG effect but reduced the NE effect by only 26% (P = 0.08). In tubules from salt-loaded rats, NE did not increase DAG concentration, but NE-stimulated 86Rb uptake was reduced by only 23% (P = 0.15). Thus DAG released by NE may stimulate Na+ entry through Na(+)-H+ exchange. NE predominantly stimulates Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) by activating a protein kinase that is insensitive to DAG and TPA and is inhibited by staurosporine but not by sphingosine. NE may also stimulate K+ efflux through a BaCl-insensitive K+ channel that is inhibited by millimolar furosemide.

  18. The single kinin receptor signals to separate and independent physiological pathways in Malpighian tubules of the yellow fever mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past we have used the leucokinins, the kinins of the cockroach Leucophaea, to evaluate the mechanism of diuretic action of kinin peptides in Malpighian tubules of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Now using aedeskinins, the kinins of Aedes, are available, we find that in isolated Aede...

  19. Elucidation of density profile of self-assembled sitosterol + oryzanol tubules with small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, A.; Gilbert, E.P.; Bouwman, W.G.; Sawalha, H.I.M.; Adel, den R.; Garamus, V.M.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.; Flöter, E.

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have been performed on self-assembled tubules of sitosterol and oryzanol in triglyceride oils to investigate details of their structure. Alternative organic phases (deuterated and non-deuterated decane, limonene, castor oil and eugenol) were used to

  20. Denervation and high-fat diet reduce insulin signaling in T-tubules in skeletal muscle of living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M; Ploug, Thorkil; Ai, Hua

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates muscle glucose transport by translocation of GLUT4 to sarcolemma and T-tubules. Despite muscle glucose uptake playing a major role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the temporal and spatial changes in insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation during these co...

  1. Numerical variation of cell lysosomes of the proximal convoluted tubules of mice Kidneys submitted to different X-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Lapa, R. de C.R. da; Pacheco, I.P.; Segreto, C.

    1984-01-01

    The number of cell lysosomes of the proximal convoluted tubules of mice Kidneys (Mus musculus) before and after whole-body irradiation with different X-ray doses is confronted. The mice were sacrificed after 72 hours and the cortex fragments were conduct to electron microscopy. A statistically significant numerical reduction of the lysosomas was observed in 72 hours. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Adaptive regulation of taurine and beta-alanine uptake in a human kidney cell line from the proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1997-01-01

    1. The underlying mechanisms involved in the adaptive regulation of beta-amino acid uptake in the human proximal tubule were examined by use of an immortalized human embryonic kidney epithelial cell line (IHKE). 2. The results indicated that the adaptive response to maintain whole-body taurine...

  3. Morphometry of testis and seminiferous tubules of the adult crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous, Linnaeus, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Cabral Caldeira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Body and testicular biometric parameters are very important for establishing reproductive patterns and, consequently, the development of protocols for assisted reproduction in different species. A direct correlation between the testis weight and the sperm population was observed in other studied species, because the testis size primarily reflects the total volume of the seminiferous tubule, its main component. The objective of this study was to determine the testicular volume parameters and correlate data from morphometry of testis and seminiferous tubules with body mass in six adult crab-eating foxes. The mean body weight of the crab-eating foxes in this study was 6.53 kg, with approximately 0.068% allocated to the testicular mass and 0.042% specifically to seminiferous tubules, which represented 87.5% of the testicular parenchyma. The albuginea comprised 12.5% of the testicular mass. The mean diameter of seminiferous tubules was 236 µm, and the mean thickness of the seminiferous epithelium was 62.9 µm. Values of tubular parameters indicate a sperm productivity close to those observed in previously studied carnivores.

  4. Substrate modulation of fatty acid effects on energization and respiration of kidney proximal tubules during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Bienholz

    Full Text Available Kidney proximal tubules subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation develop a nonesterified fatty acid-induced energetic deficit characterized by persistent partial mitochondrial deenergization that can be prevented and reversed by citric acid cycle substrates. To further assess the role of competition between fatty acids and substrates on inner membrane substrate carriers in the deenergization and the contribution to deenergization of fatty acid effects on respiratory function, digitonin-permeabilized rabbit and mouse tubules were studied using either addition of exogenous oleate after control normoxic incubation or increases of endogenous fatty acids produced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. The results demonstrated major effects of matrix oxaloacetate accumulation on succinate-supported energization and respiration and their modification by fatty acids. Improvements of energization in the presence of fatty acids by glutamate were shown to result predominantly from lowering matrix oxaloacetate rather than from amelioration of transmembrane cycling of fatty acids and uncoupling. Mouse tubules had 2.5 fold higher rates of succinate utilization, which resulted in stronger effects of oxaloacetate accumulation than rabbit tubules. Hypoxia/reoxygenation induced respiratory inhibition that was more severe for complex I-dependent substrates. Fatty acids themselves did not acutely contribute to this respiratory inhibition, but lowering them during 60 min. reoxygenation to allow recovery of ATP during that period alleviated it. These data clarify the basis for the nonesterified fatty acid-induced mitochondrial energetic deficit in kidney proximal tubules that impairs structural and functional recovery and provide insight into interactions that need to be considered in the design of substrate-based interventions to improve mitochondrial function.

  5. MRI of focal cortical dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.C.P.; Hatfield, G.A.; Bourgeois, B.; Park, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    We studied nine cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) by MRI, with surface-rendered 3D reconstructions. One case was also examined using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). The histological features were reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. The gyri affected by FCD were enlarged and the signal of the cortex was slightly increased on T1-weighted images. The gray-white junction was indistinct. Signal from the subcortical white matter was decreased on T1- and increased on T2-weighted images in most cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in two cases. Proton MRS showed a spectrum identical to that of normal brain. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  7. Communication and Wiring in the Cortical Connectome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian eBudd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In cerebral cortex, the huge mass of axonal wiring that carries information between near and distant neurons is thought to provide the neural substrate for cognitive and perceptual function. The goal of mapping the connectivity of cortical axons at different spatial scales, the cortical connectome, is to trace the paths of information flow in cerebral cortex. To appreciate the relationship between the connectome and cortical function, we need to discover the nature and purpose of the wiring principles underlying cortical connectivity. A popular explanation has been that axonal length is strictly minimized both within and between cortical regions. In contrast, we have hypothesized the existence of a multi-scale principle of cortical wiring where to optimise communication there is a trade-off between spatial (construction and temporal (routing costs. Here, using recent evidence concerning cortical spatial networks we critically evaluate this hypothesis at neuron, local circuit, and pathway scales. We report three main conclusions. First, the axonal and dendritic arbor morphology of single neocortical neurons may be governed by a similar wiring principle, one that balances the conservation of cellular material and conduction delay. Second, the same principle may be observed for fibre tracts connecting cortical regions. Third, the absence of sufficient local circuit data currently prohibits any meaningful assessment of the hypothesis at this scale of cortical organization. To avoid neglecting neuron and microcircuit levels of cortical organization, the connectome framework should incorporate more morphological description. In addition, structural analyses of temporal cost for cortical circuits should take account of both axonal conduction and neuronal integration delays, which appear mostly of the same order of magnitude. We conclude the hypothesized trade-off between spatial and temporal costs may potentially offer a powerful explanation for

  8. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M.; Els, T.

    2001-01-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  9. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROLE OF CORTICAL MASTOIDECTOMY IN MYRINGOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kawatra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Chronic suppurative otitis media is an inflammatory process of mucoperiosteal lining of middle ear space and mastoid. Effect of mastoidectomy on patients without evidence of active infectious disease remains highly debated and unproven. In this study the role of cortical mastoidectomy in myringoplasty in patients of CSOM in dry as well as wet ears was evaluated. OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the efficacy and role of cortical mastoidectomy in patients with CSOM (safe type in dry as well as wet ears. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective randomized. METHODS : Data was collected from the patients undergoing myringoplasty with or without cortical mastoidectomy. Study was carried out on a total of 80 patients undergoing the surgery. Study period was 18 months with 6 months of follow up. Outcome was evaluated in terms of graft rejection, lateralization and change in AB gap. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The statistical analysis was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 15.0 statistical Analysis Software. RESULT S : overall success rate was 77.5%. It was higher in dry ear (87.5% as compared to wet ear (67.5% and this difference was significant statistically. On evaluating odds of failure for wet ear, it was observed that group 1 had higher odds of failure for wet ear as compared to that of group 2. CONCLUSION : In both myringoplasty alone or with cortical mastoidectomy, failure rates were higher in wet as compared to dry ears, however odds of failure in wet cases were much higher in myringoplasty alone group as compared to myringoplasty with cortic al mastoidectomy

  10. Cortical hypermetabolism in MCI subjects: a compensatory mechanism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, A.; Fan, Z.; Brooks, D.J.; Edison, P.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with amyloid accumulation that takes place decades before symptoms appear. Cognitive impairment in AD is associated with reduced glucose metabolism. However, neuronal plasticity/compensatory mechanisms might come into play before the onset of dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence of cortical hypermetabolism as a compensatory mechanism before amyloid deposition takes place in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Nine AD subjects and ten aMCI subjects had both [ 11 C]PIB and [ 18 F]FDG PET scans with arterial input in order to quantify the amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism in vivo in comparison with healthy control subjects who underwent either [ 11 C]PIB or [ 18 F]FDG PET scans. The [ 11 C]PIB PET scans were quantified using [ 11 C]PIB target region to cerebellum uptake ratio images created by integrating the activity collected from 60 to 90 min, and regional cerebral glucose metabolism was quantified using spectral analysis. In MCI subjects, cortical hypermetabolism was observed in four amyloid-negative subjects and one amyloid-positive subject, while hypometabolism was seen in five other MCI subjects with high amyloid load. Subjects with hypermetabolism and low amyloid did not convert to AD during clinical follow-up for 18 months in contrast to four amyloid-positive hypometabolic subjects who did convert to AD. This preliminary study suggests that compensatory hypermetabolism can occur in aMCI subjects, particularly in those who are amyloid-negative. The increase in metabolic rate in different cortical regions with predominance in the occipital cortex may be a compensatory response to the neuronal damage occurring early in the disease process. It may also reflect recruitment of relatively minimally affected cortical regions to compensate for reduced function in the temporoparietal cortical association areas. (orig.)

  11. Cortical hypermetabolism in MCI subjects: a compensatory mechanism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashraf, A.; Fan, Z.; Brooks, D.J.; Edison, P. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with amyloid accumulation that takes place decades before symptoms appear. Cognitive impairment in AD is associated with reduced glucose metabolism. However, neuronal plasticity/compensatory mechanisms might come into play before the onset of dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence of cortical hypermetabolism as a compensatory mechanism before amyloid deposition takes place in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Nine AD subjects and ten aMCI subjects had both [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET scans with arterial input in order to quantify the amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism in vivo in comparison with healthy control subjects who underwent either [{sup 11}C]PIB or [{sup 18}F]FDG PET scans. The [{sup 11}C]PIB PET scans were quantified using [{sup 11}C]PIB target region to cerebellum uptake ratio images created by integrating the activity collected from 60 to 90 min, and regional cerebral glucose metabolism was quantified using spectral analysis. In MCI subjects, cortical hypermetabolism was observed in four amyloid-negative subjects and one amyloid-positive subject, while hypometabolism was seen in five other MCI subjects with high amyloid load. Subjects with hypermetabolism and low amyloid did not convert to AD during clinical follow-up for 18 months in contrast to four amyloid-positive hypometabolic subjects who did convert to AD. This preliminary study suggests that compensatory hypermetabolism can occur in aMCI subjects, particularly in those who are amyloid-negative. The increase in metabolic rate in different cortical regions with predominance in the occipital cortex may be a compensatory response to the neuronal damage occurring early in the disease process. It may also reflect recruitment of relatively minimally affected cortical regions to compensate for reduced function in the temporoparietal cortical association areas. (orig.)

  12. SLEEP AND OLFACTORY CORTICAL PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eBarnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders.

  13. Cortical representations of communication sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Marc A; Cheung, Steven W

    2008-10-01

    This review summarizes recent research into cortical processing of vocalizations in animals and humans. There has been a resurgent interest in this topic accompanied by an increased number of studies using animal models with complex vocalizations and new methods in human brain imaging. Recent results from such studies are discussed. Experiments have begun to reveal the bilateral cortical fields involved in communication sound processing and the transformations of neural representations that occur among those fields. Advances have also been made in understanding the neuronal basis of interaction between developmental exposures and behavioral experiences with vocalization perception. Exposure to sounds during the developmental period produces large effects on brain responses, as do a variety of specific trained tasks in adults. Studies have also uncovered a neural link between the motor production of vocalizations and the representation of vocalizations in cortex. Parallel experiments in humans and animals are answering important questions about vocalization processing in the central nervous system. This dual approach promises to reveal microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic principles of large-scale dynamic interactions between brain regions that underlie the complex phenomenon of vocalization perception. Such advances will yield a greater understanding of the causes, consequences, and treatment of disorders related to speech processing.

  14. A bradykinin-potentiating peptide (BPP-10c) from Bothrops jararaca induces changes in seminiferous tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Joyce M; Portaro, Fernanda Cv; Borella, Maria I; Lameu, Claudiana; Camargo, Antonio Cm; Alberto-Silva, Carlos

    2013-11-06

    The testis-specific isoform of angiotensin-converting enzyme (tACE) is exclusively expressed in germ cells during spermatogenesis. Although the exact role of tACE in male fertility is unknown, it clearly plays a critical function in spermatogenesis. The dipeptidase domain of tACE is identical to the C-terminal catalytic domain of somatic ACE (sACE). Bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPPs) from snake venoms are the first natural sACE inhibitors described and their structure-activity relationship studies were the basis for the development of antihypertensive drugs such as captopril. In recent years, it has been showed that a number of BPPs - including BPP-10c - are able to distinguish between the N- and C-active sites of sACE, what is not applicable to captopril. Considering the similarity between tACE and sACE (and since BPPs are able to distinguish between the two active sites of sACE), the effects of the BPP-10c and captopril on the structure and function of the seminiferous epithelium were characterized in the present study. BPP-10c and captopril were administered in male Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection (4.7 μmol/kg for 15 days) and histological sections of testes were analyzed. Classification of seminiferous tubules and stage analysis were carried out for quantitative evaluation of germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium. The blood-testis barrier (BTB) permeability and distribution of claudin-1 in the seminiferous epithelium were analyzed by hypertonic fixative method and immunohistochemical analyses of testes, respectively. The morphology of seminiferous tubules from animals treated with BPP-10c showed an intense disruption of the epithelium, presence of atypical multinucleated cells in the lumen and degenerated germ cells in the adluminal compartment. BPP-10c led to an increase in the number of round spermatids and total support capacity of Sertoli cell in stages I, V, VII/VIII of the seminiferous epithelium cycle, without affecting BTB permeability

  15. A bradykinin-potentiating peptide (BPP-10c) from Bothrops jararaca induces changes in seminiferous tubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The testis-specific isoform of angiotensin-converting enzyme (tACE) is exclusively expressed in germ cells during spermatogenesis. Although the exact role of tACE in male fertility is unknown, it clearly plays a critical function in spermatogenesis. The dipeptidase domain of tACE is identical to the C-terminal catalytic domain of somatic ACE (sACE). Bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPPs) from snake venoms are the first natural sACE inhibitors described and their structure–activity relationship studies were the basis for the development of antihypertensive drugs such as captopril. In recent years, it has been showed that a number of BPPs – including BPP-10c – are able to distinguish between the N- and C-active sites of sACE, what is not applicable to captopril. Considering the similarity between tACE and sACE (and since BPPs are able to distinguish between the two active sites of sACE), the effects of the BPP-10c and captopril on the structure and function of the seminiferous epithelium were characterized in the present study. BPP-10c and captopril were administered in male Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection (4.7 μmol/kg for 15 days) and histological sections of testes were analyzed. Classification of seminiferous tubules and stage analysis were carried out for quantitative evaluation of germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium. The blood-testis barrier (BTB) permeability and distribution of claudin-1 in the seminiferous epithelium were analyzed by hypertonic fixative method and immunohistochemical analyses of testes, respectively. Results The morphology of seminiferous tubules from animals treated with BPP-10c showed an intense disruption of the epithelium, presence of atypical multinucleated cells in the lumen and degenerated germ cells in the adluminal compartment. BPP-10c led to an increase in the number of round spermatids and total support capacity of Sertoli cell in stages I, V, VII/VIII of the seminiferous epithelium cycle, without

  16. Osteocyte Lacunae are Lenticular/Ellipsoid Spaces or Spiral/Helical Tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijit Kanti Guha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the current concept of bone structure, the osteocyte lacunae are lenticular or ellipsoid spaces occupied by osteocytes. These osteocytes are thought to communicate with each other through a tubular system made up of Canaliculi. The rest of the structures i.e., Haversian canal, and Volkmann’s canal are also tubular in shape. Considering this existing concept of bone microstructure described by various authors, it is highly unlikely that the lacunae alone would be lenticular/ellipsoid structure. In the present study author wanted to know that amongst the all tubular spaces, what is the reason that only the osteocyte lacunae are lenticular or ellipsoid structure? Also to investigate whether these lenticular spaces are really lenticular/ellipsoid or they are cut sections of tubes, which are lying helically or spirally. It is well known from various previous studies that Haversian canal, Volkmann’s canal and Canaliculi are tubular shaped structures and how it is possible that lenticular/ellipsoid structure can present amongst them. So we thought that, it may be possible that these lenticular spaces are not actually lenticular but this lenticular shape is due to the cut sections of any type of tubule in various possible planes (i.e., transverse, longitudinal and various degrees of oblique plane. Aim: The present study was carried out to reinvestigate the shape of the osteocyte lacunae amongst the tubular system (i.e., Haversian canal, Volkmann’s canal and Canaliculi of compact bone. Materials and Methods: The study is carried out by preparing thin sections of adult bones (ground glass preparation and visualizing them under binocular light microscope and scanelectron microscope after following proper procedure. Results: We observed that the lacunae are actually spirally/helically placed tubules with several branching. These branching are considered as canaliculi. These branching are of various diameters and they

  17. Response of cortical bone to antiresorptive treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldstrup, Lars; Jørgensen, J T; Sørensen, T K

    2001-01-01

    of the spine, hip, and forearm. Longitudinal changes in bone densitometry were compared with changes captured by DXR: BMD evaluated by DXR (BMDDXR), cortical thickness of the second metacarpal (CTMC2), and porosity of cortical bone. The expected annual postmenopausal reduction in BMD in the control group...... treatment regimens used in the prevention of osteoporosis....

  18. Effect of alphatocopherol on diameter of proximal convoluted tubules of kidney in diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of alphatocopherol supplement on proximal convoluted tubular diameter of kidney in diabetic mice. Methods: The randomised controlled trials was conducted partly at the National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad, and partly in Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from November 2009 to November 2010. Thirty adult female mice BALB/C were randomly divided into three equal groups. Group A served as the control group. Group B was made diabetic by the intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Group C received injection streptozotocin and was fed with alphatocopherol (vitamin E) supplemented diet. After 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histomorphological study. Results: Diabetes caused significant changes in the diameter of proximal tubule of Experimental Group B (diabetic) compared to the controls in Group A, but these changes were prevented in alphatocopherol treated Group C. Tubular diameter in Group B was significantly reduced compared to the Control Group A (p 0.05). Conclusion: Significant difference in proximal tubular diameter of kidneys between diabetic and alphatocopherol treated diabetic mice confirm that vitamin E does extend a protective role in improving diabetic nephropathy. (author)

  19. Dual Regulation of Gluconeogenesis by Insulin and Glucose in the Proximal Tubules of the Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Motohiro; Sasako, Takayoshi; Kubota, Naoto; Sakurai, Yoshitaka; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Tetsuya; Inagi, Reiko; Seki, George; Goto, Moritaka; Ueki, Kohjiro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Jomori, Takahito; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Growing attention has been focused on the roles of the proximal tubules (PTs) of the kidney in glucose metabolism, including the mechanism of regulation of gluconeogenesis. In this study, we found that PT-specific insulin receptor substrate 1/2 double-knockout mice, established by using the newly generated sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2)-Cre transgenic mice, exhibited impaired insulin signaling and upregulated gluconeogenic gene expression and renal gluconeogenesis, resulting in systemic insulin resistance. In contrast, in streptozotocin-treated mice, although insulin action was impaired in the PTs, the gluconeogenic gene expression was unexpectedly downregulated in the renal cortex, which was restored by administration of an SGLT1/2 inhibitor. In the HK-2 cells, the gluconeogenic gene expression was suppressed by insulin, accompanied by phosphorylation and inactivation of forkhead box transcription factor 1 (FoxO1). In contrast, glucose deacetylated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC1α), a coactivator of FoxO1, via sirtuin 1, suppressing the gluconeogenic gene expression, which was reversed by inhibition of glucose reabsorption. These data suggest that both insulin signaling and glucose reabsorption suppress the gluconeogenic gene expression by inactivation of FoxO1 and PGC1α, respectively, providing insight into novel mechanisms underlying the regulation of gluconeogenesis in the PTs. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Update on Mechanisms of Renal Tubule Injury Caused by Advanced Glycation End Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN caused by advanced glycation end products (AGEs may be associated with lipid accumulation in the kidneys. This study was designed to investigate whether Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine (CML, a member of the AGEs family increases lipid accumulation in a human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2 via increasing cholesterol synthesis and uptake and reducing cholesterol efflux through endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS. Our results showed that CML disrupts cholesterol metabolism in HK-2 cells by activating sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2 and liver X receptor (LXR, followed by an increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR mediated cholesterol synthesis and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr mediated cholesterol uptake and a reduction in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 mediated cholesterol efflux, ultimately causing lipid accumulation in HK-2 cells. All of these responses could be suppressed by an ERS inhibitor, which suggests that CML causes lipid accumulation in renal tubule cells through ERS and that the inhibition of ERS is a potential novel approach to treating CML-induced renal tubular foam cell formation.

  1. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4+ with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na+-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression. PMID:27009341

  2. Transport of salicylate in proximal tubule (S2 segment) isolated from rabbit kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, L.; Roch-Ramel, F.

    1988-01-01

    The secretory and the reabsorptive transport of salicylate was studied in the isolated and perfused rabbit proximal tubule (S 2 segment). Salicylate secretion (J sal b→l ) fulfilled the criteria for a carrier-mediated transport system: J sal b→l was saturable, was reversibly inhibited by probenecid, and occurred against a concentration gradient. The K m and V max for this secretory transport were 80 μM and 3,200 fmol·min -1 ·mm -1 , respectively. At luminal pH of 7.4 and 6.6, salicylate reabsorption (J sal l→b ) was low. J sal l→b was stimulated by increasing the bath Pco 2 or by removing basolateral HCO 3 - ; J sal l→b was inhibited by ethoxyzolamide and by SITS in the bath. The results indicate that salicylate reabsorption depends on H + secretion, consistent with reabsorption by simple nonionic diffusion. When salicylate was present in the lumen only, J sal l→b increased after inhibition of the secretory transport by adding ouabain or probenecid in the bath or by lowering the bath temperature. These results are compatible with luminal recycling of salicylate, and suggest the presence of a mediated secretory transporter located at the luminal membrane

  3. Mechanism of cisplatin proximal tubule toxicity revealed by integrating transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and biokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, Anja; Bielow, Chris; Ranninger, Christina; Bellwon, Patricia; Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Chassaigne, Hubert; Kristl, Theresa; Aiche, Stephan; Huber, Christian G; Guillou, Claude; Hewitt, Philipp; Leonard, Martin O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Bois, Frederic; Jennings, Paul

    2015-12-25

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of solid tumours. The major dose-limiting factor is nephrotoxicity, in particular in the proximal tubule. Here, we use an integrated omics approach, including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics coupled to biokinetics to identify cell stress response pathways induced by cisplatin. The human renal proximal tubular cell line RPTEC/TERT1 was treated with sub-cytotoxic concentrations of cisplatin (0.5 and 2 μM) in a daily repeat dose treating regime for up to 14 days. Biokinetic analysis showed that cisplatin was taken up from the basolateral compartment, transported to the apical compartment, and accumulated in cells over time. This is in line with basolateral uptake of cisplatin via organic cation transporter 2 and bioactivation via gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase located on the apical side of proximal tubular cells. Cisplatin affected several pathways including, p53 signalling, Nrf2 mediated oxidative stress response, mitochondrial processes, mTOR and AMPK signalling. In addition, we identified novel pathways changed by cisplatin, including eIF2 signalling, actin nucleation via the ARP/WASP complex and regulation of cell polarization. In conclusion, using an integrated omic approach together with biokinetics we have identified both novel and established mechanisms of cisplatin toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Luminal and basolateral uptake of insulin in isolated perfused, proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.; Nielsen, J.T.; Christensen, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was performed to quantitate compare the luminal and the peritubular uptake of 125 I-insulin in isolated, perfused, proximal tubules from rabbit kidneys. 125 I-insulin was added in physiological concentrations to either the perfusate or the bath fluid for 30 min. The luminal uptake in 30 min averaged 0.76 pg/mm at physiological concentrations and 18.0 pg/mm at high insulin concentrations. About 15-41% of the absorbed insulin was digested and 125 I-insulin at physiological and high concentrations in the bath was 0.136 and 0.318 pg, respectively. The data indicates that insulin is bound/absorbed at the basolateral membranes both by a saturable specific mechanism and a nonspecific, nonsaturable mechanism. The basolateral absorption constituted 15.2 and 1.8% of the total tubular extraction of insulin at physiological and high insulin concentrations, respectively. Electron microscope autoradiography showed that, after luminal as well as basolateral endocytosis, insulin was exclusively accumulated in endocytic vacuoles and lysosomes

  5. Premeiotic germ cell defect in seminiferous tubules of Atm-null testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takubo, Keiyo; Hirao, Atsushi; Ohmura, Masako; Azuma, Masaki; Arai, Fumio; Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    Lifelong spermatogenesis is maintained by coordinated sequential processes including self-renewal of stem cells, proliferation of spermatogonial cells, meiotic division, and spermiogenesis. It has been shown that ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) is required for meiotic division of the seminiferous tubules. Here, we show that, in addition to its role in meiosis, ATM has a pivotal role in premeiotic germ cell maintenance. ATM is activated in premeiotic spermatogonial cells and the Atm-null testis shows progressive degeneration. In Atm-null testicular cells, differing from bone marrow cells of Atm-null mice, reactive oxygen species-mediated p16 Ink4a activation does not occur in Atm-null premeiotic germ cells, which suggests the involvement of different signaling pathways from bone marrow defects. Although Atm-null bone marrow undergoes p16 Ink4a -mediated cellular senescence program, Atm-null premeiotic germ cells exhibited cell cycle arrest and apoptotic elimination of premeiotic germ cells, which is different from p16 Ink4a -mediated senescence

  6. The myopathy-causing mutation DNM2-S619L leads to defective tubulation in vitro and in developing zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Gibbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DNM2 is a ubiquitously expressed GTPase that regulates multiple subcellular processes. Mutations in DNM2 are a common cause of centronuclear myopathy, a severe disorder characterized by altered skeletal muscle structure and function. The precise mechanisms underlying disease-associated DNM2 mutations are unresolved. We examined the common DNM2-S619L mutation using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. Expression of DNM2-S619L in zebrafish led to the accumulation of aberrant vesicular structures and to defective excitation-contraction coupling. Expression of DNM2-S619L in COS7 cells resulted in defective BIN1-dependent tubule formation. These data suggest that DNM2-S619L causes disease, in part, by interfering with membrane tubulation.

  7. Protective Effect of Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) on Morphometric and Morphologic Alterations of Seminiferous Tubules in STZ Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar; Kabiri Balajadeh, Babak; Ghafari, Soraya; Azarhosh, Ramin; Khori, Vahid

    2011-09-01

    Urtica dioica L. has been known as a medicinal plant in the world. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica leaves on seminiferous tubules of diabetic rats. Animals were allocated to control, diabetic and protective groups. Treated animals received extract of U. dioica (100 mg/ kg/ day) IP for the first 5 days and STZ injection on the 6th day. After 5 weeks, testes removed and stained with H&E technique. Tubular cell disintegration, sertoli and spermatogonia cell vacuolization, and decrease in sperm concentration observed in diabetic in comparison with control and protective groups. External seminiferous tubular diameter and seminiferous epithelial height significantly reduced (Pdioica, before induction of diabetes; has protective role on seminiferous tubules alterations.

  8. Data on Na,K-ATPase in primary cultures of renal proximal tubule cells treated with catecholamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Taub

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article is concerned with chronic regulation of Na,K-ATPase by catecholamines. After a chronic treatment, inhibition of Na,K-ATPase activity was observed in cultures with dopamine, while a stimulation was observed in cultures treated with norepinephrine. Following a chronic incubation with guanabenz, an α adrenergic agonist, an increase in Na,K-ATPase α and β subunit mRNAs was observed. This data supports the research article entitled, “Renal proximal tubule Na, K-ATPase is controlled by CREB regulated transcriptional coactivators as well as salt inducible kinase 1” (Taub et al. 2015 [1]. Keywords: Catecholamines, Kidney, Proximal tubule, Na,K-ATPase, Chronic

  9. Perceptual learning and adult cortical plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Charles D; Li, Wu; Piech, Valentin

    2009-06-15

    The visual cortex retains the capacity for experience-dependent changes, or plasticity, of cortical function and cortical circuitry, throughout life. These changes constitute the mechanism of perceptual learning in normal visual experience and in recovery of function after CNS damage. Such plasticity can be seen at multiple stages in the visual pathway, including primary visual cortex. The manifestation of the functional changes associated with perceptual learning involve both long term modification of cortical circuits during the course of learning, and short term dynamics in the functional properties of cortical neurons. These dynamics are subject to top-down influences of attention, expectation and perceptual task. As a consequence, each cortical area is an adaptive processor, altering its function in accordance to immediate perceptual demands.

  10. Fabrication of Collagen Gel Hollow Fibers by Covalent Cross-Linking for Construction of Bioengineering Renal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chong; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Qichen; Meng, Qin

    2015-09-09

    Collagen, the most used natural biomacromolecule, has been extensively utilized to make scaffolds for cell cultures in tissue engineering, but has never been fabricated into the configuration of a hollow fiber (HF) for cell culture due to its poor mechanical properties. In this study, renal tubular cell-laden collagen hollow fiber (Col HF) was fabricated by dissolving sacrificial Ca-alginate cores from collagen shells strengthened by carbodiimide cross-linking. The inner/outer diameters of the Col HF were precisely controlled by the flow rates of core alginate/shell collagen solution in the microfluidic device. As found, the renal tubular cells self-assembled into renal tubules with diameters of 50-200 μm post to the culture in Col HF for 10 days. According to the 3D reconstructed confocal images or HE staining, the renal cells appeared as a tight tubular monolayer on the Col HF inner surface, sustaining more 3D cell morphology than the cell layer on the 2D flat collagen gel surface. Moreover, compared with the cultures in either a Transwell or polymer HF membrane, the renal tubules in Col HF exhibited at least 1-fold higher activity on brush border enzymes of alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyltransferase, consistent with their gene expressions. The enhancement occurred similarly on multidrug resistance protein 2 and glucose uptake. Such bioengineered renal tubules in Col HF will present great potential as alternatives to synthetic HF in both clinical use and pharmaceutical investigation.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of dendrimer-functionalized nano-hydroxyapatite and its application in dentin tubule occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuandong; Xie, Fangfang; Ma, Xueling; Hao, Yuhong; Qin, Hejia; Long, Jindong

    2017-06-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity. In this paper, we successfully modified nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) with carboxyl-terminated polyamidoamine dendrimers by an aqueous-based chemical method and verified by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then the demineralization dentin discs were randomly divided into 4 groups, corresponding to subsequent brushing experiments: deionized water and kept in artificial saliva (AS), dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP and stored in AS, n-HAP and saved in AS, dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP and stored in deionized water. After 7 days of simulated brushing, dentin discs followed the in vitro characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and microhardness test. These data suggested that dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP could crosslink with collagen fibers and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, the new material can induce the HAP formation with the help of superficial carboxyl and fill the spaces in dentinal tubules furtherly. The microhardness of dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP-treated specimens was significantly higher than others. In summary, dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP can be a new therapeutic material for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

  12. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Discrimination of cortical laminae using MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-11-15

    Typically MEG source reconstruction is used to estimate the distribution of current flow on a single anatomically derived cortical surface model. In this study we use two such models representing superficial and deep cortical laminae. We establish how well we can discriminate between these two different cortical layer models based on the same MEG data in the presence of different levels of co-registration noise, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and cortical patch size. We demonstrate that it is possible to make a distinction between superficial and deep cortical laminae for levels of co-registration noise of less than 2mm translation and 2° rotation at SNR > 11 dB. We also show that an incorrect estimate of cortical patch size will tend to bias layer estimates. We then use a 3D printed head-cast (Troebinger et al., 2014) to achieve comparable levels of co-registration noise, in an auditory evoked response paradigm, and show that it is possible to discriminate between these cortical layer models in real data. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reye's syndrome with cortical laminar necrosis: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Takahashi, S.; Ishii, K.; Higano, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Haginoya, K.; Iinuma, K.

    1996-01-01

    Serial MRI findings are described in two patients with Reye's syndrome, demonstrating diffuse cortical and white matter changes. In the acute stage, T2-weighted images showed subtle but definite laminar high signal and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images laminar enhancement, along the entire cerebral cortex bilaterally. In the chronic stage, unenhanced T1-weighted images showed diffuse cortical laminar high signal. These characteristic MRI features seemed very similar to those of laminar cortical necrosis in hypoxic brain damage. MRI also displayed delayed white matter changes with cerebral atrophy. (orig.)

  15. Cortical heterotopia in Aicardi's syndrome - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenski, N.; Bosnjak, V.; Ligutic, I.; Marusic-Della Marina, B.

    1988-01-01

    The case of 5-month-old female infant with Aicardi's syndrome is presented. The main clinical features were severe developmental retardation and intractable epileptic seizures. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed pathognomonic choriorethinopathy. Ultrasonic examination of the brain detected agenesis of the corpus callosum, whereas CT showed a coexisting malformation of the brain, i.e. cortical heterotopia of the gray matter. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is an entity well-recognized by sonography. However, ultrasonography is an insufficient modality for the visualization of cortical heterotopia which is common to all cases of Aicardi's syndrome. Therefore, in cases of suspected Aicardi's syndrome CT is recommended, as it enables the diagnosis of cortical heterotopia. (orig.)

  16. The transcriptome of the Didelphis virginiana opossum kidney OK proximal tubule cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbach, Megan L; Sethi, Rahil; Avula, Raghunandan; Lamb, Janette; Hollingshead, Deborah J; Finegold, David N; Locker, Joseph D; Chandran, Uma R; Weisz, Ora A

    2017-09-01

    The OK cell line derived from the kidney of a female opossum Didelphis virginiana has proven to be a useful model in which to investigate the unique regulation of ion transport and membrane trafficking mechanisms in the proximal tubule (PT). Sequence data and comparison of the transcriptome of this cell line to eutherian mammal PTs would further broaden the utility of this culture model. However, the genomic sequence for D. virginiana is not available and although a draft genome sequence for the opossum Monodelphis domestica (sequenced in 2012 by the Broad Institute) exists, transcripts sequenced from both species show significant divergence. The M. domestica sequence is not highly annotated, and the majority of transcripts are predicted rather than experimentally validated. Using deep RNA sequencing of the D. virginiana OK cell line, we characterized its transcriptome via de novo transcriptome assembly and alignment to the M. domestica genome. The quality of the de novo assembled transcriptome was assessed by the extent of homology to sequences in nucleotide and protein databases. Gene expression levels in the OK cell line, from both the de novo transcriptome and genes aligned to the M. domestica genome, were compared with publicly available rat kidney nephron segment expression data. Our studies demonstrate the expression in OK cells of numerous PT-specific ion transporters and other key proteins relevant for rodent and human PT function. Additionally, the sequence and expression data reported here provide an important resource for genetic manipulation and other studies on PT cell function using these cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Permeation of macromolecules into the renal glomerular basement membrane and capture by the tubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Altenburg, Michael K.; Sanford, Ryan; Willett, Julian D.; Bleasdale, Benjamin; Ballou, Byron; Wilder, Jennifer; Li, Feng; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Berg, Ulla B.; Smithies, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    How the kidney prevents urinary excretion of plasma proteins continues to be debated. Here, using unfixed whole-mount mouse kidneys, we show that fluorescent-tagged proteins and neutral dextrans permeate into the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), in general agreement with Ogston's 1958 equation describing how permeation into gels is related to molecular size. Electron-microscopic analyses of kidneys fixed seconds to hours after injecting gold-tagged albumin, negatively charged gold nanoparticles, and stable oligoclusters of gold nanoparticles show that permeation into the lamina densa of the GBM is size-sensitive. Nanoparticles comparable in size with IgG dimers do not permeate into it. IgG monomer-sized particles permeate to some extent. Albumin-sized particles permeate extensively into the lamina densa. Particles traversing the lamina densa tend to accumulate upstream of the podocyte glycocalyx that spans the slit, but none are observed upstream of the slit diaphragm. At low concentrations, ovalbumin-sized nanoparticles reach the primary filtrate, are captured by proximal tubule cells, and are endocytosed. At higher concentrations, tubular capture is saturated, and they reach the urine. In mouse models of Pierson’s or Alport’s proteinuric syndromes resulting from defects in GBM structural proteins (laminin β2 or collagen α3 IV), the GBM is irregularly swollen, the lamina densa is absent, and permeation is increased. Our observations indicate that size-dependent permeation into the lamina densa of the GBM and the podocyte glycocalyx, together with saturable tubular capture, determines which macromolecules reach the urine without the need to invoke direct size selection by the slit diaphragm. PMID:28246329

  18. HK2 Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells Synthesize and Secrete Plasma Proteins Predominantly Through the Apical Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2017-04-01

    Renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTECs) are known to reabsorb salts and small plasma proteins filtered through Bowman's capsule. Following acute kidney injury, PTECs assume some characteristics of hepatocytes in producing various plasma proteins. We now demonstrate that even at a resting state, a PTEC cell line, HK2 expresses mRNAs for and synthesizes and secretes plasma proteins in a complex with complement C3, an α 2 -macroglobulin family chaperone, including albumin, transferrin, α 1 -antitrypsin, α 1 -antichymotrypsin, α 2 -HS-glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, C1-inhibitor, secreted phosphoprotein-24, and insulin-like growth factor-1. When grown on transwell inserts, HK2 cells predominantly secrete (∼90%) plasma proteins into the apical side and a smaller fraction into the basolateral side as determined by ELISA assays. When cultured in the presence of exogenous cytokines such as IL1β, IL6, TNFα, BMP2, or TGFβ1, HK2 cell mRNA expressions for plasma proteins were variably affected whereas basolateral secretions were elevated to or in excess of those of the apical level. In addition, HK2 cells produce proTGFβ1 with its intact N-terminal latency associated peptide and latent-TGF-β-binding proteins. The complex cannot be dissociated under conditions of SDS, heating, and electrophoresis. Moreover, HK2 cells maintain their ability to quickly uptake exogenously added serum proteins from the culture medium, as if they are recognized differently by the endocytic receptors. These results provide new insight into the hepatization of PTECs. In addition to their unique uptake of plasma proteins and salts from the filtrate, they are a source of urinary proteins under normal conditions as wells as in chronic and acute kidney diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 924-933, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Induction of apoptosis in cultured human proximal tubule cells by fumonisins and fumonisin metabolites

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    Seefelder, W; Humpf, H -U; Schwerdt, G; Freudinger, R; Gekle, M

    2003-10-15

    Fumonisin B{sub 1} (FB{sub 1}) causes apoptosis in a variety of cell types and tissues but the apoptotic potential of other fumonisins and fumonisin metabolites has not been determined and the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In our studies we exposed human proximal tubule-derived cells (IHKE cells) to FB{sub 1}, fumonisin B{sub 2} (FB{sub 2}), fumonisin B{sub 3} (FB{sub 3}), hydrolyzed fumonisin B{sub 1} (HFB{sub 1}) and N-palmitoyl-hydrolyzed fumonisin B{sub 1} (N-Pal-HFB{sub 1}) and investigated caspase-3 activation, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Exposure to 10 {mu}mol/L FB{sub 1} for 24 h led to a significant increase in caspase-3 activity, chromatin condensation and to DNA fragmentation. All other tested compounds did not show any significant activation of caspase-3 activity nor chromatin condensation and DNA-fragmentation. Furthermore, we examined if a sphinganine accumulation is correlated with an induction of apoptosis in IHKE cells. Therefore we used a liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry(LC/ESI-MS)-method using phytosphingosine as an internal standard to determine sphinganine and sphingosine concentrations in IHKE cells. Whereas a significant increase of sphinganine (up to 7000% compared to control cells) was observed with all fumonisin-derivates, sphingosine levels nearly remained unchanged indicating that all substrates inhibited ceramide synthase effectively. These results demonstrate that all compounds let to increased sphinganine levels in IHKE cells but only FB{sub 1} was able to induce apoptosis. We conclude that the inhibition of the ceramide synthase is not per se a predictor whether or not fumonisins induce apoptosis.

  20. Induction of apoptosis in cultured human proximal tubule cells by fumonisins and fumonisin metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seefelder, W.; Humpf, H.-U.; Schwerdt, G.; Freudinger, R.; Gekle, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) causes apoptosis in a variety of cell types and tissues but the apoptotic potential of other fumonisins and fumonisin metabolites has not been determined and the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In our studies we exposed human proximal tubule-derived cells (IHKE cells) to FB 1 , fumonisin B 2 (FB 2 ), fumonisin B 3 (FB 3 ), hydrolyzed fumonisin B 1 (HFB 1 ) and N-palmitoyl-hydrolyzed fumonisin B 1 (N-Pal-HFB 1 ) and investigated caspase-3 activation, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Exposure to 10 μmol/L FB 1 for 24 h led to a significant increase in caspase-3 activity, chromatin condensation and to DNA fragmentation. All other tested compounds did not show any significant activation of caspase-3 activity nor chromatin condensation and DNA-fragmentation. Furthermore, we examined if a sphinganine accumulation is correlated with an induction of apoptosis in IHKE cells. Therefore we used a liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry(LC/ESI-MS)-method using phytosphingosine as an internal standard to determine sphinganine and sphingosine concentrations in IHKE cells. Whereas a significant increase of sphinganine (up to 7000% compared to control cells) was observed with all fumonisin-derivates, sphingosine levels nearly remained unchanged indicating that all substrates inhibited ceramide synthase effectively. These results demonstrate that all compounds let to increased sphinganine levels in IHKE cells but only FB 1 was able to induce apoptosis. We conclude that the inhibition of the ceramide synthase is not per se a predictor whether or not fumonisins induce apoptosis

  1. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Atgl gene deletion predisposes to proximal tubule damage by impairing the fatty acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wen; Zhang, Qiong; Cheng, Shiwu; Huang, Jie; Diao, Ge; Han, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis is the final common pathway of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Normal lipid metabolism is integral to renal physiology, and disturbances of renal lipid metabolism are increasingly being linked with CKD, including the fibrosis. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme of lipolysis. In the present study, we used Atgl −/− mice to investigate whether ATGL played a role in the regulation of proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) lipid metabolism and renal fibrosis development. ATGL deficiency led to lipid vacuolation of PCT and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, accompanied by massive albuminuria and decreased creatinine clearance rate (Ccr). In vitro experiments indicated that inhibition of ATGL in proximal tubular cell line HK-2 promoted intracellular lipid deposition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and cell apoptosis. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that ATGL inhibition decreased the renal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα(PPARα) expression, which implied the suppressed lipid metabolism. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could partially reverse the effect of ROS accumulation and cell apoptosis, but could not restore the PPARαdecrease. These data raise the possibility that ATGL deficiency could impair the renal fatty acid metabolism though inhibiting PPARαexpression, which may lead to lipid deposition and cell apoptosis of PCT, and finally contribute to the renal fibrosis and dysfunction. - Highlights: • Atgl −/− mice develop tubulointerstitial damage and renal dysfunction. • ATGL deficiency results in lipid accumulation and apoptosis of proximal tubular cells. • ROS scavenger alleviates the ATGL-knockdown mediated lipid accumulation and apoptosis. • PPARαdown-regulation is the reason of ROS elevating in ATGL-knockdown HK-2 cells.

  3. Swine cortical and cancellous bone: histomorphometric and densitometric characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Andreis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Swine bone morphology, composition and remodelling are similar to humans’, therefore they are considered good models in bone-related research. They have been used for several studies involving bone growth, bone and cartilage fractures and femoral head osteonecrosis. Nevertheless, the literature about pig normal bone features is incomplete. This work aims to fill the literature gaps on the microarchitecture and Bone Mineral Density (BMD of swine femoral diaphysis and distal epiphysis and tibial plateau and diaphysis. Materials and methods: Five hind limbs were collected from slaughtered 80-100 kg pigs. Microscopic analysis of cortical and cancellous bone from middle/distal femur and proximal/middle tibia was performed to determine basic histomorphometric parameters at different sites. Dual-energy X-Rays Absorptiometry was also employed to evaluate BMD. ANOVA and correlation between BMD, bone area (BA and cortical thickness were performed. Results and discussion: Diaphyseal cortical bone was mostly plexiform both in the tibia and the femur; primary/secondary osteons without clear organization were also found. Mean values for bone area, bone perimeter, trabecular width, number and separation and BMD at different anatomical sites were defined. No significant difference was found for these values at different anatomical sites. BMD proved to be positively correlated with cortical thickness (r=0,80; p<0,01. Despite the small sample size, these results seem homogeneous. They could therefore represent reference values for normal bone parameters in pigs. Applied anatomy and regenerative medicine, in fact, demand very precise information about bone micromorphology, composition and density to provide reliable indication in bone substitutes building. Moreover, since the interpretation of bone abnormalities is based on mastering normal bone characteristics, the definition of reference parameters is mandatory to avoid misinterpretation and

  4. Biomechanics of far cortical locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Feist, Florian

    2011-02-01

    The development of far cortical locking (FCL) was motivated by a conundrum: locked plating constructs provide inherently rigid stabilization, yet they should facilitate biologic fixation and secondary bone healing that relies on flexible fixation to stimulate callus formation. Recent studies have confirmed that the high stiffness of standard locked plating constructs can suppress interfragmentary motion to a level that is insufficient to reliably promote secondary fracture healing by callus formation. Furthermore, rigid locking screws cause an uneven stress distribution that may lead to stress fracture at the end screw and stress shielding under the plate. This review summarizes four key features of FCL constructs that have been shown to enhance fixation and healing of fractures: flexible fixation, load distribution, progressive stiffening, and parallel interfragmentary motion. Specifically, flexible fixation provided by FCL reduces the stiffness of a locked plating construct by 80% to 88% to actively promote callus proliferation similar to an external fixator. Load is evenly distributed between FCL screws to mitigate stress risers at the end screw. Progressive stiffening occurs by near cortex support of FCL screws and provides additional support under elevated loading. Finally, parallel interfragmentary motion by the S-shaped flexion of FCL screws promotes symmetric callus formation. In combination, these features of FCL constructs have been shown to induce more callus and to yield significantly stronger and more consistent healing compared with standard locked plating constructs. As such, FCL constructs function as true internal fixators by replicating the biomechanical behavior and biologic healing response of external fixators.

  5. Perceptual incongruence influences bistability and cortical activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.J.; Tong, F.; Hagoort, P.; van Ee, R.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a parametric psychophysical design in combination with functional imaging to examine the influence of metric changes in perceptual incongruence on perceptual alternation rates and cortical responses. Subjects viewed a bistable stimulus defined by incongruent depth cues; bistability

  6. Cortical electrophysiological network dynamics of feedback learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Wilmes, K.A.; van de Vijver, I.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the neurophysiological mechanisms of learning is important for both fundamental and clinical neuroscience. We present a neurophysiologically inspired framework for understanding cortical mechanisms of feedback-guided learning. This framework is based on dynamic changes in systems-level

  7. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p area (Brodmann area 37; p areas.

  8. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  9. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  10. The developing human connectome project: A minimal processing pipeline for neonatal cortical surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Emma C; Schuh, Andreas; Wright, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Bozek, Jelena; Counsell, Serena J; Steinweg, Johannes; Vecchiato, Katy; Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Lenz, Gregor; Mortari, Filippo; Tenev, Tencho; Duff, Eugene P; Bastiani, Matteo; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Hughes, Emer; Tusor, Nora; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Hutter, Jana; Price, Anthony N; Teixeira, Rui Pedro A G; Murgasova, Maria; Victor, Suresh; Kelly, Christopher; Rutherford, Mary A; Smith, Stephen M; Edwards, A David; Hajnal, Joseph V; Jenkinson, Mark; Rueckert, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    The Developing Human Connectome Project (dHCP) seeks to create the first 4-dimensional connectome of early life. Understanding this connectome in detail may provide insights into normal as well as abnormal patterns of brain development. Following established best practices adopted by the WU-MINN Human Connectome Project (HCP), and pioneered by FreeSurfer, the project utilises cortical surface-based processing pipelines. In this paper, we propose a fully automated processing pipeline for the structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the developing neonatal brain. This proposed pipeline consists of a refined framework for cortical and sub-cortical volume segmentation, cortical surface extraction, and cortical surface inflation, which has been specifically designed to address considerable differences between adult and neonatal brains, as imaged using MRI. Using the proposed pipeline our results demonstrate that images collected from 465 subjects ranging from 28 to 45 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) can be processed fully automatically; generating cortical surface models that are topologically correct, and correspond well with manual evaluations of tissue boundaries in 85% of cases. Results improve on state-of-the-art neonatal tissue segmentation models and significant errors were found in only 2% of cases, where these corresponded to subjects with high motion. Downstream, these surfaces will enhance comparisons of functional and diffusion MRI datasets, supporting the modelling of emerging patterns of brain connectivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-07-04

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Extent of cortical involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis--an analysis based on cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorns, Johannes; Jansma, Henk; Peschel, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Mohammadi, Bahram; Dengler, Reinhard; Münte, Thomas F

    2013-10-18

    Besides the defining involvement of upper and lower motor neurons, the involvement of extramotor structures has been increasingly acknowledged in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we investigated a group of 14 mildly to moderately affected ALS patients and 14 age-matched healthy control participants using cortical thickness analysis. Cortical thickness was determined from high resolution 3D T1 magnetic resonance images and involved semiautomatic segmentation in grey and white matter, cortical alignment and determination of thickness using the Laplace method. In addition to a whole-cortex analysis a region of interest approach was applied. ALS patients showed regions of significant cortical thinning in the pre- and postcentral gyri bilaterally. Further regions of cortical thinning included superior and inferior parietal lobule, angular and supramarginal gyrus, insula, superior frontal, temporal and occipital regions, thus further substantiating extramotor involvement in ALS. A relationship between cortical thickness of the right superior frontal cortex and clinical severity (assessed by the ALS functional rating scale) was also demonstrated. Cortical thickness is reduced in ALS not only in motor areas but in widespread non-motor cortical areas. Cortical thickness is related to clinical severity.

  13. Urinary loss of glucose, phosphate, and protein by diffusion into proximal straight tubules injured by D-serine and maleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, F.A.; Nakamura, S.; Goldman, B.

    1985-01-01

    In several models of acute renal failure leakage of glomerular filtrate out of the tubule is an important pathogenetic mechanism; however, bidirectional diffusion of solute to account for certain pathophysiologic features of acute renal failure has received meager attention. Using micropuncture and clearance methods, the authors assessed sequentially leakage of solutes and inulin across proximal straight tubules (PST) injured by two nephrotoxins. In d-serine-treated rats with extensive necrosis of PST, the basis for glucosuria and tubular leakage of inulin was studied. Glucose absorption by the proximal convoluted tubule and glucose delivery to the PST were normal, but glucose delivery to the distal tubule was increased nearly 8-fold, indicating diffusion of glucose from interstitial to tubular luminal fluid across the necrotic PST. Total kidney inulin clearance was greatly reduced, but single nephron glomerular filtration rate, based on proximal convoluted tubule samples, was normal, indicating tubular loss of inulin. Urinary recovery of [ 14 C]inulin infused into tubular lumina revealed that proximal convoluted tubule and distal tubule were impermeable to inulin and that inulin diffused out of the necrotic PST. The progressive return over 6 days of tubular impermeability for inulin correlated with relining of PST with new cells. In maleic acid-treated rats the site and extent of tubular necrosis and the nature of urinary loss of solutes were studied. Microdissection revealed that maleic acid caused limited necrosis of PST which averaged 7.4% of total proximal tubular length. Increased urinary excretion of protein, phosphate, and glucose and increased tubular permeability to microinfused [ 14 C]inulin occurred with the onset of PST necrosis, and return of these abnormalities to normal correlated with the degree of cellular repair of the PST

  14. Cortical herniation through compressive subdural membrane in an infant with a history of a large bihemispheric subdural hematoma and subdural-peritoneal shunt: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoco, Aleka; Emily Bennett, E; Recinos, Violette

    2017-02-01

    Cortical herniation through subdural membrane formation is a rare complication of chronic subdural fluid collections and may occur following subdural shunting. The authors present a unique case of progressive cortical herniation through a compressive subdural membrane that occurred concomitant with a functioning subdural-peritoneal shunt.

  15. Immunohistochemical profile of some neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in the seminiferous tubules of rats treated by lonidamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Bronzetti, E; Saso, L; Felici, L M; D'Ambrosio, A; Forte, F; Grande, C; Ortolani, F

    2007-01-01

    Lonidamine (LND) or [1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid] is an anticancer and antispermatogenic drug that exerts a large number of effects on tumor cells and germ cells. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed at 22 degrees C on a 12-h light/12-h dark cycle 1 week before the experiments, with free access to food and water. LND was suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose at a concentration of 10 mg/mL and administered orally at the dose of 10 mL/kg (b.w.) as a single dose. Control rats received an equal amount of vehicle. Testes were removed, fixed for 24 h in 2% glutaraldehyde and 2% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M sodium phosphate (pH 7.2 at 22 degrees C), rinsed with the same buffer, and stored at room temperature. From each sample, a block of tissue was removed by sectioning through the organ. After dehydration in ethanol at increasing concentrations (70-100%), each block was embedded in paraffin and serial 5 mm thick sections were cut using a rotatory microtome. The immunoreactivity for NTs has been observed in spermatogonia of untreated rats, while the rats treated with LND showed an immunohistochemical localization in all the stages of germinal cells. The generally well-expressed immunoreactivity for the neurotrophins receptors in treated rats observed in our study is presumably attributable to alterations of the receptors' structure and/or expression leading to changes of the activity, affinity, localization or protein interactions that may depend on sensitization of ion channels (induced by LND). Neurotrophins (NTs) appear to be interesting proteins for the modulation of sperm maturation and motility with a prominent role for the nerve growth factor (NGF), that may exert an autocrine or paracrine role. We therefore investigated the location and distribution of immunoreactivity for some neurotransmitters (SP, VIP, CGRP, nNOS, Chat), neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, NT-3) and their own receptors (TrKA, TrKB, TrKC, p75) in the seminiferous tubules

  16. Immunohistochemical profile of some neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in the seminiferous tubules of rats treated by lonidamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Artico

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Lonidamine (LND or [1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl-1H-indazole-3- carboxylic acid] is an anticancer and antispermatogenic drug that exerts a large number of effects on tumor cells and germ cells. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed at 22°C on a 12-h light/12-h dark cycle 1 week before the experiments, with free access to food and water. LND was suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose at a concentration of 10 mg/mL and administered orally at the dose of 10 mL/kg (b.w. as a single dose. Control rats received an equal amount of vehicle. Testes were removed, fixed for 24 h in 2% glutaraldehyde and 2% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M sodium phosphate (pH 7.2 at 22°C, rinsed with the same buffer, and stored at room temperature. From each sample, a block of tissue was removed by sectioning through the organ. After dehydration in ethanol at increasing concentrations (70-100%, each block was embedded in paraffin and serial 5 mm thick sections were cut using a rotatory microtome. The immunoreactivity for NTs has been observed in spermatogonia of untreated rats, while the rats treated with LND showed an immunohistochemical localization in all the stages of germinal cells. The generally well-expressed immunoreactivity for the neurotrophins receptors in treated rats observed in our study is presumably attributable to alterations of the receptors’ structure and/or expression leading to changes of the activity, affinity, localization or protein interactions that may depend on sensitization of ion channels (induced by LND. Neurotrophins (NTs appear to be interesting proteins for the modulation of sperm maturation and motility with a prominent role for the nerve growth factor (NGF, that may exert an autocrine or paracrine role.We therefore investigated the location and distribution of immunoreactivity for some neurotransmitters (SP, VIP, CGRP, nNOS, Chat, neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, NT-3 and their own receptors (TrKA, TrKB, TrKC, p75 in the seminiferous tubules of

  17. Unique role of NADPH oxidase 5 in oxidative stress in human renal proximal tubule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiying Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases are the major sources of reactive oxygen species in cardiovascular, neural, and kidney cells. The NADPH oxidase 5 (NOX5 gene is present in humans but not rodents. Because Nox isoforms in renal proximal tubules (RPTs are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, we tested the hypothesis that NOX5 is differentially expressed in RPT cells from normotensive (NT and hypertensive subjects (HT. We found that NOX5 mRNA, total NOX5 protein, and apical membrane NOX5 protein were 4.2±0.7-fold, 5.2±0.7-fold, and 2.8±0.5-fold greater in HT than NT. Basal total NADPH oxidase activity was 4.5±0.2-fold and basal NOX5 activity in NOX5 immunoprecipitates was 6.2±0.2-fold greater in HT than NT (P=<0.001, n=6–14/group. Ionomycin increased total NOX and NOX5 activities in RPT cells from HT (P<0.01, n=4, ANOVA, effects that were abrogated by pre-treatment of the RPT cells with diphenylene-iodonium or superoxide dismutase. Silencing NOX5 using NOX5-siRNA decreased NADPH oxidase activity (−45.1±3.2% vs. mock-siRNA, n=6–8 in HT. D1-like receptor stimulation decreased NADPH oxidase activity to a greater extent in NT (−32.5±1.8% than HT (−14.8±1.8. In contrast to the marked increase in expression and activity of NOX5 in HT, NOX1 mRNA and protein were minimally increased in HT, relative to NT; total NOX2 and NOX4 proteins were not different between HT and NT, while the increase in apical RPT cell membrane NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4 proteins in HT, relative to NT, was much less than those observed with NOX5. Thus, we demonstrate, for the first time, that NOX5 is expressed in human RPT cells and to greater extent than the other Nox isoforms in HT than NT. We suggest that the increased expression of NOX5, which may be responsible for the increased oxidative stress in RPT cells in human essential hypertension, is caused, in part, by a defective renal dopaminergic system.

  18. Feulgen-DNA response and chromatin condensation in Malpighian tubules of Melipona rufiventris and Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera, Apoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampumbu, André Roberto; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2008-08-01

    Melipona quadrifasciata and Melipona rufiventris are stingless bee species which present low and high heterochromatin content, respectively, on their mitotic chromosomes as assessed visually after a C-banding assay. However, these species do not show differences in the C-banding responses of their Malpighian tubule interphase nuclei. In the present study, the Feulgen-DNA response, which could inform on differences in DNA depurination due to differences in chromatin condensation, was compared in the cell nuclei of the Malpighian tubules of these species. It was hypothesized that differences in acid hydrolysis kinetics patterns, as assessed by Feulgen reaction and studied microspectrophotometrically, could discriminate M. quadrifasciata and M. rufiventris interphase nuclei not distinguishable with the C-banding method. Feulgen-DNA values corresponding to more than one ploidy class were found in both species; these values at the hydrolysis time corresponding to the maximal DNA depurination for each ploidy degree were higher in M. quadrifasciata, reflecting a higher DNA content in the Malpighian tubule cell nuclei of this species compared to those of M. rufiventris at the same larval instar. The maximal Feulgen-DNA values of M. quadrifasciata after short (50 min) and long (90 min) hydrolysis times were found to be closer to each other, while those of M. rufiventris occurred sharply at the long hydrolysis time, indicating that DNA depurination in M. quadrifasciata occurred faster. This result is probably related to the involvement of differences in chromatin condensation; it agrees with the idea that M. rufiventris contains more heterochromatin than M. quadrifasciata, which is supported by the analysis of results obtained with the image analysis parameter average absorption ratio. The depurination kinetics studied here with the Feulgen reaction were revealed to be more pertinent than the C-banding technique in establishing differences in levels of chromatin condensation

  19. The effect of L-cysteine on the portion-selective uptake of cadmium in the renal proximal tubule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masataka; Sano, Kenichi; Webb, M.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), co-administered with an excess of L-cysteine, accumulates rapidly in the kidneys of the rat. After subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of 3 μmol CdCl 2 /kg body wt the concentrations of Cd in the blood and kidneys increase with the dose of cysteine over the range 0.06-5.0 mmol/kg body wt. At cysteine doses of less than 1.5 mmol/kg body wt the ratio of the concentrations of Cd in the outer medulla and cortex of the kidney remains the same as that after the injection of Cd alone. This ratio, however, is more than doubled at dose levels of 5-10 mmol cysteine/kg body wt. Hepatic uptake of Cd is unaffected by doses of cysteine below 1.5 mmol/kg body wt but decreases markedly at higher doses. In animals that are dosed simultaneously with 5 mmol cysteine/kg body wt, renal uptake of 109 Cd is known to occur in the straight segments of the proximal tubules. At a dose level of less than 1.5 mmol cysteine/kg body wt the present autoradiographical studies show that 109 Cd is taken up predominantly by the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney cortex. At the critical dose level (1.5 mmol/kg body wt), cysteine decreases the retention of Cd at the s.c. injection site, but probably has little effect on the distribution of Cd between protein and other carrier molecules in the blood. This distribution, however, is altered at higher cysteine dose levels. It is suggested that, under the latter conditions, stable Cd-cysteine complexes are formed in the blood and are filtered readily through the glomeruli. These complexes are taken up in the kidney at the sites of cysteine reabsorption which, by studies with L-[ 35 S]-cysteine, are identified as the straight segments of the proximal tubules. (orig.)

  20. Accelerated recovery of renal mitochondrial and tubule homeostasis with SIRT1/PGC-1α activation following ischemia–reperfusion injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Jason A., E-mail: funkj@musc.edu [Center for Cell Death, Injury, and Regeneration, Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Schnellmann, Rick G., E-mail: schnell@musc.edu [Center for Cell Death, Injury, and Regeneration, Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Kidney ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury elicits cellular injury in the proximal tubule, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a pathological consequence of I/R. Promoting mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) as a repair mechanism after injury may offer a unique strategy to restore both mitochondrial and organ function. Rats subjected to bilateral renal pedicle ligation for 22 min were treated once daily with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 (5 mg/kg) starting 24 h after reperfusion until 72 h–144 h. SIRT1 expression was elevated in the renal cortex of rats after I/R + vehicle treatment (IRV), but was associated with less nuclear localization. SIRT1 expression was even further augmented and nuclear localization was restored in the kidneys of rats after I/R + SRT1720 treatment (IRS). PGC-1α was elevated at 72 h–144 h in IRV and IRS kidneys; however, SRT1720 treatment induced deacetylation of PGC-1α, a marker of activation. Mitochondrial proteins ATP synthase β, COX I, and NDUFB8, as well as mitochondrial respiration, were diminished 24 h–144 h in IRV rats, but were partially or fully restored in IRS rats. Urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) was persistently elevated in both IRV and IRS rats; however, KIM-1 tissue expression was attenuated in IRS rats. Additionally, sustained loss of Na{sup +},K{sup +}–ATPase expression and basolateral localization and elevated vimentin in IRV rats was normalized in IRS rats, suggesting restoration of a differentiated, polarized tubule epithelium. The results suggest that SRT1720 treatment expedited recovery of mitochondrial protein expression and function by enhancing MB, which was associated with faster proximal tubule repair. Targeting MB may offer unique therapeutic strategy following ischemic injury. - Highlights: • We examined recovery of mitochondrial and renal function after ischemia–reperfusion. • SRT1720 treatment after I/R induced mitochondrial biogenesis via SIRT1/PGC-1α. • Recovery of mitochondrial function was

  1. Effects of advanced glycation end products on ezrin-dependent functions in LLC-PK1 proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A; Gallicchio, Marisa A; McRobert, E Anne; Tikoo, Anjali; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    We have recently shown that advanced glycation products (AGEs) bind to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between cell membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. They are also involved in signal transduction pathways. They therefore have a critical role in normal cell processes, including modulation of cell shape, adhesion, and motility. We postulate that AGEs may contribute to diabetic complications by disrupting ERM function. In support of this hypothesis, AGEs inhibit ezrin-dependent tubulogenesis of proximal tubule cells. Phosphorylation is an important activating mechanism for ERM proteins, and AGEs inhibit ezrin phosphorylation mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  2. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment alters Na+ uptake in renal proximal tubule cells from adult offspring in a sex-specific manner

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yixin; Bi, Jianli; Pulgar, Victor M.; Figueroa, Jorge; Chappell, Mark; Rose, James C.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown a sex-specific effect of fetal programming on Na+ excretion in adult sheep. The site of this effect in the kidney is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) from adult male sheep exposed to betamethasone (Beta) before birth have greater Na+ uptake than do RPTCs from vehicle-exposed male sheep and that RPTCs from female sheep similarly exposed are not influenced by antenatal Beta. In isolated RPTCs from 1- to 1.5-yr-old male and femal...

  3. Assessment of cortical and sub-cortical function in neonates by electrophysiological monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jennekens, W.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the assessment of cortical and sub-cortical function in neonates by electrophysiological monitoring, i.e. to evaluate the function of the neonatal cortex and brainstem through quantitative analysis of signals readily available in the NICU. These signals include

  4. Network bursts in cortical neuronal cultures: 'noise - versus pacemaker'- driven neural network simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsun, T.; Stegenga, J.; le Feber, Jakob; Rutten, Wim

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the issue of spontaneous bursting activity in cortical neuronal cultures and explain what might cause this collective behavior using computer simulations of two different neural network models. While the common approach to acivate a passive network is done by introducing

  5. Stochastic amplification of fluctuations in cortical up-states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hidalgo

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons are bistable; as a consequence their local field potentials can fluctuate between quiescent and active states, generating slow 0.5 2 Hz oscillations which are widely known as transitions between Up and Down States. Despite a large number of studies on Up-Down transitions, deciphering its nature, mechanisms and function are still today challenging tasks. In this paper we focus on recent experimental evidence, showing that a class of spontaneous oscillations can emerge within the Up states. In particular, a non-trivial peak around 20 Hz appears in their associated power-spectra, what produces an enhancement of the activity power for higher frequencies (in the 30-90 Hz band. Moreover, this rhythm within Ups seems to be an emergent or collective phenomenon given that individual neurons do not lock to it as they remain mostly unsynchronized. Remarkably, similar oscillations (and the concomitant peak in the spectrum do not appear in the Down states. Here we shed light on these findings by using different computational models for the dynamics of cortical networks in presence of different levels of physiological complexity. Our conclusion, supported by both theory and simulations, is that the collective phenomenon of "stochastic amplification of fluctuations"--previously described in other contexts such as Ecology and Epidemiology--explains in an elegant and parsimonious manner, beyond model-dependent details, this extra-rhythm emerging only in the Up states but not in the Downs.

  6. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (ΔBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  7. The pelvic kidney of male Ambystoma maculatum (Amphibia, urodela, ambystomatidae) with special reference to the sexual collecting ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Dustin S; Sever, David M; Aldridge, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    This study details the gross and microscopic anatomy of the pelvic kidney in male Ambystoma maculatum. The nephron of male Ambystoma maculatum is divided into six distinct regions leading sequentially away from a renal corpuscle: (1) neck segment, which communicates with the coelomic cavity via a ventrally positioned pleuroperitoneal funnel, (2) proximal tubule, (3) intermediate segment, (4) distal tubule, (5) collecting tubule, and (6) collecting duct. The proximal tubule is divided into a vacuolated proximal region and a distal lysosomic region. The basal plasma membrane is modified into intertwining microvillus lamellae. The epithelium of the distal tubule varies little along its length and is demarcated by columns of mitochondria with their long axes oriented perpendicular to the basal lamina. The distal tubule possesses highly interdigitating microvillus lamellae from the lateral membranes and pronounced foot processes of the basal membrane that are not intertwined, but perpendicular to the basal lamina. The collecting tubule is lined by an epithelium with dark and light cells. Light cells are similar to those observed in the distal tuble except with less mitochondria and microvillus lamellae of the lateral and basal plasma membrane. Dark cells possess dark euchromatic nuclei and are filled with numerous small mitochondria. The epithelium of the neck segment, pleuroperitoneal funnel, and intermediate segment is composed entirely of ciliated cells with cilia protruding from only the central portion of the apical plasma membrane. The collecting duct is lined by a highly secretory epithelium that produces numerous membrane bound granules that stain positively for neutral carbohydrates and proteins. Apically positioned ciliated cells are intercalated between secretory cells. The collecting ducts anastomose caudally and unite with the Wolffian duct via a common collecting duct. The Wolffian duct is secretory, but not to the extent of the collecting duct

  8. Thiazolidinediones enhance sodium-coupled bicarbonate absorption from renal proximal tubules via PPARγ-dependent nongenomic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yoko; Suzuki, Masashi; Yamada, Hideomi; Horita, Shoko; Kunimi, Motoei; Yamazaki, Osamu; Shirai, Ayumi; Nakamura, Motonobu; Iso-O, Naoyuki; Li, Yuehong; Hara, Masumi; Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa; Moriyama, Nobuo; Kudo, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hayato; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Kume, Haruki; Enomoto, Yutaka; Homma, Yukio; Seki, George; Fujita, Toshiro

    2011-05-04

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) improve insulin resistance by activating a nuclear hormone receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). However, the use of TZDs is associated with plasma volume expansion through a mechanism that remains to be clarified. Here we showed that TZDs rapidly stimulate sodium-coupled bicarbonate absorption from the renal proximal tubule in vitro and in vivo. TZD-induced transport stimulation is dependent on PPARγ-Src-EGFR-ERK and observed in rat, rabbit and human, but not in mouse proximal tubules where Src-EGFR is constitutively activated. The existence of PPARγ-Src-dependent nongenomic signaling, which requires the ligand-binding ability, but not the transcriptional activity of PPARγ, is confirmed in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The enhancement of the association between PPARγ and Src by TZDs supports an indispensable role of Src in this signaling. These results suggest that the PPARγ-dependent nongenomic stimulation of renal proximal transport is also involved in TZD-induced volume expansion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of phospho- and calciotropic hormones on electrolyte transport in the proximal tubule [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin J. Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and phosphate are critical for a myriad of physiological and cellular processes within the organism. Consequently, plasma levels of calcium and phosphate are tightly regulated. This occurs through the combined effects of the phospho- and calciotropic hormones, parathyroid hormone (PTH, active vitamin D3, and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23. The organs central to this are the kidneys, intestine, and bone. In the kidney, the proximal tubule reabsorbs the majority of filtered calcium and phosphate, which amounts to more than 60% and 90%, respectively. The basic molecular mechanisms responsible for phosphate reclamation are well described, and emerging work is delineating the molecular identity of the paracellular shunt wherein calcium permeates the proximal tubular epithelium. Significant experimental work has delineated the molecular effects of PTH and FGF23 on these processes as well as their regulation of active vitamin D3 synthesis in this nephron segment. The integrative effects of both phospho- and calciotropic hormones on proximal tubular solute transport and subsequently whole body calcium-phosphate balance thus have been further complicated. Here, we first review the molecular mechanisms of calcium and phosphate reabsorption from the proximal tubule and how they are influenced by the phospho- and calciotropic hormones acting on this segment and then consider the implications on both renal calcium and phosphate handling as well as whole body mineral balance.

  10. PET in malformations of cortical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouilleret, V.; O'Brien, T.J.; Bouilleret, V.; Bouilleret, V.; Chiron, C.; Chiron, C.

    2009-01-01

    Within the group of malformations of cortical development, focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are an increasingly recognized cause of intractable epilepsy that can be cured by surgery. The success of cortical resection for intractable epilepsy is highly dependent on the accurate pre-surgical delineation of the regions responsible for generating seizures. [ 18 F]-FDG PET, which images cerebral metabolism studying brain glucose uptake, is the most established functional imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with epilepsy. The aim of this article is to review [ 18 F]-FDG PET usefulness as a pre-surgical tool in the evaluation of medically refractory partial epilepsy. It has an established place in assisting in the localisation and definition of FCD in patients with no lesion, or only a subtle abnormality, on MRI. The role of FDG-PET in defining the extent of the surgical resection is still uncertain and needs to be the focus of future research. (authors)

  11. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, P; Bardin, T; Laredo, J D; Ziza, J M; D'Anglejan, G; Lansaman, J; Bucki, B; Forest, M; Kuntz, D

    1994-05-01

    To determine the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion. The records of 6 patients with paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis and adjacent bone cortex erosion were reviewed. Calcific tendinitis involved the linea aspera in 4 patients, the bicipital groove in 1 patient, and the deltoid insertion in another. Calcium deposits were associated with cortical bone erosions, revealed on plain radiographs in 4 patients and computed tomography scans in 2. Bone scans were performed in 2 patients and showed local hyperfixation of the isotope. In 4 patients, suspicion of a neoplasm led to a biopsy. Calcium deposits appeared to be surrounded by a foreign body reaction with numerous giant cells. Apatite crystals were identified by transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis in 1 surgical sample. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion is an uncommon presentation of apatite deposition disease.

  12. Reduced cortical thickness in gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    with significant reductions (average 15.8-19.9 %) in cortical thickness, versus controls, predominantly in right frontal cortical regions. Pronounced right frontal morphometric brain abnormalities occur in gambling disorder, supporting neurobiological overlap with substance disorders and its recent......Gambling disorder has recently been recognized as a prototype 'behavioral addiction' by virtue of its inclusion in the DSM-5 category of 'Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders.' Despite its newly acquired status and prevalence rate of 1-3 % globally, relatively little is known regarding...... the neurobiology of this disorder. The aim of this study was to explore cortical morphometry in untreated gambling disorder, for the first time. Subjects with gambling disorder (N = 16) free from current psychotropic medication or psychiatric comorbidities, and healthy controls (N = 17), were entered...

  13. Altered cortical thickness and attentional deficits in adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Laura A; Stefan, Mihaela; Lee, Seonjoo; Wang, Zhishun; Terranova, Kate; Attia, Evelyn; Marsh, Rachel

    2018-01-12

    Frontostriatal and frontoparietal abnormalities likely contribute to deficits in control and attentional processes in individuals with bulimia nervosa and to the persistence of dysregulated eating across development. This study assessed these processes and cortical thickness in a large sample of adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa compared with healthy controls. We collected anatomical MRI data from adolescent girls and women (ages 12-38 yr) with full or subthreshold bulimia nervosa and age-matched healthy controls who also completed the Conners Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). Groups were compared on task performance and cortical thickness. Mediation analyses explored associations among cortical thickness, CPT-II variables, bulimia nervosa symptoms and age. We included 60 girls and women with bulimia nervosa and 54 controls in the analyses. Compared with healthy participants, those with bulimia nervosa showed increased impulsivity and inattention on the CPT-II, along with reduced thickness of the right pars triangularis, right superior parietal and left dorsal posterior cingulate cortices. In the bulimia nervosa group, exploratory analyses revealed that binge eating frequency correlated inversely with cortical thickness of frontoparietal and insular regions and that reduced frontoparietal thickness mediated the association between age and increased symptom severity and inattention. Binge eating frequency also mediated the association between age and lower prefrontal cortical thickness. These findings are applicable to only girls and women with bulimia nervosa, and our cross-sectional design precludes understanding of whether cortical thickness alterations precede or result from bulimia nervosa symptoms. Structural abnormalities in the frontoparietal and posterior cingulate regions comprising circuits that support control and attentional processes should be investigated as potential contributors to the maintenance of bulimia nervosa and useful

  14. Altered cortical thickness and attentional deficits in adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Laura A; Stefan, Mihaela; Lee, Seonjoo; Wang, Zhishun; Terranova, Kate; Attia, Evelyn; Marsh, Rachel

    2018-05-01

    Frontostriatal and frontoparietal abnormalities likely contribute to deficits in control and attentional processes in individuals with bulimia nervosa and to the persistence of dysregulated eating across development. This study assessed these processes and cortical thickness in a large sample of adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa compared with healthy controls. We collected anatomical MRI data from adolescent girls and women (ages 12-38 yr) with full or subthreshold bulimia nervosa and age-matched healthy controls who also completed the Conners Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). Groups were compared on task performance and cortical thickness. Mediation analyses explored associations among cortical thickness, CPT-II variables, bulimia nervosa symptoms and age. We included 60 girls and women with bulimia nervosa and 54 controls in the analyses. Compared with healthy participants, those with bulimia nervosa showed increased impulsivity and inattention on the CPT-II, along with reduced thickness of the right pars triangularis, right superior parietal and left dorsal posterior cingulate cortices. In the bulimia nervosa group, exploratory analyses revealed that binge eating frequency correlated inversely with cortical thickness of frontoparietal and insular regions and that reduced frontoparietal thickness mediated the association between age and increased symptom severity and inattention. Binge eating frequency also mediated the association between age and lower prefrontal cortical thickness. These findings are applicable to only girls and women with bulimia nervosa, and our cross-sectional design precludes understanding of whether cortical thickness alterations precede or result from bulimia nervosa symptoms. Structural abnormalities in the frontoparietal and posterior cingulate regions comprising circuits that support control and attentional processes should be investigated as potential contributors to the maintenance of bulimia nervosa and useful

  15. Altered cortical thickness and attentional deficits in adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela; Lee, Seonjoo; Wang, Zhishun; Terranova, Kate; Attia, Evelyn; Marsh, Rachel

    2018-01-01

    Background Frontostriatal and frontoparietal abnormalities likely contribute to deficits in control and attentional processes in individuals with bulimia nervosa and to the persistence of dysregulated eating across development. This study assessed these processes and cortical thickness in a large sample of adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa compared with healthy controls. Methods We collected anatomical MRI data from adolescent girls and women (ages 12–38 yr) with full or subthreshold bulimia nervosa and age-matched healthy controls who also completed the Conners Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). Groups were compared on task performance and cortical thickness. Mediation analyses explored associations among cortical thickness, CPT-II variables, bulimia nervosa symptoms and age. Results We included 60 girls and women with bulimia nervosa and 54 controls in the analyses. Compared with healthy participants, those with bulimia nervosa showed increased impulsivity and inattention on the CPT-II, along with reduced thickness of the right pars triangularis, right superior parietal and left dorsal posterior cingulate cortices. In the bulimia nervosa group, exploratory analyses revealed that binge eating frequency correlated inversely with cortical thickness of frontoparietal and insular regions and that reduced frontoparietal thickness mediated the association between age and increased symptom severity and inattention. Binge eating frequency also mediated the association between age and lower prefrontal cortical thickness. Limitations These findings are applicable to only girls and women with bulimia nervosa, and our cross-sectional design precludes understanding of whether cortical thickness alterations precede or result from bulimia nervosa symptoms. Conclusion Structural abnormalities in the frontoparietal and posterior cingulate regions comprising circuits that support control and attentional processes should be investigated as potential

  16. The role of renal proximal tubule P450 enzymes in chloroform-induced nephrotoxicity: Utility of renal specific P450 reductase knockout mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Senyan; Yao, Yunyi; Lu, Shijun; Aldous, Kenneth; Ding, Xinxin; Mei, Changlin; Gu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The kidney is a primary target for numerous toxic compounds. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) are responsible for the metabolic activation of various chemical compounds, and in the kidney are predominantly expressed in proximal tubules. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that renal proximal tubular P450s are critical for nephrotoxicity caused by chemicals such as chloroform. We developed two new mouse models, one having proximal tubule-specific deletion of the cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) gene (the enzyme required for all microsomal P450 activities), designated proximal tubule-Cpr-null (PTCN), and the other having proximal tubule-specific rescue of CPR activity with the global suppression of CPR activity in all extra-proximal tubular tissues, designated extra-proximal tubule-Cpr-low (XPT-CL). The PTCN, XPT-CL, Cpr-low (CL), and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with a single oral dose of chloroform at 200 mg/kg. Blood, liver and kidney samples were obtained at 24 h after the treatment. Renal toxicity was assessed by measuring BUN and creatinine levels, and by pathological examination. The blood and tissue levels of chloroform were determined. The severity of toxicity was less in PTCN and CL mice, compared with that of WT and XPT-CL mice. There were no significant differences in chloroform levels in the blood, liver, or kidney, between PTCN and WT mice, or between XPT-CL and CL mice. These findings indicate that local P450-dependent activities play an important role in the nephrotoxicity induced by chloroform. Our results also demonstrate the usefulness of these novel mouse models for studies of chemical-induced kidney toxicity. - Highlights: • New mouse models were developed with varying P450 activities in the proximal tubule. • These mouse models were treated with chloroform, a nephrotoxicant. • Studies showed the importance of local P450s in chloroform-induced nephrotoxicity

  17. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. O'Rourke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and discuss the literature on this topic.

  18. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, D.J.; Bergin, A.; Rotenberg, A.; Peters, J.; Gorman, M.; Poduri, A.; Cryan, J.; Lidov, H.; Madsen, J.; Harini, C.

    2014-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and discuss the literature on this topic. PMID:25667877

  19. Cortical Networks for Visual Self-Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed.

  20. Cortical networks for visual self-recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    2007-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed. (author)

  1. /sup 99m/Tc penicillamine: a renal cortical scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.; Davis, G.; Halpern, S.; Ashburn, W.

    1977-01-01

    /sup 99m/Technetium penicillamine, a renal cortical imaging agent, can be used to provide a rapid, safe and non-invasive assessment of renal morphology and the renal vascular supply. Since this agent is not excreted significantly during the imaging procedure cortical scans of high quality can be obtained without image deterioration owing to a superimposed collecting system. These scans, which are clearly superior in anatomical detail to earlier scans using 131 I hippuran, can be obtained along with the 131 I hippuran renogram when the patient comes to the nuclear medicine department. Herein we demonstrate the anatomical detail it is now possible to achieve by presenting the cortical renal scans and accompanying radiograms from 5 patients with different renal pathology

  2. Comparing the influence of crestal cortical bone and sinus floor cortical bone in posterior maxilla bi-cortical dental implantation: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Zhang, Xinwen; Chi, Weichao; Ai, Hongjun; Wu, Lin

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the influence of alveolar ridge cortical bone and sinus floor cortical bone in sinus areabi-cortical dental implantation by means of 3D finite element analysis. Three-dimensional finite element (FE) models in a posterior maxillary region with sinus membrane and the same height of alveolar ridge of 10 mm were generated according to the anatomical data of the sinus area. They were either with fixed thickness of crestal cortical bone and variable thickness of sinus floor cortical bone or vice versa. Ten models were assumed to be under immediate loading or conventional loading. The standard implant model based on the Nobel Biocare implant system was created via computer-aided design software. All materials were assumed to be isotropic and linearly elastic. An inclined force of 129 N was applied. Von Mises stress mainly concentrated on the surface of crestal cortical bone around the implant neck. For all the models, both the axial and buccolingual resonance frequencies of conventional loading were higher than those of immediate loading; however, the difference is less than 5%. The results showed that bi-cortical implant in sinus area increased the stability of the implant, especially for immediately loading implantation. The thickness of both crestal cortical bone and sinus floor cortical bone influenced implant micromotion and stress distribution; however, crestal cortical bone may be more important than sinus floor cortical bone.

  3. The sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe2 (slc4a5) expressed in human renal proximal tubules shows increased apical expression under high-salt conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, John J; Xu, Peng; Carlson, Julia M; Gaglione, Robert T; Bigler Wang, Dora; Kemp, Brandon A; Reyes, Camellia M; McGrath, Helen E; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2015-12-01

    The electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe2) is encoded by SLC4A5, variants of which have been associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure, which affects 25% of the adult population. NBCe2 is thought to mediate sodium bicarbonate cotransport primarily in the renal collecting duct, but NBCe2 mRNA is also found in the rodent renal proximal tubule (RPT). The protein expression or function of NBCe2 has not been demonstrated in the human RPT. We validated an NBCe2 antibody by shRNA and Western blot analysis, as well as overexpression of an epitope-tagged NBCe2 construct in both RPT cells (RPTCs) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Using this validated NBCe2 antibody, we found NBCe2 protein expression in the RPT of fresh and frozen human kidney slices, RPTCs isolated from human urine, and isolated RPTC apical membrane. Under basal conditions, NBCe2 was primarily found in the Golgi, while NBCe1 was primarily found at the basolateral membrane. Following an acute short-term increase in intracellular sodium, NBCe2 expression was increased at the apical membrane in cultured slices of human kidney and polarized, immortalized RPTCs. Sodium bicarbonate transport was increased by monensin and overexpression of NBCe2, decreased by NBCe2 shRNA, but not by NBCe1 shRNA, and blocked by 2,2'-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-isothiocyanato-benzenesulfonic acid]. NBCe2 could be important in apical sodium and bicarbonate cotransport under high-salt conditions; the implication of the ex vivo studies to the in vivo situation when salt intake is increased remains unclear. Therefore, future studies will examine the role of NBCe2 in mediating increased renal sodium transport in humans whose blood pressures are elevated by an increase in sodium intake. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. MicroRNA-338 Attenuates Cortical Neuronal Outgrowth by Modulating the Expression of Axon Guidance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Aron; Klein-Gunnewiek, Teun; Meinhardt, Julia; Loohuis, Nikkie F M Olde; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kaplan, Barry B; Martens, Gerard J; Kolk, Sharon M; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that confer robustness to gene networks through post-transcriptional gene regulation. Previously, we identified miR-338 as a modulator of axonal outgrowth in sympathetic neurons. In the current study, we examined the role of miR-338 in the development of cortical neurons and uncovered its downstream mRNA targets. Long-term inhibition of miR-338 during neuronal differentiation resulted in reduced dendritic complexity and altered dendritic spine morphology. Furthermore, monitoring axon outgrowth in cortical cells revealed that miR-338 overexpression decreased, whereas inhibition of miR-338 increased axonal length. To identify gene targets mediating the observed phenotype, we inhibited miR-338 in cortical neurons and performed whole-transcriptome analysis. Pathway analysis revealed that miR-338 modulates a subset of transcripts involved in the axonal guidance machinery by means of direct and indirect gene targeting. Collectively, our results implicate miR-338 as a novel regulator of cortical neuronal maturation by fine-tuning the expression of gene networks governing cortical outgrowth.

  5. Simplified Classification of Focal Cortical Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Sections of cortex from 52 of 224 (23% patients with cortical dysplasia, operated on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy, were retrospectively re-examined histologically at Niguarda Hospital, and Istituto Nazionale Neurologico ‘C. Besta’, Milan, Italy.

  6. Stroke rehabilitation using noninvasive cortical stimulation: aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, Veit; Zouari, Hela G; Ayache, Samar S; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2012-08-01

    Poststroke aphasia results from the lesion of cortical areas involved in the motor production of speech (Broca's aphasia) or in the semantic aspects of language comprehension (Wernicke's aphasia). Such lesions produce an important reorganization of speech/language-specific brain networks due to an imbalance between cortical facilitation and inhibition. In fact, functional recovery is associated with changes in the excitability of the damaged neural structures and their connections. Two main mechanisms are involved in poststroke aphasia recovery: the recruitment of perilesional regions of the left hemisphere in case of small lesion and the acquisition of language processing ability in homotopic areas of the nondominant right hemisphere when left hemispheric language abilities are permanently lost. There is some evidence that noninvasive cortical stimulation, especially when combined with language therapy or other therapeutic approaches, can promote aphasia recovery. Cortical stimulation was mainly used to either increase perilesional excitability or reduce contralesional activity based on the concept of reciprocal inhibition and maladaptive plasticity. However, recent studies also showed some positive effects of the reinforcement of neural activities in the contralateral right hemisphere, based on the potential compensatory role of the nondominant hemisphere in stroke recovery.

  7. Brain cortical characteristics of lifetime cognitive ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Simon R; Bastin, Mark E; Ritchie, Stuart J; Dickie, David Alexander; Liewald, Dave C; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Redmond, Paul; Royle, Natalie A; Pattie, Alison; Valdés Hernández, Maria; Corley, Janie; Aribisala, Benjamin S; McIntosh, Andrew M; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J

    2018-01-01

    Regional cortical brain volume is the product of surface area and thickness. These measures exhibit partially distinct trajectories of change across the brain's cortex in older age, but it is unclear which cortical characteristics at which loci are sensitive to cognitive ageing differences. We examine associations between change in intelligence from age 11 to 73 years and regional cortical volume, surface area, and thickness measured at age 73 years in 568 community-dwelling older adults, all born in 1936. A relative positive change in intelligence from 11 to 73 was associated with larger volume and surface area in selective frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital regions (r cognitive ageing and a thinner cortex for any region. Interestingly, thickness and surface area were phenotypically independent across bilateral lateral temporal loci, whose surface area was significantly related to change in intelligence. These findings suggest that associations between regional cortical volume and cognitive ageing differences are predominantly driven by surface area rather than thickness among healthy older adults. Regional brain surface area has been relatively underexplored, and is a potentially informative biomarker for identifying determinants of cognitive ageing differences.

  8. Neuroimaging of malformation of cortical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.; Hadjidekov, V.; Tournev, I.; Rossi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are heterogeneous group of disease which result from disruption of 3 main stages of cortical development.The common clinical presentation is refractory epilepsy and or developmental delay. The aim of this paper is to describe and analyze magnetic resonance (MR) findings and to present protocol for examination. We analyze MR findings in 17 patients with MCD. The average age was 12,1 year (from 2 months - 57 years). The main indications from reference physician are epilepsy and developmental delay. In 12 patients 1.5T MR was performed, and in 5 - 0.5T. Subependymal heterotopias was found in 6 patients, focal cortical dysplasia - 3. polymicrogyria - 3, schizencephaly - 2, hemimegalencephaly -1, lizencephaly -1, tuberous sclerosis -1. The most common MCD are heterotopias, focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria. schizencephaiy, pachygyria and lizencephaly. In our study the number of patients is not big enough to make a conclusion about frequency of the forms of MCD and our goal is to analyze MR findings which are not well studied in our country. MRI is the method of choice for diagnosis of MCD. The protocol should be different from routine brain protocol to interpret the images with good quality and not miss the pathology. Knowledge of MR findings in MCD would help for genetic counselling in some cases or can predict prognosis in some patients. (authors)

  9. Response variability in balanced cortical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerchner, Alexander; Ursta, C.; Hertz, J.

    2006-01-01

    We study the spike statistics of neurons in a network with dynamically balanced excitation and inhibition. Our model, intended to represent a generic cortical column, comprises randomly connected excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, driven by excitatory input from an external...

  10. Cortical enhancement in chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Sato, Jun; Makita, Tadatoshi; Hayashi, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Norio.

    1981-01-01

    In the CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma, brain enhancement adjacent to a subdural hematoma was seen occasionally after the injection of a contrast material. The authors called this finding ''cortical enhancement'', and 35 cases of chronic subdural hematoma were studied concerning cortical enhancement in relation to age, clinical signs and symptoms, hematoma density, and volume of the hematoma. Eight cases out of the 35 were subjected to measurements of the regional cerebral blood flow preoperatively by the method of the carotid injection of Xe-133. Cortical enhancement was apt to be seen in the cases which revealed intracranial hypertension or disturbance of consciousness, in isodensity or mixed-density hematomas, and in huge subdural hematomas. There was no specific correlation with age distribution. The pathogenesis of cortical enhancement seemed to be the result of cerebral compression with an increase in the contrast material per unit of volume and a prolonged venous outflow from the hemisphere, but no characteristic feature was detected in the average regional cerebral blood flow in our cases. (author)

  11. Spontaneously emerging cortical representations of visual attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenet, Tal; Bibitchkov, Dmitri; Tsodyks, Misha; Grinvald, Amiram; Arieli, Amos

    2003-10-01

    Spontaneous cortical activity-ongoing activity in the absence of intentional sensory input-has been studied extensively, using methods ranging from EEG (electroencephalography), through voltage sensitive dye imaging, down to recordings from single neurons. Ongoing cortical activity has been shown to play a critical role in development, and must also be essential for processing sensory perception, because it modulates stimulus-evoked activity, and is correlated with behaviour. Yet its role in the processing of external information and its relationship to internal representations of sensory attributes remains unknown. Using voltage sensitive dye imaging, we previously established a close link between ongoing activity in the visual cortex of anaesthetized cats and the spontaneous firing of a single neuron. Here we report that such activity encompasses a set of dynamically switching cortical states, many of which correspond closely to orientation maps. When such an orientation state emerged spontaneously, it spanned several hypercolumns and was often followed by a state corresponding to a proximal orientation. We suggest that dynamically switching cortical states could represent the brain's internal context, and therefore reflect or influence memory, perception and behaviour.

  12. Rehabilitation of cortical blindness secondary to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Tarek A-Z K

    2010-01-01

    Cortical blindness is a rare complication of posterior circulation stroke. However, its complex presentation with sensory, physical, cognitive and behavioural impairments makes it one of the most challenging. Appropriate approach from a rehabilitation standpoint was never reported. Our study aims to discuss the rehabilitation methods and outcomes of a cohort of patients with cortical blindness. The notes of all patients with cortical blindness referred to a local NHS rehabilitation service in the last 6~years were examined. Patients' demographics, presenting symptoms, scan findings, rehabilitation programmes and outcomes were documented. Seven patients presented to our service, six of them were males. The mean age was 63. Patients 1, 2 and 3 had total blindness with severe cognitive and behavioural impairments, wandering and akathisia. All of them failed to respond to any rehabilitation effort and the focus was on damage limitation. Pharmacological interventions had a modest impact on behaviour and sleep pattern. The 3 patients were discharged to a nursing facility. Patients 4, 5, 6 and 7 had partial blindness with variable severity. All of them suffered from significant memory impairment. However, none suffered from any behavioural, physical or other cognitive impairment. Rehabilitation efforts on 3 patients were carried out collaboratively between brain injury occupational therapists and sensory disability officers. All patients experienced significant improvement in handicap and they all maintained community placements. This small cohort of patients suggests that the rehabilitation philosophy and outcomes of these 2 distinct groups of either total or partial cortical blindness differ significantly.

  13. Critical fluctuations in cortical models near instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aburn, M.J.; Holmes, C.A.; Roberts, J.A.; Boonstra, T.W.; Breakspear, M.

    2012-01-01

    Computational studies often proceed from the premise that cortical dynamics operate in a linearly stable domain, where fluctuations dissipate quickly and show only short memory. Studies of human electroencephalography (EEG), however, have shown significant autocorrelation at time lags on the scale

  14. Assessment of cortical maturation with prenatal MRI. Part I: normal cortical maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliarini, Celine; Chaumoitre, Katia; Chapon, Frederique; Levrier, Olivier; Girard, Nadine; Fernandez, Carla; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Cortical maturation, especially gyral formation, follows a temporospatial schedule and is a good marker of fetal maturation. Although ultrasonography is still the imaging method of choice to evaluate fetal anatomy, MRI has an increasingly important role in the detection of brain abnormalities, especially of cortical development. Knowledge of MRI techniques in utero with the advantages and disadvantages of some sequences is necessary, in order to try to optimize the different magnetic resonance sequences to be able to make an early diagnosis. The different steps of cortical maturation known from histology represent the background necessary for the understanding of maturation in order to be then able to evaluate brain maturation through neuroimaging. Illustrations of the normal cortical maturation are given for each step accessible to MRI for both the cerebral hemispheres and the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of cortical maturation with prenatal MRI. Part I: normal cortical maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliarini, Celine [Faculte Timone, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Chaumoitre, Katia [Hopital Nord, Department of Radiology, Marseille (France); Chapon, Frederique; Levrier, Olivier; Girard, Nadine [Hopital Timone, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Fernandez, Carla; Figarella-Branger, Dominique [Hopital Timone, Department of Pathology, Marseille (France)

    2005-08-01

    Cortical maturation, especially gyral formation, follows a temporospatial schedule and is a good marker of fetal maturation. Although ultrasonography is still the imaging method of choice to evaluate fetal anatomy, MRI has an increasingly important role in the detection of brain abnormalities, especially of cortical development. Knowledge of MRI techniques in utero with the advantages and disadvantages of some sequences is necessary, in order to try to optimize the different magnetic resonance sequences to be able to make an early diagnosis. The different steps of cortical maturation known from histology represent the background necessary for the understanding of maturation in order to be then able to evaluate brain maturation through neuroimaging. Illustrations of the normal cortical maturation are given for each step accessible to MRI for both the cerebral hemispheres and the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  16. Trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume maturation in normal brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ducharme

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of developmental trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual typically-developing subjects with repeated scanning (1–3 per subject, total scans n=753 from 4.9 to 22.3 years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models, with statistical correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory. Analyses were performed with and without controlling for total brain volume. These data are provided for reference and comparison with other databases. Further discussion and interpretation on cortical developmental trajectories can be found in the associated Ducharme et al.׳s article “Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development – the importance of quality control procedures” (Ducharme et al., 2015 [1].

  17. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  18. Stage-specific and age-dependent profiles of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium in rat seminiferous tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma-Takeda, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Imaseki, H.; Yukawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Stage-specific and age-dependent profiles of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium in testis were examined in Wistar rats by both inductively coupled argon plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a microdissection technique and in situ elemental imaging of micro-PIXE analysis. The young adult animals (10 weeks old) contained higher levels of zinc and manganese in the seminiferous tubules at stages VII-VIII than stages XI through VI and IX-X and the levels were higher than those of the immature and old animals. Copper and selenium levels at stages VII-VIII of the young adult animals were also higher than those of the immature and old animals. In stages VII and VIII, zinc was higher in the central area of the seminiferous epithelium, where spermatozoa were localized, demonstrating a cell-specific property. (author)

  19. Widespread cortical thinning in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-H; Kwak, K; Hyun, J-W; Jeong, I H; Jo, H-J; Joung, A; Kim, J-H; Lee, S H; Yun, S; Joo, J; Lee, J-M; Kim, H J

    2016-07-01

    Studies on cortical involvement and its relationship with cognitive function in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) remain scarce. The objective of this study was to compare cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between patients with NMOSD and multiple sclerosis (MS) and to investigate its relationship with clinical features and cognitive function. This observational clinical imaging study of 91 patients with NMOSD, 52 patients with MS and 44 healthy controls was conducted from 1 December 2013 to 30 April 2015 at the institutional referral center. Three tesla MRI of the brain and neuropsychological tests were performed. Cortical thickness was measured using three-dimensional surface-based analysis. Both sets of patients exhibited cortical thinning throughout the entire brain cortex. Patients with MS showed a significantly greater reduction in cortical thickness over broad regions of the bilateral frontal and parieto-temporal cortices and the left precuneus compared to those with NMOSD. Memory functions in patients with MS were correlated with broad regional cortical thinning, whereas no significant associations were observed between cortical thickness and cognitive function in patients with NMOSD. Widespread cortical thinning was observed in patients with NMOSD and MS, but the extent of cortical thinning was greater in patients with MS. The more severe cortical atrophy may contribute to memory impairment in patients with MS but not in those with NMOSD. These results provide in vivo evidence that the severity and clinical relevance of cortical thinning differ between NMOSD and MS. © 2016 EAN.

  20. Person identification based on multiscale matching of cortical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, P; Petkov, N; Hertzberger, B; Serazzi, G

    1995-01-01

    A set of so-called cortical images, motivated by the function of simple cells in the primary visual cortex of mammals, is computed from each of two input images and an image pyramid is constructed for each cortical image. The two sets of cortical image pyramids are matched synchronously and an

  1. Cortical gyrification is abnormal in children with prenatal alcohol exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Hendrickson

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Abnormalities in cortical development were seen across the brain in children with PAE compared to controls. Cortical gyrification and IQ were strongly correlated, suggesting that examining mechanisms by which alcohol disrupts cortical formation may yield clinically relevant insights and potential directions for early intervention.

  2. FlnA binding to PACSIN2 F-BAR domain regulates membrane tubulation in megakaryocytes and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Pluthero, Fred G; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Giannini, Silvia; Christensen, Hilary; Leung, Richard; Lo, Richard W; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lehman, William; Plomann, Markus; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Kahr, Walter H A; Hartwig, John H; Falet, Hervé

    2015-07-02

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) and Fes-CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) proteins generate tubular membrane invaginations reminiscent of the megakaryocyte (MK) demarcation membrane system (DMS), which provides membranes necessary for future platelets. The F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is one of the most abundant BAR/F-BAR proteins in platelets and the only one reported to interact with the cytoskeletal and scaffold protein filamin A (FlnA), an essential regulator of platelet formation and function. The FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction was therefore investigated in MKs and platelets. PACSIN2 associated with FlnA in human platelets. The interaction required FlnA immunoglobulin-like repeat 20 and the tip of PACSIN2 F-BAR domain and enhanced PACSIN2 F-BAR domain membrane tubulation in vitro. Most human and wild-type mouse platelets had 1 to 2 distinct PACSIN2 foci associated with cell membrane GPIbα, whereas Flna-null platelets had 0 to 4 or more foci. Endogenous PACSIN2 and transfected enhanced green fluorescent protein-PACSIN2 were concentrated in midstage wild-type mouse MKs in a well-defined invagination of the plasma membrane reminiscent of the initiating DMS and dispersed in the absence of FlnA binding. The DMS appeared less well defined, and platelet territories were not readily visualized in Flna-null MKs. We conclude that the FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction regulates membrane tubulation in MKs and platelets and likely contributes to DMS formation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Development of a living membrane comprising a functional human renal proximal tubule cell monolayer on polyethersulfone polymeric membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schophuizen, Carolien M S; De Napoli, Ilaria E; Jansen, Jitske; Teixeira, Sandra; Wilmer, Martijn J; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Van den Heuvel, Lambert P W; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    The need for improved renal replacement therapies has stimulated innovative research for the development of a cell-based renal assist device. A key requirement for such a device is the formation of a "living membrane", consisting of a tight kidney cell monolayer with preserved functional organic ion transporters on a suitable artificial membrane surface. In this work, we applied a unique conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) line with an optimized coating strategy on polyethersulfone (PES) membranes to develop a living membrane with a functional proximal tubule epithelial cell layer. PES membranes were coated with combinations of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine and human collagen IV (Coll IV). The optimal coating time and concentrations were determined to achieve retention of vital blood components while preserving high water transport and optimal ciPTEC adhesion. The ciPTEC monolayers obtained were examined through immunocytochemistry to detect zona occludens 1 tight junction proteins. Reproducible monolayers were formed when using a combination of 2 mg ml(-1) 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (4 min coating, 1h dissolution) and 25 μg ml(-1) Coll IV (4 min coating). The successful transport of (14)C-creatinine through the developed living membrane system was used as an indication for organic cation transporter functionality. The addition of metformin or cimetidine significantly reduced the creatinine transepithelial flux, indicating active creatinine uptake in ciPTECs, most likely mediated by the organic cation transporter, OCT2 (SLC22A2). In conclusion, this study shows the successful development of a living membrane consisting of a reproducible ciPTEC monolayer on PES membranes, an important step towards the development of a bioartificial kidney. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasticity of the transverse tubules following denervation and subsequent reinnervation in rat slow and fast muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekura, Hiroaki; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Tomie; Kasuga, Norikatsu

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the effects of short term denervation followed by reinnervation on the ultrastructure of the membrane systems and on the content of and distribution of key proteins involved in calcium regulation of fast-twitch (FT) extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch (ST) soleus (SOL) muscle fibres. Ischiadic nerve freezing resulted in total lack of neuromuscular transmission for 3 days followed by a slow recovery, but no decline in twitch force elicited by direct stimulation. The latter measurements indicate no significant atrophy within this time frame. The membrane systems of skeletal muscle fibres were visualized using Ca92+)-K3Fe(CN)6-OsO4 techniques and observed using a high voltage electron microscope. [3H]nitrendipine binding was used to detect levels of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) expression. The Ca2+ pumping free sarcoplasmic reticulum domains were not affected by the denervation, but the Ca2+ release domains were dramatically increased, particularly in the FT-EDL muscle fibres. The increase is evidenced by a doubling up of the areas of contacts between SR and transverse (t-) tubules, so that in place of the normal triadic arrangement, pentadic and heptadic junctions, formed by multiple interacting layers of ST and t-tubules are seen. Frequency of pentads and heptads increases and declines in parallel to the denervation and reinnervation but with a delay. Immunofluorecence and electron microscopy observations show presence of DHPR and ryanodine receptor clusters at pentads and heptads junctions. A significant (P muscle fibres indicating that overexpression of DHPRs accompanies the build up extra junctional contacts. The results indicate that denervation reversibly affects the domains of the membrane systems involved in excitation-contraction coupling.

  5. Antenatal betamethasone attenuates the angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor-nitric oxide axis in isolated proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yixin; Bi, Jianli; Pulgar, Victor M; Chappell, Mark C; Rose, James C

    2017-06-01

    We previously reported a sex-specific effect of antenatal treatment with betamethasone (Beta) on sodium (Na + ) excretion in adult sheep whereby treated males but not females had an attenuated natriuretic response to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]. The present study determined the Na + uptake and nitric oxide (NO) response to low-dose Ang-(1-7) (1 pM) in renal proximal tubule cells (RPTC) from adult male and female sheep antenatally exposed to Beta or vehicle. Data were expressed as percentage of basal uptake or area under the curve for Na + or percentage of control for NO. Male Beta RPTC exhibited greater Na + uptake than male vehicle cells (433 ± 28 vs. 330 ± 26%; P 0.05). Ang-(1-7) significantly inhibited Na + uptake in RPTC from vehicle male (214 ± 11%) and from both vehicle (190 ± 14%) and Beta (209 ± 11%) females but failed to attenuate Na + uptake in Beta male cells. Beta exposure also abolished stimulation of NO by Ang-(1-7) in male but not female RPTC. Both the Na + and NO responses to Ang-(1-7) were blocked by Mas receptor antagonist d-Ala 7 -Ang-(1-7). We conclude that the tubular Ang-(1-7)-Mas-NO pathway is attenuated in males and not females by antenatal Beta exposure. Moreover, since primary cultures of RPTC retain both the sex and Beta-induced phenotype of the adult kidney in vivo they appear to be an appropriate cell model to examine the effects of fetal programming on Na + handling by the renal tubules. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The Influence of Concentration and Temperature on the Formation of ¿-Oryzanol + ß-Sitosterol Tubules in Edible Oil Organogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawalha, H.I.M.; Venema, P.; Bot, A.; Flöter, E.; Linden, van der E.

    2011-01-01

    The gelation process of mixtures of ¿-oryzanol and sitosterol structurants in sunflower oil was studied using light scattering, rheology, and micro-scanning calorimetry (Micro-DSC). The relation between temperature and the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of tubule formation of ¿-oryzanol

  7. The influence of the type of oil phase on the self-assembly process of ¿-oryzanol + ß-sitosterol tubules in organogel systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawalha, H.I.M.; Margry, G.; Adel, den R.; Venema, P.; Bot, A.; Flöter, E.; Linden, van der E.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of ¿-oryzanol and ß-sitosterol were used to structure different oils (decane, limonene, sunflower oil, castor oil and eugenol). The ¿-oryzanol and ß-sitosterol mixtures self-assemble into double-walled hollow tubules (~10 nm in diameter) in the oil phase, which aggregate to form a network

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Efficacy of Iontophoresis with 0.33% Sodium Fluoride Gel and Diode Laser Alone on Occlusion of Dentinal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anup Raghunath; Varma, Siddhartha; Suragimath, Girish; Abbayya, Keshava; Zope, Sameer Anil; Kale, Vishwajeet

    2017-08-01

    Dentinal Hypersensitivity (DH) is one of the most commonly encountered clinical problems. Literature reveals no specific therapy to satisfactorily eliminate dentinal hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the efficacy of iontophoresis with 0.33% Sodium Fluoride (NaF) gel and diode laser alone in dentinal tubule occlusion. This in vitro study included 20 teeth with intact root surfaces unaltered by extraction procedure for specimen preparation. Each tooth was cleaned, air dried and cut into three sections. Total 60 sections were prepared (30 longitudinal and 30 transverse sections), which were acid etched. In control group, no treatment was carried. In iontophoresis treatment group, samples were inserted into a foam tray containing 0.33 % NaF Gel and subjected to 1.5 mA output current for three minutes. In laser treatment group, specimens were lased with 980 nm diode laser at 0.5 W/PW (62.2J /cm 2 ) in a noncontact mode for 30 seconds. Specimens were evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at 10KV to 20KV under x 2000, x5000 magnification for surface characteristics and patency of dentinal tubules. Total number of tubules visible, open, completely and partially occluded were recorded in each microphotograph and compared. On comparison, laser group showed the least number of open tubules i.e., 130 (31.1%) followed by iontophoresis group, 155 (51.32%) and control group 417 (100%). Diode laser application provided better results as compared to iontophoresis on occlusion of dentinal tubules. Hence, it can be used to treat the patients with DH.

  9. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  10. Efficacy of 4 Irrigation Protocols in Killing Bacteria Colonized in Dentinal Tubules Examined by a Novel Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Adham A; Aksel, Hacer; Zhuang, Tingting; Mashtare, Terry; Babu, Jegdish P; Huang, George T-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of 4 irrigation systems in eliminating bacteria in root canals, particularly in dentinal tubules. Roots of human teeth were prepared to 25/04, autoclaved, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks. Canals were then disinfected by (1) standard needle irrigation, (2) sonically agitating with EndoActivator, (3) XP Endo finisher, or (4) erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser (PIPS) (15 roots/group). The bacterial reduction in the canal was determined by MTT assays. For measuring live versus dead bacteria in the dentinal tubules (4 teeth/group), teeth were split open and stained with LIVE/DEAD BackLight. Coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the canal dentin were scanned by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to determine the ratio of dead/total bacteria in the dentinal tubules at various depths. All 4 irrigation protocols significantly eliminated bacteria in the canal, ranging from 89.6% to 98.2% reduction (P bacteria in the coronal, middle, and apical segments at 50-μm depth. On the other hand, PIPS had the greatest bacterial killing efficiency at the 150-μm depth in all 3 root segments. XP Endo appears to be more efficient than other 3 techniques in disinfecting the main canal space and up to 50 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. PIPS appears to be most effective in killing the bacteria deep in the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Leptospira outer membrane protein LipL32 induces tubulointerstitial nephritis-mediated gene expression in mouse proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Wei; Wu, Mai-Szu; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Hsieh, Wang-Ju; Vandewalle, Alain; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2002-08-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis is a main renal manifestation caused by pathogenic leptospira that accumulate mostly in the proximal tubules, thereby inducing tubular injury and tubulointerstitial nephritis. To elucidate the role of leptospira outer membrane proteins in tubulointerstitial nephritis, outer membrane proteins from pathogenic Leptospira shermani and nonpathogenic Leptospira patoc extracted by Triton X-114 were administered to cultured mouse proximal tubule cells. A dose-dependent increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), RANTES, nitrite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the culture supernatant was observed 48 h after incubating Leptospira shermani outer membrane proteins with mouse proximal tubule cells. RT competitive-PCR experiments showed that Leptospira shermani outer membrane proteins (0.2 microg/ml) increased the expression of MCP-1, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), RANTES, and TNF-alpha mRNA by 3.0-, 9.4-, 2.5-, and 2.5-fold, respectively, when compared with untreated cells. Outer membrane proteins extract from avirulent Leptospira patoc did not induce significant effects. The pathogenic outer membrane proteins extract contain a major component of a 32-kD lipoprotein (LipL32), which is absent in the nonpathogenic leptospira outer membrane. An antibody raised against LipL32 prevented the stimulatory effect of Leptospira shermani outer membrane proteins extract on MCP-1 and iNOS mRNA expression in cultured proximal tubule cells, whereas recombinant LipL32 significantly stimulated the expression of MCP-1 and iNOS mRNAs and augmented nuclear binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and AP-1 transcription factors in proximal tubule cells. An antibody raised against LipL32 also blunted the effects induced by the recombinant LipL32. This study demonstrates that LipL32 is a major component of pathogenic leptospira outer membrane proteins involved in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  12. Effects of parietal TMS on visual and auditory processing at the primary cortical level -- a concurrent TMS-fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Werner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    cortices under 3 sensory contexts: visual, auditory, and no stimulation. IPS-TMS increased activations in auditory cortices irrespective of sensory context as a result of direct and nonspecific auditory TMS side effects. In contrast, IPS-TMS modulated activations in the visual cortex in a state...... deactivations induced by auditory activity to TMS sounds. TMS to IPS may increase the responses in visual (or auditory) cortices to visual (or auditory) stimulation via a gain control mechanism or crossmodal interactions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that understanding TMS effects on (uni......Accumulating evidence suggests that multisensory interactions emerge already at the primary cortical level. Specifically, auditory inputs were shown to suppress activations in visual cortices when presented alone but amplify the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to concurrent visual...

  13. Functional cortical mapping of scale illusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li-qun; Kuriki, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    We have studied cortical activation using 1.5 T fMRI during 'Scale Illusion', a kind of auditory illusion, in which subjects perceive smooth melodies while listening to dichotic irregular pitch sequences consisting of scale tones, in repeated phrases composed of eight tones. Four male and four female subjects listened to different stimuli, that including illusion-inducing tone sequence, monaural tone sequence and perceived pitch sequence with a control of white noises delivered to the right and left ears in random order. 32 scans with a repetition time (TR) 3 s Between 3 s interval for each type of the four stimuli were performed. In BOLD signals, activation was observed in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, parietal lobule and occipital areas by first-level group analysis. However, there existed large intersubject variability such that systematic tendency of the activation was not clear. The study will be continued to obtain larger number of subjects for group analysis. (author)

  14. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-03-15

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills.

  15. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorn, Colette S. van, E-mail: cvandoorn@gmail.com; De Boo, Diederick W., E-mail: d.w.deboo@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Weersink, Els J. M., E-mail: e.j.m.weersink@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van, E-mail: o.m.vandelden@amc.uva.nl; Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl; Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  16. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N.; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  17. Perceptual incongruence influences bistability and cortical activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs Joost Brouwer

    Full Text Available We employed a parametric psychophysical design in combination with functional imaging to examine the influence of metric changes in perceptual incongruence on perceptual alternation rates and cortical responses. Subjects viewed a bistable stimulus defined by incongruent depth cues; bistability resulted from incongruence between binocular disparity and monocular perspective cues that specify different slants (slant rivalry. Psychophysical results revealed that perceptual alternation rates were positively correlated with the degree of perceived incongruence. Functional imaging revealed systematic increases in activity that paralleled the psychophysical results within anterior intraparietal sulcus, prior to the onset of perceptual alternations. We suggest that this cortical activity predicts the frequency of subsequent alternations, implying a putative causal role for these areas in initiating bistable perception. In contrast, areas implicated in form and depth processing (LOC and V3A were sensitive to the degree of slant, but failed to show increases in activity when these cues were in conflict.

  18. Shining a light on posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Boeve, Bradley F; Cappa, Stefano F; Dickerson, Bradford C; Dubois, Bruno; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Mendez, Mario F; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Tim; Tang-Wai, David F; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bain, Lisa; Carrillo, Maria C; Fox, Nick C

    2013-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Slow cortical evoked potentials after noise exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Wedel, H; Opitz, H J

    1979-07-01

    Human cortical evoked potentials under conditions of stimuation are registrated in the post-stimulatory phase of a five minutes lasting equally masking white noise (90 dB HL). Changes of the evoked potentials during adaptation, possible analogy with high tone losses after noise representation and the origin of tinnitus are examined. Stimulation was started 3 sec after the off-effect of the noise. For five minutes periodically tone bursts were represented. Each train of stimulation consists of tone bursts of three frequencies: 2 kcs, 4 kcs, 8 kcs. The 0.5 sec lasting tones were separated by pauses of 2 sec. During the experiment stimulation and analysis were controlled by a computer. Changes in latency and amplitudes of the cortical evoked potentials were registered. Changes of the adaptation patterns as a function of the poststimulatory time are discussed.

  20. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  1. Thickened cortical bones in congenital neutropenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boechat, M.I.; Gormley, L.S.; O'Laughlin, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Congenital neutropenia is an uncommon entity which may be familial and has a wide spectrum of clinical expression. Three sisters with the severe form of the disease, that suffered from recurrent infections which lead to their demise are described. Review of their radiographs revealed the presence of cortical thickening of the bones. Although several syndroms with different bone abnormalities have been reported associated with neutropenia, the radiographic finding of thickened cortex in children with congenital neutropenia has not been previously described. (orig.)

  2. Thickened cortical bones in congenital neutropenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boechat, M.I.; Gormley, L.S.; O' Laughlin, B.J.

    1987-02-01

    Congenital neutropenia is an uncommon entity which may be familial and has a wide spectrum of clinical expression. Three sisters with the severe form of the disease, that suffered from recurrent infections which lead to their demise are described. Review of their radiographs revealed the presence of cortical thickening of the bones. Although several syndroms with different bone abnormalities have been reported associated with neutropenia, the radiographic finding of thickened cortex in children with congenital neutropenia has not been previously described.

  3. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  4. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  5. SPECT in patients with cortical visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, I E; Galetta, S L; Gray, L G; Moster, M; Atlas, S W; Maurer, A H; Alavi, A

    1993-09-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) was used to investigate changes in cerebral blood flow in seven patients with cortical visual impairment. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the cause of cortical damage in two patients, cerebral ischemia in two patients and carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, status epilepticus and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) each in three separate patients. The SPECT scans of the seven patients were compared to T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) scans of the brain to determine the correlation between functional and anatomical findings. In six of the seven patients, the qualitative interpretation of the SPECT studies supported the clinical findings (i.e., the visual field defect) by revealing altered regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the appropriate regions of the visual pathway. MR scans in all of the patients, on the other hand, were either normal or disclosed smaller lesions than those detected by SPECT. We conclude that SPECT may reveal altered rCBF in patients with cortical visual impairment of various etiologies, even when MRI studies are normal or nondiagnostic.

  6. Extensive cortical rewiring after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancause, Numa; Barbay, Scott; Frost, Shawn B; Plautz, Erik J; Chen, Daofen; Zoubina, Elena V; Stowe, Ann M; Nudo, Randolph J

    2005-11-02

    Previously, we showed that the ventral premotor cortex (PMv) underwent neurophysiological remodeling after injury to the primary motor cortex (M1). In the present study, we examined cortical connections of PMv after such lesions. The neuroanatomical tract tracer biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the PMv hand area at least 5 months after ischemic injury to the M1 hand area. Comparison of labeling patterns between experimental and control animals demonstrated extensive proliferation of novel PMv terminal fields and the appearance of retrogradely labeled cell bodies within area 1/2 of the primary somatosensory cortex after M1 injury. Furthermore, evidence was found for alterations in the trajectory of PMv intracortical axons near the site of the lesion. The results suggest that M1 injury results in axonal sprouting near the ischemic injury and the establishment of novel connections within a distant target. These results support the hypothesis that, after a cortical injury, such as occurs after stroke, cortical areas distant from the injury undergo major neuroanatomical reorganization. Our results reveal an extraordinary anatomical rewiring capacity in the adult CNS after injury that may potentially play a role in recovery.

  7. Rab3A, a possible marker of cortical granules, participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Oscar Daniel; Cappa, Andrea Isabel; Paola, Matilde de; Zanetti, María Natalia [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Fukuda, Mitsunori [Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fissore, Rafael A. [Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 661 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Mayorga, Luis S. [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Michaut, Marcela A., E-mail: mmichaut@gmail.com [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Argentina)

    2016-09-10

    Fusion of cortical granules with the oocyte plasma membrane is the most significant event to prevent polyspermy. This particular exocytosis, also known as cortical reaction, is regulated by calcium and its molecular mechanism is still not known. Rab3A, a member of the small GTP-binding protein superfamily, has been implicated in calcium-dependent exocytosis and is not yet clear whether Rab3A participates in cortical granules exocytosis. Here, we examine the involvement of Rab3A in the physiology of cortical granules, particularly, in their distribution during oocyte maturation and activation, and their participation in membrane fusion during cortical granule exocytosis. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis showed that Rab3A and cortical granules have a similar migration pattern during oocyte maturation, and that Rab3A is no longer detected after cortical granule exocytosis. These results suggested that Rab3A might be a marker of cortical granules. Overexpression of EGFP-Rab3A colocalized with cortical granules with a Pearson correlation coefficient of +0.967, indicating that Rab3A and cortical granules have almost a perfect colocalization in the egg cortical region. Using a functional assay, we demonstrated that microinjection of recombinant, prenylated and active GST-Rab3A triggered cortical granule exocytosis, indicating that Rab3A has an active role in this secretory pathway. To confirm this active role, we inhibited the function of endogenous Rab3A by microinjecting a polyclonal antibody raised against Rab3A prior to parthenogenetic activation. Our results showed that Rab3A antibody microinjection abolished cortical granule exocytosis in parthenogenetically activated oocytes. Altogether, our findings confirm that Rab3A might function as a marker of cortical granules and participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs. - Highlights: • Rab3A has a similar migration pattern to cortical granules in mouse oocytes. • Rab3A can be a marker of

  8. Effect of age at onset on cortical thickness and cognition in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Lehmann, Manja; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio; Roldán-Lora, Florinda; Schott, Jonathan M; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2016-08-01

    Age at onset (AAO) has been shown to influence the phenotype of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but how it affects atypical presentations of AD remains unknown. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is the most common form of atypical AD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AAO on cortical thickness and cognitive function in 98 PCA patients. We used Freesurfer (v5.3.0) to compare cortical thickness with AAO both as a continuous variable, and by dichotomizing the groups based on median age (58 years). In both the continuous and dichotomized analyses, we found a pattern suggestive of thinner cortex in precuneus and parietal areas in earlier-onset PCA, and lower cortical thickness in anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in later-onset PCA. These cortical thickness differences between PCA subgroups were consistent with earlier-onset PCA patients performing worse on cognitive tests involving parietal functions. Our results provide a suggestion that AAO may not only affect the clinico-anatomical characteristics in AD but may also affect atrophy patterns and cognition within atypical AD phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of age at onset on cortical thickness and cognition in posterior cortical atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Lehmann, Manja; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Yong, Keir X.X.; Paterson, Ross W.; Slattery, Catherine F.; Foulkes, Alexander J.M.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio; Roldán-Lora, Florinda; Schott, Jonathan M.; Fox, Nick C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    Age at onset (AAO) has been shown to influence the phenotype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but how it affects atypical presentations of AD remains unknown. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is the most common form of atypical AD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AAO on cortical thickness and cognitive function in 98 PCA patients. We used Freesurfer (v5.3.0) to compare cortical thickness with AAO both as a continuous variable, and by dichotomizing the groups based on median age (58 years). In both the continuous and dichotomized analyses, we found a pattern suggestive of thinner cortex in precuneus and parietal areas in earlier-onset PCA, and lower cortical thickness in anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in later-onset PCA. These cortical thickness differences between PCA subgroups were consistent with earlier-onset PCA patients performing worse on cognitive tests involving parietal functions. Our results provide a suggestion that AAO may not only affect the clinico-anatomical characteristics in AD but may also affect atrophy patterns and cognition within atypical AD phenotypes. PMID:27318138

  10. In vitro remineralization of enamel subsurface lesions and assessment of dentine tubule occlusion from NaF dentifrices with and without calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Prabhakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, fluoride is the most effective preventive treatment for remineralization of incipient carious lesions and dentinal hypersensitivity due to wasting disorders. The products containing fluoride, calcium and phosphate are also claim to remineralize early, non-cavitated enamel demineralization. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the efficacy of two such products, Tooth Mousse and Clinpro tooth crème on remineralization and tubule occluding ability with 5000ppm fluoride-containing toothpaste. Materials and Methods :Thirty third molar teeth were placed in demineralizing solution for 5 days such that only a window of 1mm x 5mm was exposed to the environment to produce artificial caries-like lesions and randomly assigned to three groups: Group I, 5000ppm sodium fluoride; Group II, GC MI paste plus and Group III, Clinpro tooth crème. Axial longitudinal sections of 140-160 μm of each tooth which included the artificial carious lesion taken and were photographed under polarized light microscope. The demineralized areas were then quantified with a computerized imaging system. The experimental materials were applied onto the tooth sections as a topical coating and subjected to pH-cycling for 28 days. To evaluate tubule occlusion ability, thirty dentin specimens of 2mm thickness were obtained from cervical third of sound third molars. Specimens were ultrasonicated and etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes to simulate the hypersensitive dentin. Specimens were randomly divided into above mentioned three groups (n=10. The test agents were brushed over the specimens with an electric toothbrush, prepared and observed under Scanning Electron Microscope for calculation of the percentage of occluded tubules. Results: Group I showed a significantly greater percentage of remineralization than Group III and Group II. Comparison of the remineralization potential between group II and group III were not significant.In case of dentine

  11. Age Effects on Cortical Thickness in Cognitively Normal Elderly Individuals

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    Sona Hurtz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atrophy in both grey and white matter is found in normal aging. The prefrontal cortex and the frontal lobe white matter are thought to be the most affected regions. Our aim was to examine the effects of normal aging on cortical grey matter using a 3D quantitative cortical mapping method. Methods: We analyzed 1.5-tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 44 cognitively normal elderly subjects using cortical pattern matching and cortical thickness analyses. Linear regression analysis was used to study the effect of age on cortical thickness. 3D map-wide correction for multiple comparisons was conducted with permutation analyses using a threshold of p Results: We found a significant negative association between age and cortical thickness in the right hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.009 and a trend level association in the left hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.081. Age-related changes were greatest in the sensorimotor, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortices, and the right posterior middle and inferior frontal gyri. Age effects greater in the medial than lateral visual association cortices were also seen bilaterally. Conclusion: Our novel method further validates that normal aging results in diffuse cortical thinning that is most pronounced in the frontal and visual association cortices.

  12. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Ping; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; von Deneen, Karen M; Liu, Yijun; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18) and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18) were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  13. Dynamic Causal Modeling of the Cortical Responses to Wrist Perturbations

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    Yuan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations applied to the wrist joint typically evoke a stereotypical sequence of cortical and muscle responses. The early cortical responses (<100 ms are thought be involved in the “rapid” transcortical reaction to the perturbation while the late cortical responses (>100 ms are related to the “slow” transcortical reaction. Although previous studies indicated that both responses involve the primary motor cortex, it remains unclear if both responses are engaged by the same effective connectivity in the cortical network. To answer this question, we investigated the effective connectivity cortical network after a “ramp-and-hold” mechanical perturbation, in both the early (<100 ms and late (>100 ms periods, using dynamic causal modeling. Ramp-and-hold perturbations were applied to the wrist joint while the subject maintained an isometric wrist flexion. Cortical activity was recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG. We investigated how the perturbation modulated the effective connectivity for the early and late periods. Bayesian model comparisons suggested that different effective connectivity networks are engaged in these two periods. For the early period, we found that only a few cortico-cortical connections were modulated, while more complicated connectivity was identified in the cortical network during the late period with multiple modulated cortico-cortical connections. The limited early cortical network likely allows for a rapid muscle response without involving high-level cognitive processes, while the complexity of the late network may facilitate coordinated responses.

  14. State-dependent intrinsic predictability of cortical network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fakhraei

    Full Text Available The information encoded in cortical circuit dynamics is fleeting, changing from moment to moment as new input arrives and ongoing intracortical interactions progress. A combination of deterministic and stochastic biophysical mechanisms governs how cortical dynamics at one moment evolve from cortical dynamics in recently preceding moments. Such temporal continuity of cortical dynamics is fundamental to many aspects of cortex function but is not well understood. Here we study temporal continuity by attempting to predict cortical population dynamics (multisite local field potential based on its own recent history in somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats and in a computational network-level model. We found that the intrinsic predictability of cortical dynamics was dependent on multiple factors including cortical state, synaptic inhibition, and how far into the future the prediction extends. By pharmacologically tuning synaptic inhibition, we obtained a continuum of cortical states with asynchronous population activity at one extreme and stronger, spatially extended synchrony at the other extreme. Intermediate between these extremes we observed evidence for a special regime of population dynamics called criticality. Predictability of the near future (10-100 ms increased as the cortical state was tuned from asynchronous to synchronous. Predictability of the more distant future (>1 s was generally poor, but, surprisingly, was higher for asynchronous states compared to synchronous states. These experimental results were confirmed in a computational network model of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our findings demonstrate that determinism and predictability of network dynamics depend on cortical state and the time-scale of the dynamics.

  15. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18 and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18 were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  16. Censoring distances based on labeled cortical distance maps in cortical morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Elvan; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Alexopolous, Dimitrios; Todd, Richard D; Botteron, Kelly N; Miller, Michael I; Ratnanather, J Tilak

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that shape differences in cortical structures may be manifested in neuropsychiatric disorders. Such morphometric differences can be measured by labeled cortical distance mapping (LCDM) which characterizes the morphometry of the laminar cortical mantle of cortical structures. LCDM data consist of signed/labeled distances of gray matter (GM) voxels with respect to GM/white matter (WM) surface. Volumes and other summary measures for each subject and the pooled distances can help determine the morphometric differences between diagnostic groups, however they do not reveal all the morphometric information contained in LCDM distances. To extract more information from LCDM data, censoring of the pooled distances is introduced for each diagnostic group where the range of LCDM distances is partitioned at a fixed increment size; and at each censoring step, the distances not exceeding the censoring distance are kept. Censored LCDM distances inherit the advantages of the pooled distances but also provide information about the location of morphometric differences which cannot be obtained from the pooled distances. However, at each step, the censored distances aggregate, which might confound the results. The influence of data aggregation is investigated with an extensive Monte Carlo simulation analysis and it is demonstrated that this influence is negligible. As an illustrative example, GM of ventral medial prefrontal cortices (VMPFCs) of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD), subjects at high risk (HR) of MDD, and healthy control (Ctrl) subjects are used. A significant reduction in laminar thickness of the VMPFC in MDD and HR subjects is observed compared to Ctrl subjects. Moreover, the GM LCDM distances (i.e., locations with respect to the GM/WM surface) for which these differences start to occur are determined. The methodology is also applicable to LCDM-based morphometric measures of other cortical structures affected by disease.

  17. Censoring Distances Based on Labeled Cortical Distance Maps in Cortical Morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvan eCeyhan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that shape differences are manifested in cortical structures due to neuropsychiatric disorders. Such morphometric differences can be measured by labeled cortical distance mapping (LCDM which characterizes the morphometry of the laminar cortical mantle of cortical structures. LCDM data consist of signed/labeled distances of gray matter (GM voxels with respect to GM/white matter (WM surface. Volumes and other summary measures for each subject and the pooled distances can help determine the morphometric differences between diagnostic groups, however they do not reveal all the morphometric information con-tained in LCDM distances. To extract more information from LCDM data, censoring of the pooled distances is introduced for each diagnostic group where the range of LCDM distances is partitioned at a fixed increment size; and at each censoring step, the distances not exceeding the censoring distance are kept. Censored LCDM distances inherit the advantages of the pooled distances but also provide information about the location of morphometric differences which cannot be obtained from the pooled distances. However, at each step, the censored distances aggregate, which might confound the results. The influence of data aggregation is investigated with an extensive Monte Carlo simulation analysis and it is demonstrated that this influence is negligible. As an illustrative example, GM of ventral medial prefrontal cortices (VMPFCs of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD, subjects at high risk (HR of MDD, and healthy control (Ctrl subjects are used. A significant reduction in laminar thickness of the VMPFC in MDD and HR subjects is observed compared to Ctrl subjects. Moreover, the GM LCDM distances (i.e., locations with respect to the GM/WM surface for which these differences start to occur are determined. The methodology is also applicable to LCDM-based morphometric measures of other cortical structures affected by disease.

  18. Visfatin Reduces Gap Junction Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells

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    Claire E. Hills

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the current study we examined if the adipocytokine, visfatin, alters connexin-mediated intercellular communication in proximal tubule-derived epithelial cells. Methods: The effects of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on cell viability and cytotoxicity in HK2-cells were assessed by MTT, crystal violet and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Western blot analysis was used to confirm expression of Cx26, Cx40 and Cx43. The effect of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on TGF-β1 secretion was confirmed by ELISA, and the effects of both TGF-β1 (2-10ng/mL and visfatin (10-200ng/mL on connexin expression were assessed by western blot. Functional intercellular communication was determined using transfer of Lucifer Yellow and paired-whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Results: In low glucose (5mM, visfatin (10-200ng/mL did not affect membrane integrity, cytotoxicity or cell viability at 48hrs, but did evoke a concentration-dependent reduction in Cx26 and Cx43 expression. The expression of Cx40 was unaffected. At 48hrs, visfatin (10-200ng/mL increased the secretion of TGF-β1 and the visfatin-evoked changes in connexin expression were mimicked by exogenous application of the pro-fibrotic cytokine (2-10ng/ml. Visfatin reduced dye transfer between coupled cells and decreased functional conductance, with levels falling by 63% as compared to control. Although input resistance was increased following visfatin treatment by 166%, the change was not significant as compared to control. The effects of visfatin on Cx-expression and cell-coupling were blocked in the presence of a TGF-β1 specific neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: The adipocytokine visfatin selectively evoked a non-toxic reduction in connexin expression in HK2-cells. The loss in gap-junction associated proteins was mirrored by a loss in functional conductance between coupled cells. Visfatin increased TGF-β secretion and the pattern of change for connexins expression was mimicked by exogenous

  19. A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarró, Eduard; Jacobs-Cachá, Conxita; Itarte, Emilio; Meseguer, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ► We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ► The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ► CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ► Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ► We also identified ER

  20. A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarró, Eduard, E-mail: eduard.sarro@vhir.org [Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioquímica de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d' Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Jacobs-Cachá, Conxita, E-mail: conxita.jacobs@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d' Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Itarte, Emilio, E-mail: emili.itarte@uab.es [Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioquímica de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Meseguer, Anna, E-mail: ana.meseguer@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d' Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ► We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ► The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ► CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ► Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ► We also identified ER

  1. MRI study on the cortical thickness of occipital lobe in children with ametropic amblyopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Hanjian; Wang Jian; Li Chuan; Zhang Jiuquan; Chen Li; Liu Bo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study cortical thickness of the occipital lobe in children with ametropic amblyopia by using MRI technique and the FreeSurfer software. Methods: Nine children with ametropic amblyopia were included in the amblyopic group and 8 normal children were included in the control group. All the children underwent brain MRI on the Siemens Avanto 1.5 T scanner. For the cortical thickness analysis, 3-demensional MPRAGE images were collected and analyzed with FreeSurfer software package. Cortical thickness of related regions in the occipital lobe (including the cuneus, later occipital, lingual, and pericalcarine gyri) were recorded and compared. Results: The cortical thickness of the lingual, pericalcarine gyri on the left hemisphere and the cuneus, lateraloccipital, lingual gyri on the right hemisphere in amblyopic group were lower than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Morphological changes existed in the occipital lobe in ametropic amblyopic children. The analysis technique with the FreeSurfer package has a potential value in the clinical application. (authors)

  2. Aberrant cortical associative plasticity associated with severe adult Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Ruiz-Rodríguez, María Adilia; Palomar, Francisco J; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas, Laura; Porcacchia, Paolo; Gómez-Crespo, Mercedes; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Carrillo, Fátima; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Mir, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown altered cortical plasticity in adult patients with Tourette syndrome. However, the clinical significance of this finding remains elusive. Motor cortical plasticity was evaluated in 15 adult patients with severe Tourette syndrome and 16 healthy controls using the paired associative stimulation protocol by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Associations between paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity and relevant clinical variables, including cortical excitability, psychiatric comorbidities, drug treatment and tic severity, were assessed. Motor cortical plasticity was abnormally increased in patients with Tourette syndrome compared with healthy subjects. This abnormal plasticity was independently associated with tic severity. Patients with severe Tourette syndrome display abnormally increased cortical associative plasticity. This aberrant cortical plasticity was associated with tic severity, suggesting an underlying mechanism for tic pathophysiology. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Critical fluctuations in cortical models near instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Aburn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Computational studies often proceed from the premise that cortical dynamics operate in a linearly stable domain, where fluctuations dissipate quickly and show only short memory. Studies of human EEG, however, have shown significant autocorrelation at time lags on the scale of minutes, indicating the need to consider regimes where nonlinearities influence the dynamics. Statistical properties such as increased autocorrelation length, increased variance, power-law scaling and bistable switching have been suggested as generic indicators of the approach to bifurcation in nonlinear dynamical systems. We study temporal fluctuations in a widely-employed computational model (the Jansen-Rit model of cortical activity, examining the statistical signatures that accompany bifurcations. Approaching supercritical Hopf bifurcations through tuning of the background excitatory input, we find a dramatic increase in the autocorrelation length that depends sensitively on the direction in phase space of the input fluctuations and hence on which neuronal subpopulation is stochastically perturbed. Similar dependence on the input direction is found in the distribution of fluctuation size and duration, which show power law scaling that extends over four orders of magnitude at the Hopf bifurcation. We conjecture that the alignment in phase space between the input noise vector and the center manifold of the Hopf bifurcation is directly linked to these changes. These results are consistent with the possibility of statistical indicators of linear instability being detectable in real EEG time series. However, even in a simple cortical model, we find that these indicators may not necessarily be visible even when bifurcations are present because their expression can depend sensitively on the neuronal pathway of incoming fluctuations.

  4. Effect of water on self-assembled tubules in β-sitosterol + γ-oryzanol-based organogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Adel, Ruud; Heussen, Patricia C. M.; Bot, Arjen

    2010-10-01

    Mixtures of β-sitosterol and γ-oryzanol form a network in triglyceride oil that may serve as an alternative to the network of small crystallites of triglycerides occurring in regular oil structuring. The present x-ray diffraction study investigates the relation between the crystal forms of the individual compounds and the mixture in oil, water and emulsion. β-Sitosterol and γ-oryzanol form normal crystals in oil, in water, or in emulsions. The crystals are sensitive to the presence of water. The mixture of β-sitosterol + γ-oryzanol forms crystals in water and emulsions that can be traced back to the crystals of the pure compounds. Only in oil, a completely different structure emerges in the mixture of β-sitosterol + γ-oryzanol, which bears no relation to the structures that are formed by both individual compounds, and which can be identified as a self-assembled tubule (diameter 7.2±0.1 nm, wall thickness 0.8±0.2 nm).

  5. Physiological Functions and Regulation of the Na+/H+ Exchanger [NHE1] in Renal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia G Vallés

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 [NHE1] is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane protein that plays a central role in intracellular pH and cell volume homeostasis by catalyzing an electroneutral exchange of extracellular sodium and intracellular hydrogen. Outside of this important physiological function, the NHE1 cytosolic tail domain acts as a molecular scaffold regulating cell survival and actin cytoskeleton organization through NHE1-dependent signaling proteins. NHE1 plays main roles in response to physiological stress conditions which in addition to cell shrinkage and acidification, include hypoxia and mechanical stimuli, such as cell stretch. NHE1-mediated modulation of programmed cell death results from the exchanger-mediated changes in pHi, cell volume, and/or [Na+]I; and, it has recently become known that regulation of cellular signaling pathways are involved as well. This review focuses on NHE1 functions and regulations. We describe evidence showing how these structural actions integrate with ion translocation in regulating renal tubule epithelial cell survival.

  6. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen.

  7. Urinary Excretion of Tetrodotoxin Modeled in a Porcine Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cell Line, LLC-PK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Matsumoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the urinary excretion of tetrodotoxin (TTX modeled in a porcine renal proximal tubule epithelial cell line, LLC-PK1. Time course profiles of TTX excretion and reabsorption across the cell monolayers at 37 °C showed that the amount of TTX transported increased linearly for 60 min. However, at 4 °C, the amount of TTX transported was approximately 20% of the value at 37 °C. These results indicate that TTX transport is both a transcellular and carrier-mediated process. Using a transport inhibition assay in which cell monolayers were incubated with 50 µM TTX and 5 mM of a transport inhibitor at 37 °C for 30 min, urinary excretion was significantly reduced by probenecid, tetraethylammonium (TEA, l-carnitine, and cimetidine, slightly reduced by p-aminohippuric acid (PAH, and unaffected by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+, oxaliplatin, and cefalexin. Renal reabsorption was significantly reduced by PAH, but was unaffected by probenecid, TEA and l-carnitine. These findings indicate that TTX is primarily excreted by organic cation transporters (OCTs and organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTNs, partially transported by organic anion transporters (OATs and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs, and negligibly transported by multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters (MATEs.

  8. Construction of bioartificial renal tubule assist device in vitro and its function of transporting sodium and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinggang; Chen, Jianghua; He, Qiang; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Wei

    2009-08-01

    To explore a new way of constructing bioartificial renal tubule assist device (RAD) in vitro and its function of transporting sodium (Na(+)) and glucose and to evaluate the application of atomic force microscope in the RAD construction, rat renal tubular epithelial cell line NRK-52E was cultured in vitro, seeded onto the outer surfaces of hollow fibers in a bioreactor, and then cultured for two weeks to construct RAD. Bioreactor hollow fibers without NRK-52E cells were used as control. The morphologies of attached cells were observed with scanning electron microscope, and the junctions of cells and polysulfone membrane were observed with atomic force microscope. Transportation of Na(+) and glucose was measured. Oubaine and phlorizin were used to inhibit the transporting property. The results showed that NRK-52E cells and polysulfone membrane were closely linked, as observed under atomic force microscope. After exposure to oubaine and phlorizin, transporting rates of Na(+) and glucose were decreased significantly in the RAD group as compared with that in the control group (Pconstructed successfully in vitro, and it is able to selectively transport Na(+) and glucose.

  9. Synthesis and secretion of proteins by perifused caput epididymal tubules, and association of secreted proteins with spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinefelter, G.R.; Hamilton, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    We have used perifusion organ culture of proximal and distal caput epididymal tubules of the rat to study the secretion of proteins by epididymal epithelium and uptake of the luminal radioactive proteins by sperm. The amount of incorporation of L-[35S]methionine into luminal fluid proteins was time dependent and completely inhibited by cycloheximide. The association of labeled proteins with cultured sperm was also dependent on time and continuous, with sperm still acquiring labeled luminal proteins after protein synthesis was arrested. A Mr = 46,000 molecule was found to be heavily labeled in luminal fluid and sperm extracts. Fluorograms of all L-[35S]methionine extracts immunoprecipitated using an antiepididymal alpha-lactalbumin antibody (Klinefelter and Hamilton, 1984) showed labeling of an Mr = 18,000 molecule and, in addition, the Mr = 46,000 molecule, but immunostaining was specific only for the Mr = 18,000 molecule and the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin. We suggest that the Mr = 46,000 molecule may be galactosyltransferase. Galactose oxidase-NaB[3H]4 labeling of the cultured caput sperm cell surface revealed a Mr = 23,000 molecule that was able to be immunoprecipitated with antiepididymal alpha-lactalbumin antibody. Our data suggest that this cell surface molecule is similar to one component of the fluid epididymal alpha-lactalbumin-like complex and, in addition, show that glycosylation of the sperm surface can occur in the caput epididymidis

  10. Effect of water on self-assembled tubules in {beta}-sitosterol + {gamma}-oryzanol-based organogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, Ruud den; Heussen, Patricia C M; Bot, Arjen, E-mail: ruud-den.adel@unilever.co [Unilever Research and Development Vlaardingen, Olivier van Noortlaan 120, NL-3133 AT Vlaardingen (Netherlands)

    2010-10-01

    Mixtures of {beta}-sitosterol and {gamma}-oryzanol form a network in triglyceride oil that may serve as an alternative to the network of small crystallites of triglycerides occurring in regular oil structuring. The present x-ray diffraction study investigates the relation between the crystal forms of the individual compounds and the mixture in oil, water and emulsion. {beta}-Sitosterol and {gamma}-oryzanol form normal crystals in oil, in water, or in emulsions. The crystals are sensitive to the presence of water. The mixture of {beta}-sitosterol + {gamma}-oryzanol forms crystals in water and emulsions that can be traced back to the crystals of the pure compounds. Only in oil, a completely different structure emerges in the mixture of {beta}-sitosterol + {gamma}-oryzanol, which bears no relation to the structures that are formed by both individual compounds, and which can be identified as a self-assembled tubule (diameter 7.2{+-}0.1 nm, wall thickness 0.8{+-}0.2 nm).

  11. Effect of water on self-assembled tubules in β-sitosterol + γ-oryzanol-based organogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adel, Ruud den; Heussen, Patricia C M; Bot, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    Mixtures of β-sitosterol and γ-oryzanol form a network in triglyceride oil that may serve as an alternative to the network of small crystallites of triglycerides occurring in regular oil structuring. The present x-ray diffraction study investigates the relation between the crystal forms of the individual compounds and the mixture in oil, water and emulsion. β-Sitosterol and γ-oryzanol form normal crystals in oil, in water, or in emulsions. The crystals are sensitive to the presence of water. The mixture of β-sitosterol + γ-oryzanol forms crystals in water and emulsions that can be traced back to the crystals of the pure compounds. Only in oil, a completely different structure emerges in the mixture of β-sitosterol + γ-oryzanol, which bears no relation to the structures that are formed by both individual compounds, and which can be identified as a self-assembled tubule (diameter 7.2±0.1 nm, wall thickness 0.8±0.2 nm).

  12. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, E.J.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  13. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases...... with the strength of the synapses in the network and with the value to which the membrane potential is reset after a spike. Generalizing the model to include conductance-based synapses gives insight into the connection between the firing statistics and the high- conductance state observed experimentally in visual...

  14. Cisternography contribution in the cortical atrophy diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, J.U.M.; Balallai, N.; Suzuki, K.

    1975-01-01

    A 37 years-old woman suffered a car accident. On admission to hospital she presented: torpor, the right pupil greater than the left, both reacting to light, and left hemiparesis with homologous Babinski reflex. She was submitted to carotid arteriogram an air-contrast study without significant findings. Eletroencephalographic examination showed diffuse parenquimatous involvement of left cerebral hemisphery. Scinticisternography demonstrated delayed reabsorption of the radioactive tracer in both frontal areas. A subsequent trepanation made the diagnosis of cortical atrophy in the areas mentioned above. This case shows aditional information concerning anatomic detail provided by isotope cisternography, that eventually can't be detected by air-contrast study [pt

  15. Cerebral cortices of East african early hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, D

    1983-09-09

    An endocast of the frontal lobe of a reconstructed skull, which is approximately 2 million years old, from the Koobi Fora region of Kenya appears to represent the oldest human-like cortical sulcal pattern in the fossil record, while the endocast from another skull from the same region produces an endocast that appears apelike in its frontal lobe and similar to endocasts from earlier South African australopithecines. New analysis of paleoanatomical evidence thus indicates that at least two taxa of early hominids coexisted in East Africa.

  16. Hiperactivacion cortical y deterioro cognitivo en esquizofrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Suazo Bonnelly, Vanessa Johanna

    2014-01-01

    [ES] En este trabajo se estudió la actividad cerebral desorganizada y el deterioro cognitivo adjudicado a pacientes con esquizofrenia. Para estudiar la actividad cerebral se empleó una medida electroencefalográfica de ruido cortical (actividad promediada de fondo no ligada a la tarea) durante el desarrollo de una tarea sencilla (P300) en dos de las bandas oscilatorias (gamma y theta) más asociadas a la organización de la actividad cerebral según la literatura. Se utilizó una medida estructura...

  17. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ceschin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm born children with spastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy and white matter injury or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, are known to have motor, visual and cognitive impairments. Most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies performed in this group have demonstrated widespread abnormalities using averaged deterministic tractography and voxel-based DTI measurements. Little is known about structural network correlates of white matter topography and reorganization in preterm cerebral palsy, despite the availability of new therapies and the need for brain imaging biomarkers. Here, we combined novel post-processing methodology of probabilistic tractography data in this preterm cohort to improve spatial and regional delineation of longitudinal cortical association tract abnormalities using an along-tract approach, and compared these data to structural DTI cortical network topology analysis. DTI images were acquired on 16 preterm children with cerebral palsy (mean age 5.6 ± 4 and 75 healthy controls (mean age 5.7 ± 3.4. Despite mean tract analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS and voxel-based morphometry (VBM demonstrating diffusely reduced fractional anisotropy (FA reduction in all white matter tracts, the along-tract analysis improved the detection of regional tract vulnerability. The along-tract map-structural network topology correlates revealed two associations: (1 reduced regional posterior–anterior gradient in FA of the longitudinal visual cortical association tracts (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, posterior thalamic radiation correlated with reduced posterior–anterior gradient of intra-regional (nodal efficiency metrics with relative sparing of frontal and temporal regions; and (2 reduced regional FA within frontal–thalamic–striatal white matter pathways (anterior limb/anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculus and cortical spinal tract

  18. Cisternography contribution in the cortical atrophy diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calegaro, J U.M. [Centro de Analises Clinicas e Medicina Nuclear, Londrina (Brazil); Balallai, N; Suzuki, K [Instituto de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, Londrina (Brazil)

    1975-01-01

    A 37 years-old woman suffered a car accident. On admission to hospital she presented: torpor, the right pupil greater than the left, both reacting to light, and left hemiparesis with homologous Babinski reflex. She was submitted to carotid arteriogram an air-contrast study without significant findings. Eletroencephalographic examination showed diffuse parenquimatous involvement of left cerebral hemisphery. Scinticisternography demonstrated delayed reabsorption of the radioactive tracer in both frontal areas. A subsequent trepanation made the diagnosis of cortical atrophy in the areas mentioned above. This case shows aditional information concerning anatomic detail provided by isotope cisternography, that eventually can't be detected by air-contrast study.

  19. Localization of cortical areas activated by thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, P E; Friberg, L

    1985-05-01

    These experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that pure mental activity, thinking, increases the cerebral blood flow and that different types of thinking increase the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in different cortical areas. As a first approach, thinking was defined as brain work in the form of operations on internal information, done by an awake subject. The rCBF was measured in 254 cortical regions in 11 subjects with the intracarotid 133Xe injection technique. In normal man, changes in the regional cortical metabolic rate of O2 leads to proportional changes in rCBF. One control study was taken with the subjects at rest. Then the rCBF was measured during three different simple algorithm tasks, each consisting of retrieval of a specific memory followed by a simple operation on the retrieved information. Once started, the information processing went on in the brain without any communication with the outside world. In 50-3 thinking, the subjects started with 50 and then, in their minds only, continuously subtracted 3 from the result. In jingle thinking the subjects internally jumped every second word in a nine-word circular jingle. In route-finding thinking the subjects imagined that they started at their front door and then walked alternatively to the left or the right each time they reached a corner. The rCBF increased only in homotypical cortical areas during thinking. The areas in the superior prefrontal cortex increased their rCBF equivalently during the three types of thinking. In the remaining parts of the prefrontal cortex there were multifocal increases of rCBF. The localizations and intensities of these rCBF increases depended on the type of internal operation occurring. The rCBF increased bilaterally in the angular cortex during 50-3 thinking. The rCBF increased in the right midtemporal cortex exclusively during jingle thinking. The intermediate and remote visual association areas, the superior occipital, posterior inferior temporal, and

  20. Outline of a novel architecture for cortical computation

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a novel architecture for cortical computation has been proposed. This architecture is composed of computing paths consisting of neurons and synapses only. These paths have been decomposed into lateral, longitudinal and vertical components. Cortical computation has then been decomposed into lateral computation (LaC), longitudinal computation (LoC) and vertical computation (VeC). It has been shown that various loop structures in the cortical circuit play important roles in cortica...

  1. A novel member of the trehalose transporter family functions as an H+-dependent trehalose transporter in the reabsorption of trehalose in Malpighian tubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo eKikuta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In insects, Malpighian tubules are functionally analogous to mammalian kidneys in that they not only are essential to excrete waste molecules into the lumen but also are responsible for the reabsorption of indispensable molecules, such as sugars, from the lumen to the principal cells. Among sugars, the disaccharide trehalose is highly important to insects because it is the main hemolymph sugar to serve as a source of energy and carbon. The trehalose transporter TRET1 participates in the transfer of newly synthesized trehalose from the fat body across the cellular membrane into the hemolymph. Although transport proteins must play a pivotal role in the reabsorption of trehalose in Malpighian tubules, the molecular context underlying this process remains obscure. Previously, we identified a Tret1 homolog (Nlst8 that is expressed principally in the Malpighian tubules of the brown planthopper (BPH. Here, we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system to show that NlST8 exerts trehalose transport activity that is elevated under low pH conditions. These functional assays indicate that Nlst8 encodes a proton-dependent trehalose transporter (H-TRET1. To examine the involvement of Nlst8 in trehalose reabsorption, we analyzed the sugar composition of honeydew by using BPH with RNAi gene silencing. Trehalose was detected in the honeydew as waste excreted from Nlst8-dsRNA-injected BPH under hyperglycemic conditions. However, trehalose was not expelled from GFP-dsRNA-injected BPH even under hyperglycemic conditions. We conclude that NlST8 could participate in trehalose reabsorption driven by a H+ gradient from the lumen to the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules.

  2. RNA-Seq Comparison of Larval and Adult Malpighian Tubules of the Yellow Fever Mosquito Aedes aegypti Reveals Life Stage-Specific Changes in Renal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The life history of Aedes aegypti presents diverse challenges to its diuretic system. During the larval and pupal life stages mosquitoes are aquatic. With the emergence of the adult they become terrestrial. This shifts the organism within minutes from an aquatic environment to a terrestrial environment where dehydration has to be avoided. In addition, female mosquitoes take large blood meals, which present an entirely new set of challenges to salt and water homeostasis.Methods: To determine differences in gene expression associated with these different life stages, we performed an RNA-seq analysis of the main diuretic tissue in A. aegypti, the Malpighian tubules. We compared transcript abundance in 4th instar larvae to that of adult females and analyzed the data with a focus on transcripts that encode proteins potentially involved in diuresis, like water and solute channels as well as ion transporters. We compared our results against the model of potassium- and sodium chloride excretion in the Malpighian tubules proposed by Hine et al. (2014, which involves at least eight ion transporters and a proton-pump.Results: We found 3,421 of a total number of 17,478 (19.6% unique transcripts with a P < 0.05 and at least a 2.5 fold change in expression levels between the two groups. We identified two novel transporter genes that are highly expressed in the adult Malpighian tubules, which have not previously been part of the transport model in this species and may play important roles in diuresis. We also identified candidates for hypothesized sodium and chloride channels. Detoxification genes were generally higher expressed in larvae.Significance: This study represents the first comparison of Malpighian tubule transcriptomes between larval and adult A. aegypti mosquitoes, highlighting key differences in their renal systems that arise as they transform from an aquatic filter-feeding larval stage to a terrestrial, blood-feeding adult stage.

  3. Localization of Secondary Metabolites in Marine Invertebrates: Contribution of MALDI MSI for the Study of Saponins in Cuvierian Tubules of H. forskali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaux, Céline; Bonnel, David; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle; Wisztorski, Maxence

    2010-01-01

    Background Several species of sea cucumbers of the family Holothuriidae possess a particular mechanical defense system called the Cuvierian tubules (Ct). It is also a chemical defense system as triterpene glycosides (saponins) appear to be particularly concentrated in Ct. In the present study, the precise localization of saponins in the Ct of Holothuria forskali is investigated. Classical histochemical labeling using lectin was firstly performed but did not generate any conclusive results. Thus, MALDI mass spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) was directly applied and completed by statistical multivariate tests. A comparison between the tubules of relaxed and stressed animals was realized. Results These analyses allowed the detection of three groups of ions, corresponding to the isomeric saponins of the tubules. Saponins detected at m/z 1287 and 1303 were the most abundant and were apparently localized in the connective tissue of the tubules of both relaxed and stressed individuals. Saponins at m/z 1125 and 1141 were detected in lower amount and were present in tissues of relaxed animals. Finally, saponin ions at 1433, 1449, 1463 and 1479 were observed in some Ct of stressed holothuroids in the outer part of the connective tissue. The saponin group m/z 14xx seems therefore to be stress-specific and could originate from modifications of the saponins with m/z of 11xx. Conclusions All the results taken together indicate a complex chemical defense mechanism with, for a single organ, different sets of saponins originating from different cell populations and presenting different responses to stress. The present study also reflects that MALDI-MSI is a valuable tool for chemical ecology studies in which specific chemical signalling molecules like allelochemicals or pheromones have to be tracked. This report represents one of the very first studies using these tools to provide a functional and ecological understanding of the role of natural products from marine invertebrates

  4. De novo expression of sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT2 in Bowman's capsule coincides with replacement of parietal epithelial cell layer with proximal tubule-like epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, Niloofar M; North, Paula E; Regner, Kevin R; Kumar, Suresh N; Duris, Christine B; Blodgett, Amy B

    2014-08-01

    In kidney nephron, parietal epithelial cells line the Bowman's capsule and function as a permeability barrier for the glomerular filtrate. Bowman's capsule cells with proximal tubule epithelial morphology have been found. However, the effects of tubular metaplasia in Bowman's capsule on kidney function remain poorly understood. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) plays a major role in reabsorption of glucose in the kidney and is expressed on brush border membrane (BBM) of epithelial cells in the early segment of the proximal tubule. We hypothesized that SGLT2 is expressed in tubularized Bowman's capsule and used our novel antibody to test this hypothesis. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed with our SGLT2 antibody on C57BL/6 mouse kidney prone to have tubularized Bowman's capsules. Cell membrane was examined with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain. The results showed that SGLT2 was localized on BBM of the proximal tubules in young and adult mice. Bowman's capsules were lined mostly with normal brush border-less parietal epithelial cells in young mice, while they were almost completely covered with proximal tubule-like cells in adult mice. Regardless of age, SGLT2 was expressed on BBM of the tubularized Bowman's capsule but did not co-localize with nephrin in the glomerulus. SGLT2-expressing tubular cells expanded from the urinary pole toward the vascular pole of the Bowman's capsule. This study identified the localization of SGLT2 in the Bowman's capsule. Bowman's capsules with tubular metaplasia may acquire roles in reabsorption of filtered glucose and sodium.

  5. Basic visual function and cortical thickness patterns in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Manja; Barnes, Josephine; Ridgway, Gerard R; Wattam-Bell, John; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2011-09-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is characterized by a progressive decline in higher-visual object and space processing, but the extent to which these deficits are underpinned by basic visual impairments is unknown. This study aimed to assess basic and higher-order visual deficits in 21 PCA patients. Basic visual skills including form detection and discrimination, color discrimination, motion coherence, and point localization were measured, and associations and dissociations between specific basic visual functions and measures of higher-order object and space perception were identified. All participants showed impairment in at least one aspect of basic visual processing. However, a number of dissociations between basic visual skills indicated a heterogeneous pattern of visual impairment among the PCA patients. Furthermore, basic visual impairments were associated with particular higher-order object and space perception deficits, but not with nonvisual parietal tasks, suggesting the specific involvement of visual networks in PCA. Cortical thickness analysis revealed trends toward lower cortical thickness in occipitotemporal (ventral) and occipitoparietal (dorsal) regions in patients with visuoperceptual and visuospatial deficits, respectively. However, there was also a lot of overlap in their patterns of cortical thinning. These findings suggest that different presentations of PCA represent points in a continuum of phenotypical variation.

  6. Frontal cortical control of posterior sensory and association cortices through the claustrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael G; Mathur, Brian N

    2018-04-06

    The claustrum is a telencephalic gray matter nucleus that is richly interconnected with the neocortex. This structure subserves top-down executive functions that require frontal cortical control of posterior cortical regions. However, functional anatomical support for the claustrum allowing for long-range intercortical communication is lacking. To test this, we performed a channelrhodopsin-assisted long-circuit mapping strategy in mouse brain slices. We find that anterior cingulate cortex input to the claustrum is transiently amplified by claustrum neurons that, in turn, project to parietal association cortex or to primary and secondary visual cortices. Additionally, we observe that claustrum drive of cortical neurons in parietal association cortex is layer-specific, eliciting action potential generation briefly in layers II/III, IV, and VI but not V. These data are the first to provide a functional anatomical substrate through claustrum that may underlie top-down functions, such as executive attention or working memory, providing critical insight to this most interconnected and enigmatic nucleus.

  7. Overweight is not associated with cortical thickness alterations in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Jane Sharkey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSeveral studies report an association between body mass index (BMI and cortical thickness in adults. Some studies demonstrate diffuse cortical thinning in obesity, while others report effects in areas that are associated with self-regulation, such as lateral prefrontal cortex. MethodsThis study used multilevel modelling of data from the NIH Pediatric MRI Data Repository, a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional database, to examine the relationship between cortical thickness and body weight in children. Cortical thickness was computed at 81,942 vertices of 716 MRI scans from 378 children aged between 4 and 18 years. Body mass index Z score for age was computed for each participant. We preformed vertex-wise statistical analysis of the relationship between cortical thickness and BMI, accounting for age and gender. In addition, cortical thickness was extracted from regions of interest in prefrontal cortex and insula.ResultsNo significant association between cortical thickness and BMI was found, either by statistical parametric mapping or by region of interest analysis. Results remained negative when the analysis was restricted to children aged 12-18.ConclusionsThe correlation between BMI and cortical thickness was not found in this large pediatric sample. The association between BMI and cortical thinning develops after adolescence. This has implications for the nature of the relationship between brain anatomy and weight gain.

  8. The Influence of Concentration and Temperature on the Formation of γ-Oryzanol + β-Sitosterol Tubules in Edible Oil Organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawalha, Hassan; Venema, Paul; Bot, Arjen; Flöter, Eckhard; van der Linden, Erik

    2011-03-01

    The gelation process of mixtures of γ-oryzanol and sitosterol structurants in sunflower oil was studied using light scattering, rheology, and micro-scanning calorimetry (Micro-DSC). The relation between temperature and the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of tubule formation of γ-oryzanol and sitosterol was determined using these techniques. The temperature dependence of the CAC was used to estimate the binding energy and enthalpic and entropic contribution to the tubular formation process. The binding energy calculated at the corresponding temperatures and CACs were relatively low, in order of 2 RT (4.5 kJ mol(-1)), which is in accord with the reversibility of the tubular formation process. The formation of the tubules was associated with negative (exothermic) enthalpy change (ΔH(0)) compared with positive entropy term (-T ΔS(0) >0), indicating that the aggregation into tubules is an enthalpy-driven process. The oryzanol-sitosterol ratio affected the aggregation process; solutions with ratio of (60 oryzanol-40 sitosterol) started aggregation at higher temperature compared with other ratios.

  9. Dysferlin, annexin A1, and mitsugumin 53 are upregulated in muscular dystrophy and localize to longitudinal tubules of the T-system with stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Leigh B; Lemckert, Frances A; Zheng, Xi F; Tran, Jenny; Evesson, Frances J; Hawkes, Joanne M; Lek, Angela; Street, Neil E; Lin, Peihui; Clarke, Nigel F; Landstrom, Andrew P; Ackerman, Michael J; Weisleder, Noah; Ma, Jianjie; North, Kathryn N; Cooper, Sandra T

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in dysferlin cause an inherited muscular dystrophy because of defective membrane repair. Three interacting partners of dysferlin are also implicated in membrane resealing: caveolin-3 (in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C), annexin A1, and the newly identified protein mitsugumin 53 (MG53). Mitsugumin 53 accumulates at sites of membrane damage, and MG53-knockout mice display a progressive muscular dystrophy. This study explored the expression and localization of MG53 in human skeletal muscle, how membrane repair proteins are modulated in various forms of muscular dystrophy, and whether MG53 is a primary cause of human muscle disease. Mitsugumin 53 showed variable sarcolemmal and/or cytoplasmic immunolabeling in control human muscle and elevated levels in dystrophic patients. No pathogenic MG53 mutations were identified in 50 muscular dystrophy patients, suggesting that MG53 is unlikely to be a common cause of muscular dystrophy in Australia. Western blot analysis confirmed upregulation of MG53, as well as of dysferlin, annexin A1, and caveolin-3 to different degrees, in different muscular dystrophies. Importantly, MG53, annexin A1, and dysferlin localize to the t-tubule network and show enriched labeling at longitudinal tubules of the t-system in overstretch. Our results suggest that longitudinal tubules of the t-system may represent sites of physiological membrane damage targeted by this membrane repair complex.

  10. Sex Differences in the Relationship Between Conduct Disorder and Cortical Structure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaragdi, Areti; Cornwell, Harriet; Toschi, Nicola; Riccelli, Roberta; Gonzalez-Madruga, Karen; Wells, Amy; Clanton, Roberta; Baker, Rosalind; Rogers, Jack; Martin-Key, Nayra; Puzzo, Ignazio; Batchelor, Molly; Sidlauskaite, Justina; Bernhard, Anka; Martinelli, Anne; Kohls, Gregor; Konrad, Kerstin; Baumann, Sarah; Raschle, Nora; Stadler, Christina; Freitag, Christine; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; De Brito, Stephane; Fairchild, Graeme

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have reported reduced cortical thickness and surface area and altered gyrification in frontal and temporal regions in adolescents with conduct disorder (CD). Although there is evidence that the clinical phenotype of CD differs between males and females, no studies have examined whether such sex differences extend to cortical and subcortical structure. As part of a European multisite study (FemNAT-CD), structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were collected from 48 female and 48 male participants with CD and from 104 sex-, age-, and pubertal-status-matched controls (14-18 years of age). Data were analyzed using surface-based morphometry, testing for effects of sex, diagnosis, and sex-by-diagnosis interactions, while controlling for age, IQ, scan site, and total gray matter volume. CD was associated with cortical thinning and higher gyrification in ventromedial prefrontal cortex in both sexes. Males with CD showed lower, and females with CD showed higher, supramarginal gyrus cortical thickness compared with controls. Relative to controls, males with CD showed higher gyrification and surface area in superior frontal gyrus, whereas the opposite pattern was seen in females. There were no effects of diagnosis or sex-by-diagnosis interactions on subcortical volumes. Results are discussed with regard to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression, and substance abuse comorbidity, medication use, handedness, and CD age of onset. We found both similarities and differences between males and females in CD-cortical structure associations. This initial evidence that the pathophysiological basis of CD may be partly sex-specific highlights the need to consider sex in future neuroimaging studies and suggests that males and females may require different treatments. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  12. Cortical bone mineral content in primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautalen, C.; Reyes, H.R.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Fromm, G.

    1986-01-01

    The bone mineral content (BMC) of 35 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) was measured at the mid radius (95% cortical bone) by photon absorptiometry of a 241 Am source. The majority of the patients had an overt disease of moderate to severe degree. Average serum calcium of the group was 12.3 mg/100 ml (range 10.6 to 18.0 mg/100 ml). The percentage of normality of the BMC was (Av +- 1 SD) 75.1 +- 13.0% for the whole group. The average increment of BMC in 14 patients 9 to 26 months after parathyroidectomy was 9.9%, with a wide dispersion. However, a highly significant negative correlation (r: 0.83; P < 0.01) was found between the initial bone mass and the percentage increment per month after surgery. No furhter gain was observed 2 years after parathyroidectomy except in one patient with an extremely severe bone loss. In spite of the gain obtained after surgery the bone mass remained markedly diminished in most patients showing that the cortical bone loss caused by PHPT is mainly irreversible. (author)

  13. Cortical Thickness Changes Associated with Photoparoxysmal Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Groppa, Stanislav A; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an EEG trait of spike and spike-wave discharges in response to photic stimulation that is closely linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In our previous studies we showed that PPR is associated with functional alterations in the occipital and frontal co...... in the occipital lobe, frontoparietal regions and temporal lobe, which also show functional changes associated with PPR. Patients with epilepsy present changes in the temporal lobe and supplementary motor area.......-positive-subjects presented a significant decrease of cortical thickness in the temporal cortex in the same group contrast. IGE patients exhibited lower cortical thickness in the temporal lobe bilaterally and in the right paracentral region in comparison to PPR-positive-subjects. Our study demonstrates structural changes......Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an EEG trait of spike and spike-wave discharges in response to photic stimulation that is closely linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In our previous studies we showed that PPR is associated with functional alterations in the occipital and frontal...

  14. Cortical activation in patients with functional hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, G; Bingel, U; Spiekermann, G; Kurthen, M; Müller, S; Hufnagel, A

    2001-10-01

    Functional hemispherectomy, a safe and effective therapeutical procedure in medically intractable epilepsy, offers the chance to investigate a strictly unilateral cortical activation in ipsilateral limb movement. We assessed the pattern of cortical activation in a group of patients following functional hemispherectomy. We measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 6 patients postoperatively and 6 normal subjects with positron emission tomography using 15[O]H2O as a tracer. Brain activation was achieved by passive elbow movements of the affected arm. Analysis of group results and between-group comparisons were performed with statistical parametric mapping, (SPM96). In normal subjects brain activation was found contralaterally in the cranial sensorimotor cortex and the supplementary motor area and ipsilaterally in the inferior parietal cortex. In patients significant rCBF increases were found in the inferior parietal cortex, caudal sensorimotor cortex and the supplementary motor area ipsilaterally. The activation was weaker than in normal subjects. Compared with normal subjects patients showed additional activation in the premotor cortex, caudal sensorimotor cortex and the inferior parietal cortex of the remaining hemisphere. Less activation compared with normal subjects was found in the cranial sensorimotor cortex and the supplementary motor area. A functional network connecting the inferior parietal cortex, premotor cortex and the supplementary motor area as well as the existence of ipsilateral projections originating from these regions may explain why these areas are predominantly involved in reorganization confined to a single hemisphere.

  15. Scaling Up Cortical Control Inhibits Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahrane Dale

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Acute pain evokes protective neural and behavioral responses. Chronic pain, however, disrupts normal nociceptive processing. The prefrontal cortex (PFC is known to exert top-down regulation of sensory inputs; unfortunately, how individual PFC neurons respond to an acute pain signal is not well characterized. We found that neurons in the prelimbic region of the PFC increased firing rates of the neurons after noxious stimulations in free-moving rats. Chronic pain, however, suppressed both basal spontaneous and pain-evoked firing rates. Furthermore, we identified a linear correlation between basal and evoked firing rates of PFC neurons, whereby a decrease in basal firing leads to a nearly 2-fold reduction in pain-evoked response in chronic pain states. In contrast, enhancing basal PFC activity with low-frequency optogenetic stimulation scaled up prefrontal outputs to inhibit pain. These results demonstrate a cortical gain control system for nociceptive regulation and establish scaling up prefrontal outputs as an effective neuromodulation strategy to inhibit pain. : Dale et al. find that acute pain increases activity levels in the prefrontal cortex. Chronic pain reduces both basal spontaneous and pain-evoked activity in this region, whereas neurostimulation to restore basal activities can in turn enhance nociception-evoked prefrontal activities to inhibit pain. Keywords: chronic pain, neuromodulation, prefrontal cortex, PFC, cortical gain control

  16. Bayesian automated cortical segmentation for neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Zane; Paquette, Natacha; Ganesh, Bhavana; Wang, Yalin; Ceschin, Rafael; Nelson, Marvin D.; Macyszyn, Luke; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Panigrahy, Ashok; Lepore, Natasha

    2017-11-01

    Several attempts have been made in the past few years to develop and implement an automated segmentation of neonatal brain structural MRI. However, accurate automated MRI segmentation remains challenging in this population because of the low signal-to-noise ratio, large partial volume effects and inter-individual anatomical variability of the neonatal brain. In this paper, we propose a learning method for segmenting the whole brain cortical grey matter on neonatal T2-weighted images. We trained our algorithm using a neonatal dataset composed of 3 fullterm and 4 preterm infants scanned at term equivalent age. Our segmentation pipeline combines the FAST algorithm from the FSL library software and a Bayesian segmentation approach to create a threshold matrix that minimizes the error of mislabeling brain tissue types. Our method shows promising results with our pilot training set. In both preterm and full-term neonates, automated Bayesian segmentation generates a smoother and more consistent parcellation compared to FAST, while successfully removing the subcortical structure and cleaning the edges of the cortical grey matter. This method show promising refinement of the FAST segmentation by considerably reducing manual input and editing required from the user, and further improving reliability and processing time of neonatal MR images. Further improvement will include a larger dataset of training images acquired from different manufacturers.

  17. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, J B; Ganezer, K S; Halcrow, P W; Neeson, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statistical and systematic errors associated with the variability in the pressure applied by the clinician to the transmitting transducer that NCU might provide. The authors also undertook this study in order to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. A noncontact ultrasound imaging system using a pair of specially designed broadband, 1.5 MHz noncontact piezoelectric transducers and cortical bone phantoms, were used to determine bone mineral density (BMD), speed of sound (SOS), integrated response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were also used in the collection of data from phantoms of nominal mass densities that varied from 1.17 to 2.25 g/cm(3) and in bone mineral density from 0 to 1.7 g/cm(3). Good correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 17 phantoms, and methods for quantifying and minimizing sources of systematic errors were outlined. The BMD of the phantom sets extended through most of the in vivo range found in cortical bone. A total of 16-20 repeated measurements of the SOS, thickness, and IR for the phantom set that were conducted over a period of several months showed a small variation in the range of measurements of ±1%-2%. These NCU data were shown to be in agreement with similar results using contact ultrasound to be within 1%-2%. Transmittance

  18. Cortical thickness patterns as state biomarker of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnino, Luca; Mwangi, Benson; Cao, Bo; Shott, Megan E; Soares, Jair C; Frank, Guido K W

    2018-03-01

    Only few studies have investigated cortical thickness in anorexia nervosa (AN), and it is unclear whether patterns of altered cortical thickness can be identified as biomarkers for AN. Cortical thickness was measured in 19 adult women with restricting-type AN, 24 individuals recovered from restricting-type AN (REC-AN) and 24 healthy controls. Those individuals with current or recovered from AN had previously shown altered regional cortical volumes across orbitofrontal cortex and insula. A linear relevance vector machine-learning algorithm estimated patterns of regional thickness across 24 subdivisions of those regions. Region-based analysis showed higher cortical thickness in AN and REC-AN, compared to controls, in the right medial orbital (olfactory) sulcus, and greater cortical thickness for short insular gyri in REC-AN versus controls bilaterally. The machine-learning algorithm identified a pattern of relatively higher right orbital, right insular and left middle frontal cortical thickness, but lower left orbital, right middle and inferior frontal, and bilateral superior frontal cortical thickness specific to AN versus controls (74% specificity and 74% sensitivity, χ 2 p < .004); predicted probabilities differed significantly between AN and controls (p < .023). No pattern significantly distinguished the REC-AN group from controls. Higher cortical thickness in medial orbitofrontal cortex and insula probably contributes to higher gray matter volume in AN in those regions. The machine-learning algorithm identified a mixed pattern of mostly higher orbital and insular, but relatively lower superior frontal cortical thickness in individuals with current AN. These novel results suggest that regional cortical thickness patterns could be state markers for AN. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alessandrini

    Full Text Available Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN, that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34 and Temporal (BA 38 cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34 and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38 respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding

  20. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  1. Cadmium induces Wnt signaling to upregulate proliferation and survival genes in sub-confluent kidney proximal tubule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff Natascha A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The class 1 carcinogen cadmium (Cd2+ disrupts the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex of epithelial adherens junctions (AJs and causes renal cancer. Deregulation of E-cadherin adhesion and changes in Wnt/β-catenin signaling are known to contribute to carcinogenesis. Results We investigated Wnt signaling after Cd2+-induced E-cadherin disruption in sub-confluent cultured kidney proximal tubule cells (PTC. Cd2+ (25 μM, 3-9 h caused nuclear translocation of β-catenin and triggered a Wnt response measured by TOPflash reporter assays. Cd2+ reduced the interaction of β-catenin with AJ components (E-cadherin, α-catenin and increased binding to the transcription factor TCF4 of the Wnt pathway, which was upregulated and translocated to the nucleus. While Wnt target genes (c-Myc, cyclin D1 and ABCB1 were up-regulated by Cd2+, electromobility shift assays showed increased TCF4 binding to cyclin D1 and ABCB1 promoter sequences with Cd2+. Overexpression of wild-type and mutant TCF4 confirmed Cd2+-induced Wnt signaling. Wnt signaling elicited by Cd2+ was not observed in confluent non-proliferating cells, which showed increased E-cadherin expression. Overexpression of E-cadherin reduced Wnt signaling, PTC proliferation and Cd2+ toxicity. Cd2+ also induced reactive oxygen species dependent expression of the pro-apoptotic ER stress marker and Wnt suppressor CHOP/GADD153 which, however, did not abolish Wnt response and cell viability. Conclusions Cd2+ induces Wnt signaling in PTC. Hence, Cd2+ may facilitate carcinogenesis of PTC by promoting Wnt pathway-mediated proliferation and survival of pre-neoplastic cells.

  2. Superresolution microscope image reconstruction by spatiotemporal object decomposition and association: application in resolving t-tubule structure in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhai; Huang, Jiaqing; Bunyak, Filiz; Gumpper, Kristyn; De, Gejing; Sermersheim, Matthew; Liu, George; Lin, Pei-Hui; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-05-19

    One key factor that limits resolution of single-molecule superresolution microscopy relates to the localization accuracy of the activated emitters, which is usually deteriorated by two factors. One originates from the background noise due to out-of-focus signals, sample auto-fluorescence, and camera acquisition noise; and the other is due to the low photon count of emitters at a single frame. With fast acquisition rate, the activated emitters can last multiple frames before they transiently switch off or permanently bleach. Effectively incorporating the temporal information of these emitters is critical to improve the spatial resolution. However, majority of the existing reconstruction algorithms locate the emitters frame by frame, discarding or underusing the temporal information. Here we present a new image reconstruction algorithm based on tracklets, short trajectories of the same objects. We improve the localization accuracy by associating the same emitters from multiple frames to form tracklets and by aggregating signals to enhance the signal to noise ratio. We also introduce a weighted mean-shift algorithm (WMS) to automatically detect the number of modes (emitters) in overlapping regions of tracklets so that not only well-separated single emitters but also individual emitters within multi-emitter groups can be identified and tracked. In combination with a maximum likelihood estimator method (MLE), we are able to resolve low to medium density of overlapping emitters with improved localization accuracy. We evaluate the performance of our method with both synthetic and experimental data, and show that the tracklet-based reconstruction is superior in localization accuracy, particularly for weak signals embedded in a strong background. Using this method, for the first time, we resolve the transverse tubule structure of the mammalian skeletal muscle.

  3. Interactive toxicity of inorganic mercury and trichloroethylene in rat and human proximal tubules: Effects on apoptosis, necrosis, and glutathione status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Putt, David A.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Payton, Scott G.; Zwickl, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous or prior exposure to one chemical may alter the concurrent or subsequent response to another chemical, often in unexpected ways. This is particularly true when the two chemicals share common mechanisms of action. The present study uses the paradigm of prior exposure to study the interactive toxicity between inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and trichloroethylene (TRI) or its metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in rat and human proximal tubule. Pretreatment of rats with a subtoxic dose of Hg 2+ increased expression of glutathione S-transferase-α1 (GSTα1) but decreased expression of GSTα2, increased activities of several GSH-dependent enzymes, and increased GSH conjugation of TRI. Primary cultures of rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells exhibited both necrosis and apoptosis after incubation with Hg 2+ . Pretreatment of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells with Hg 2+ caused little or no changes in GST expression or activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, decreased apoptosis induced by TRI or DCVC, but increased necrosis induced by DCVC. In contrast, pretreatment of hPT cells with TRI or DCVC protected from Hg 2+ by decreasing necrosis and increasing apoptosis. Thus, whereas pretreatment of hPT cells with Hg 2+ exacerbated cellular injury due to TRI or DCVC by shifting the response from apoptosis to necrosis, pretreatment of hPT cells with either TRI or DCVC protected from Hg 2+ -induced cytotoxicity by shifting the response from necrosis to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that by altering processes related to GSH status, susceptibilities of rPT and hPT cells to acute injury from Hg 2+ , TRI, or DCVC are markedly altered by prior exposures

  4. Cationic uremic toxins affect human renal proximal tubule cell functioning through interaction with the organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schophuizen, Carolien M S; Wilmer, Martijn J; Jansen, Jitske; Gustavsson, Lena; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-12-01

    Several organic cations, such as guanidino compounds and polyamines, have been found to accumulate in plasma of patients with kidney failure due to inadequate renal clearance. Here, we studied the interaction of cationic uremic toxins with renal organic cation transport in a conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cell line (ciPTEC). Transporter activity was measured and validated in cell suspensions by studying uptake of the fluorescent substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium-iodide (ASP(+)). Subsequently, the inhibitory potencies of the cationic uremic toxins, cadaverine, putrescine, spermine and spermidine (polyamines), acrolein (polyamine breakdown product), guanidine, and methylguanidine (guanidino compounds) were determined. Concentration-dependent inhibition of ASP(+) uptake by TPA, cimetidine, quinidine, and metformin confirmed functional endogenous organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) expression in ciPTEC. All uremic toxins tested inhibited ASP(+) uptake, of which acrolein required the lowest concentration to provoke a half-maximal inhibition (IC50 = 44 ± 2 μM). A Dixon plot was constructed for acrolein using three independent inhibition curves with 10, 20, or 30 μM ASP(+), which demonstrated competitive or mixed type of interaction (K i = 93 ± 16 μM). Exposing the cells to a mixture of cationic uremic toxins resulted in a more potent and biphasic inhibitory response curve, indicating complex interactions between the toxins and ASP(+) uptake. In conclusion, ciPTEC proves a suitable model to study cationic xenobiotic interactions. Inhibition of cellular uptake transport was demonstrated for several uremic toxins, which might indicate a possible role in kidney disease progression during uremia.

  5. Gestational Undernourishment Modifies the Composition of Skeletal Muscle Transverse Tubule Membranes and the Mechanical Properties of Muscles in Newborn Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tonathiu Ramírez-Oseguera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: Skeletal muscle (SM constitutes more than 40% of the body weight in adulthood. Transports dietary glucose mainly through the insulin-dependent glucose transporter (Glut-4 located in the Transverse tubule membrane system (TT. The TT development ends shortly after birth. The TT membrane hosts the proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling and glucose uptake. Glycaemic regulation through movement is a key function of fully developed skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to characterize the effect of gestational undernourishment (GUN in rats GLUT-4 expression and on the protein/lipid content of the TT membranes. We also examined the effect of GUN on the mechanical properties of muscles as an indication of the metabolic condition of the SM at birth. Methods: Isolated TT membrane from SM of GUN rats were used to study lipid/protein content and protein stability by differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of GUN on the SM mechanical properties was determined in isolated Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL muscle. Results: We demonstrate that compared to control, GUN in the new-born produces; i decreases body weight; ii diminution in SM mass; iii decreases the formation of TT membranes; iv expresses TT membrane proteins with higher thermal stability. The TT membrane expression of GLUT-4 in GUN offspring was twice that of controls. The isolated EDL of GUN offspring was 20% stronger as measured by contractile force and more resistant to fatigue relative to controls. Conclusion; These results provide the first evidence of adaptive changes of the SM in new-borns exposed to severe gestational food restriction. The effects of GUN on muscle at birth are the first step toward detrimental SM metabolic function, contributing to the physiopathology of metabolic diseases in adulthood.

  6. Gestational undernourishment modifies the composition of skeletal muscle transverse tubule membranes and the mechanical properties of muscles in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Oseguera, Ricardo Tonathiu; Jiménez-Garduño, Aura Matilde; Alvarez, Rocío; Heine, Katharina; Pinzón-Estrada, Enrique; Torres-Saldaña, Ismael; Ortega, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    [corrected] Skeletal muscle (SM) constitutes more than 40% of the body weight in adulthood. Transports dietary glucose mainly through the insulin-dependent glucose transporter (Glut-4) located in the Transverse tubule membrane system (TT). The TT development ends shortly after birth. The TT membrane hosts the proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling and glucose uptake. Glycaemic regulation through movement is a key function of fully developed skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to characterize the effect of gestational undernourishment (GUN) in rats GLUT-4 expression and on the protein/lipid content of the TT membranes. We also examined the effect of GUN on the mechanical properties of muscles as an indication of the metabolic condition of the SM at birth. Isolated TT membrane from SM of GUN rats were used to study lipid/protein content and protein stability by differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of GUN on the SM mechanical properties was determined in isolated Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) muscle. We demonstrate that compared to control, GUN in the new-born produces; i) decreases body weight; ii) diminution in SM mass; iii) decreases the formation of TT membranes; iv) expresses TT membrane proteins with higher thermal stability. The TT membrane expression of GLUT-4 in GUN offspring was twice that of controls. The isolated EDL of GUN offspring was 20% stronger as measured by contractile force and more resistant to fatigue relative to controls. These results provide the first evidence of adaptive changes of the SM in new-borns exposed to severe gestational food restriction. The effects of GUN on muscle at birth are the first step toward detrimental SM metabolic function, contributing to the physiopathology of metabolic diseases in adulthood. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. K+ transport in the mesonephric collecting duct system of the toad Bufo bufo : microelectrode recordings from isolated and perfused tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møbjerg, Nadja; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Novak, Ivana

    2002-01-01

    V, respectively (N=11; 11). This conductance could also be inhibited by Ba(2+), which depolarized a V(bl) of -71+/-5 mV by 9+/-3 mV (N=5). The pump inhibitor ouabain (1 mmol l(-1)) depolarized V(bl), but addition of furosemide to bath solution did not affect V(bl). The [K(+)] in urine varied from 1.3 to 22.8 mmol...

  8. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  9. Amygdala activation for eye contact despite complete cortical blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burra, N.; Hervais-Adelman, A.; Kerzel, D.; Tamietto, M.; de Gelder, B.; Pegna, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical blindness refers to the loss of vision that occurs after destruction of the primary visual cortex. Although there is no sensory cortex and hence no conscious vision, some cortically blind patients show amygdala activation in response to facial or bodily expressions of emotion. Here we

  10. Coherence analysis differentiates between cortical myoclonic tremor and essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, AF; Maurits, NM; Koelman, JHTM; van der Hoeven, JH; Bour, LJ; Leenders, KL; Brown, P; Tijssen, MAJ

    Familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FCMTE) is characterized by a distal kinetic tremor, infrequent epileptic attacks, and autosomal dominant inheritance. The tremor is thought to originate from the motor cortex. In our patient group, a premovement cortical spike Could not be

  11. Increased Cortical Thickness in Professional On-Line Gamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Gi Jung; Shin, Yong Wook; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Jin, Seong Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The bulk of recent studies have tested whether video games change the brain in terms of activity and cortical volume. However, such studies are limited by several factors including cross-sectional comparisons, co-morbidity, and short-term follow-up periods. In the present study, we hypothesized that cognitive flexibility and the volume of brain cortex would be correlated with the career length of on-line pro-gamers. Methods High-resolution magnetic resonance scans were acquired in twenty-three pro-gamers recruited from StarCraft pro-game teams. We measured cortical thickness in each individual using FreeSurfer and the cortical thickness was correlated with the career length and the performance of the pro-gamers. Results Career length was positively correlated with cortical thickness in three brain regions: right superior frontal gyrus, right superior parietal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. Additionally, increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal cortex was correlated with winning rates of the pro-game league. Increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal and parietal cortices was also associated with higher performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion Our results suggest that in individuals without pathologic conditions, regular, long-term playing of on-line games is associated with volume changes in the prefrontal and parietal cortices, which are associated with cognitive flexibility. PMID:24474988

  12. Cortical neurogenesis in the absence of centrioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insolera, Ryan; Bazzi, Hisham; Shao, Wei; Anderson, Kathryn V; Shi, Song-Hai

    2014-11-01

    Neuronal production in the mammalian cortex depends on extensive mitoses of radial glial progenitors (RGPs) residing in the ventricular zone (VZ). We examined the function of centrioles in RGPs during cortical neurogenesis in mice by conditional removal of SAS-4, a protein that is required for centriole biogenesis. SAS-4 deletion led to a progressive loss of centrioles, accompanied by RGP detachment from the VZ. Delocalized RGPs did not become outer subventricular zone RGPs (oRGs). Although they remained proliferative, ectopic RGPs, as well as those in the VZ, with a centrosomal deficit exhibited prolonged mitosis, p53 upregulation and apoptosis, resulting in neuronal loss and microcephaly. Simultaneous removal of p53 fully rescued RGP death and microcephaly, but not RGP delocalization and randomized mitotic spindle orientation. Our findings define the functions of centrioles in anchoring RGPs in the VZ and ensuring their efficient mitoses, and reveal the robust adaptability of RGPs in the developing cortex.

  13. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  14. Localization of cortical areas activated by thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, P E; Friberg, L

    1985-01-01

    midtemporal cortex exclusively during jingle thinking. The intermediate and remote visual association areas, the superior occipital, posterior inferior temporal, and posterior superior parietal cortex, increased their rCBF exclusively during route-finding thinking. We observed no decreases in rCBF. All r......These experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that pure mental activity, thinking, increases the cerebral blood flow and that different types of thinking increase the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in different cortical areas. As a first approach, thinking was defined as brain work...... communication with the outside world. In 50-3 thinking, the subjects started with 50 and then, in their minds only, continuously subtracted 3 from the result. In jingle thinking the subjects internally jumped every second word in a nine-word circular jingle. In route-finding thinking the subjects imagined...

  15. Premotor and Motor Cortices Encode Reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Ramkumar

    Full Text Available Rewards associated with actions are critical for motivation and learning about the consequences of one's actions on the world. The motor cortices are involved in planning and executing movements, but it is unclear whether they encode reward over and above limb kinematics and dynamics. Here, we report a categorical reward signal in dorsal premotor (PMd and primary motor (M1 neurons that corresponds to an increase in firing rates when a trial was not rewarded regardless of whether or not a reward was expected. We show that this signal is unrelated to error magnitude, reward prediction error, or other task confounds such as reward consumption, return reach plan, or kinematic differences across rewarded and unrewarded trials. The availability of reward information in motor cortex is crucial for theories of reward-based learning and motivational influences on actions.

  16. Osteocyte lacunar properties in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Weaver, James C.; Jensen, Mads Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the roles of osteocytes in bone maintenance have gained increasing attention. Osteocytes reside in lacunae that are interconnected by canaliculi resulting in a vast cellular network within the mineralized bone matrix. As the structure of the lacuno-canalicular network is highly connected......-species but also inter-site variation in lacunar properties. Here, osteocyte lacunae in rat cortical bone have been studied using synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR μCT) and backscattered electron (BE) microscopy. Quantitative lacunar geometric characteristics are reported based on the synchrotron...... radiation data, differentiating between circumferential lamellar bone and a central, more disordered bone type. From these studies, no significant differences were found in lacunar volumes between lamellar and central bone, whereas significant differences in lacunar orientation, shape and density values...

  17. Are the Symptoms of Parkinsonism Cortical in Origin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Arbuthnott

    Full Text Available We present three reasons to suspect that the major deleterious consequence of dopamine loss from the striatum is a cortical malfunction. We suggest that it is cortex, rather than striatum, that should be considered as the source of the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD since: 1. Cortical synapses onto striatal dendritic spines are lost in PD. 2. All known treatments of the symptoms of PD disrupt beta oscillations. Oscillations that are also disrupted following antidromic activation of cortical neurons. 3. The final output of basal ganglia directly modulates thalamic connections to layer I of frontal cortical areas, regions intimately associated with motor behaviour.These three reasons combined with evidence that the current summary diagram of the basal ganglia involvement in PD is imprecise at best, suggest that a re-orientation of the treatment strategies towards cortical, rather than striatal malfunction, is overdue. Keywords: Parkinson's disease, Deep brain stimulation, Layer I, Motor cortex

  18. Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicholas J; Eastwick, Paul W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Contextual control of audiovisual integration in low-level sensory cortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Atteveldt, N.; Peterson, Bradley S; Schroeder, Charles E

    Potential sources of multisensory influences on low-level sensory cortices include direct projections from sensory cortices of different modalities, as well as more indirect feedback inputs from higher order multisensory cortical regions. These multiple architectures may be functionally

  20. Cortical hubs form a module for multisensory integration on top of the hierarchy of cortical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Zamora-López

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensory stimuli entering the nervous system follow particular paths of processing, typically separated (segregated from the paths of other modal information. However, sensory perception, awareness and cognition emerge from the combination of information (integration. The corticocortical networks of cats and macaque monkeys display three prominent characteristics: (i modular organisation (facilitating the segregation, (ii abundant alternative processing paths and (iii the presence of highly connected hubs. Here, we study in detail the organisation and potential function of the cortical hubs by graph analysis and information theoretical methods. We find that the cortical hubs form a spatially delocalised, but topologically central module with the capacity to integrate multisensory information in a collaborative manner. With this, we resolve the underlying anatomical substrate that supports the simultaneous capacity of the cortex to segregate and to integrate multisensory information.

  1. Cortical influences drive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Andrew; Braak, Heiko; Del Tredici, Kelly; Lemon, Roger; Ludolph, Albert C; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-11-01

    The early motor manifestations of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), while rarely documented, reflect failure of adaptive complex motor skills. The development of these skills correlates with progressive evolution of a direct corticomotoneuronal system that is unique to primates and markedly enhanced in humans. The failure of this system in ALS may translate into the split hand presentation, gait disturbance, split leg syndrome and bulbar symptomatology related to vocalisation and breathing, and possibly diffuse fasciculation, characteristic of ALS. Clinical neurophysiology of the brain employing transcranial magnetic stimulation has convincingly demonstrated a presymptomatic reduction or absence of short interval intracortical inhibition, accompanied by increased intracortical facilitation, indicating cortical hyperexcitability. The hallmark of the TDP-43 pathological signature of sporadic ALS is restricted to cortical areas as well as to subcortical nuclei that are under the direct control of corticofugal projections. This provides anatomical support that the origins of the TDP-43 pathology reside in the cerebral cortex itself, secondarily in corticofugal fibres and the subcortical targets with which they make monosynaptic connections. The latter feature explains the multisystem degeneration that characterises ALS. Consideration of ALS as a primary neurodegenerative disorder of the human brain may incorporate concepts of prion-like spread at synaptic terminals of corticofugal axons. Further, such a concept could explain the recognised widespread imaging abnormalities of the ALS neocortex and the accepted relationship between ALS and frontotemporal dementia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. A Mechanistic Link from GABA to Cortical Architecture and Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasinski, James; Logan, John P; Hinson, Emily L; Manners, Daniel; Divanbeighi Zand, Amir P; Makin, Tamar R; Emir, Uzay E; Stagg, Charlotte J

    2017-06-05

    Understanding both the organization of the human cortex and its relation to the performance of distinct functions is fundamental in neuroscience. The primary sensory cortices display topographic organization, whereby receptive fields follow a characteristic pattern, from tonotopy to retinotopy to somatotopy [1]. GABAergic signaling is vital to the maintenance of cortical receptive fields [2]; however, it is unclear how this fine-grain inhibition relates to measurable patterns of perception [3, 4]. Based on perceptual changes following perturbation of the GABAergic system, it is conceivable that the resting level of cortical GABAergic tone directly relates to the spatial specificity of activation in response to a given input [5-7]. The specificity of cortical activation can be considered in terms of cortical tuning: greater cortical tuning yields more localized recruitment of cortical territory in response to a given input. We applied a combination of fMRI, MR spectroscopy, and psychophysics to substantiate the link between the cortical neurochemical milieu, the tuning of cortical activity, and variability in perceptual acuity, using human somatosensory cortex as a model. We provide data that explain human perceptual acuity in terms of both the underlying cellular and metabolic processes. Specifically, higher concentrations of sensorimotor GABA are associated with more selective cortical tuning, which in turn is associated with enhanced perception. These results show anatomical and neurochemical specificity and are replicated in an independent cohort. The mechanistic link from neurochemistry to perception provides a vital step in understanding population variability in sensory behavior, informing metabolic therapeutic interventions to restore perceptual abilities clinically. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Min

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals.

  4. Altered Regional Brain Cortical Thickness in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Macey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available RationaleObstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects 2–5% of all children and is associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, resulting in poor school performance. These psychological deficits may arise from brain injury, as seen in preliminary findings of lower gray matter volume among pediatric OSA patients. However, the psychological deficits in OSA are closely related to functions in the cortex, and such brain areas have not been specifically assessed. The objective was to determine whether cortical thickness, a marker of possible brain injury, is altered in children with OSA.MethodsWe examined regional brain cortical thicknesses using high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images in 16 pediatric OSA patients (8 males; mean age ± SD = 8.4 ± 1.2 years; mean apnea/hypopnea index ± SD = 11 ± 6 events/h and 138 controls (8.3 ± 1.1 years; 62 male; 138 subjects from the NIH Pediatric MRI database to identify cortical thickness differences in pediatric OSA subjects.ResultsCortical thinning occurred in multiple regions including the superior frontal, ventral medial prefrontal, and superior parietal cortices. The left side showed greater thinning in the superior frontal cortex. Cortical thickening was observed in bilateral precentral gyrus, mid-to-posterior insular cortices, and left central gyrus, as well as right anterior insula cortex.ConclusionChanges in cortical thickness are present in children with OSA and likely indicate disruption to neural developmental processes, including maturational patterns of cortical volume increases and synaptic pruning. Regions with thicker cortices may reflect inflammation or astrocyte activation. Both the thinning and thickening associated with OSA in children may contribute to the cognitive and behavioral dysfunction frequently found in the condition.

  5. Deficits in Beam-Walking After Neonatal Motor Cortical Lesions are not Spared by Fetal Cortical Transplants in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Swenson, R. S.; Danielsen, E. H.; Klausen, B. S.; Erlich, E.; Zimmer, J.; Castro, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Adult rats that sustained unilateral motor cortical lesions at birth demonstrated deficits in traversing an elevated narrow beam. These deficits, manifested by hindlimb slips off the edge of the beam, were not spared in animals that received fetal cortical transplants into the lesion cavity immediately after lesion placement.

  6. Functional specialisation within the cortical language network: effects of cortical dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, R

    2007-01-01

    In the 1990's neuroanatomical models of language and semantic memory have been mainly based on functional neuroimaging studies of brain activity in healthy volunteers and correlational studies between structural lesions in patients and behavioral deficits. In this paper we present a novel approach where we test models that have been developed in healthy volunteers by means of functional imaging in patients in combination with behavioral studies. Study populations consist of patients with focal cortical stroke (n = 2), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 14) and primary progressive aphasia (n = 18). The experiments provide converging evidence that 1. the integrity of the right mid- and anterior fusiform gyrus is required for full and detailed retrieval of knowledge of visual attributes of concrete entities 2. the left posterior superior temporal sulcus is critically involved in lexical-semantic retrieval 3. the anterior temporal pole to the left functions as an associative structure that links the representations of meaning that are distribured over the cortical brain surface. Our experiments also provide us with new insight into the degradation and re-organisation of the language system in cortical neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Shortened cortical silent period in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: evidence for widespread cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samargia, Sharyl; Schmidt, Rebekah; Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson

    2014-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical inhibition in the hand region of the primary motor cortex between subjects with focal hand dystonia (FHD), adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), and healthy controls. Data from 28 subjects were analyzed (FHD n=11, 53.25 ± 8.74 y; AdSD: n=8, 56.38 ± 7.5 y; and healthy controls: n=941.67 ± 10.85 y). All subjects received single pulse TMS to the left motor cortex to measure cortical silent period (CSP) in the right first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle. Duration of the CSP was measured and compared across groups. A one-way ANCOVA with age as a covariate revealed a significant group effect (p<0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed significantly longer CSP duration in the healthy group vs. AdSD group (p<0.001) and FHD group (p<0.001). These results suggest impaired intracortical inhibition is a neurophysiologic characteristic of FHD and AdSD. In addition, the shortened CSP in AdSD provides evidence to support a widespread decrease in cortical inhibition in areas of the motor cortex that represent an asymptomatic region of the body. These findings may inform future investigations of differential diagnosis as well as alternative treatments for focal dystonias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Collective Improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Collective improvisation as a creative practice is intensely social, trusting, unpopular, anti-hierarchical and, for these reasons, political. Cooper describes the risks and rich rewards of improvising with fellow artists and identifies the parallels between improvising ensembles of musicians in Australia with the collectively painted protest banners of the Taring Padi Collective in Indonesia after a brief visit to Jogjakarta.

  9. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  10. Dynamics of Ionic Shifts in Cortical Spreading Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Rune; Tang, Wannan; Vindedal, Gry Fluge; Jensen, Vidar; Johannes Helm, P; Sprengel, Rolf; Looger, Loren L; Nagelhus, Erlend A

    2015-11-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a slowly propagating wave of near-complete depolarization of brain cells followed by temporary suppression of neuronal activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that cortical spreading depression underlies the migraine aura and that similar waves promote tissue damage in stroke, trauma, and hemorrhage. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by neuronal swelling, profound elevation of extracellular potassium and glutamate, multiphasic blood flow changes, and drop in tissue oxygen tension. The slow speed of the cortical spreading depression wave implies that it is mediated by diffusion of a chemical substance, yet the identity of this substance and the pathway it follows are unknown. Intercellular spread between gap junction-coupled neurons or glial cells and interstitial diffusion of K(+) or glutamate have been proposed. Here we use extracellular direct current potential recordings, K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes, and 2-photon imaging with ultrasensitive Ca(2+) and glutamate fluorescent probes to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of ionic shifts associated with the propagation of cortical spreading depression in the visual cortex of adult living mice. Our data argue against intercellular spread of Ca(2+) carrying the cortical spreading depression wavefront and are in favor of interstitial K(+) diffusion, rather than glutamate diffusion, as the leading event in cortical spreading depression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Basal Forebrain Gating by Somatostatin Neurons Drives Prefrontal Cortical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Nelson; Alonso, Alejandra; Morales, Cristian; Espinosa, Pedro; Chávez, Andrés E; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2017-11-17

    The basal forebrain provides modulatory input to the cortex regulating brain states and cognitive processing. Somatostatin-expressing neurons constitute a heterogeneous GABAergic population known to functionally inhibit basal forebrain cortically projecting cells thus favoring sleep and cortical synchronization. However, it remains unclear if somatostatin cells can regulate population activity patterns in the basal forebrain and modulate cortical dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that somatostatin neurons regulate the corticopetal synaptic output of the basal forebrain impinging on cortical activity and behavior. Optogenetic inactivation of somatostatin neurons in vivo rapidly modified neural activity in the basal forebrain, with the consequent enhancement and desynchronization of activity in the prefrontal cortex, reflected in both neuronal spiking and network oscillations. Cortical activation was partially dependent on cholinergic transmission, suppressing slow waves and potentiating gamma oscillations. In addition, recruitment dynamics was cell type-specific, with interneurons showing similar temporal profiles, but stronger responses than pyramidal cells. Finally, optogenetic stimulation of quiescent animals during resting periods prompted locomotor activity, suggesting generalized cortical activation and increased arousal. Altogether, we provide physiological and behavioral evidence indicating that somatostatin neurons are pivotal in gating the synaptic output of the basal forebrain, thus indirectly controlling cortical operations via both cholinergic and non-cholinergic mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Influences of brain development and ageing on cortical interactive networks.

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    Zhu, Chengyu; Guo, Xiaoli; Jin, Zheng; Sun, Junfeng; Qiu, Yihong; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-02-01

    To study the effect of brain development and ageing on the pattern of cortical interactive networks. By causality analysis of multichannel electroencephalograph (EEG) with partial directed coherence (PDC), we investigated the different neural networks involved in the whole cortex as well as the anterior and posterior areas in three age groups, i.e., children (0-10 years), mid-aged adults (26-38 years) and the elderly (56-80 years). By comparing the cortical interactive networks in different age groups, the following findings were concluded: (1) the cortical interactive network in the right hemisphere develops earlier than its left counterpart in the development stage; (2) the cortical interactive network of anterior cortex, especially at C3 and F3, is demonstrated to undergo far more extensive changes, compared with the posterior area during brain development and ageing; (3) the asymmetry of the cortical interactive networks declines during ageing with more loss of connectivity in the left frontal and central areas. The age-related variation of cortical interactive networks from resting EEG provides new insights into brain development and ageing. Our findings demonstrated that the PDC analysis of EEG is a powerful approach for characterizing the cortical functional connectivity during brain development and ageing. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early development of synchrony in cortical activations in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, N; Dereymaeker, A; Räsänen, O; Jansen, K; Vervisch, J; Matic, V; Naulaers, G; De Vos, M; Van Huffel, S; Vanhatalo, S

    2016-05-13

    Early intermittent cortical activity is thought to play a crucial role in the growth of neuronal network development, and large scale brain networks are known to provide the basis for higher brain functions. Yet, the early development of the large scale synchrony in cortical activations is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the early intermittent cortical activations seen in the human scalp EEG show a clear developmental course during the last trimester of pregnancy, the period of intensive growth of cortico-cortical connections. We recorded scalp EEG from altogether 22 premature infants at post-menstrual age between 30 and 44 weeks, and the early cortical synchrony was quantified using recently introduced activation synchrony index (ASI). The developmental correlations of ASI were computed for individual EEG signals as well as anatomically and mathematically defined spatial subgroups. We report two main findings. First, we observed a robust and statistically significant increase in ASI in all cortical areas. Second, there were significant spatial gradients in the synchrony in fronto-occipital and left-to-right directions. These findings provide evidence that early cortical activity is increasingly synchronized across the neocortex. The ASI-based metrics introduced in our work allow direct translational comparison to in vivo animal models, as well as hold promise for implementation as a functional developmental biomarker in future research on human neonates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. The cortical signature of impaired gesturing: Findings from schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Verena Viher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is characterized by deficits in gesturing that is important for nonverbal communication. Research in healthy participants and brain-damaged patients revealed a left-lateralized fronto-parieto-temporal network underlying gesture performance. First evidence from structural imaging studies in schizophrenia corroborates these results. However, as of yet, it is unclear if cortical thickness abnormalities contribute to impairments in gesture performance. We hypothesized that patients with deficits in gesture production show cortical thinning in 12 regions of interest (ROIs of a gesture network relevant for gesture performance and recognition. Forty patients with schizophrenia and 41 healthy controls performed hand and finger gestures as either imitation or pantomime. Group differences in cortical thickness between patients with deficits, patients without deficits, and controls were explored using a multivariate analysis of covariance. In addition, the relationship between gesture recognition and cortical thickness was investigated. Patients with deficits in gesture production had reduced cortical thickness in eight ROIs, including the pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, the superior and inferior parietal lobes, and the superior and middle temporal gyri. Gesture recognition correlated with cortical thickness in fewer, but mainly the same, ROIs within the patient sample. In conclusion, our results show that impaired gesture production and recognition in schizophrenia is associated with cortical thinning in distinct areas of the gesture network.

  15. The changing roles of neurons in the cortical subplate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Friedlander

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons may serve different functions over the course of an organism’s life. Recent evidence suggests that cortical subplate neurons including those that reside in the white matter may perform longitudinal multi-tasking at different stages of development. These cells play a key role in early cortical development in coordinating thalamocortical reciprocal innervation. At later stages of development, they become integrated within the cortical microcircuitry. This type of longitudinal multi-tasking can enhance the capacity for information processing by populations of cells serving different functions over the lifespan. Subplate cells are initially derived when cells from the ventricular zone underlying the cortex migrate to the cortical preplate that is subsequently split by the differentiating neurons of the cortical plate with some neurons locating in the marginal zone and others settling below in the subplate (SP. While the cortical plate neurons form most of the cortical layers (layers 2-6, the marginal zone neurons form layer 1 and the SP neurons become interstitial cells of the white matter as well as forming a compact sublayer along the bottom of layer 6. After serving as transient innervation targets for thalamocortical axons, most of these cells die and layer 4 neurons become innervated by thalamic axons. However, 10-20% survives, remaining into adulthood along the bottom of layer 6 and as a scattered population of interstitial neurons in the white matter. Surviving subplate cells’ axons project throughout the overlying laminae, reaching layer 1 and issuing axon collaterals within white matter and in lower layer 6. This suggests that they participate in local synaptic networks, as well. Moreover, they receive excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs, potentially monitoring outputs from axon collaterals of cortical efferents, from cortical afferents and/or from each other. We explore our understanding of the functional connectivity of

  16. Regulation of the Na+2Cl–K+ cotransporter in in vitro perfused rectal gland tubules of Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, R; Bleich, M; Thiele, I; Lang, F; Greger, R

    1998-07-01

    Previously it has been shown that the Na+2Cl–K+ cotransporter accepts NH4 + at its K+ binding site. This property can be used to estimate its transport rates by adding NH4 + to the bath and measuring the initial furosemide-dependent rates of change in BCECF fluorescence. We have utilized this technique to determine the regulation of the furosemide-inhibitable Na+2Cl–K+ cotransporter in in vitroperfused rectal gland tubules (RGT) of Squalus acanthias. Addition of NH4 + to the bath (20 mmol/l) led to an initial alkalinization, corresponding to NH3 uptake. This was followed by an acidification, corresponding to NH4 + uptake. The rate of this uptake was quantified by exponential curve fitting and is given in arbitrary units (Δfluorescence/time). This acidification could be completely inhibited by furosemide. In the absence of any secretagogue preincubation of RGT in a low Cl– solution (6 mmol/l, low Cl–) for 10 min enhanced the uptake rate significantly from 4.04±0.51 to 12.7±1.30 (n=5). The addition of urea (200 mmol/l) was without effect, but the addition of 300 mmol/l mannitol (+300 mannitol) enhanced the rate significantly from 7.24±1.33 to 14.7±4.6 (n=6). Stimulation of NaCl secretion by a solution maximizing the cytosolic cAMP concentration (Stim) led to a significant increase in NH4 + uptake rate from 5.00±1.33 to 13.3±1.54 (n=6). Similar results were obtained in the additional presence of Ba2+ (1 mmol/l): the uptake rate was increased significantly from 4.23±0.34 to 15.1±1.86 (n=16). In the presence of Stim low Cl– had no additional effect on the uptake rate: 15.1±3.1 versus 15.2±2.8 in high Cl– (n=6). The uptake rate in Stim containing additional +300 mannitol (22.3±4.0, n=5) was not significantly different from that obtained with Stim or +300 mannitol alone. By whatever mechanism the NH4 + uptake rate was increased furosemide (500 µmol/l) always reduced this rate to control values. Hence three manoeuvres enhanced furosemide

  17. Does stimulation of NaCl secretion in in vitro perfused rectal gland tubules of Squalus acanthias increase membrane capacitance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greger, R; Thiele, I; Warth, R; Bleich, M

    1998-07-01

    NaCl secretion in rectal gland tubules (RGT) of Squalus acanthias requires the activation of Cl– channels in the luminal membrane. The RGT and its mechanism of activation are an early evolutionary paradigm of exocrine secretion. The respective Cl– channels probably resemble the shark equivalent of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Activation of these Cl– channels occurs via cAMP. It has been hypothesized that the activation of CFTR occurs via exocytosis or inhibited endocytosis. To examine this question directly by electrical measurements we have performed whole-cell patch-clamp analyses of in vitro perfused RGT. NaCl secretion was stimulated by a solution (Stim) containing forskolin (10 µmol/l), dibutyryl-cAMP (0.5 mmol/l) and adenosine (0.5 mmol/l). This led to the expected strong depolarization and an increase in membrane conductance (G m). The membrane capacitance (C m) was measured by a newly devised two-frequency synchronous detector method. It was increased by Stim significantly from 5.00±0.22 to 5.17±0.21 pF (n=50). The increase in C m correlated with the increase in G m with a slope of 51 fF/nS. Next the effect of furosemide (500 µmol/l) was examined in previously stimulated RGT. Furosemide was supposed to inhibit coupled Na+2Cl–K+ uptake and to reduce cell volume but not membrane trafficking of Cl– channels. Furosemide reduced G m slightly (due to the fall in cytosolic Cl– concentration) and C m to the same extent by which Stim had increased it. Both changes were statistically significant, and the slope of ΔC m/ΔG m was similar to that caused by Stim. Inhibitors of microtubules or actin (colchicine, phalloidin and cytochalasin D added at 10 µmol/l to the pipette solution and dialysed for >10 min) did not alter cell voltage, G m or C m, nor did these inhibitors abolish the stimulatory effect of cAMP. These data suggest that the small C m changes observed with Stim reflect a minor cell volume increase and an

  18. Outer retinal tubulation as a predictor of the enlargement amount of geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Amirhossein; Nittala, Muneeswar G; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prognostic value of outer retinal tubulation (ORT) in the enlargement amount of geographic atrophy (GA) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Cohort study. One hundred eight fellow untreated eyes of 143 patients with GA resulting from AMD enrolled in the MAHALO study (clinicaltrials.gov identifier, NCT01229215) who completely satisfied the study term and had gradable spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images obtained at both baseline and month 18 visits. The MAHALO study enrolled 143 subjects into a phase 1b/2 multicenter, randomized, single-masked, sham-injection controlled clinical trial of the safety, tolerability, and evidence of activity of lampalizumab in patients with GA associated with AMD. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images were obtained at multiple time points in both eyes, although only the baseline and month 18 data of the fellow (nonstudy) eyes were considered in this exploratory analysis. The Cirrus HD-OCT review software was used for automatic segmentation and measurement of GA areas, with manual correction of segmentation errors by certified OCT graders. Baseline OCT images also were assessed for the presence of ORT. The enlargement amount of GA in eyes with ORT was compared with that of eyes without ORT. Comparison of the enlargement amount of GA in eyes with and without ORT. Twenty-four of these 108 eyes demonstrated evidence of ORT. The amount of enlargement of GA in eyes with ORT was significantly slower than that of eyes without ORT (1.85±0.78 vs. 2.67±1.61; P = 0.001). This difference remained significant when considering subgroups with unifocal or multifocal GA lesions, because eyes with ORT in both subgroups had a slower enlargement amount of GA than eyes without ORT (2.91±1.70 vs. 2.08±0.88 [P = 0.01], in eyes with multifocal GA lesions; and 2.24±1.40 vs. 1.63±0.57 [P = 0.02], in eyes with unifocal GA lesions). In eyes with ORT, GA lesions seem to enlarge at a

  19. Polyploidy and Mitotic Cell Death Are Two Distinct HIV-1 Vpr-Driven Outcomes in Renal Tubule Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Emily H; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Fox, Donald T; Klotman, Mary E

    2018-01-15

    Prior studies have found that HIV, through the Vpr protein, promotes genome reduplication (polyploidy) in infection-surviving epithelial cells within renal tissue. However, the temporal progression and molecular regulation through which Vpr promotes polyploidy have remained unclear. Here we define a sequential progression to Vpr-mediated polyploidy in human renal tubule epithelial cells (RTECs). We found that as in many cell types, Vpr first initiates G 2 cell cycle arrest in RTECs. We then identified a previously unreported cascade of Vpr-dependent events that lead to renal cell survival and polyploidy. Specifically, we found that a fraction of G 2 -arrested RTECs reenter the cell cycle. Following this cell cycle reentry, two distinct outcomes occur. Cells that enter complete mitosis undergo mitotic cell death due to extra centrosomes and aberrant division. Conversely, cells that abort mitosis undergo endoreplication to become polyploid. We further show that multiple small-molecule inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, including those that target ATR, ATM, and mTOR, indirectly prevent Vpr-mediated polyploidy by preventing G 2 arrest. In contrast, an inhibitor that targets DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) specifically blocks the Vpr-mediated transition from G 2 arrest to polyploidy. These findings outline a temporal, molecularly regulated path to polyploidy in HIV-positive renal cells. IMPORTANCE Current cure-focused efforts in HIV research aim to elucidate the mechanisms of long-term persistence of HIV in compartments. The kidney is recognized as one such compartment, since viral DNA and mRNA persist in the renal tissues of HIV-positive patients. Further, renal disease is a long-term comorbidity in the setting of HIV. Thus, understanding the regulation and impact of HIV infection on renal cell biology will provide important insights into this unique HIV compartment. Our work identifies mechanisms that distinguish

  20. 'Special K' and a Loss of Cell-To-Cell Adhesion in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells: Modulation of the Adherens Junction Complex by Ketamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E.; Jin, Tianrong; Siamantouras, Eleftherios; Liu, Issac K-K; Jefferson, Kieran P.; Squires, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing ‘party drug’ used by 16–24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2) to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24–48 hrs) produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1–1 mg/mL) cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E)- and neural (N)-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:24009666

  1. Organic anion and cation SLC22 "drug" transporter (Oat1, Oat3, and Oct1 regulation during development and maturation of the kidney proximal tubule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Gallegos

    Full Text Available Proper physiological function in the pre- and post-natal proximal tubule of the kidney depends upon the acquisition of selective permeability, apical-basolateral epithelial polarity and the expression of key transporters, including those involved in metabolite, toxin and drug handling. Particularly important are the SLC22 family of transporters, including the organic anion transporters Oat1 (originally identified as NKT and Oat3 as well as the organic cation transporter Oct1. In ex vivo cultures of metanephric mesenchyme (MM; the embryonic progenitor tissue of the nephron Oat function was evident before completion of nephron segmentation and corresponded with the maturation of tight junctions as measured biochemically by detergent extractability of the tight junction protein, ZO-1. Examination of available time series microarray data sets in the context of development and differentiation of the proximal tubule (derived from both in vivo and in vitro/ex vivo developing nephrons allowed for correlation of gene expression data to biochemically and functionally defined states of development. This bioinformatic analysis yielded a network of genes with connectivity biased toward Hnf4α (but including Hnf1α, hyaluronic acid-CD44, and notch pathways. Intriguingly, the Oat1 and Oat3 genes were found to have strong temporal co-expression with Hnf4α in the cultured MM supporting the notion of some connection between the transporters and this transcription factor. Taken together with the ChIP-qPCR finding that Hnf4α occupies Oat1, Oat3, and Oct1 proximal promoters in the in vivo differentiating rat kidney, the data suggest a network of genes with Hnf4α at its center plays a role in regulating the terminal differentiation and capacity for drug and toxin handling by the nascent proximal tubule of the kidney.

  2. Influence of extracellular HCO3- and pH on lysine (LYS) and leucine (LEU) uptake and metabolism in swine renal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patience, J.F.; Esteve-Garcia, E.; Austic, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Fragments of renal tubules prepared by collagenase treatment of renal cortex were suspended to Krebs-Henseleit buffers which were modified to contain 10, 25 and 35 mM HCO 3 - at pH 7.4, or 25 mM HCO 3 - at pH 7.1, 7.4 and 7.7. Buffers were oxygenated with O 2 -CO 2 gas mixtures varying in carbon dioxide concentration prior to incubation. Approximately 100 mg tubules were incubated with shaking at 37 0 C for 30 min in serum-stoppered 25 ml Erlenmeyer flasks in 3.0 ml of buffer containing 0.1% dialyzed bovine serum albumin, 5 mM D-glucose and 0.3 mM L-[U- 14 C]-lysine or L-[1- 14 C]-leucine. The incorporation of carbon-14 into CO 2 and into 10% sulfosalicylic acid (SSA)-soluble and SSA-insoluble fractions of the incubation mixture was determined. Low (10mM) bicarbonate reduced the incorporation of lys and leu into protein but did not substantially affect the recovery of 14 CO 2 from either amino acid. High pH (7.7) resulted in reduced incorporation of lys and leu into protein, and decreased the oxidation of lys but not leu. The specific activity of lys (leu was not determined) in the SSA-soluble fraction was unaffected by bicarbonate or pH. The authors conclude that variations in extracellular pH and HCO 3 - (or pCO 2 ) affect the metabolism of amino acids by renal tubules and that low extracellular HCO 3 - (or pCO 2 ) may depress the incorporation of amino acids into protein

  3. Dancing with the Stars: Using Image Analysis to Study the Choreography of the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Its Partners and of Movement Within Its Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, Lawrence R

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, approaches to the image analysis of the choreography of the plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) labeled with fluorescent fusion proteins ("stars," if you wish) are presented. The approaches include the analyses of those parts of the ER that are attached through membrane contact sites to moving or nonmoving partners (other "stars"). Image analysis is also used to understand the nature of the tubular polygonal network, the hallmark of this organelle, and how the polygons change over time due to tubule sliding or motion. Furthermore, the remodeling polygons of the ER interact with regions of fundamentally different topology, the ER cisternae, and image analysis can be used to separate the tubules from the cisternae. ER cisternae, like polygons and tubules, can be motile or stationary. To study which parts are attached to nonmoving partners, such as domains of the ER that form membrane contact sites with the plasma membrane/cell wall, an image analysis approach called persistency mapping has been used. To study the domains of the ER that are moving rapidly and streaming through the cell, the image analysis of optic flow has been used. However, optic flow approaches confuse the movement of the ER itself with the movement of proteins within the ER. As an overall measure of ER dynamics, optic flow approaches are of value, but their limitation as to what exactly is "flowing" needs to be specified. Finally, there are important imaging approaches that directly address the movement of fluorescent proteins within the ER lumen or in the membrane of the ER. Of these, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), inverse FRAP (iFRAP), and single particle tracking approaches are described.

  4. Non-traumatic cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage: diagnostic work-up and aetiological background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzer, C.; Kosinski, C.M. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Mull, M. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Rohde, V. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Only 15% of all subarachnoid haemorrhages (SAHs) are not of aneurysmal origin. Among those, circumscribed SAHs along the cortical convexity are rare and have only been described in singular case reports so far. Here, we present a collection of 12 cases of SAH along the convexity, of non-traumatic origin. Over a period of 10 years, 12 cases of circumscribed SAH along the convexity were identified at our clinic. The clinical presentations, neuroradiological SAH characteristics, further diagnostic work-up to identify the underlying aetiologies, the therapy and clinical outcome were analysed. The patients' chief complaints were unspecific cephalgia, focal or generalised seizures and focal neurological deficits. Typical signs of basal SAH, such as nuchal rigidity, thunderclap-headache or alteration of consciousness, were rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed different aetiologies, namely postpartal posterior encephalopathy (three), cerebral vasculitis (two), dural sinus thrombosis (two), cortical venous thrombosis (one), intracerebral abscesses (one) and cerebral cavernoma (one). Two cases remained unresolved. Treatment of the underlying disease and symptomatic medication led to good clinical outcome in almost all cases. On the basis of these findings, we demonstrate that the clinical presentation, localisation and aetiology of cortical SAH differ clearly from other SAHs. A diagnostic work-up with MRI and eventually DSA is essential. Mostly, the causative disease can be identified, and specific treatment allows a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  5. Pretraining Cortical Thickness Predicts Subsequent Perceptual Learning Rate in a Visual Search Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Sebastian M; Reavis, Eric A; Greenlee, Mark W; Tse, Peter U

    2016-03-01

    We report that preexisting individual differences in the cortical thickness of brain areas involved in a perceptual learning task predict the subsequent perceptual learning rate. Participants trained in a motion-discrimination task involving visual search for a "V"-shaped target motion trajectory among inverted "V"-shaped distractor trajectories. Motion-sensitive area MT+ (V5) was functionally identified as critical to the task: after 3 weeks of training, activity increased in MT+ during task performance, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We computed the cortical thickness of MT+ from anatomical magnetic resonance imaging volumes collected before training started, and found that it significantly predicted subsequent perceptual learning rates in the visual search task. Participants with thicker neocortex in MT+ before training learned faster than those with thinner neocortex in that area. A similar association between cortical thickness and training success was also found in posterior parietal cortex (PPC). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bovine Cortical Bone: Its Potential for Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BPCM had been widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR whose manufacturing process usually required chemical cross-linking to prolong its biodegradation. However, cross-linking of collagen fibrils was associated with poorer tissue integration and delayed vascular invasion. Objective. This study evaluated the potential of bovine cortical bone collagen membrane for GBR by evaluating its antigenicity potential, cytotoxicity, immune and tissue response, and biodegradation behaviors. Material and Methods. Antigenicity potential of demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane (DFDBCBM was done with histology-based anticellularity evaluation, while cytotoxicity was analyzed using MTT Assay. Evaluation of immune response, tissue response, and biodegradation was done by randomly implanting DFDBCBM and BPCM in rat’s subcutaneous dorsum. Samples were collected at 2, 5, and 7 days and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for biocompatibility and tissue response-biodegradation study, respectively. Result. DFDBCBM, histologically, showed no retained cells; however, it showed some level of in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo study exhibited increased immune response to DFDBCBM in early healing phase; however, normal tissue response and degradation rate were observed up to 4 weeks after DFDBCBM implantation. Conclusion. Demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane showed potential for clinical application; however, it needs to be optimized in its biocompatibility to fulfill all requirements for GBR membrane.

  7. BOLD responses in somatosensory cortices better reflect heat sensation than pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Eric A; Pendse, Gautam; Becerra, Lino R; Borsook, David

    2012-04-25

    The discovery of cortical networks that participate in pain processing has led to the common generalization that blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in these areas indicate the processing of pain. Physical stimuli have fundamental properties that elicit sensations distinguishable from pain, such as heat. We hypothesized that pain intensity coding may reflect the intensity coding of heat sensation during the presentation of thermal stimuli during fMRI. Six 3T fMRI heat scans were collected for 16 healthy subjects, corresponding to perceptual levels of "low innocuous heat," "moderate innocuous heat," "high innocuous heat," "low painful heat," "moderate painful heat," and "high painful heat" delivered by a contact thermode to the face. Subjects rated pain and heat intensity separately after each scan. A general linear model analysis detected different patterns of brain activation for the different phases of the biphasic response to heat. During high painful heat, the early phase was associated with significant anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Persistent responses were detected in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Only the late phase showed significant correlations with perceptual ratings. Significant heat intensity correlated activation was identified in contralateral primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, motor cortex, and superior temporal lobe. These areas were significantly more related to heat ratings than pain. These results indicate that heat intensity is encoded by the somatosensory cortices, and that pain evaluation may either arise from multimodal evaluative processes, or is a distributed process.

  8. Hemodynamic monitoring in different cortical layers with a single fiber optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linhui; Noor, M. Sohail; Kiss, Zelma H. T.; Murari, Kartikeya

    2018-02-01

    Functional monitoring of highly-localized deep brain structures is of great interest. However, due to light scattering, optical methods have limited depth penetration or can only measure from a large volume. In this research, we demonstrate continuous measurement of hemodynamics in different cortical layers in response to thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) using a single fiber optical system. A 200-μm-core-diameter multimode fiber is used to deliver and collect light from tissue. The fiber probe can be stereotaxically implanted into the brain region of interest at any depth to measure the di use reflectance spectra from a tissue volume of 0.02-0.03 mm3 near the fiber tip. Oxygenation is then extracted from the reflectance spectra using an algorithm based on Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements were performed on the surface (cortical layer I) and at 1.5 mm depth (cortical layer VI) of the motor cortex in anesthetized rats with thalamic DBS. Preliminary results revealed the oxygenation changes in response to DBS. Moreover, the baseline as well as the stimulus-evoked change in oxygenation were different at the two depths of cortex.

  9. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weissman, Barbara N. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Boston (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J.; Weissman, Barbara N.

    2004-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  11. The continuum of spreading depolarizations in acute cortical lesion development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Shuttleworth, C William; Kirov, Sergei A

    2017-01-01

    A modern understanding of how cerebral cortical lesions develop after acute brain injury is based on Aristides Leão's historic discoveries of spreading depression and asphyxial/anoxic depolarization. Treated as separate entities for decades, we now appreciate that these events define a continuum....... The causal role of these waves in lesion development has been proven by real-time monitoring of electrophysiology, blood flow, and cytotoxic edema. The spreading depolarization continuum further applies to other models of acute cortical lesions, suggesting that it is a universal principle of cortical lesion...

  12. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  13. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  14. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Daejin Medical Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  15. Cortically-controlled population stochastic facilitation as a plausible substrate for guiding sensory transfer across the thalamic gateway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Béhuret

    Full Text Available The thalamus is the primary gateway that relays sensory information to the cerebral cortex. While a single recipient cortical cell receives the convergence of many principal relay cells of the thalamus, each thalamic cell in turn integrates a dense and distributed synaptic feedback from the cortex. During sensory processing, the influence of this functional loop remains largely ignored. Using dynamic-clamp techniques in thalamic slices in vitro, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to implement a realistic hybrid retino-thalamo-cortical pathway mixing biological cells and simulated circuits. The synaptic bombardment of cortical origin was mimicked through the injection of a stochastic mixture of excitatory and inhibitory conductances, resulting in a gradable correlation level of afferent activity shared by thalamic cells. The study of the impact of the simulated cortical input on the global retinocortical signal transfer efficiency revealed a novel control mechanism resulting from the collective resonance of all thalamic relay neurons. We show here that the transfer efficiency of sensory input transmission depends on three key features: i the number of thalamocortical cells involved in the many-to-one convergence from thalamus to cortex, ii the statistics of the corticothalamic synaptic bombardment and iii the level of correlation imposed between converging thalamic relay cells. In particular, our results demonstrate counterintuitively that the retinocortical signal transfer efficiency increases when the level of correlation across thalamic cells decreases. This suggests that the transfer efficiency of relay cells could be selectively amplified when they become simultaneously desynchronized by the cortical feedback. When applied to the intact brain, this network regulation mechanism could direct an attentional focus to specific thalamic subassemblies and select the appropriate input lines to the cortex according to the descending

  16. Renal cortical volume measured using automatic contouring software for computed tomography and its relationship with BMI, age and renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Natalia Sayuri; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Harris, Ardene A.; Kato, Fumi; Onodera, Yuya; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between renal cortical volume, measured by an automatic contouring software, with body mass index (BMI), age and renal function. Materials and methods: The study was performed in accordance to the institutional guidelines at our hospital. Sixty-four patients (34 men, 30 women), aged 19 to 79 years had their CT scans for diagnosis or follow-up of hepatocellular carcinoma retrospectively examined by a computer workstation using a software that automatically contours the renal cortex and the renal parenchyma. Body mass index and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were calculated based on data collected. Statistical analysis was done using the Student t-test, multiple regression analysis, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The ICC for total renal and renal cortical volumes were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively. Renal volume measurements yielded a mean cortical volume of 105.8 cm 3 ± 28.4 SD, mean total volume of 153 cm 3 ± 39 SD and mean medullary volume of 47.8 cm 3 ± 19.5 SD. The correlation between body weight/height/BMI and both total renal and cortical volumes presented r = 0.6, 0.6 and 0.4, respectively, p < 0.05, while the correlation between renal cortex and age was r = -0.3, p < 0.05. eGFR showed correlation with renal cortical volume r = 0.6, p < 0.05. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that renal cortical volume had a moderate positive relationship with BMI, moderate negative relationship with age, and a strong positive relationship with the renal function, and provided a new method to routinely produce volumetric assessment of the kidney.

  17. A de novo transcriptome of the Malpighian tubules in non-blood-fed and blood-fed Asian tiger mosquitoes Aedes albopictus: insights into diuresis, detoxification, and blood meal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Esquivel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. In adult female mosquitoes, the renal (Malpighian tubules play an important role in the post-prandial diuresis, which removes excess ions and water from the hemolymph of mosquitoes following a blood meal. After the post-prandial diuresis, the roles that Malpighian tubules play in the processing of blood meals are not well described. Methods. We used a combination of next-generation sequencing (paired-end RNA sequencing and physiological/biochemical assays in adult female Asian tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus to generate molecular and functional insights into the Malpighian tubules and how they may contribute to blood meal processing (3–24 h after blood ingestion. Results/Discussion. Using RNA sequencing, we sequenced and assembled the first de novo transcriptome of Malpighian tubules from non-blood-fed (NBF and blood-fed (BF mosquitoes. We identified a total of 8,232 non-redundant transcripts. The Malpighian tubules of NBF mosquitoes were characterized by the expression of transcripts associated with active transepithelial fluid secretion/diuresis (e.g., ion transporters, water channels, V-type H+-ATPase subunits, xenobiotic detoxification (e.g., cytochrome P450 monoxygenases, glutathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and purine metabolism (e.g., xanthine dehydrogenase. We also detected the expression of transcripts encoding sodium calcium exchangers, G protein coupled-receptors, and septate junctional proteins not previously described in mosquito Malpighian tubules. Within 24 h after a blood meal, transcripts associated with active transepithelial fluid secretion/diuresis exhibited a general downregulation, whereas those associated with xenobiotic detoxification and purine catabolism exhibited a general upregulation, suggesting a reinvestment of the Malpighian tubules’ molecular resources from diuresis to detoxification. Physiological and biochemical assays were conducted in mosquitoes and isolated

  18. Effects of deuterium oxide and galvanic vestibular stimulation on visual cortical cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinis, S.; Landolt, J.P.; Weiss, D.S.; Money, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The spontaneous and evoked unit activities of complex visual cortical cells were recorded from Brodmann's area 18 in immobilized, unanesthetized cats before, during, and after stimulation of the vestibular system. The vestibular system was stimulated by intravenous injection of deuterium oxide (D2O)--a noted nystagmogenic agent--or by direct galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth. Measures of the receptive-field areas, poststimulus time histograms, directional preferences, and the optimal speed of the light bar stimulating the cell were obtained before and after the application of D2O. Directional preferences were determined in a novel manner, using a method derived from a hierarchical clustering technique. Data were collected and analyzed from a) visual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths, b) visual cortical cells in cats following bilateral labrinthectomies, and c) nonvisual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths. The other cellular characteristics were also altered by the D2O. Galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth resembles, in its effects, the injection of D2O. In labyrinth-intact cats, the time course of area 18 spontaneous activity dramatically increased 30 min or more after D2O was administered. It peaked 2-3 h later and still had not returned to preinjection levels even 7 h after the D2O administration. In bilaterally labyrinthectomized cats, the spontaneous activity of the visual cells did not change following D2O administration. In nonvisual cells from labyrinth-intact cats, the spontaneous activity demonstrated a slight but significant decrease over time after D2O injection. In pilot studies, the cats were injected with D2O. Within 8-10 min afterward, signs of positional nystagmus commenced; and within 30 min, problems in maintaining balance were noted. This continued for 7-8 h before disappearing. In the labyrinthectomized animals, such effects were not observed

  19. Effects of deuterium oxide and galvanic vestibular stimulation on visual cortical cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinis, S.; Landolt, J.P.; Weiss, D.S.; Money, K.E.

    1984-03-01

    The spontaneous and evoked unit activities of complex visual cortical cells were recorded from Brodmann's area 18 in immobilized, unanesthetized cats before, during, and after stimulation of the vestibular system. The vestibular system was stimulated by intravenous injection of deuterium oxide (D2O)--a noted nystagmogenic agent--or by direct galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth. Measures of the receptive-field areas, poststimulus time histograms, directional preferences, and the optimal speed of the light bar stimulating the cell were obtained before and after the application of D2O. Directional preferences were determined in a novel manner, using a method derived from a hierarchical clustering technique. Data were collected and analyzed from a) visual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths, b) visual cortical cells in cats following bilateral labrinthectomies, and c) nonvisual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths. The other cellular characteristics were also altered by the D2O. Galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth resembles, in its effects, the injection of D2O. In labyrinth-intact cats, the time course of area 18 spontaneous activity dramatically increased 30 min or more after D2O was administered. It peaked 2-3 h later and still had not returned to preinjection levels even 7 h after the D2O administration. In bilaterally labyrinthectomized cats, the spontaneous activity of the visual cells did not change following D2O administration. In nonvisual cells from labyrinth-intact cats, the spontaneous activity demonstrated a slight but significant decrease over time after D2O injection. In pilot studies, the cats were injected with D2O. Within 8-10 min afterward, signs of positional nystagmus commenced; and within 30 min, problems in maintaining balance were noted. This continued for 7-8 h before disappearing. In the labyrinthectomized animals, such effects were not observed.

  20. K -shell decomposition reveals hierarchical cortical organization of the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahav, Nir; Ksherim, Baruch; Havlin, Shlomo; Ben-Simon, Eti; Maron-Katz, Adi; Cohen, Reuven

    2016-01-01

    In recent years numerous attempts to understand the human brain were undertaken from a network point of view. A network framework takes into account the relationships between the different parts of the system and enables to examine how global and complex functions might emerge from network topology. Previous work revealed that the human brain features ‘small world’ characteristics and that cortical hubs tend to interconnect among themselves. However, in order to fully understand the topological structure of hubs, and how their profile reflect the brain’s global functional organization, one needs to go beyond the properties of a specific hub and examine the various structural layers that make up the network. To address this topic further, we applied an analysis known in statistical physics and network theory as k-shell decomposition analysis. The analysis was applied on a human cortical network, derived from MRI/DSI data of six participants. Such analysis enables us to portray a detailed account of cortical connectivity focusing on different neighborhoods of inter-connected layers across the cortex. Our findings reveal that the human cortex is highly connected and efficient, and unlike the internet network contains no isolated nodes. The cortical network is comprised of a nucleus alongside shells of increasing connectivity that formed one connected giant component, revealing the human brain’s global functional organization. All these components were further categorized into three hierarchies in accordance with their connectivity profile, with each hierarchy reflecting different functional roles. Such a model may explain an efficient flow of information from the lowest hierarchy to the highest one, with each step enabling increased data integration. At the top, the highest hierarchy (the nucleus) serves as a global interconnected collective and demonstrates high correlation with consciousness related regions, suggesting that the nucleus might serve as a

  1. Cortical plasticity associated with Braille learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, R H; Pascual-Leone, A

    1998-05-01

    Blind subjects who learn to read Braille must acquire the ability to extract spatial information from subtle tactile stimuli. In order to accomplish this, neuroplastic changes appear to take place. During Braille learning, the sensorimotor cortical area devoted to the representation of the reading finger enlarges. This enlargement follows a two-step process that can be demonstrated with transcranial magnetic stimulation mapping and suggests initial unmasking of existing connections and eventual establishment of more stable structural changes. In addition, Braille learning appears to be associated with the recruitment of parts of the occipital, formerly `visual', cortex (V1 and V2) for tactile information processing. In blind, proficient Braille readers, the occipital cortex can be shown not only to be associated with tactile Braille reading but also to be critical for reading accuracy. Recent studies suggest the possibility of applying non-invasive neurophysiological techniques to guide and improve functional outcomes of these plastic changes. Such interventions might provide a means of accelerating functional adjustment to blindness.

  2. Learning in AN Oscillatory Cortical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpetta, Silvia; Li, Zhaoping; Hertz, John

    We study a model of generalized-Hebbian learning in asymmetric oscillatory neural networks modeling cortical areas such as hippocampus and olfactory cortex. The learning rule is based on the synaptic plasticity observed experimentally, in particular long-term potentiation and long-term depression of the synaptic efficacies depending on the relative timing of the pre- and postsynaptic activities during learning. The learned memory or representational states can be encoded by both the amplitude and the phase patterns of the oscillating neural populations, enabling more efficient and robust information coding than in conventional models of associative memory or input representation. Depending on the class of nonlinearity of the activation function, the model can function as an associative memory for oscillatory patterns (nonlinearity of class II) or can generalize from or interpolate between the learned states, appropriate for the function of input representation (nonlinearity of class I). In the former case, simulations of the model exhibits a first order transition between the "disordered state" and the "ordered" memory state.

  3. Altered cortical communication in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Mashour, George A; Lee, Heonsoo; Huggins, Jane E; Lee, Uncheol

    2013-05-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder associated primarily with the degeneration of the motor system. More recently, functional connectivity studies have demonstrated potentially adaptive changes in ALS brain organization, but disease-related changes in cortical communication remain unknown. We recruited individuals with ALS and age-matched controls to operate a brain-computer interface while electroencephalography was recorded over three sessions. Using normalized symbolic transfer entropy, we measured directed functional connectivity from frontal to parietal (feedback connectivity) and parietal to frontal (feedforward connectivity) regions. Feedback connectivity was not significantly different between groups, but feedforward connectivity was significantly higher in individuals with ALS. This result was consistent across a broad electroencephalographic spectrum (4-35 Hz), and in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Feedback connectivity has been associated with conscious state and was found to be independent of ALS symptom severity in this study, which may have significant implications for the detection of consciousness in individuals with advanced ALS. We suggest that increases in feedforward connectivity represent a compensatory response to the ALS-related loss of input such that sensory stimuli have sufficient strength to cross the threshold necessary for conscious processing in the global neuronal workspace. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cortical visual impairment: Characteristics and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the latest studies, Cortical visual impairment – CVI is one of the most common causes of problems and difficulties in visual functioning. It results from the impairment of the central part of visual system, i.e. visual cortex, posterior visual pathway, or both. The diagnosis is usually made in the first three years of life. The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of children with CVI, and the strategies used for treatment. CVI has a negative impact on almost all developmental domains, visual-perceptive skills, motor skills, cognitive skills, and social skills. In children with CVI, vision ranges from the total inability to see to minimal visual perceptive difficulties, while more than 50% have multiple disabilities. Due to the progress in understanding the patterns of neuron activity and neuroplasticity, as well as the intensive studies of strengths and weaknesses of children with CVI, special treatment has been designed and performed in the last few decades, which provides optimal visual functioning in everyday life for these children.

  5. Possible Quantum Absorber Effects in Cortical Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Uwe

    The Wheeler-Feynman transactional "absorber" approach was proposed originally to account for anomalous resonance coupling between spatio-temporally distant measurement partners in entangled quantum states of so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradoxes, e.g. of spatio-temporal non-locality, quantum teleportation, etc. Applied to quantum brain dynamics, however, this view provides an anticipative resonance coupling model for aspects of cortical synchronization and recurrent visual action control. It is proposed to consider the registered activation patterns of neuronal loops in so-called synfire chains not as a result of retarded brain communication processes, but rather as surface effects of a system of standing waves generated in the depth of visual processing. According to this view, they arise from a counterbalance between the actual input's delayed bottom-up data streams and top-down recurrent information-processing of advanced anticipative signals in a Wheeler-Feynman-type absorber mode. In the framework of a "time-loop" model, findings about mirror neurons in the brain cortex are suggested to be at least partially associated with temporal rather than spatial mirror functions of visual processing, similar to phase conjugate adaptive resonance-coupling in nonlinear optics.

  6. Incidental Transient Cortical Blindness after Lung Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncel, Murat; Sunam, Guven Sadi; Varoglu, Asuman Orhan; Karabagli, Hakan; Yildiran, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Transient vision loss after major surgical procedures is a rare clinical complication. The most common etiologies are cardiac, spinal, head, and neck surgeries. There has been no report on vision loss after lung resection. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with lung cancer. Resection was performed using right upper lobectomy with no complications. Cortical blindness developed 12 hours later in the postoperative period. Results from magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted investigations were normal. The neurologic examination was normal. The blood glucose level was 92 mg/dL and blood gas analysis showed a PO 2 of 82 mm Hg. After 24 hours, the patient began to see and could count fingers, and his vision was fully restored within 72 hours after this point. Autonomic dysfunction due to impaired microvascular structures in diabetes mellitus may induce posterior circulation dysfunction, even when the hemodynamic state is normal in the perioperative period. The physician must keep in mind that vision loss may occur after lung resection due to autonomic dysfunction, especially in older patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:28824977

  7. Cortical oscillatory activity during spatial echoic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jochen; Walker, Florian; Leiberg, Susanne; Lutzenberger, Werner

    2005-01-01

    In human magnetoencephalogram, we have found gamma-band activity (GBA), a putative measure of cortical network synchronization, during both bottom-up and top-down auditory processing. When sound positions had to be retained in short-term memory for 800 ms, enhanced GBA was detected over posterior parietal cortex, possibly reflecting the activation of higher sensory storage systems along the hypothesized auditory dorsal space processing stream. Additional prefrontal GBA increases suggested an involvement of central executive networks in stimulus maintenance. The present study assessed spatial echoic memory with the same stimuli but a shorter memorization interval of 200 ms. Statistical probability mapping revealed posterior parietal GBA increases at 80 Hz near the end of the memory phase and both gamma and theta enhancements in response to the test stimulus. In contrast to the previous short-term memory study, no prefrontal gamma or theta enhancements were detected. This suggests that spatial echoic memory is performed by networks along the putative auditory dorsal stream, without requiring an involvement of prefrontal executive regions.

  8. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leff, Alexander P; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-28

    We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%-270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Cortical Integration of Audio-Visual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wyk, Brent C.; Ramsay, Gordon J.; Hudac, Caitlin M.; Jones, Warren; Lin, David; Klin, Ami; Lee, Su Mei; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of audio-visual processing in speech and non-speech stimuli. Physically identical auditory stimuli (speech and sinusoidal tones) and visual stimuli (animated circles and ellipses) were used in this fMRI experiment. Relative to unimodal stimuli, each of the multimodal conjunctions showed increased activation in largely non-overlapping areas. The conjunction of Ellipse and Speech, which most resembles naturalistic audiovisual speech, showed higher activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus, fusiform gyri, left posterior superior temporal sulcus, and lateral occipital cortex. The conjunction of Circle and Tone, an arbitrary audio-visual pairing with no speech association, activated middle temporal gyri and lateral occipital cortex. The conjunction of Circle and Speech showed activation in lateral occipital cortex, and the conjunction of Ellipse and Tone did not show increased activation relative to unimodal stimuli. Further analysis revealed that middle temporal regions, although identified as multimodal only in the Circle-Tone condition, were more strongly active to Ellipse-Speech or Circle-Speech, but regions that were identified as multimodal for Ellipse-Speech were always strongest for Ellipse-Speech. Our results suggest that combinations of auditory and visual stimuli may together be processed by different cortical networks, depending on the extent to which speech or non-speech percepts are evoked. PMID:20709442

  10. Pitch perception prior to cortical maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Bonnie K.

    Pitch perception plays an important role in many complex auditory tasks including speech perception, music perception, and sound source segregation. Because of the protracted and extensive development of the human auditory cortex, pitch perception might be expected to mature, at least over the first few months of life. This dissertation investigates complex pitch perception in 3-month-olds, 7-month-olds and adults -- time points when the organization of the auditory pathway is distinctly different. Using an observer-based psychophysical procedure, a series of four studies were conducted to determine whether infants (1) discriminate the pitch of harmonic complex tones, (2) discriminate the pitch of unresolved harmonics, (3) discriminate the pitch of missing fundamental melodies, and (4) have comparable sensitivity to pitch and spectral changes as adult listeners. The stimuli used in these studies were harmonic complex tones, with energy missing at the fundamental frequency. Infants at both three and seven months of age discriminated the pitch of missing fundamental complexes composed of resolved and unresolved harmonics as well as missing fundamental melodies, demonstrating perception of complex pitch by three months of age. More surprisingly, infants in both age groups had lower pitch and spectral discrimination thresholds than adult listeners. Furthermore, no differences in performance on any of the tasks presented were observed between infants at three and seven months of age. These results suggest that subcortical processing is not only sufficient to support pitch perception prior to cortical maturation, but provides adult-like sensitivity to pitch by three months.

  11. Workbench surface editor of brain cortical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Douglas E.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Serra, Luis

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a 3D reach-in tool to manually reconstruct 3D cortical surface patches from 2D brain atlas images. The first application of our cortex editor is building 3D functional maps, specifically Brodmann's areas. This tool may also be useful in clinical practice to adjust incorrectly mapped atlas regions due to the deforming effect of lesions. The cortex editor allows a domain expert to control the correlation of control points across slices. Correct correlation has been difficult for 3D reconstruction algorithms because the atlas slices are far apart and because of the complex topology of the cortex which differs so much from slice to slice. Also, higher precision of the resulting surfaces is demanded since these define 3D brain atlas features upon which future stereotactic surgery may be based. The cortex editor described in this paper provides a tool suitable for a domain expert to use in defining the 3D surface of a Brodmann's area.

  12. Lateralization of cortical negative motor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggraefe, Ingo; Catarino, Claudia B; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Peraud, Aurelia; Winkler, Peter A; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-10-01

    The lateral and mesial aspects of the central and frontal cortex were studied by direct electrical stimulation of the cortex in epilepsy surgery candidates in order to determine the localization of unilateral and bilateral negative motor responses. Results of electrical cortical stimulation were examined in epilepsy surgery candidates in whom invasive electrodes were implanted. The exact localization of subdural electrodes was defined by fusion of 3-dimensional reconstructed MRI and CT images in 13 patients and by analysis of plane skull X-rays and intraoperative visual localization of the electrodes in another 7 patients. Results of electrical stimulation of the cortex were evaluated in a total of 128 patients in whom invasive electrodes were implanted for planning resective epilepsy surgery. Twenty patients, in whom negative motor responses were obtained, were included in the study. Bilateral upper limb negative motor responses were more often elicited from stimulation of the mesial frontal cortex whereas stimulation of the lateral central cortex leads to contralateral upper limb negative motor responses (pfrontal gyrus whereas contralateral negative motor responses localized predominantly in the anterior part of the precentral gyrus (pgyrus and the mesial fronto-central cortex showing functional differences with regard to unilateral and bilateral upper limb representation. The lateral fronto-central negative motor area serves predominantly contralateral upper limb motor control whereas the mesial frontal negative motor area represents bilateral upper limb movement control. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Minimally conscious state or cortically mediated state?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccache, Lionel

    2018-04-01

    Durable impairments of consciousness are currently classified in three main neurological categories: comatose state, vegetative state (also recently coined unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) and minimally conscious state. While the introduction of minimally conscious state, in 2002, was a major progress to help clinicians recognize complex non-reflexive behaviours in the absence of functional communication, it raises several problems. The most important issue related to minimally conscious state lies in its criteria: while behavioural definition of minimally conscious state lacks any direct evidence of patient's conscious content or conscious state, it includes the adjective 'conscious'. I discuss this major problem in this review and propose a novel interpretation of minimally conscious state: its criteria do not inform us about the potential residual consciousness of patients, but they do inform us with certainty about the presence of a cortically mediated state. Based on this constructive criticism review, I suggest three proposals aiming at improving the way we describe the subjective and cognitive state of non-communicating patients. In particular, I present a tentative new classification of impairments of consciousness that combines behavioural evidence with functional brain imaging data, in order to probe directly and univocally residual conscious processes.

  14. Sulcal set optimization for cortical surface registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand A; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Li, Quanzheng; Damasio, Hanna; Shattuck, David W; Toga, Arthur W; Leahy, Richard M

    2010-04-15

    Flat mapping based cortical surface registration constrained by manually traced sulcal curves has been widely used for inter subject comparisons of neuroanatomical data. Even for an experienced neuroanatomist, manual sulcal tracing can be quite time consuming, with the cost increasing with the number of sulcal curves used for registration. We present a method for estimation of an optimal subset of size N(C) from N possible candidate sulcal curves that minimizes a mean squared error metric over all combinations of N(C) curves. The resulting procedure allows us to estimate a subset with a reduced number of curves to be traced as part of the registration procedure leading to optimal use of manual labeling effort for registration. To minimize the error metric we analyze the correlation structure of the errors in the sulcal curves by modeling them as a multivariate Gaussian distribution. For a given subset of sulci used as constraints in surface registration, the proposed model estimates registration error based on the correlation structure of the sulcal errors. The optimal subset of constraint curves consists of the N(C) sulci that jointly minimize the estimated error variance for the subset of unconstrained curves conditioned on the N(C) constraint curves. The optimal subsets of sulci are presented and the estimated and actual registration errors for these subsets are computed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  16. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  17. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentially absent on DIV 2 and developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking activity was primarily sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time in culture, with bursting parameters, synchrony and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity and principal components analysis using these features demonstrated a general segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using a combination of random forest classifiers and Support Vector Machines, we demonstrated that 4 features (CV of within burst ISI, CV of IBI, network spike rate and burst rate) were sufficient to predict the age (either DIV 5, 7, 9 or 12) of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification problem to a binary decision, we found that classification improved dramatically, e.g. 95% accuracy for discriminating DIV 5 vs DIV 12 wells. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells that might be needed for conducting comparisons of different treatments using mwMEA plates. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to

  18. Equivalent complex conductivities representing the effects of T-tubules and folded surface membranes on the electrical admittance and impedance of skeletal muscles measured by external-electrode method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2017-12-01

    In order to represent the effects of T-tubules and folded surface membranes on the electrical admittance and impedance of skeletal muscles measured by the external-electrode method, analytical relations for the equivalent complex conductivities of hypothetical smooth surface membranes were derived. In the relations, the effects of each tubule were represented by the admittance of a straight cable. The effects of the folding of a surface membrane were represented by the increased area of surface membranes. The equivalent complex conductivities were represented as summation of these effects, and the effects of the T-tubules were different between the transversal and longitudinal directions. The validity of the equivalent complex conductivities was supported by the results of finite-difference method (FDM) calculations made using three-dimensional models in which T-tubules and folded surface membranes were represented explicitly. FDM calculations using the equivalent complex conductivities suggested that the electrically inhomogeneous structure due to the existence of muscle cells with T-tubules was sufficient for explaining the experimental results previously obtained using the external-electrode method. Results of FDM calculations in which the structural changes caused by muscle contractions were taken into account were consistent with the reported experimental results.

  19. Cortical surface area and cortical thickness in the precuneus of adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, E; Román, F J; de la Cuétara, J M; Martin-Loeches, M; Colom, R

    2015-02-12

    The precuneus has received considerable attention in the last decade, because of its cognitive functions, its role as a central node of the brain networks, and its involvement in neurodegenerative processes. Paleoneurological studies suggested that form changes in the deep parietal areas represent a major character associated with the origin of the modern human brain morphology. A recent neuroanatomical survey based on shape analysis suggests that the proportions of the precuneus are also a determinant source of overall brain geometrical differences among adult individuals, influencing the brain spatial organization. Here, we evaluate the variation of cortical thickness and cortical surface area of the precuneus in a sample of adult humans, and their relation with geometry and cognition. Precuneal thickness and surface area are not correlated. There is a marked individual variation. The right precuneus is thinner and larger than the left one, but there are relevant fluctuating asymmetries, with only a modest correlation between the hemispheres. Males have a thicker cortex but differences in cortical area are not significant between sexes. The surface area of the precuneus shows a positive allometry with the brain surface area, although the correlation is modest. The dilation/contraction of the precuneus, described as a major factor of variability within adult humans, is associated with absolute increase/decrease of its surface, but not with variation in thickness. Precuneal thickness, precuneal surface area and precuneal morphology are not correlated with psychological factors such as intelligence, working memory, attention control, and processing speed, stressing further possible roles of this area in supporting default mode functions. Beyond gross morphology, the processes underlying the large phenotypic variation of the precuneus must be further investigated through specific cellular analyses, aimed at considering differences in cellular size, density

  20. Cortical basis of communication: local computation, coordination, attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Frederic

    2009-03-01

    Human communication emerges from cortical processing, known to be implemented on a regular repetitive neuronal substratum. The supposed genericity of cortical processing has elicited a series of modeling works in computational neuroscience that underline the information flows driven by the cortical circuitry. In the minimalist framework underlying the current theories for the embodiment of cognition, such a generic cortical processing is exploited for the coordination of poles of representation, as is reported in this paper for the case of visual attention. Interestingly, this case emphasizes how abstract internal referents are built to conform to memory requirements. This paper proposes that these referents are the basis for communication in humans, which is firstly a coordination and an attentional procedure with regard to their congeners.

  1. Outline of a novel architecture for cortical computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2008-03-01

    In this paper a novel architecture for cortical computation has been proposed. This architecture is composed of computing paths consisting of neurons and synapses. These paths have been decomposed into lateral, longitudinal and vertical components. Cortical computation has then been decomposed into lateral computation (LaC), longitudinal computation (LoC) and vertical computation (VeC). It has been shown that various loop structures in the cortical circuit play important roles in cortical computation as well as in memory storage and retrieval, keeping in conformity with the molecular basis of short and long term memory. A new learning scheme for the brain has also been proposed and how it is implemented within the proposed architecture has been explained. A few mathematical results about the architecture have been proposed, some of which are without proof.

  2. Disorganized Cortical Patches Suggest Prenatal Origin of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Disorganized cortical patches suggest prenatal origin of autism NIH-funded study shows disrupted cell layering process ... study suggests that brain irregularities in children with autism can be traced back to prenatal development. “While ...

  3. Cortical desmoid of the humerus: radiographic and MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Matthew; Counsel, Peter [Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Perth (Australia); Perth Radiological Clinic, Perth (Australia); Wood, David [Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Perth (Australia); Breidahl, William [Perth Radiological Clinic, Perth (Australia)

    2017-07-15

    Cortical desmoids are self-limiting fibro-osseous lesions commonly occurring at the medial supracondylar femur in active adolescents, at either the origin of the medial head of the gastrocnemius or at the insertion of the adductor magnus aponeurosis. Less commonly, in a similar demographic, cortical desmoids may occur in the proximal humerus medially at the insertion of the pectoralis major muscle or laterally at the insertion of the deltoid. The radiographic appearance of the proximal humerus cortical desmoid has been described previously, but not the MRI appearance. We present the radiographic and MRI appearances of a proximal humerus cortical desmoid in a young adolescent who presented for investigation of right shoulder pain. (orig.)

  4. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: chronological changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Yasui, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    We studied the MRI characteristics of cortical laminar necrosis in ischaemic stroke. We reviewed 13 patients with cortical laminar high signal on T1-weighted images to analyse the chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-density cortical lesions began to appear on T1-weighted images about 2 weeks after the ictus. At 1-2 months they were prominent. They began to fade from 3 months but could be seen up to 11 months. These cortical lesions showed isointensity or high intensity on T2-weighted images and did not show low intensity at any stage. Contrast enhancement of the laminar lesions was prominent at 1-2 months and became less apparent from 3 months, but could be seen up to 8 months. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Morphometric Changes in the Cortical Microvascular Network in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, E.; van Gool, W.A.; Hoozemans, J.J.M.; van Haastert, E.S.; Eikelenboom, P.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; van de Berg, W.D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is accompanied by abnormalities of the microvasculature. Despite the potential importance of morphometric changes in the cortical capillary network on neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairment, few autopsy studies have addressed this issue. In the present

  6. MicroRNA-338 modulates cortical neuronal placement and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Aron; de Mooij-Malsen, Annetrude J; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kaplan, Barry B; Martens, Gerard J; Kolk, Sharon M; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2017-07-03

    The precise spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression orchestrates the many intricate processes during brain development. In the present study we examined the role of the brain-enriched microRNA-338 (miR-338) during mouse cortical development. Reduction of miR-338 levels in the developing mouse cortex, using a sequence-specific miR-sponge, resulted in a loss of neuronal polarity in the cortical plate and significantly reduced the number of neurons within this cortical layer. Conversely, miR-338 overexpression in developing mouse cortex increased the number of neurons, which exhibited a multipolar morphology. All together, our results raise the possibility for a direct role for this non-coding RNA, which was recently associated with schizophrenia, in the regulation of cortical neuronal polarity and layer placement.

  7. Electrocorticographic discharge patterns in glioneuronal tumors and focal cortical dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrier, Cyrille H.; Aronica, Eleanora; Leijten, Frans S. S.; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Huffelen, Alexander C.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Binnie, Colin D.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether highly epileptiform electrocorticographical discharge patterns occur in patients with glioneuronal tumors (GNTs) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and whether specific histopathological features are related to such patterns. METHODS: The series consists of operated

  8. Cortical desmoid of the humerus: radiographic and MRI correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Matthew; Counsel, Peter; Wood, David; Breidahl, William

    2017-01-01

    Cortical desmoids are self-limiting fibro-osseous lesions commonly occurring at the medial supracondylar femur in active adolescents, at either the origin of the medial head of the gastrocnemius or at the insertion of the adductor magnus aponeurosis. Less commonly, in a similar demographic, cortical desmoids may occur in the proximal humerus medially at the insertion of the pectoralis major muscle or laterally at the insertion of the deltoid. The radiographic appearance of the proximal humerus cortical desmoid has been described previously, but not the MRI appearance. We present the radiographic and MRI appearances of a proximal humerus cortical desmoid in a young adolescent who presented for investigation of right shoulder pain. (orig.)

  9. Visualizing stages of cortical atrophy in progressive MCI from the ADNI cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Fonov, Vladimir; Coupé, Pierrick

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a condition where patients are at risk of developing clinically definite Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an annual conversion rate of approximately 15%[1]. AD is characterized by progressive brain atrophy with major impact on the cerebral cortex...... and visualize the cortical atrophy at different stages in patients who eventually converted to clinically definite AD. We selected patients with a diagnosis of MCI from the ADNI database who converted to AD during the follow-up period. T1-weighted MRI scans were collected at time of conversion(n=140...

  10. Cortical Structures Associated With Sports Participation in Children: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Mónica; Tiemeier, Henning; Wildeboer, Andrea; Muetzel, Ryan L; Verhulst, Frank C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Sunyer, Jordi; White, Tonya

    2017-01-01

    We studied cortical morphology in relation to sports participation and type of sport using a large sample of healthy children (n = 911). Sports participation data was collected through a parent-reported questionnaire. Magnetic resonance scans were acquired, and different morphological brain features were quantified. Global volumetric measures were not associated with sports participation. We observed thicker cortex in motor and premotor areas associated with sports participation. In boys, team sports participation, relative to individual sports, was related to thinner cortex in prefrontal brain areas involved in the regulation of behaviors. This study showed a relationship between sports participation and brain maturation.

  11. Flow of cortical activity underlying a tactile decision in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zengcai V.; Li, Nuo; Huber, Daniel; Ophir, Eran; Gutnisky, Diego; Ting, Jonathan T.; Feng, Guoping; Svoboda, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual decisions involve distributed cortical activity. Does information flow sequentially from one cortical area to another, or do networks of interconnected areas contribute at the same time? Here we delineate when and how activity in specific areas drives a whisker-based decision in mice. A short-term memory component temporally separated tactile “sensation” and “action” (licking). Using optogenetic inhibition (spatial resolution, 2 mm; temporal resolution, 100 ms), we surveyed the neo...

  12. Relating Cortical Wave Dynamics to Learning and Remembering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mercado III

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical waves propagate across sensory and motor cortices in stereotypical patterns. These waves have been described as potentially facilitating sensory processing when they travel through sensory cortex, as guiding movement preparation and performance when they travel across motor cortex, and as possibly promoting synaptic plasticity and the consolidation of memory traces, especially during sleep. Here, an alternative theoretical framework is suggested that integrates Pavlovian hypotheses about learning and cortical function with concepts from contemporary proceduralist theories of memory. The proposed framework postulates that sensory-evoked cortical waves are gradually modified across repeated experiences such that the waves more effectively differentiate sensory events, and so that the waves are more likely to reverberate. It is argued that the qualities of cortical waves—their origins, form, intensity, speed, periodicity, extent, and trajectories —are a function of both the structural organization of neural circuits and ongoing reverberations resulting from previously experienced events. It is hypothesized that experience-dependent cortical plasticity, both in the short- and long-term, modulates the qualities of cortical waves, thereby enabling individuals to make progressively more precise distinctions between complex sensory events, and to reconstruct components of previously experienced events. Unlike most current neurobiological theories of learning and memory mechanisms, this hypothesis does not assume that synaptic plasticity, or any other form of neural plasticity, serves to store physical records of previously experienced events for later reactivation. Rather, the reorganization of cortical circuits may alter the potential for certain wave patterns to arise and persist. Understanding what factors determine the spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical waves, how structural changes affect their qualities, and how wave dynamics

  13. Cortical thickness differences between bipolar depression and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Martin J; Chhetry, Binod Thapa; Oquendo, Maria A; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Sullivan, Gregory; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-06-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality that cannot be distinguished from major depressive disorder (MDD) until the first manic episode. A biomarker able to differentiate BD and MDD could help clinicians avoid risks of treating BD with antidepressants without mood stabilizers. Cortical thickness differences were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging in BD depressed patients (n = 18), MDD depressed patients (n = 56), and healthy volunteers (HVs) (n = 54). A general linear model identified clusters of cortical thickness difference between diagnostic groups. Compared to the HV group, the BD group had decreased cortical thickness in six regions, after controlling for age and sex, located within the frontal and parietal lobes, and the posterior cingulate cortex. Mean cortical thickness changes in clusters ranged from 7.6 to 9.6% (cluster-wise p-values from 1.0 e-4 to 0.037). When compared to MDD, three clusters of lower cortical thickness in BD were identified that overlapped with clusters that differentiated the BD and HV groups. Mean cortical thickness changes in the clusters ranged from 7.5 to 8.2% (cluster-wise p-values from 1.0 e-4 to 0.023). The difference in cortical thickness was more pronounced when the subgroup of subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) was compared to the MDD group. Cortical thickness patterns were distinct between BD and MDD. These results are a step toward developing an imaging test to differentiate the two disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals cortical hyperexcitability in episodic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Guiseppe; Brighina, Filippo; Brancato, Sara; Valentino, Francesca; Indovino, Serena; Fierro, Brigida

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows involvement of the cerebral cortex in the pathophysiology of cluster headache (CH). Here we investigated cortical excitability in episodic CH patients by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. In 25 patients with episodic CH and 13 healthy subjects we evaluated the motor cortical response to single-pulse (ie, motor threshold, input-output curves, cortical silent period) and paired-pulse (ie, intracortical facilitation, short intracortical inhibition) transcranial magnetic stimulation in both hemispheres. Thirteen patients were evaluated outside bout and the remaining 12 patients inside bout. Our results showed increased slope of the input-output curves after stimulation of both hemispheres in patients outside bout and in the hemisphere contralateral to the headache side in patients inside bout. Increased intracortical facilitation was observed in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the headache side in patients evaluated both outside and inside bout; reduced short intracortical inhibition was observed in patients inside bout ipsilateral to the side of pain. In conclusion, we provide evidence of increased cortical excitability in episodic CH both outside and inside bout, especially in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the side of headache attacks. Our results suggest that an abnormal regulation of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of CH. We investigated cortical excitability in episodic cluster headache by using transcranial magnetic stimulation, providing evidence of cortical hyperexcitability in patients both inside and outside bout. We suggest that an abnormal state of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adult-onset Rasmussen encephalitis associated with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenbichler, Katharina; Lelotte, Julie; Lhommel, Renaud; Tahry, Riëm El; Vrielynck, Pascal; Santos, Susana Ferrao

    2017-12-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis is a rare, devastating condition, typically presenting in childhood. Cases of adult-onset Rasmussen have also been described, but the clinical picture is less defined, rendering final diagnosis difficult. We present a case of adult-onset Rasmussen encephalitis with dual pathology, associated with focal cortical dysplasia and encephalitis. We interpreted the Rasmussen encephalitis to be caused by severe and continuous epileptic activity due to focal cortical dysplasia. The best therapeutic approach for such cases remains unclear.

  16. Post-adolescent developmental changes in cortical complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Sandu, Anca-Larisa; Izard, Edouard; Specht, Karsten; Beneventi, Harald; Lundervold, Arvid; Ystad, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-adolescence is known to be a period of general maturation and development in the human brain. In brain imaging, volumetric and morphologic cortical grey-matter changes can easily be assessed, but the analysis of cortical complexity seems to have been broadly neglected for this age interval. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to acquire structural brain images. The study involved 17 adolescents (mean age 14.1 ± 0.27, 11 girls) who were compared with 1...

  17. Cortical spreading depression in migraine-time to reconsider?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J McComas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available New evidence concerning the pathophysiology of migraine has come from the results of therapeutic transcranial magnetic stimulation (tTMS. The instantaneous responses to single pulses applied during the aura or headache phase, together with a number of other observations, make it unlikely that cortical spreading depression is involved in migraine. tTMS is considered to act by abolishing abnormal impulse activity in cortical pyramidal neurons and a suggestion is made as to how this activity could arise.

  18. Cortical thinning and clinical heterogeneity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzapesa, Domenico Maria; D'Errico, Eustachio; Tortelli, Rosanna; Distaso, Eugenio; Cortese, Rosa; Tursi, Marianna; Federico, Francesco; Zoccolella, Stefano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Dicuonzo, Franca; Simone, Isabella Laura

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients into two groups for each of them: the bulbar or spinal onset, the higher or lower upper motor neuron burden, the faster or slower disease progression. We used both a whole brain vertex-wise analysis and a ROI analysis on primary motor areas. ALS patients showed cortical thinning in bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and right occipital cortex. ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and in other frontal extra-motor areas, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with spinal onset showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and paracentral lobule, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with faster progressive disease showed a significant cortical thinning in widespread bilateral frontal and temporal areas, including the bilateral precentral gyrus, compared to healthy controls. Focusing on the primary motor areas, the ROI analysis revealed that the mean cortical thickness values were significantly reduced in ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden, spinal onset and faster disease progression related to healthy controls. In conclusion, the thickness of primary motor cortex could be a useful surrogate marker of upper motor neuron involvement in ALS; also our results suggest that cortical thinning in motor and non motor areas seem to reflect the clinical heterogeneity of the disease.

  19. Cortical Thinning and Clinical Heterogeneity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzapesa, Domenico Maria; D?Errico, Eustachio; Tortelli, Rosanna; Distaso, Eugenio; Cortese, Rosa; Tursi, Marianna; Federico, Francesco; Zoccolella, Stefano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Dicuonzo, Franca; Simone, Isabella Laura

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients in...

  20. Cortical thinning and clinical heterogeneity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Maria Mezzapesa

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients into two groups for each of them: the bulbar or spinal onset, the higher or lower upper motor neuron burden, the faster or slower disease progression. We used both a whole brain vertex-wise analysis and a ROI analysis on primary motor areas. ALS patients showed cortical thinning in bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and right occipital cortex. ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and in other frontal extra-motor areas, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with spinal onset showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and paracentral lobule, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with faster progressive disease showed a significant cortical thinning in widespread bilateral frontal and temporal areas, including the bilateral precentral gyrus, compared to healthy controls. Focusing on the primary motor areas, the ROI analysis revealed that the mean cortical thickness values were significantly reduced in ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden, spinal onset and faster disease progression related to healthy controls. In conclusion, the thickness of primary motor cortex could be a useful surrogate marker of upper motor neuron involvement in ALS; also our results suggest that cortical thinning in motor and non motor areas seem to reflect the clinical heterogeneity of the disease.

  1. The double cortical line: a sign of osteopenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The double cortical line is a radiographic sign of osteopenia which results from intracortical resorption of bone. This sign is frequently seen in humans with osteopenia but has received minimal attention in the veterinary literature. This report describes the double cortical line in cases of senile osteopenia, nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism, suspected renal secondary hyperparathyroidism and in the acetabulum following triple pelvic osteotomy for hip dysplasia

  2. Cortical entrainment to music and its modulation by expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelling, Keith B; Poeppel, David

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies establish that cortical oscillations track naturalistic speech in a remarkably faithful way. Here, we test whether such neural activity, particularly low-frequency (music and whether experience modifies such a cortical phenomenon. Music of varying tempi was used to test entrainment at different rates. In three magnetoencephalography experiments, we recorded from nonmusicians, as well as musicians with varying years of experience. Recordings from nonmusicians demonstrate cortical entrainment that tracks musical stimuli over a typical range of tempi, but not at tempi below 1 note per second. Importantly, the observed entrainment correlates with performance on a concurrent pitch-related behavioral task. In contrast, the data from musicians show that entrainment is enhanced by years of musical training, at all presented tempi. This suggests a bidirectional relationship between behavior and cortical entrainment, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported. Additional analyses focus on responses in the beta range (∼15-30 Hz)-often linked to delta activity in the context of temporal predictions. Our findings provide evidence that the role of beta in temporal predictions scales to the complex hierarchical rhythms in natural music and enhances processing of musical content. This study builds on important findings on brainstem plasticity and represents a compelling demonstration that cortical neural entrainment is tightly coupled to both musical training and task performance, further supporting a role for cortical oscillatory activity in music perception and cognition.

  3. The cortical representation of sensory inputs arising from bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanusic, Jason J; Sahai, Vineet; Mahns, David A

    2009-05-07

    In the present study, we show that sensory information from bone reaches the discriminative areas of the somatosensory cortices by electrically stimulating the nerve to the cat humerus and recording evoked potentials on the surface of the primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory cortex. The SI focus was located over the rostral part of the postcruciate cortex, caudal to the lateral aspect of the cruciate sulcus. The SII focus was identified on the anterior ectosylvian gyrus, lateral to the suprasylvian sulcus. These foci were located adjacent to, or within areas that responded to stimulation of the median, ulnar and/or musculocutaneous nerves. The latency (6-11 ms) to onset of cortical responses in SI and SII were indistinguishable (unpaired t-test; P>0.05), and were consistent with activation of A delta fibers in the peripheral nerve. The amplitudes of the cortical responses were graded as a function of stimulus intensity, and may reflect a mechanism for intensity coding. We did not observe long latency cortical responses (50-300 ms) that would be consistent with C fiber activation in the peripheral nerve, and provide evidence that this may be attributable to inhibition of cortical responsiveness following the initial A delta response. Our finding of discrete, short latency evoked potentials (presumably of A delta origin) in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, following stimulation of a nerve innervating bone, may reflect a mechanism for the discriminative component of bone pain.

  4. Longitudinal course of cortical thickness decline in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christina; Kasper, Elisabeth; Machts, Judith; Bittner, Daniel; Kaufmann, Jörn; Benecke, Reiner; Teipel, Stefan; Vielhaber, Stefan; Prudlo, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    To determine longitudinal rates of cortical atrophy in classical Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS variants. Rates of cortical thinning were determined between 2 scans, 3-15 months apart, in 77 ALS patients: 51 classical, 12 upper motor neuron (UMN), and 14 lower motor neuron (LMN) ALS variants. Cortical thickness at the first assessment was compared with 60 healthy controls matched by age and gender. Atrophy rates were compared between patient sub-groups and correlated with disease duration, progression, and severity. Using a cross-sectional analysis, we found a significant difference in cortical thickness between ALS patients and controls in the motor and extra-motor areas (left medial orbito frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal gyrus, bilateral insular cortex, right fusiform gyrus, bilateral precuneus). Using a longitudinal analysis, we found a significant decline of cortical thickness in frontal, temporal, and parietal regions over the course of the study in ALS patients. Effects were independent of the clinical subtype, with exception of the precentral gyrus (p gyrus, the UMN-dominant subjects exhibited intermediate rates of atrophy, and the classical ALS patients exhibited no such change. Atrophy of the precentral gyrus in classical ALS indicates a floor effect at the first assessment, resulting in a lack of further atrophy over time. Structural loss of the precentral gyrus appears to be an early sign of classical ALS. Over time, patterns of cortical thinning in extra-motor areas can be identified in ALS, regardless of the phenotype.

  5. Neurodevelopmental origins of abnormal cortical morphology in dissociative identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, A A T S; Chalavi, S; Schlumpf, Y R; Vissia, E M; Nijenhuis, E R S; Jäncke, L; Veltman, D J; Ecker, C

    2018-02-01

    To examine the two constitutes of cortical volume (CV), that is, cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA), in individuals with dissociative identity disorder (DID) with the view of gaining important novel insights into the underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating DID. This study included 32 female patients with DID and 43 matched healthy controls. Between-group differences in CV, thickness, and SA, the degree of spatial overlap between differences in CT and SA, and their relative contribution to differences in regional CV were assessed using a novel spatially unbiased vertex-wise approach. Whole-brain correlation analyses were performed between measures of cortical anatomy and dissociative symptoms and traumatization. Individuals with DID differed from controls in CV, CT, and SA, with significantly decreased CT in the insula, anterior cingulate, and parietal regions and reduced cortical SA in temporal and orbitofrontal cortices. Abnormalities in CT and SA shared only about 3% of all significantly different cerebral surface locations and involved distinct contributions to the abnormality of CV in DID. Significant negative associations between abnormal brain morphology (SA and CV) and dissociative symptoms and early childhood traumatization (0 and 3 years of age) were found. In DID, neuroanatomical areas with decreased CT and SA are in different locations in the brain. As CT and SA have distinct genetic and developmental origins, our findings may indicate that different neurobiological mechanisms and environmental factors impact on cortical morphology in DID, such as early childhood traumatization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical