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Sample records for correlation energy

  1. Energy calibration via correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241 Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be le...

  2. Electron correlation energies in atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Shane Patrick

    This dissertation is a study of electron correlation energies Ec in atoms. (1) Accurate values of E c are computed for isoelectronic sequences of "Coulomb-Hooke" atoms with varying mixtures of Coulombic and Hooke character. (2) Coupled-cluster calculations in carefully designed basis sets are combined with fully converged second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) computations to obtain fairly accurate, non-relativistic Ec values for the 12 closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn. The complete basis-set (CBS) limits of MP2 energies are obtained for open-shell atoms by computations in very large basis sets combined with a knowledge of the MP2/CBS limit for the next larger closed-shell atom with the same valence shell structure. Then higher-order correlation corrections are found by coupled-cluster calculations using basis sets that are not quite as large. The method is validated for the open-shell atoms from Al to Cl and then applied to get E c values, probably accurate to 3%, for the 4th-period open-shell atoms: K, Sc-Cu, and Ga-Br. (3) The results show that, contrary to quantum chemical folklore, MP2 overestimates |Ec| for atoms beyond Fe. Spin-component scaling arguments are used to provide a simple explanation for this overestimation. (4) Eleven non-relativistic density functionals, including some of the most widely-used ones, are tested on their ability to predict non-relativistic, electron correlation energies for atoms and their cations. They all lead to relatively poor predictions for the heavier atoms. Several novel, few-parameter, density functionals for the correlation energy are developed heuristically. Four new functionals lead to improved predictions for the 4th-period atoms without unreasonably compromising accuracy for the lighter atoms. (5) Simple models describing the variation of E c with atomic number are developed.

  3. Controlling energy landscapes with correlations between minima

    CERN Document Server

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Neural network models have been used to construct energy landscapes for modeling biological phenomena, in which the minima of the landscape correspond to memory patterns stored by the network. Here, we show that dynamic properties of those landscapes, such as the sizes of the basins of attraction and the density of stable and metastable states, depend strongly on the correlations between the memory patterns and can be altered by introducing hierarchical structures. Our findings suggest dynamic features of energy landscapes can be controlled by choosing the correlations between patterns

  4. Correlations in nuclear energy recurrence relations

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, B; Perez, S M

    2013-01-01

    The excitation energies of states belonging to the ground state bands of heavy even-even nuclei are analysed using recurrence relations. Excellent agreement with experimental data at the 10 keV level is obtained by taking into account strong correlations which emerge in the analysis. This implies that the excitation energies can be written as a polynomial of maximum degree four in the angular momentum.

  5. Conformal collider physics: Energy and charge correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Hofman, Diego M

    2008-01-01

    We study observables in a conformal field theory which are very closely related to the ones used to describe hadronic events at colliders. We focus on the correlation functions of the energies deposited on calorimeters placed at a large distance from the collision. We consider initial states produced by an operator insertion and we study some general properties of the energy correlation functions for conformal field theories. We argue that the small angle singularities of energy correlation functions are controlled by the twist of non-local light-ray operators with a definite spin. We relate the charge two point function to a particular moment of the parton distribution functions appearing in deep inelastic scattering. The one point energy correlation functions are characterized by a few numbers. For ${\\cal N}=1$ superconformal theories the one point function for states created by the R-current or the stress tensor are determined by the two parameters $a$ and $c$ characterizing the conformal anomaly. Demandin...

  6. Correlation energy, correlated electron density, and exchange-correlation potential in some spherically confined atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2016-12-05

    We report correlation energies, electron densities, and exchange-correlation potentials obtained from configuration interaction and density functional calculations on spherically confined He, Be, Be(2+) , and Ne atoms. The variation of the correlation energy with the confinement radius Rc is relatively small for the He, Be(2+) , and Ne systems. Curiously, the Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) functional works well for weak confinements but fails completely for small Rc . However, in the neutral beryllium atom the CI correlation energy increases markedly with decreasing Rc . This effect is less pronounced at the density-functional theory level. The LYP functional performs very well for the unconfined Be atom, but fails badly for small Rc . The standard exchange-correlation potentials exhibit significant deviation from the "exact" potential obtained by inversion of Kohn-Sham equation. The LYP correlation potential behaves erratically at strong confinements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Correlated Energy Exchange in Drifting Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice floe speed variations were monitored at the research camp North Pole 35 established on the Arctic ice pack in 2008. A three-month time series of measured speed values was used for determining changes in the kinetic energy of the drifting ice floe. The constructed energy distributions were analyzed by methods of nonextensive statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis statistics for open nonequilibrium systems, such as tectonic formations and drifting sea ice. The nonextensivity means the nonadditivity of externally induced energy changes in multicomponent systems due to dynamic interrelation of components having no structural links. The Tsallis formalism gives one an opportunity to assess the correlation between ice floe motions through a specific parameter, the so-called parameter of nonextensivity. This formalistic assessment of the actual state of drifting pack allows one to forecast some important trends in sea ice behavior, because the level of correlated dynamics determines conditions for extended mechanical perturbations in ice pack. In this work, we revealed temporal fluctuations of the parameter of nonextensivity and observed its maximum value before a large-scale sea ice fragmentation (faulting of consolidated sea ice. The correlation was not detected in fragmented sea ice where long-range interactions are weakened.

  8. A simple local correlation energy functional for spherically confined atoms from ab initio correlation energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2017-09-03

    We propose a simple method of calculating the electron correlation energy density e_c(r) and the correlation potential V_c(r) from second-order Møller-Plesset amplitudes and its generalization for the case of a Configuration Interaction wavefunction, based on Nesbet's theorem. The correlation energy density obtained by this method for free and spherically confined Be and He atoms was employed to fit a local analytical density functional based on Wigner's functional. The functional is capable to reproduce a strong increase of the correlation energy with decreasing the confined radius for the Be atom. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. New angles on energy correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moult, Ian; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-12-01

    Jet substructure observables, designed to identify specific features within jets, play an essential role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), both for searching for signals beyond the Standard Model and for testing QCD in extreme phase space regions. In this paper, we systematically study the structure of infrared and collinear safe substructure observables, defining a generalization of the energy correlation functions to probe n-particle correlations within a jet. These generalized correlators provide a flexible basis for constructing new substructure observables optimized for specific purposes. Focusing on three major targets of the jet substructure community — boosted top tagging, boosted W/Z/H tagging, and quark/gluon discrimination — we use power-counting techniques to identify three new series of powerful discriminants: M i , N i , and U i . The M i series is designed for use on groomed jets, providing a novel example of observables with improved discrimination power after the removal of soft radiation. The N i series behave parametrically like the N -subjettiness ratio observables, but are defined without respect to subjet axes, exhibiting improved behavior in the unresolved limit. Finally, the U i series improves quark/gluon discrimination by using higher-point correlators to simultaneously probe multiple emissions within a jet. Taken together, these observables broaden the scope for jet substructure studies at the LHC.

  10. ERP Energy and Cognitive Activity Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel analysis approach for high-density event related scalp potential (ERP) data where the integrated channel-power is used to attain an energy density functional state for channel-clusters of neurophysiological significance. The method is applied to data recorded during a two-stimulus, directed lie paradigm and shows that deceptive responses emit between 8% and 10% less power. A time course analysis of these cognitive activity measures over posterior and anterior regions of the cortex suggests that neocortical interactions, reflecting the differing workload demands during executive and semantic processes, take about 50% longer for the case of deception. These results suggest that the proposed method may provide a useful tool for the analysis of ERP correlates of high-order cognitive functioning. We also report on a possible equivalence between the energy functional distribution and near-infrared signatures that have been measured with other modalities.

  11. New Angles on Energy Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Moult, Ian; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Jet substructure observables, designed to identify specific features within jets, play an essential role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), both for searching for signals beyond the Standard Model and for testing QCD in extreme phase space regions. In this paper, we systematically study the structure of infrared and collinear safe substructure observables, defining a generalization of the energy correlation functions to probe $n$-particle correlations within a jet. These generalized correlators provide a flexible basis for constructing new substructure observables optimized for specific purposes. Focusing on three major targets of the jet substructure community---boosted top tagging, boosted $W/Z/H$ tagging, and quark/gluon discrimination---we use power-counting techniques to identify three new series of powerful discriminants: $M_i$, $N_i$, and $U_i$. The $M_i$ series is designed for use on groomed jets, providing a novel example of observables with improved discrimination power after the removal of soft ra...

  12. A Quick Estimate of the Correlation Energy for Alkanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎书华; 李伟; 马晶

    2003-01-01

    Within the localized molecular orbital description, the intraand interorbital pair correlation energies calculated with the coupled cluster doubles (CCD) theory have been obtained for methane, ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane,isopentane and neopentane using the 6-31G* basis set. The results showed the quantitative transferability of pair correlation energies and gross orbital correlation energies within this series of molecules. Based on the gross orbital correlation energies of five sample alkanes (butane, isobutane, pentane,isopentane and neopentane), we have derived a simple linear relationship to estimate the CCD correlation energy for an arbitrary large alkane. The correlation energy predicted by this simple relationship remarkably recovers more than 98.9% of the exact CCD correlation energy for a number of alkanes containing six to eight carbon atoms. The relative stability of less branched isomers can be correctly predicted.

  13. Energy Inputs Uncertainty: Total Amount, Distribution and Correlation Between Different Forms of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Describes solar energy inputs contributing to ionospheric and thermospheric weather processes, including total energy amounts, distributions and the correlation between particle precipitation and Poynting flux.

  14. Energy momentum conservation effects on two-particle correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Two particle correlations are used to extract information about the characteristic size of the system in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. The size of the system can be extracted from the Bose-Einstein quantum mechanical effect for identical particles. However there are also long range correlations that shift the baseline of the correlation function from the expected flat behavior. A possible source of these correlations is the conservation of energy and momentum, especially for small systems, where the energy available for particle production is limited. A new technique, first used by the STAR collaboration, of quantifying these long range correlations using energy-momentum conservation considerations is presented in this talk. Using Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton collisions at 900 GeV, it is shown that the baseline of the two particle correlation function can be described using this technique.

  15. Rapidity dependence of Bose-Einstein correlations at SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Kniege, S; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, Jerzy; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csat, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Genchev, V; Georgopoulos, G; Gadysz, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kolesnikov, V I; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Laszlo, A; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnr, J; Mrwczy, St; Nicolic, V; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Prindle, D; Phlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczy, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Szymanski, P; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wodarczyk, Z; Zimnyi, J; Kniege, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    This article is devoted to results on pion-pion -Bose-Einstein correlations in central Pb+Pb collisions measured by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. Rapidity as well as transverse momentum dependences of the correlation lengths will be shown for collisions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV beam energy. Only a weak energy dependence of the radii is observed at SPS energies. The kt-dependence of the correlation lengths as well as the single particle mt-spectra will be compared to model calculations. The rapidity dependence is analysed in a range of 2.5 units of rapidity starting at the center of mass rapidity at each beam energy. The correlation lengths measured in the longitudinally comoving system show only a weak dependence on rapidity.

  16. Fission fragment energy correlation measurements for Cf-252(SF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreau, G.; Sicre, A.; Caitucoli, F.; Doan, T.P.; Leroux, B.; Martinez, G.; Asghar, M.; Benfoughal, T.

    1986-01-01

    The mean total kinetic energy, its variance and to a lesser extent the mass yield show strong and correlated fluctuations. These structures are discussed in terms of the static macro-microscopic potential energy calculations. The cold fission mass yield distribution exhibits a fine structure which results from an odd-even effect on nuclear charge.

  17. Correlated energy transfer between two ultracold atomic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krönke, Sven; Knörzer, Johannes; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We study a single atom as an open quantum system, which is initially prepared in a coherent state of low energy and oscillates in a one-dimensional harmonic trap through an interacting ensemble of NA bosons, held in a displaced trap [arXiv:1410.8676]. The non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of the total system is simulated by means of an ab-initio method, giving us access to all properties of the open system and its finite environment. In this talk, we focus on unraveling the interplay of energy exchange and correlations between the subsystems, which are coupled in such a spatio-temporally localized manner. We show that an inter-species interaction-induced level splitting accelerates the energy transfer between the atomic species for larger NA, which becomes less complete at the same time. System-environment correlations prove to be significant except for times when the excess energy distribution among the subsystems is highly imbalanced. These correlations result in incoherent energy transfer processes, which accelerate the early energy donation of the single atom. By analyzing correlations between intra-subsystem excitations, certain energy transfer channels are shown to be (dis-)favored depending on the instantaneous direction of transfer.

  18. Correlation energy for elementary bosons: Physics of the singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2016-04-01

    We propose a compact perturbative approach that reveals the physical origin of the singularity occurring in the density dependence of correlation energy: like fermions, elementary bosons have a singular correlation energy which comes from the accumulation, through Feynman "bubble" diagrams, of the same non-zero momentum transfer excitations from the free particle ground state, that is, the Fermi sea for fermions and the Bose-Einstein condensate for bosons. This understanding paves the way toward deriving the correlation energy of composite bosons like atomic dimers and semiconductor excitons, by suggesting Shiva diagrams that have similarity with Feynman "bubble" diagrams, the previous elementary boson approaches, which hide this physics, being inappropriate to do so.

  19. Correlation energy for elementary bosons: Physics of the singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan, E-mail: syshiau@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701, Taiwan (China); Combescot, Monique [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Chang, Yia-Chung, E-mail: yiachang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-15

    We propose a compact perturbative approach that reveals the physical origin of the singularity occurring in the density dependence of correlation energy: like fermions, elementary bosons have a singular correlation energy which comes from the accumulation, through Feynman “bubble” diagrams, of the same non-zero momentum transfer excitations from the free particle ground state, that is, the Fermi sea for fermions and the Bose–Einstein condensate for bosons. This understanding paves the way toward deriving the correlation energy of composite bosons like atomic dimers and semiconductor excitons, by suggesting Shiva diagrams that have similarity with Feynman “bubble” diagrams, the previous elementary boson approaches, which hide this physics, being inappropriate to do so.

  20. Time correlations of high energy muons in an underground detector

    CERN Document Server

    Becherini, Y; Chiarusi, T; Cozzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Esposito, L S; Giacomelli, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Maaroufi, F; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Moussa, A

    2005-01-01

    We present the result of a search for correlations in the arrival times of high energy muons collected from 1995 till 2000 with the streamer tube system of the complete MACRO detector at the underground Gran Sasso Lab. Large samples of single muons (8.6 million), double muons (0.46 million) and multiple muons with multiplicities from 3 to 6 (0.08 million) were selected. These samples were used to search for time correlations of cosmic ray particles coming from the whole upper hemisphere or from selected space cones. The results of our analyses confirm with high statistics a random arrival time distribution of high energy cosmic rays.

  1. Strong pressure-energy correlations in van der Waals liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Strong correlations between equilibrium fluctuations of the configurational parts of pressure and energy are found in computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones liquid and other simple liquids, but not for hydrogen-bonding liquids such as methanol and water. The correlations that are present also...... in the crystal and glass phases reflect an effective inverse power-law repulsive potential dominating fluctuations, even at zero and slightly negative pressure. In experimental data for supercritical argon, the correlations are found to be approximately 96%. Consequences for viscous liquid dynamics are discussed....

  2. Anti-Correlation between Energy-Gap and Phonon Energy for Cuprate Bi2212 Superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wei

    2008-01-01

    Using the electron-phonon mechanism, we explain the spatial anti-correlation between the energy-gap and the energy of phonon mode for cuprate superconductor found in tunnelling spectrum by STM measurements of Bi2212, which is the direct effect of an important relationship (or constraint) I =const, where I is superconducting parameters. By relaxing above constraint, we study the correlation of energy gap and phonon energy when I has a distribution. We calculate a map of transition temperature in space constructing by phonon energy and the parameter of electron-phonon interaction, which is helpful for understanding of the relation.

  3. Correlations and fluctuations in high energy heavy ion collision experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dai-Mei; WANG Ya-Ping; WEI Li-Hua; CAI Xu

    2008-01-01

    An overview of research status of soft physics in high energy heavy-ion collision experiments and recent experimental results are presented.The experimental status on fluctuations and correlations has been reviewed and the outlook for research status of soft physics in LHC/ALICE has been introduced in this paper.

  4. Estimation of correlation energy for excited-states of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hemanadhan, M

    2014-01-01

    The correlation energies of various atoms in their excited-states are estimated by modelling the Coulomb hole following the previous work by Chakravorty and Clementi. The parameter in the model is fixed by making the corresponding Coulomb hole to satisfy the exact constraint of charge neutrality.

  5. Correlation Between Energy Transfer Rate and Atomization Energy of Some Trinitro Aromatic Explosive Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-hong Ge; Xin-lu Cheng; Zheng-lai Liu; Xiang-dong Yang; Fang-fang Dong

    2008-01-01

    An assumptive theoretical relationship is suggested to describe the property of molecular atomization energy and energy transfer rate in the initiation of explosions. To investigate the relationship between atomization energy and energy transfer rate, the number of doorway modes of explosives is estimated by the theory of Dlott and Fayer in which the rate is proportional to the number of normal mode vibrations. It was evaluated frequencies of normal mode vibrations of eight molecules by means of density functional theory (DFT) at the b3p86/6-31G(d,p) level. It is found that the number of doorway modes shows a linear correlation to the atomization energies of the molecules, which were also calculated by means of the same method. A mechanism of this correlation is discussed. It is also noted that in those explosives with similar molecular structure and molecular weight, the correlation between the atomization energy and the number of doorway modes is higher.

  6. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Disha, E-mail: sawant@fe.infn.it [University of Ferrara, Via Saragat-1, Block C, Ferrara 44122 (Italy); University of Nice, 28 Avenue Valrose, Nice 06103 (France); IRAP Erasmus PhD Program, European Union and INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); Amati, Lorenzo, E-mail: amati@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); ICRANet, Piazzale Aldo Moro-5, Rome 00185 (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  7. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ˜ 0.01 up to ˜ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the "intensity" is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i - Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ˜ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  8. Liouville field theory and log-correlated Random Energy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xiangyu; Rosso, Alberto; Santachiara, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    An exact mapping is established between the $c\\geq25$ Liouville field theory (LFT) and the Gibbs measure statistics of a thermal particle in a 2D Gaussian Free Field plus a logarithmic confining potential. The probability distribution of the position of the minimum of the energy landscape is obtained exactly by combining the conformal bootstrap and one-step replica symmetry breaking methods. Operator product expansions in LFT allow to unveil novel universal behaviours of the log-correlated Random Energy class. High precision numerical tests are given.

  9. Video quality assessment based on correlation between spatiotemporal motion energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng; Mou, Xuanqin

    2016-09-01

    Video quality assessment (VQA) has been a hot research topic because of rapid increase of huge demand of video communications. From the earliest PSNR metric to advanced models that are perceptual aware, researchers have made great progress in this field by introducing properties of human vision system (HVS) into VQA model design. Among various algorithms that model the property of HVS perceiving motion, the spatiotemporal energy model has been validated to be high consistent with psychophysical experiments. In this paper, we take the spatiotemporal energy model into VQA model design by the following steps. 1) According to the pristine spatiotemporal energy model proposed by Adelson et al, we apply the linear filters, which are oriented in space-time and tuned in spatial frequency, to filter the reference and test videos respectively. The outputs of quadrature pairs of above filters are then squared and summed to give two measures of motion energy, which are named rightward and leftward energy responses, respectively. 2) Based on the pristine model, we calculate summation of the rightward and leftward energy responses as spatiotemporal features to represent perceptual quality information for videos, named total spatiotemporal motion energy maps. 3) The proposed FR-VQA model, named STME, is calculated with statistics based on the pixel-wise correlation between the total spatiotemporal motion energy maps of the reference and distorted videos. The STME model was validated on the LIVE VQA Database by comparing with existing FR-VQA models. Experimental results show that STME performs with excellent prediction accuracy and stays in state-of-the-art VQA models.

  10. Correlation matrix renormalization approximation for total-energy calculations of correlated electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Y. X. [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Jun [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-01-23

    We generalized the commonly used Gutzwiller approximation for calculating the electronic structure and total energy of strongly correlated electron systems. In our method, the evaluation of one-body and two-body density matrix elements of the Hamiltonian is simplified using a renormalization approximation to achieve better scaling of the computational effort as a function of system size. To achieve a clear presentation of the concept and methodology, we describe the detailed formalism for a finite hydrogen system with minimal basis set. We applied the correlation matrix renormalization approximation approach to a H2 dimer and H8 cubic fragment with minimal basis sets, as well as a H2 molecule with a large basis set. The results compare favorably with sophisticated quantum chemical calculations. We believe our approach can serve as an alternative way to build up the exchange-correlation energy functional for an improved density functional theory description of systems with strong electron correlations.

  11. Energy spectrum for a strongly correlated network and local magnetism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li LIU; Qiao BI

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider a quantum strongly correlated network described by an Anderson s-d mixing model. By introducing the Green function on the projected formalism of the Schrieffer and Wolf transformation, the energy spectrum of the system can be obtained. Using this result we calculate the survivability distribution of the network and discuss the local magnetism in the network, which shows that the survivability is an important statistical characteristic quantity not just to reflect the network topological property but also dynamics.

  12. Using the theoretical linear energy solvation energy relationship to correlate and predict nasal pungency thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famini, George R; Aguiar, Denise; Payne, Marvin A; Rodriquez, Ryan; Wilson, Leland Y

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical linear solvation energy relationship (TLSER) has been used to correlate and characterize 44 nasal pungency threshold (NPT) values in man with parameters derived from semi-empirical molecular orbital theory. The resulting relationship provides good correlative (R2 > 0.92) and predictive (R2cy > 0.88) capability. In addition, the TLSER parameters are used as a molecular probe to attempt to understand the fundamental properties influencing nasal pungency.

  13. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion.

  14. Energy- Angular Correlation of Medium Energy Particles Produced in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, M T; Sadek, N M; Elsweedy, J; Elsweedy, Jamila

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear photo-emulsion technique is used to study the information carried by the medium energy nucleons produced in heavy ion collisions. Multiplicity, energies as well as the angular distribution of this type of particles are measured. Due to the difficulties in measuring the energy only some particles having special criteria could be selected to measure their energy with consenting accuracy. A hypothetical model is proposed to correlate the energy of the produced particles to their emission angles so that it becomes easy to estimate the energy distribution in terms of measured emission angle. The proposed model is constructed upon statistical thermodynamic assumptions. Moreover, two additional base functions are originated that play the role of the statistical angular weight factor and the nuclear density of the compressed nuclear matter at the moment of particle emission. The prediction of the model are compared with complete set of measured data of the reactions of proton, helium, carbon and neon nucl...

  15. Probing quantum correlation functions through energy-absorption interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withington, S.; Thomas, C. N.; Goldie, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    An interferometric technique is described for determining the spatial forms of the individual degrees of freedom through which a many-body system can absorb energy from its environment. The method separates out the spatial forms of the coherent excitations present at any single frequency; it is not necessary to sweep the frequency and then infer the spatial forms of possible excitations from resonant absorption features. The system under test is excited with two external sources, which create generalized forces, and the fringe in the total power dissipated is measured as the relative phase between the sources is varied. If the complex fringe visibility is measured for different pairs of source locations, the anti-Hermitian part of the complex-valued nonlocal correlation tensor can be determined, which can then be decomposed to give the natural dynamical modes of the system and their relative responsivities. If each source in the interferometer creates a different kind of force, the spatial forms of the individual excitations that are responsible for cross-correlated response can be found. The technique is related to holography, but measures the state of coherence to which the system is maximally sensitive. It can be applied across a wide range of wavelengths, in a variety of ways, to homogeneous media, thin films, patterned structures, and components such as sensors, detectors, and energy-harvesting absorbers.

  16. Correlations in Particle Production in Nuclear Collisions at LHC Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Sputowska, Iwona

    New data on forward-backward charged particle correlations and multiplicity uctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at p sNN = 2.76 TeV measured by the ALICE detector at CERN are presented. The analysis focuses on the dependence of (a) the correlation coecient bcorr, (b) the intensive quantity ! and (c) the strongly-intensive quantity as a function of (1) the pseudorapidity gap (2) the centrality of the collision and (3) the width of the centrality bin. The considered observables are studied for Pb+Pb data with two dierent centrality estimators. The centrality selection methods are based on charged particle multiplicity measurement by the ALICE VZERO detector and on determination of energy carried by spectator systems by the Zero Degree Calorimeter. A strong dependence of the measured magnitude of forward-backward correlation (bcorr), and of the size of multiplicity uctuations (!), is observed as a function of the ap- plied centrality estimator and as a function of the size of centrality window. A dominant eect on ...

  17. Energy normalization of TV viewed optical correlation (automated correlation plane analyzer for an optical processor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumet, A.

    1981-01-01

    An automatic correlation plane processor that can rapidly acquire, identify, and locate the autocorrelation outputs of a bank of multiple optical matched filters is described. The read-only memory (ROM) stored digital silhouette of each image associated with each matched filter allows TV video to be used to collect image energy to provide accurate normalization of autocorrelations. The resulting normalized autocorrelations are independent of the illumination of the matched input. Deviation from unity of a normalized correlation can be used as a confidence measure of correct image identification. Analog preprocessing circuits permit digital conversion and random access memory (RAM) storage of those video signals with the correct amplitude, pulse width, rising slope, and falling slope. TV synchronized addressing of 3 RAMs permits on-line storage of: (1) the maximum unnormalized amplitude, (2) the image x location, and (3) the image y location of the output of each of up to 99 matched filters. A fourth RAM stores all normalized correlations. A normalization approach, normalization for cross correlations, a system's description with block diagrams, and system's applications are discussed.

  18. Energy Momentum Tensor Correlators in Improved Holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Krssak, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we study the physics of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) using holographic methods borrowed from string theory. We start our discussion by motivating the use of such machinery, explaining how recent experimental results from the LHC and RHIC colliders suggests that the created QGP should be described as a strongly coupled liquid with small but nonvanishing bulk and shear viscosities. We argue that holographic dualities are a very efficient framework for studying transport properties in such a medium. Next, we introduce the underlying physics behind all holographic dualities, the AdS/CFT correspondence, and then motivate the necessity of implementing conformal invariance breaking in them. After this, we present the phenomenologically most successful holographic model of the strong interactions - Improved Holographic QCD (IHQCD). Working within IHQCD, we next move on to calculate energy momentum tensor correlators in the bulk and shear channels of large-Nc Yang-Mills theory. In the shear channel, we...

  19. Hammer events, neutrino energies, and nucleon-nucleon correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, L B; Piasetzky, E

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation measurements depend on a difference between the rate of neutrino-nucleus interactions at different neutrino energies or different distances from the source. Knowledge of the neutrino energy spectrum and neutrino-detector interactions are crucial for these experiments. Short range nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei (SRC) affect properties of nuclei. The ArgoNeut liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (lArTPC) observed neutrino-argon scattering events with two protons back-to-back in the final state ("hammer" events) which they associated with SRC pairs. The MicroBoone lArTPC will measure far more of these events. We simulate hammer events using two simple models. We use the well-known electron-nucleon cross section to calculate e-argon interactions where the e- scatters from a proton, ejecting a pi+, and the pi+ is then absorbed on a moving deuteron-like $np$ pair. We also use a model where the electron excites a nucleon to a Delta, which then deexcites by interacting with a second nucle...

  20. Laplacian-level density functionals for the kinetic energy density and exchange-correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdew, John P.; Constantin, Lucian A.

    2007-04-01

    We construct a Laplacian-level meta-generalized-gradient-approximation (meta-GGA) for the noninteracting (Kohn-Sham orbital) positive kinetic energy density τ of an electronic ground state of density n . This meta-GGA is designed to recover the fourth-order gradient expansion τGE4 in the appropriate slowly varying limit and the von Weizsäcker expression τW=∣∇n∣2/(8n) in the rapidly varying limit. It is constrained to satisfy the rigorous lower bound τW(r)⩽τ(r) . Our meta-GGA is typically a strong improvement over the gradient expansion of τ for atoms, spherical jellium clusters, jellium surfaces, the Airy gas, Hooke’s atom, one-electron Gaussian density, quasi-two-dimensional electron gas, and nonuniformly scaled hydrogen atom. We also construct a Laplacian-level meta-GGA for exchange and correlation by employing our approximate τ in the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-GGA density functional. The Laplacian-level TPSS gives almost the same exchange-correlation enhancement factors and energies as the full TPSS, suggesting that τ and ∇2n carry about the same information beyond that carried by n and ∇n . Our kinetic energy density integrates to an orbital-free kinetic energy functional that is about as accurate as the fourth-order gradient expansion for many real densities (with noticeable improvement in molecular atomization energies), but considerably more accurate for rapidly varying ones.

  1. The role of correlation in the ground state energy of confined helium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, 09340 México Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2014-01-14

    We analyze the ground state energy of helium atom confined by spherical impenetrable walls, and the role of the correlation energy in the total energy. The confinement of an atom in a cavity is one way in which we can model the effect of the external pressure on an atom. The calculations of energy of the system are carried out by the variational method. We find that the correlation energy remains almost constant for a range values of size of the boxes analyzed.

  2. Electron-electron correlations in square-well quantum dots: direct energy minimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hidekazu; Hirose, Kikuji

    2011-04-01

    Electron-electron correlations in two-dimensional square-well quantum dots are investigated using the direct energy minimization scheme. Searches for groundstate charges and spin configurations are performed with varying the sizes of dots and the number of electrons. For a two-electron system, a standout difference between the configurations with and without counting correlation energy is demonstrated. The emergence and melting of Wigner-molecule-like structures arising from the interplay between the kinetic energy and Coulombic interaction energy are described. Electron-electron correlation energies and addition energy spectra are calculated, and special electron numbers related to peculiar effects of the square well are extracted.

  3. Correlates of University Students' Soft and Energy Drink Consumption According to Gender and Residency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed personal and environmental correlates of Belgian university students' soft and energy drink consumption and investigated whether these associations were moderated by gender or residency...

  4. Correlations between the energy consumptions and the key parameters of exploitation; Correlations entre les consommations d'energie et les parametres-cles d'exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    At each step of the process, correlations between specific energy consumptions, operational parameters and machines management have been analyzed to examine the existence or not of relations between the consumptions and these parameters. The correlation degree between the studied values have been determined by the regressions mathematical model. (O.M.)

  5. Volume-energy correlations in the slow degrees of freedom of computer-simulated phospholipid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2007-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular-dynamics simulations of phospholipid membranes in the fluid phase reveal strong correlations between equilibrium fluctuations of volume and energy on the nanosecond time-scale. The existence of strong volume-energy correlations was previously deduced indirectly by Heimburg from experiments focusing on the phase transition between the fluid and the ordered gel phases. The correlations, which are reported here for three different membranes (DMPC, DMPS-Na, and DMPSH), have volume-energy correlation coefficients ranging from 0.81 to 0.89. The DMPC membrane was studied at two temperatures showing that the correlation coefficient increases as the phase transition is approached.

  6. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  7. Zero Energy Anomaly in One-Dimensional Anderson Lattice with Exponentially Correlated Weak Diagonal Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宗国; 覃绍京; 康凯; 王垂林

    2012-01-01

    We calculated numerically the localization length of one-dimensional Anderson model with correlated diagonal disorder. For zero energy point in the weak disorder limit, we showed that the localization length changes continuously as the correlation of the disorder increases. We found that higher order terms of the correlation must be included into the current perturbation result in order to give the correct localization length, arid to connect smoothly the anomaly at zero correlation with the perturbation result for large correlation.

  8. Predicting the Energy Output of Wind Farms Based on Weather Data: Important Variables and their Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Vladislavleva, Katya; Neumann, Frank; Wagner, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Wind energy plays an increasing role in the supply of energy world-wide. The energy output of a wind farm is highly dependent on the weather condition present at the wind farm. If the output can be predicted more accurately, energy suppliers can coordinate the collaborative production of different energy sources more efficiently to avoid costly overproductions. With this paper, we take a computer science perspective on energy prediction based on weather data and analyze the important parameters as well as their correlation on the energy output. To deal with the interaction of the different parameters we use symbolic regression based on the genetic programming tool DataModeler. Our studies are carried out on publicly available weather and energy data for a wind farm in Australia. We reveal the correlation of the different variables for the energy output. The model obtained for energy prediction gives a very reliable prediction of the energy output for newly given weather data.

  9. Gluon transverse momentum dependent correlators in polarized high energy processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boer, Daniel; van Daal, Tom; Mulders, Piet J; Signori, Andrea; Zhou, Yajin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the gluon transverse momentum dependent correlators as Fourier transform of matrix elements of nonlocal operator combinations. At the operator level these correlators include both field strength operators and gauge links bridging the nonlocality. In contrast to the collinear PDFs, the gauge links are no longer unique for transverse momentum dependent PDFs (TMDs) and also Wilson loops lead to nontrivial effects. We look at gluon TMDs for unpolarized, vector and tensor polarized targets. In particular a single Wilson loop operators become important when one considers the small-x limit of gluon TMDs.

  10. Energy dissipation from a correlated system driven out of equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameau, J. D.; Freutel, S.; Kemper, A. F.; Sentef, M. A.; Freericks, J. K.; Avigo, I.; Ligges, M.; Rettig, L.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Johnson, P. D.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-12-01

    In complex materials various interactions have important roles in determining electronic properties. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is used to study these processes by resolving the complex single-particle self-energy and quantifying how quantum interactions modify bare electronic states. However, ambiguities in the measurement of the real part of the self-energy and an intrinsic inability to disentangle various contributions to the imaginary part of the self-energy can leave the implications of such measurements open to debate. Here we employ a combined theoretical and experimental treatment of femtosecond time-resolved ARPES (tr-ARPES) show how population dynamics measured using tr-ARPES can be used to separate electron-boson interactions from electron-electron interactions. We demonstrate a quantitative analysis of a well-defined electron-boson interaction in the unoccupied spectrum of the cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x characterized by an excited population decay time that maps directly to a discrete component of the equilibrium self-energy not readily isolated by static ARPES experiments.

  11. Study on correlativity among some seismological prediction indexes related to earthquake frequency or energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Correlation among various seismological prediction indexes related to earthquake frequency N or energy E for describing seismicity changes is studied by seismic data of 11 seismic zones (areas) in the Sichuan-Yunnan region. A statistical test for correlativity shows that seismicity indexes obtained from transformation of earthquake fre-quency N or energy E have correlation to a certain extent while they are used to describe seismicity changes. If the transformation is linear in all cases, the correlation coefficient is equal to 1. The smaller the transformation devia-tion from linearity, the bigger the correlation coefficient is.

  12. Correlation between the Open-Circuit Voltage and Charge Transfer State Energy in Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yunlong; Holmes, Russell J

    2015-08-26

    In order to further improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), it is essential to better understand the factors that limit the open-circuit voltage (VOC). Previous work has sought to correlate the value of VOC in donor-acceptor (D-A) OPVs to the interface energy level offset (EDA). In this work, measurements of electroluminescence are used to extract the charge transfer (CT) state energy for multiple small molecule D-A pairings. The CT state as measured from electroluminescence is found to show better correlation to the maximum VOC than EDA. The difference between EDA and the CT state energy is attributed to the Coulombic binding energy of the CT state. This correlation is demonstrated explicitly by inserting an insulating spacer layer between the donor and acceptor materials, reducing the binding energy of the CT state and increasing the measured VOC. These results demonstrate a direct correlation between maximum VOC and CT state energy.

  13. Impact of Wind Speed Correlation on the Operation of Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davril Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable resources technologies such as wind power currently demonstrate a worldwide popularity thanks to their environmental friendly status and their economic potential. The variability of the wind power output implies the use of practical solutions such as energy storage systems in order to retain the power system stability and reliability. The wind geographical correlation between different wind farms also impacts the system reliability. This paper studies the effects of the wind speed correlation level on the performance of the associated energy storage system (ESS. Wind correlated model using Weibull probability distribution and Nataf transformation is presented. Energy storage system model and energy management algorithm are developed. Both are applied to a modified IEEE-RTS power generation and load model. The case simulation results indicate that the wind speed correlation level between two wind farms impacts the power distribution inside energy storages and that it needs to be considered in order not to overestimate ESS benefits on the system.

  14. Four-point correlation function of stress-energy tensors in N=4 superconformal theories

    CERN Document Server

    Korchemsky, G P

    2015-01-01

    We derive the explicit expression for the four-point correlation function of stress-energy tensors in four-dimensional N=4 superconformal theory. We show that it has a remarkably simple and suggestive form allowing us to predict a large class of four-point correlation functions involving the stress-energy tensor and other conserved currents. We then apply the obtained results on the correlation functions to computing the energy-energy correlations, which measure the flow of energy in the final states created from the vacuum by a source. We demonstrate that they are given by a universal function independent of the choice of the source. Our analysis relies only on N=4 superconformal symmetry and does not use the dynamics of the theory.

  15. Communication: Simple and accurate uniform electron gas correlation energy for the full range of densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachiyo, Teepanis

    2016-07-01

    A simple correlation energy functional for the uniform electron gas is derived based on the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. It can reproduce the known correlation functional in the high-density limit, while in the mid-density range maintaining a good agreement with the near-exact correlation energy of the uniform electron gas to within 2 × 10-3 hartree. The correlation energy is a function of a density parameter rs and is of the form a * ln ( 1 + /b r s + /b rs 2 ) . The constants "a" and "b" are derived from the known correlation functional in the high-density limit. Comparisons to the Ceperley-Alder's near-exact Quantum Monte Carlo results and the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair correlation functional are also reported.

  16. Using Exergy to Correlate Energy Research Investments and Efficiencies: Concept and Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of exergy to correlate energy-utilization efficiencies and energy research investments is described. Specifically, energy and exergy losses are compared with energy research and development expenditures, demonstrating that the latter correlates with energy losses, even though it would be more sensible to allocate energy research and development funding in line with exergy losses, as they represent the actual deviation of efficiency from the ideal. The methodology is outlined and illustrated with two case studies. The case studies consider the province of Ontario, Canada and the United States. The investigation utilizes data on the energy utilization in a country or region, including flows of energy and exergy through the main sectors of the economy. The results are expected to be of use to government and public authorities that administer research and development funding and resources and should help improve the effectiveness of such investments.

  17. Correlation of Effective Dispersive and Polar Surface Energies in Heterogeneous Self-Assembled Monolayer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Yanxin; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We show, theoretically, that the measured effective dispersive and polar surface energies of a heterogeneous Surface are correlated; the correlation, however, differs whether a Cassic or an Israelachvili and Gee model is assumed. Fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers with varying coverage were...... grown oil oxidized (100) silicon Surfaces in a vapor phase process using five different precursors. Experimentally, effective surface energy components of the fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers were determined from measured contact angles using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. We show...... that the correlation between the effective surface energy components of the heterogeneous Surfaces coated with fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers is in agreement with the Cassie model....

  18. Extending the random-phase approximation for electronic correlation energies: the renormalized adiabatic local density approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2012-01-01

    while chemical bond strengths and absolute correlation energies are systematically underestimated. In this work we extend the RPA by including a parameter-free renormalized version of the adiabatic local-density (ALDA) exchange-correlation kernel. The renormalization consists of a (local) truncation...... of the ALDA kernel for wave vectors q > 2kF, which is found to yield excellent results for the homogeneous electron gas. In addition, the kernel significantly improves both the absolute correlation energies and atomization energies of small molecules over RPA and ALDA. The renormalization can...

  19. Accurate all-electron correlation energies for the closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn and their relationship to the corresponding MP2 correlation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Shane P.; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2011-01-01

    All-electron correlation energies E_c are not very well-known for atoms with more than 18 electrons. Hence, coupled-cluster calculations in carefully designed basis sets are combined with fully converged second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) computations to obtain fairly accurate, nonrelativistic E_c values for the 12 closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn. These energies will be useful for the evaluation and parameterization of density functionals. The results show that MP2 overestimates \\vert {E_c}\\vert for heavy atoms. Spin-component scaling of the MP2 correlation energy is used to provide a simple explanation for this overestimation.

  20. Dielectric matrix formulation of correlation energies in the Random Phase Approximation (RPA): inclusion of exchange effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mussard, Bastien; Jansen, Georg; Angyan, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the co...

  1. Long-range correlation energy calculated from coupled atomic response functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    An accurate determination of the electron correlation energy is essential for describing the structure, stability, and function in a wide variety of systems, ranging from gas-phase molecular assemblies to condensed matter and organic/inorganic interfaces. Even small errors in the correlation energy can have a large impact on the description of chemical and physical properties in the systems of interest. In this context, the development of efficient approaches for the accurate calculation of the long-range correlation energy (and hence dispersion) is the main challenge. In the last years a number of methods have been developed to augment density functional approximations via dispersion energy corrections, but most of these approaches ignore the intrinsic many-body nature of correlation effects, leading to inconsistent and sometimes even qualitatively incorrect predictions. Here we build upon the recent many-body dispersion (MBD) framework, which is intimately linked to the random-phase approximation for the co...

  2. Correlation effects on the energy spectra of quantum dot electrons with harmonic model interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The low-lying excitation energy spectra of two, three and five quantum dot electrons with harmonic model interactions in a large magnetic field are calculated by the Hartree-Fock(HF) methods. Correlation effects on the energy level structures are investigated by comparing the HF results with the exact ones. It is found that the pure collective excitations(center-of-mass mode quanta) existing in the exact energy spectra do not appear in the HF energy spectra. The degeneracies of energy levels are also related to the correlation interactions, especially in the energy spectrum of two electrons. In the cases of more than two electrons, as the electron-electron interaction strength is increased the HF energy levels exhibit more complex crossings than the exact ones.

  3. Correlation effects in MgO and CaO Cohesive energies and lattice constants

    CERN Document Server

    Doll, K; Stoll, H; Doll, Klaus; Dolg, Michael; Stoll, Hermann

    1996-01-01

    A recently proposed computational scheme based on local increments has been applied to the calculation of correlation contributions to the cohesive energy of the CaO crystal. Using ab-initio quantum chemical methods for evaluating individual increments, we obtain 80% of the difference between the experimental and Hartree-Fock cohesive energies. Lattice constants corrected for correlation effects deviate by less than 1% from experimental values, in the case of MgO and CaO.

  4. Correlated volume-energy fluctuations of phospholipid membranes: A simulation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf. R.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Schröder, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    correlations of their slow fluctuations (defined by averaging over 0.5 ns). These quantities, on the other hand, do not correlate significantly with area, thickness, or chain order. The correlations are mainly reported for the fluid phase, but we also give some results for the ordered (gel) phase of two...... membranes, showing a similar picture. The cause of the observed strong correlations is identified by splitting volume and energy into contributions from tails, heads, and water, and showing that the slow volume−energy fluctuations derive from van der Waals interactions of the tail region; they are thus...... analogous to the similar strong correlations recently observed in computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones and other simple van der Waals type liquids (U. R. Pedersen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 015701). The strong correlations reported here confirm one crucial assumption of a recent theory...

  5. Volume-Energy Correlations in the Slow Degrees of Freedom of Computer-Simulated Phospholipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Schröder, T.B.;

    2008-01-01

    by Heimburg from experiments focusing on the phase transition between the Lα and the Lβ phases. The correlations, which are reported here for three different membranes (DMPC, DMPS-Na, and DMPSH), have volume-energy correlation coefficients ranging from 0.81 to 0.89. The DMPC membrane was studied at two...... temperatures showing that the correlation coefficient increases as the phase transition is approached....

  6. Volume-energy correlations in the slow degrees of freedom of computer-simulated phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Peters, Günther H.; Schrøder, Thomas;

    by Heimburg from experiments focusing on the phase transition between the fluid and the ordered gel phases. The correlations, which are reported here for three different membranes (DMPC, DMPS-Na, and DMPSH), have volume-energy correlation coefficients ranging from 0.81 to 0.89. The DMPC membrane was studied...... at two temperatures showing that the correlation coefficient increases as the phase transition is approached...

  7. Efficient energy transfer in light-harvesting systems, I: optimal temperature, reorganization energy, and spatial-temporal correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jianlan; Shen, Young; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of efficient and robust energy transfer in light-harvesting systems provides new insights for the optimal design of artificial systems. In this paper, we use the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex and phycocyanin 645 (PC 645) to explore the general dependence on physical parameters that help maximize the efficiency and maintain its stability. With the Haken-Strobl model, the maximal energy transfer efficiency (ETE) is achieved under an intermediate optimal value of dephasing rate. Guided by the insight, we use the generalized Bloch-Redfield (GBR) equation approach to correctly describe dissipative exciton dynamics and find that maximal ETE can be achieved under various physical conditions, including temperature, reorganization energy, and spatial-temporal correlations in noise. We also identify regimes of reorganization energy where the ETE changes monotonically with temperature or spatial correlation and therefore cannot be optimized with respect to these two variables.

  8. Fission fragment mass energy correlation for 13 actinides ranging from Th to Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caitucoli, F.; Barreau, G.; Leroux, B.; Doan, T.P.; Sicre, A.; Asghar, M.; Perrin, P.; Maurel, M.

    1986-01-01

    Fission fragment mass-energy correlations have been measured for a large range of fissioning systems. The ''cold fragmentations'' mass distributions show the strong influence of the potential energy surface around scission (shell and charge effects).

  9. Correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in SU(2) gauge theory at finite temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K.; Karsch, F.; Pica, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We calculate correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition of (3+1)-dimensional SU(2) gauge theory and discuss their critical behavior in the vicinity of the second order deconfinement transition. We show that correlation functions...... of the trace of the energy momentum tensor diverge uniformly at the critical point in proportion to the specific heat singularity. Correlation functions of the pressure, on the other hand, stay finite at the critical point. We discuss the consequences of these findings for the analysis of transport...... coefficients, in particular the bulk viscosity, in the vicinity of a second order phase transition point....

  10. Correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in SU(2) gauge theory at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Huebner, K; Pica, C

    2008-01-01

    We calculate correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition of (3+1)-dimensional SU(2) gauge theory and discuss their critical behavior in the vicinity of the second order deconfinement transition. We show that correlation functions of the trace of the energy momentum tensor diverge uniformly at the critical point in proportion to the specific heat singularity. Correlation functions of the pressure, on the other hand, stay finite at the critical point. We discuss the consequences of these findings for the analysis of transport coefficients, in particular the bulk viscosity, in the vicinity of a second order phase transition point.

  11. Dielectric Matrix Formulation of Correlation Energies in the Random Phase Approximation: Inclusion of Exchange Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussard, Bastien; Rocca, Dario; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2016-05-10

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case, the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed, and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the computational efficiency; a discussion on the numerical quadrature made on the frequency variable is also provided. A series of test calculations on atomic correlation energies and molecular reaction energies shows that exchange effects are instrumental for improvement over direct RPA results.

  12. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, A.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Lappi, T.; Schenke, B.; Venugopalan, R.

    2011-12-01

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large Nc approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  13. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Schenke, Bjoern; Venugopalan, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large N_c approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  14. Rules on intrapair and interpair correlation energy for Cl,Cl~- and MCl(M=H,Li,Na,K)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦吉崇; 禚淑苹; 居冠之

    2001-01-01

    According to the calculation results of the intrapair and interpair correlation energy for the title systems, it has been found that the intrapair correlation energy of K shell of Cl is almost a constant and both the intrashell and intershell correlation energy of K and L shell changes little. It has also been found that in MCI series compounds the value of Cl correlation energy contribution depends on the ionicity of MCI compounds, i.e., the Cl correlation energy contribution increases with the increase of the ionic bond strength of the compound and this value is always less than the correlation energy of Cl" anion but always larger than that of Cl atom. These rules are helpful for the estimation of the correlation energy of ionic compounds and the energy changes of chemical reactions.

  15. Rules on intrapair and interpair correlation energy for Cl, Cl- and MCl (M=H, Li, Na, K)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    According to the calculation results of the intrapair and interpair correlation energy for the title systems, it has been found that the intrapair correlation energy of K shell of Cl is almost a constant and both the intrashell and intershell correlation energy of K and L shell changes little. It has also been found that in MCl series compounds the value of Cl correlation energy contribution depends on the ionicity of MCl compounds, i.e., the Cl correlation energy contribution increases with the increase of the ionic bond strength of the compound and this value is always less than the correlation energy of Cl- anion but always larger than that of Cl atom. These rules are helpful for the estimation of the correlation energy of ionic compounds and the energy changes of chemical reactions.

  16. Energy and daylighting: A correlation between quality of light and energy consciousness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, N. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Architecture

    1997-12-31

    Energy and Daylighting, an advanced topics graduate/professional elective has been established to help the student develop a deeper understanding of Architectural Daylighting, Energy Conserving Design, and Material/Construction/Methods through direct application. After a brief survey of the principles and applications of current and developing attitudes and techniques in energy conservation and natural lighting strategies is conducted (in order to build upon previous courses), an extensive exercise follows which allows the student the opportunity for direct applications. Both computer modeling/analysis and physical modeling (light box simulation with photographic documentation) are employed to focus attention on the interrelationships between natural lighting and passive energy conserving design--all within the context of establishing environmental (interior) quality and (exterior) design direction. As a result, students broaden their understanding of natural light and energy conservation as design tools; the importance of environmental responsibility, both built and natural environments; and using computer analysis as a design tool. This presentation centers around the activities and results obtained from explorations into Energy and Daylighting. Discussion will highlight the course objectives, the methodology involved in the studies, specific requirements and means of evaluation, a slide show of befores and afters (results), and a retrospective look at the course`s value, as well as future directions and implications.

  17. Does Galactic Magnetic Field Disturb the Correlation of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays with their Sources?

    CERN Document Server

    Takami, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    The propagation trajectories of the highest energy cosmic rays can be deflected by Galactic magnetic field (GMF) and expected correlation between their arrival directions and the positions of their sources can be disturbed. In order to explore whether the possible correlation is disturbed or not, we simulate the arrival distribution of the highest energy protons (HEPs) with energies above $6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV taking 4 different GMF models into account and investigate the cross-correlation between the protons and sources assumed in the simulation. We show that the error of cross-correlation function adopted in this study is sufficiently small by accumulating 200 events. We also find that the correlation is not disturbed largely in many cases after 200 events accumulation and positive signals of the correlation are significantly expected at angular scale of 3-5$^{\\circ}$. Only in the cases of the northern sky with axisymmetric spiral structures of GMF, the cross-correlation functions are consistent with no cor...

  18. A Combination of the Work Formalism for Exchange with an Optimized Correlation Energy Functional for Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, N. A.; Sen, K. D.; Alonso, J. A.; Balbás, L. C.

    1995-09-01

    The Harbola-Sahni formalism for the exchange potential of many-electron systems gives extremely accurate total energies for atoms (the energies are practically indistinguishable from the Hartree-Fock energies). We combine here this formalism with the usual density functional prescription for the correlation potential, using a recently developed optimized local correlation functional (Gritsenko O.V. et al., Phys. Rev. A 47 (1993) 1811). Numerical tests carried out for several closed shell atoms and ions indicate that the results preserve the accuracy of the exchange-only calculations. We expect the same behavior to hold true for large molecules and atomic clusters. However, similar tests for the He, Be and Ne isoelectronic series indicate that the optimized local correlation functional is not valid for highly ionized atoms.

  19. A Correlated Model for Evaluating Performance and Energy of Cloud System Given System Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious issue of energy consumption for high performance computing systems has attracted much attention. Performance and energy-saving have become important measures of a computing system. In the cloud computing environment, the systems usually allocate various resources (such as CPU, Memory, Storage, etc. on multiple virtual machines (VMs for executing tasks. Therefore, the problem of resource allocation for running VMs should have significant influence on both system performance and energy consumption. For different processor utilizations assigned to the VM, there exists the tradeoff between energy consumption and task completion time when a given task is executed by the VMs. Moreover, the hardware failure, software failure and restoration characteristics also have obvious influences on overall performance and energy. In this paper, a correlated model is built to analyze both performance and energy in the VM execution environment given the reliability restriction, and an optimization model is presented to derive the most effective solution of processor utilization for the VM. Then, the tradeoff between energy-saving and task completion time is studied and balanced when the VMs execute given tasks. Numerical examples are illustrated to build the performance-energy correlated model and evaluate the expected values of task completion time and consumed energy.

  20. Correlation between surface free energy and anchoring energy of 6CHBT on polyimide surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Jerzy; Okulska-Bozek, Malgorzata; Kedzierski, Jerzy; Kojdecki, Marek A.

    2002-06-01

    Polyimides were prepared in the classical two-step method via poly(amic acids). Poly(amic acids) were obtained from 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA), 4,4'- (hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride (6FDA), pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA), 3,3',4,4'- diphenylsulfonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (DSDA), 4,4'- oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA) and amines 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA), 1,3-phenylenediamine (MPD), 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD), 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA), 4,4'- ethylenedianiline (DAB), 2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3- phenylenediamine (TMPD), 4-methyl-1,3-phenylenediamine (MMPD) and 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DAD) in dimethylformamide. The indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass plates were spin-coated with the poly(amic acids) solutions and dried. A thermal imidization process was then carried out at 250 degree(s)C for 4 h. In this study the anchoring energies of 6CHBT molecules were evaluated on rubbing aligning layers of PI films. The polar anchoring energy coefficient was determined by wedge cell method. The surface free energy and its components of polyimide layers were determined by measuring the contact angles of water, ethylene glycol, formamide and diiodomethane drops on the rubbing polymer surfaces. The Lifshitz-van der Waals and acidic-basic components of surface free energies were found from van Oss equation.

  1. High-energy photoemission spectroscopy for investigating bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiyama, Akira, E-mail: sekiyama@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials Physics, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531, Osaka (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, Sayo 679-5148, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Progress of high-energy photoemission spectroscopy for investigating the bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated electron systems is reviewed. High-resolution soft X-ray photoemission has opened the door for revealing the bulk strongly correlated spectral functions overcoming the surface contributions. More bulk-sensitive hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) enables us to study the electronic structure with negligible surface contribution. The recent development of the polarization-dependent HAXPES is also described in this short review.

  2. Impact of nonlocal correlations over different energy scales: A dynamical vertex approximation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohringer, G.; Toschi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate how nonlocal correlations affect, selectively, the physics of correlated electrons over different energy scales, from the Fermi level to the band edges. This goal is achieved by applying a diagrammatic extension of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), the dynamical vertex approximation (D Γ A ), to study several spectral and thermodynamic properties of the unfrustrated Hubbard model in two and three dimensions. Specifically, we focus first on the low-energy regime by computing the electronic scattering rate and the quasiparticle mass renormalization for decreasing temperatures at a fixed interaction strength. This way, we obtain a precise characterization of the several steps through which the Fermi-liquid physics is progressively destroyed by nonlocal correlations. Our study is then extended to a broader energy range, by analyzing the temperature behavior of the kinetic and potential energy, as well as of the corresponding energy distribution functions. Our findings allow us to identify a smooth but definite evolution of the nature of nonlocal correlations by increasing interaction: They either increase or decrease the kinetic energy w.r.t. DMFT depending on the interaction strength being weak or strong, respectively. This reflects the corresponding evolution of the ground state from a nesting-driven (Slater) to a superexchange-driven (Heisenberg) antiferromagnet (AF), whose fingerprints are, thus, recognizable in the spatial correlations of the paramagnetic phase. Finally, a critical analysis of our numerical results of the potential energy at the largest interaction allows us to identify possible procedures to improve the ladder-based algorithms adopted in the dynamical vertex approximation.

  3. Correlation energies beyond the random-phase approximation: ISTLS applied to spherical atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjolander (ISTLS) correlation energy functional of Dobson, Wang and Gould [PRB {\\bf 66} 081108(R) (2008)] has proved to be excellent at predicting correlation energies in semi-homogeneous systems, showing promise as a robust `next step' fifth-rung functional by using dynamic correlation to go beyond the limitations of the direct random-phase approximation (dRPA), but with similar numerical scaling with system size. In this work we test the functional on fourteen spherically symmetric, neutral and charged atomic systems and find it gives excellent results (within 2mHa/$e^-$ except Be) for the absolute correlation energies of the neutral atoms tested, and good results for the ions (within 4mHa/$e^-$). In all cases it performs better than the dRPA. When combined with the previous successes, these new results point to the ISTLS functional being a prime contender for high-accuracy, benchmark DFT correlation energy calculations.

  4. Angular correlation between IceCube high-energy starting events and starburst sources

    CERN Document Server

    Moharana, Reetanjali

    2016-01-01

    Starburst galaxies and star-forming regions in the Milkyway, with high rate of supernova activities, are candidate sources of high-energy neutrinos. Using a gamma-ray selected sample of these sources we perform statistical analysis of their angular correlation with the four-year sample of high-energy starting events (HESE), detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. We find that the two samples (starburst galaxies and local star-forming regions) are correlated with cosmic neutrinos at $\\sim (2-3)\\sigma$ (pre-trial) significance level, when the full HESE sample with deposited energy $\\gtrsim 20$~TeV is considered. However when we consider the HESE sample with deposited energy $\\gtrsim 60$~TeV, which is almost free of atmospheric neutrino and muon backgrounds, the significance of correlation decreased drastically. We perform a similar study for Galactic sources in the 2FHL catalog as well, obtaining $\\sim (2-3)\\sigma$ (pre-trial) correlation, however the significance of correlation increases with higher cuto...

  5. Study of $b\\bar{b}$ correlations in high energy proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    Kinematic correlations for pairs of beauty hadrons, produced in high energy proton-proton collisions, are studied. The data sample used was collected with the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ The measurement is performed using inclusive $b\\rightarrow J/\\psi X$ decays in the rapidity range $2 < y^{J/\\psi} <4.5$. The observed correlations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  6. Dynamic Compression-Transmission for Energy-Harvesting Multihop Networks with Correlated Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tapparello, Cristiano; Rossi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Energy-harvesting wireless sensor networking is an emerging technology with applications to various fields such as environmental and structural health monitoring. A distinguishing feature of wireless sensors is the need to perform both source coding tasks, such as measurement and compression, and transmission tasks. It is known that the overall energy consumption for source coding is generally comparable to that of transmission, and that a joint design of the two classes of tasks can lead to relevant performance gains. Moreover, the efficiency of source coding in a sensor network can be potentially improved via distributed techniques by leveraging the fact that signals measured by different nodes are correlated. In this paper, a data gathering protocol for multihop wireless sensor networks with energy harvesting capabilities is studied whereby the sources measured by the sensors are correlated. Both the energy consumptions of source coding and transmission are modeled, and distributed source coding is assumed...

  7. Scaled Opposite Spin Second Order Moller-Plesset Correlation Energy: An Economical Electronic Structure Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yousung; Lochan, Rohini C.; Dutoi, Anthony D.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-08-02

    A simplified approach to treating the electron correlation energy is suggested in which only the alpha-beta component of the second order Moller-Plesset energy is evaluated, and then scaled by an empirical factor which is suggested to be 1.3. This scaled opposite spin second order energy (SOS-MP2) yields results for relative energies and derivative properties that are statistically improved over the conventional MP2 method. Furthermore, the SOS-MP2 energy can be evaluated without the 5th order computational steps associated with MP2 theory, even without exploiting any spatial locality. A 4th order algorithm is given for evaluating the opposite spin MP2 energy using auxiliary basis expansions, and a Laplace approach, and timing comparisons are given.

  8. Explicitly correlated intermolecular distances and interaction energies of hydrogen bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lane, Joseph R; Kjærgaard, Henrik G

    2009-01-01

    We have optimized the lowest energy structures and calculated interaction energies for the H(2)O-H(2)O, H(2)O-H(2)S, H(2)O-NH(3), and H(2)O-PH(3) dimers with the recently developed explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 methods and the associated VXZ-F12 (where X = D,T,Q) basis sets. For a given...

  9. Beam energy dependence of two-proton correlations at the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Panitkin, S Y; Alexander, J; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J; Chung, J; Cole, B; Crowe, K M; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Klay, J L; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L; Srivastava, B; Stone, N; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Yang, X; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the beam energy dependence of the two proton correlation function in central Au+Au collisions are performed by the E895 Collaboration at the BNL AGS. No significant changes with beam energy were observed. The imaging technique of Brown-Danielewicz is used in order to extract information about the space-time content of the proton source at freeze-out. Extracted source functions show peculiar enhancement at low relative separation.

  10. Dual energy computed tomography quantification of carotid plaques calcification: comparison between monochromatic and polychromatic energies with pathology correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannelli, Lorenzo [University of Washington, Departments of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Lawrence; Ferguson, Marina; Shuman, William P.; Xu, Dongxiang; Yuan, Chun; Mitsumori, Lee M. [University of Washington, Departments of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Mancini, Marcello; Ragucci, Monica; Monti, Serena [IRCCS Fondazione SDN, Naples (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    We compared carotid plaque calcification detection sensitivity and apparent cross-sectional area on CT as a function of CT beam energy using conventional CT techniques and virtual mono-energetic CT images generated from dual-energy acquisitions. Five ex-vivo carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens were imaged with dual-energy computed tomography. Virtual monochromatic spectrum (VMS) CT images were reconstructed at energies between 40-140 keV. The same specimens were imaged using conventional polyenergetic spectrum (PS) CT with peak beam energies 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. The histological calcium areas on each corresponding CEA specimen were traced manually on digitized images of Toluidine-Blue/Basic-Fuchsin stained plastic sections. 40 keV VMS CT images provided high detection sensitivity (97 %) similar to conventional PS CT images (∝96 %). The calcification size measured on CT decreased systematically with increasing CT beam energy; the rate of change was larger for the VMS images than for PS images. From a single dual-energy CT, multiple VMS-CT images can be generated, yielding equivalent detection sensitivity and size correlations as conventional PS-CT in CEA calcification imaging. VMS-CT at 80-100 keV provided the most accurate estimates of calcification size, as compared to histology, but detection sensitivity was reduced for smaller calcifications on these images. (orig.)

  11. Cross-Correlations between Energy and Emissions Markets: New Evidence from Fractal and Multifractal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Jin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We supply a new perspective to describe and understand the behavior of cross-correlations between energy and emissions markets. Namely, we investigate cross-correlations between oil and gas (Oil-Gas, oil and CO2 (Oil-CO2, and gas and CO2 (Gas-CO2 based on fractal and multifractal analysis. We focus our study on returns of the oil, gas, and CO2 during the period of April 22, 2005–April 30, 2013. In the empirical analysis, by using the detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA method, we find that cross-correlations for Oil-Gas, Oil-CO2, and Gas-CO2 obey a power-law and are weakly persistent. Then, we adopt the method of DCCA cross-correlation coefficient to quantify cross-correlations between energy and emissions markets. The results show that their cross-correlations are diverse at different time scales. Next, based on the multifractal DCCA method, we find that cross-correlated markets have the nonlinear and multifractal nature and that the multifractality strength for three cross-correlated markets is arranged in the order of Gas-CO2 > Oil-Gas > Oil-CO2. Finally, by employing the rolling windows method, which can be used to investigate time-varying cross-correlation scaling exponents, we analyze short-term and long-term market dynamics and find that the recent global financial crisis has a notable influence on short-term and long-term market dynamics.

  12. Azimuthal correlation functions and the energy of vanishing flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Cussol, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Patry, J.P.; Peter, J.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Buta, A.; Popescu, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire]|[Central Inst. of Physics, Bucharest (Romania). Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Auger, G.; Cabot, C.; Peghaire, A.; Saint-Laurent, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Cassagnou, Y.; Legrain, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; El Masri, Y. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Eudes, P.; Lebrun, C. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France). Lab. de Physique Nucleaire; Gonin, M.; Hagel, K.; Wada, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Cyclotron Inst.; Rosato, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy); He, Z.Y. [Lanzhou Univ., GS (China). Dept. of Modern Physics; Crema, E. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)]|[Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1994-06-01

    A novel method is proposed for studying the evolution of flow phenomena with the incident energy, and for quantitatively estimating the energy of vanishing flow (also called balance energy, E{sub bal}) without reconstructing the reaction plane. We used a method based on the shapes of experimental particle-particle azimuthal correlation functions to determine E{sub bal} for three systems: Ar + Al, Zn + Ti, Zn + Ni. We compare the results with estimations using flow parameter analysis and also with theoretical expectations. (authors). 25 refs.

  13. An Optimal Energy Estimator to Reduce Correlated Noise for the EXO-200 Light Readout

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Hall, C; Albert, J B; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Cen, W R; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Feyzbakhsh, S; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Krücken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Njoya, O; Nelson, R; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Retière, F; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2016-01-01

    The energy resolution of the EXO-200 detector is limited by electronics noise in the measurement of the scintillation response. Here we present a new technique to extract optimal scintillation energy measurements for signals split across multiple channels in the presence of correlated noise. The implementation of these techniques improves the energy resolution of the detector at the neutrinoless double beta decay Q-value from $\\left[1.9641\\pm 0.0039\\right]\\%$ to $\\left[1.5820\\pm 0.0044\\right]\\%$.

  14. Phase-transient hierarchical turbulence as an energy correlation generator of blazar light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, Mitsuru

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchical turbulent structure constituting a jet is considered to reproduce energy-dependent variability in blazars, particularly, the correlation between X- and gamma-ray light curves measured in the TeV blazar Markarian 421. The scale-invariant filaments are featured by the ordered magnetic fields that involve hydromagnetic fluctuations serving as electron scatterers for diffusive shock acceleration, and the spatial size scales are identified with the local maximum electron energies, which are reflected in the synchrotron spectral energy distribution (SED) above the near-infrared/optical break. The structural transition of filaments is found to be responsible for the observed change of spectral hysteresis.

  15. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H2, and eliminates delocalization errors in H2(+) and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies--competitive with the ph-RPA--with the correct R(-6) asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  16. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón-Boado, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fonte, R.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kopmann, A.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kümpel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Le Brun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nguyen Thi, T.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pçkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Ngoc, DiepPham; Ngoc, DongPham; Pham Thi, T. N.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Porter, T. A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Rídky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smetniansky De Grande, N.; Smialkowski, A.; Smída, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrated a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 6 × 1019 electron volts and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within ~75 megaparsecs. We rejected the hypoth

  17. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; Bg, S. J. de Jong; De La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; Garcia, B.; Gaimez, D. Garcia; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Herrero, R. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; do Amaral, M. Goncalves; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalezc, J. G.; Gonzalez, M.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A. F.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Larlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koanga, V. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; LeBrun, P.; Lee, J.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Lopez, R.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Aguera, A. Lopez; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Garcia, R. Luna; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mancarella, G.; Mancenido, M. E.; Mandatat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Falcon, H. R. Marquez; Martello, D.; Martinez, J.; Bravo, O. Martinez; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Martino, J. Rodriguez; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Roverok, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovanek, P.; Schuessler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; De Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdes; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest-energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [Pierre Auger Collaboration, Science 318 (2007) 938]. The c

  18. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A. F.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; García, R. Luna; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Falcon, H. R. Marquez; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PȩKala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; de Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdés; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2008-04-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest-energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [Pierre Auger Collaboration, Science 318 (2007) 938]. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than ˜6 × 1019 eV and AGN at a distance less than ˜75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified a priori, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest-energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen Zatsepin Kuz’min effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin disk of our galaxy. Our present data do not identify AGN as the sources of cosmic rays unambiguously, and other candidate sources which are distributed as nearby AGN are not ruled out. We discuss the prospect of unequivocal identification of individual sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays within a few years of continued operation of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón-Boado, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fonte, R.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kopmann, A.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kümpel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Le Brun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nguyen Thi, T.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pçkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Ngoc, DiepPham; Ngoc, DongPham; Pham Thi, T. N.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Porter, T. A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Rídky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smetniansky De Grande, N.; Smialkowski, A.; Smída, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrated a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 6 × 1019 electron volts and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within ~75 megaparsecs. We rejected the hypoth

  20. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; Bg, S. J. de Jong; De La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; Garcia, B.; Gaimez, D. Garcia; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Herrero, R. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; do Amaral, M. Goncalves; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalezc, J. G.; Gonzalez, M.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A. F.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Larlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koanga, V. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; LeBrun, P.; Lee, J.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Lopez, R.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Aguera, A. Lopez; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Garcia, R. Luna; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mancarella, G.; Mancenido, M. E.; Mandatat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Falcon, H. R. Marquez; Martello, D.; Martinez, J.; Bravo, O. Martinez; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Martino, J. Rodriguez; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Roverok, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovanek, P.; Schuessler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; De Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdes; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest-energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [Pierre Auger Collaboration, Science 318 (2007) 938]. The c

  1. Communication: Thermodynamics of condensed matter with strong pressure-energy correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Bøhling, Lasse; Schrøder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We show that for any liquid or solid with strong correlation between its NVT virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations, the temperature is a product of a function of excess entropy per particle and a function of density, T = f(s)h(ρ). This implies that (1) the system's isomorphs (curve...

  2. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration, The Pierre auger

    2007-12-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [1]. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than {approx} 6 x 10{sup 19} eV and AGN at a distance less than {approx} 75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified a priori, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin disk of our galaxy. Our present data do not identify AGN as the sources of cosmic rays unambiguously, and other candidate sources which are distributed as nearby AGN are not ruled out. We discuss the prospect of unequivocal identification of individual sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays within a few years of continued operation of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  3. Lorentz factor - Beaming corrected energy/luminosity correlations and GRB central engine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2017-03-01

    We work on a GRB sample whose initial Lorentz factors (Γ0) are constrained by the afterglow onset method and the jet opening angles (θj) are determined by the jet break time. We confirm the Γ0-Eγ,iso correlation by Liang et al. (2010), and the Γ0-Lγ,iso correlation by Lü et al. (2012). Furthermore, we find correlations between Γ0 and the beaming corrected γ-ray energy (Eγ) and mean γ-ray luminosity (Lγ). By also including the kinetic energy of the afterglow, we find rough correlations (with larger scatter) between Γ0 and the total (γ-ray plus kinetic) energy and the total mean luminosity, both for isotropic values and beaming corrected values: these correlations allow us to test the data with GRB central engine models. Limiting our sample to the GRBs that likely have a black hole central engine, we compare the data with theoretical predictions of two types of jet launching mechanisms from BHs, i.e. the non-magnetized ν ν bar -annihilation mechanism, and the strongly magnetized Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We find that the data are more consistent with the latter mechanism, and discuss the implications of our findings for GRB jet composition.

  4. Energy and energy gradient matrix elements with N-particle explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions with L=1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2008-03-21

    In this work we consider explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions for expanding the wave function of an N-particle system with the L=1 total orbital angular momentum. We derive analytical expressions for various matrix elements with these basis functions including the overlap, kinetic energy, and potential energy (Coulomb interaction) matrix elements, as well as matrix elements of other quantities. The derivatives of the overlap, kinetic, and potential energy integrals with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters are also derived and used to calculate the energy gradient. All the derivations are performed using the formalism of the matrix differential calculus that facilitates a way of expressing the integrals in an elegant matrix form, which is convenient for the theoretical analysis and the computer implementation. The new method is tested in calculations of two systems: the lowest P state of the beryllium atom and the bound P state of the positronium molecule (with the negative parity). Both calculations yielded new, lowest-to-date, variational upper bounds, while the number of basis functions used was significantly smaller than in previous studies. It was possible to accomplish this due to the use of the analytic energy gradient in the minimization of the variational energy.

  5. CGC/saturation approach for soft interactions at high energy: long range rapidity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotsman, E.; Maor, U. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Levin, E. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria and Centro Cientifico- Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Departemento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper we continue our program to construct a model for high energy soft interactions that is based on the CGC/saturation approach. The main result of this paper is that we have discovered a mechanism that leads to large long range rapidity correlations and results in large values of the correlation function R(y{sub 1}, y{sub 2}) ≥ 1, which is independent of y{sub 1} and y{sub 2}. Such a behavior of the correlation function provides strong support for the idea that at high energies the system of partons that is produced is not only dense but also has strong attractive forces acting between the partons. (orig.)

  6. The scaling limit of the energy correlations in non integrable Ising models

    CERN Document Server

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2012-01-01

    We obtain an explicit expression for the multipoint energy correlations of a non solvable two-dimensional Ising models with nearest neighbor ferromagnetic interactions plus a weak finite range interaction of strength $\\lambda$, in a scaling limit in which we send the lattice spacing to zero and the temperature to the critical one. Our analysis is based on an exact mapping of the model into an interacting lattice fermionic theory, which generalizes the one originally used by Schultz, Mattis and Lieb for the nearest neighbor Ising model. The interacting model is then analyzed by a multiscale method first proposed by Pinson and Spencer. If the lattice spacing is finite, then the correlations cannot be computed in closed form: rather, they are expressed in terms of infinite, convergent, power series in $\\lambda$. In the scaling limit, these infinite expansions radically simplify and reduce to the limiting energy correlations of the integrable Ising model, up to a finite renormalization of the parameters. Explicit...

  7. Correlation, Breit and Quantum Electrodynamics effects on energy level and transition properties of W54+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaobin; Sun, Rui; Koike, Fumihiro; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Dong, Chenzhong

    2017-03-01

    The electron correlation effects and Breit interaction as well as Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) effects were expected to have important contribution to the energy level and transition properties of heavy highly charged ions. The ground states [Ne]3 s 23 p 63 d 2 and first excited states [Ne]3 s 23 p 53 d 3 of W54+ ion have been studied by using Multi-Configuration Dirac-Fock method with the implementation of Grasp2K package. A restricted active space method was employed to investigate the correlation contribution from different models. The Breit interaction and QED effects were taken into account in the relativistic configuration interaction calculation with the converged wavefunction. It is found that the correlation contribution from 3 s and 3 p orbital have important contribution to the energy level, transition wavelength and probability of the ground and the first excited state of W54+ ion.

  8. Quantum Transfer Energy and Nonlocal Correlation in a Dimer with Time-Dependent Coupling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; Berrada, K.; Haddon, Robert C.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Al-Heniti, Saleh H.; Raffah, Bahaaudin M.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of coherence phenomenon due to the interference of probability amplitude terms, is one of the most important features of quantum mechanics theory. Recent experiments show the presence of quantum processes whose coherence provided over suddenly large interval-time. In particular, photosynthetic mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes provide oscillatory behaviors in quantum mechanics due to quantum coherence. In this work, we investigate the coherent quantum transfer energy for a single-excitation and nonlocal correlation in a dimer system modelled by a two-level atom system with and without time-dependent coupling effect. We analyze and explore the required conditions that are feasible with real experimental realization for optimal transfer of quantum energy and generation of nonlocal quantum correlation. We show that the enhancement of the probability for a single-excitation transfer energy is greatly benefits from the combination of the energy detuning and time-dependent coupling effect. We investigate the presence of quantum correlations in the dimer using the entanglement of formation. We also find that the entanglement between the donor and acceptor is very sensitive to the physical parameters and it can be generated during the coherent energy transfer. On the other hand, we study the dynamical behavior of the quantum variance when performing a measurement on an observable of the density matrix operator. Finally, an interesting relationship between the transfer probability, entanglement and quantum variance is explored during the time evolution in terms of the physical parameters.

  9. Correlation between Dual-Energy and Perfusion CT in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert D; Krauss, Bernhard; Klotz, Ernst; Desbiolles, Lotus; Lesurtel, Mickaël; Müllhaupt, Beat; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To develop a dual-energy contrast media-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) protocol by using time-attenuation curves from previously acquired perfusion CT data and to evaluate prospectively the relationship between iodine enhancement metrics at dual-energy CT and perfusion CT parameters in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Institutional review board and local ethics committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. The retrospective part of this study included the development of a dual-energy CT contrast-enhanced protocol to evaluate peak arterial enhancement of HCC in the liver on the basis of time-attenuation curves from previously acquired perfusion CT data in 20 patients. The prospective part of the study consisted of an intraindividual comparison of dual-energy CT and perfusion CT data in another 20 consecutive patients with HCC. Iodine density and iodine ratio (iodine attenuation of the lesion divided by iodine attenuation in the aorta) from dual-energy CT and arterial perfusion (AP), portal venous perfusion, and total perfusion (TP) from perfusion CT were compared. Pearson R and linear correlation coefficients were calculated for AP and iodine density, AP and iodine ratio, TP and iodine density, and TP and iodine ratio. Results The dual-energy CT protocol consisted of bolus tracking in the abdominal aorta (threshold, 150 HU; scan delay, 9 seconds). The strongest intraindividual correlations in HCCs were found between iodine density and AP (r = 0.75, P = .0001). Moderate correlations were found between iodine ratio and AP (r = 0.50, P = .023) and between iodine density and TP (r = 0.56, P = .011). No further significant correlations were found. The volume CT dose index (11.4 mGy) and dose-length product (228.0 mGy · cm) of dual-energy CT was lower than those of the arterial phase of perfusion CT (36.1 mGy and 682.3 mGy · cm, respectively). Conclusion A contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT protocol developed

  10. Approximations to complete basis set-extrapolated, highly correlated non-covalent interaction energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Iain D.; DiLabio, Gino A.

    2011-10-01

    The first-principles calculation of non-covalent (particularly dispersion) interactions between molecules is a considerable challenge. In this work we studied the binding energies for ten small non-covalently bonded dimers with several combinations of correlation methods (MP2, coupled-cluster single double, coupled-cluster single double (triple) (CCSD(T))), correlation-consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVXZ, X = D, T, Q), two-point complete basis set energy extrapolations, and counterpoise corrections. For this work, complete basis set results were estimated from averaged counterpoise and non-counterpoise-corrected CCSD(T) binding energies obtained from extrapolations with aug-cc-pVQZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. It is demonstrated that, in almost all cases, binding energies converge more rapidly to the basis set limit by averaging the counterpoise and non-counterpoise corrected values than by using either counterpoise or non-counterpoise methods alone. Examination of the effect of basis set size and electron correlation shows that the triples contribution to the CCSD(T) binding energies is fairly constant with the basis set size, with a slight underestimation with CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ compared to the value at the (estimated) complete basis set limit, and that contributions to the binding energies obtained by MP2 generally overestimate the analogous CCSD(T) contributions. Taking these factors together, we conclude that the binding energies for non-covalently bonded systems can be accurately determined using a composite method that combines CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ with energy corrections obtained using basis set extrapolated MP2 (utilizing aug-cc-pVQZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets), if all of the components are obtained by averaging the counterpoise and non-counterpoise energies. With such an approach, binding energies for the set of ten dimers are predicted with a mean absolute deviation of 0.02 kcal/mol, a maximum absolute deviation of 0.05 kcal/mol, and a mean percent

  11. Environmental correlation effects on excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies of energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes have revealed a subtle interplay between coherent and decoherent dynamic contributions to the overall transfer efficiency in these open quantum systems. In this work we systematically investigate the impact of temporal and spatial correlations in environmental fluctuations on excitation transport in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex. We demonstrate that the exact nature of the correlations can have a large impact on the efficiency of light harvesting. In particular, we find that spatial correlations can enhance coherences in the site basis while at the same time slowing transport, and that the overall efficiency of transport is maximized at a finite temporal correlation that results in optimal driving of transitions between excitonic states.

  12. Correlates of University Students’ Soft and Energy Drink Consumption According to Gender and Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Deliens

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed personal and environmental correlates of Belgian university students’ soft and energy drink consumption and investigated whether these associations were moderated by gender or residency. Four hundred twenty-five university students completed a self-reported on-line questionnaire assessing socio-demographics, health status, soft and energy drink consumption, as well as personal and environmental factors related to soft and energy drink consumption. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Students believing soft drink intake should be minimized (individual subjective norm, finding it less difficult to avoid soft drinks (perceived behavioral control, being convinced they could avoid soft drinks in different situations (self-efficacy, having family and friends who rarely consume soft drinks (modelling, and having stricter family rules about soft drink intake were less likely to consume soft drinks. Students showing stronger behavioral control, having stricter family rules about energy drink intake, and reporting lower energy drink availability were less likely to consume energy drinks. Gender and residency moderated several associations between psychosocial constructs and consumption. Future research should investigate whether interventions focusing on the above personal and environmental correlates can indeed improve university students’ beverage choices.

  13. Correlates of University Students’ Soft and Energy Drink Consumption According to Gender and Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed personal and environmental correlates of Belgian university students’ soft and energy drink consumption and investigated whether these associations were moderated by gender or residency. Four hundred twenty-five university students completed a self-reported on-line questionnaire assessing socio-demographics, health status, soft and energy drink consumption, as well as personal and environmental factors related to soft and energy drink consumption. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Students believing soft drink intake should be minimized (individual subjective norm), finding it less difficult to avoid soft drinks (perceived behavioral control), being convinced they could avoid soft drinks in different situations (self-efficacy), having family and friends who rarely consume soft drinks (modelling), and having stricter family rules about soft drink intake were less likely to consume soft drinks. Students showing stronger behavioral control, having stricter family rules about energy drink intake, and reporting lower energy drink availability were less likely to consume energy drinks. Gender and residency moderated several associations between psychosocial constructs and consumption. Future research should investigate whether interventions focusing on the above personal and environmental correlates can indeed improve university students’ beverage choices. PMID:26258790

  14. Correlates of University Students' Soft and Energy Drink Consumption According to Gender and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2015-08-06

    This study assessed personal and environmental correlates of Belgian university students' soft and energy drink consumption and investigated whether these associations were moderated by gender or residency. Four hundred twenty-five university students completed a self-reported on-line questionnaire assessing socio-demographics, health status, soft and energy drink consumption, as well as personal and environmental factors related to soft and energy drink consumption. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Students believing soft drink intake should be minimized (individual subjective norm), finding it less difficult to avoid soft drinks (perceived behavioral control), being convinced they could avoid soft drinks in different situations (self-efficacy), having family and friends who rarely consume soft drinks (modelling), and having stricter family rules about soft drink intake were less likely to consume soft drinks. Students showing stronger behavioral control, having stricter family rules about energy drink intake, and reporting lower energy drink availability were less likely to consume energy drinks. Gender and residency moderated several associations between psychosocial constructs and consumption. Future research should investigate whether interventions focusing on the above personal and environmental correlates can indeed improve university students' beverage choices.

  15. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez, C; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Argiro, S; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Backer, T; Badagnani, D; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Ben Zvi, S; Bérat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohaov, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceico, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; De Mello-Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Fernández, A; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipi, A; Fleck, ccI; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fulgione, W; Garca, B; Garca Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, i G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gomez Berisso, M; Gmez Herrero, R; Gonalves, P; Goncalvesdo Amaral, M; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Gora, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A F; Grunfeld, C; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutirrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hauschildt, T; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Horandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovsky, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kgl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Le Brun, P; Lee, J; Leiguide Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; López-Aguera, A; LozanoBahilo, J; Luna Garca, R; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mancarella, G; Mancenido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Martello, D; Martínez, J; Martinez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, ii J A J; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, M C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menschikov, A; Meurer, Chr; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostaf, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, a S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Noka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Diep Pham Ngoc Dong Pham Ngoc; Pham Thi, T N; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Porter, T A; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, A; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivi`re, C; Rizi, V; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Rodrguez Fras, D; Rodríguez-Martino, J; RodrigueziiRojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Rouill-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovnek, P; Schussler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, i G; Smetniansky De Grande, N; Smialkowski, A; Smda, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Takahashi, J; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tacu, O; Tcaciuc, R; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tom, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Torresi, D; Travnicek, P; Tripathi, A; Tristram, G; Tscherniakhovski, D; Tueros, M; Tunnicliffe, V; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valds Galicia, J F; Valino, I; Valore, e L; vanden Berg, A M; van Elewyck, V; Vázquez, R A; Veberi, D; Veiga, A; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, cM; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walker, P; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zech, A; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2007-01-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) \\cite{science}. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than ~ 6x10^{19}$ eV and AGN at a distance less than ~ 75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified {\\em a priori}, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin d...

  16. The Multiscale Fluctuations of the Correlation between Oil Price and Wind Energy Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shupei Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is considered a clear and sustainable substitution for fossil fuel, and the stock index of the wind energy industry is closely related to the oil price fluctuation. Their relationship is characterized by multiscale and time-varying features based on a variety of stakeholders who have different objectives within various time horizons, which makes it difficult to identify the factor in which time scale could be the most influential one in the market. Aiming to explore the correlation between oil price and the wind energy stock index from the time–frequency domain in a dynamic perspective, we propose an algorithm combining the wavelet transform, complex network, and gray correlation analyses and choose the Brent oil price and the international securities exchange (ISE global wind energy index from January 2006 to October 2015 in daily frequency as data sample. First, we define the multiscale conformation by a set of fluctuation information with different time horizons to represent the fluctuation status of the correlation of the oil–wind nexus rather than by a single original correlation value. Then, we transform the multiscale conformation evolution into a network model, and only 270 multiscale conformations and 710 transmissions could characterize 2451 data points. We find that only 30% of conformations and transmissions work as a backbone of the entire correlation series; through these major conformations, we identify that the main factor that could influence the oil–wind nexus are long-term components, such as policies, the status of the global economy and demand–supply issues. In addition, there is a clustering effect and transmissions among conformations that mainly happen inside clusters and rarely among clusters, which means the interaction of the oil–wind nexus is stable over a short period of time.

  17. Thyroid hormones correlate with resting metabolic rate, not daily energy expenditure, in two charadriiform seabirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H. Elliott

    2013-04-01

    Thyroid hormones affect in vitro metabolic intensity, increase basal metabolic rate (BMR in the lab, and are sometimes correlated with basal and/or resting metabolic rate (RMR in a field environment. Given the difficulty of measuring metabolic rate in the field—and the likelihood that capture and long-term restraint necessary to measure metabolic rate in the field jeopardizes other measurements—we examined the possibility that circulating thyroid hormone levels were correlated with RMR in two free-ranging bird species with high levels of energy expenditure (the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, and thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia. Because BMR and daily energy expenditure (DEE are purported to be linked, we also tested for a correlation between thyroid hormones and DEE. We examined the relationships between free and bound levels of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 with DEE and with 4-hour long measurements of post-absorptive and thermoneutral resting metabolism (resting metabolic rate; RMR. RMR but not DEE increased with T3 in both species; both metabolic rates were independent of T4. T3 and T4 were not correlated with one another. DEE correlated with body mass in kittiwakes but not in murres, presumably owing to the larger coefficient of variation in body mass during chick rearing for the more sexually dimorphic kittiwakes. We suggest T3 provides a good proxy for resting metabolism but not DEE in these seabird species.

  18. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment.

  19. Is the Accuracy of Density Functional Theory for Atomization Energies and Densities in Bonding Regions Correlated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Pak, Michael V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-05-04

    The development of approximate exchange-correlation functionals is critical for modern density functional theory. A recent analysis of atomic systems suggested that some modern functionals are straying from the path toward the exact functional because electron densities are becoming less accurate while energies are becoming more accurate since the year 2000. To investigate this trend for more chemically relevant systems, the electron densities in the bonding regions and the atomization energies are analyzed for a series of diatomic molecules with 90 different functionals. For hybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals developed since the year 2000, the errors in densities and atomization energies are decoupled; the accuracy of the energies remains relatively consistent while the accuracy of the densities varies significantly. Such decoupling is not observed for generalized gradient and meta-generalized gradient approximation functionals. Analysis of electron densities in bonding regions is found to be important for the evaluation of functionals for chemical systems.

  20. Water-Energy Correlations: Analysis of Water Technologies, Processes and Systems in Rural and Urban India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murumkar, A. R.; Gupta, S.; Kaurwar, A.; Satankar, R. K.; Mounish, N. K.; Pitta, D. S.; Virat, J.; Kumar, G.; Hatte, S.; Tripathi, R. S.; Shedekar, V.; George, K. J.; Plappally, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    In India, the present value of water, both potable and not potable, bears no relation to the energy of water production. However, electrical energy spent on ground water extraction alone is equivalent to the nation's hydroelectric capacity of 40.1 GWh. Likewise, desalinating 1m3 water of the Bay of Bengal would save three times the energy for potable ground water extraction along the coast of the Bay. It is estimated that every second woman in rural India expends 0.98 kWhe/m3/d for bringing water for household needs. Yet, the water-energy nexus remains to be a topic which is gravely ignored. This is largely caused by factors such as lack of awareness, defective public policies, and intrusive cultural practices. Furthermore, there are instances of unceasing dereliction towards water management and maintenance of the sparsely distributed water and waste water treatment plants across the country. This pollutes the local water across India apart from other geogenic impurities. Additionally, product aesthetics and deceptive advertisements take advantage of the abulia generated by users' ignorance of technical specifications of water technologies and processes in mismanagement of water use. Accordingly, urban residents are tempted to expend on energy intensive water technologies at end use. This worsens the water-energy equation at urban households. Cooking procedures play a significant role in determining the energy expended on water at households. The paper also evaluates total energy expense involved in cultivating some major Kharif and Rabi crops. Manual and traditional agricultural practices are more prominent than mechanized and novel agricultural techniques. The specific energy consumption estimate for different water technologies will help optimize energy expended on water in its life cycles. The implication of the present study of water-energy correlation will help plan and extend water management infrastructure at different locations across India.

  1. Correlations between the dynamics of parallel tempering and the free-energy landscape in spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a large-scale numerical study of the equilibrium three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass with Gaussian disorder. Using parallel tempering (replica exchange) Monte Carlo we measure various static, as well as dynamical quantities, such as the autocorrelation times and round-trip times for the parallel tempering Monte Carlo method. The correlation between static and dynamic observables for 5000 disorder realizations and up to 1000 spins down to temperatures at 20% of the critical temperature is examined. Our results show that autocorrelation times are directly correlated with the roughness of the free-energy landscape.

  2. Energy-dependent correlations in the S-matrix of chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    The M-dimensional unitary matrix S(E), which describes scattering of waves, is a strongly fluctuating function of the energy for complex systems such as ballistic cavities, whose geometry induces chaotic ray dynamics. Its statistical behaviour can be expressed by means of correlation functions of the kind , which have been much studied within the random matrix approach. In this work, we consider correlations involving an arbitrary number of matrix elements and express them as infinite series in 1/M, whose coefficients are rational functions of ɛ. From a mathematical point of view, this may be seen as a generalization of the Weingarten functions of circular ensembles.

  3. Alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies in range-separated density-functional perturbation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornaton, Y.; Stoyanova, A.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    An alternative separation of short-range exchange and correlation energies is used in the framework of second-order range-separated density-functional perturbation theory. This alternative separation was initially proposed by Toulouse and relies on a long-range-interacting wave function instead...... expression when expanded in perturbation theory. In contrast to the usual RSDH functionals, RSDHf describes the coupling between long- and short-range correlations as an orbital-dependent contribution. Calculations on the first four noble-gas dimers show that this coupling has a significant effect...

  4. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, S.A. (Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  5. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, S.A. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fawcett, E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  6. Alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies in range-separated density-functional perturbation theory

    OpenAIRE

    Cornaton, Yann; Stoyanova, Alexandrina; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    An alternative separation of short-range exchange and correlation energies is used in the framework of second-order range-separated density-functional perturbation theory. This alternative separation was initially proposed by Toulouse et al. [Theor. Chem. Acc. 114, 305 (2005)] and relies on a long-range interacting wavefunction instead of the non-interacting Kohn-Sham one. When second-order corrections to the density are neglected, the energy expression reduces to a range-separated double-hyb...

  7. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  8. Correlation of the Highest-Energy Cosmic Rays with Nearby Extragalactic Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón-Boado, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fonte, R.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kopmann, A.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kümpel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Le Brun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nguyen Thi, T.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pçkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Ngoc, DiepPham; Ngoc, DongPham; Pham Thi, T. N.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Porter, T. A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Rídky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smetniansky De Grande, N.; Smialkowski, A.; Smída, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2007-11-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrated a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 6 × 1019 electron volts and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within ~75 megaparsecs. We rejected the hypothesis of an isotropic distribution of these cosmic rays with at least a 99% confidence level from a prescribed a priori test. The correlation we observed is compatible with the hypothesis that the highest-energy particles originate from nearby extragalactic sources whose flux has not been substantially reduced by interaction with the cosmic background radiation. AGN or objects having a similar spatial distribution are possible sources.

  9. Testing the Correlation of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with High Redshift Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sigl, G; Anchordoqui, L A; Romero, G; Sigl, Guenter; Torres, Diego; Anchordoqui, Luis; Romero, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    We study the correlation between compact radio quasars and ultra-high energy cosmic rays using an updated list of air shower detections. We estimate the level of positional correlation between both samples and the probability of pure chance association through simulations of random sets of synthetic cosmic ray events. We find that there are no reasons to claim for a physical association and that some previous results appear to be an effect of the small size of the sample used. This is also true when, instead of compact radio quasars, 3EG gamma-ray blazars are considered. Consequently, unless somehow severely deflected, it is unlikely that the high energy CR primaries are new particles or particles with new interactions beyond the electroweak scale, produced in high-redshift active galactic nuclei.

  10. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez, C; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barbosa, A F; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Benzvi, S; Berat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohácová, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazón-Boado, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Cronin, J; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; de Mello Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Selva, A Della; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; Dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Fernández, A; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fulgione, W; García, B; García Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Herrero, R Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonçalves do Amaral, M; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A; Grunfeld, C; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hauschildt, T; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovsky, M; Huege, T; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D-H; Kopmann, A; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kümpel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Lopez Agüera, A; Lozano Bahilo, J; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Malek, M; Mancarella, G; Manceñido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Martello, D; Martínez, J; Martínez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, M C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menschikov, A; Meurer, Chr; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Thi, T Nguyen; Nierstenhöfer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Ngoc, Dieppham; Ngoc, Dongpham; Pham Thi, T N; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Porter, T A; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Rodríguez Frías, D; Rodriguez Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovánek, P; Schüssler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; De Grande, N Smetniansky; Smialkowski, A; Smída, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H

    2007-11-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrated a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 6 x 10(19) electron volts and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within approximately 75 megaparsecs. We rejected the hypothesis of an isotropic distribution of these cosmic rays with at least a 99% confidence level from a prescribed a priori test. The correlation we observed is compatible with the hypothesis that the highest-energy particles originate from nearby extragalactic sources whose flux has not been substantially reduced by interaction with the cosmic background radiation. AGN or objects having a similar spatial distribution are possible sources.

  11. Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /CNEA, Buenos Aires /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.

    2007-11-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrate that there is a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above {approx} 6 x 10{sup 19} eV and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within {approx} 75 Mpc. We reject the hypothesis of an isotropic distribution of these cosmic rays at over 99% confidence level from a prescribed a priori test. The correlation we observe is compatible with the hypothesis that the highest energy particles originate from nearby extragalactic sources whose flux has not been significantly reduced by interaction with the cosmic background radiation. AGN or objects having a similar spatial distribution are possible sources.

  12. Metabolic energy correlates of heart rate variability spectral power associated with a 900-calorie challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Richard M; Austin, Rachel E; Hatcher, Mark D; Bond, Vernon; Goring, Kim L

    2011-01-01

    We studied healthy males challenged with a 900 Cal test beverage and correlated EE with the raw (ms(2)) and normalized units (nu) of total power (TP), low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) and VLF spectral power of heart rate variability (HRV). The correlations were evaluated during 20 min of normal breathing (NB, control) and 20 min of paced breathing (PB) at 12 breaths·min(-1) (0.2 Hz). EE was not significantly correlated with any of the HRV variables before the metabolic challenge. After the challenge, EE was positively correlated with LF/HF and with VLF; VLF was also positively correlated with LF/HF during both NB and PB. These findings suggest that EE may be a correlate of LF/HF and of VLF spectral power of HRV in healthy adolescent/young adult males. The association of lower resting energy expenditure with lower amounts of VLF spectral power may occur in individuals with predilections for obese phenotypes.

  13. Metabolic Energy Correlates of Heart Rate Variability Spectral Power Associated with a 900-Calorie Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Millis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied healthy males challenged with a 900 Cal test beverage and correlated EE with the raw (ms2 and normalized units (nu of total power (TP, low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF and VLF spectral power of heart rate variability (HRV. The correlations were evaluated during 20 min of normal breathing (NB, control and 20 min of paced breathing (PB at 12 breaths⋅min−1 (0.2 Hz. EE was not significantly correlated with any of the HRV variables before the metabolic challenge. After the challenge, EE was positively correlated with LF/HF and with VLF; VLF was also positively correlated with LF/HF during both NB and PB. These findings suggest that EE may be a correlate of LF/HF and of VLF spectral power of HRV in healthy adolescent/young adult males. The association of lower resting energy expenditure with lower amounts of VLF spectral power may occur in individuals with predilections for obese phenotypes.

  14. Simple estimation of electron correlation energy for multi-atomic strong ionic compounds KX and (KX)2 (X = OH, NC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禚淑苹; 韦吉崇; 陈德展; 居冠之

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the calculations and analyses of the intrapair and interpair correlation energy of KX (X = OH, NC) molecules and the results of the transferability of both the innermost intrapair correlation energy and the inner core effect of K and X in KX molecules, we defined and calculated the Kδ+ and Xδ-correlation contributions to the total correlation energy of KX molecules. With the comparison of the pair correlation energy of K+, X-and KX systems, we present a simple estimation method to estimate the electron correlation energy of strong ionic compound by summarizing the correlation energy of its constituent ion and ionic group. By using this simple method, the reasonable estimation results of the correlation energy of (KOH)2 and (KNC)2 have been obtained at mp2/6-311++G(d) level with Gaussian98 program, and the deviations are very small. Applying the scheme of "Separate Large System into Smaller Ones" to the calculation of electron correlation energy of large ionic compounds, it can not only save lot of computation work but also reach the chemical accuracy.

  15. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical

  16. The scaling limit of the energy correlations in non integrable Ising models

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We obtain an explicit expression for the multipoint energy correlations of a non solvable two-dimensional Ising models with nearest neighbor ferromagnetic interactions plus a weak finite range interaction of strength $\\lambda$, in a scaling limit in which we send the lattice spacing to zero and the temperature to the critical one. Our analysis is based on an exact mapping of the model into an interacting lattice fermionic theory, which generalizes the one originally used by Schultz, Mattis an...

  17. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an

  18. Numerical integration of exchange-correlation energies and potentials using transformed sparse grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Juan I; Thompson, David C; Ayers, Paul W; Köster, Andreas M

    2008-06-14

    A new numerical integration procedure for exchange-correlation energies and potentials is proposed and "proof of principle" results are presented. The numerical integration grids are built from sparse-tensor product grids (constructed according to Smolyak's prescription [Dokl. Akad. Nauk. 4, 240 (1963)] ) on the unit cube. The grid on the unit cube is then transformed to a grid over real space with respect to a weight function, which we choose to be the promolecular density. This produces a "whole molecule" grid, in contrast to conventional integration methods in density-functional theory, which use atom-in-molecule grids. The integration scheme was implemented in a modified version of the DEMON2K density-functional theory program, where it is used to evaluate integrals of the exchange-correlation energy density and the exchange-correlation potential. Ground-state energies and molecular geometries are accurately computed. The biggest advantages of the grid are its flexibility (it is easy to change the number and distribution of grid points) and its whole molecule nature. The latter feature is potentially helpful for basis-set-free computational algorithms.

  19. Diagnosing collisionless energy transfer using field-particle correlations: gyrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kristopher G.; Howes, Gregory G.; Tenbarge, Jason M.

    2017-08-01

    Determining the physical mechanisms that extract energy from turbulent fluctuations in weakly collisional magnetized plasmas is necessary for a more complete characterization of the behaviour of a variety of space and astrophysical plasmas. Such a determination is complicated by the complex nature of the turbulence as well as observational constraints, chiefly that in situ measurements of such plasmas are typically only available at a single point in space. Recent work has shown that correlations between electric fields and particle velocity distributions constructed from single-point measurements produce a velocity-dependent signature of the collisionless damping mechanism. We extend this work by constructing field-particle correlations using data sets drawn from single points in strongly driven, turbulent, electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations to demonstrate that this technique can identify the collisionless mechanisms operating in such systems. The velocity-space structure of the correlation between proton distributions and parallel electric fields agrees with expectations of resonant mechanisms transferring energy collisionlessly in turbulent systems. This work motivates the eventual application of field-particle correlations to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind, with the ultimate goal to determine the physical mechanisms that dissipate magnetized plasma turbulence.

  20. Fisher matrix forecast on cosmological parameters from the dark energy survey 2-point angular correlation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobreira, F.; Rosenfeld, R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. Fisica Teorica; Simoni, F. de; Costa, L.A.N. da; Gaia, M.A.G.; Ramos, B.; Ogando, R.; Makler, M. [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia (LIneA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We study the cosmological constraints expected for the upcoming project Dark Energy Survey (DES) with the full functional form of the 2-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation function model applied in this work includes the effects of linear redshift-space distortion, photometric redshift errors (assumed to be Gaussian) and non-linearities prevenient from gravitational infall. The Fisher information matrix is constructed with the full covariance matrix, which takes the correlation between nearby redshift shells in a proper manner. The survey was sliced into 20 redshift shells in the range 0:4 {<=} z {<=} 1:40 with a variable angular scale in order to search only the scale around the signal from the baryon acoustic oscillation, therefore well within the validity of the non-linear model employed. We found that under those assumptions and with a flat {Lambda}CDM WMAP7 fiducial model, the DES will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w with a precision of {approx} 20% and the cold dark matter with {approx} 11% when marginalizing over the other 25 parameters (bias is treated as a free parameter for each shell). When applying WMAP7 priors on {Omega}{sub baryon}, {Omega} c{sub dm}, n{sub s}, and HST priors on the Hubble parameter, w is constrained with {approx} 9% precision. This shows that the full shape of the angular correlation function with DES data will be a powerful probe to constrain cosmological parameters. (author)

  1. Vortical fluid and $\\Lambda$ spin correlations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Long-Gang; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Fermions become polarized in a vortical fluid due to spin-vorticity coupling. The spin polarization density is proportional to the local fluid vorticity at the next-to-leading order of a gradient expansion in a quantum kinetic theory. Spin correlations of two $\\Lambda$-hyperons can therefore reveal the vortical structure of the dense matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ a (3+1)D viscous hydrodynamic model with event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions from A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT) model to calculate the vorticity distributions and $\\Lambda$ spin correlations. The azimuthal correlation of the transverse spin is shown to have a cosine form plus an offset due to a circular structure of the transverse vorticity around the beam direction and global spin polarization. The longitudinal spin correlation shows a structure of vortex-pairing in the transverse plane due to the convective flow of hot spots in the radial direction. The dependence on colliding energy, rapidity, centrality and sensi...

  2. Foreign Direct Investment and Energy Supply in the Middle East and North Africa: A Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghali, Siddig

    Middle East and North Africa countries have been criticized for failing to utilize foreign direct investment energy resources efficiently. The changing of energy resources environment of the past decades with its growing emphasis on the importance of imminent energy supply challenges require strategists to consider different types of energy resources investment to improve energy supply. One type of energy investment will show effectiveness and efficiency in utilizing foreign direct investment in exposing RE, fossil fuels, natural gas, and reducing CO2 emissions. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to utilize foreign direct investment to predict total primary energy supply in the Middle East and North Africa region between 1971 and 2013. The study was conducted using a sample size of 43 years of energy supply resources and foreign direct investment from 1971 to 2013, which includes all of the years for which FDI is available. RE potential may equip Middle East and North Africa countries with sustainable and clean electricity for centuries to come, as non-renewable energy resources may not meet the demands globally and domestically or environmentally. As demands for fossil fuels grow, carbon emissions will increase. RE may be a better option of CO 2 emissions sequestration and will increase electricity to rural areas without government subsidies and complex decision-making policies. RE infrastructure will reduce water desalinization costs, cooling systems, and be useful in heating. Establishing concentrated solar power may be useful for the region cooperation, negotiations, and integration to share this energy. The alternative sought to fossil fuels was nuclear power. However, nuclear power depends on depleting, non-renewable uranium resources. The cost of uranium will increase if widely used and the presence of a nuclear plant in an unstable region is unsafe. Thus, renewable energy as a long-term option is efficient. A nonlinear regression

  3. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  4. The correlation of the energy resolution of incident light with the measured reflectance of multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯仕猛; 赵海鹰; 黄梅珍; 窦晓鸣

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an expression for describing the correlation of the energy resolution of incident light with the measured reflectance of multilayers, and gives a new method for calculating the polychromatic-light reflectance of multilayers. Using this method we give the reflectance spectrum of some multilayers in the case in which the incident light is polychromatic. The theoretical analysis shows that for the multilayers of a given design the peak reflectance of the polychromatic light is smaller than that of the monochromatic light, but no-peak reflectance of the polychromatic light is bigger than that of the monochromatic light. Further, the measured reflectance spectrum will be a line if the energy resolution is less than a decided value. The shorter the design-wavelength of the multilayer, the stronger the effect of the energy resolution on the reflectance.

  5. Fission-fragment energy correlation measurements for the spontaneous fission of /sup 244/Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caitucoli, F.; Leroux, B.; Barreau, G.; Sicre, A.; Doan, T.P. (Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Gradignan (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires); Asghar, M.; Hamadache, K.; Allab, M. (Centre des Sciences et de la Technologie Nucleaires, Algiers (Algeria))

    1983-02-28

    Fission-fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions and their correlations have been measured for the spontaneous fission of /sup 244/Cm. About 3.54 x 10/sup 5/ fission events were collected. The global mass distribution shows shoulders at ..mu..sub(H) approx.= 134 and ..mu..sub(H) approx.= 143-144. The peak/valley ratio is 86. The dip ..delta..Esub(K) value at symmetry is 13.4 +- 1.5 MeV. In the yields for high-kinetic-energy selected events, the masses 139 and 144 dominate. The results of /sup 244/Cm are compared with the other isotopes of Cm and discussed in terms of the structures present in the potential energy surface of the fissioning system caused by the structures in the nascent fragments.

  6. Global study of beyond-mean-field correlation energies in covariant energy density functional theory using a collective Hamiltonian method

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, K Q; Li, Z P; Yao, J M; Meng, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the first global study of dynamic correlation energies (DCEs) associated with rotational motion and quadrupole shape vibrational motion in a covariant energy density functional (CEDF) for 575 even-even nuclei with proton numbers ranging from $Z=8$ to $Z=108$ by solving a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian, the collective parameters of which are determined from triaxial relativistic mean-field plus BCS calculation using the PC-PK1 force. After taking into account these beyond mean-field DCEs, the root-mean-square (rms) deviation with respect to nuclear masses is reduced significantly down to 1.14 MeV, which is smaller than those of other successful CEDFs: NL3* (2.96 MeV), DD-ME2 (2.39 MeV), DD-ME$\\delta$ (2.29 MeV) and DD-PC1 (2.01 MeV). Moreover, the rms deviation for two-nucleon separation energies is reduced by $\\sim34\\%$ in comparison with cranking prescription.

  7. Rapidity and energy dependence of the electric charge correlations in A+A collisions at the SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Genchev, V; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kikola, D; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Nicolic, V; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Peryt, W; Pikna, M; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Pühlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Szuba, M; Szymanski, P; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Yoo, I K; Zimányi, J

    2007-01-01

    Results from electric charge correlations studied with the Balance Function method in A+A collisions from 20\\emph{A} to 158\\emph{A} GeV are presented in two different rapidity intervals: In the mid-rapidity region we observe a decrease of the width of the Balance Function distribution with increasing centrality of the collision, whereas this effect vanishes in the forward rapidity region. Results from the energy dependence study in central Pb+Pb collisions show that the narrowing of the Balance Function expressed by the normalised width parameter \\textit{W} increases with energy towards the highest SPS and RHIC energies. Finally we compare our experimental data points with predictions of several models. The hadronic string models UrQMD and HIJING do not reproduce the observed narrowing of the Balance Function. However, AMPT which contains a quark-parton transport phase before hadronization can reproduce the narrowing of the BF's width with centrality. This confirms the proposed sensitivity of the Balance Func...

  8. The effects of gap parameter and spin polarization on electronic Hartree and correlation energies of doped graphene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Hamed; Abdi, Ameneh

    2017-04-01

    We study the behaviors of both Hartree and correlation energies of undoped gapped armchair graphene nanoribbon using random phase approximation in the context of Hubbard model Hamiltonian. Specially, the effects of spin polarization and gap parameter on electron density dependence of Hartree and correlation energies of armchair graphene nanoribbon has been addressed. Our results show the variation of gap parameter leads to considerable effect on correlation and Hartree energy behavior of spin unpolarized gapped graphene in the middle electron density region. However local Hubbard interaction parameter affects the behaviors of Hartree and correlation energy on the whole range of electron density in zero magnetization case. We also show that a considerable reduction has been observed for density dependence of Hartree and correlation energies of spin polarized gapped graphene nanoribbon.

  9. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O2 adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N4 chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O2 adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O2 on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d(z(2)), d(xy), d(xz), and d(yz)) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O2 adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  10. The scaling limit of the energy correlations in non-integrable Ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Greenblatt, Rafael L.; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2012-09-01

    We obtain an explicit expression for the multipoint energy correlations of a non-solvable two-dimensional Ising models with nearest neighbor ferromagnetic interactions plus a weak finite range interaction of strength λ, in a scaling limit in which we send the lattice spacing to zero and the temperature to the critical one. Our analysis is based on an exact mapping of the model into an interacting lattice fermionic theory, which generalizes the one originally used by Schultz, Mattis, and Lieb for the nearest neighbor Ising model. The interacting model is then analyzed by a multiscale method first proposed by Pinson and Spencer. If the lattice spacing is finite, then the correlations cannot be computed in closed form: rather, they are expressed in terms of infinite, convergent, power series in λ. In the scaling limit, these infinite expansions radically simplify and reduce to the limiting energy correlations of the integrable Ising model, up to a finite renormalization of the parameters. Explicit bounds on the speed of convergence to the scaling limit are derived.

  11. Energy scan of correlations in p+p and Be+Be from NA61/SHINE

    CERN Document Server

    Seryakov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The existence of the critical point (CP) of strongly interacting matter is still an open problem. An extensive strong interactions program including a search of the CP and the study of the onset of deconfinement was started by the NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN SPS. A two dimensional scan of the phase diagram scan is performed to search for the CP and to shed light on the phase transition region. This program includes studies of hadron production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions measured in a wide range of colliding energy and system size. Correlations between various observables measured at midrapidity as well as in separated rapidity intervals are considered as additional and sensitive tools of this phase diagram scan. We present NA61/SHINE results of studies of energy dependence of two-particle correlations of pseudo-rapidity and azimuthal angle in p+p collisions at the SPS and the first results on correlations between multiplicity and mean transverse momentum in 7Be+9Be...

  12. Is there correlation between fine structure and dark energy cosmic dipoles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Antonio; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis (including redshift tomography) of the cosmic dipoles in the Keck+VLT quasar absorber and in the Union2 SnIa samples. We show that the fine structure constant cosmic dipole obtained through the Keck+VLT quasar absorber sample at 4.1σ level is anomalously aligned with the corresponding dark energy dipole obtained through the Union2 sample at 2σ level. The angular separation between the two dipole directions is 11.3°±11.8°. We use Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of obtaining the observed dipole magnitudes with the observed alignment, in the context of an isotropic cosmological model with no correlation between dark energy and fine structure constant α. We find that this probability is less than one part in 106. We propose a simple physical model (extended topological quintessence) which naturally predicts a spherical inhomogeneous distribution for both dark energy density and fine structure constant values. The model is based on the existence of a recently formed giant global monopole with Hubble scale core which also couples nonminimally to electromagnetism. Aligned dipole anisotropies would naturally emerge for an off-center observer for both the fine structure constant and for dark energy density. This model smoothly reduces to ΛCDM for proper limits of its parameters. Two predictions of this model are (a) a correlation between the existence of strong cosmic electromagnetic fields and the value of α and (b) the existence of a dark flow on Hubble scales due to the repulsive gravity of the global defect core (“Great Repulser”) aligned with the dark energy and α dipoles. The direction of the dark flow is predicted to be towards the spatial region of lower accelerating expansion. Existing data about the dark flow are consistent with this prediction.

  13. Enzymatic correlates of energy status in wild yellow perch inhabiting clean and contaminated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Charles; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    Enzymes representing a variety of metabolic pathways were examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from a metal-contaminated region (Rouyn-Noranda, Québec, Canada) to determine which were most closely related to fish condition factor, pyloric caeca weight, and visceral lipid accumulation, as well to seek a better understanding of the influence of metal contamination on the physiology and biometrics of perch. Compared to laboratory fish, wild perch were under important energy restrictions. The condition factor of wild fish was correlated with indicators of aerobic metabolism (citrate synthase, cytochrome C oxidase), protein anabolism (nucleoside diphosphokinase), and indicators of lipid accumulation (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, visceral lipid index). Pyloric caeca weights were well correlated with indicators of protein anabolism, but only when both seasons were examined together, possibly indicating a lag in the response of enzymes to changes in diet. The addition of contaminant stress to existing energy restrictions led to changes in the relationships between enzymes and biometrics, reducing the predictive power of the models for perch in contaminated lakes. The present study broadens our knowledge of the impact of metal contamination on energy accumulation and tissue metabolic capacities in wild perch. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  14. New approach to energy transfer and quantum correlations in a molecular dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, M.; Bagheri Harouni, M.; Roknizadeh, R.; Latifi, H.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of single-excitation energy transfer in a molecular dimer interacting with a phonon bath is studied. Although there are exact numerical solutions for this system, we propose an approach that provides exact analytical results with few electronic degrees of freedom. This approach is based on considering the phonon subsystem in the coherent state representation. Applying this approach, the long-lived coherence time is evaluated in the weak and strong coupling regimes. Moreover, by calculating the quantum entanglement and global quantum discord, the time evolution of quantum correlations is examined. The effects of two parameters, electronic coupling strength and bath temperature, on the energy transfer and quantum correlations are studied. It is shown, in agreement with previous results, that the long-lived coherence time in the weak coupling regime is longer than in the strong coupling regime. Also, the increasing bath temperature gives rise to faster delocalization of energy transfer. Furthermore, it is illustrated that the bath temperature has a significant effect on the quantum entanglement with respect to the global quantum discord.

  15. Exchange-correlation energy of a hole gas including valence band coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, P. A.; Wieldraaijer, H.; van der Weide, R.; Kemerink, M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Wolter, J. H.

    1997-08-01

    We have calculated an accurate exchange-correlation energy of a hole gas, including the complexities related to the valence band coupling as occurring in semiconductors like GaAs, but excluding the band warping. A parametrization for the dependence on the density and the ratio between light- and heavy-hole masses is given. We apply our results to a hole gas in an AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well and calculate the two-dimensional band structure and the band-gap renormalization. The inclusion of the valence band coupling in the calculation of the exchange-correlation potentials for holes and electrons leads to a much better agreement between theoretical and experimental data than when it is omitted.

  16. Correlations between Energy and Displacement Demands for Performance-Based Seismic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaioli, Fabrizio; Bruno, Silvia; Decanini, Luis; Saragoni, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    The development of a scientific framework for performance-based seismic engineering requires, among other steps, the evaluation of ground motion intensity measures at a site and the characterization of their relationship with suitable engineering demand parameters (EDPs) which describe the performance of a structure. In order to be able to predict the damage resulting from earthquake ground motions in a structural system, it is first necessary to properly identify ground motion parameters that are well correlated with structural response and, in turn, with damage. Since structural damage during an earthquake ground motion may be due to excessive deformation or to cumulative cyclic damage, reliable methods for estimating displacement demands on structures are needed. Even though the seismic performance is directly related to the global and local deformations of the structure, energy-based methodologies appear more helpful in concept, as they permit a rational assessment of the energy absorption and dissipation mechanisms that can be effectively accomplished to balance the energy imparted to the structure. Moreover, energy-based parameters are directly related to cycles of response of the structure and, therefore, they can implicitly capture the effect of ground motion duration, which is ignored by conventional spectral parameters. Therefore, the identification of reliable relationships between energy and displacement demands represents a fundamental issue in both the development of more reliable seismic code provisions and the evaluation of seismic vulnerability aimed at the upgrading of existing hazardous facilities. As these two aspects could become consistently integrated within a performance-based seismic design methodology, understanding how input and dissipated energy are correlated with displacement demands emerges as a decisive prerequisite. The aim of the present study is the establishment of functional relationships between input and dissipated energy

  17. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  18. Accurate exchange-correlation energies for the warm dense electron gas

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, FD; Blunt, NS; Brown, EW; Lee, DKK; Spencer, JS; Foulkes, WMC; Shepherd, JJ

    2016-01-01

    Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) is used to sample exact-on-average $N$-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10$^{124}$ matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the $k$-space configurati...

  19. Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Y.

    2003-06-08

    This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments.

  20. Enhanced coherent emission of terahertz radiation by energy-phase correlation in a bunched electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, A; Gallerano, G P; Giovenale, E; Messina, G; Spassovsky, I

    2004-12-31

    We report the first observation of enhanced coherent emission of terahertz radiation in a compact free electron laser. A radio-frequency (rf) modulated electron beam is passed through a magnetic undulator emitting coherent radiation at harmonics of the rf with a phase which depends on the electron drift velocity. A proper correlation between the energy and phase distributions of the electrons in the bunch has been exploited to lock in phase the radiated field, resulting in over 1 order of magnitude enhancement of the coherent emission.

  1. DETERMINATION OF FLOQUET STATES AND QUASI-ENERGY BY CORRELATION FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The Floquet spectrum generated by the use of time correlation function has been developed to extract the Floquet functions with Fourier transform method for wave function at integral multiples of optical period. The quasi-energy position and ionization width of those Floquet states have also been determined by least-squares fit method. Numerical calculation shows that the Fourier transform method is powerful and the resultant Floquet functions are in excellent agreement with that obtained by orthogonality projection method developed in our previous work.

  2. Correlation between band excitation energies and strength parameters in the pseudo-SU(3) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalluri, S. (Koneru Lakshmaiah Coll. of Engineering, Green Fields, Guntur (India). Dept. of Physics; Andhra Christian Coll., Guntur (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-11-01

    Low-lying energy spectra of some odd-A isotopes of Lu and Ta are predicted using the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction as the effective residual interaction together with the usual spin-orbit and extrapolation terms in the Hamiltonian. It is suggested that the Coriolis antipairing force might generate the correct doublet structure of the 1/2/sup +/ bands, especially in highly deformed regions. It is shown that the pseudo-SU(3) model satisfies the general requirement that it is capable of describing the spectral behaviour of different nuclei with only minor variations in the strength parameters. Correlations between the band excitation energies and the strength parameters are also given in a first approximation. The ratios of interband M1 transition probabilities are also presented.

  3. GRB Energies and Eγ - Epeak Correlation with the Jet Expanding Laterally at the Sound Speed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A Gamma-ray burst (GRB) is generally believed to be a jet with a small opening angle, this opening angle is usually derived with the afterglow light curve break time using an analytical method. Here we show that the method is not accurate. Using the set of equations of hydrodynamic evolution with the sideways expansion at the local sound speed derived by previous authors and the observed light curve break times, we numerically derive the initial opening angles. Then the collimation-corrected energies (Eγ) for a sample of GRBs are calculated. They are found to show a wide spread, suggesting that the previously declared clustering by some authors may not exist. Also, the Epeak - Eγ relation, claimed by some other authors (Epeak is the spectral peak energy), is found still to hold, with a slightly stronger correlation.

  4. Spatial Correlation Based Low Energy Aware Clustering (LEACH in a Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriano De Rango

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an enhanced Low Energy Aware Cluster Head (LEACH protocol is proposed. It applies aggregation strategies in the area monitored by sensor nodes to reduce the number of reports sent to sink and to save energy. The basic idea is to weight the information sensed by sensors based on the distortion area in order to estimate better the event at the sink node. This approach seeks to exploit the spatial correlation among nodes and among clusters to assign different importance to the information aggregated and forwarded by the cluster head nodes. A multi-zone monitoring related to clusters is proposed, and a dynamic weights management is presented to consider distortion at cluster level introduced in the event estimation. A mathematical formulation of the problem and the proposal to weight space and data information is led out. Simulation campaigns in Matlab show the effectiveness of the event estimation in terms of event estimation distortion and network lifetime.

  5. arXiv Two particle correlations from the energy scan with p+p interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Maksiak, Bartosz

    2015-05-12

    The NA61/Shine experiment aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. These goals are to be achieved by performing a two dimensional phase diagram T-mu_B scan by measurements of hadron production properties in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and system size. Close to the phase transition and/or close to the critical point large fluctuations are predicted. In this contribution preliminary results on two-particle correlations in pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle will be presented for p+p interactions at beam momenta: 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c. The NA61/Shine results will be compared with the corresponding data of other experiments and model predictions. A striking evolution with collision energy is observed.

  6. On the distribution of energy versus Alfvénic correlation for polar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous analyses have shown that polar wind fluctuations at MHD scales appear as a mixture of Alfvénic fluctuations and variations with an energy imbalance in favour of the magnetic term. In the present study, by separately examining the behaviour of kinetic and magnetic energies versus the Alfvénic correlation level, we unambiguously confirm that the second population is essentially related to a large increase of the magnetic energy with respect to that of the Alfvénic population. The relevant new result is that this magnetic population, though of secondary importance in terms of occurrence frequency, corresponds to a primary peak in the distribution of total energy. The fact that this holds in the case of polar wind, which is the least structured type of interplanetary plasma flow and with the slowest evolving Alfvénic turbulence, strongly suggests the general conclusion that magnetic structures cannot be neglected when modeling fluctuations for all kinds of wind regime.

  7. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-03-21

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  8. Nonlocal Wigner-like correlation energy density functional: parametrization and tests on two-electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katriel, Jacob; Bauer, Michael; Springborg, Michael; McCarthy, Shane P; Thakkar, Ajit J

    2007-07-14

    Reparametrization of Wigner's correlation energy density functional yields a very close fit to the correlation energies of the helium isoelectronic sequence. However, a quite different reparametrization is required to obtain an equally close fit to the isoelectronic sequence of Hooke's atom. In an attempt to avoid having to reparametrize the functional for different choices of the one-body potential, we propose a parametrization that depends on global characteristics of the ground-state electron density as quantified by scale-invariant combinations of expectation values of local one-body operators. This should be viewed as an alternative to the density-gradient paradigm, allowing one to introduce the nonlocal dependence of the density functional on the density in a possibly more effective way. Encouraging results are obtained for two-electron systems with one-body potentials of the form r(zeta) with zeta=-12,+12,1, which span the range between the Coulomb potential (zeta=-1) and the Hooke potential (zeta=2).

  9. Correlation of Thermally Induced Pores with Microstructural Features Using High Energy X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menasche, David B.; Shade, Paul A.; Lind, Jonathan; Li, Shiu Fai; Bernier, Joel V.; Kenesei, Peter; Schuren, Jay C.; Suter, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Combined application of a near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy measurement of crystal lattice orientation fields and a tomographic measurement of pore distributions in a sintered nickel-based superalloy sample allows pore locations to be correlated with microstructural features. Measurements were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-ID using an X-ray energy of 65 keV for each of the measurement modes. The nickel superalloy sample was prepared in such a way as to generate significant thermally induced porosity. A three-dimensionally resolved orientation map is directly overlaid with the tomographically determined pore map through a careful registration procedure. The data are shown to reliably reproduce the expected correlations between specific microstructural features (triple lines and quadruple nodes) and pore positions. With the statistics afforded by the 3D data set, we conclude that within statistical limits, pore formation does not depend on the relative orientations of the grains. The experimental procedures and analysis tools illustrated are being applied to a variety of materials problems in which local heterogeneities can affect materials properties.

  10. Explicit correlation treatment of the potential energy surface of CO{sub 2} dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalugina, Yulia N., E-mail: kalugina@phys.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Buryak, Ilya A. [Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ajili, Yosra [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA Université de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Vigasin, Andrei A. [Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jaidane, Nejm Eddine [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA Université de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Hochlaf, Majdi [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée (France)

    2014-06-21

    We present an extensive study of the four-dimensional potential energy surface (4D-PES) of the carbon dioxide dimer, (CO{sub 2}){sub 2}. This PES is developed over the set of intermolecular coordinates. The electronic computations are carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12] level of theory in connection with the augmented correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. An analytic representation of the 4D-PES is derived. Our extensive calculations confirm that “Slipped Parallel” is the most stable form and that the T-shaped structure corresponds to a transition state. Later on, this PES is employed for the calculations of the vibrational energy levels of the dimer. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the dimer second virial coefficient and of the first spectral moment of rototranslational collision-induced absorption spectrum is derived. For both quantities, a good agreement is found between our values and the experimental data for a wide range of temperatures. This attests to the high quality of our PES. Generally, our PES and results can be used for modeling CO{sub 2} supercritical fluidity and examination of its role in planetary atmospheres. It can be also incorporated into dynamical computations of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. This allows deep understanding, at the microscopic level, of these processes.

  11. Research on seasonal correlation of wavelet packet energy spectrum and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING YouLiang; LI AiQun; SUN Jun; DENG Yang

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish an environmental-condition-normalized structural damage alarming method, the seasonal correlation analysis of wavelet packet energy spectrum (WPES) and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge is performed by means of the 236-day health monitoring data. The analysis results reveal that the measured WPES has remarkable seasonal correlation with the environmental tempera-ture. The seasonal change of environmental temperature accounts for the variation of the damage alarming parameter Ip of the dominant frequency bands with an averaged variance of 200%. The statis-tical modeling technique using a 6th-order polynomial is adopted to formulate the correlation between the WPES and temperature, on the basis of which the abnormal changes of measured damage alarming parameter Ip are detected using the mean value control chart. It is found that the proposed method can effectively eliminate temperature complications from the time series of WPES and exhibit good capa-bility for detecting the damage-induced 10% variances of the damage alarming parameter Ip. And the proposed WPES-based method is superior the modal frequency and hence is more suitable for online real-time damage alarming for long-span bridges.

  12. Research on seasonal correlation of wavelet packet energy spectrum and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish an environmental-condition-normalized structural damage alarming method,the seasonal correlation analysis of wavelet packet energy spectrum(WPES)and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge is performed by means of the 236-day health monitoring data.The analysis results reveal that the measured WPES has remarkable seasonal correlation with the environmental tempera-ture.The seasonal change of environmental temperature accounts for the variation of the damage alarming parameter Ip of the dominant frequency bands with an averaged variance of 200%.The statis-tical modeling technique using a 6th-order polynomial is adopted to formulate the correlation between the WPES and temperature,on the basis of which the abnormal changes of measured damage alarming parameter Ip are detected using the mean value control chart.It is found that the proposed method can effectively eliminate temperature complications from the time series of WPES and exhibit good capa-bility for detecting the damage-induced 10% variances of the damage alarming parameter Ip.And the proposed WPES-based method is superior the modal frequency and hence is more suitable for online real-time damage alarming for long-span bridges.

  13. A correlated study between effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energies for neutron beams with continuous spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, H

    1999-01-01

    Two practically useful quantities have been introduced to characterize a continuous-energy-spectrum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in the field of quantitative neutron radiography. These quantities are the effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section as defined for a monochromatic energy. Four neutron beams have been used to measure ETM cross sections at effective energies of 29.8, 17.2, 9.8 meV, and at the In resonance energy of 1.46 eV. Results are studied as a function of estimated effective energy, where the effective energy was estimated by a beam quality indicator (BQI) which has been proposed recently. Validity of ETM cross sections as a function of the effective energy is discussed and correlated with recent nuclear data.

  14. Density functional for short-range correlation: Is the random phase approximation accurate for iso-electronic energy changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zidan; Perdew, John P.; Kurth, Stefan

    2000-03-01

    Within a density functional context, the random phase approximation (RPA) for the correlation emergy makes a short-range error which is well-suited for correction by a local spin density or generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Here we construct a GGA for the short-range correction, following the same reliable procedure used earlier to construct the GGA for the whole exchange-correlation energy: real-space cutoff of the spurious long-range contribution to the gradient expansion of the hole around an electron. The resulting density functional is nearly local, and predicts a substantial correction to the RPA correlation energy of an atom but \\underlinevery small corrections to the RPA atomization energy of a molecule, which may by itself come close to "chemical accuracy", and to the RPA surface energy of a metal. A by-product of this work is a density functional for the system-averaged correlation hole within RPA.

  15. Accurate Exchange-Correlation Energies for the Warm Dense Electron Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Brown, Ethan W; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C; Shepherd, James J

    2016-09-09

    The density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) method is used to sample exact-on-average N-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10^{124} matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the k-space configuration path-integral formalism disagree by up to ∼10% at certain reduced temperatures T/T_{F}≤0.5 and densities r_{s}≤1. Our calculations confirm the accuracy of the configuration path-integral Monte Carlo results available at high density and bridge the gap to lower densities, providing trustworthy data in the regime typical of planetary interiors and solids subject to laser irradiation. We demonstrate that the DMQMC method can calculate free energies directly and present exact free energies for T/T_{F}≥1 and r_{s}≤2.

  16. Mass-energy correlation measurements for /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sicre, A.; Barreau, G.; Caitucoli, F.; Doan, T.P.; Leroux, B.; Martinez, G.; Asghar, M.; Benfoughal, T.

    1985-01-01

    Fragment-mass and kinetic energy distribution measurements for /sup 252/Cf(sf) have been extended to the far-out asymmetric low yield fission region up to Msub(H) = 190 compared with the existing data that go up to Msub(H) approximately 168. The mass yield Y(M) shows an important enhancement for Msub(H) >= 176. The (M), sigmasub(Esub(K))(M) and, to a lesser extent, Y(M) distributions show strong and correlated amplitude fluctuations for Msub(H) >= 170. These data indicate strong and rapid changes in deformation of the nascent fragments. These structures are discussed in terms of the static macro-microscopic potential energy calculations. Several spherical and deformed shells are involved to stabilize the light fragment and especially the proton spherical shell Z = 28. So it is possible to observe very rich neutron nuclei like /sub 28//sup 73/Ni. Furthermore we select small excitation energy events (E* = Qsub(R) - Esub(KT) <= 8 MeV). The distribution Y(M) for these nearly cold fragmentations is dominated by the strong neutron deformed shell N = 88 and shows an important charge odd-even effect.

  17. Correlating DFT-calculated energy barriers to experiments in nonheme octahedral Fe(IV)O species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Kim, Eun Jeong; Seo, Mi Sook; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-08-13

    The experimentally measured bimolecular reaction rate constant, k(2), should in principle correlate with the theoretically calculated rate-limiting free energy barrier, ΔG(≠), through the Eyring equation, but it fails quite often to do so due to the inability of current computational methods to account in a precise manner for all the factors contributing to ΔG(≠). This is further aggravated by the exponential sensitivity of the Eyring equation to these factors. We have taken herein a pragmatic approach for C-H activation reactions of 1,4-cyclohexadiene with a variety of octahedral nonheme Fe(IV)O complexes. The approach consists of empirically determining two constants that would aid in predicting experimental k(2) values uniformly from theoretically calculated electronic energy (ΔE(≠)) values. Shown in this study is the predictive power as well as insights into energy relationships in Fe(IV)O C-H activation reactions. We also find that the difference between ΔG(≠) and ΔE(≠) converges at slow reactions, in a manner suggestive of changes in the importance of the triplet spin state weight in the overall reaction.

  18. Exact ensemble density functional theory for excited states in a model system: Investigating the weight dependence of the correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deur, Killian; Mazouin, Laurent; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (eDFT) is an exact time-independent alternative to time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for the calculation of excitation energies. Despite its formal simplicity and advantages in contrast to TD-DFT (multiple excitations, for example, can be easily taken into account in an ensemble), eDFT is not standard, which is essentially due to the lack of reliable approximate exchange-correlation (x c ) functionals for ensembles. Following Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. B 93, 245131 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245131], we propose in this work to construct an exact eDFT for the nontrivial asymmetric Hubbard dimer, thus providing more insight into the weight dependence of the ensemble x c energy in various correlation regimes. For that purpose, an exact analytical expression for the weight-dependent ensemble exchange energy has been derived. The complementary exact ensemble correlation energy has been computed by means of Legendre-Fenchel transforms. Interesting features like discontinuities in the ensemble x c potential in the strongly correlated limit have been rationalized by means of a generalized adiabatic connection formalism. Finally, functional-driven errors induced by ground-state density-functional approximations have been studied. In the strictly symmetric case or in the weakly correlated regime, combining ensemble exact exchange with ground-state correlation functionals gives better ensemble energies than when calculated with the ground-state exchange-correlation functional. However, when approaching the asymmetric equiensemble in the strongly correlated regime, the former approximation leads to highly curved ensemble energies with negative slope which is unphysical. Using both ground-state exchange and correlation functionals gives much better results in that case. In fact, exact ensemble energies are almost recovered in some density domains. The analysis of density-driven errors is left for future work.

  19. Anisotropic particle production and azimuthal correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We summarize some recent ideas relating to anisotropic particle production in high-energy collisions. Anisotropic gluon distributions lead to anisotropies of the single-particle azimuthal distribution and hence to disconnected contributions to multi-particle cumulants. When these dominate, the four-particle elliptic anisotropy $c_2\\{4\\}$ changes sign. On the other hand, connected diagrams for $m$-particle cumulants are found to quickly saturate with increasing $m$, a ``coherence'' quite unlike conventional ``non-flow'' contributions such as decays. Finally, we perform a first exploratory phenomenological analysis in order to estimate the amplitude ${\\cal A}$ of the $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ anisotropy of the gluon distribution at small $x$, and we provide a qualitative prediction for the elliptic asymmetry from three-particle correlations, $c_2\\{3\\}$.

  20. Correlation length and universality in the BCS-BEC crossover for energy-dependent resonance superfluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, S.; Chiofalo, M.-L.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the BCS-BEC crossover of a quantum Fermi gas at T = 0 in the presence of an energy-dependent Fano-Feshbach resonance, driving the system from broad to narrow limits. We choose a minimal microscopic potential reproducing the two-particle resonance physics in terms of the scattering length a and the effective range R∗ representing the resonance width, and solve the BCS mean-field equations varying a, R∗ and the density. We show that the condensate fraction manifests a universal behavior when the correlation length, measuring the pair size, is used as the crossover parameter. Generally, a negative effective range has the effect of stretching the crossover region between the two extreme regimes, as evidenced by the behavior of the chemical potential. These results can be useful in view of the more recent perspectives of realizing narrow resonances also by optical means and amenable as a base quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Correlated electric field and low-energy electron measurements in the low-altitude polar cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.; Ackerson, K. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Correlated electric field and low-energy electron measurements are presented for two passes of Hawkeye 1 through the south polar cusp at 2000-km altitude during local morning. In one case the electric field reversal coincides with the boundary of detectable 5.2keV electron intensities and the equatorward boundary of the cusp. In the other case the electric field reversal and the 5.2 keV electron trapping boundary coincide, but the equatorward edge of the cusp as determined from the presence of 180 eV electron intensities is 5 degrees invariant latitude equatorward of the electric field reversal. It is concluded that in the second case, electron intensities associated with the polar cusp populate closed dayside field lines, and hence the corresponding equatorward edge of these electron intensities is not always an indicator of the boundary between closed dayside field lines and polar cap field lines.

  2. Energy-independent total quantum transmission of electrons through nanodevices with correlated disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    In nanostructures with no appreciable scattering, electrons propagate ballistically, and hence have energy-independent total quantum transmission. For an incoming electron of energy E, the probability T (E) of transmission is obtained from the solution of the time-independent Schrödinger equation. Ballistic transport hence corresponds to T (E)=1. We show that there is a wide class of nanostructures with correlated disorder that have T (E)=1 for all propagating modes, even though they can have strong scattering. We call these nanostructures quantum dragons. An exact mathematical mapping for quantum transmission valid for a large class of atomic arrangements is presented within the single-band tight-binding model. Quantum transmission through a nanostructure is exactly mapped onto quantum transmission through a one-dimensional chain. The mapping is applied to carbon nanotubes in the armchair and zigzag configurations, Bethe lattices, conjoined Bethe lattices, Bethe lattices with hopping within each ring, and tubes formed from rectangular and orthorhombic lattices. The mapping shows that tuning tight-binding parameters to particular correlated values gives T (E)=1 for all the systems studied. A quantum dragon has the same electrical conductivity as a ballistic nanodevice, namely, in a four-terminal measurement the electrical resistance is zero, while in a two-terminal measurement for the single-channel case, the electrical conductivity is equal to the conductance quantum G0=2e2/h, where h is Planck's constant and e the electron charge. We find T (E)=1 is ubiquitous but occurs only on particular surfaces in the tight-binding parameter space.

  3. Genetic correlation between days until start of luteal activity and milk yield, energy balance, and live weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, R.F.; Oldenbroek, J.K.; Gaast, van der H.J.; Werf, van der J.H.J.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic correlations among fertility and measures of energy balance, dry matter intake, and live weight (change). Data from 622 first lactation cows (fed ad libitum a complete ration) included milk, fat, and protein yields; energy balance; and live weights

  4. Unified Green's function retrieval by cross-correlation; connection with energy principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees; Wegler, Ulrich

    2007-03-01

    It has been shown theoretically and observationally that the Green's function for acoustic and elastic waves can be retrieved by cross-correlating fluctuations recorded at two locations. We extend the concept of the extraction of the Green's function to a wide class of scalar linear systems. For systems that are not invariant under time reversal, the fluctuations must be excited by volume sources in order to satisfy the energy balance (equipartitioning) that is needed to extract the Green's function. The general theory for retrieving the Green's function is illustrated with examples that include the diffusion equation, Schrödinger's equation, a vibrating string, the acoustic wave equation, a vibrating beam, and the advection equation. Examples are also shown of situations where the Green's function cannot be extracted from ambient fluctuations. The general theory opens up new applications for the extraction of the Green's function from field correlations that include flow in porous media, quantum mechanics, and the extraction of the response of mechanical structures such as bridges.

  5. Test of the peak energy- luminosity correlations of GRBs for their application in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Disha

    In a few dozen seconds gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit upto 10 (54) ergs in terms of an equivalent isotropical radiated energy "E _{iso}", so they can be observed with redshifts almost upto 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to shed light on the expansion rate and the history of the universe. Here we review the use of the E _{p,i} - E _{iso} correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter Omega _{M}. We show that the present data set of gamma ray bursts, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that Omega _{M} ˜ 0.3. As the first step, we consider verifying the correltion depending on several considerable criteria (e.g. E _{p,i} - E _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{peak}, etc.). The results of the comparisons will lead us to verify the reliability of the correlations for cosmographical purpose. This will eventually be utilized to constrain GRBs as standard candles for studying cosmology.

  6. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln χ = -α (ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn(TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  7. Fermi and Coulomb correlation effects upon the interacting quantum atoms energy partition

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Isela; Holguín-Gallego, Fernando José; Francisco, Evelio; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) electronic energy partition is an important method in the field of quantum chemical topology which has given important insights of different systems and processes in physical chemistry. There have been several attempts to include Electron Correlation (EC) in the IQA approach, for example, through DFT and Hartree-Fock/Coupled-Cluster (HF/CC) transition densities. This work addresses the separation of EC in Fermi and Coulomb correlation and its effect upon the IQA analysis by taking into account spin-dependent one- and two-electron matrices $D^{\\mathrm{HF/CC}}_{p\\sigma q \\sigma}$ and $d^{\\mathrm{HF/CC}}_{p\\sigma q\\sigma r\\tau s\\tau}$ wherein $\\sigma$ and $\\tau$ represent either of the $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ spin projections. We illustrate this approach by considering BeH$_2$,BH, CN$^-$, HF, LiF, NO$^+$, LiH, H$_2$O$\\cdots$H$_2$O and C$_2$H$_2$, which comprise non-polar covalent, polar covalent, ionic and hydrogen bonded systems. The same and different spin contributions to ($i$...

  8. Borexino's search for low-energy neutrino and antineutrino signals correlated with gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; de Kerret, H.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    A search for neutrino and antineutrino events correlated with 2350 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is performed with Borexino data collected between December 2007 and November 2015. No statistically significant excess over background is observed. We look for electron antineutrinos (νbare) that inverse beta decay on protons with energies from 1.8 MeV to 15 MeV and set the best limit on the neutrino fluence from GRBs below 8 MeV. The signals from neutrinos and antineutrinos from GRBs that scatter on electrons are also searched for, a detection channel made possible by the particularly radio-pure scintillator of Borexino. We obtain currently the best limits on the neutrino fluence of all flavors and species below 7 MeV. Finally, time correlations between GRBs and bursts of events are investigated. Our analysis combines two semi-independent data acquisition systems for the first time: the primary Borexino readout optimized for solar neutrino physics up to a few MeV, and a fast waveform digitizer system tuned for events above 1 MeV.

  9. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  10. Climatic correlates of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian J Das

    Full Text Available Recent increases in tree mortality rates across the western USA are correlated with increasing temperatures, but mechanisms remain unresolved. Specifically, increasing mortality could predominantly be a consequence of temperature-induced increases in either (1 drought stress, or (2 the effectiveness of tree-killing insects and pathogens. Using long-term data from California's Sierra Nevada mountain range, we found that in water-limited (low-elevation forests mortality was unambiguously best modeled by climatic water deficit, consistent with the first mechanism. In energy-limited (high-elevation forests deficit models were only equivocally better than temperature models, suggesting that the second mechanism is increasingly important in these forests. We could not distinguish between models predicting mortality using absolute versus relative changes in water deficit, and these two model types led to different forecasts of mortality vulnerability under future climate scenarios. Our results provide evidence for differing climatic controls of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests, while highlighting the need for an improved understanding of tree mortality processes.

  11. Environment degradation, economic growth and energy consumption nexus: A wavelet-windowed cross correlation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammazi, Rania; Aloui, Chaker

    2015-10-01

    This paper analyzes the interactive linkages between carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, energy consumption (EC) and economic growth (EG) using a novel approach namely wavelet windowed cross correlation (WWCC) for six oil-exporting countries from the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) region over the period 1980-2012. Our empirical results show that there exists a bidirectional causal relationship between EC and EG. However, the results support the occurrence of unidirectional causality from EC to CO2 emissions without any feedback effects, and there exists a bidirectional causal relationship between EG and CO2 emissions for the region as a whole. The study suggests that environmental and energy policies should recognize the differences in the nexus between EC and EG in order to maintain sustainable EG in the GCC region. Our findings will be useful for GCC countries to better evaluate its situation in the future climate negotiations. The overall findings will help GCC countries assess its position better in future climate change negotiations.

  12. Climatic correlates of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Adrian J; Stephenson, Nathan L; Flint, Alan; Das, Tapash; van Mantgem, Phillip J

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in tree mortality rates across the western USA are correlated with increasing temperatures, but mechanisms remain unresolved. Specifically, increasing mortality could predominantly be a consequence of temperature-induced increases in either (1) drought stress, or (2) the effectiveness of tree-killing insects and pathogens. Using long-term data from California's Sierra Nevada mountain range, we found that in water-limited (low-elevation) forests mortality was unambiguously best modeled by climatic water deficit, consistent with the first mechanism. In energy-limited (high-elevation) forests deficit models were only equivocally better than temperature models, suggesting that the second mechanism is increasingly important in these forests. We could not distinguish between models predicting mortality using absolute versus relative changes in water deficit, and these two model types led to different forecasts of mortality vulnerability under future climate scenarios. Our results provide evidence for differing climatic controls of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests, while highlighting the need for an improved understanding of tree mortality processes.

  13. Velocity dispersion of correlated energy spread electron beams in the free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L. T.; Maier, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of a correlated linear energy/velocity chirp in the electron beam in the free electron laser (FEL), and how to compensate for its effects by using an appropriate taper (or reverse-taper) of the undulator magnetic field, is well known. The theory, as described thus far, ignores velocity dispersion from the chirp in the undulator, taking the limit of a ‘small’ chirp. In the following, the physics of compensating for chirp in the beam is revisited, including the effects of velocity dispersion, or beam compression or decompression, in the undulator. It is found that the limit of negligible velocity dispersion in the undulator is different from that previously identified as the small chirp limit, and is more significant than previously considered. The velocity dispersion requires a taper which is nonlinear to properly compensate for the effects of the detuning, and also results in a varying peak current (end thus a varying gain length) over the length of the undulator. The results may be especially significant for plasma driven FELs and low energy linac driven FEL test facilities.

  14. Update on the correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Dembinski, H.; Denkiewicz, A.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gascon, A.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory through 31 August 2007 showed evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min energy threshold, 6 × 10 19 eV. The anisotropy was measured by the fraction of arrival directions that are less than 3.1° from the position of an active galactic nucleus within 75 Mpc (using the Véron-Cetty and Véron 12th catalog). An updated measurement of this fraction is reported here using the arrival directions of cosmic rays recorded above the same energy threshold through 31 December 2009. The number of arrival directions has increased from 27 to 69, allowing a more precise measurement. The correlating fraction is 38-6+7%, compared with 21% expected for isotropic cosmic rays. This is down from the early estimate of 69-13+11%. The enlarged set of arrival directions is examined also in relation to other populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2 Microns All Sky Survey and active galactic nuclei detected in hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. A celestial region around the position of the radiogalaxy Cen A has the largest excess of arrival directions relative to isotropic expectations. The 2-point autocorrelation function is shown for the enlarged set of arrival directions and compared to the isotropic expectation.

  15. Update on the correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, IST

    2010-06-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory through 31 August 2007 showed evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin energy threshold, 6 x 10{sup 19} eV. The anisotropy was measured by the fraction of arrival directions that are less than 3.1{sup o} from the position of an active galactic nucleus within 75 Mpc (using the Veron-Cetty and Veron 12th catalog). An updated measurement of this fraction is reported here using the arrival directions of cosmic rays recorded above the same energy threshold through 31 December 2009. The number of arrival directions has increased from 27 to 69, allowing a more precise measurement. The correlating fraction is (38{sub -6}{sup +7})%, compared with 21% expected for isotropic cosmic rays. This is down from the early estimate of (69{sub -13}{sup +11})%. The enlarged set of arrival directions is examined also in relation to other populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2 Microns All Sky Survey and active galactic nuclei detected in hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. A celestial region around the position of the radiogalaxy Cen A has the largest excess of arrival directions relative to isotropic expectations. The 2-point autocorrelation function is shown for the enlarged set of arrival directions and compared to the isotropic expectation.

  16. Correlates of use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks among youth across 10 US metropolitan areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shivani R; Cottler, Linda B; Striley, Catherine W

    2016-06-01

    Predictors of use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) among youth have been understudied. The current analyses investigated the prevalence of and correlates for use of AmED among alcohol users from a national study of stimulant use among youth. The National Monitoring of Adolescent Prescription Stimulants Study (N-MAPSS) assessed behaviors and risk factors for stimulant use from 11,048 youth, 10-18 years of age recruited from entertainment venues across 10 US cities. Of the four cross sections, two had questions on having alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) in the past 30 days along with sociodemographic characteristics, current tobacco and marijuana use and current nonmedical use of prescription opioids, anxiolytics, and stimulants. Only 13 to18 year olds and those who reported alcohol use were included in the analyses. Overall, 28.4% (1392 out of 4905) of the 13 to18 year olds reported past 30-day alcohol use. Among alcohol users, 27% reported having alcohol mixed with energy drinks in the past 30 days. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that use of AmED was significantly associated with tobacco and marijuana use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Underage drinking is common among youth and more than a quarter of these drinkers use AmED. Use of AmED is significantly associated with tobacco and marijuana use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Drug and alcohol intervention programs should educate on the risks of AmED, as the same population is at high-risk for use of AmED and alcohol/drug use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Precise all-electron dynamical response functions: Application to COHSEX and the RPA correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    We present a methodology to calculate frequency and momentum dependent all-electron response functions determined within Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It overcomes the main obstacle in calculating response functions in practice, which is the slow convergence with respect to the number of unoccupied states and the basis-set size. In this approach, the usual sum-over-states expression of perturbation theory is complemented by the response of the orbital basis functions, explicitly constructed by radial integrations of frequency-dependent Sternheimer equations. To an essential extent an infinite number of unoccupied states are included in this way. Furthermore, the response of the core electrons is treated virtually exactly, which is out of reach otherwise. The method is an extension of the recently introduced incomplete-basis-set correction (IBC) [Betzinger et al., Phys. Rev. B 85, 245124 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.245124; Phys. Rev. B 88, 075130 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.075130] to the frequency and momentum domain. We have implemented the generalized IBC within the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method and demonstrate for rocksalt BaO the improved convergence of the dynamical Kohn-Sham polarizability. We apply this technique to compute (a) quasiparticle energies employing the COHSEX approximation for the self-energy of many-body perturbation theory and (b) all-electron RPA correlation energies. It is shown that the favorable convergence of the polarizability is passed over to the COHSEX and RPA calculation.

  18. Effects of energy correlations and superexchange on charge transport and exciton formation in amorphous molecular semiconductors: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, Andrea; Friederich, Pascal; Symalla, Franz; Liu, Feilong; Meded, Velimir; Coehoorn, Reinder; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Bobbert, Peter A.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we investigate on the basis of ab initio calculations how the morphology, molecular on-site energies, reorganization energies, and charge transfer integral distribution affect the hopping charge transport and the exciton formation process in disordered organic semiconductors. We focus on three materials applied frequently in organic light-emitting diodes: α -NPD , TCTA, and Spiro-DPVBi. Spatially correlated disorder and, more importantly, superexchange contributions to the transfer integrals, are found to give rise to a significant increase of the electric field dependence of the electron and hole mobility. Furthermore, a material-specific correlation is found between the HOMO and LUMO energy on each specific molecular site. For α -NPD and TCTA, we find a positive correlation between the HOMO and LUMO energies, dominated by a Coulombic contribution to the energies. In contrast, Spiro-DPVBi shows a negative correlation, dominated by a conformational contribution. The size and sign of this correlation have a strong influence on the exciton formation rate.

  19. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dichiara, S; Amati, L; Frontera, F; Margutti, R

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long gamma-ray bursts with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged nuFnu spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope alpha detected with Swift, Fermi and past s...

  20. Velocity Dispersion of Correlated Energy Spread Electron Beams in the Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, L T

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a correlated linear energy/velocity chirp in the electron beam in the FEL, and how to compensate for its effects by using an appropriate taper (or reverse-taper) of the undulator magnetic field, is well known. The theory, as described thus far, ignores velocity dispersion from the chirp in the undulator, taking the limit of a `small' chirp. In the following, the physics of compensating for chirp in the beam is revisited, including the effects of velocity dispersion, or beam compression or decompression, in the undulator. It is found that the limit of negligible velocity dispersion in the undulator is different from that previously identified as the small chirp limit, and is more significant than previously considered. The velocity dispersion requires a taper which is non-linear to properly compensate for the effects of the detuning, and also results in a varying peak current (end thus a varying gain length) over the length of the undulator. The results may be especially significant for plasma d...

  1. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  2. The Wigner cusp revisited: The Strutinskij-smoothing of the RPA part of the isovector pair correlation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Neergård, K

    2016-01-01

    Previously published expressions for a smooth counterterm in the sense of the Strutinskij theory to the correction to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer isovector pair correlation energy obtained in the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) are derived in detail and extended. In particular the counterterm to the neutron-proton pair correlation energy, whose variation contributes to the so-called Wigner cusp in plots of masses along isobaric chains, is analyzed rigorously and found to be less attenuated at large excesses of neutrons or protons than suggested by the previous estimate.

  3. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  4. Multi-particle correlation observables in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, R.

    1981-01-01

    Global features of exclusively measured events, including number correlations and vector correlations, and hybrid analysis of measurements of one or two specific fragments like spectator nuclei, high transverse momentum particles, polarization of one particle, etc., are considered. (GHT)

  5. A refined cluster-in-molecule local correlation approach for predicting the relative energies of large systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Guo, Yang; Li, Shuhua

    2012-06-07

    A refined cluster-in-molecule (CIM) method for local correlation calculations of large molecules is presented. In the present work, two new strategies are introduced to further improve the CIM approach: (1) Some medium-range electron correlation energies, which are neglected in the previous CIM approach, are taken into account. (2) A much simpler procedure using only a distance threshold is used to construct various clusters. To cover the medium-range correlation effect as much as possible, some two-atom-centered clusters are built, in addition to one-atom-centered clusters. Our test calculations at the second order perturbation theory (MP2) level show that the refined CIM method can recover about 99.9% of the conventional MP2 correlation energy using an appropriate distance threshold. The accuracy of the present CIM method is capable of providing reliable relative energies of medium-sized systems such as polyalanines with 10 residues, and water molecules with 50 water molecules. For polyalanines with up to 30 residues, we have demonstrated that the computational cost of the CIM-MP2 calculation increases linearly with the molecular size, but the required memory and disc-space do not need to increase for large systems. The improved CIM method has been used to compute the relative energy of ice-like (H(2)O)(96) clusters (with 2400 basis functions) and to predict the dimerization energy of a double-helical foldamer (with 2330 basis functions). The present CIM method is expected to be a practical local correlation method for describing the relative energies of large systems.

  6. Strong correlations of neutron star radii with the slopes of nuclear matter incompressibility and symmetry energy at saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N.; Agrawal, B. K.; Fortin, M.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Sulaksono, A.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the correlations of neutron star radii with the nuclear matter incompressibility, symmetry energy, and their slopes, which are the key parameters of the equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron star radii and the EoS parameters are evaluated using a representative set of 24 Skyrme-type effective forces and 18 relativistic mean field models, and two microscopic calculations, all describing 2 M⊙ neutron stars. Unified EoSs for the inner-crust-core region have been built for all the phenomenological models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic. Our investigation shows the existence of a strong correlation of the neutron star radii with the linear combination of the slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients at the saturation density. Such correlations are found to be almost independent of the neutron star mass in the range 0.6 -1.8 M⊙ . This correlation can be linked to the empirical relation existing between the star radius and the pressure at a nucleonic density between one and two times saturation density, and the dependence of the pressure on the nuclear matter incompressibility, its slope, and the symmetry energy slope. The slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients as estimated from the finite nuclei data yield the radius of a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star in the range 11.09 -12.86 km.

  7. Two Typical Examples of Scaling Ionic Partition Scheme for Estimating Correlation Energy of A2 Type Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO,Shu-Ping(禚淑萍); SI,Wei-Jiang(司维江); WEI,Ji-Chong(韦吉崇); JU,Guan-Zhi(居冠之)

    2004-01-01

    Based on the calculation results of pair correlation energy contributions of the various electron pairs in Na2 and H2NNH2 systems and the application of the scaling ionic partition scheme for symmetrical A2 type systems,the total correlation energies of Na2 and H2NNH2 have been reproduced by using this simple scheme.The two results show that the absolute deviations are within an acceptable range of error,however,in this way,more than 90% of computational work can be saved.The most attractive result in present paper is that,in these two molecules the coefficients c1 and c2 in the estimation equation can be obtained by the proportion of correlation energy of A-to that of A+ singlet system.Therefore,it is believed that the proposed ionic partition scheme for symmetrical A2 molecules would be very useful to estimate the correlation energies of large symmetrical molecules.

  8. A Layer Correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00433248; Abdallah, J.M.; Addy, T.N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O.K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H.P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P.J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeans Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M.V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S.A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P.O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T.F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A.I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A.I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O.L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B.C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Gottfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M.D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P.D.C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P.T.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T.H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S.P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Kruger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L.G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C.G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K.F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V.P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K.W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V.A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S.V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S.V.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A.V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S.Y.; Newcomer, F.M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S.H.; Oleshko, S.B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S.M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T.C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M.J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; Rohne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L.P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J.M.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J.E.; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S.I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J.A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J.B.; Volpi, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P.S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H.H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by 11% to 25% compared to the response at the electromagnetic scale.

  9. Manifestation of proton structure in ridge-like correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiczek, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the CMS collaboration reported a long range in rapidity, near-side ('ridge-like') angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collisions, so called ridge effect. This surprising observation suggests the presence of a collective flow that resembles the one believed to produce a similar correlation hydrodynamically in heavy-ion collisions. If the hydrodynamic description is valid then the effect is triggered by the initial spatial anisotropy of the colliding matter. Estimating this anisotropy within different models of the proton internal structure in comparison with measured angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton collision data could in principle discriminate between different proton models. Inspired by recent theoretical developments, we propose several phenomenological models of the proton structure. Subsequently, we calculate the anisotropy coefficients of the dense matter formed in proton-proton collisions within the formalism of the Monte Carlo Glauber model. We find that some p...

  10. Constraining in-medium heavy-quark energy-loss mechanisms via angular correlations between heavy and light mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmoser, M.; Gossiaux, P.-B.; Gousset, T.; Aichelin, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two-particle correlations obtained from parton showers that pass the hot and dense medium of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) can be used as an alternative observable, in addition to the combination of the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v 2, to study the mechanisms of in-medium heavy quark energy-loss. In particular, angular correlations represent a promising tool to distinguish between energy loss due to collisional and radiative interactions of jet and medium particles. To this end, parton cascades were created in Monte-Carlo simulations, where individual particles can undergo both parton splitting as well as an effective jet-medium interaction. A first model simulates the effects of induced radiations on parton cascades. Its consequences on angular correlations of partons within jets were studied in detail, with particular focus on angular broadening. The results can be compared to a second model that effectively describes elastic scatterings of jet and medium particles.

  11. Constraining in-medium heavy-quark energy-loss mechanisms via angular correlations between heavy and light mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Rohrmoser, Martin; Gousset, Thierry; Aichelin, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Two-particle correlations obtained from parton showers that pass the hot and dense medium of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) can be used as an alternative observable, in addition to the combination of the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ and the elliptic flow $v_2$, to study the mechanisms of in-medium heavy quark energy-loss. In particular, angular correlations represent a promising tool to distinguish between energy loss due to collisional and radiative interactions of jet and medium particles. To this end, parton cascades were created in Monte-Carlo simulations, where individual particles can undergo both parton splitting as well as an effective jet-medium interaction. A first model simulates the effects of induced radiations on parton cascades. Its consequences on angular correlations of partons within jets were studied in detail, with particular focus on angular broadening. The results can be compared to a second model that effectively describes elastic scatterings of jet and medium particles.

  12. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Correlation Energy in a Triplet State of a Two Electron Spherical Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rejo Jeice

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on correlation energy in a triplet state of two electron spherical quantum dot with square well potential is computed. The result is presented taking GaAs dot as an example. Our result shows the correlation energies are inegative in the triplet state contrast to the singlet state ii it increases with increase in pressure  iiifurther decreases due to the application  of temperature iv it approaches zero as dot size approaches infinity and v it contribute 10% decrement in total confined energy to the narrow dots. All the calculations have been carried out with finite models and the results are compared with existing literature.

  13. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespillo, M.L., E-mail: mcrespil@utk.edu [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Agulló-López, F., E-mail: fal@uam.es [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, CMAM-UAM, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Extensive survey formation energies Frenkel pairs and electronic stopping thresholds. • Correlation: track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation. • Formation energies Frenkel pairs discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms. • Amorphous track formation mechanisms: defect accumulation models versus melting. • Advantages cumulative models to deal with new hot topics: nuclear-electronic synergy. - Abstract: An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO{sub 3} crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND INDUSTRIAL COMPETITIVENESS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ionescu SAS

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author analyzes the dependence between energy and industrial competitiveness before and after the 2008 economic crisis in the European Union. The Europe 2020 strategy aims energy major industrial competitiveness and increasing energy efficiency. But the economic crisis of 2008 led to reduced energy consumption and prices have increased considerably, so prices in the European Union in the energy industry are estimated to be twice higher than in the United States and Russia and 20% higher than those in China. According to the 2020 European Strategy for Sustainable Growth proposed increasing share of renewables to 20% increasing 20% energy efficiency and 20% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions greenhouse (or even 30 %, in favorable conditions compared to 1990. The economic analysis in this paper are based on statistical quantitative method. Indicators used in this analysis are available on major platforms Eurostat data.

  15. Effective homogeneity of the exchange-correlation and non-interacting kinetic energy functionals under density scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoo, Alex; Teale, Andrew M; Tozer, David J

    2012-01-21

    Correlated electron densities, experimental ionisation potentials, and experimental electron affinities are used to investigate the homogeneity of the exchange-correlation and non-interacting kinetic energy functionals of Kohn-Sham density functional theory under density scaling. Results are presented for atoms and small molecules, paying attention to the influence of the integer discontinuity and the choice of the electron affinity. For the exchange-correlation functional, effective homogeneities are highly system-dependent on either side of the integer discontinuity. By contrast, the average homogeneity-associated with the potential that averages over the discontinuity-is generally close to 4/3 when the discontinuity is computed using positive affinities for systems that do bind an excess electron and negative affinities for those that do not. The proximity to 4/3 becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing atomic number. Evaluating the discontinuity using a zero affinity in systems that do not bind an excess electron instead leads to effective homogeneities on the electron abundant side that are close to 4/3. For the non-interacting kinetic energy functional, the effective homogeneities are less system-dependent and the effect of the integer discontinuity is less pronounced. Average values are uniformly below 5/3. The study provides information that may aid the development of improved exchange-correlation and non-interacting kinetic energy functionals. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  16. Correlation of AES FY 1978 program with energy-related environmental research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    This report has a two-fold objective: (1) to identify major energy-related environmental concerns, needs, and problem areas, and (2) to show the relationship of the planned FY 1978 research program of the ERDA Assistant Administrator of Environment and Safety (AES) to those environmental issues. The document is organized into sections addressing each major energy form. Each section identifies environmental issues of an energy form and indicates the level of planned FY 78 AES research addressing each issue, thus delineating the links between environmental research and the needs of energy research, development, and demonstration (RD and D).

  17. Exact ensemble density functional theory for excited states in a model system: investigating the weight dependence of the correlation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Deur, Killian; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (eDFT) is an exact time-independent alternative to time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for the calculation of excitation energies. Despite its formal simplicity and advantages in contrast to TD-DFT (multiple excitations, for example, can be easily taken into account in an ensemble), eDFT is not standard which is essentially due to the lack of reliable approximate exchange-correlation (xc) functionals for ensembles. Following Burke and coworkers [Phys. Rev. B 93, 245131 (2016)], we propose in this work to construct an exact eDFT for the nontrivial asymmetric Hubbard dimer, thus providing more insight into the weight dependence of the ensemble xc energy in various correlation regimes. For that purpose, an exact analytical expression for the weight-dependent ensemble exchange energy has been derived. The complementary exact ensemble correlation energy has been computed by means of Legendre-Fenchel transforms. Interesting features like discontinuities in the ensemble xc potential in the...

  18. Inclusion of electron correlation for the target wave function in low- to intermediate-energy e-N2 scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, C. A.; Brown, F. B.; Temkin, A.

    1987-01-01

    In a recent calculation, an exact exchange method was developed for use in the partial-differential-equation approach to electron-molecule scattering and was applied to e-N2 scattering in the fixed-nuclei approximation with an adiabatic polarization potential at low energies (0-10 eV). Integrated elastic cross sections were calculated and found to be lower than experiment at energies both below and above the Pi(g) resonance. It was speculated at that time that improved experimental agreement could be obtained if a correlated target representation were used in place of the uncorrelated one. The present paper implements this suggestion and demonstrates the improved agreement. These calculations are also extended to higher energies (0-30 eV) so asd to include the Sigma(u) resonance. Some discrepancies among the experiments and between experiment and the various calculations at very low energy are noted.

  19. Probing Multi-Strange Dibaryon with Proton-Omega Correlation in High-energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Kenji; Etminan, Faisal; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Two-particle intensity correlation between the proton ($p$) and the Omega-baryon ($\\Omega$) in high-energy heavy ion collisions is studied to unravel the possible spin-2 $p\\Omega$ dibaryon recently suggested by lattice QCD simulations. The ratio of correlation functions between small and large collision systems, $C_{\\rm SL}(Q)$, is proposed to be a new measure to extract the strong $p\\Omega$ interaction without much contamination from the Coulomb attraction. Relevance of this quantity to the experimental observables in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

  20. Correlations and fluctuations in p+p and Be+Be at the SPS energies from NA61/SHINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryakov, Andrey

    2016-11-01

    Preliminary results of three different analyses are presented for the lightest collision systems studied in the energy-system size scan program of NA61/SHINE: two-particle correlations in p+p collisions at 20 - 158 GeV/c beam momentum, pseudorapidity correlations in Be+Be collisions at 150A GeV/c and transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations of charged particles in p+p (20 - 158 GeV/c) and Be+Be (19A - 150A GeV/c) collisions at the CERN SPS.

  1. A note on the conditional correlation between energy prices: Evidence from future markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzo, Massimiliano [University of Bologna, Department of Economics, 2, Piazza Scaravilli, 40126 Bologna, BO (Italy); Zagaglia, Paolo [Department of Economics, Stockholm University, Universitetsvaegen 10A, 106-91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    We model the joint movements of daily returns on one-month futures for crude oil, heating oil and natural gas through the multivariate GARCH with dynamic conditional correlations and elliptical distributions introduced by Pelagatti and Rondena [Pelagatti, M.M., Rondena, S., 2007. 'Dynamic Conditional Correlation with Elliptical Distributions', unpublished manuscript. Universita di Milano - Bicocca, August]. Futures prices of crude and heating oil covary strongly. The conditional correlation between the futures prices of natural gas and crude oil has been rising over the last 5 years. However, this correlation has been low on average over two thirds of the sample, suggesting that future markets have no established tradition of pricing natural gas as a function of developments on oil markets. (author)

  2. Long-range rapidity correlations in soft interactions at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsman, E.; Levin, E.; Maor, U.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we take the next step (following the successful description of inclusive hadron production) in describing the structure of the bias events without the aid of Monte Carlo codes. Two new results are presented: (i) a method for calculating the two particle correlation functions in the BFKL pomeron calculus in zero transverse dimension; and (ii) an estimation of the values of these correlations in a model of soft interactions. Comparison with the multiplicity data at the LHC is given.

  3. Correlations between D and D-bar mesons in high energy photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; Link, J.; Reyes, M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.; Bediaga, I.; Gobel, C.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Miranda, J.M. de; Pepe, I.M.; Reis, A.C. dos; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vasquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; O' Reilly, B.; Ramirez, J.E.; Segoni, I.; Butler, J.N.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Chiodini, G.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P.H.; Garren, L.A.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Kasper, P.H.; Kreymer, A.E.; Kutschke, R.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Zallo, A.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D.Y.; Park, K.S.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chang, K.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Kang, J.S.; Ko, B.R.; Kwak, J.W.; Lee, K.B.; Cho, K.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Barberis, S.; Cerutti, A.; Boschini, M.; D' Angelo, P.; DiCorato, M.; Dini, P.; Edera, L.; Erba, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T.F.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Merlo, M.M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S.P.; Vitulo, P.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A.M.; Mendez, H.; Mendez, L.; Montiel, E.; Olaya, D.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Rivera, C.; Xiong, W.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J.R.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W.E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P.D.; Stenson, K.; Vaadering, E.W.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M

    2003-04-01

    Over 7000 events containing a fully reconstructed D D-bar pair have been extracted from data recorded by the FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab. Preliminary results from a study of correlations between D and D-bar mesons are presented. Correlations are used to study perturbative QCD predictions and investigate non-perturbative effects. We also present a preliminary result on the production of {psi}(3770)

  4. A preliminary evaluation of the correlation between regional energy phosphates and resting state functional connectivity in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chun S; Lin, Pan; Vitaliano, Gordana; Wang, Kristina; Villafuerte, Rosemond; Lukas, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Impaired brain energy metabolism is among the leading hypotheses in the pathogenesis of affective disorders and linking energy phosphates with states of tissue-function activity is a novel and non-invasive approach to differentiate healthy from unhealthy states. Resting state functional MRI (fMRI) has been established as an important tool for mapping cerebral regional activity and phosphorous chemical shift imaging ((31)P CSI) has been applied to measure levels of energy phosphates and phospholipids non-invasively in order to gain insight into the possible etiology of affective disorders. This is an initial attempt to identify the existence of a correlation between regional energy phosphates and connectivity at nodes of the posterior default mode network (DMN). Resting state fMRI in conjunction with (31)P 2D CSI was applied to 11 healthy controls and 11 depressed patients at 3 T. We found that differences between the two groups exist in correlation of lateral posterior parietal cortex functional connectivity and regional Pi/PCr. Results of this study indicate that resting-state-fMRI-guided (31)P CSI can provide new insight into depression via regional energy phosphates and functional connectivity.

  5. Measurement of the Total Cross Section and Energy - Correlations for Electron-Positron Annihilation Into Hadrons at 29 GEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltsley, Brian Keith

    This work describes measurements of the total cross section and the energy-energy correlation cross section for hadronic events produced in electron-positron annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV. The performance of the MAC detector at PEP, featuring total absorption calorimetry and charged particle tracking over nearly the full solid angle, is examined and found to meet the original design requirements. The unique and optimal features of MAC are fully exploited to reduce the systematics involved in both measurements, resulting in significant quantitative tests of the theory of quantum chromodynamics. Special attention is focussed on radiative corrections to the total cross section, which constitute a critical component of the acceptance determination, and for the first time the effects of higher order than (alpha)('3) QED processes are included. The total cross section measurement yields R = 3.91 with a total error of (+OR-)2.7%, an accuracy not previously attained by other experiments. For the energy-energy correlation cross section, the consequences of combining pure quantum chromodynamics with contrasting fragmentation models are explored and compared with the data, and result in different values for the strong coupling constant, (alpha)(,s) (TURNEQ) 0.13 (+OR-) 0.02 for incoherent jet formation and 0.24 (+OR-) 0.04 in the string model.

  6. High energy behavior of a six-point R-current correlator in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Jochen; Hentschinski, Martin; Mischler, Anna-Maria [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Ewerz, Carlo [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI; Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT), Villazzano (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    We study the high energy limit of a six-point R-current correlator in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory for finite N{sub c}. We make use of the framework of perturbative resummation of large logarithms of the energy. More specifically, we apply the (extended) generalized leading logarithmic approximation. We find that the same conformally invariant two-to-four gluon vertex occurs as in non-supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. As a new feature we find a direct coupling of the four-gluon t-channel state to the R-current impact factor. (orig.)

  7. Statistical-noise reduction in correlation analysis of high-energy nuclear collisions with event-mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, R L

    2016-01-01

    The error propagation and statistical-noise reduction method of Reid and Trainor for two-point correlation applications in high-energy collisions is extended to include particle-pair references constructed by mixing two particles from all event-pair combinations within event subsets of arbitrary size. The Reid-Trainor method is also applied to other particle-pair mixing algorithms commonly used in correlation analysis of particle production from high-energy nuclear collisions. The statistical-noise reduction, inherent in the Reid-Trainor event-mixing procedure, is shown to occur for these other event-mixing algorithms as well. Monte Carlo simulation results are presented which verify the predicted degree of noise reduction. In each case the final errors are determined by the bin-wise particle-pair number, rather than by the bin-wise single-particle count.

  8. Correlation between Cohesive Energy Density, Fractional Free Volume, and Gas Transport Properties of Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport properties of the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA materials to He, N2, O2, and CO2 are correlated with two polymer molecular structure parameters, that is, cohesive energy density (CED and fractional free volume (FFV, determined by the group contribution method. In our preceding paper, the attempt was made to approximate EVA permeability using a linear function of 1/FFV as predicted by the free volume theory. However, the deviations from this relationship appeared to be significant. In this paper, it is shown that permeation of gas molecules is controlled not only by free volume but also by the polymer cohesive energy. Moreover, the behavior of CO2 was found to differ significantly from that of other gases. In this instance, the correlation is much better when diffusivity instead of permeability is taken into account in a modified transport model.

  9. Statistical-noise reduction in correlation analysis of high-energy nuclear collisions with event-mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.L., E-mail: ray@physics.utexas.edu; Bhattarai, P.

    2016-06-11

    The error propagation and statistical-noise reduction method of Reid and Trainor for two-point correlation applications in high-energy collisions is extended to include particle-pair references constructed by mixing two particles from all event-pair combinations within event subsets of arbitrary size. The Reid–Trainor method is also applied to other particle-pair mixing algorithms commonly used in correlation analysis of particle production from high-energy nuclear collisions. The statistical-noise reduction, inherent in the Reid–Trainor event-mixing procedure, is shown to occur for these other event-mixing algorithms as well. Monte Carlo simulation results are presented which verify the predicted degree of noise reduction. In each case the final errors are determined by the bin-wise particle-pair number, rather than by the bin-wise single-particle count.

  10. Correlation between the TeV and X-ray emission in high--energy peaked BL Lac objects

    CERN Document Server

    Katarzynski, K; Tavecchio, F; Maraschi, L; Fossati, G; Mastichiadis, A

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the correlation between the evolution of the TeV emission and X-ray radiation observed in high-energy peaked BL Lac objects. We describe such a correlation by a simple power law. In the first part of this work we present correlations obtained for the activity of Mrk~501 observed in 1997 April and for the activity of Mrk~421 observed in 2000 February. We also discuss results of similar correlation obtained for this source by other authors. They report an almost quadratic correlations observed between the evolution of the TeV and X-ray emission. In the second part of this paper we present a phenomenological model which describes the evolution of the synchrotron and inverse Compton emission of a simple spherical homogeneous source. Neglecting the radiative cooling of the particles we derive analytical expressions that describe the evolution. Then we use a numerical code to investigate the impact of radiative cooling on the evolution. The quadratic correlation observed during the decay phase of the fla...

  11. Simple estimation of electron correlation energy for multi-atomic strong ionic compounds KX and (KX)2 (X = OH, NC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禚淑苹; 居冠之; 韦吉崇; 陈德展

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the calculations and analyses of the intrapair and interpair correlation energy of KX (X = OH, NC) molecules and the results of the transferability of both the innermost intrapair correlation energy and the inner core effect of K and X in KX molecules, we defined and calculated the Kδ- and Xδ-correlation contributions to the total correlation energy of KX molecules. With the comparison of the pair correlation energy of K+, X- and KX systems, we present a simple estimation method to estimate the electron correlation energy of strong ionic compound by summarizing the correlation energy of its constituent ion and ionic group. By using this simple method, the reasonable estimation results of the correlation energy of (KOH)2 and (KNC)2 have been obtained at mp2/6-311++G(d) level with Gaussian98 program, and the deviations are very small. Applying the scheme of "Separate Large System into Smaller Ones" to the calculation of electron correlation energy of large ionic compounds, it can not only

  12. Stress-energy tensor correlators in N-dimensional hot flat spaces via the generalized zeta-function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H. T.; Hu, B. L.

    2012-09-01

    We calculate the expectation values of the stress-energy bitensor defined at two different spacetime points x, x‧ of a massless, minimally coupled scalar field with respect to a quantum state at finite temperature T in a flat N-dimensional spacetime by means of the generalized zeta-function method. These correlators, also known as the noise kernels, give the fluctuations of energy and momentum density of a quantum field which are essential for the investigation of the physical effects of negative energy density in certain spacetimes or quantum states. They also act as the sources of the Einstein-Langevin equations in stochastic gravity which one can solve for the dynamics of metric fluctuations as in spacetime foams. In terms of constitutions these correlators are one rung above (in the sense of the correlation—BBGKY or Schwinger-Dyson—hierarchies) the mean (vacuum and thermal expectation) values of the stress-energy tensor which drive the semiclassical Einstein equation in semiclassical gravity. The low- and the high-temperature expansions of these correlators are also given here: at low temperatures, the leading order temperature dependence goes like TN while at high temperatures they have a T2 dependence with the subleading terms exponentially suppressed by e-T. We also discuss the singular behavior of the correlators in the x‧ → x coincident limit as was done before for massless conformal quantum fields. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  13. Correlation between Quantumchemically Calculated LUMO Energies and the Electrochemical Window of Ionic Liquids with Reduction-Resistant Anions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Buijs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum chemical calculations showed to be an excellent method to predict the electrochemical window of ionic liquids with reduction-resistant anions. A good correlation between the LUMO energy and the electrochemical window is observed. Surprisingly simple but very fast semiempirical calculations are in full record with density functional theory calculations and are a very attractive tool in the design and optimization of ionic liquids for specific purposes.

  14. Accurate double many-body expansion potential energy surface of HS2A2A‧) by scaling the external correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu-Lu, Zhang; Yu-Zhi, Song; Shou-Bao, Gao; Yuan, Zhang; Qing-Tian, Meng

    2016-05-01

    A globally accurate single-sheeted double many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the first excited state of HS2 by fitting the accurate ab initio energies, which are calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. By using the double many-body expansion-scaled external correlation method, such calculated ab initio energies are then slightly corrected by scaling their dynamical correlation. A grid of 2767 ab initio energies is used in the least-square fitting procedure with the total root-mean square deviation being 1.406 kcal·mol-1. The topographical features of the HS2(A2A‧) global potential energy surface are examined in detail. The attributes of the stationary points are presented and compared with the corresponding ab initio results as well as experimental and other theoretical data, showing good agreement. The resulting potential energy surface of HS2(A2A‧) can be used as a building block for constructing the global potential energy surfaces of larger S/H molecular systems and recommended for dynamic studies on the title molecular system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304185), the Taishan Scholar Project of Shandong Province, China, the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. ZR2014AM022), the Shandong Province Higher Educational Science and Technology Program, China (Grant No. J15LJ03), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561957), and the Post-doctoral Innovation Project of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. 201402013).

  15. Probing dark energy with steerable wavelets through correlation of WMAP and NVSS local morphological measures

    CERN Document Server

    McEwen, J D; Hobson, M P; Vandergheynst, P; Lasenby, A N

    2007-01-01

    Using local morphological measures on the sphere defined through a steerable wavelet analysis, we examine the three-year WMAP and the NVSS data for correlation induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. The steerable wavelet constructed from the second derivative of a Gaussian allows one to define three local morphological measures, namely the signed-intensity, orientation and elongation of local features. Detections of correlation between the WMAP and NVSS data are made with each of these morphological measures. The most significant detection is obtained in the correlation of the signed-intensity of local features at a significance of 99.9%. By inspecting signed-intensity sky maps, it is possible for the first time to see the correlation between the WMAP and NVSS data by eye. Foreground contamination and instrumental systematics in the WMAP data are ruled out as the source of all significant detections of correlation. Our results provide new insight on the ISW effect by probing the morphological nat...

  16. Correlation of high energy muons with primary composition in extensive air shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Ozaki, S.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahasi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high energy muons above 200 GeV in extensive air showers has been made for studying high energy interaction and primary composition of cosmic rays of energies in the range 10 to the 14th power approx. 10 to the 15th power eV. The muon energies are estimated from the burst sizes initiated by the muons in the rock, which are measured by four layers of proportional counters, each of area 5 x 2.6 sq m, placed at 30 m.w.e. deep, Funasaka tunnel vertically below the air shower array. These results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on the scaling model and the fireball model for two primary compositions, all proton and mixed.

  17. Prediction of non-identical particle correlations for the Beam Energy Scan program

    CERN Document Server

    Poniatowska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Femtoscopy of two non-identical particles in heavy ion collisions enables one to study the space-time asymmetry in the particle's emission process. Theoretical studies based on EPOS model performed for collision energies from the Beam Energy Scan program in STAR allow us to investigate the dependence of source sizes and dynamics effects. Obtained information will enable us to predict the collective behaviour of femtoscopic particle's source.

  18. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassani, Davide; Simbula, Angelica; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs.

  19. Energy correlations of photon pairs generated by a silicon microring resonator probed by Stimulated Four Wave Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Grassani, Davide; Pirotta, Stefano; Galli, Matteo; Menotti, Matteo; Harris, Nicholas C; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Galland, Christophe; Liscidini, Marco; Bajoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Compact silicon integrated devices, such as micro-ring resonators, have recently been demonstrated as efficient sources of quantum correlated photon pairs. The mass production of integrated devices demands the implementation of fast and reliable techniques to monitor the device performances. In the case of time-energy correlations, this is particularly challenging, as it requires high spectral resolution that is not currently achievable in coincidence measurements. Here we reconstruct the joint spectral density of photons pairs generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon ring resonator by studying the corresponding stimulated process, namely stimulated four wave mixing. We show that this approach, featuring high spectral resolution and short measurement times, allows one to discriminate between nearly-uncorrelated and highly-correlated photon pairs.

  20. Strong correlations of neutron star radii with the slopes of nuclear matter incompressibility and symmetry energy at saturation

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, N; Fortin, M; Pais, H; Providência, C; Raduta, Ad R; Sulaksono, A

    2016-01-01

    We examine the correlations of neutron star radii with the nuclear matter incompressibility, symmetry energy, and their slopes, which are the key parameters of the equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron star radii and the EoS parameters are evaluated using a representative set of 24 Skyrme-type effective forces and 18 relativistic mean field models, and two microscopic calculations, all describing 2$M_\\odot$ neutron stars. Unified EoSs for the inner-crust-core region have been built for all the phenomenological models, both relativistic and non-relativistic. Our investigation shows the existence of a strong correlation of the neutron star radii with the linear combination of the slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients at the saturation density. Such correlations are found to be almost independent of the neutron star mass in the range $0.6\\text{-}1.8M_{\\odot}$. This correlation can be linked to the empirical relation existing between the st...

  1. Revisiting the Correlations of Peak Luminosity with Spectral Lag and Peak Energy of the Observed Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yun-A.; Chang, Heon-Young

    2016-12-01

    An analysis of light curves and spectra of observed gamma-ray bursts in gamma-ray ranges is frequently demanded because the prompt emission contains immediate details regarding the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We have revisited the relationship between the collimation-corrected peak luminosity and the spectral lag, investigating the lag-luminosity relationships in great detail by focusing on spectral lags resulting from all possible combinations of channels. Firstly, we compiled the opening angle data and demonstrated that the distribution of opening angles of 205 long GRBs is represented by a double Gaussian function having maxima at 0.1 and 0.3 radians. We confirmed that the peak luminosity and the spectral lag are anti-correlated, both in the observer frame and in the source frame. We found that, in agreement with our previous conclusion, the correlation coefficient improves significantly in the source frame. It should be noted that spectral lags involving channel 2 (25-50 keV) yield high correlation coefficients, where Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) has four energy channels (channel 1: 15-25 keV, channel 2: 25-50 keV, channel 3: 50-100 keV, channel 4: 100-200 keV). We also found that peak luminosity is positively correlated with peak energy.

  2. Searches for correlation between UHECR events and high-energy gamma-ray Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Mirabal, Nestor; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2016-01-01

    The astrophysical sources responsible for ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) continue to be one of the most intriguing mysteries in astrophysics. We present a comprehensive search for correlations between high-energy ($\\gtrapprox 1$ GeV) gamma-ray events from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and UHECRs ($\\gtrapprox 60$ EeV) detected by the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory. We perform two separate searches. First, we conduct a standard cross-correlation analysis between the arrival directions of 148 UHECRs and 360 gamma-ray sources in the Second Catalog of Hard Fermi-LAT sources (2FHL). Second, we search for a possible correlation between UHECR directions and unresolved Fermi-LAT gamma-ray emission. For the latter, we use three different methods: a stacking technique with both a model-dependent and model-independent background estimate, and a cross-correlation function analysis. We also test for statistically significant excesses in gamma rays from signal regions centered on Cen A and t...

  3. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-03-18

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v_{3}^{2}{2}=⟨cos3(ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2})⟩, where ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2} is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη=η_{1}-η_{2}. Nonzero v_{3}^{2}{2} is directly related to the previously observed large-Δη narrow-Δϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v_{3}^{2}{2} persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v_{3}^{2}{2} is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v_{3}^{2}{2} for central collisions shows a minimum near sqrt[s_{NN}]=20  GeV.

  4. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ GeV to 200 GeV. The third harmonic $v_3^2\\{2\\}=\\langle \\cos3(\\phi_1-\\phi_2)\\rangle$, where $\\phi_1-\\phi_2$ is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs $\\Delta\\eta = \\eta_1-\\eta_2$. Non-zero {\\vthree} is directly related to the previously observed large-$\\Delta\\eta$ narrow-$\\Delta\\phi$ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) phase. For sufficiently central collisions, $v_3^2\\{2\\}$ persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV suggesting that QGP may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies however, $v_3^2\\{2\\}$ is consistent with zero. When scaled by pseudorapidity density of charged particle multiplicity per participating nuc...

  5. Low Energy Constants from the zero mode contribution to the pseudo-scalar correlator

    CERN Document Server

    Shcheredin, S

    2005-01-01

    We apply different types of overlap operators in quenched QCD simulations to compute the zero mode contribution to the pseudo-scalar correlator. In particular we use the conventional Neuberger Dirac operator and the overlap hypercube Dirac operator. Confronting our data with the analytical predictions by Chiral Perturbation Theory we evaluate the pion decay constant and the parameter \\alpha of the quenched chiral Lagrangian.

  6. A new method to determine the energy of vanishing flow, using particle-particle azimuthal correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buta, A. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire]|[Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Cussol, D. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Auger, G.; Cabot, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Cassagnou, Y. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Crema, E. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire]|[Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; El Masri, Y. [Louvain Univ., Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Unite de Physique Nucleaire; and others

    1996-09-01

    Measuring the in-plane flow parameter appears to be a promising method to gain information on the equation of state of nuclear matter. A new method, based on particle-particle azimuthal correlations is proposed. This method does not require the knowledge of the reaction plane. The collisions Zn+Ni and Ar+Al are presented as an example. (K.A.).

  7. System size and energy dependence of near-side di-hadron correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Agakishiev, G; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anderson, B D; Anson, C D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barnby, L S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Geurts, F; Ghosh, P; Gliske, S; Gorbunov, Y N; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kizka, V; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Koroleva, L; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, L; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Lu, Y; Lukashov, E V; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan,; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Steadman, S G; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Jr.,; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbæ, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Witzke, W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y

    2011-01-01

    Two-particle azimuthal ($\\Delta\\phi$) and pseudorapidity ($\\Delta\\eta$) correlations using a trigger particle with large transverse momentum ($p_T$) in $d$+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}$ =\\xspace 62.4 GeV and 200~GeV from the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The \

  8. The broad away side of azimuthal correlations: 3 vs 2 final state particles in high energy nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Magnin, J; Ortiz, Antonio; Paic, G; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-01-01

    In high energy heavy ion collisions at RHIC there are important aspects of the medium induced dynamics, that are still not well understood. In particular, there is a broadening and even a double hump structure of the away-side peak appearing in azimuthal correlation studies in Au+Au collisions which is absent in p+p collisions at the same energies. These features are already present but suppressed in p+p collisions: 2 to 3 parton processes produce such structures but are suppressed with respect to 2 to 2 processes. We argue that in A+A collisions the different geometry for the trajectories of 3 as opposed to 2 particles in the final state, together with the medium induced energy loss effects on the different cross sections, create a scenario that enhances processes with 3 particles in the final state, which gives on average this double hump structure.

  9. Measurement of 4-jet production cross sections and transverse energy correlations with the ATLAS detector (WG2)

    CERN Document Server

    Ridel, Melissa; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The production of multi-jet final states at hadron colliders probes pQCD at several mass scales. The processes can also be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the production of 4-jets final states in in 20.3 /fb of data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The measurements have been performed differentially as a function of a variety of kinematic and topological observables and compared with state-of-the-art theory calculations at NLO in pQCD and with the predictions of several MC generators. The collaboration has also used multi-jets events in data taken at an effective integrated luminosity of 158 /pb at a center-of-mass energy of 7TeV to measure the transverse energy correlation and its asymmetry and derive a measurement of the strong coupling constant.

  10. Ab initio correlated study of the Al13H- anion: Isomers, their kinetic stability and vertical detachment energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moc, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    We report correlated ab initio calculations for the Al13H- cluster anion isomers, their kinetic stability and vertical detachment energies (VDEs). Of the two most energetically favored anion structures involving H atom in terminal and threefold bridged sites of the icosahedral Al13-, the higher energy ‘threefold bridged' isomer is shown to be of low kinetic stability. Our results are consistent with the recent photoelectron spectroscopy (PE) study of Grubisic et al. who observed two distinct Al13H- isomers, one of them identified as ‘metastable'. The VDE energies computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level for the ‘terminal' and ‘threefold bridged' Al13H- isomers of 3.21 and 2.32 eV are in good agreement with those determined in the PE study.

  11. Estimation of Energy Equation Correlate of CMEs with X-Ray Flares during Solar Cycle 23rd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Mosalam; Shaltout, Mosalam; Ramy Mawad, Rr.

    . The aim of this paper is estimating the energy equation of CMEs with associated X-ray flares. In addition, we studied, when and where X-ray flares can eject CMEs? We are used CMEs data which observed from SOHO/LASCO, during the full solar cycle 23rd (1996- 2006), we have 12433 events. Also we are used the X-Ray flares data observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GEOS), during the same interval (1996-2006) in the 1-8 Ao GEOS Channel, it is recorded 22688 X-ray flare events. We had estimated energy equation between CMEs and associated X-ray flares during solar cycle 23rd (1996-2006). It is found the energy equation between them is polynomial series with correlation coefficient 92%. The characteristics of the CMEs and associated X-ray flares have been studied.

  12. A new correlation between solar energy radiation and some atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, Antonio; Bonnici, Maurizio; Madonia, Mauro; Trancossi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The energy balance for an atmospheric layer near the soil is evaluated. By integrating it over the whole day period a linear relationship between the global daily solar radiation incident on a horizontal surface and the product of the sunshine hours at clear sky with the maximum temperature variation in the day is achieved. The results show a comparable accuracy with some well recognized solar energy models such as the \\ang-Prescott one, at least for Mediterranean climatic area. Validation of the result has been performed using old dataset which are almost contemporary and relative to the same sites with the ones used for comparison.

  13. Correlations in light nuclei and their relation to fine tuning and uncertainty quantifications of many body forces in low-energy nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lupu, Sergiu; Gazit, Doron

    2015-01-01

    The large nucleon-nucleon scattering length, and the isospin approximate symmetry, are low energy properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). These entail correlations in the binding energies of light nuclei, e.g., the A=3 iso-multiplet, and Tjon's correlation between the binding energy of three and four body nuclei. Using a new representation of these, we establish that they translate into a correlation between different short-range contributions to three body forces in chiral effective field theory of low-energy nuclear physics. We demonstrate that these correlations should be taken into account in order to avoid fine-tuning in the calibration of three body forces. We relate this to the role of correlations in uncertainty quantification of non-renormalizable effective field theories of the nuclear regime. In addition, we show that correlations can be useful in assessing the importance of forces induced by renormalization group (RG) transformations. We give numerical evidence that such RG transformations can...

  14. SPECTRAL-WEIGHT TRANSFER - BREAKDOWN OF LOW-ENERGY-SCALE SUM-RULES IN CORRELATED SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEINDERS, MBJ; ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the spectral-weight transfer from the high- to the low-energy scale by means of exact diagonalization of finite clusters for the Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer model. We find that the spectral-weight transfer is very sensitive to the hybridization strength as well as to the

  15. The multiplicity and the spectra of secondaries correlated with the leading particle energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglov, N. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The spectra of leading particles of different nature in pp-collisions at E sub 0 = 33 GeV are obtained. The multiplicities and the spectra of secondaries, mesons, gamma-quanta, lambda and lambda-hyperons and protons for different leading particle energy ranges are determined.

  16. Communication: Multipole approximations of distant pair energies in local correlation methods with pair natural orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of multipole approximations for distant pair energies in local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) as introduced by Hetzer et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 290, 143 (1998)] is investigated for three chemical reactions involving molecules with up to 92 atoms. Various iterative and non-iterative approaches are compared, using different energy thresholds for distant pair selection. It is demonstrated that the simple non-iterative dipole-dipole approximation, which has been used in several recent pair natural orbitals (PNO)-LMP2 and PNO-LCCSD (local coupled-cluster with singles and doubles) methods, may underestimate the distant pair energies by up to 50% and can lead to significant errors in relative energies, unless very tight thresholds are used. The accuracy can be much improved by including higher multipole orders and by optimizing the distant pair amplitudes iteratively along with all other amplitudes. A new approach is presented in which very small special PNO domains for distant pairs are used in the iterative approach. This reduces the number of distant pair amplitudes by 3 orders of magnitude and keeps the additional computational effort for the iterative optimization of distant pair amplitudes minimal.

  17. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  18. Multicontextual correlates of energy-dense, nutrient-poor snack food consumption by adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicole; Miller, Jonathan M; Eisenberg, Marla E; Watts, Allison W; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2017-05-01

    Frequent consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor snack foods is an eating behavior of public health concern. This study was designed to inform strategies for reducing adolescent intake of energy-dense snack foods by identifying individual and environmental influences. Surveys were completed in 2009-2010 by 2540 adolescents (54% females, mean age = 14.5 ± 2.0, 80% nonwhite) in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota schools. Daily servings of energy-dense snack food was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire that asked about consumption of 21 common snack food items, such as potato chips, cookies, and candy. Data representing characteristics of adolescents' environments were collected from parents/caregivers, friends, school personnel, Geographic Information System sources, and a content analysis of favorite television shows. Linear regression was used to examine relationships between each individual or environmental characteristic and snack food consumption in separate models and also to examine relationships in a model including all of the characteristics simultaneously. The factors found to be significantly associated with higher energy-dense snack food intake represented individual attitudes/behaviors (e.g., snacking while watching television) and characteristics of home/family (e.g., home unhealthy food availability), peer (friends' energy-dense snack food consumption), and school (e.g., student snack consumption norms) environments. In total, 25.5% of the variance in adolescents' energy-dense snack food consumption was explained when factors from within each context were examined together. The results suggest that the design of interventions targeting improvement in the dietary quality of adolescents' snack food choices should address relevant individual factors (e.g., eating while watching television) along with characteristics of their home/family (e.g., limiting the availability of unhealthy foods), peer (e.g., guiding the efforts of a peer leader in

  19. An evaluation of exchange-correlation functionals for the calculations of the ionization energies for atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segala, Maximiliano [Universidade Estadual do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Oscar Matzembacher 475, 96760-000, Tapes, RS (Brazil); Chong, Delano P. [Department of Chemistry, 2036 Main Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1 (Canada)], E-mail: chong@chem.ubc.ca

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, ionization energies of gas-phase atoms and molecules are calculated by energy-difference method and by approximate transition-state models with density functional theory (DFT). To determine the best functionals for ionization energies, we first study the H to Ar atoms. An approximation is used in which the electron density is first obtained from Kohn-Sham computations with an exchange-correlation potential V{sub xc} known as statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP), after which the energy is computed from that density with 59 different exchange-correlation energy functionals E{sub xc}. For the 18 atoms, the best E{sub xc} functional providing an average absolute deviation (AAD) of only 0.110 eV is one known as the Krieger-Chen-Iafrate-Savin functional modified by Krieger, Chen, Iafrate, and Kurth, if one uses the spin-polarized spherical atom description. On the other hand, if one imposes the condition of integer-electrons, the best functional is the Becke 1997 functional modified by Wilson, Bradley, and Tozer, with an AAD of 0.107 eV, while several other functionals perform almost as well. For molecules, we can achieve an accuracy of AAD = 0.21 eV for valence VIPs of nonperhalo molecules with {delta}E(V{sub xc} = SAOP;PBE0) using integer-electron description. For perhalo molecules our best approach is {delta}E(V{sub xc} from either E{sub xc} or SAOP;mPW1PW) with full symmetry to obtain an AAD = 0.24 eV.

  20. Jet quenching and γ-jet correlation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division Mailstop 70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94740 (United States); Zhu, Yan [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Medium modification of γ-tagged jets in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is investigated within a linearized Boltzmann transport model which includes both elastic parton scattering and induced gluon emission. In Pb + Pb collisions at √(s)=2.76 TeV, a γ-tagged jet is seen to lose 15% of its energy at 0–10% central collisions. Simulations also point to a sizable azimuthal angle broadening of γ-tagged jets at the tail of a distribution which should be measurable when experimental errors are significantly reduced. An enhancement at large z{sub jet}=p{sub L}/E{sub jet} in jet fragmentation function at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be attributed to the dominance of leading particles in the reconstructed jet. A γ-tagged jet fragmentation function is shown to be more sensitive to jet quenching, therefore a better probe of the jet transport parameter.

  1. The Correlation between the Energy Gap and the Pseudogap Temperature in Cuprates: The YCBCZO and LSHCO Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Szczȩśniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the influence of the hole density, the out-of-plane or in-plane disorder, and the isotopic oxygen mass on the zero temperature energy gap (2Δ(0 Y1-xCaxBa2Cu1-yZny3O7-δ (YCBCZO and La1.96-xSrxHo0.04CuO4 (LSHCO superconductors. It has been found that the energy gap is visibly correlated with the value of the pseudogap temperature (T⋆. On the other hand, no correlation between 2Δ(0 and the critical temperature (TC has been found. The above results mean that the value of the dimensionless ratio 2Δ0/kBTC can vary very strongly together with the chemical composition, while the parameter 2Δ(0/kBT⋆ does not change significantly. In the paper, the analytical formula which binds the zero temperature energy gap and the pseudogap temperature has been also presented.

  2. Azimuthal anisotropy of long-range correlations at LHC energy in Monte Carlo model with string fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-range multiplicity correlations in intervals separated in pseudorapidity and azimuth are studied in the framework of string fusion approach. We applied a Monte Carlo model, in which the string configurations in the transverse plane and rapidity are simulating event-by-event. The string interaction is realized in the lattice string fusion approach with introduction of a grid in the transverse plane. We assumed that the azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is caused by parton energy loss traveling trough the media formed by clusters of fused strings : Δpt/Δx = −α(pt √η2/3, where η is a string density. In the cellular approach the Bresenham’s line algorithm has been applied. It is obtained that in AA collisions, the parton energy loss seems to play considerable role, in particular, by providing large contribution to the correlation of mean transverse momentum with multiplicity. The developed approach provides non-zero values flows in p-Pb collisions at LHC energies and produces the pattern similar to the one of the experimental di-hadron analysis.

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy of long-range correlations at LHC energy in Monte Carlo model with string fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    Long-range multiplicity correlations in intervals separated in pseudorapidity and azimuth are studied in the framework of string fusion approach. We applied a Monte Carlo model, in which the string configurations in the transverse plane and rapidity are simulating event-by-event. The string interaction is realized in the lattice string fusion approach with introduction of a grid in the transverse plane. We assumed that the azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is caused by parton energy loss traveling trough the media formed by clusters of fused strings : Δpt/Δx = -α(pt √η)2/3, where η is a string density. In the cellular approach the Bresenham's line algorithm has been applied. It is obtained that in AA collisions, the parton energy loss seems to play considerable role, in particular, by providing large contribution to the correlation of mean transverse momentum with multiplicity. The developed approach provides non-zero values flows in p-Pb collisions at LHC energies and produces the pattern similar to the one of the experimental di-hadron analysis.

  4. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Basically, the energy distribution of bottom-flavored hadrons produced through polarized top quark decays t (↑) →W+ + b (→Xb), is governed by the unpolarized rate and the polar and the azimuthal correlation functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay t (↑) → bW+. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the O (αs) radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process t (↑) → b +W+ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the hadrons produced in polarized top decays. These spin-momentum correlations between the top quark spin and its decay product momenta will allow the detailed studies of the top decay mechanism. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions also enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to test the universality and scaling violations of the bottom-flavored meson fragmentation functions.

  5. Assessment of building cooling energy need through a quasi-steady state model: Simplified correlation for gain-loss mismatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrado, V.; Fabrizio, E. [Dipartimento di Energetica (DENER), Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement a simplified calculation procedure for building net energy need, based on a quasi-steady state model and on a monthly data set. In particular, it is intended to supply a formulation of the dynamic parameters and to adapt them to Italian climatic, typological, constructive and user data. The method was validated by determining the numerical correlations of the gain/loss utilization factor, through a comparison with a detailed building energy simulation software (EnergyPlus). The simulation was run on some test rooms defined by CEN (European Committee for Standardization) and on some real buildings that are representative of the Italian building stock, assuming weather data from different Italian locations (Torino, Roma, Palermo). The work shows that the accuracy of results is greatly affected by nonlinearities in the determination of the heat transfer and that the dynamic parameters are sensitive to some building features which are not taken into account in the CEN correlations. (author)

  6. Gauge-invariant two-point correlator of energy density in deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    The thesis is considering aspects of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics in its deconfining high-temperature phase. We calculate the two-point correlation function of the energy density of the photon in a thermalized gas, at first in the conventional U(1) gauge theory, followed by a calculation, where the photon is identified with the massless gauge mode in deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics. Apart from the fact, that this calculation is interesting from a technical point of view, we can consider several aspects of phenomenological relevance. Since we interpret the two-point correlator of energy density as a measure for the energy transfer, and thus for the electromagnetic interaction of microscopic objects, such as atoms immersed into a photon gas, we are able to give an explanation for the unexpected stability of cold, innergalactic clouds consisting of atomic hydrogen. Subsequently, we evaluate the spatial string tension in deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics, which can be regarded as measure ...

  7. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Moosavi Nejad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Basically, the energy distribution of bottom-flavored hadrons produced through polarized top quark decays t(↑→W++b(→Xb, is governed by the unpolarized rate and the polar and the azimuthal correlation functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay t(↑→bW+. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the O(αs radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process t(↑→b+W+ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the hadrons produced in polarized top decays. These spin-momentum correlations between the top quark spin and its decay product momenta will allow the detailed studies of the top decay mechanism. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions also enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to test the universality and scaling violations of the bottom-flavored meson fragmentation functions.

  8. Dual energy CT for the assessment of lung perfusion-Correlation to scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Sven F.; Becker, Christoph R. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten R.C. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany)], E-mail: thorsten.johnson@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-12-15

    Purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of dual energy CT in the assessment of pulmonary perfusion with reference to pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy. Thirteen patients received both dual energy CT (DECT) angiography (Somatom Definition, Siemens) and ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. Median time between scans was 3 days (range, 0-90). DECT perfusion maps were generated based on the spectral properties of iodine. Two blinded observes assessed DECT angiograms, perfusion maps and scintigrams for presence and location of perfusion defects. The results were compared by patient and by segment, and diagnostic accuracy of DECT perfusion imaging was calculated regarding scintigraphy as standard of reference. Diagnostic accuracy per patient showed 75% sensitivity, 80% specificity and a negative predictive value of 66%. Sensitivity per segment amounted to 83% with 99% specificity, with 93% negative predictive value. Peripheral parts of the lungs were not completely covered by the 80 kVp detector in 85% of patients. CTA identified corresponding emboli in 66% of patients with concordant perfusion defects in DECT and scintigraphy. Dual energy CT perfusion imaging is able to display pulmonary perfusion defects with good agreement to scintigraphic findings. DECT can provide a pulmonary CT angiogram, high-resolution morphology of the lung parenchyma and perfusion information in one single exam.

  9. Hadron Correlations at Energies from GeV to TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, W.

    One of the central issues in High Energy Physics is the close interchange between Theory and Experiment. Ever since I know Andrzej Bia{\\l}as, I know him as one of the theorists most interested in experimental data. This has naturally led to continuous fruitful contacts. Even though we have been working somehow together since about 1968, we so far have only one single publication in common. This was back in 1969 and it was on means to efficiently study what we then called (exclusive) Multihadron Final States. At that time this meant 3- or at best 4-particle final states of two-hadron collisions at cms energies of some 4 GeV (not TeV!). The field of multiparticle dynamics was in fact the domain of Polish high-energy physicists. The first of a very successful (and still lasting) series of annual International Symposia on Multiparticle Dynamics was organized in Paris in 1970, but essentially by Polish physicists. Andrzej himself was not attending, but it was he who organized the third in these series in (of course) Zakopane. Since heavy ion-collisions, another field of major interest for Andrzej, will be covered by others, I here will restrict myself mainly to the collisions of two elementary particles.

  10. Hadron Correlations at Energies from GeV to TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Kittel, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    One of the central issues in High Energy Physics is the close interchange between Theory and Experiment. Ever since I know Andrzej Bia{\\l}as, I know him as one of the theorists most interested in experimental data. This has naturally led to continuous fruitful contacts. Even though we have been working somehow together since about 1968, we so far have only one single publication in common. This was back in 1969 and it was on means to efficiently study what we then called (exclusive) Multihadron Final States. At that time this meant 3- or at best 4-particle final states of two-hadron collisions at cms energies of some 4 GeV (not TeV!). The field of multiparticle dynamics was in fact the domain of Polish high-energy physicists. The first of a very successful (and still lasting) series of annual International Symposia on Multiparticle Dynamics was organized in Paris in 1970, but essentially by Polish physicists. Andrzej himself was not attending, but it was he who organized the third in these series in (of cours...

  11. The consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks: prevalence and key correlates among Canadian high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagba, Sunday; Langille, Don; Asbridge, Mark

    2013-01-01

    An emerging body of research has reported high consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks among young adults, particularly college students. However, little is known about adolescents' consumption of these drinks. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks and to examine its correlates among Canadian high school students. We used a nationally representative sample of 36 155 Canadian students in grades 7 to 12 who participated in the 2010/2011 Youth Smoking Survey. About 20% of Canadian high school students reported consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks in the last year, with considerable variation across provinces. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the odds of consumption of these drinks were higher among students in lower grades (grades 7 and 8) and among students who identified their ethnicity as black or "other." Consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks was positively associated with substance use (current smoking [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.95], past-year heavy drinking [adjusted OR 3.41, 95% CI 2.84-4.09] and marijuana use [adjusted OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.90-2.76]), absence from school, participation in school team sports and having more weekly spending money. Students who felt more connected to school and had an academic average of 70% or higher were less likely to consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks. The consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks is an emerging public health concern. Consumption of these drinks is substantial among Canadian high school students and can lead to many potential harms, both acute (e.g., injury) and long term (e.g., increased alcohol dependence). Our findings highlight the need for further research into the long-term effects of consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks among young people, as well as the development of interventions aimed at reducing consumption of these drinks.

  12. Depletion of density of states near Fermi energy induced by disorder and electron correlation in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Han-Jin; Nahm, Tschang-Uh; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, W.-G.; Oh, S.-J.; Hong, J.-P.; Kim, C.-O.

    2000-03-01

    We have performed high resolution photoemission study of substitutionally disordered alloys Cu-Pt, Cu-Pd, Cu-Ni, and Pd-Pt. The ratios between alloy spectra and pure metal spectra are found to have dips at the Fermi level when the residual resistivity is high and when rather strong repulsive electron-electron interaction is expected. This is in accordance with Altshuler and Aronov's model which predicts depletion of density of states at the Fermi level when both disorder and electron correlation are present.

  13. Quantifying Correlations Between Isovector Observables and the Density Dependence of Nuclear Symmetry Energy away from Saturation Density

    CERN Document Server

    Fattoyev, F J; Li, Bao-An

    2014-01-01

    According to the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, the nuclear symmetry energy $S(\\rho)$ and its slope $L(\\rho)$ at arbitrary densities can be decomposed in terms of the density and momentum dependence of the single-nucleon potentials in isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter which are potentially accessible to experiment. We quantify the correlations between several well-known isovector observables and $L(\\rho)$ to locate the density range in which each isovector observable is most sensitive to the density dependence of the $S(\\rho)$. We then study the correlation coefficients between those isovector observables and all the components of the $L(\\rho)$. The neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb is found to be strongly correlated with the $L(\\rho)$ at a subsaturation density of $\\rho = 0.59 \\rho_0$ through the density dependence of the first-order symmetry potential. Neutron star radii are found to be strongly correlated with the $L(\\rho)$ over a wide range of supra-saturation densities mainly through both the density an...

  14. Two-particle correlations in p+p and Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081214

    In this thesis two-particle correlations in pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle in p+p collisions at beam momenta: 20, 31, 40, 80, and 158 GeV/c are presented. Data were recorded in the NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The results are compared to the EPOS and the UrQMD models as well as to the results from various experiments at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Dedicated comparison analysis was done also on NA49 data of Pb+Pb collisions. The inclusive results in p+p show correlation structures connected with resonance decays, Bose-Einstein statistics, momentum conservation, and strings fragmentation. No structures connected with hard processes were observed even at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. The EPOS model reproduces data fine except of Bose-Einstein enhancement; the UrQMD model shows many disagreements with data. The results provide an insight into forgotten realm of soft physics where jet peaks do not cast shadows onto two-particle...

  15. Simple Cellular Model of Long-Range Multiplicity and $p_t$ Correlations in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vechernin, V V

    2003-01-01

    A simple cellular model for the description of the long-range multiplicity and $p_t$ correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions originating from the string fusion model is proposed. Three versions of the model: without fusion, with local and with global string fusion are formulated. A Gauss approximation which enables explicit analytical calculations of the correlation functions in some asymptotic cases in the framework of the model is developed. The assumptions of the model and the validity of a Gauss approximation are checked up in the simplest (no fusion) case when the explicit solution of the model can be found. The role of a size of cells is analysed. The modification of the results in the case of non-Poissonian distributions is also discussed.

  16. Robust Frame Synchronization for Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Channels Using Energy-Corrected Differential Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Pansoo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent standards for wireless transmission require reliable synchronization for channels with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR as well as with a large amount of frequency offset, which necessitates a robust correlator structure for the initial frame synchronization process. In this paper, a new correlation strategy especially targeted for low SNR regions is proposed and its performance is analyzed. By utilizing a modified energy correction term, the proposed method effectively reduces the variance of the decision variable to enhance the detection performance. Most importantly, the method is demonstrated to outperform all previously reported schemes by a significant margin, for SNRs below 5 dB regardless of the existence of the frequency offsets. A variation of the proposed method is also presented for further enhancement over the channels with small frequency errors. The particular application considered for the performance verification is the second generation digital video broadcasting system for satellites (DVB-S2.

  17. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaee, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Rezaee@USherbrooke.ca; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon [Groupe en Sciences des Radiations, Département de Médecine Nucléaire et Radiobiologie, Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods: Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by{sup 125}I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results: For a single decay of{sup 125}I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm{sup 3} volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions: Ultra-low-energy electrons (<18 eV) substantially contribute to the absorbed dose and to the molecular damage from Auger-electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should

  18. Postprandial Increase in Energy Expenditure Correlates with Body Weight Reduction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Receiving Diet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoyama, Daisuke; Nagao, Mototsugu; Asai, Akira; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazumi; Nakajima, Yasushi; Oikawa, Shinichi; Sugihara, Hitoshi

    2017-04-03

    The clinical significance of energy expenditure (EE) in the treatment of type 2 diabetes has not been fully elucidated. Here we analyzed the relationships between EE and clinical measurements in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving diet therapy. A total of 100 patients (34 women and 66 men) with type 2 diabetes admitted to our hospital for glycemic control were enrolled. The participants received an energy-restricted diet during their hospitalization (median, 15 days). EE was measured in the fasted (FEE) and postprandial (PPEE) states using indirect calorimetry. The postprandial increment of EE (ΔEE) was calculated from the FEE and PPEE (ΔEE=PPEE-FEE). FEE, PPEE, and ΔEE were 0.997±0.203, 1.104±0.213, and 0.107±0.134 kcal/min, respectively. Body weight decreased from 68.7±16.6 to 66.8±16.0 kg (p<0.0001) during hospitalization. FEE and PPEE showed positive correlations with height, body weight, body mass index, and abdominal circumference at admission, but ΔEE was not correlated with these anthropometric measurements. On the other hand, ΔEE was inversely correlated with the body weight change. The association between ΔEE and the body weight change was independent of age, sex, and HbA1c. Postprandial increase in energy expenditure may be a determinant of individual differences in weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes on diet therapy. As a simple surrogate for diet-induced thermogenesis, ΔEE may serve as a useful predictive marker for the efficacy of diet therapy.

  19. Hadron Correlations at Energies from GeV to TeV

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    One of the central issues in High Energy Physics is the close interchange between Theory and Experiment. Ever since I know Andrzej Bia{\\l}as, I know him as one of the theorists most interested in experimental data. This has naturally led to continuous fruitful contacts. Even though we have been working somehow together since about 1968, we so far have only one single publication in common. This was back in 1969 and it was on means to efficiently study what we then called (exclusive) Multihadr...

  20. Fission-fragment energy correlation measurements for /sup 252/Cf(sf) and structures in far-out asymmetric fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreau, G.; Sicre, A.; Caitucoli, F.; Doan, T.P.; Leroux, B.; Martinez, G. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 - Gradignan (France)); Asghar, M. (Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Alger (Algeria)); Benfoughal, T. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 - Gradignan (France); Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Alger (Algeria))

    1985-01-14

    Fragment-mass and kinetic-energy distribution measurements for /sup 252/Cf(sf) have been extended to the far-out asymmetric low-yield fission region of Msub(H) = 190 compared with the existing data that go up to Msub(H) proportional 168. The mass yield Y(m) shows a shoulder for Msub(H) proportional 163 and an important enhancement for Msub(H) > or approx. 176. The (m), sigmasub(EK)(m) and, to a lesser extent, Y(m) distributions show strong and correlated amplitude fluctuations for Msub(H) > or approx. 170. These data indicate strong and rapid changes in deformation of the nascent fragments and the coexistence of more than one deformed-shell stabilized scission configuration for the same mass splits. These structures and those present in the relatively high-yield regions are discussed in terms of the static macro-microscopic potential-energy calculations.

  1. Inductive Magnetic Footpoint Tracking by Combining the Minimum Energy Fit with the Local Correlation Tracking and Doppler Velocity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Ravindra; D. W. Longcope

    2008-03-01

    Time-dependent magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of active region coronal magnetic field require the underlying photospheric magnetic footpoint velocities. The minimum energy fit (MEF) is a new velocity inversion technique to infer the photospheric magnetic footpoint velocities using a pair of vector magnetograms, introduced by Longcope (2004). The MEF selects the smallest overall flow from several consistent flows by minimizing an energy functional. The inferred horizontal and vertical flow fields by the MEF can be further constrained by incorporating the partial or imperfect velocity information obtained through independent means. This hybrid method is expected to give a velocity close to the true magnetic footpoint velocity. Here, we demonstrate that a combination of the MEF, the local correlation tracking (LCT) and Doppler velocity is capable of inferring the velocity close to the photospheric flow.

  2. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, W.E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Holst, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: bodil@cantab.net

    2008-05-15

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  3. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L.; Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M.; Ernst, W. E.; Holst, B.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  4. Effect of removing the no-virtual-pair approximation on the correlation energy of the He isoelectronic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Haruyuki; Tatewaki, Hiroshi

    2007-05-07

    The correlation energies (CEs) for the He-like ions are studied with the virtual-pair approximation (VPA) and with the no-virtual-pair approximation (NVPA). In contrast to the nonrelativistic CEs, the CEs calculated with relativity fell sharply as the nuclear charge Z increased, although the CE calculated with the NVPA was considerably lower than with the VPA for the heavier atoms. It is shown that CE calculated with a Hylleraas-type function implicitly includes the effects of the excitations into negative-energy states, which corresponds to the VPA. The present results verify that the strong dependence on Z of the CE of He-like ions is an essential effect of the relativity.

  5. Transverse momentum fluctuations and $\\Delta\\eta-\\Delta\\phi$ correlations in p+p interactions at the CERN SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00386428; Maksiak, Bartosz

    2013-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE experiment aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. These goals are to be achieved by performing a two dimensional phase diagram (T-\\mu_B) scan by measurements of hadron production properties in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and system size. Close to the critical point an increase of fluctuations is predicted. In this contribution preliminary results on transverse momentum fluctuations and two-particle pseudorapidity/azimuthal angle correlations from the NA61/SHINE energy scan of p+p collisions will be presented. These new results will be compared with NA49 data on central Pb+Pb collisions and model predictions.

  6. Molecular calculations of excitation energies and (hyper)polarizabilities with a statistical average of orbital model exchange-correlation potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, P. R. T.; Gritsenko, O. V.; van Gisbergen, S. J. A.; Baerends, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    An approximate Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation potential νxcSAOP is developed with the method of statistical averaging of (model) orbital potentials (SAOP) and is applied to the calculation of excitation energies as well as of static and frequency-dependent multipole polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities within time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). νxcSAOP provides high quality results for all calculated response properties and a substantial improvement upon the local density approximation (LDA) and the van Leeuwen-Baerends (LB) potentials for the prototype molecules CO, N2, CH2O, and C2H4. For the first three molecules and the lower excitations of the C2H4 the average error of the vertical excitation energies calculated with νxcSAOP approaches the benchmark accuracy of 0.1 eV for the electronic spectra.

  7. Studies of linear correlation factor of dielectric polarization and excess dipolar free energies of amides in apolar solvents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Malathi; R Sabesan; S Krishnan

    2005-09-01

    The Kirkwood–Frohlich correlation factor (), Eyring's parameters and * and the dipolar excess free energies of dilute solutions of formamide, acetamide, -methyl acetamide, , -dimethyl formamide and , -dimethyl acetamide in 1,4-dioxan/benzene were obtained from a measurement of their static dielectric permittivities at 308 K. The fluid structure of these amides is discussed. Both in formamide and acetamide a dimeric linear chain with the individual dipoles more or less parallely oriented is preferred. In -methyl acetamide, the antiparallel orientation of dipoles at lower concentrations turns into a parallel orientation with increase of concentration. In tertiary amides, with increase of concentration, parallel orientation of dipoles with global value of tending to unity is observed. The dipolar excess free energy of mixing in a given solvent is of the order primary amide > secondary amide > tertiary amide.

  8. Correlation energies by the generator coordinate method: computational aspects for quadrupolar deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, M; Heenen, P H

    2004-01-01

    We investigate truncation schemes to reduce the computational cost of calculating correlations by the generator coordinate method based on mean-field wave functions. As our test nuclei, we take examples for which accurate calculations are available. These include a strongly deformed nucleus, 156Sm, a nucleus with strong pairing, 120Sn, the krypton isotope chain which contains examples of soft deformations, and the lead isotope chain which includes the doubly magic 208Pb. We find that the Gaussian overlap approximation for angular momentum projection is effective and reduces the computational cost by an order of magnitude. Cost savings in the deformation degrees of freedom are harder to realize. A straightforward Gaussian overlap approximation can be applied rather reliably to angular-momentum projected states based on configuration sets having the same sign deformation (prolate or oblate), but matrix elements between prolate and oblate deformations must be treated with more care. We propose a two-dimensional ...

  9. The impact of highly correlated potential energy surfaces on the anharmonically corrected IR spectrum of acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Oliver M. D.; Rode, Bernd M.; Bonn, Günther K.; Huck, Christian W.

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses the quality and feasibility of highly correlated ab initio techniques in a vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) approach using acetonitrile as a model system. The topical renormalized coupled-cluster technique exploiting the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian's left eigenstates (i.e. CR-CC(2,3)) is investigated alongside the well-known Hartree-Fock (HF), Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) methods. The inclusion of mode triple interactions is discussed and it is found that the use of an effective core potential (ECP) serves as a viable compromise during the highly demanding task of computing such contributions, thus enabling a grid-based evaluation of three mode interaction terms with coupled cluster techniques also for larger molecules. In this context, a previously proposed reduced coupling scheme [1] is investigated, confirming the applicability of this technique to a system exhibiting a rather complex electronic structure. A combination of Ahlrichs' triple-ζ valence polarized (TZVP) basis set with Dunning's set of core-valence correlation functions is found to deliver results in good agreement with experiment while being computationally very feasible. Since CH3CN exhibits four degenerate vibrational degrees of freedom, it serves as an ideal model system for critically assessing the qualities of the degenerate second-order perturbation theory corrected (DPT2) VSCF technique. Besides fundamental vibrations, a thorough investigation of overtone transitions and combination bands is conducted by means of comparing the results to both available and newly recorded experimental data.

  10. Cross-matching: A modified cross-correlation underlying threshold energy model and match-based depth perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eDoi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional visual perception requires correct matching of images projected to the left and right eyes. The matching process is faced with an ambiguity: part of one eye’s image can be matched to multiple parts of the other eye’s image. This stereo correspondence problem is complicated for random-dot stereograms (RDSs, because dots with an identical appearance produce numerous potential matches. Despite such complexity, human subjects can perceive a coherent depth structure. A coherent solution to the correspondence problem does not exist for anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs, in which luminance contrast is reversed in one eye. Neurons in the visual cortex reduce disparity selectivity for aRDSs progressively along the visual processing hierarchy. A disparity-energy model followed by threshold nonlinearity (threshold energy model can account for this reduction, providing a possible mechanism for the neural matching process. However, the essential computation underlying the threshold energy model is not clear. Here, we propose that a nonlinear modification of cross-correlation, which we term ‘cross-matching’, represents the essence of the threshold energy model. We placed half-wave rectification within the cross-correlation of the left-eye and right-eye images. The disparity tuning derived from cross-matching was attenuated for aRDSs. We simulated a psychometric curve as a function of graded anticorrelation (graded mixture of aRDS and normal RDS; this simulated curve reproduced the match-based psychometric function observed in human near/far discrimination. The dot density was 25% for both simulation and observation. We predicted that as the dot density increased, the performance for aRDSs should decrease below chance (i.e., reversed depth, and the level of anticorrelation that nullifies depth perception should also decrease. We suggest that cross-matching serves as a simple computation underlying the match-based disparity signals in

  11. Baryon-Strangeness Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC BES energies from UrQMD model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations and correlations of conserved charges are sensitive observables for studying the QCD phase transition and critical point in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We have studied the centrality and energy dependence of mixed-cumulants (up to fourth order) between net-baryon and net-strangeness in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, 200 GeV from UrQMD model. To compare with other theoretical calculations, we normalize these mixed-cumulants by various order cumulants of net-strangeness distributions. We found that the results obtained from UrQMD calculations are comparable with the results from Lattice QCD at low temperature and hadron resonance gas model. The ratios of mixed-cumulants ($R_{11}^{BS},R_{13}^{BS},R_{22}^{BS}$,$R_{31}^{BS}$) from UrQMD calculations show weak centrality dependence. However, the mixed-cumulant ratios $R_{11}^{BS}$ and $R_{31}^{BS}$ show strong increase at low energy, while the $R_{13}^{BS}$ snd $R_{22}^{BS}$ are similar at different energies. ...

  12. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  13. Correlation of water with carbon/energy footprints for effective agricultural and livestock products classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsato, Eros; Marinello, Francesco; Tarolli, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    World population is increasing and human diet is becoming of considerable concern for human welfare. Natural resources are overexploited and governments need policies for a good management of the environment. Sustainable agriculture can provide some solutions, as it minimizes inputs, wastes or pollution. The aim of the present study is to provide a combined analysis of different footprints approaches in order to allow comparison of different agricultural and livestock products in terms of efficiency of resource exploitation. Time is the real important variable that influences the footprint. Water use efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions and energy indexes are included in this study. The study takes advantage of indexes collected from a wide bibliography focused on different fresh agricultural products: the target is the definition of a time table of footprints for agricultural products. Starting from a top-down prospective, an analysis of the environmental footprint for different products is an approach to understand which products can be more sustainable for human diet. This study distinguishes different clusters in different sub-cluster of vegetable products and animal products. The classification is based on a comparison of water consumption in relation to yield, greenhouse gas emissions equivalent and energy for a given product quantity. Additionally time is considered, which affects sustainability, in terms of inputs caught for a period. The footprint is spread out in time, thus changing its relevance with respect to the exploitation of a resource. Ultimately, this works wants to propose a new original basis for sustainability metrics, allowing an effective quantitative comparison of food products for a more conscious human diet.

  14. Pion correlations and calorimeter design for high energy heavy ion collisions. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, K.L.

    1997-04-01

    Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV {sup 208}Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered {sup 208}Pb + Pb collisions. An updated multi-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-pion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au + Au reaction, taken with full event characterization.

  15. Pion and kaon correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, K.L.; Wolf, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV {sup 208}Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered {sup 208}Pb + Pb collisions. An upgraded multi-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-pion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au+Au reaction, taken with full event characterization. 35 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Exact solution of the 2d dimer model: Corner free energy, correlation functions and combinatorics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegra, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.allegra@univ-lorraine.fr

    2015-05-15

    In this work, some classical results of the pfaffian theory of the dimer model based on the work of Kasteleyn, Fisher and Temperley are introduced in a fermionic framework. Then we shall detail the bosonic formulation of the model via the so-called height mapping and the nature of boundary conditions is unravelled. The complete and detailed fermionic solution of the dimer model on the square lattice with an arbitrary number of monomers is presented, and finite size effect analysis is performed to study surface and corner effects, leading to the extrapolation of the central charge of the model. The solution allows for exact calculations of monomer and dimer correlation functions in the discrete level and the scaling behavior can be inferred in order to find the set of scaling dimensions and compare to the bosonic theory which predicts particular features concerning corner behaviors. Finally, some combinatorial and numerical properties of partition functions with boundary monomers are discussed, proved and checked with enumeration algorithms.

  17. Testing of coalescence mechanism in high energy heavy ion collisions using two-particle correlations with identified particle trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Subikash; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2016-01-01

    In central Au-Au collisions at top RHIC energy, two particle correlation measurements with identified hadron trigger have shown attenuation of near side proton triggered jet-like yield at intermediate transverse momentum ($p{_T}$), 2$< p{_T} <$ 6 GeV/$\\it{c}$. The attenuation has been attributed to the anomalous baryon enhancement observed in the single inclusive measurements at the same $p{_T}$ range. The enhancement has been found to be in agreement with the models invoking coalescence of quarks as a mechanism of hadronization. Baryon enhancement has also been observed at LHC in the single inclusive spectra. We study the consequence of such an enhancement on two particle correlations at LHC energy within the framework of A Multi Phase Transport (AMPT) model that implements quark coalescence as a mode of hadronization. In this paper we have calculated the proton over pion ratio and the near side per trigger yield associated to pion and proton triggers at intermediate $p{_T}$ from String Melting (SM) ve...

  18. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation coefficients for the (2n, n) Lennard-Jones system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IDA M FRIISBERG; LORENZO COSTIGLIOLA; JEPPE C DYRE

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potential energy correlation coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ system in two,three, and four dimensions. The state points studied include many low-density states at which the virial potential energy correlations are not strong. For these state points we find the roughly linear relation γ∼=3n R/d in d dimensions. This result is discussed in light of the approximate “extended inverse power law” description of generalized LJ potentials (Bailey N P et al. 2008 J. Chem. Phys. 129 184508). In the plot of γ versus R there is in all cases a transition around R ≈ 0.9, above which γ starts to decrease as R approaches unity. This is consistent with the fact that γ → 2n/d for R → 1, a limit that is approached at high densities and/or high temperatures at which the repulsive r−2n term dominates the physics.

  19. PHENIX results on fluctuations and Bose-Einstein correlations in Au+Au collisions from the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Prakhar

    2016-01-01

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan focuses on mapping the QCD phase diagram and pinpointing the location of a possible critical end point. Bose-Einstein correlations and event-by-event fluctuations of conserved quantities, measured as a function of centrality and collision energy, are promising tools in these studies. Recent lattice QCD and statistical thermal model calculations predict that higher-order cumulants of the fluctuations are sensitive indicators of the phase transition. Products of these cumulants can be used to extract the freeze-out parameters (1) and to locate the critical point (2). Two-pion interferometry measurements are predicted to be sensitive to potential softening of the equation of state and prolonged emission duration close to the critical point (3). We present recent PHENIX results on fluctuations of net-charge using high-order cumulants and their products in Au+Au collisions at \\sqsn = 7.7 - 200 GeV, and measurement of two-pion correlation functions and emission-source radii in Cu+Cu and Au...

  20. Correlation between the morphology of unheated staircase and energy performance of residential buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajčić Aleksandar N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a side effect of the need for greater energy efficiency of buildings, there is a problem of decrease of the available interior space affected by the reduction in U-value of parts of thermal building envelope, i.e. an increase in thickness of insulating layer, which is especially present in unheated staircase. Having in mind that present methods of calculation of transmission heat losses through elements of thermal envelope include the adjustment factor which regulates designed temperature conditions if the temperature at the colder side of the element of the thermal envelope differs from that of the external environment, this paper strives to demonstrate that in the case of unheated staircases, this fixed value should be reconsidered and treated as a variable depending on the morphology, i.e. form, size and position of the staircase within the building. This problem has been analyzed on the example of Serbian housing stock and relevant national thermal regulations. Three morphological types of unheated staircases have been distinguished within which three models have been defined and examined with respect to variations in number of floors and percentage of glazing. Average temperatures of staircase volume and temperature correction factors were calculated in following temperature modes: stationary that excluded solar gains and ventilation heat losses and gains, and dynamic with variations in air exchange rates and insolation conditions, expressing in all of the cases variations in calculated values of temperature correction factors in comparison to the prescribed fixed value.

  1. Stochastic rank correlation: a robust merit function for 2D/3D registration of image data obtained at different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Stock, Markus; Figl, Michael; Gendrin, Christelle; Hummel, Johann; Dong, Shuo; Kettenbach, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Bergmann, Helmar

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the authors evaluate a merit function for 2D/3D registration called stochastic rank correlation (SRC). SRC is characterized by the fact that differences in image intensity do not influence the registration result; it therefore combines the numerical advantages of cross correlation (CC)-type merit functions with the flexibility of mutual-information-type merit functions. The basic idea is that registration is achieved on a random subset of the image, which allows for an efficient computation of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. This measure is, by nature, invariant to monotonic intensity transforms in the images under comparison, which renders it an ideal solution for intramodal images acquired at different energy levels as encountered in intrafractional kV imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. Initial evaluation was undertaken using a 2D/3D registration reference image dataset of a cadaver spine. Even with no radiometric calibration, SRC shows a significant improvement in robustness and stability compared to CC. Pattern intensity, another merit function that was evaluated for comparison, gave rather poor results due to its limited convergence range. The time required for SRC with 5% image content compares well to the other merit functions; increasing the image content does not significantly influence the algorithm accuracy. The authors conclude that SRC is a promising measure for 2D/3D registration in IGRT and image-guided therapy in general.

  2. Controlling nanotube dimensions: correlation between composition, diameter, and internal energy of single-walled mixed oxide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Suchitra; Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Nair, Sankar

    2007-12-01

    Control over the diameter of nanotubes is of significance in manipulating their properties, which depend on their dimensions in addition to their structure and composition. This aspect has remained a challenge in both carbon and inorganic nanotubes, since there is no obvious aspect of the formation mechanism that allows facile control over nanotube curvature. Here we develop and analyze a quantitative correlation between the composition, diameter, and internal energy of a class of single-walled mixed oxide aluminosilicogermanate (AlSiGeOH) nanotubes. A series of synthetic AlSiGeOH nanotubes with varying Si/Ge ratio are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction to relate their compositions and diameters. We then study these nanotubes computationally by first parametrizing and validating a suitable interatomic potential model, and then using this potential model to investigate the internal energy of the nanotube as a function of diameter and composition via molecular dynamics simulations. There are minima in the internal energy as a function of diameter which progressively shift to larger nanotube diameters with increasing Ge content. An approximate analytical theory of nanotube diameter control, which contains a small number of physically significant fitted parameters, well describes the computational data by relating the composition and geometry to the strain energy of bending into a nanotube. The predicted composition-dependent shift in the energetically favored diameter follows the experimental trends. We suggest related methods of controlling nanotube energetics and their role in engineering nanotubes of controlled dimensions by liquid-phase chemistry.

  3. Anomaly Detection in Electroencephalogram Signals Using Unconstrained Minimum Average Correlation Energy Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Hussain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Electroencepharogram (EEG is an extremely complex signal with very low signal to noise ratio and these attributed to difficulty in analyzing the signal. Hence for detecting abnormal segment, a distinctive method is required to train the technologist to distinguish the anomalous in EEG data. The objective of this study was to create a framework to analyze EEG signals recorded from epileptic patients by evaluating the potential of UMACE filter to detect changes in single-channel EEG data during routine epilepsy monitoring. Approach: Normally, the peak to side lobe ratio (PSR of a UMACE filter was employed as an indicator if a test data is similar to an authentic class or vice versa, however in this study, the consistent changes of the correlation output known as Region Of Interest (ROI was plotted and monitored. Based on this approach, a novel method to analyze and distinguish variances in scalp EEG as well as comparing both normal and abnormal regions of the patient’s EEG was assessed. The performance of the novelty detection was examined based on the onset and end time of each seizure in the ROI plot. Results: Results showed that using ROI plot of variances one can distinguish irregularities in the EEG data. The advantage of the proposed technique was that it did not require large amount of data for training. Conclusion: As such, it was feasible to perform seizure analysis as well as localizing seizure onsets. In short, the technique can be used as a guideline for faster diagnosis in a lengthy EEG recording.

  4. A quantitative correlational investigation of the definition of key decision variables used for the determination of wind energy systems' feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathleen M.

    Several factors are critical in determining if a wind farm has a high probability of success. These factors include wind energy potential or wind class, sales price, cost of the wind energy generated, market for selling the wind, capacity factor or efficiency of the turbines, capital investment cost, debt and financing, and governmental factors such as taxes and incentives. This research studied the critical factors of thirty-three land based wind farms in the United States with over 20 mega-watts (MW) of capacity that have become operational since 1999. The goal was to develop a simple yet effective decision model using the critical factors to predict an internal rate of return (IRR) and the impact of having a tax credit to supplement the revenue stream. The study found that there are five critical factors that are significantly correlated with the internal rate of return (IRR) of a wind farm project. The critical factors are wind potential or wind class, cost of the wind energy generated, capacity factor or efficiency of the wind turbines, cost of capital investment, and the existence of a federal production tax credit (PTC). The decision model was built using actual wind farm data and industry standards whereby a score from zero to one hundred was coded for each of values except for the production tax credit. Since all the projects qualified for the production tax credit prior to their start up, it was no longer a variable. However, without the presence of this tax credit, the data imply that the projects would not be profitable within the first ten to fifteen years of operation. The scores for each of the categories were totaled and regressed against a calculated internal rate of return. There was ninety-seven percent correlation which was supported by simulation analysis. While this model is not intended to supplant rigorous accounting and financial study, it will help quickly determine if a site has potential and save many hours of analytical work.

  5. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  6. Enhanced localization, energy anomalous diffusion and resonant mode in harmonic chains with correlated mass-spring disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, S. S.; dos Santos, J. L. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we study the vibrational modes and energy spreading in a harmonic chain model with diluted second-neighbors couplings and correlated mass-spring disorder. While all nearest neighbor masses are coupled by an elastic spring, second neighbors springs are introduced with a probability pD. The masses are randomly distributed according to the site connectivity m_i=m_0≤ft(1+1/n_iα\\right) , where ni is the connectivity of the site i and α is a tunable exponent. We show that maximum localization of the vibrational modes is achieved for α ≃ 3/4. The time-evolution of the energy wave-packet is followed after an initial localized excitation. While the participation number remains finite, the energy spread is shown to be sub-diffusive after a displacement and super-diffusive after an impulse excitation. These features are related to the development of a power-law tail in the wave-packet distribution. Further, we unveil that the spring dilution leads to the emergence of a resonant localized state which is signaled by a van Hove singularity in the density of states.

  7. Cumulative approaches to track formation under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation: Phenomenological correlation with formation energies of Frenkel pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespillo, M. L.; Agulló-López, F.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2017-03-01

    An extensive survey for the formation energies of Frenkel pairs, as representative candidates for radiation-induced point defects, is presented and discussed in relation to the cumulative mechanisms (CM) of track formation in dielectric materials under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. These mechanisms rely on the generation and accumulation of point defects during irradiation followed by collapse of the lattice once a threshold defect concentration is reached. The physical basis of those approaches has been discussed by Fecht as a defect-assisted transition to an amorphous phase. Although a first quantitative analysis of the CM model was previously performed for LiNbO3 crystals, we have, here, adopted a broader phenomenological approach. It explores the correlation between track formation thresholds and the energies for Frenkel pair formation for a broad range of materials. It is concluded that the threshold stopping powers can be roughly scaled with the energies required to generate a critical Frenkel pair concentration in the order of a few percent of the total atomic content. Finally, a comparison with the predictions of the thermal spike model is discussed within the analytical Szenes approximation.

  8. Outburst of GX304-1 Monitored with INTEGRAL: Positive Correlation Between the Cyclotron Line Energy and Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klochkov, D.; Doroshenko, V.; Santangelo, A.; Staubert, R.; Ferrigno, C.; Kretschmar, P.; Caballero, I.; Wilms, J.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Pottschmidt, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Context. X-ray spectra of many accreting pulsars exhibit significant variations as a function of flux and thus of mass accretion rate. In some of these pulsars, the centroid energy of the cyclotron line(s), which characterizes the magnetic field strength at the site of the X-ray emission, has been found to vary systematically with flux. Aims. GX304-1 is a recently established cyclotron line source with a line energy around 50 keV. Since 2009, the pulsar shows regular outbursts with the peak flux exceeding one Crab. We analyze the INTEGRAL observations of the source during its outburst in January-February 2012. Methods. The observations covered almost the entire outburst, allowing us to measure the source's broad-band X-my spectrum at different flux levels. We report on the variations in the spectral parameters with luminosity and focus on the variations in the cyclotron line. Results. The centroid energy of the line is found to be positively correlated with the luminosity. We interpret this result as a manifestation of the local sub-Eddington (sub-critical) accretion regime operating in the source.

  9. Search for correlations of the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic ray with extragalactic objects as observed by the telescope array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2013-01-01

    We search for correlations between positions of extragalactic objects and arrival directions of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) with primary energy $E \\ge 40$ EeV as observed by the surface detector array of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment during the first 40 months of operation. We examined several public astronomical object catalogs, including the Veron-Cetty and Veron catalog of active galactic nuclei. We counted the number of TA events correlated with objects in each catalog as a function of three parameters: the maximum angular separation between a TA event and an object, the minimum energy of the events, and the maximum redshift of the objects. We determine combinations of these parameters which maximize the correlations, and calculate the chance probabilities of having the same levels of correlations from an isotropic distribution of UHECR arrival directions. No statistically significant correlations are found when penalties for scanning over the above parameters and for searching in several...

  10. Static $\\bar{Q}Q$ pair free energy and screening masses from correlators of Polyakov loops: continuum extrapolated lattice results at the QCD physical point

    CERN Document Server

    Borsányi, Szabolcs; Katz, Sándor D; Pásztor, Attila; Szabó, Kálmán K; Török, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    We study the correlators of Polyakov loops, and the corresponding gauge invariant free energy of a static quark-antiquark pair in 2+1 flavor QCD at finite temperature. Our simulations were carried out on $N_t$ = 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 lattices using Symanzik improved gauge action and a stout improved staggered action with physical quark masses. The free energies calculated from the Polyakov loop correlators are extrapolated to the continuum limit. For the free energies we use a two step renormalization procedure that only uses data at finite temperature. We also measure correlators with definite Euclidean time reversal and charge conjugation symmetry to extract two different screening masses, one in the magnetic, and one in the electric sector, to distinguish two different correlation lengths in the full Polyakov loop correlator.

  11. Consumption and correlates of sweet foods, carbonated beverages, and energy drinks among primary school children in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Ali Saad R

    2017-10-01

    To assess the consumption of sweets, carbonated beverages, and energy drinks along with their correlates among primary school children.  Methods: A total of 725 children (7-12 years old) were randomly recruited from 10 elementary schools from Al-Baha city, Saudi Arabia in 2013, using a multi-stage stratified sampling technique and pre-tested validated questionnaire.  Results: Approximately 26.1% of children reported consuming sweets on daily basis, and 63.4% consumed sweets occasionally during the week. Approximately 56.3%children were reportedly drinking carbonated beverages weekly and 17.1% in daily basis. Weekly consumption of energy drinks was reported in 21.9% and daily consumption in 4.3% of the children. Daily sweets consumption was positively associated with children age (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5-9.5, p=0.035), consuming carbonated beverages (OR=3.4, 95% CI: 2.2-5.2, p less than 0.001), energy drinks (OR=2.5, 95% CI: 1.1-5.4, p=0.029), eating high fat food (OR= 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1 - 2.4, p=0.023), and inversely with children body mass index (BMI) (OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.8-0.9, p less than 0.001). Consuming carbonated beverages on regular basis was positively associated with consuming energy drinks (OR=9.0, 95% CI: 4.0-21.0, p less than 0.001).  Conclusion: Unhealthy dietary choices were found to be prevalent at early age. Comprehensive intervention programs should be established to prevent unhealthy dietary choices and promote healthier dietary behaviors. Qualitative studies are needed for better understanding of children's dietary behaviors.

  12. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Almer, Jonathan D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  13. Correlated blinking via time dependent energy transfer in single CdSe quantum dot-dye nanoassemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Frank; Täuber, Daniela; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2013-05-01

    Optical confocal spectroscopy on self-assembled single nanoassemblies from CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) and perylene diimide dye molecules demonstrates efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Intramolecular dynamics of the flexible dye molecule change the FRET efficiency in course of the detection period of several minutes. This can be followed by correlated observations of luminescence intensities and related spectral shifts of both constituents. Contrary to several experiments on similar assemblies, the FRET efficiencies are by almost one order of magnitude larger in the non-polar liquid solvent TEHOS as compared e.g. to toluene. Experimental and theoretically expected efficiencies are in close agreement with each other.

  14. NA61/SHINE results on fluctuations and correlations in p + p and Be + Be interactions at CERN SPS energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak-Pawlowska, Maja

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the NA61/SHINE strong interaction program is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. The main physics goals are the study of the onset of deconfinement and the search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter. These goals are pursued by performing a beam momentum (13A - 158A GeV/c) and system size (p+p, p+Pb, Be+Be, Ar+Sc, Xe+La) scan. This contribution presents results on transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations from the Be+Be and p+p energy scan. Also, results on two-particle correlations in pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle obtained in p+p interactions will be shown. The influence of conservation laws and resonance decays on multiplicity and chemical fluctuations of identified particles in p+p interactions will be discussed. Obtained results will be compared with data from other experiments and with model predictions.

  15. Correlation of ion-ion interaction with electrical conductivity in solid state polymeric separator for energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parul Kumar; Sadiq, M.; Bhatt, Chandni; Sharma, A. L.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we report innovative study on the prepared high quality solid state free standing thin polymeric separator. In prepared free standing polymeric separator, polymer (PEO) has been used as host matrix; appropriate bulky anion salt (LiPF6) as conducting species and Nano ceramic filler (BaTiO3) is used to enrich the mechanical and thermal stability of separator used for the device applications. The Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) result has been analysed properly of the prepared materials to look the microscopic interaction among polymer-ion, ion-ion and polymer-ion-clay interaction. Electrical conductivity results has been recorded using the impedance spectroscopy results which gives the estimated value of the order of ˜10-3 Scm-1 of the nano ceramic doped polymeric separator which is desirable for energy storage application. A fine correlation has been established between the obtained results by this two analysis.

  16. Azimuthal asymmetries and the emergence of "collectivity" from multi-particle correlations in high-energy pA collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitru, Adrian; Skokov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We show how angular asymmetries $\\sim\\cos 2\\phi$ can arise in dipole scattering at high energies. We illustrate the effects due to anisotropic fluctuations of the saturation momentum of the target with a finite correlation length in the transverse impact parameter plane, i.e. from a domain-like structure. We compute the two-particle azimuthal cumulant in this model including both one-particle factorizable as well as genuine two-particle non-factorizable contributions to the two-particle cross section. We also compute the full BBGKY hierarchy for the four-particle azimuthal cumulant and find that only the fully factorizable contribution to $c_2\\{4\\}$ is negative while all contributions from genuine two, three and four-particle correlations are positive. Our results provide some insight into the origin of azimuthal asymmetries in p+Pb collisions at the LHC which reveal a change of sign of $c_2\\{4\\}$ in high-multiplicity events.

  17. Dark energy constraints and correlations with systematics from CFHTLS weak lensing, SNLS supernovae Ia and WMAP5

    CERN Document Server

    Kilbinger, M; Guy, J; Astier, Pierre; Tereno, I; Fu, L; Wraith, D; Coupon, J; Mellier, Y; Balland, C; Bouchet, F R; Hamana, T; Hardin, D; McCracken, H J; Pain, R; Regnault, N; Schultheiss, M; Yahagi, H

    2008-01-01

    We combine measurements of weak gravitational lensing from the CFHTLS-Wide survey, supernovae Ia from CFHT SNLS and CMB anisotropies from WMAP5 to obtain joint constraints on cosmological parameters, in particular, the dark energy equation of state parameter w. We assess the influence of systematics in the data on the results and look for possible correlations with cosmological parameters. We implement an MCMC algorithm to sample the parameter space of a flat CDM model with a dark-energy component of constant w. Systematics in the data are parametrised and included in the analysis. We determine the influence of photometric calibration of SNIa data on cosmological results by calculating the response of the distance modulus to photometric zero-point variations. The weak lensing data set is tested for anomalous field-to-field variations and a systematic shape measurement bias for high-z galaxies. Ignoring photometric uncertainties for SNLS biases cosmological parameters by at most 20% of the statistical errors, ...

  18. Proteomic analysis indicates that mitochondrial energy metabolism in skeletal muscle tissue is negatively correlated with feed efficiency in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liangliang; Xu, Yueyuan; Hou, Ye; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhou, Lian; Liu, Huiying; Luan, Yu; Jing, Lu; Miao, Yuanxin; Zhao, Shuhong; Liu, Huazhen; Li, Xinyun

    2017-01-01

    Feed efficiency (FE) is a highly important economic trait in pig production. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of FE is essential for trait improvement. In this study, the skeletal muscle proteome of high-FE and low-FE pigs were investigated by the iTRAQ approach. A total of 1780 proteins were identified, among which 124 proteins were differentially expressed between the high- and low-FE pigs, with 74 up-regulated and 50 down-regulated in the high-FE pigs. Ten randomly selected differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were validated by Western blotting and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that all the 25 DEPs located in mitochondria were down-regulated in the high-FE pigs. Furthermore, the glucose-pyruvate-tricarboxylic acid (TCA)-oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism signaling pathway was found to differ between high- and low-FE pigs. The key enzymes involved in the conversion of glucose to pyruvate were up-regulated in the high-FE pigs. Thus, our results suggested mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle tissue was negatively correlated with FE in pigs, and glucose utilization to generate ATP was more efficient in the skeletal muscle tissue of high-FE pigs. This study offered new targets and pathways for improvement of FE in pigs. PMID:28345649

  19. The power of the three-point correlation function: disentangling interacting dark energy cosmologies and estimating the halo bias

    CERN Document Server

    Moresco, Michele; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of constraining coupled dark energy (cDE) cosmologies using the three-point correlation function (3PCF). Making use of the CoDECS N-body simulations, we study the statistical properties of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes for a variety of models, including a fiducial $\\Lambda$CDM scenario and five models in which dark energy (DE) and CDM mutually interact. We measure both the halo 3PCF, $\\zeta(\\theta)$, and the reduced 3PCF, $Q(\\theta)$, at different scales ($2

  20. Proteomic analysis indicates that mitochondrial energy metabolism in skeletal muscle tissue is negatively correlated with feed efficiency in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liangliang; Xu, Yueyuan; Hou, Ye; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhou, Lian; Liu, Huiying; Luan, Yu; Jing, Lu; Miao, Yuanxin; Zhao, Shuhong; Liu, Huazhen; Li, Xinyun

    2017-03-01

    Feed efficiency (FE) is a highly important economic trait in pig production. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of FE is essential for trait improvement. In this study, the skeletal muscle proteome of high-FE and low-FE pigs were investigated by the iTRAQ approach. A total of 1780 proteins were identified, among which 124 proteins were differentially expressed between the high- and low-FE pigs, with 74 up-regulated and 50 down-regulated in the high-FE pigs. Ten randomly selected differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were validated by Western blotting and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that all the 25 DEPs located in mitochondria were down-regulated in the high-FE pigs. Furthermore, the glucose-pyruvate-tricarboxylic acid (TCA)-oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism signaling pathway was found to differ between high- and low-FE pigs. The key enzymes involved in the conversion of glucose to pyruvate were up-regulated in the high-FE pigs. Thus, our results suggested mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle tissue was negatively correlated with FE in pigs, and glucose utilization to generate ATP was more efficient in the skeletal muscle tissue of high-FE pigs. This study offered new targets and pathways for improvement of FE in pigs.

  1. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: measuring the cosmic growth rate with the two-point galaxy correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Carlos; Poole, Gregory B; Marin, Felipe; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Davis, Tamara M; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C; 10.1093/mnras/sts608

    2013-01-01

    The growth history of large-scale structure in the Universe is a powerful probe of the cosmological model, including the nature of dark energy. We study the growth rate of cosmic structure to redshift $z = 0.9$ using more than $162{,}000$ galaxy redshifts from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We divide the data into four redshift slices with effective redshifts $z = [0.2,0.4,0.6,0.76]$ and in each of the samples measure and model the 2-point galaxy correlation function in parallel and transverse directions to the line-of-sight. After simultaneously fitting for the galaxy bias factor we recover values for the cosmic growth rate which are consistent with our assumed $\\Lambda$CDM input cosmological model, with an accuracy of around 20% in each redshift slice. We investigate the sensitivity of our results to the details of the assumed model and the range of physical scales fitted, making close comparison with a set of N-body simulations for calibration. Our measurements are consistent with an independent power-spe...

  2. Plantar enthesopathy: thickening of the enthesis is correlated with energy dissipation of the plantar fat pad during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Scott C; Smeathers, James E; Urry, Stephen R; Sullivan, Patrick M; Yates, Bede; Dubois, Philip

    2010-12-01

    The enthesis of the plantar fascia is thought to play an important role in stress dissipation. However, the potential link between entheseal thickening characteristic of enthesopathy and the stress-dissipating properties of the intervening plantar fat pad have not been investigated. This study was conducted to identify whether plantar fat pad mechanics explain variance in the thickness of the fascial enthesis in individuals with and without plantar enthesopathy. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. The study population consisted of 9 patients with unilateral plantar enthesopathy and 9 asymptomatic, individually matched controls. The thickness of the enthesis of the symptomatic, asymptomatic, and a matched control limb was acquired using high-resolution ultrasound. The compressive strain of the plantar fat pad during walking was estimated from dynamic lateral radiographs acquired with a multifunction fluoroscopy unit. Peak compressive stress was simultaneously acquired via a pressure platform. Principal viscoelastic parameters were estimated from subsequent stress-strain curves. The symptomatic fascial enthesis (6.7 ± 2.0 mm) was significantly thicker than the asymptomatic enthesis (4.2 ± 0.4 mm), which in turn was thicker than the enthesis (3.3 ± 0.4 mm) of control limbs (P stress, peak strain, or secant modulus of the plantar fat pad between limbs. However, the energy dissipated by the fat pad during loading and unloading was significantly lower in the symptomatic limb (0.55 ± 0.17) when compared with asymptomatic (0.69 ± 0.13) and control (0.70 ± 0.09) limbs (P correlated with the energy dissipation ratio of the plantar fat pad (r = .72, P < .05), but only in the symptomatic limb. The energy-dissipating properties of the plantar fat pad are associated with the sonograpic appearance of the enthesis in symptomatic limbs, providing a previously unidentified link between the mechanical behavior of the plantar fat pad and enthesopathy.

  3. Correlating Flight Behavior and Radar Measurements for Species Based Classification of Bird Radar Echoes for Wind Energy Site Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, S. P.; Frasier, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest-growing segments of the world energy market, offering a clean and abundant source of electricity. However, wind energy facilities can have detrimental effects on wildlife, especially birds and bats. Monitoring systems based on marine navigation radar are often used to quantify migration near potential wind sites, but the ability to reliably distinguish between bats and different varieties of birds has not been practically achieved. This classification capability would enable wind site selection that protects more vulnerable species, such as bats and raptors. Flight behavior, such as wing beat frequency, changes in speed, or changes in orientation, are known to vary by species [1]. The ability to extract these properties from radar data could ultimately enable a species based classification scheme. In this work, we analyze the relationship between radar measurements and bird flight behavior in echoes from avifauna. During the 2014 fall migration season, the UMass dual polarized weather radar was used to collect low elevation observations of migrating birds as they traversed through a fixed antenna beam. The radar was run during the night time, in clear-air conditions. Data was coherently integrated, and detections of biological targets exceeding an SNR threshold were extracted. Detections without some dominant frequency content (i.e. clear periodicity, potentially the wing beat frequency) were removed from the sample in order to isolate observations suspected to contain a single species or bird. For the remaining detections, measurements including the polarimetric products and the Doppler spectrum were extracted at each time step over the duration of the observation. The periodic and time changing nature of some of these different measurements was found to have a strong correlation with flight behavior (i.e. flapping vs. gliding behavior). Assumptions about flight behavior and orientation were corroborated through scattering

  4. Correlates of dietary energy misreporting among European adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel-Serrat, Silvia; Julián-Almárcegui, Cristina; González-Gross, Marcela; Mouratidou, Theodora; Börnhorst, Claudia; Grammatikaki, Evangelia; Kersting, Mathilde; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; Gottrand, Frederic; Molnár, Dénes; Hallström, Lena; Dallongeville, Jean; Plada, Maria; Roccaldo, Romana; Widhalm, Kurt; Moreno, Luis A; Manios, Yannis; De Henauw, Stefaan; Leclercq, Catherine; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Lioret, Sandrine; Gutin, Bernard; Huybrechts, Inge

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the correlates of dietary energy under-reporting (UR) and over-reporting (OV) in European adolescents. Two self-administered computerised 24-h dietary recalls and physical activity data using accelerometry were collected from 1512 adolescents aged 12·5-17·5 years from eight European countries. Objective measurements of height and weight were obtained. BMI was categorised according to Cole/International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-off points. Diet-related attitudes were assessed via self-administered questionnaires. Reported energy intake (EI) was compared with predicted total energy expenditure to identify UR and OV using individual physical activity objective measures. Associations between misreporting and covariates were examined by multilevel logistic regression analyses. Among all, 33·3 % of the adolescents were UR and 15·6 % were OV when considering mean EI. Overweight (OR 3·25; 95 % CI 2·01, 5·27) and obese (OR 4·31; 95 % CI 1·92, 9·65) adolescents had higher odds for UR, whereas underweight individuals were more likely to over-report (OR 1·67; 95 % CI 1·01, 2·76). Being content with their own figures (OR 0·61; 95 % CI 0·41, 0·89) decreased the odds for UR, whereas frequently skipping breakfast (OR 2·14; 95 % CI 1·53, 2·99) was linked with higher odds for UR. Those being worried about gaining weight (OR 0·55; 95 % CI 0·33, 0·92) were less likely to OV. Weight status and psychosocial weight-related factors were found to be the major correlates of misreporting. Misreporting may reflect socially desirable answers and low ability to report own dietary intakes, but also may reflect real under-eating in an attempt to lose weight or real over-eating to reflect higher intakes due to growth spurts. Factors influencing misreporting should be identified in youths to clarify or better understand diet-disease associations.

  5. Correlation in Energy Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Nina

    In this paper, I study the relationship between volatility of crude oil prices and volatility of the EURUSD rate. If there is a common factor in the volatility of crude oil and the volatility of exchange rates, possible explanations could be that the financial crisis caused a volatility spillover...... a period from 2000 to 2012. This data allows me to analyse the marketperceived volatility rather than investigating volatilities in the form of realised returns. A model-free analysis supports the presence of a joint factor in the volatilities since mid-2007. As the two markets are asynchronous in futures...... and options maturity date, a term structure models allow for a description of the observed volatility surfaces by one or more stochastic volatility processes. A term structure model including one joint volatility factor and two market-specific volatility factors is proposed to capture the joint factor...

  6. Correlation in Energy Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Nina

    In this paper, I study the relationship between volatility of crude oil prices and volatility of the EURUSD rate. If there is a common factor in the volatility of crude oil and the volatility of exchange rates, possible explanations could be that the financial crisis caused a volatility spillover...

  7. Correlated oscillations of the magnetic anisotropy energy and orbital moment anisotropy in thin films: The role of quantum well states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandratskii, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    We report the first-principles study of the correlated behavior of the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and orbital moment anisotropy (OMA) as the functions of the thickness N of the Fe film. The work is motivated by recent experimental studies combining photoemission, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and magnetic anisotropy measurements. In agreement with experiment, the correlated oscillations of MAE (N ) and OMA (N ) are obtained that have their origin in the formation of the 3d quantum well states (QWS) confined in the films. The main contribution to the oscillation amplitude comes from the surface layer. This is an interesting feature of the phenomenon consisting in the peculiar dependence of the physical quantities on the thickness of the film. We demonstrate that the band structure of the bulk Fe does not reflect adequately the properties of the 3d QWS in thin films and, therefore, does not provide the basis for understanding the oscillations of MAE (N ) and OMA (N ) . A detailed point-by-point analysis in the two-dimensional (2D) Brillouin zone (BZ) of the film shows that the contribution of the Γ point, contrary to a rather common expectation, does not play an important role in the formation of the oscillations. Instead, the most important contributions come from a broad region of the 2D BZ distant from the center of the BZ. Combining symmetry arguments and direct calculations we show that orbital moments of the electronic states possess nonzero transverse components orthogonal to the direction of the spin magnetization. The account for this feature is crucial in the point-by-point analysis of the OMA. On the basis of the calculations for noncollinear spin configurations we suggest interpretations of two interesting experimental findings: fast temperature decay of the oscillation amplitude in MAE (N ) and unexpectedly strong spin mixing of the initial states of the photoemission process.

  8. The low attenuation area on dual-energy perfusion CT: Correlation with the pulmonary function tests and quantitative CT measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Munemasa, E-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kunihiro, Yoshie; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Sano, Yuichi; Yuasa, Yuuki; Narazaki, Akiko; Kudomi, Shohei; Koike, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Hospital (Japan); Kido, Shoji [Computer-aided Diagnosis and Biomedical Imaging Research Biomedical Engineering, Applied Medical Engineering Science Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate the distribution of the low attenuation area (LAA) on dual energy perfusion CT (DEpCT) in comparison with the results of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and quantitative CT measurements. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight patients (15 male and 13 female; mean age: 62.21 years) underwent DEpCT and PFTs within a 1-month interval. The ranges of the LAA on DEpCT were classified into six groups with attenuation values of 0–3, 0–5, 0–8, 0–10, 0–13 and 0–15 HU and the ratios of LAA in each group were compared with the percentage of forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (%FEV{sub 1.0}), FEV{sub 1.0}/forced vital capacity (FEV{sub 1.0}/FVC) and the relative area of the lung with attenuation coefficients lower than −950 HU (RA{sub −950}). Results: The LAAs on the DEpCT images were significantly correlated with the RA{sub −950}, %FEV{sub 1.0} and FEV{sub 1.0}/FVC, and the regression analysis showed that the best values of LAA on DEpCT were 0–10 HU with RA{sub −950} (r = 0.63), 0–8 HU with %FEV{sub 1.0} (r = −0.52) and 0–8 HU with FEV{sub 1.0}/FVC (r = −0.61) per patient. Conclusion: The iodine disturbance on DEpCT had a moderate correlation with the results of the PFTs and RA{sub −950}, but further examination would be needed for evaluation of iodine distribution.

  9. Search for a Correlation Between Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays and Giant Radio Pulses in the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ( E(sub Gamma) > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On approx. 8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  10. Ab initio-driven nuclear energy density functional method. A proposal for safe/correlated/improvable parametrizations of the off-diagonal EDF kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguet, T. [IRFU/Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bender, M. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Universite Bordeaux, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5797, Gradignan (France); Ebran, J.P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Lesinski, T.; Soma, V. [IRFU/Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    This programmatic paper lays down the possibility to reconcile the necessity to resum many-body correlations into the energy kernel with the fact that safe multi-reference energy density functional (EDF) calculations cannot be achieved whenever the Pauli principle is not enforced, as is for example the case when many-body correlations are parametrized under the form of empirical density dependencies. Our proposal is to exploit a newly developed ab initio many-body formalism to guide the construction of safe, explicitly correlated and systematically improvable parametrizations of the off-diagonal energy and norm kernels that lie at the heart of the nuclear EDF method. The many-body formalism of interest relies on the concepts of symmetry breaking and restoration that have made the fortune of the nuclear EDF method and is, as such, amenable to this guidance. After elaborating on our proposal, we briefly outline the project we plan to execute in the years to come. (orig.)

  11. Energy and System-size Dependence of Two-particle Azimuthal Correlations of High-pT Charged Hadrons at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Szuba, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Angular correlations of high-pT hadrons can serve as a probe of interactions of partons with the dense medium produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions but other sources of such correlations exist which can be non-negligible SPS energies. In an attempt to determine the primary source, NA49 has performed an energy and system-size scan of two-particle azimuthal correlations in central Pb+Pb, Si+Si and p+p collisions at 158A GeV, as well as central Pb+Pb collisions at 20A, 30A, 40A and 80A GeV. Moreover, results at 158A GeV have been compared to UrQMD simulations.

  12. Momentum and angular correlations study in $\\pi^{-}$ nuclei jets at high energies using emulsion telescopes technique with magnetic field

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment aims at studying angular and momentum correlations between particles in high energy hadron jets, using emulsion telescopes technique. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experimental arrangement is to obtain the highest possible accuracy in angular data. The ordinary emulsion technique is known to be limited in precision by distorsion phenomena. We have developed a technique which is able to flow emulsion on both sides of glass sheets. We measure the co-ordinates of the tracks at the glass surfaces. All possible shrinkage and distorsions are eliminated. \\\\ \\\\ We use telescope units made of glass sheets, 60 $\\mu$m thick with 30 $\\mu$m emulsion on both sides; the telescopes we use contain 10 units whose position is measured before the experiment with an accuracy of about 5 $\\mu$m in the transverse direction, using an opticle rule. It is of about 1 $\\mu$m after geometrical fit on the beam tracks. In the longitudinal direction the accuracies are, respectively, 100 $\\mu$m and 10 $\\mu$m. If the target position is ...

  13. Correlated X-ray and Very High Energy emission in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Balestra, S; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Bigas, O Blanch; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Britzger, D; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E de Cea; Reyes, R De los; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Godinovic, N; Göbel, F; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hsu, C C; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J; Falcone, A; Vetere, L; Gehrels, N; Trushkin, S; Dhawan, V; Reig, P

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emitting X-ray binaries has triggered an intense effort to better understand the particle acceleration, absorption, and emission mechanisms in compact binary systems, which provide variable conditions along eccentric orbits. Despite this, the nature of some of these systems, and of the accelerated particles producing the VHE emission, is unclear. To answer some of these open questions, we conducted a multiwavelength campaign of the VHE gamma-ray emitting X-ray binary LS I +61 303 including the MAGIC telescope, XMM-Newton, and Swift during 60% of an orbit in 2007 September. We detect a simultaneous outburst at X-ray and VHE bands, with the peak at phase 0.62 and a similar shape at both wavelengths. A linear fit to the simultaneous X-ray/VHE pairs obtained during the outburst yields a correlation coefficient of r=0.97, while a linear fit to all simultaneous pairs provides r=0.81. Since a variable absorption of the VHE emission towards the observer is not expecte...

  14. Search for a correlation between very-high-energy gamma rays and giant radio pulses in the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Lee, K; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nelson, T; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Kondratiev, V

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ($E_{\\gamma} >$ 150 GeV) and Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hours of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in December 2008 and in November and December 2009. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, 8 different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Further, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pu...

  15. Two-Gluon Correlations in Heavy-Light Ion Collisions: Energy and Geometry Dependence, IR Divergences, and $k_T$-Factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Kovchegov, Yuri V

    2013-01-01

    We study the properties of the cross section for two-gluon production in heavy-light ion collisions derived in our previous paper on the subject in the saturation/Color Glass Condensate framework. Concentrating on the energy and geometry dependence of the corresponding correlation functions we find that the two-gluon correlator is a much slower function of the center-of-mass energy than the one- and two-gluon production cross sections. The geometry dependence of the correlation function leads to stronger azimuthal near- and away-side correlations in the tip-on-tip U+U collisions than in the side-on-side U+U collisions, an exactly opposite behavior from the correlations generated by the elliptic flow of the quark-gluon plasma: a study of azimuthal correlations in the U+U collisions may thus help to disentangle the two sources of correlations. We demonstrate that the cross section for two-gluon production in heavy-light ion collisions contains a power-law infrared (IR) divergence even for fixed produced gluon m...

  16. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for Obesity Indicators and Energy Balance-Related Behaviors Among New York City Public Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Heewon Lee; Burgermaster, Marissa; Tipton, Elizabeth; Contento, Isobel R; Koch, Pamela A; Di Noia, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Sample size and statistical power calculation should consider clustering effects when schools are the unit of randomization in intervention studies. The objective of the current study was to investigate how student outcomes are clustered within schools in an obesity prevention trial. Baseline data from the Food, Health & Choices project were used. Participants were 9- to 13-year-old students enrolled in 20 New York City public schools (n= 1,387). Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on measures of height and weight, and body fat percentage was measured with a Tanita® body composition analyzer (Model SC-331s). Energy balance-related behaviors were self-reported with a frequency questionnaire. To examine the cluster effects, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated as school variance over total variance for outcome variables. School-level covariates, percentage students eligible for free and reduced-price lunch, percentage Black or Hispanic, and English language learners were added in the model to examine ICC changes. The ICCs for obesity indicators are: .026 for BMI-percentile, .031 for BMIz-score, .035 for percentage of overweight students, .037 for body fat percentage, and .041 for absolute BMI. The ICC range for the six energy balance-related behaviors are .008 to .044 for fruit and vegetables, .013 to .055 for physical activity, .031 to .052 for recreational screen time, .013 to .091 for sweetened beverages, .033 to .121 for processed packaged snacks, and .020 to .083 for fast food. When school-level covariates were included in the model, ICC changes varied from -95% to 85%. This is the first study reporting ICCs for obesity-related anthropometric and behavioral outcomes among New York City public schools. The results of the study may aid sample size estimation for future school-based cluster randomized controlled trials in similar urban setting and population. Additionally, identifying school-level covariates that can reduce cluster

  17. Rapidity dependence of multiplicity fluctuations and correlations in high-energy nucleus–nucleus interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipak Ghosh; Argha Deb; Swarnapratim Bhattacharyya; Utpal Datta

    2011-08-01

    The multiplicity fluctuations of the produced pions were studied using scaled variance method in 16O–AgBr interactions at 2.1 AGeV, 24Mg–AgBr interactions at 4.5 AGeV, 12C–AgBr interactions at 4.5 AGeV, 16O–AgBr interactions at 60 AGeV and 32S–AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV at two different binning conditions. In the first binning condition, the rapidity interval was varied in steps of one centring about the central rapidity until it reached 14. In the second case, the rapidity interval was increased in steps of 1.6 up to 14.4. Multiplicity distributions and their scaled variances were presented as a function of the dependence on the rapidity width for both the binning conditions. Multiplicity fluctuations were found to increase with the increase of rapidity interval and later found to saturate at larger rapidity window for all the interactions and in both the binning conditions. Multiplicity fluctuations were found to increase with the energy of the projectile beam. The values of the scaled variances were found to be greater than one in all the cases in both the binning conditions indicating the presence of correlation during the multiparticle production process in high-energy nucleus–nucleus interactions. Experimental results were compared with the results obtained from the Monte Carlo simulated events for all the interactions. The Monte Carlo simulated data showed very small values of scaled variance suggesting very small fluctuations for the simulated events. Experimental results obtained from 16O–AgBr interactions at 60 AGeV and 32S–AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV were compared with the events generated by Lund Monte Carlo code (FRITIOF model). FRITIOF model failed to explain the multiplicity fluctuations of pions emitted from 16O–AgBr interactions at 60 AGeV for both the binning conditions. However, the experimental data agreed well with the FRITIOF model for 32S–AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV.

  18. Parallel Large-scale Semidefinite Programming for Strong Electron Correlation: Using Correlation and Entanglement in the Design of Efficient Energy-Transfer Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-24

    low-scaling 2-RDM method that scales computationally as O(r 4 ) where r is the number of orbitals in the one electron basis set. Further...to the foundation of 2-RDM quantum theory. Conditions beyond T2 will eventually allow for the computation of molecular quantum systems in...21. A. M. Sand and D. A. Mazziotti, “Effect of molecular - orbital rotations on ground-state energies in the parametric two-electron reduced density

  19. Correlating toxicological effects of ionic liquids on Daphnia magna with in silico calculated linear free energy relationship descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-06-01

    In silico prediction model for toxicological effects of ionic liquids (ILs) is useful to understand ILs' toxicological interactions and to design environmentally benign IL structures. Actually, it is essential since the types of ILs are extremely numerous. Accordingly, prediction models were developed in this study. For the modelling, well-defined linear free energy relationship (LFER) descriptors - i.e. excess molar refraction (E), dipolarity/polarizability (S), H-bonding acidity (A), H-bonding basicity (B), McGowan volume (V), cation interaction (J(+)) and anion interaction (J(-)) - were in silico calculated using density functional theory and conductor-like screening model. These descriptors were then correlated with the toxicological values of ILs to Daphnia magna. First, a model established by Hoover et al. (2007) using measured LFER descriptors of 97 neutral compounds was applied to the prediction of ILs' toxicity. As expected, the model by Hoover et al. (2007) needs to be amended for ILs. To that end, the difference in toxicological interactions between neutral compounds and ILs was addressed by additional single J(+) or five LFER descriptors of cation i.e. Ec, Sc, Bc, Vc, and J(+). Secondly, a prediction model for only ILs was developed by using the three LFER descriptors Ec, Bc, and J(+). The model had a reasonable predictability and robustness of R(2) = 0.880 for the training set, 0.848 for the test set, and 0.867 for the overall set. The established models can be used to design environmentally benign IL structures and to reduce labour, danger, time, and materials compared to the experiment-based study.

  20. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  1. Effects of Ground-State Correlations on High Energy Scattering off Nuclei: the Case of the Total Neutron-Nucleus Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Alvioli, M; Marchino, I; Palli, V; Morita, H

    2008-01-01

    With the aim at quantitatively investigating the longstanding problem concerning the effect of short range nucleon-nucleon correlations on scattering processes at high energies, the total neutron-nucleus cross section is calculated within a parameter-free approach which, for the first time, takes into account, simultaneously, central, spin, isospin and tensor nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations, and Glauber elastic and Gribov inelastic shadowing corrections. Nuclei ranging from 4He to 208Pb and incident neutron momenta in the range 3 GeV/c - 300 GeV/c are considered; the commonly used approach which approximates the square of the nuclear wave function by a product of one-body densities is carefully analyzed, showing that NN correlations can play a non-negligible role in high energy scattering off nuclei.

  2. Shape, orientation and magnitude of the curl quantum flux, the coherence and the statistical correlations in energy transport at nonequilibrium steady state

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhedong

    2015-01-01

    We provide a quantitative description of the nonequilibriumness based on the model of coupled oscillators interacting with multiple energy sources. This can be applied to the study of vibrational energy transport in molecules. The curl quantum flux quantifying the nonequilibriumness and time-irreversibility is quantified in the coherent representation and we find the geometric description of the shape and polarization of the flux which provides the connection between the microscopic description of quantum nonequilibriumness and the macroscopic observables, i.e., correlation function. We use the Wilson loop integral to quantify the magnitude of curl flux, which is shown to be correlated to the correlation function as well. Coherence contribution is explicitly demonstrated to be non-trivial and to considerably promote the heat transport quantified by heat current and efficiency. This comes from the fact that coherence effect is microscopically reflected by the geometric description of the flux. To uncover the e...

  3. Large-scale Two-particle Correlation Structures In Gold- Gold Collisions At Center Of Mass Energy = 130 Gev

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, A

    2004-01-01

    The first measurement of surviving correlation structure in the final-state charged hadron distribution produced in the collisions of gold nuclei at sNN = 130 GeV is presented. We observe an abundance of correlation structures reflecting dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions over a large momentum acceptance, transverse momentum range 0.15 ≤ p t ≤ 2.0 GeV/c, pseudorapidity range −1.3 ≤ η ≤ 1.3 and full azimuth angle −π ≤ &phis; ≤ π among primary hadrons measured by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Correlation structures are measured by means of two-particle number-density ratios in transverse and axial momentum spaces. Isoscalar and isovector correlations are studied separately by examining pair- charge dependent (CD) and independent (CI) correlation components. Observed correlation structures are consistent with the picture that particle production from color-string fragmentation ...

  4. Effects of zonal flows on correlation between energy balance and energy conservation associated with nonlinear nonviscous atmospheric dynamics in a thin rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear Euler equations are used to model two-dimensional atmosphere dynamics in a thin rotating spherical shell. The energy balance is deduced on the basis of two classes of functorially independent invariant solutions associated with the model. It it shown that the energy balance is exactly the conservation law for one class of the solutions whereas the second class of invariant solutions provides and asymptotic convergence of the energy balance to the conservation law.

  5. Computational prediction for emission energy of iridium (III) complexes based on TDDFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals containing various HF exchange percentages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shengxian; Wang, Jinglan; Xia, Hongying; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yibo

    2015-02-01

    The accurate prediction for the emission energies of the phosphorescent Ir (III) complexes is very useful for the realizing of full-color displays and large-area solid-state lighting in OLED fields. Quantum chemistry calculations based on TDDFT methods are most widely used to directly compute the triplet vertical excitation energies, yet sometimes the universality of these calculations can be limited because of the lack of experimental data for the relative family of structural analogues. In this letter, 16 literature emission energies at low temperature are linearly correlated with their theoretical values computed by TDDFT using exchange-correlation functionals containing various HF exchange percentage with the relation of E exp (em)  = 1.2Ē calc (em). The relation is proven to be robust across a wide range of structures for Ir (III) complexes. These theoretical studies should be expected to provide some guides for the design and synthesis of efficient emitting materials.

  6. Random-phase approximation correlation energies from Lanczos chains and an optimal basis set: theory and applications to the benzene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Dario

    2014-05-14

    A new ab initio approach is introduced to compute the correlation energy within the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem in the random phase approximation. First, an optimally small basis set to represent the response functions is obtained by diagonalizing an approximate dielectric matrix containing the kinetic energy contribution only. Then, the Lanczos algorithm is used to compute the full dynamical dielectric matrix and the correlation energy. The convergence issues with respect to the number of empty states or the dimension of the basis set are avoided and the dynamical effects are easily kept into account. To demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this approach the binding curves for three different configurations of the benzene dimer are computed: T-shaped, sandwich, and slipped parallel.

  7. A search for correlation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays with IRAS-PSCz and 2MASS-6dF galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Foteini; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Thomas, Shaun A. [Astrophysics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Connolly, Amy [Department of Physics and CCAPP, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Colombus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Waters, David [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Waxman, Eli, E-mail: fotini@star.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: connolly@physics.osu.edu, E-mail: fba@star.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: o.lahav@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: sat@star.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: d.waters@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2013-05-01

    We study the arrival directions of 69 ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) observed at the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) with energies exceeding 55 EeV. We investigate whether the UHECRs exhibit the anisotropy signal expected if the primary particles are protons that originate in galaxies in the local universe, or in sources correlated with these galaxies. We cross-correlate the UHECR arrival directions with the positions of IRAS-PSCz and 2MASS-6dF galaxies taking into account particle energy losses during propagation. This is the first time that the 6dF survey is used in a search for the sources of UHECRs and the first time that the PSCz survey is used with the full 69 PAO events. The observed cross-correlation signal is larger for the PAO UHECRs than for 94% (98%) of realisations from an isotropic distribution when cross-correlated with the PSCz (6dF). On the other hand the observed cross-correlation signal is lower than that expected from ∼>85% of realisations, had the UHECRs originated in galaxies in either survey. The observed cross-correlation signal does exceed that expected by 50% of the realisations if the UHECRs are randomly deflected by intervening magnetic fields by 5° or more. We propose a new method of analysing the expected anisotropy signal, by dividing the predicted UHECR source distribution into equal predicted flux radial shells, which can help localise and constrain the properties of UHECR sources. We find that the 69 PAO events are consistent with isotropy in the nearest of three shells we define, whereas there is weak evidence for correlation with the predicted source distribution in the two more distant shells in which the galaxy distribution is less anisotropic.

  8. Two-gluon correlations in heavy–light ion collisions: Energy and geometry dependence, IR divergences, and k{sub T}-factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V., E-mail: kovchegov.1@asc.ohio-state.edu; Wertepny, Douglas E., E-mail: wertepny.1@osu.edu

    2014-05-15

    We study the properties of the cross section for two-gluon production in heavy–light ion collisions derived in our previous paper [1] in the saturation/Color Glass Condensate framework. Concentrating on the energy and geometry dependence of the corresponding correlation functions we find that the two-gluon correlator is a much slower function of the center-of-mass energy than the one- and two-gluon production cross sections. The geometry dependence of the correlation function leads to stronger azimuthal near- and away-side correlations in the tip-on-tip U+U collisions than in the side-on-side U+U collisions, an exactly opposite behavior from the correlations generated by the elliptic flow of the quark–gluon plasma: a study of azimuthal correlations in the U+U collisions may thus help to disentangle the two sources of correlations. We demonstrate that the cross section for two-gluon production in heavy–light ion collisions contains a power-law infrared (IR) divergence even for fixed produced gluon momenta: while saturation effects in the target regulate some of the power-law IR-divergent terms in the lowest-order expression for the two-gluon correlator, other power-law IR-divergent terms remain, possibly due to absence of saturation effects in the dilute projectile. Finally we rewrite our result for the two-gluon production cross-section in a k{sub T}-factorized form, obtaining a new factorized expression involving a convolution of one- and two-gluon Wigner distributions over both the transverse momenta and impact parameters. We show that the two-gluon production cross-section depends on two different types of unintegrated two-gluon Wigner distribution functions.

  9. Two-gluon correlations in heavy-light ion collisions: Energy and geometry dependence, IR divergences, and kT-factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Wertepny, Douglas E.

    2014-05-01

    We study the properties of the cross section for two-gluon production in heavy-light ion collisions derived in our previous paper [1] in the saturation/Color Glass Condensate framework. Concentrating on the energy and geometry dependence of the corresponding correlation functions we find that the two-gluon correlator is a much slower function of the center-of-mass energy than the one- and two-gluon production cross sections. The geometry dependence of the correlation function leads to stronger azimuthal near- and away-side correlations in the tip-on-tip U+U collisions than in the side-on-side U+U collisions, an exactly opposite behavior from the correlations generated by the elliptic flow of the quark-gluon plasma: a study of azimuthal correlations in the U+U collisions may thus help to disentangle the two sources of correlations. We demonstrate that the cross section for two-gluon production in heavy-light ion collisions contains a power-law infrared (IR) divergence even for fixed produced gluon momenta: while saturation effects in the target regulate some of the power-law IR-divergent terms in the lowest-order expression for the two-gluon correlator, other power-law IR-divergent terms remain, possibly due to absence of saturation effects in the dilute projectile. Finally we rewrite our result for the two-gluon production cross-section in a kT-factorized form, obtaining a new factorized expression involving a convolution of one- and two-gluon Wigner distributions over both the transverse momenta and impact parameters. We show that the two-gluon production cross-section depends on two different types of unintegrated two-gluon Wigner distribution functions.

  10. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  11. Correlation analysis for energy losses, waiting times and durations of type I edge-localized modes in the Joint European Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, A.; Verdoolaege, G.; Hornung, G.; Kardaun, O. J. W. F.; Zohm, H.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    Several important ELM control techniques are in large part motivated by the empirically observed inverse relationship between average ELM energy loss and ELM frequency in a plasma. However, to ensure a reliable effect on the energy released by the ELMs, it is important that this relation is verified for individual ELM events. Therefore, in this work the relation between ELM energy loss ≤ft({{W}\\text{ELM}}\\right) and waiting time ≤ft(Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}}\\right) is investigated for individual ELMs in a set of ITER-like wall plasmas in JET. A comparison is made with the results from a set of carbon-wall and nitrogen-seeded ITER-like wall JET plasmas. It is found that the correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} for individual ELMs varies from strongly positive to zero. Furthermore, the effect of the extended collapse phase often accompanying ELMs from unseeded JET ILW plasmas and referred to as the slow transport event (STE) is studied on the distribution of ELM durations, and on the correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} . A high correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} , comparable to CW plasmas is only found in nitrogen-seeded ILW plasmas. Finally, a regression analysis is performed using plasma engineering parameters as predictors for determining the region of the plasma operational space with a high correlation between W ELM and Δ {{t}\\text{ELM}} .

  12. Correlation Between Dual-energy and Perfusion CT in Patients with Focal Liver Lesions Using Third-generation Dual-source CT Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Zheng, Yongchang; Wang, Xuan; Xue, Huadan; Wang, Shitian; Liang, Jixiang; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-02-20

    Objective To compare measurements of dual-energy CT iodine map parameters and liver perfusion CT parameters in patients with focal liver lesions using a third-generation dual-source CT scanner. Methods Between November 2015 and August 2016,33 patients with non-cystic focal lesions of liver were enrolled in this study. CT examinations were performed with a third-generation dual-source CT. The study CT protocol included a perfusion CT and dual-energy arterial and portal venous scans,with a time interval of 15 minutes. Iodine attenuation was measured at five region of interests including areas of high,medium,and low density within the lesion,as well as right and left liver parenchyma from the iodine map,while arterial liver perfusion (ALP),portal venous liver perfusion (PVP),and hepatic perfusion index (HPI) at the same location were measured from perfusion CT. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between iodine attenuation and perfusion parameters. Results The iodine attenuation at arterial phase showed significant intra-individual correlation with ALP (r=0.812,95% CI=0.728-0.885,Pperfusion CT [(14.53±0.45)mSv](t=25.212,P<0.001). Conclusion Iodine attenuation from arterial phase of dual energy CT demonstrates significant correlation with ALP and PVP,and iodine attenuation from portal venous phase demonstrates significant correlation with PVP.

  13. Use of caffeinated energy drinks among secondary school students in Ontario: Prevalence and correlates of using energy drinks and mixing with alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jessica L; Hammond, David; McCrory, Cassondra; Dubin, Joel A; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2015-03-12

    Caffeinated energy drinks have become increasingly popular among young people, raising concern about possible adverse effects, including increased alcohol consumption and related risk behaviours. The current study examined consumption of caffeinated energy drinks and use of energy drinks with alcohol, as well as associations with socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics, among a sample of secondary school students in Ontario. Survey data from 23,610 grade 9-12 students at 43 purposefully sampled Ontario secondary schools participating in the baseline wave (2012/13) of the COMPASS study were analyzed using generalized linear mixed-effects models. Outcomes were any energy drink use, frequency of use, and use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks; covariates were age, sex, race, spending money, bodymass index (BMI), weight-related efforts and alcohol use. Two-way interactions between sex and other covariates were tested. Nearly one in five students (18.2%) reported consuming energy drinks in a usual week. Use of energy drinks was associated (p < 0.01) with all socio-demographic variables examined and was more common among students who were male, off-reserve Aboriginal, had some spending money, had a BMI outside of "healthy" range, were trying to lose weight, and/or reported a higher intensity of alcohol use. Interactions with sex were observed for age, spending money and weight-related efforts. Use of energy drinks mixed with alcohol in the previous 12 months was reported by 17.3% of the sample, and was associated with race, spending money, and more frequent binge drinking. Regular use of energy drinks was common among this sample of students and strongly linked to alcohol consumption.

  14. Picosecond Bunch length and Energy-z correlation measurements at SLAC's A-Line and End Station A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloy, Stephen; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.C.; Iverson, R.H.; Ross, M.; McCormick, D.J.; /SLAC; Ross, Marc C.; /Fermilab /SLAC; Walston, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Blackmore, V.; /Oxford U.

    2007-06-27

    We report on measurements of picosecond bunch lengths and the energy-z correlation of the bunch with a high energy electron test beam to the A-line and End Station A (ESA) facilities at SLAC. The bunch length and the energy-z correlation of the bunch are measured at the end of the linac using a synchrotron light monitor diagnostic at a high dispersion point in the A-line and a transverse RF deflecting cavity at the end of the linac. Measurements of the bunch length in ESA were made using high frequency diodes (up to 100 GHz) and pyroelectric detectors at a ceramic gap in the beamline. Modeling of the beam's longitudinal phase space through the linac and A-line to ESA is done using the 2-dimensional tracking program LiTrack, and LiTrack simulation results are compared with data. High frequency diode and pyroelectric detectors are planned to be used as part of a bunch length feedback system for the LCLS FEL at SLAC. The LCLS also plans precise bunch length and energy-z correlation measurements using transverse RF deflecting cavities.

  15. Two-proton small-angle correlations in central heavy-ion collisions: A beam-energy- and system-size-dependent study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotte, R. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, IKH, PF 510119, Dresden (Germany); Alard, P.; Barret, V.; Bastid, N.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P. [IN2P3/CNRS and Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Andronic, A.A. [Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Basrak, Z.; Caplar, R.; Dzelalija, M.; Gasparic, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Cordier, E.; Herrmann, N. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Fodor, Z. [Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Gobbi, A.; Hartmann, O.N.; Hildenbrand, K.D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Grishkin, Y. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hong, B. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Kecskemeti, J.; Kim, Y.J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koczon, P.; Korolija, M.; Kress, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lopez, X.; Merschmeyer, M.; Moesner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, P.; Petrovici, M.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; De Schauenburg, B.; Schuettauf, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K.S.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stoicea, G.; Tyminski, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Xiao, Z.G.; Yushmanov, Y.; Zhilin, A.

    2005-02-01

    Small-angle correlations of pairs of protons emitted in central collisions of Ca+Ca, Ru+Ru and Au+Au at beam energies from 400 to 1500 MeV per nucleon are investigated with the FOPI detector system at SIS/GSI Darmstadt. Dependences on system size and beam energy are presented which extend the experimental data basis of pp correlations in the SIS energy range substantially. The size of the proton-emitting source is estimated by comparing the experimental data with the output of a final-state interaction model which utilizes either static Gaussian sources or the one-body phase-space distribution of protons provided by the BUU transport approach. The trends in the experimental data, i.e.system size and beam energy dependences, are well reproduced by this hybrid model. However, the pp correlation function is found rather insensitive to the stiffness of the equation of state entering the transport model calculations. (orig.)

  16. Incidental Findings in Abdominal Dual-Energy Computed Tomography: Correlation Between True Noncontrast and Virtual Noncontrast Images Considering Renal and Liver Cysts and Adrenal Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebocki, Karin; Kraus, Bastian; Chang, De-Hua; Hellmich, Martin; Maintz, David; Bangard, Christopher

    To assess correlation between attenuation measurements of incidental findings in abdominal second generation dual-energy computed tomography (CT) on true noncontrast (TNC) and virtual noncontrast (VNC) images. Sixty-three patients underwent arterial dual-energy CT (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens; pitch factor, 0.75-1.0; gantry rotation time, 0.28 seconds) after endovascular aneurysm repair, consisting of a TNC single energy CT scan (collimation, 128 × 0.6 mm; 120 kVp) and a dual-energy arterial phase scan (collimation, 32 × 0.6 mm, 140 and 100 kVp; blended, 120 kVp data set). Attenuation measurements in Hounsfield units (HU) of liver parenchyma and incidental findings like renal and hepatic cysts and adrenal masses on TNC and VNC images were done by drawing regions of interest. Statistical analysis was performed by paired t test and Pearson correlation. Incidental findings were detected in 56 (89%) patients. There was excellent correlation for both renal (n = 40) and hepatic cysts (n = 12) as well as adrenal masses (n = 6) with a Pearson correlation of 0.896, 0.800, and 0.945, respectively, and mean attenuation values on TNC and VNC images of 10.6 HU ± 12.8 versus 5.1 HU ± 17.5 (attenuation value range from -8.8 to 59.1 HU vs -11.8 to 73.4 HU), 6.4 HU ± 5.8 versus 6.3 HU ± 4.6 (attenuation value range from 2.0 to 16.2 HU vs -3.0 to 15.9 HU), and 12.8 HU ± 11.2 versus 12.4 HU ± 10.2 (attenuation value range from -2.3 to 27.5 HU vs -2.2 to 23.6 HU), respectively. As proof of principle, liver parenchyma measurements also showed excellent correlation between TNC and VNC (n = 40) images with a Pearson correlation of 0.839 and mean attenuation values on TNC and VNC images of 47.2 HU ± 10.5 versus 43.8 HU ± 8.7 (attenuation value range from 21.9 to 60.2 HU vs 4.5 to 65.3 HU). In conclusion, attenuation measurements of incidental findings like renal cysts or adrenal masses on TNC and VNC images derived from second generation dual-energy CT scans show excellent

  17. 超细金属丝中电子的关联函数和关联能%The Correlation Function and Correlation Energies of the Electron Gas in Ultra-thin Metal Wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹康生; 邵金山

    2000-01-01

    For the ultra- thin metal wires systems with coulomb interaction, a new quasi one - dimensionmodel is presented in thispaper. The form of effective coulomb potential for the ultra - thin metal wire systems is derived. Based on the correlated wave function theory, the Jastrow- Feenbery -stater many- body variation wave function is obtained on the basis of the collective oscillation behavior of the electron. gas. We have solved correlation function equation of real space and variation calculation to the system energies. 牋牋牋The pair correlation wave function and correlation energies and many- body wave function of ultrathin K wires are obtained. The pair correlation function obtained in this paper is positive definite and can satisfy the normalization condition.%对于具有库仑相互作用的超细金属丝,该文提出了一种新的准一维模型,从而得到了准一维超细金属丝体系的电子有效库仑势形式.并在相关基函数理论框架下,利用准一维电子体系的集体振荡行为,确定了具有库仑相互作用的二体关联的Jastrow-Feenberg-Slater多体变分波函数,通过对实空间关联函数的方程的自洽迭代求解以及体系能量的变分计算,得到了金属钾r5=4.967细丝的关联函数、关联能.该文得到的关联函数是恒正的,并且满足归一化条件.

  18. Energy budget measurements using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio techniques at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, G.; Neumann, H. H.; King, K. M.; Chipanshi, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Fluxes of heat and water vapor were measured on a 20-m tower at Kinosheo Lake in the Hudson Bay lowlands using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio energy balance techniques. The study period was June 25 to July 28, 1990. Measurements were made over a peat bog consisting of a mixture of sphagnum moss and lichen hummocks and black pools. About 200 m west of the tower were several shallow ponds. The hummocks had a dry, insulating surface and were underlain by an ice layer near 50 cm depth until mid-July. At the beginning of the period the black pools were covered with water, and although the free water gradually disappeared over the study period, they remained saturated to the end of July. The depth of peat near the tower was about 3 m. Despite the ice layer under the hummocks, their daytime surface temperatures were high, near 35 C, and after the middle of July, above 40 C. Inspection of temperature, precipitation, and radiation data showed that the midsummer period of 1990 was warmer, drier, and sunnier than usual at Moosonee and so by influence at Lake Kinosheo. When all the data were combined to yield average diurnal energy balance components, the eddy correlation fluxes accounted for 90% of the available energy. Latent heat flux averaged 46% of the total available energy and the sensible heat flux averaged 34%. Daytime Bowen ratios were near 1 for the experimental period, suggesting that the bog behaved more like a dryland than a wetland. Eddy correlation measurements of sensible heat and latent heat flux were less than those measured using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique, the average ratios being 0.81 and 0.86 respectively. These differences were possibly due to the difficulty in measuring energy balance components of net radiation and ground heat flux over the mosaic surface.

  19. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of high-energy neutrino-induced muon tracks, which provided evidence for a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin, and study their cross-correlation with the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) samples as...

  20. Emission of correlated electron pairs from Au(111) and Cu(111) surfaces under low-energy electron impact: Contribution of surface states, d-states and spin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarin, S., E-mail: samar@physics.uwa.edu.au [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artamonov, O.M. [Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Guagliardo, P. [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, UWA, Perth (Australia); Pravica, L. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Baraban, A. [Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schumann, F.O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Williams, J.F. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy (e,2e) was applied for studying surface states on Cu(111) and Au(111). • Relative (to d-states) contribution of surface states in the (e,2e) spectrum decreases exponentially when primary electron energy increases from 14 to 30 eV. • Spin asymmetry is readily observed in the spectra of Au(111) whereas in the spectra of Cu(111) the spin effect is negligible. - Abstract: The emission of correlated electron pairs excited from surfaces of Au(111) and Cu(111) by low-energy electrons is measured and analyzed. Energy and momentum conservation allows identification of electron pairs involving excitation of electrons from Shockley surface states and from valence d-states. The relative contributions of surface and d-states to the measured spectra of correlated electron pairs is shown to depend on the primary electron energy and is larger from surface states at relatively small primary energies. The use of a spin-polarized incident electron beam highlights the spin effects in producing an electron pair. Measurements show that spin effects are larger for the pair excitation from the valence d-states than for pairs excited from the surface states.

  1. Rapidity and transverse momentum dependence of pion-pion Bose-Einstein correlations measured at 20, 30, 40, 80, and 158 AGeV beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kniege, S; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, Jerzy; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Filip, P; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R E; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J; Kniege, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary results on pion-pion Bose-Einstein correlations in central Pb+Pb collisions measured by the NA49 experiment are presented. Rapidity as well as transverse momentum dependence of the HBT-radii are shown for collisions at 20, 30, 40, 80, and 158 AGeV beam energy. Including results from AGS and RHIC experiments only a weak energy dependence of the radii is observed. Based on hydrodynamical models parameters like lifetime and geometrical radius of the source are derived from the dependence of the radii on transverse momentum.

  2. A search for low-energy neutrinos correlated with gravitational wave events GW150914, GW151226 and GW170104 with the Borexino detector

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, M.; Altenmuller, K.; Appel, S; Atroshchenko, V.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Basilico, D.; Bellini, G; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Caprioli, S

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a low-energy neutrino search using the Borexino detector in coincidence with the gravitational wave (GW) events GW150914, GW151226 and GW170104. We searched for correlated neutrino events with energies greater than 250 keV within a time window of $\\pm500$ s centered around the GW detection time. A total of five candidates were found for all three GW150914, GW151226 and GW170104. This is consistent with the number of expected solar neutrino and background events. As a...

  3. Performance of a solar energy-assisted heat pump heating system: analysis and correlation of field-collected data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.C.

    1979-08-01

    An analysis of building energy usage and thermal load for the Solar Building during the winter heating seasons of 1974-75 and 1975-76 is reported. The one-story office building is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Its mechanical heating and cooling equipment is categorized as a solar-assisted heat pump system consisting of solar collectors, water thermal storage, a water-to-water heat pump and five smaller water-to-air heat pump packaged units. Building energy usage was examined with emphasis on the time of day energy was consumed and the source from which the energy was obtained; i.e., from the electricity for lighting, office equipment and mechanical equipment, and from the heat output of the thermal storage and heat pumps. The rate of electrical energy consumption was found to be very dependent on building use. High rates of electrical energy usage during occupied periods required cooling during parts of even the coldest days. Mechanical equipment heating was found to vary as a function of building usage as well as a function of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Energies supplied to and withdrawn from the building were examined and are presented for hourly, daily, and seasonal periods. A comparison of the two heating seasons was made. Energy losses and gains from the building to the surroundings were examined for both steady-state and transient load profiles. Envelope conductive heat losses and losses due to infiltration and ventilation were calculated using actual weather data through the use of the Building Environmental Analysis Program (BEAP). The effect of building thermal storage on heating and cooling loads was examined and a set of building balance-point temperatures was established. Comparisons between the building energy consumption and a calculated load were made for hourly, daily, and seasonal periods.

  4. Factorial Correlators and Oscillatory Multiplicity Moments at the CERN SPS Energy for Ring-Like and Jet-Like Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabir Kumar Haldar; Sanjib Kumar Manna

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of ring-like and jet-like events in terms of factorial correlations and oscillatory multiplicity moments of 32S-Ag/Br interactions at 200 A GeV. The investigation reveals that the correlated moments increase with decrease in bin-bin separation D, following the power law, which suggests the presence of an intermittent nature of self-similar dynamical fluctuations pattern for ring-like and jet-like events. The analysis further shows that the strength of the non-statistical fluctuations is larger for jet-like events than those of ring-like events and total events. However, ring-like and jet-like events are not to be consistent with the total events of the a model of intermittency. To go beyond the lower order correlation, the oscillatory multiplicity moments are used to study the higher order correlation. The ratios Hq (cumulant over factorial moments, Kq/Fq) are determined for ring-like, jet-like and the total events. The presence of few-particle short range correlation is established. It is extremely interesting to observe that the oscillations of ring-like events are different from the jet-like events and the total events. However, in almost all the cases, the simulated interactions fail to replicate the experimental results.

  5. Spin-dependent energy distribution of B-hadrons from polarized top decays considering the azimuthal correlation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Nejad, S M Moosavi

    2015-01-01

    In our previous work, we studied the polar distribution of the scaled energy of bottom-flavored hadrons from polarized top quark decays $t(\\uparrow)\\rightarrow W^++b(\\rightarrow X_b)$, using two different helicity coordinate systems. Basically, the energy distributions are governed by the unpolarized, polar and azimuthal rate functions which are related to the density matrix elements of the decay $t(\\uparrow)\\rightarrow W^++b$. Here we present, for the first time, the analytical expressions for the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s)$ radiative corrections to the differential azimuthal decay rates of the partonic process $t(\\uparrow)\\rightarrow b+W^+(+g)$ in two helicity systems, which are needed to study the azimuthal distribution of the energy spectrum of the B-hadron produced in polarized top quark decays. Our predictions of the hadron energy distributions enable us to deepen our knowledge of the hadronization process and to determine the polarization states of top quarks.

  6. Correlation of the structure and applications of dealloyed nanoporous metals in catalysis and energy conversion/storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, H-J; Xu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Li; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-14

    Nanoporous metals produced by dealloying have shown great promise in many areas such as catalysis/electrocatalysis, energy conversion/storage, sensing/biosensing, actuation, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Particularly, nanoscale metal ligaments with high electronic conductivity, tunable size and rich surface chemistry make nanoporous metals very promising as catalysts/electrocatalysts for energy conversion applications such as fuel cells and also as versatile three-dimensional substrates for energy-storage in supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of dealloyed nanoporous metals in both catalysis/electrocatalysis and energy storage. In particular, based on the state-of-the-art electron microscopy characterization, we explain the atomic origin of the high catalytic activity of nanoporous gold. We also highlight the recent advances in rationally designing nanoporous metal-based composites and hierarchical structures for enhanced energy storage. Finally, we conclude with some outlook and perspectives with respect to future research on dealloyed nanoporous metals in catalysis- and energy-related applications.

  7. Correlation between skeletal trauma and energy in falls from great height detected by post-mortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilemann, Y; Thali, M J; Kneubuehl, B P; Bolliger, S A

    2008-09-18

    Fatal falls from great height are a frequently encountered setting in forensic pathology. They present--by virtue of a calculable energy transmission to the body--an ideal model for the assessment of the effects of blunt trauma to a human body. As multislice computed tomography (MSCT) has proven not only to be invaluable in clinical examinations, but also to be a viable tool in post-mortem imaging, especially in the field of osseous injuries, we performed a MSCT scan on 20 victims of falls from great height. We hereby detected fractures and their distributions were compared with the impact energy. Our study suggests a marked increase of extensive damage to different body regions at about 20 kJ and more. The thorax was most often affected, regardless of the amount of impacting energy and the primary impact site. Cranial fracture frequency displayed a biphasic distribution with regard to the impacting energy; they were more frequent in energies of less than 10, and more than 20 kJ, but rarer in the intermediate energy group, namely that of 10-20 kJ.

  8. Ab initio-driven nuclear energy density functional method. A proposal for safe/correlated/improvable parametrizations of the off-diagonal EDF kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Duguet, T; Ebran, J -P; Lesinski, T; Somà, V

    2015-01-01

    This programmatic paper lays down the possibility to reconcile the necessity to resum many-body correlations into the energy kernel with the fact that safe multi-reference energy density functional (EDF) calculations cannot be achieved whenever the Pauli principle is not strictly enforced, as is for example the case when many-body correlations are parametrized under the form of empirical density dependencies. Our proposal is to exploit a newly developed ab initio many-body formalism to guide the construction of safe, explicitly correlated and systematically improvable parametrizations of the {\\it off-diagonal} energy and norm kernels that lie at the heart of the nuclear EDF method. The many-body formalism of interest relies on the concepts of symmetry breaking {\\it and} restoration that have made the fortune of the nuclear EDF method and is, as such, amenable to this guidance. After elaborating on our proposal, we briefly outline the project we plan to execute in the years to come.

  9. Variations in annual water-energy balance and their correlations with vegetation and soil moisture dynamics: A case study in the Wei River Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shengzhi; Huang, Qiang; Leng, Guoyong; Zhao, Menglong; Meng, Erhao

    2017-03-01

    It is of importance to investigate watershed water-energy balance variations and to explore their correlations with vegetation and soil moisture dynamics, which helps better understand the interplays between underlying surface dynamics and the terrestrial water cycle. The heuristic segmentation method was adopted to identify change points in the parameter to series in Fu's equation belonging to the Budyko framework in the Wei River Basin (WRB) and its sub-basins aiming to examine the validity of stationary assumptions. Additionally, the cross wavelet analysis was applied to explore the correlations between vegetation and soil moisture dynamics and to variations. Results indicated that (1) the omega variations in the WRB are significant, with some change points identified except for the sub-basin above Zhangjiashan, implying that the stationarity of omega series in the WRB is invalid except for the sub-basin above Zhangjiashan; (2) the correlations between soil moisture series and to series are weaker than those between Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) series and omega series; (3) vegetation dynamics show significantly negative correlations with omega variations in 1983-2003 with a 4-8 year signal in the whole WRB, and both vegetation and soil moisture dynamics exert strong impacts on the parameter omega changes. This study helps understanding the interactions between underlying land surface dynamics and watershed water-energy balance. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiplicity fluctuations of pions and protons at SPS energy – An in-depth analysis with factorial correlator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipak Ghosh; Argha Deb; Madhumita Banerjee Lahiri; Subrata Biswas; Pasupati Mandal

    2009-10-01

    We compute the factorial correlators to study the dynamical fluctuations of pions and a combination of pions and protons (compound multiplicity) in 32S–AgBr interactions at 200 A GeV. The study reveals that for both pion and compound multiplicity the correlated moments increase with the decrease in bin–bin separation , following a power-law, which suggests the self-similarity of multiplicity fluctuation in each case. The results of the analysis also show a consistency with the prediction of -model for the existence of intermittency in both cases.

  11. Small angle proton-proton correlations in collisions of high energy light ions with carbon and gold nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budilov, V.A.; Filipkowski, A.; Golembiewski, A.; Ilyuschenko, V.I.; Korejwo, A.; Kozma, P.; Laritcheva, A.P.; Nikitin, V.A.; Nomokonov, P.V.; Traikova, M.; Zhidkov, N.K. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)); Kotus, A.; Nawrot, A.; Szawlowski, M.; Zielinski, I.P. (Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland)); Sidor, G.; Surala, M.; Turowiecki, A.; Wilhelmi, Z.; Zlomanczuk, J. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej)

    1990-07-05

    Small angle correlations of protons (p>320 MeV/c) emitted in 5.1 GeV/c proton, 4 GeV/c deuteron and 8 GeV/c helium-4 collisions with carbon and gold targets were measured using plastic scintillator hodoscopes and NaI(Tl) detectors placed at 72deg and 101deg with respect to the beam. It has been found that for both targets the two-proton correlation function depends on the emission angle and that this dependence is stronger for the carbon target than for the gold one. (orig.).

  12. Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...meet an emerging national crisis (war), emergency (natural disaster), or major impact event (Y2K). Certain resources are generally critical to the

  13. Dew Formation, Eddy-Correlation Latent Heat Fluxes, and the Surface Energy Imbalance at Cabauw During Stable Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Roode, S.R.; Bosveld, F.C.; Kroon, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Observations collected between 2000 and 2008 at the Cabauw meteorological measurement platform in the Netherlands were conditionally sampled to select nights with stably stratified atmospheric conditions, clear skies and weak horizontal wind speeds (<3ms−1). For these conditions the eddy-correlation

  14. Dew Formation, Eddy-Correlation Latent Heat Fluxes, and the Surface Energy Imbalance at Cabauw During Stable Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Roode, S.R.; Bosveld, F.C.; Kroon, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Observations collected between 2000 and 2008 at the Cabauw meteorological measurement platform in the Netherlands were conditionally sampled to select nights with stably stratified atmospheric conditions, clear skies and weak horizontal wind speeds (<3ms−1). For these conditions the eddy-correlation

  15. A search for low-energy neutrino and antineutrino signals correlated with gamma-ray bursts with Borexino

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Appel, S; Atroshchenko, V; Bellini, G; Benziger, J; Bick, D; Bonfini, G; Bravo, D; Caccianiga, B; Calaprice, F; Caminata, A; Carlini, M; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Choi, K; D'Angelo, D; Davini, S; de Kerret, H; Derbin, A; Di Noto, L; Drachnev, I; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Ghiano, C; Giammarchi, M; Goeger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Gromov, M; Hagner, C; Hungerford, E; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A; Jedrzejczak, K; Jeschke, D; Kobychev, V; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Lehnert, B; Litvinovich, E; Lombardi, F; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Lukyanchenko, G; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Manuzio, G; Marcocci, S; Meroni, E; Meyer, M; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montuschi, M; Mosteiro, P; Muratova, V; Neumair, B; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Pocar, A; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Re, A; Romani, A; Roncin, R; Rossi, N; Scheonert, S; Semenov, D; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Thurn, J; Toropova, M; Unzhakov, E; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, R B; von Feilitzsch, F; Wang, H; Weinz, S; Winter, J; Wojcik, M; Wurm, M; Yokley, Z; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2016-01-01

    A search for neutrino and antineutrino events correlated with 2,350 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is performed with Borexino data collected between December 2007 and November 2015. No statistically significant excess over background is observed. We look for electron antineutrinos ($\\bar{\

  16. Borexino’s search for low-energy neutrino and antineutrino signals correlated with gamma-ray bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K; D’Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; de Kerret, H.; Derbin, A.; Appel, S; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.

    2017-01-01

    A search for neutrino and antineutrino events correlated with 2,350 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is performed with Borexino data collected between December 2007 and November 2015. No statistically significant excess over background is observed. We look for electron antineutrinos ($\\bar{\

  17. A search for low-energy neutrino and antineutrino signals correlated with gamma-ray bursts with Borexino

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, M.; Altenmeuller, K.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; de Kerret, H.; Derbin, A.; Appel, S; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.

    2016-01-01

    A search for neutrino and antineutrino events correlated with 2,350 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is performed with Borexino data collected between December 2007 and November 2015. No statistically significant excess over background is observed. We look for electron antineutrinos ($\\bar{\

  18. Correlation between the energy shell structure and geometry in metallic nanoclusters: quasi-resonance states, isotope effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kresin, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Metallic nanoclusters displaying electronic shell structure exhibit the special feature of a correlation between their geometry and the number of delocalized electrons . Their shape evolution can be described as a quantum oscillation between quasi-resonant states (prolate and oblate configurations) whose amplitudes depend upon the degree of shell filling. The picture explains the evolution of absorption spectra and predicts a peculiar isotope effect .

  19. Influence of Exchange-Correlation Functional in the Calculations of Vertical Excitation Energies of Halogenated Copper Phthalocyanines using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Uck [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    The accurate prediction of vertical excitation energies is very important for the development of new materials in the dye and pigment industry. A time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach coupled with 22 different exchange-correlation functionals was used for the prediction of vertical excitation energies in the halogenated copper phthalocyanine molecules in order to find the most appropriate functional and to determine the accuracy of the prediction of the absorption wavelength and observed spectral shifts. Among the tested functional, B3LYP functional provides much more accurate vertical excitation energies and UV-vis spectra. Our results clearly provide a benchmark calibration of the TD-DFT method for phthalocyanine based dyes and pigments used in industry.

  20. Correlations between isospin dynamics and Intermediate Mass Fragments emission time scales: a probe for the symmetry energy in asymmetric nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    De Filippo, E; Auditore, L; Baran, V; Berceanu, I; Cardella, G; Colonna, M; Geraci, E; Gianì, S; Grassi, L; Grzeszczuk, A; Guazzoni, P; Han, J; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I; Maiolino, C; Minniti, T; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Piasecki, E; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Pop, A; Porto, F; Rizzo, F; Russotto, P; Santoro, S; Trifirò, A; Trimarchi, M; Verde, G; Vigilante, M; Wilczyński, J; Zetta, L

    2012-01-01

    We show new data from the $^{64}$Ni+$^{124}$Sn and $^{58}$Ni+$^{112}$Sn reactions studied in direct kinematics with the CHIMERA detector at INFN-LNS and compared with the reverse kinematics reactions at the same incident beam energy (35 A MeV). Analyzing the data with the method of relative velocity correlations, fragments coming from statistical decay of an excited projectile-like (PLF) or target-like (TLF) fragments are discriminated from the ones coming from dynamical emission in the early stages of the reaction. By comparing data of the reverse kinematics experiment with a stochastic mean field (SMF) + GEMINI calculations our results show that observables from neck fragmentation mechanism add valuable constraints on the density dependence of symmetry energy. An indication is found for a moderately stiff symmetry energy potential term of EOS.

  1. Determination of the strong coupling constant from transverse energy-energy correlations in multi-jet events in pp collisions at 13 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Manuel; Llorente, Javier

    This analysis presents measurements of transverse energy-energy correlations (TEEC) and its associated asymmetry (ATEEC) in multi-jet events in bins of the scalar sum of the two leading jets transverse momenta. The data are unfolded to the particle level and compared to Monte Carlo generators like PYTHIA8, HERWIG++ and SHERPA. A comparison with NLOJET++ predictions is also performed. The value of the strong coupling constant is extracted and the running is tested up to scales beyond 1 TeV.

  2. Inhibition of spontaneous network activity in neonatal hippocampal slices by energy substrates is not correlated with intracellular acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtarov, Marat; Ivanov, Anton; Zilberter, Yuri; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Several energy substrates complementary to glucose, including lactate, pyruvate and β-hydroxybutyrate, serve as a fuel for neurons. It was reported recently that these substrates can substantially modulate cortical excitability in neonatal slices. However, complementary energy substrates (CES) can also induce an intracellular acidification when added exogenously. Therefore, action of CES on the neuronal properties governing excitability in neonatal brain slices may be underlain by a change in the cell energy status or by intracellular acidification, or both. Here, we attempt to elucidate these possibilities in neonatal hippocampus by recording neuronal population activity and monitoring intracellular pH. We show that a spontaneous network activity pattern, giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), characteristic for the neonatal hippocampal slices exposed to artificial cerebrospinal fluid, is strongly inhibited by CES and this effect is unlikely to be caused by a subtle intracellular acidification induced by these compounds. Indeed, a much stronger intracellular acidification in the HCO(3) -free solution inhibited neither the GDP frequency nor the GDP amplitude. Therefore, modulation of neuronal energy homeostasis is the most likely factor underlying the effect of lactate, pyruvate and β-hydroxybutyrate on network excitability in neonatal brain slices.

  3. [Fill it up...! Combined consumption of alcohol with energy drinks and its correlation with risk taking behaviour among young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradvohl, Edina; Vida, Katalin; Rácz, József

    2015-07-05

    In Hungary and all around the world the incidence of consumption of energy drinks together with alcohol has increased among adolescents and young adults. The foremost aim of this survey was to find out whether alcohol mixed with energy drinks can enhance the appearance of other forms of risky behaviour among young adults. In spring 2013 the authors carried out a quantitative sociological survey at three faculties of two major universities in Budapest, Hungary. The survey showed that 1) consumers, who mixed alcohol with energy drinks, were likely to drink more alcohol both at parties and on ordinary days, and they took part in binge drinking more frequently than those consuming only alcohol; 2) students drank significantly less alcohol when they mixed it with energy drink. The conflicts of the results showed that even at the starting point there was a clear distinction between the two groups, moreover, it is not yet clear what interactions the combined effect of caffeine and alcohol can trigger in the behaviour of the individual.

  4. A Measurement Of B Hadron Correlations In Proton- Antiproton Collisions At Center Of Mass Energy = 1.8 Tev

    CERN Document Server

    Lannon, K P

    2003-01-01

    B hadron correlations provide input into the significance of higher-order bb¯ production mechanisms. We present a study of B hadron correlations in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV. Events containing a bb¯ pair are identified by the presence of an energetic electron or muon and both B hadrons in the event are located by reconstructing their decay vertices using precision charged-particle tracking. The transverse opening angle distribution, Δ&phis;, measured in data is compared to prediction from the PYTHIA and HERWIG Monte Carlo programs and found to be qualitatively similar. The closest matching Monte Carlo model is used to extract the B hadron Δ&phis; distribution from the raw tag distribution. For the combined electron and muon sample, 28.8 ± 1.0 (stat.) ± 3.1 (syst.)% of B hadron pairs are found to have Δ&phis; < 90°.

  5. Azimuthal correlations of D-mesons in p+p and p+Pb collisions at LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younus, M.; Sahu, P.K. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India); Tripathy, S.K. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India); Sambalpur University, Burla (India); Naik, Z. [Sambalpur University, Burla (India)

    2017-05-15

    We study the correlations of D mesons produced in p+p and p+Pb collisions. These are found to be sensitive to the effects of the cold nuclear medium and the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) regions we are looking into. In order to put this on a quantitative footing, as a first step we analyse the azimuthal correlations of D meson-charged hadron (Dh), and then predict the same for D meson-anti D meson (D anti D) pairs in p+p and p+Pb collisions with strong coupling at leading order O(α{sub s}{sup 2}) and next-to-leading order O(α{sub s}{sup 3}), which includes space-time evolution (in both systems) as well as cold nuclear matter effects (in p+Pb). This also sets the stage and baseline for the identification and study of medium modification of azimuthal correlations in relativistic collision of heavy nuclei at the Large Hadron Collider. (orig.)

  6. CGC/saturation approach for high energy soft interactions: `soft' Pomeron structure and $v_{n}$ in hadron and nucleus collisions from Bose-Einstein correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Gotsman, E; Maor, U

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of our model of soft interactions at high energy based on CGC/saturation approach,we show that Bose-Einstein correlations of identical gluons lead to large values of $v_n$. We demonstrate how three dimensional scales of high energy interactions: hadron radius, typical size of the wave function in diffractive production of small masses (size of the constituent quark), and the saturation momentum, influence the values of BE correlations, and in particular, the values of $v_n$. Our calculation shows that the structure of the `dressed' Pomeron leads to values of $v_n$ which are close to experimental values for proton-proton scattering, 20\\% smaller than the observed values for proton-lead collisions, and close to lead-lead collisions for 0-10\\% centrality. Bearing this result in mind, we conclude that it is premature to consider, that the appearance of long range rapidity azimuthal correlations are due only to the hydrodynamical behaviour of the quark-gluon plasma.

  7. A Search for Correlation of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with IRAS-PSCz and 2MASS-6dF Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Oikonomou, Foteini; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer; Thomas, Shaun A; Waters, David; Waxman, Eli

    2014-01-01

    We study the arrival directions of 69 ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) observed at the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) with energies exceeding 55 EeV. We investigate whether the UHECRs exhibit the anisotropy signal expected if the primary particles are protons that originate in galaxies in the local universe, or in sources correlated with these galaxies. We cross-correlate the UHECR angular positions with the positions of IRAS-PSCz and 2MASS-6dF galaxies (with median depth of 120 and 225 Mpc respectively) weighted for GZK and other particle propagation effects. This is the first time that the 6dF survey is used for a study of this type and the first time that the PSCz survey is used with the full 69 publicly released PAO events. We find the probability that the observed UHECR events are consistent with an isotropic hypothesis to be less than 5% for most of the parameter space considered. The observed correlation is consistent with the mean of the model distribution of UHECRs associated with PSCz and 6dF ...

  8. An analytical coarse-graining method which preserves the free energy, structural correlations, and thermodynamic state of polymer melts from the atomistic to the mesoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, J.; Clark, A. J.; Copperman, J.; Guenza, M. G.

    2014-05-01

    Structural and thermodynamic consistency of coarse-graining models across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. Our approach is a coarse-grained model based on integral equation theory, which can represent polymer chains at variable levels of chemical details. The model is analytical and depends on molecular and thermodynamic parameters of the system under study, as well as on the direct correlation function in the k → 0 limit, c0. A numerical solution to the PRISM integral equations is used to determine c0, by adjusting the value of the effective hard sphere diameter, dHS, to agree with the predicted equation of state. This single quantity parameterizes the coarse-grained potential, which is used to perform mesoscale simulations that are directly compared with atomistic-level simulations of the same system. We test our coarse-graining formalism by comparing structural correlations, isothermal compressibility, equation of state, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, and potential energy and entropy using both united atom and coarse-grained descriptions. We find quantitative agreement between the analytical formalism for the thermodynamic properties, and the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations, independent of the chosen level of representation. In the mesoscale description, the potential energy of the soft-particle interaction becomes a free energy in the coarse-grained coordinates which preserves the excess free energy from an ideal gas across all levels of description. The structural consistency between the united-atom and mesoscale descriptions means the relative entropy between descriptions has been minimized without any variational optimization parameters. The approach is general and applicable to any polymeric system in different thermodynamic conditions.

  9. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Galiana, B.; Lorenz, K.; Palomares, FJ; Bahena, D.; Ballesteros, C.; Hernandez-Calderón, I.; Vázquez, L.

    2016-11-01

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe+ ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  10. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A; Galiana, B; Lorenz, K; Palomares, F J; Bahena, D; Ballesteros, C; Hernandez-Calderón, I; Vázquez, L

    2016-11-01

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe(+) ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  11. Metabolic correlation between polyol and energy-storing carbohydrate under osmotic and oxidative stress condition in Moniliella megachiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yosuke; Iwata, Hisashi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2015-10-01

    Moniliella megachiliensis, the osmo-tolerant basidiomycetous yeast was found to accumulate intracellularly energy-storing carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) along with polyols (glycerol and erythritol) up to stationary growth phase. In trehalose-loaded cell, osmotic-stress resulted in the rapid generation of glycerol, and oxidative stress with menadione resulted in the rapid generation of erythritol. Under either of these conditions, the levels of the energy-storing carbohydrates were depleted, while little glucose uptake was observed. These results suggested that the intracellular pools of trehalose and glycogen were rapidly converted to glycerol in response to osmotic stress, and to erythritol in response to oxidative stress and altered redox balance. Expression of tps1 encoding trehalose synthetic enzymes paralleled trehalose accumulation in the cell during the culture in 2% glucose, in contrast, expression of tpp1 or tpp2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase was little increased under the same condition. Expression of tre (tre1/tre2) encoding trehalose hydrolase (trehalase) increased with time associated with depletion of trehalose during oxidative stress. From these results, we concluded that glycerol and erythritol, the compatible solutes in M. megachiliensis were metabolically interrelated to energy-storing carbohydrates such as trehalose or glycogen during conditions of osmotic or oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Why do TD-DFT excitation energies of BODIPY/Aza-BODIPY families largely deviate from experiment? Answers from electron correlated and multireference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Mohammad R; Brown, Alex

    2015-06-09

    The vertical excitation energies of 17 boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) core structures with a variety of substituents and ring sizes are benchmarked using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) with nine different functionals combined with the cc-pVTZ basis set. When compared to experimental measurements, all functionals provide mean absolute errors (mean AEs) greater than 0.3 eV, larger than the 0.1-0.3 eV differences typically expected from TD-DFT. Due to the high linear correlation of TD-DFT results with experiment, most functionals can be used to predict excitation energies if corrected empirically. Using the CAM-B3LYP functional, 0-0 transition energies are determined, and while the absolute difference is improved (mean AE = 0.478 eV compared to 0.579 eV), the correlation diminishes substantially (R(2) = 0.961 to 0.862). Two very recently introduced charge transfer (CT) indices, q(CT) and d(CT), and electron density difference (EDD) plots demonstrate that CT does not play a significant role for most of the BODIPYs examined and, thus, cannot be the source of error in TD-DFT. To assess TD-DFT methods, vertical excitation energies are determined utilizing TD-HF, configuration interaction CIS and CIS(D), equation of motion EOM-CCSD, SAC-CI, and Laplace-transform based local coupled-cluster singles and approximate doubles LCC2* methods. Moreover, multireference CASSCF and CASPT2 vertical excitation energies were also obtained for all species (except CASPT2 was not feasible for the four largest systems). The SAC-CI/cc-pVDZ, LCC2*/cc-pVDZ, and CASPT2/cc-pVDZ approaches are shown to have the smallest mean AEs of 0.154, 0.109, and 0.100 eV, respectively; the utility of the LCC2* approach is demonstrated for eight extended BODIPYs and aza-BODIPYs. We found that the problems with TD-DFT arise from difficulties in dealing with the differential electron correlation (as assessed by comparing CCS, CC2, LR-CCSD, CCSDR(T), and CCSDR(3) vertical excitation energies for

  13. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: constraining galaxy bias and cosmic growth with 3-point correlation functions

    OpenAIRE

    Marin, Felipe; Blake, Chris; Poole, Gregory; McBride, Cameron; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Davis, Tamara M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Higher-order statistics are a useful and complementary tool for measuring the clustering of galaxies, containing information on the non-gaussian evolution and morphology of large-scale structure in the Universe. In this work we present measurements of the three-point correlation function (3PCF) for 187,000 galaxies in the WiggleZ spectroscopic galaxy survey. We explore the WiggleZ 3PCF scale and shape dependence at three different epochs z=0.35, 0.55 and 0.68, the highest redshifts where thes...

  14. Spin Correlation for pp Elastic Scattering at θc.m.=π2 in the Energy Region of Dibaryon Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, T. S.; Glass, G.; Hiebert, J. C.; Kenefick, R. A.; Northcliffe, L. C.; Tippens, W. B.; Boissevain, J. G. J.; Jarmer, J. J.; Simmons, J. E.; Tripard, G. E.; Fitzgerald, D.; Holt, J.; Mokhtari, A.

    1982-10-01

    Precise measurements are reported of the spin-correlation parameter ANN for 500-800 MeV pp elastic scattering at θc.m.=π2. While not reproducing the large value of ANN reported earlier at 697 MeV, the data show a pronounced maximum in the 90° triplet-to-singlet ratio near the location of the reported 3F3 dibaryon resonance. In contradiction with an earlier report, structure is not found in the moduli of the singlet and triplet amplitudes.

  15. Depletion of the density of states near the Fermi energy induced by disorder and electron correlation in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, H.-J.; Nahm, T.-U.; Kim, J.-Y.; Park, W.-G.; Oh, S.-J.; Hong, J.-P.; Kim, C.-O.

    2000-09-01

    We have performed high-resolution photoemission study of substitutionally disordered alloys Cu-Pt, Cu-Ni, and Pd-Pt. The ratios between alloy spectra and pure metal spectra are found to have dips at the Fermi level when the residual resistivity is high and when strong repulsive electron-electron interaction is expected. This is in accordance with Altshuler and Aronov's model which predicts a depletion of the density of states at the Fermi level when both disorder and electron correlation are present.

  16. Severity assessment of pulmonary embolism using dual energy CT - correlation of a pulmonary perfusion defect score with clinical and morphological parameters of blood oxygenation and right ventricular failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Sven F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie der LMU Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Ashoori, Nima; Bamberg, Fabian; Sommer, Wieland H.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Maxien, Daniel; Helck, Andreas D.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Leuchte, Hanno; Becker, Alexander [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Medicine I, Muenchen (Germany); Behr, Juergen [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Medicine I, Muenchen (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliches Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil GmbH Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Department of Medicine III, Bochum (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    To correlate a Dual Energy (DE)-based visual perfusion defect scoring system with established CT-based and clinical parameters of pulmonary embolism (PE) severity. In 63 PE patients, DE perfusion maps were visually scored for perfusion defects (P-score). Vascular obstruction was quantified using the Mastora score. Both scores were correlated with short-axis diameters of the right and left ventricle, their ratio (RV/LV ratio), width of the pulmonary trunk, a number of clinical parameters and each other. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Times to generate both scores were recorded. After univariate and multivariate analysis, a significant (p < 0.05) correlation with the P-score was shown for the Mastora score (r = 0.65), RV/LV ratio (r = 0.47), width of the pulmonary trunk (r = 0.26), troponin I (r = 0.43) and PaO{sub 2} (r = -0.50). For the left ventricular diameter, only univariate analysis showed a significant correlation. Mastora score correlated significantly with RV/LV ratio (r = 0.36), width of the pulmonary trunk (r = 0.27), PaO{sub 2} (r = -0.41) and troponin I (r = 0.37). Mean time for generating the P-score was significantly shorter than for the Mastora score. A DE-based P-score correlates with a number of parameters of PE severity. It might be easier and faster to perform than some traditional CT scoring methods for vascular obstruction. (orig.)

  17. Severity assessment of pulmonary embolism using dual energy CT - correlation of a pulmonary perfusion defect score with clinical and morphological parameters of blood oxygenation and right ventricular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sven F; Ashoori, Nima; Bamberg, Fabian; Sommer, Wieland H; Johnson, Thorsten R C; Leuchte, Hanno; Becker, Alexander; Maxien, Daniel; Helck, Andreas D; Behr, Jürgen; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2012-02-01

    To correlate a Dual Energy (DE)-based visual perfusion defect scoring system with established CT-based and clinical parameters of pulmonary embolism (PE) severity. In 63 PE patients, DE perfusion maps were visually scored for perfusion defects (P-score). Vascular obstruction was quantified using the Mastora score. Both scores were correlated with short-axis diameters of the right and left ventricle, their ratio (RV/LV ratio), width of the pulmonary trunk, a number of clinical parameters and each other. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Times to generate both scores were recorded. After univariate and multivariate analysis, a significant (p < 0.05) correlation with the P-score was shown for the Mastora score (r = 0.65), RV/LV ratio (r = 0.47), width of the pulmonary trunk (r = 0.26), troponin I (r = 0.43) and PaO(2) (r = -0.50). For the left ventricular diameter, only univariate analysis showed a significant correlation. Mastora score correlated significantly with RV/LV ratio (r = 0.36), width of the pulmonary trunk (r = 0.27), PaO(2) (r = -0.41) and troponin I (r = 0.37). Mean time for generating the P-score was significantly shorter than for the Mastora score. A DE-based P-score correlates with a number of parameters of PE severity. It might be easier and faster to perform than some traditional CT scoring methods for vascular obstruction.

  18. Cross-correlations of the Lyman-alpha forest with weak lensing convergence I: Analytical Estimates of S/N and Implications for Neutrino Mass and Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallinotto, Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-10-01

    We expect a detectable correlation between two seemingly unrelated quantities: the four point function of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the amplitude of flux decrements in quasar (QSO) spectra. The amplitude of CMB convergence in a given direction measures the projected surface density of matter. Measurements of QSO flux decrements trace the small-scale distribution of gas along a given line-of-sight. While the cross-correlation between these two measurements is small for a single line-of-sight, upcoming large surveys should enable its detection. This paper presents analytical estimates for the signal to noise (S/N) for measurements of the cross-correlation between the flux decrement and the convergence, {delta}F{kappa}, and for measurements of the cross-correlation between the variance in flux decrement and the convergence, <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}>. For the ongoing BOSS (SDSS III) and Planck surveys, we estimate an S/N of 30 and 9.6 for these two correlations. For the proposed BigBOSS and ACTPOL surveys, we estimate an S/N of 130 and 50 respectively. Since <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}> {proportional_to} {delta}{sub s}{sup 4}, the amplitude of these cross-correlations can potentially be used to measure the amplitude of {delta}{sub 8} at z {approx} 2 to 2.5% with BOSS and Planck and even better with future data sets. These measurements have the potential to test alternative theories for dark energy and to constrain the mass of the neutrino. The large potential signal estimated in our analytical calculations motivate tests with non-linear hydrodynamical simulations and analyses of upcoming data sets.

  19. Measurement of Charge Multiplicity Asymmetry Correlations in High Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; Didenko, L; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Gorbunov, Y N; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kizka, V; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Koroleva, L; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Lu, Y; Luo, X; Luszczak, A; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, B; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Ostrowski, P; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Powell, C B; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Steadman, S G; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    A study is reported of the same- and opposite-sign charge-dependent azimuthal correlations with respect to the event plane in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV. The charge multiplicity asymmetries between the up/down and left/right hemispheres relative to the event plane are utilized. The contributions from statistical fluctuations and detector effects were subtracted from the (co-)variance of the observed charge multiplicity asymmetries. In the mid- to most-central collisions, the same- (opposite-) sign pairs are preferentially emitted in back-to-back (aligned on the same-side) directions. The charge separation across the event plane, measured by the difference, $\\Delta$, between the like- and unlike-sign up/down $-$ left/right correlations, is largest near the event plane. The difference is found to be proportional to the event-by-event final-state particle ellipticity (via the observed second-order harmonic $v_2^{\\rm obs}$, where $\\Delta=(1.3\\pm1.4({\\rm stat})^{+4.0}_{-1.0}({\\rm syst}))\\times10^{-5}+(3.2\\pm0.2({...

  20. Positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity in sub-critical X-ray pulsars: Doppler effect in the accretion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Serber, Alexander V.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    Cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars show significant changes of the line centroid energy with the pulsar luminosity. Whereas for bright sources above the so-called critical luminosity, these variations are established to be connected with the appearance of the high-accretion column above the neutron star surface, at low, sub-critical luminosities the nature of the variations (but with the opposite sign) has not been discussed widely. We argue here that the cyclotron line is formed when the radiation from a hotspot propagates through the plasma falling with a mildly relativistic velocity on to the neutron star surface. The position of the cyclotron resonance is determined by the Doppler effect. The change of the cyclotron line position in the spectrum with luminosity is caused by variations of the velocity profile in the line-forming region affected by the radiation pressure force. The presented model has several characteristic features: (i) the line centroid energy is positively correlated with the luminosity; (ii) the line width is positively correlated with the luminosity as well; (iii) the position and the width of the cyclotron absorption line are variable over the pulse phase; (iv) the line has a more complicated shape than widely used Lorentzian or Gaussian profiles; (v) the phase-resolved cyclotron line centroid energy and the width are negatively and positively correlated with the pulse intensity, respectively. The predictions of the proposed theory are compared with the variations of the cyclotron line parameters in the X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 over a wide range of sub-critical luminosities as seen by the INTEGRAL observatory.

  1. Molecular dynamics and MM/GBSA-integrated protocol probing the correlation between biological activities and binding free energies of HIV-1 TAR RNA inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat with its cognate transactivation response (TAR) RNA has emerged as a promising target for developing antiviral compounds and treating HIV infection, since it is a crucial step for efficient transcription and replication. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM/GBSA calculations have been performed on a series of neamine derivatives in order to estimate appropriate MD simulation time for acceptable correlation between ΔGbind and experimental pIC50 values. Initially, all inhibitors were docked into the active site of HIV-1 TAR RNA. Later to explore various conformations and examine the docking results, MD simulations were carried out. Finally, binding free energies were calculated using MM/GBSA method and were correlated with experimental pIC50 values at different time scales (0-1 to 0-10 ns). From this study, it is clear that in case of neamine derivatives as simulation time increased the correlation between binding free energy and experimental pIC50 values increased correspondingly. Therefore, the binding energies which can be interpreted at longer simulation times can be used to predict the bioactivity of new neamine derivatives. Moreover, in this work, we have identified some plausible critical nucleotide interactions with neamine derivatives that are responsible for potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, we also provide some insights into a new class of oxadiazole-based back bone cyclic peptides designed by incorporating the structural features of neamine derivatives. On the whole, this approach can provide a valuable guidance for designing new potent inhibitors and modify the existing compounds targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA.

  2. SparseMaps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. IV. Linear-scaling second-order explicitly correlated energy with pair natural orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2016-04-01

    We present a formulation of the explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2-F12) energy in which all nontrivial post-mean-field steps are formulated with linear computational complexity in system size. The two key ideas are the use of pair-natural orbitals for compact representation of wave function amplitudes and the use of domain approximation to impose the block sparsity. This development utilizes the concepts for sparse representation of tensors described in the context of the domain based local pair-natural orbital-MP2 (DLPNO-MP2) method by us recently [Pinski et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Novel developments reported here include the use of domains not only for the projected atomic orbitals, but also for the complementary auxiliary basis set (CABS) used to approximate the three- and four-electron integrals of the F12 theory, and a simplification of the standard B intermediate of the F12 theory that avoids computation of four-index two-electron integrals that involve two CABS indices. For quasi-1-dimensional systems (n-alkanes), the O (" separators="N ) DLPNO-MP2-F12 method becomes less expensive than the conventional O (" separators="N5 ) MP2-F12 for n between 10 and 15, for double- and triple-zeta basis sets; for the largest alkane, C200H402, in def2-TZVP basis, the observed computational complexity is N˜1.6, largely due to the cubic cost of computing the mean-field operators. The method reproduces the canonical MP2-F12 energy with high precision: 99.9% of the canonical correlation energy is recovered with the default truncation parameters. Although its cost is significantly higher than that of DLPNO-MP2 method, the cost increase is compensated by the great reduction of the basis set error due to explicit correlation.

  3. 中哈能源消费结构与能源安全关联性对比分析%The correlation analysis between energy consumption structure and energy security in China and Kazakhstan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明辉; 袁培; 卢飞

    2016-01-01

    能源产业作为丝绸之路经济带建设的首推工程,影响丝绸之路经济带建设的整体进程。文章以能源消费结构为切入点,构建能源供应安全和使用安全的指标体系,运用回归方法对比分析了1992年~2013年中哈两国能源消费结构与能源安全的关联性。研究结果表明:两国传统的能源消费结构对能源安全的贡献呈现逐渐下降的趋势;两国能源安全均呈现“波动上升-波动下降”演进特征;两国能源安全形势都较为严峻,能源使用安全产生的环境负面效应凸显并逐渐放大。鉴于此,文章以两国能源合作为基础,从区域一体化层面审视并探究两国能源安全合作的深化路径。%Energy industry, as the first engineering construction of the Silk Road Economic Belt, influencing the whole process of its construction. The ar-ticle takes the energy consumption structure as the breakthrough point, lay down the energy supply security and the use safety index system, using the re-gression method to analyze the correlation between the energy consumption structure and the energy security during 1992-2013. The results show a trend of gradual decline the contribution to energy security made by bilateral tra-ditional energy consumption structure; the evolution of bilateral energy secu-rity were characteristiced by rising volatility-volatility decline ; bilateral energy security situation are expected to be more serious, energy use security especially, makes highlighted negative effects on environment and even en-larged gradually. So the article takes the bilateral energy cooperation as the foundation, from the regional integration level, in order to examine and ex-plore the deepening path of the two energy security cooperation.

  4. Latitude variation of recurrent MeV-energy proton flux enhancements in the heliocentric radial range 11 to 20 AU and possible correlation with solar coronal hole dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Recurrent low energy (not less than 0.5 MeV) proton flux enhancements, reliable indicators of corotating plasma interaction regions in interplanetary space, have been observed on the Voyager 1 and 2 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft in the heliographic latitude range 2 deg S to 23 deg N and the heliocentric radial range 11 to 20 AU. After a period of rather high correlation between fluxes at different latitudes in early 1983, distinct differences develop. The evolution of the fluxes appears to be related to the temporal and latitudinal dynamics of solar coronal holes, suggesting that information about the latitudinal structure of solar wind stream sources propagates to these distances.

  5. Comment on "Communication: Simple and accurate uniform electron gas correlation energy for the full range of densities" [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 021101 (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Karasiev, Valentin V

    2016-01-01

    A simple expression for the uniform electron gas (UEG) correlation energy, recently presented in Ref. [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 021101 (2016)], deviates from the reference quantum Monte-Carlo (QMC) data at large r_s. We propose to define one of the parameters from a requirement to match the large-rs QMC data. Functional with the new parameter provides much better agreement with the QMC data at large r_s without deterioration of the functional quality at small and intermediate r_s.

  6. The Deep Correlation between Energy Metabolism and Reproduction: A View on the Effects of Nutrition for Women Fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Fontana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In female mammals, mechanisms have been developed, throughout evolution, to integrate environmental, nutritional and hormonal cues in order to guarantee reproduction in favorable energetic conditions and to inhibit it in case of food scarcity. This metabolic strategy could be an advantage in nutritionally poor environments, but nowadays is affecting women’s health. The unlimited availability of nutrients, in association with reduced energy expenditure, leads to alterations in many metabolic pathways and to impairments in the finely tuned inter-relation between energy metabolism and reproduction, thereby affecting female fertility. Many energetic states could influence female reproductive health being under- and over-weight, obesity and strenuous physical activity are all conditions that alter the profiles of specific hormones, such as insulin and adipokines, thus impairing women fertility. Furthermore, specific classes of nutrients might affect female fertility by acting on particular signaling pathways. Dietary fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins and food-associated components (such as endocrine disruptors have per se physiological activities and their unbalanced intake, both in quantitative and qualitative terms, might impair metabolic homeostasis and fertility in premenopausal women. Even though we are far from identifying a “fertility diet”, lifestyle and dietary interventions might represent a promising and invaluable strategy to manage infertility in premenopausal women.

  7. Quantitative dual-energy CT for phantomless evaluation of cancellous bone mineral density of the vertebral pedicle: correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L.; Booz, Christian; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kerl, J.M.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Khan, M.F. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wesarg, Stefan [Fraunhofer IGD, Cognitive Computing and Medical Imaging, Darmstadt (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Spine Center, Asklepios Klinik Lindenlohe, Schwandorf (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate quantitative dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for phantomless analysis of cancellous bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebral pedicles and to assess the correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength. Twenty-nine thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from cadaver specimens were examined with DECT. Using dedicated post-processing software, a pedicle screw vector was mapped (R1, intrapedicular segment of the pedicle vector; R2, intermediate segment; R3, intracorporal segment; global, all segments) and BMD was calculated. To invasively evaluate pedicle stability, pedicle screws were drilled through both pedicles and left pedicle screw pull-out strength was measured. Resulting values were correlated using the paired t test and Pearson's linear correlation. Average pedicle screw vector BMD (R1, 0.232 g/cm{sup 3}; R2, 0.166 g/cm{sup 3}; R3, 0.173 g/cm{sup 3}; global, 0.236 g/cm{sup 3}) showed significant differences between R1-R2 (P < 0.002) and R1-R3 (P < 0.034) segments while comparison of R2-R3 did not reach significance (P > 0.668). Average screw pull-out strength (639.2 N) showed a far stronger correlation with R1 (r = 0.80; P < 0.0001) than global BMD (r = 0.42; P = 0.025), R2 (r = 0.37; P = 0.048) and R3 (r = -0.33; P = 0.078) segments. Quantitative DECT allows for phantomless BMD assessment of the vertebral pedicle. BMD of the intrapedicular segment shows a significantly stronger correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength than other segments. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of perfusion pattern and extent of perfusion defect on dual-energy CT angiography: Correlation between the causes of pulmonary hypertension and vascular parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young; Lee, Choong Wook; Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hye Jeon [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To assess perfusion patterns on a dual-energy pulmonary CT angiography (DECTA) of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) with variable causes and to assess whether the extent of perfusion defect can be used in the severity assessment of PHT. Between March 2007 and February 2011, DECTA scans of 62 consecutive patients (24 men, 38 women; mean age, 58.5 ± 17.3 [standard deviation] years; range, 19-87 years) with PHT were retrospectively included with following inclusion criteria; 1) absence of acute pulmonary thromboembolism, 2) maximal velocity of tricuspid regurgitation jet (TR Vmax) above 3 m/s on echocardiography performed within one week of the DECTA study. Perfusion patterns of iodine map were divided into normal (NL), diffuse heterogeneously decreased (DH), multifocal geographic and multiple peripheral wedging patterns. The extent of perfusion defects (PD), the diameter of main pulmonary artery (MPA) and the ratio of ascending aorta diameter/MPA (aortopulmonary ratio, APR) were measured. Pearson correlation analysis was performed between TR Vmax on echocardiography and CT imaging parameters. Common perfusion patterns of primary PHT were DH (n = 15) and NL (n = 12). The perfusion patterns of secondary PHT were variable. On the correlation analysis, in primary PHT, TR Vmax significantly correlated with PD, MPA and APR (r = 0.52, r = 0.40, r = -0.50, respectively, all p < 0.05). In secondary PHT, TR Vmax significantly correlated with PD and MPA (r = 0.38, r = 0.53, respectively, all p < 0.05). Different perfusion patterns are observed on DECTA of PHT according to the causes. PD and MPA are significantly correlated with the TR Vmax.

  9. Pion and kaon correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Annual report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV {sup 208}Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered {sup 208}Pb + Pb collisions. An upgraded multiple-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-ion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au+Au reaction, taken with full event characterization.

  10. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: constraining galaxy bias and cosmic growth with 3-point correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Felipe; Poole, Gregory; McBride, Cameron; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Davis, Tamara M; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C

    2013-01-01

    Higher-order statistics are a useful and complementary tool for measuring the clustering of galaxies, containing information on the non-gaussian evolution and morphology of large-scale structure in the Universe. In this work we present measurements of the three-point correlation function (3PCF) for 187,000 galaxies in the WiggleZ spectroscopic galaxy survey. We explore the WiggleZ 3PCF scale and shape dependence at three different epochs z=0.35, 0.55 and 0.68, the highest redshifts where these measurements have been made to date. Using N-body simulations to predict the clustering of dark matter, we constrain the linear and non-linear bias parameters of WiggleZ galaxies with respect to dark matter, and marginalise over them to obtain constraints on sigma_8(z), the variance of perturbations on a scale of 8 Mpc/h and its evolution with redshift. These measurements of sigma_8(z), which have 10-20% accuracies, are consistent with the predictions of the LCDM concordance cosmology and test this model in a new way.

  11. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  12. Adiabatic eigenfunction based approach to coherent transfer: application to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex and the role of correlations in the efficiency of energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Pallavi; Sebastian, K L

    2013-09-12

    We have recently suggested a method (Pallavi Bhattacharyya and K. L. Sebastian, Physical Review E 2013, 87, 062712) for the analysis of coherence in finite-level systems that are coupled to the surroundings and used it to study the process of energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. The method makes use of adiabatic eigenstates of the Hamiltonian, with a subsequent transformation of the Hamiltonian into a form where the terms responsible for decoherence and population relaxation could be separated out at the lowest order. Thus one can account for decoherence nonperturbatively, and a Markovian type of master equation could be used for evaluating the population relaxation. In this paper, we apply this method to a two-level system as well as to a seven-level system. Comparisons with exact numerical results show that the method works quite well and is in good agreement with numerical calculations. The technique can be applied with ease to systems with larger numbers of levels as well. We also investigate how the presence of correlations among the bath degrees of freedom of the different bacteriochlorophyll a molecules of the FMO Complex affect the rate of energy transfer. Surprisingly, in the cases that we studied, our calculations suggest that the presence of anticorrelations, in contrast to correlations, make the excitation transfer more facile.

  13. A Two-Tiered Correlation of Dark Matter with Missing Transverse Energy: Reconstructing the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle Mass at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Walker, Joel W

    2011-01-01

    We suggest that non-trivial correlations between the dark matter particle mass and collider based probes of missing transverse energy H_T^miss may facilitate a two tiered approach to the initial discovery of supersymmetry and the subsequent reconstruction of the LSP mass at the LHC. These correlations are demonstrated via extensive Monte Carlo simulation of seventeen benchmark models, each sampled at five distinct LHC center-of-mass beam energies, which span the parameter space of No-Scale F-SU(5), which is defined in turn by the union of the Flipped SU(5) Grand Unified Theory, two pairs of hypothetical TeV scale vector-like supersymmetric multiplets with origins in F-theory, and the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity. In addition, we consider a control sample comprised of a standard minimal Supergravity benchmark point. Led by a striking similarity between the H_T^miss distribution and the familiar power spectrum of a black body radiator at various temperatures, we implement...

  14. Radical ions with nearly degenerate ground state: correlation between the rate of spin-lattice relaxation and the structure of adiabatic potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkov, V I; Beregovaya, I V; Shchegoleva, L N; Potashov, P A; Bagryansky, V A; Molin, Y N

    2012-09-14

    Paramagnetic spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in radical cations (RCs) of the cycloalkane series in liquid solution was studied and analyzed from the point of view of the correlation between the relaxation rate and the structure of the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) of the RCs. SLR rates in the RCs formed in x-ray irradiated n-hexane solutions of the cycloalkanes studied were measured with the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in the recombination fluorescence of spin-correlated radical ion pairs. Temperature and, for some cycloalkanes, magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rate were determined. It was found that the conventional Redfield theory of the paramagnetic relaxation as applied to the results on cyclohexane RC, gave a value of about 0.2 ps for the correlation time of the perturbation together with an unrealistically high value of 0.1 T in field units for the matrix element of the relaxation transition. The PES structure was obtained with the DFT quantum-chemical calculations. It was found that for all of the cycloalkanes RCs considered, including low symmetric alkyl-substituted ones, the adiabatic PESes were surfaces of pseudorotation due to avoided crossing. In the RCs studied, a correlation between the SLR rate and the calculated barrier height to the pseudorotation was revealed. For RCs with a higher relaxation rate, the apparent activation energies for the SLR were similar to the calculated heights of the barrier. To rationalize the data obtained it was assumed that the vibronic states degeneracy, which is specific for Jahn-Teller active cyclohexane RC, was approximately kept in the RCs of substituted cycloalkanes for the vibronic states with the energies above and close to the barrier height to the pseudorotation. It was proposed that the effective spin-lattice relaxation in a radical with nearly degenerate low-lying vibronic states originated from stochastic crossings of the vibronic levels that occur due to fluctuations of

  15. Walking performance: correlation between energy cost of walking and walking participation. new statistical approach concerning outcome measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Walking ability, though important for quality of life and participation in social and economic activities, can be adversely affected by neurological disorders, such as Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis or Traumatic Brain Injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the energy cost of walking (CW, in a mixed group of chronic patients with neurological diseases almost 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation wards, can predict the walking performance and any walking restriction on community activities, as indicated by Walking Handicap Scale categories (WHS. One hundred and seven subjects were included in the study, 31 suffering from Stroke, 26 from Spinal Cord Injury and 50 from Multiple Sclerosis. The multivariable binary logistical regression analysis has produced a statistical model with good characteristics of fit and good predictability. This model generated a cut-off value of.40, which enabled us to classify correctly the cases with a percentage of 85.0%. Our research reveal that, in our subjects, CW is the only predictor of the walking performance of in the community, to be compared with the score of WHS. We have been also identifying a cut-off value of CW cost, which makes a distinction between those who can walk in the community and those who cannot do it. In particular, these values could be used to predict the ability to walk in the community when discharged from the rehabilitation units, and to adjust the rehabilitative treatment to improve the performance.

  16. Temperature Dependence of the Kinetic Energy of the Correlated Electron Plasma by Restricted Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Keith; Deymier, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in orbital-free Density Functional Theory (OF-DFT), particularly with regard to temperature dependent functionals, has promise for the simulation of warm dense matter (WDM) systems. WDM includes systems with densities of an order of magnitude beyond ambient or more and temperatures measured in kilokelvin. A challenge for the development of temperature dependent OF-DFT functionals is the lack of benchmark information with temperature and pressure dependence on simple models under WDM conditions. We present an approach to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Electrons are described as harmonic necklaces within the discrete path integral representation while quantum exchange takes the form of cross linking between electron necklaces. A molecular dynamics algorithm is used to sample phase space and the fermion sign problem is addressed by restricting the density matrix to positive values. The temperature dependence of kinetic energies for the strongly coupled electron plasma is presented for a number of Wigner-Seitz radii in terms of a fourth order Sommerfeld expansion. Supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0002139

  17. Detection of pulmonary embolism by dual energy CT: correlation with perfusion scintigraphy and histopathological findings in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long-Jiang; Zhao, Yan-E; Hu, Xiao-Bo; Lu, Guang-Ming [Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Chai, Xue [Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Nanjing Brain Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Wu, Sheng-Yong [Medical Imaging Institute of Tianjin, Tianjin (China); Hu, Yu-Xiao; Xue, Yang-Bo; Yang, Gui-Fen; Zhu, Hong [Nanjing University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to compare the ability of dual energy CT (DECT) and perfusion scintigraphy (PS) to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) in a rabbit model. Gelfoam (n = 20) or saline (n = 4) was injected into the femoral vein of rabbits. After 2 h, DECT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was used to create blood flow imaging (BFI) and fusion images. The rabbits then underwent PS. Pathological determination of locations and numbers of lung lobes with PE was recorded. The sensitivity and specificity for BFI, CTPA, fused images and PS were calculated using the pathological results as reference standards. Compared with pathological evaluation, CTPA correctly identified PE in 40 lobes and absence of emboli in 80 lobes, corresponding to a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. BFI and fused images correctly identified PE in 40 lobes and the absence of emboli in 78 lobes, corresponding to a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 98%, respectively. PS correctly detected 27 lobes with PE and 65 lobes without PE, corresponding to a sensitivity and specificity of 68% and 81%, respectively. BFI, CTPA and fused images derived from a single contrast-enhanced DECT provide a higher diagnostic accuracy of detecting PE than PS in a rabbit model. (orig.)

  18. Neutral Kaon Correlations In Gold-gold Collisions At Center Of Mass Energy Of 200 Gev Per Nucleon Pair

    CERN Document Server

    Bekele, S

    2004-01-01

    A few microseconds after the Big Bang, the universe is believed to have existed in the form of a plasma composed of strongly interacting particles known as quarks and gluons. Although the quarks and gluons behave as asymptotically free particles in a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), free quarks and gluons have never been discovered in the laboratory. Experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) aim to create conditions similar to the early universe by colliding heavy ions at the highest energies possible in the hope of observing a phase transition from a QGP into hadronic degrees of freedom. The response of the space time structure of the hot reaction zone created in a heavy ion collision to a phase transition is one of the many observables being studied at RHIC. Making use of the techniques of two particle intensity interferometry, also known as the HBT effect, the RHIC experiments are studying the space-time structure and dynamical properties of the region from which particles are emitted. A large spa...

  19. Dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment in acute pulmonary embolism - correlation with D-dimer level, right heart strain and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Frellesen, Claudia; Schell, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Jacobi, Volkmar; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kerl, J.M. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Renker, Matthias [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashley River Tower, Charleston, SC (United States); Ackermann, Hanns [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashley River Tower, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To investigate the role of perfusion defect (PD) size on dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment as predictor of right heart strain and patient outcome and its correlation with d-dimer levels in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). 53 patients with acute PE who underwent DECT pulmonary angiography were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary PD size caused by PE was measured on DE iodine maps and quantified absolutely (VolPD) and relatively to the total lung volume (RelPD). Signs of right heart strain (RHS) on CT were determined. Information on d-dimer levels and readmission for recurrent onset of PE and death was collected. D-dimer level was mildly (r = 0.43-0.47) correlated with PD size. Patients with RHS had significantly higher VolPD (215 vs. 73 ml) and RelPD (9.9 vs. 2.9%) than patients without RHS (p < 0.003). There were 2 deaths and 1 readmission due of PE in 18 patients with >5% RelPD, while no such events were found for patients with <5% RelPD. Pulmonary blood volume on DECT in acute PE correlates with RHS and appears to be a predictor of patient outcome in this pilot study. (orig.)

  20. High energy electron radiography system design and simulation study of beam angle-position correlation and aperture effect on the images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Quantang, E-mail: zhaoquantang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Cao, S.C.; Liu, M.; Sheng, X.K. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Y.R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zong, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, X.M. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jing, Y.; Cheng, R.; Zhao, Y.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Z.M., E-mail: zzm@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du, Y.C. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gai, W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A beam line dedicated to high-energy electron radiography experimental research with linear achromat and imaging lens systems has been designed. The field of view requirement on the target and the beam angle-position correlation correction can be achieved by fine-tuning the fields of the quadrupoles used in the achromat in combination with already existing six quadrupoles before the achromat. The radiography system is designed by fully considering the space limitation of the laboratory and the beam diagnostics devices. Two kinds of imaging lens system, a quadruplet and an octuplet system are integrated into one beam line with the same object plane and image plane but with different magnification factor. The beam angle-position correlation on the target required by the imaging lens system and the aperture effect on the images are studied with particle tracking simulation. It is shown that the aperture position is also correlated to the beam angle-position on the target. With matched beam on the target, corresponding aperture position and suitable aperture radius, clear pictures can be imaged by both lens systems. The aperture is very important for the imaging. The details of the beam optical requirements, optimized parameters and the simulation results are presented.

  1. Correlations Between Variations in Solar EUV and Soft X-Ray Irradiance and Photoelectron Energy Spectra Observed on Mars and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F(10.7) index currently used.

  2. Charge Dynamics in Low Dimensional Prototype Correlated Systems: A View with High-Energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Md-Zahid

    2002-03-20

    The electronic structure of Mott systems continues to be an unsolved problem in physics despite more than half-century of intense research efforts. Well-developed momentum-resolved spectroscopies such as photoemission and neutron scattering cannot directly address problems associated with the full Mott gap as angle-resolved photoemission probes the occupied states and neutrons do not couple to the electron's charge directly. Our observation of dispersive particle- hole pair excitations across the charge gap (effective Mott gap) in several low dimensional prototype Mott insulators using high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering suggests that the excitations across the gap are highly anisotropic and momentum dependent. The results indirectly provide some information about the momentum dependence of unoccupied states in these correlated systems. The x-ray scattering results are complementary to the electron scattering results by the possibility of studying the excitations in the high momentum transfer regimes (near the zone boundaries and comers). This is also demonstrated in case of studying plasmons near the wave vector regime where Landau damping starts to dominate. X-ray scattering also allows one to probe the symmetry characters of localized electrons and the excitations through the strong polarization dependence of scattering near a core resonance. The study of charge-orbital localization is demonstrated in case of manganese oxides. Given its deeply bulk-sensitive and weak-coupling nature and the ability to probe dispersive behavior of charge fluctuations over several Brillouin zones, inelastic x-ray scattering shows the promise to become an important experimental tool to study the electronic structure of complex quantum systems.

  3. Femtoscopic and Nonfemtoscopic Two-Particle Correlations in A+A and p+p Collisions at RHIC and LHC Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical review of the last femtoscopy results for the systems created in ultrarelativistic A+A, p+p, and p+Pb collisions is presented. The basic model, allowing to describe the interferometry data at SPS, RHIC, and LHC, is the hydrokinetic model. The model allows one to avoid the principal problem of the particlization of the medium at nonspace-like sites of transition hypersurfaces and switch to hadronic cascade at a space-like hypersurface with nonequilibrated particle input. The results for pion and kaon interferometry scales in Pb+Pb and Au+Au collisions at LHC and RHIC are presented for different centralities. The new theoretical results as for the femtoscopy of small sources with sizes of 1-2 fm or less are discussed. The uncertainty principle destroys the standard approach of completely chaotic sources: the emitters in such sources cannot radiate independently and incoherently. As a result, the observed femtoscopy scales are reduced, and the Bose-Einstein correlation function is suppressed. The results are applied for the femtoscopy analysis of p+p collisions at s=7 TeV LHC energy and p+Pb ones at s=5.02 TeV. The behavior of the corresponding interferometry volumes on multiplicity is compared with what is happening for central A+A collisions. In addition the nonfemtoscopic two-pion correlations in proton-proton collisions at the LHC energies are considered, and a simple model that takes into account correlations induced by the conservation laws and minijets is analyzed.

  4. Comparison of a new calculation of energy-energy correlations with {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow} hadrons data at the {ital Z}{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.; (SLD Collabor...

    1995-10-01

    We have compared a new QCD calculation by Clay and Ellis of energy-energy correlations (EEC`s) and their asymmetry (AEEC`s) in {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation into hadrons with data collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC. From fits of the new calculation, complete at {ital O}({alpha}{sub {ital s}}{sup 2}), we obtained {alpha}{sub {ital s}}({ital M}{sub {ital Z}}{sup 2})=0.1184{plus_minus}0.0031(expt){plus_minus}0.0129(theory) (EEC) and {alpha}{sub {ital s}}({ital M}{sub {ital Z}}{sup 2})=0.1120{plus_minus}0.0034(expt){plus_minus}0.0036(theory) (AEEC). The EEC result is significantly lower than that obtained from comparable fits using the {ital O}({alpha}{sub {ital s}}{sup 2}) calculation of Kunszt and Nason.

  5. Loop-driven graphical unitary group approach to the electron correlation problem, including configuration interaction energy gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, B.R.

    1979-09-01

    The Graphical Unitary Group Approach (GUGA) was cast into an extraordinarily powerful form by restructuring the Hamiltonian in terms of loop types. This restructuring allows the adoption of the loop-driven formulation which illuminates vast numbers of previously unappreciated relationships between otherwise distinct Hamiltonian matrix elements. The theoretical/methodological contributions made here include the development of the loop-driven formula generation algorithm, a solution of the upper walk problem used to develop a loop breakdown algorithm, the restriction of configuration space employed to the multireference interacting space, and the restructuring of the Hamiltonian in terms of loop types. Several other developments are presented and discussed. Among these developments are the use of new segment coefficients, improvements in the loop-driven algorithm, implicit generation of loops wholly within the external space adapted within the framework of the loop-driven methodology, and comparisons of the diagonalization tape method to the direct method. It is also shown how it is possible to implement the GUGA method without the time-consuming full (m/sup 5/) four-index transformation. A particularly promising new direction presented here involves the use of the GUGA methodology to obtain one-electron and two-electron density matrices. Once these are known, analytical gradients (first derivatives) of the CI potential energy are easily obtained. Several test calculations are examined in detail to illustrate the unique features of the method. Also included is a calculation on the asymmetric 2/sup 1/A' state of SO/sub 2/ with 23,613 configurations to demonstrate methods for the diagonalization of very large matrices on a minicomputer. 6 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schimp, M; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schulte, L; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; :,; Aab, A; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andrada, B; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Awal, N; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blanco, M; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Botti, A M; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Briechle, F L; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Diaz, J C Chirinos; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Dallier, R; D'Amico, S; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Debatin, J; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Dundovic, A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; Fuster, A; Gallo, F; García, B; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Hasankiadeh, Q; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, H; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Peña-Rodriguez, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Gomez, J D Sanabria; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Strafella, F; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Durán, M Suarez; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tepe, A; Theodoro, V M; Tibolla, O; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; Berg, A M van den; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vasquez, R; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yapici, T; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zong, Z; Abbasi, R U; Abe, M; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, H S; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of high-energy neutrino-induced muon tracks, which provided evidence for a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin, and study their cross-correlation with the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) samples as a function of angular separation. We also study their possible directional correlations using a likelihood method stacking the neutrino arrival directions and adopting different assumptions on the size of the UHECR magnetic deflections. Finally, we perform another likelihood analysis stacking the UHECR directions and using a sample of through-going muon tracks optimized for neutrino point-source searches with sub-degree angular resolution. No indications of correlations at discovery level are obtained for any of the sear...

  7. Ensemble v-representable ab-initio density functional calculation of energy and spin in atoms: atest of exchange-correlation approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Kraisler, Eli; Kelson, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    The total energies and the spin states for atoms and their first ions with Z = 1-86 are calculated within the the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) and the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) to the exchange-correlation (xc) energy in density-functional theory. Atoms and ions for which the ground-state density is not pure-state v-representable, are treated as ensemble v- representable with fractional occupations of the Kohn-Sham system. A newly developed algorithm which searches over ensemble v-representable densities [E. Kraisler et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 032115 (2009)] is employed in calculations. It is found that for many atoms the ionization energies obtained with the GGA are only modestly improved with respect to experimental data, as compared to the LSDA. However, even in those groups of atoms where the improvement is systematic, there remains a non-negligible difference with respect to the experiment. The ab-initio electronic configuration in the Kohn-Sham reference system does not always equ...

  8. Correlation of the neutron star crust-core properties with the slope of the symmetry energy and the lead skin thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, H; Agrawal, B K; Providência, C

    2016-01-01

    The correlations of the crust-core transition density and pressure in neutron stars with the slope of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness are investigated, using different families of relativistic mean field parametrizations with constant couplings and non-linear terms mixing the $\\sigma$, $\\omega$ and $\\rho$-meson fields. It is shown that the modification of the density dependence of the symmetry energy, involving the $\\sigma$ or the $\\omega$ meson, gives rise to different behaviors: the effect of the $\\omega$-meson may also be reproduced within non-relativistic phenomenological models, while the effect of the $\\sigma$-meson is essentially relativistic. Depending on the parametrization with $\\sigma-\\rho$ or $\\omega-\\rho$ mixing terms, different values of the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation must be considered in order to obtain a neutron matter equation of state compatible with results from chiral effective field theory. This difference leads to different pressures at the crust-core ...

  9. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Sergei D., E-mail: sergei.ivanov@unirostock.de; Grant, Ian M.; Marx, Dominik [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr–Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  10. High resolution measurements of mass, energy and nuclear charge correlations for sup 229 Th(n sub th ,f) with the COSI FAN TUTTE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucheneb, N. (Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Gradignan (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedienne, Algiers (Algeria). Inst. de Physique); Geltenbort, P.; Oed, A. (Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Barreau, G.; Doan, T.P.; Leroux, B.; Sicre, A. (Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Asghar, M. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedienne, Algiers (Algeria). Inst. de Physique); Goennenwein, F. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-10-09

    The COSI FAN TUTTE spectrometer has been used to measure for the first time in one go the mass-charge-energy correlations for well-resolved light group masses for {sup 229}Th(n{sub th},f). About 4.8x10{sup 5} events were collected in a {approx equal} 3 months run. The global mass distribution shows structures and the distribution for E{sub L}=(112+-0.5) MeV is dominated by mass number A{sub L}=86 and 96. The mean kinetic energy shows strong fluctuations as a function of the light fragment mass A{sub L}. The mean proton odd-even effects in yields and energy are {delta}p=(40.0+-1.0)% and {delta}E{sub TKE}{sup o-e}=(1.35+-0.17) MeV, respectively. The {delta}p(E{sub L}) varies by a factor of {approx equal} 3 for E{sub L}=92 to 107 MeV with a plateau for E{sub L}{approx equal} 96 to 103 MeV. The mean neutron odd-even effect is {delta}n=(1.95+-0.5)%. The mean value of the conditional variance is <{sigma}{sup 2}(Zvertical strokeA)>=(0.33+-0.02) and it varies little with energy. The conditional variance seems to decrease as one goes from {sup 252}Cf to {sup 230}Th. These data are discussed in the context of existing results on other nuclei. (orig.).

  11. Measurement of the spin correlation parameters All and Asl for the reaction pp-->dπ+ in the energy region 500-800 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, D. B.; Saha, A.; Seth, K. K.; Bhatia, T. S.; Glass, G.; Hiebert, J. C.; Kenefick, R. A.; Nath, S.; Northcliffe, L. C.; Tippens, W. B.; Jarmer, J. J.; Simmons, J. E.; Jeppesen, R. H.; Tripard, G. E.

    1988-05-01

    Angular distributions of the spin-correlation parameters Asl and All for the reaction pp-->π+d have been measured at pion center-of-mass angles 40°<=θ+π*<=130° at incident energies of 500, 650, and 800 MeV. Additional measurements of All were made at 600, 700, and 750 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with the predictions of several unified coupled-channel calculations and partial-wave analyses. While the latest partial-wave analyses were found to fit the data reasonably well, all except one of the various model predictions not only do not fit the data well, but also tend to be in disagreement with each other. The data show no clear sign of a need for proposed dibaryon resonances.

  12. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. -H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H. -P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; André, J. P. A. M. de; Clercq, C. De; Rosendo, E. del Pino; Dembinski, H.; Ridder, S. De; Desiati, P.; Vries, K. D. de; Wasseige, G. de; With, M. de; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Lorenzo, V. di; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C. -C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H. -G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Vanheule, S.; Santen, J. van; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Collaboration, M. Zoll The Pierre Auger; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. C. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Jong, S. J. de; Mauro, G. De; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Debatin, J.; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Anjos, R. C. dos; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gallo, F.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Oliveira, M. A. Leigui de; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; Casado, A. López; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Carvalho, W. Rodrigues de; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Gomez, J. D. Sanabria; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strafella, F.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Durán, M. Suarez; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Elipe, G. Torralba; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdés; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; Aar, G. van; Bodegom, P. van; Berg, A. M. van den; Vliet, A. van; Varela, E.; Cárdenas, B. Vargas; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Collaboration, F. Zuccarello The Telescope Array; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of

  13. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. -H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H. -P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; André, J. P. A. M. de; Clercq, C. De; Rosendo, E. del Pino; Dembinski, H.; Ridder, S. De; Desiati, P.; Vries, K. D. de; Wasseige, G. de; With, M. de; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Lorenzo, V. di; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C. -C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H. -G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Vanheule, S.; Santen, J. van; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Collaboration, M. Zoll The Pierre Auger; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. C. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Jong, S. J. de; Mauro, G. De; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Debatin, J.; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Anjos, R. C. dos; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gallo, F.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Oliveira, M. A. Leigui de; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; Casado, A. López; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Carvalho, W. Rodrigues de; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Gomez, J. D. Sanabria; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strafella, F.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Durán, M. Suarez; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Elipe, G. Torralba; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdés; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; Aar, G. van; Bodegom, P. van; Berg, A. M. van den; Vliet, A. van; Varela, E.; Cárdenas, B. Vargas; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Collaboration, F. Zuccarello The Telescope Array; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of hig

  14. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. -H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H. -P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; André, J. P. A. M. de; Clercq, C. De; Rosendo, E. del Pino; Dembinski, H.; Ridder, S. De; Desiati, P.; Vries, K. D. de; Wasseige, G. de; With, M. de; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Lorenzo, V. di; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C. -C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H. -G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Vanheule, S.; Santen, J. van; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Collaboration, M. Zoll The Pierre Auger; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. C. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Jong, S. J. de; Mauro, G. De; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Debatin, J.; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Anjos, R. C. dos; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gallo, F.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Oliveira, M. A. Leigui de; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; Casado, A. López; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mello, V. B. 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D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of hig

  15. Measurement of transverse energy-energy correlations in multi-jet events in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV using the ATLAS detector and determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}}(m_Z)$

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; 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Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; F