WorldWideScience

Sample records for correct flagellar assembly

  1. A common assembly module in injectisome and flagellar type III secretion sorting platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notti, Ryan Q; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Lilic, Mirjana; Stebbins, C Erec

    2015-05-21

    Translocating proteins across the double membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, type III secretion systems (T3SS) occur in two evolutionarily related forms: injectisomes, delivering virulence factors into host cells, and the flagellar system, secreting the polymeric filament used for motility. While both systems share related elements of a cytoplasmic sorting platform that facilitates the hierarchical secretion of protein substrates, its assembly and regulation remain unclear. Here we describe a module mediating the assembly of the sorting platform in both secretion systems, and elucidate the structural basis for segregation of homologous components among these divergent T3SS subtypes sharing a common cytoplasmic milieu. These results provide a foundation for the subtype-specific assembly of T3SS sorting platforms and will support further mechanistic analysis and anti-virulence drug design.

  2. Assembly and stoichiometry of the core structure of the bacterial flagellar type III export gate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Takuma; Makino, Fumiaki; Dietsche, Tobias; Kinoshita, Miki; Kato, Takayuki; Wagner, Samuel; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru

    2017-08-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus, which is required for flagellar assembly beyond the cell membranes, consists of a transmembrane export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex. FlhA, FlhB, FliP, FliQ, and FliR form the gate complex inside the basal body MS ring, although FliO is required for efficient export gate formation in Salmonella enterica. However, it remains unknown how they form the gate complex. Here we report that FliP forms a homohexameric ring with a diameter of 10 nm. Alanine substitutions of conserved Phe-137, Phe-150, and Glu-178 residues in the periplasmic domain of FliP (FliPP) inhibited FliP6 ring formation, suppressing flagellar protein export. FliO formed a 5-nm ring structure with 3 clamp-like structures that bind to the FliP6 ring. The crystal structure of FliPP derived from Thermotoga maritia, and structure-based photo-crosslinking experiments revealed that Phe-150 and Ser-156 of FliPP are involved in the FliP-FliP interactions and that Phe-150, Arg-152, Ser-156, and Pro-158 are responsible for the FliP-FliO interactions. Overexpression of FliP restored motility of a ∆fliO mutant to the wild-type level, suggesting that the FliP6 ring is a functional unit in the export gate complex and that FliO is not part of the final gate structure. Copurification assays revealed that FlhA, FlhB, FliQ, and FliR are associated with the FliO/FliP complex. We propose that the assembly of the export gate complex begins with FliP6 ring formation with the help of the FliO scaffold, followed by FliQ, FliR, and FlhB and finally FlhA during MS ring formation.

  3. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihad El Andari

    Full Text Available Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly.

  4. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Andari, Jihad; Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert; Graumann, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly. PMID:26517549

  5. Chlamydomonas axonemal dynein assembly locus ODA8 encodes a conserved flagellar protein needed for cytoplasmic maturation of outer dynein arm complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Paurav B; Freshour, Judy R; Mitchell, David R

    2015-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii oda8 mutation blocks assembly of flagellar outer dynein arms (ODAs), and interacts genetically with ODA5 and ODA10, which encode axonemal proteins thought to aid dynein binding onto axonemal docking sites. We positionally cloned ODA8 and identified the gene product as the algal homolog of vertebrate LRRC56. Its flagellar localization depends on ODA5 and ODA10, consistent with genetic interaction studies, but phylogenomics suggests that LRRC56 homologs play a role in intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent assembly of outer row dynein arms, not axonemal docking. ODA8 distribution between cytoplasm and flagella is similar to that of IFT proteins and about half of flagellar ODA8 is in the soluble matrix fraction. Dynein extracted in vitro from wild type axonemes will rebind efficiently to oda8 mutant axonemes, without re-binding of ODA8, further supporting a role in dynein assembly or transport, not axonemal binding. Assays comparing preassembled ODA complexes from the cytoplasm of wild type and mutant strains show that dynein in oda8 mutant cytoplasm has not properly preassembled and cannot bind normally onto oda axonemes. We conclude that ODA8 plays an important role in formation and transport of mature dynein complexes during flagellar assembly.

  6. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J

    2015-05-12

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. Many bacteria are able to rapidly transport themselves through their surroundings using specialized organelles called flagella. In spiral-shaped organisms called spirochetes, flagella act like inboard motors and give the bacteria the ability to bore their way through dense materials (such as human

  7. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tao; Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; LIU Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants wer...

  8. The new Sunspot Number: assembling all corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Frédéric,; Lefèvre, Laure

    2015-01-01

    The Sunspot Number, created by R.Wolf in 1849, provides a direct long-term record of solar activity from 1700 to the present. In spite of its central role in multiple studies of the solar dynamo and of the past Sun-Earth relations, it was never submitted to a global critical revision. However, various discrepancies with other solar indices recently motivated a full re-calibration of this series. Based on various diagnostics and corrections established in the framework of several Sunspot Number Workshops and described in Clette et al. 2014, we assembled all corrections in order to produce a new standard version of this reference time series. In this paper, we explain the three main corrections and the criteria used to choose a final optimal version of each correction factor or function, given the available information and published analyses. We then discuss the good agreement obtained with the Group sunspot Number derived from a recent reconstruction. Among the implications emerging from this re-calibrated ser...

  9. Shear Stress Transmission Model for the Flagellar Rotary Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ohshima

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, which are driven by a rotary motor powered by proton flux. The mechanism of the flagellar motor is discussed by reforming the model proposed by the present authors in 2005. It is shown that the mean strength of Coulomb field produced by a proton passing the channel is very strong in the Mot assembly so that the Mot assembly can be a shear force generator and induce the flagellar rotation. The model gives clear calculation results in agreement with experimental observations, e g., for the charasteristic torque-velocity relationship of the flagellar rotation.

  10. Ciliary/Flagellar Protein Ubiquitination

    OpenAIRE

    Huan Long; Qiyu Wang; Kaiyao Huang

    2015-01-01

    Cilia/flagella are conserved eukaryotic organelles that play an important role in the control of cell motility and detection of environmental cues. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliary/flagellar assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and signal transduction are not yet completely understood. Recent studies demonstrated that post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation, methylation, glutamylation, and ubiquitination are involved in these processes. In this mini ...

  11. A role for the membrane in regulating Chlamydomonas flagellar length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Dentler

    Full Text Available Flagellar assembly requires coordination between the assembly of axonemal proteins and the assembly of the flagellar membrane and membrane proteins. Fully grown steady-state Chlamydomonas flagella release flagellar vesicles from their tips and failure to resupply membrane should affect flagellar length. To study vesicle release, plasma and flagellar membrane surface proteins were vectorially pulse-labeled and flagella and vesicles were analyzed for biotinylated proteins. Based on the quantity of biotinylated proteins in purified vesicles, steady-state flagella appeared to shed a minimum of 16% of their surface membrane per hour, equivalent to a complete flagellar membrane being released every 6 hrs or less. Brefeldin-A destroyed Chlamydomonas Golgi, inhibited the secretory pathway, inhibited flagellar regeneration, and induced full-length flagella to disassemble within 6 hrs, consistent with flagellar disassembly being induced by a failure to resupply membrane. In contrast to membrane lipids, a pool of biotinylatable membrane proteins was identified that was sufficient to resupply flagella as they released vesicles for 6 hrs in the absence of protein synthesis and to support one and nearly two regenerations of flagella following amputation. These studies reveal the importance of the secretory pathway to assemble and maintain full-length flagella.

  12. RAB-like 2 has an essential role in male fertility, sperm intra-flagellar transport, and tail assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Y Lo

    Full Text Available A significant percentage of young men are infertile and, for the majority, the underlying cause remains unknown. Male infertility is, however, frequently associated with defective sperm motility, wherein the sperm tail is a modified flagella/cilia. Conversely, a greater understanding of essential mechanisms involved in tail formation may offer contraceptive opportunities, or more broadly, therapeutic strategies for global cilia defects. Here we have identified Rab-like 2 (RABL2 as an essential requirement for sperm tail assembly and function. RABL2 is a member of a poorly characterized clade of the RAS GTPase superfamily. RABL2 is highly enriched within developing male germ cells, where it localizes to the mid-piece of the sperm tail. Lesser amounts of Rabl2 mRNA were observed in other tissues containing motile cilia. Using a co-immunoprecipitation approach and RABL2 affinity columns followed by immunochemistry, we demonstrated that within developing haploid germ cells RABL2 interacts with intra-flagella transport (IFT proteins and delivers a specific set of effector (cargo proteins, including key members of the glycolytic pathway, to the sperm tail. RABL2 binding to effector proteins is regulated by GTP. Perturbed RABL2 function, as exemplified by the Mot mouse line that contains a mutation in a critical protein-protein interaction domain, results in male sterility characterized by reduced sperm output, and sperm with aberrant motility and short tails. Our data demonstrate a novel function for the RABL protein family, an essential role for RABL2 in male fertility and a previously uncharacterised mechanism for protein delivery to the flagellum.

  13. The LC7 Light Chains of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Dyneins Interact with Components Required for Both Motor Assembly and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBella, Linda M.; Sakato, Miho; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; King, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the LC7/Roadblock family of light chains (LCs) have been found in both cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins. LC7a was originally identified within Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein and associates with this motor's cargo-binding region. We describe here a novel member of this protein family, termed LC7b that is also present in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. Levels of LC7b are reduced ∼20% in axonemes isolated from strains lacking inner arm I1 and are ∼80% lower in the absence of the outer arms. When both dyneins are missing, LC7b levels are diminished to <10%. In oda9 axonemal extracts that completely lack outer arms, LC7b copurifies with inner arm I1, whereas in ida1 extracts that are devoid of I1 inner arms it associates with outer arm dynein. We also have observed that some LC7a is present in both isolated axonemes and purified 18S dynein from oda1, suggesting that it is also a component of both the outer arm and inner arm I1. Intriguingly, in axonemal extracts from the LC7a null mutant, oda15, which assembles ∼30% of its outer arms, LC7b fails to copurify with either dynein, suggesting that it interacts with LC7a. Furthermore, both the outer arm γ heavy chain and DC2 from the outer arm docking complex completely dissociate after salt extraction from oda15 axonemes. EDC cross-linking of purified dynein revealed that LC7b interacts with LC3, an outer dynein arm thioredoxin; DC2, an outer arm docking complex component; and also with the phosphoprotein IC138 from inner arm I1. These data suggest that LC7a stabilizes both the outer arms and inner arm I1 and that both LC7a and LC7b are involved in multiple intradynein interactions within both dyneins. PMID:15304520

  14. Genomes correction and assembling: present methods and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszek, Michał; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Nowak, Robert; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provided significant impact into genomics field of study enabling implementation of many de novo sequencing projects of new species which was previously confined by technological costs. Along with advancement of NGS there was need for adjustment in assembly programs. New algorithms must cope with massive amounts of data computation in reasonable time limits and processing power and hardware is also an important factor. In this paper, we address the issue of assembly pipeline for de novo genome assembly provided by programs presently available for scientist both as commercial and as open - source software. The implementation of four different approaches - Greedy, Overlap - Layout - Consensus (OLC), De Bruijn and Integrated resulting in variation of performance is the main focus of our discussion with additional insight into issue of short and long reads correction.

  15. Fuel of the Bacterial Flagellar Type III Protein Export Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru; Kinoshita, Miki; Namba, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    The flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) across the cytoplasmic membrane as the energy sources and transports flagellar component proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal growing end of the growing structure to construct the bacterial flagellum beyond the cellular membranes. The flagellar type III export apparatus coordinates flagellar protein export with assembly by ordered export of substrates to parallel with their order of the assembly. The export apparatus is composed of a PMF-driven transmembrane export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Since the ATPase complex is dispensable for flagellar protein export, PMF is the primary fuel for protein unfolding and translocation. Interestingly, the export gate complex can also use sodium motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane in addition to PMF when the ATPase complex does not work properly. Here, we describe experimental protocols, which have allowed us to identify the export substrate class and the primary fuel of the flagellar type III protein export apparatus in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  16. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-12-22

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI(6)FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α(3)β(3)γ complex of F(O)F(1)-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI(6)FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly.

  17. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  18. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials.

  19. Probing flagellar promoter occupancy in wild-type and mutant Caulobacter crescentus by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nicole J; Viollier, Patrick H

    2011-06-01

    In the asymmetric predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus, TipF and TipN mark the cellular pole for future flagellar development. TipF is essential for motility and contains a cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase-like (EAL) domain that is necessary for proper function. TipN is localized to the flagellar pole before TipF and is essential for the proper placement of the flagellum in C. crescentus. Using β-galactosidase promoter-probe assays and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, we investigated the influence of the C. crescentus flagellar assembly regulator TipF on flagellar gene transcription. We compared the transcriptional activity of class II-fliF-lacZ, class III-flgE-lacZ, and class IV-fljL-lacZ fusions in a ΔtipF mutant with that of other flagellar mutants and the wild-type strain. We subsequently verified the in vivo occupancy of the fliF, flgE, and fljL flagellar promoters by the flagellar regulators CtrA, FlbD, and FliX in addition to RNA polymerase. We deduce that TipF contributes to proper expression of flagellar genes in C. crescentus by acting both within and outside of the canonical flagellar gene expression hierarchy.

  20. Iterative error correction of long sequencing reads maximizes accuracy and improves contig assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameith, Katrin; Roscito, Juliana G; Hiller, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencers such as Illumina can now produce reads up to 300 bp with high throughput, which is attractive for genome assembly. A first step in genome assembly is to computationally correct sequencing errors. However, correcting all errors in these longer reads is challenging. Here, we show that reads with remaining errors after correction often overlap repeats, where short erroneous k-mers occur in other copies of the repeat. We developed an iterative error correction pipeline that runs the previously published String Graph Assembler (SGA) in multiple rounds of k-mer-based correction with an increasing k-mer size, followed by a final round of overlap-based correction. By combining the advantages of small and large k-mers, this approach corrects more errors in repeats and minimizes the total amount of erroneous reads. We show that higher read accuracy increases contig lengths two to three times. We provide SGA-Iteratively Correcting Errors (https://github.com/hillerlab/IterativeErrorCorrection/) that implements iterative error correction by using modules from SGA.

  1. Iterative error correction of long sequencing reads maximizes accuracy and improves contig assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameith, Katrin; Roscito, Juliana G.

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencers such as Illumina can now produce reads up to 300 bp with high throughput, which is attractive for genome assembly. A first step in genome assembly is to computationally correct sequencing errors. However, correcting all errors in these longer reads is challenging. Here, we show that reads with remaining errors after correction often overlap repeats, where short erroneous k-mers occur in other copies of the repeat. We developed an iterative error correction pipeline that runs the previously published String Graph Assembler (SGA) in multiple rounds of k-mer-based correction with an increasing k-mer size, followed by a final round of overlap-based correction. By combining the advantages of small and large k-mers, this approach corrects more errors in repeats and minimizes the total amount of erroneous reads. We show that higher read accuracy increases contig lengths two to three times. We provide SGA-Iteratively Correcting Errors (https://github.com/hillerlab/IterativeErrorCorrection/) that implements iterative error correction by using modules from SGA. PMID:26868358

  2. NxRepair: error correction in de novo sequence assembly using Nextera mate pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Rebecca R; O'Connell, Jared; Cox, Anthony J; Schulz-Trieglaff, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolding errors and incorrect repeat disambiguation during de novo assembly can result in large scale misassemblies in draft genomes. Nextera mate pair sequencing data provide additional information to resolve assembly ambiguities during scaffolding. Here, we introduce NxRepair, an open source toolkit for error correction in de novo assemblies that uses Nextera mate pair libraries to identify and correct large-scale errors. We show that NxRepair can identify and correct large scaffolding errors, without use of a reference sequence, resulting in quantitative improvements in the assembly quality. NxRepair can be downloaded from GitHub or PyPI, the Python Package Index; a tutorial and user documentation are also available.

  3. NxRepair: error correction in de novo sequence assembly using Nextera mate pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca R. Murphy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolding errors and incorrect repeat disambiguation during de novo assembly can result in large scale misassemblies in draft genomes. Nextera mate pair sequencing data provide additional information to resolve assembly ambiguities during scaffolding. Here, we introduce NxRepair, an open source toolkit for error correction in de novo assemblies that uses Nextera mate pair libraries to identify and correct large-scale errors. We show that NxRepair can identify and correct large scaffolding errors, without use of a reference sequence, resulting in quantitative improvements in the assembly quality. NxRepair can be downloaded from GitHub or PyPI, the Python Package Index; a tutorial and user documentation are also available.

  4. XTile: An Error-Correction Package for DNA Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Chaurasia, Anshul; Jain, Prateek; Gupta, Manish K

    2009-01-01

    Self assembly is a process by which supramolecular species form spontaneously from their components. This process is ubiquitous throughout the life chemistry and is central to biological information processing. It has been predicted that in future self assembly will become an important engineering discipline by combining the fields of bio molecular computation, nano technology and medicine. However error control is a key challenge in realizing the potential of self assembly. Recently many authors have proposed several combinatorial error correction schemes to control errors which have a close analogy with the coding theory such as Winfree s proofreading scheme and its generalizations by Chen and Goel and compact scheme of Reif, Sahu and Yin. In this work, we present an error correction computational tool XTile that can be used to create input files to the Xgrow simulator of Winfree by providing the design logic of the tiles and it also allows the user to apply proofreading, snake and compact error correction ...

  5. Compacting and correcting Trinity and Oases RNA-Seq de novo assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djari, Anis; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Klopp, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Background De novo transcriptome assembly of short reads is now a common step in expression analysis of organisms lacking a reference genome sequence. Several software packages are available to perform this task. Even if their results are of good quality it is still possible to improve them in several ways including redundancy reduction or error correction. Trinity and Oases are two commonly used de novo transcriptome assemblers. The contig sets they produce are of good quality. Still, their compaction (number of contigs needed to represent the transcriptome) and their quality (chimera and nucleotide error rates) can be improved. Results We built a de novo RNA-Seq Assembly Pipeline (DRAP) which wraps these two assemblers (Trinity and Oases) in order to improve their results regarding the above-mentioned criteria. DRAP reduces from 1.3 to 15 fold the number of resulting contigs of the assemblies depending on the read set and the assembler used. This article presents seven assembly comparisons showing in some cases drastic improvements when using DRAP. DRAP does not significantly impair assembly quality metrics such are read realignment rate or protein reconstruction counts. Conclusion Transcriptome assembly is a challenging computational task even if good solutions are already available to end-users, these solutions can still be improved while conserving the overall representation and quality of the assembly. The de novo RNA-Seq Assembly Pipeline (DRAP) is an easy to use software package to produce compact and corrected transcript set. DRAP is free, open-source and available under GPL V3 license at http://www.sigenae.org/drap. PMID:28224052

  6. Oxford Nanopore sequencing, hybrid error correction, and de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sara; Gurtowski, James; Ethe-Sayers, Scott; Deshpande, Panchajanya; Schatz, Michael C; McCombie, W Richard

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring the progress of DNA molecules through a membrane pore has been postulated as a method for sequencing DNA for several decades. Recently, a nanopore-based sequencing instrument, the Oxford Nanopore MinION, has become available, and we used this for sequencing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. To make use of these data, we developed a novel open-source hybrid error correction algorithm Nanocorr specifically for Oxford Nanopore reads, because existing packages were incapable of assembling the long read lengths (5-50 kbp) at such high error rates (between ∼5% and 40% error). With this new method, we were able to perform a hybrid error correction of the nanopore reads using complementary MiSeq data and produce a de novo assembly that is highly contiguous and accurate: The contig N50 length is more than ten times greater than an Illumina-only assembly (678 kb versus 59.9 kbp) and has >99.88% consensus identity when compared to the reference. Furthermore, the assembly with the long nanopore reads presents a much more complete representation of the features of the genome and correctly assembles gene cassettes, rRNAs, transposable elements, and other genomic features that were almost entirely absent in the Illumina-only assembly.

  7. Improving transcriptome assembly through error correction of high-throughput sequence reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmanes, Matthew D; Eisen, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    The study of functional genomics, particularly in non-model organisms, has been dramatically improved over the last few years by the use of transcriptomes and RNAseq. While these studies are potentially extremely powerful, a computationally intensive procedure, the de novo construction of a reference transcriptome must be completed as a prerequisite to further analyses. The accurate reference is critically important as all downstream steps, including estimating transcript abundance are critically dependent on the construction of an accurate reference. Though a substantial amount of research has been done on assembly, only recently have the pre-assembly procedures been studied in detail. Specifically, several stand-alone error correction modules have been reported on and, while they have shown to be effective in reducing errors at the level of sequencing reads, how error correction impacts assembly accuracy is largely unknown. Here, we show via use of a simulated and empiric dataset, that applying error correction to sequencing reads has significant positive effects on assembly accuracy, and should be applied to all datasets. A complete collection of commands which will allow for the production of Reptile corrected reads is available at https://github.com/macmanes/error_correction/tree/master/scripts and as File S1.

  8. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Maia André F; Vader Gerben; Lens Susanne MA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In ...

  9. Computer-assisted assembly and correction simulation for complex axis deviations using the Ilizarov fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochs, A

    1995-01-01

    In axis correction with the Ilizarov ring fixator, the correction results are often insufficient or there are unexpected translation effects, which can be causally attributed to wrong preoperative planning or inaccurate assembly. To avoid such results, computerised simulation was developed. Via digitalisation of the bone outlines traced from X-radiographs with an additional scale, preoperative correction planning can be performed, simulated with normal software. This can be used while constructing the apparatus and positioning the joints. In addition, the translation effect of the bone fragments can be simulated by arbitrarily choosing the pivot of the correction. In transferring the X-radiograph true to scale, one can compare the ring planes before and after correction. It is possible to estimate the necessary distraction as well as compression and thus the postoperative distraction mode. Using computerised planning, the apparatus construction can be optimised and complications caused by misplanning avoided. Not only the inexperienced user can benefit from this aid.

  10. Thermal optical path difference analysis of the telescope correct lens assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2012-12-01

    The effect of correct lens thermal optical path difference (OPD) on the optical performance of the Cassegrain telescope system is presented. The correct lens assembly includes several components such as a set of correct lenses, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel, and retainer. The heat transfer from the surrounding environment to the correct lens barrel will cause optical system aberration. The temperature distribution of the baffle is from 20.546°C to 21.485°C. Meanwhile, the off-axis ray's path of the OPD has taken the lens incidence point and emergence point into consideration. The correct lens temperature distribution is calculated by the lens barrel heat transfer analysis; the thermal distortion and stress are solved by the Finite Element Method (FEM) software. The temperature distribution is weighted to each incidence ray path, and the thermal OPD is calculated. The thermal OPD on the Z direction is transferred to optical aberration by fitting OPD into a rigid body motion and the Zernike polynomial. The aberration results can be used to evaluate the thermal effect on the correct lens assembly in the telescope system.

  11. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia André F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension. In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  12. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Gerben; Maia, André F; Lens, Susanne Ma

    2008-05-28

    During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  13. Flagellar membrane proteins in kinetoplastid parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfear, Scott M; Tran, Khoa D; Sanchez, Marco A

    2015-09-01

    All kinetoplastid parasites, including protozoa such as Leishmania species, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi that cause devastating diseases in humans and animals, are flagellated throughout their life cycles. Although flagella were originally thought of primarily as motility organelles, flagellar functions in other critical processes, especially in sensing and signal transduction, have become more fully appreciated in the recent past. The flagellar membrane is a highly specialized subdomain of the surface membrane, and flagellar membrane proteins are likely to be critical components for all the biologically important roles of flagella. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries relevant to flagellar membrane proteins in these parasites, including the identification of such proteins, investigation of their biological functions, and mechanisms of selective trafficking to the flagellar membrane. Prospects for future investigations and current unsolved problems are highlighted.

  14. Correction: Coordination-directed self-assembly of a simple benzothiadiazole-fused tetrathiafulvalene to low-bandgap metallogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Anneliese M; Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Geng, Yan; Lebedev, Victor; Laukhin, Vladimir; Krämer, Karl; Hauser, Jürg; Amabilino, David B; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-11-25

    Correction for 'Coordination-directed self-assembly of a simple benzothiadiazole-fused tetrathiafulvalene to low-bandgap metallogels' by Anneliese M. Amacher et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 15063-15066.

  15. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm [Wu, Hosu, and Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 4147 (2011)], 10.1073/pnas.1016693108. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μ m /s , about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outward, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test this hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.

  16. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    CERN Document Server

    Dauparas, Justas

    2016-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm (Wu, Hosu and Berg, 2011 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108 4147). A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about $10~\\mu$m/s, about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outwards, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test his hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides...

  17. On the Minimum Error Correction Problem for Haplotype Assembly in Diploid and Polyploid Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Dondi, Riccardo; Klau, Gunnar W; Pirola, Yuri; Pisanti, Nadia; Zaccaria, Simone

    2016-09-01

    In diploid genomes, haplotype assembly is the computational problem of reconstructing the two parental copies, called haplotypes, of each chromosome starting from sequencing reads, called fragments, possibly affected by sequencing errors. Minimum error correction (MEC) is a prominent computational problem for haplotype assembly and, given a set of fragments, aims at reconstructing the two haplotypes by applying the minimum number of base corrections. MEC is computationally hard to solve, but some approximation-based or fixed-parameter approaches have been proved capable of obtaining accurate results on real data. In this work, we expand the current characterization of the computational complexity of MEC from the approximation and the fixed-parameter tractability point of view. In particular, we show that MEC is not approximable within a constant factor, whereas it is approximable within a logarithmic factor in the size of the input. Furthermore, we answer open questions on the fixed-parameter tractability for parameters of classical or practical interest: the total number of corrections and the fragment length. In addition, we present a direct 2-approximation algorithm for a variant of the problem that has also been applied in the framework of clustering data. Finally, since polyploid genomes, such as those of plants and fishes, are composed of more than two copies of the chromosomes, we introduce a novel formulation of MEC, namely the k-ploid MEC problem, that extends the traditional problem to deal with polyploid genomes. We show that the novel formulation is still both computationally hard and hard to approximate. Nonetheless, from the parameterized point of view, we prove that the problem is tractable for parameters of practical interest such as the number of haplotypes and the coverage, or the number of haplotypes and the fragment length.

  18. Assembling a Correctly Folded and Functional Heptahelical Membrane Protein by Protein Trans-splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Michaela; Eckert, Carl Elias; Busche, Alena; Kulhei, Jennifer; Michaelis, Jonas; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Wachtveitl, Josef; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-11-13

    Protein trans-splicing using split inteins is well established as a useful tool for protein engineering. Here we show, for the first time, that this method can be applied to a membrane protein under native conditions. We provide compelling evidence that the heptahelical proteorhodopsin can be assembled from two separate fragments consisting of helical bundles A and B and C, D, E, F, and G via a splicing site located in the BC loop. The procedure presented here is on the basis of dual expression and ligation in vivo. Global fold, stability, and photodynamics were analyzed in detergent by CD, stationary, as well as time-resolved optical spectroscopy. The fold within lipid bilayers has been probed by high field and dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR utilizing a (13)C-labeled retinal cofactor and extensively (13)C-(15)N-labeled protein. Our data show unambiguously that the ligation product is identical to its non-ligated counterpart. Furthermore, our data highlight the effects of BC loop modifications onto the photocycle kinetics of proteorhodopsin. Our data demonstrate that a correctly folded and functionally intact protein can be produced in this artificial way. Our findings are of high relevance for a general understanding of the assembly of membrane proteins for elucidating intramolecular interactions, and they offer the possibility of developing novel labeling schemes for spectroscopic applications.

  19. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  20. Mesoscopic modeling of bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-15

    A particle-based hybrid method of elastic network model and smooth-particle hydrodynamics has been employed to describe the propulsion of bacterial flagella in a viscous hydrodynamic environment. The method explicitly models the two aspects of bacterial propulsion that involve flagellar flexibility and long-range hydrodynamic interaction of low-Reynolds-number flow. The model further incorporates the molecular organization of the flagellar filament at a coarse-grained level in terms of the 11 protofilaments. Each of these protofilaments is represented by a collection of material points that represent the flagellin proteins. A computational model of a single flexible helical segment representing the filament of a bacterial flagellum is presented. The propulsive dynamics and the flow fields generated by the motion of the model filament are examined. The nature of flagellar deformation and the influence of hydrodynamics in determining the shape of deformations are examined based on the helical filament.

  1. Correcting Working Postures in Water Pump AssemblyTasks using the OVAKO Work Analysis System (OWAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiya Kadhim Al-Zuheri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovako Working Postures Analyzing System (OWAS is a widely used method for studying awkward working postures in workplaces. This study with OWAS, analyzed working postures for manual material handling of laminations at stacking workstation for water pump assembly line in Electrical Industrial Company (EICO / Baghdad. A computer program, WinOWAS, was used for the study. In real life workstation was found that more than 26% of the working postures observed were classified as either AC2 (slightly harmful, AC3 (distinctly harmful. Postures that needed to be corrected soon (AC3 and corresponding tasks, were identified. The most stressful tasks observed were grasping, handling, and positioning of the laminations from workers. The construction of real life workstation is modified simultaneously by redesign suggestions in the values of location (positioning factors for stacking workstation. The simulation workstation executed by mean of parametric CAD software. That modifications lead to improvement in the percentage of harmful postures. It was therefore recommended the use of supplementary methods is required to identify ergonomic risk factors for handling work or other hand-intensive activities on industry sites.

  2. Load Response of the Flagellar Beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Ruloff, Christian; Wagner, Christian; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2016-12-01

    Cilia and flagella exhibit regular bending waves that perform mechanical work on the surrounding fluid, to propel cellular swimmers and pump fluids inside organisms. Here, we quantify a force-velocity relationship of the beating flagellum, by exposing flagellated Chlamydomonas cells to controlled microfluidic flows. A simple theory of flagellar limit-cycle oscillations, calibrated by measurements in the absence of flow, reproduces this relationship quantitatively. We derive a link between the energy efficiency of the flagellar beat and its ability to synchronize to oscillatory flows.

  3. The flagellar-specific transcription factor, sigma28, is the Type III secretion chaperone for the flagellar-specific anti-sigma28 factor FlgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Phillip D; Karlinsey, Joyce E; Aldridge, Christine; Birchall, Christopher; Thompson, Danielle; Yagasaki, Jin; Hughes, Kelly T

    2006-08-15

    The sigma(28) protein is a member of the bacterial sigma(70)-family of transcription factors that directs RNA polymerase to flagellar late (class 3) promoters. The sigma(28) protein is regulated in response to flagellar assembly by the anti-sigma(28) factor FlgM. FlgM inhibits sigma(28)-dependent transcription of genes whose products are needed late in assembly until the flagellar basal motor structure, the hook-basal body (HBB), is constructed. A second function for the sigma(28) transcription factor has been discovered: sigma(28) facilitates the secretion of FlgM through the HBB, acting as the FlgM Type III secretion chaperone. Transcription-specific mutants in sigma(28) were isolated that remained competent for FlgM-facilitated secretion separating the transcription and secretion-facilitation activities of sigma (28). Conversely, we also describe the isolation of mutants in sigma(28) that are specific for FlgM-facilitated secretion. The data demonstrate that sigma(28) is the Type III secretion chaperone for its own anti-sigma factor FlgM. Thus, a novel role for a sigma(70)-family transcription factor is described.

  4. Liquid metal actuators: correctable mounting and assembly of thin-shell x-ray telescope mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Klingensmith, Martin; Chalifoux, Brandon; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    An ideal bonding agent for thin-shell x-ray mirrors could be quickly applied to joints and set with deterministic and stable properties. Unfortunately, mirror assembly methods have typically utilized various epoxy formulations which are messy, slow to apply and cure, and far from deterministic or stable. Problems include shrinkage, creep and high thermal and humidity sensitivity. Once the bond is set errors are frozen in and cannot be corrected. We are developing a new method for bonding thin-foil mirrors that has the potential to solve these problems. Our process to bond mirrors to housing reference points is achieved via small beads of a low-melting-point bonding agent (such as solder or thermoset). The mirror is bonded to small contact surface points under real-time metrology. If the position of the mirror needs to be adjusted after bonding, a small force is applied normal or parallel to the contact surface and a pulsed fiber laser is used to melt an ultrathin layer of the solder for a very short time. The joint is then compressed, stretched or sheared while molten before refreezing in a new position, enabling repeatable and stable mirror position adjustments along the direction of the force in nm-level steps with minimal heat input. We present results from our prototype apparatus demonstrating proof of principle. The initial experiment includes developing a technique to bond D263 glass to Kovar, designing and building a one-dimensional stage to precisely apply force, and using an infrared laser pulse to heat the joint while measuring position and force.

  5. Conserved machinery of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlberg, A; Schuster, S C; Bauer, M; Baeuerlein, E; Zhao, R; Reese, T S; Khan, S

    1995-04-01

    Novel periplasmic and cytoplasmic structural modules of the bases of bacterial flagella have been observed in situ and isolated using new biochemical protocols. Flagellar rotation may depend upon interactions of these modules with the intramembrane particle rings, a ubiquitous feature of flagellar bases necessary for torque generation. The outer membrane-associated basal disk of the Wolinella succinogenes polar flagellum has architecture well suited for interaction with the ring particles. However, antibody against the main W. succinogenes basal disk protein did not cross-react with flagella-enriched fractions from Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus firmus; nor have such structures been observed in these species thus far. Antibodies against two S. typhimurium proteins, FliG and FliM, known to be involved in motor function and part of the cytoplasmic module in this species cross-reacted with flagella-enriched fractions from both W. succinogenes and B. firmus. In addition, flagellar cytoplasmic structure could be isolated from B. firmus. The basal disk may anchor the flagellar motor to the cell wall in some polar bacteria, but this does not seem to be a unique strategy. In contrast, the data indicate that the cytoplasmic module is conserved.

  6. Intrinsic Membrane Targeting of the Flagellar Export ATPase FliI: Interaction with Acidic Phospholipids and FliH

    OpenAIRE

    Auvray, Frédéric; Ozin, Amanda J.; Claret, Laurent; Hughes, Colin

    2002-01-01

    The specialised ATPase FliI is central to export of flagellar axial protein subunits during flagellum assembly. We establish the normal cellular location of FliI and its regulatory accessory protein FliH in motile Salmonella typhimurium, and ascertain the regions involved in FliH2/FliI heterotrimerisation. Both FliI and FliH localised to the cytoplasmic membrane in the presence and in the absence of proteins making up the flagellar export machinery and basal body. Membrane association was tig...

  7. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+-protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration.

  8. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Minamino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+-protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration.

  9. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Steps in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Mora

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellar motor is a highly efficient rotary machine used by many bacteria to propel themselves. It has recently been shown that at low speeds its rotation proceeds in steps. Here we propose a simple physical model, based on the storage of energy in protein springs, that accounts for this stepping behavior as a random walk in a tilted corrugated potential that combines torque and contact forces. We argue that the absolute angular position of the rotor is crucial for understanding step properties and show this hypothesis to be consistent with the available data, in particular the observation that backward steps are smaller on average than forward steps. We also predict a sublinear speed versus torque relationship for fixed load at low torque, and a peak in rotor diffusion as a function of torque. Our model provides a comprehensive framework for understanding and analyzing stepping behavior in the bacterial flagellar motor and proposes novel, testable predictions. More broadly, the storage of energy in protein springs by the flagellar motor may provide useful general insights into the design of highly efficient molecular machines.

  11. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  12. Correction: A highly enantioselective Biginelli reaction using self-assembled methanoproline-thiourea organocatalysts: asymmetric synthesis of 6-isopropyl-3,4-dihydropyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Zhijun; Zhu, Jun; Lian, Xiang; Xu, Peng; Yu, Han; Han, Sheng

    2016-02-07

    Correction for 'A highly enantioselective Biginelli reaction using self-assembled methanoproline-thiourea organocatalysts: asymmetric synthesis of 6-isopropyl-3,4-dihydropyrimidines' by Zhijun Hang et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 80-83.

  13. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  14. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  15. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  16. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  17. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  18. Correcting Working Postures in Water Pump AssemblyTasks using the OVAKO Work Analysis System (OWAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Atiya Kadhim Al-Zuheri; Hussein S. Ketan

    2008-01-01

    Ovako Working Postures Analyzing System (OWAS) is a widely used method for studying awkward working postures in workplaces. This study with OWAS, analyzed working postures for manual material handling of laminations at stacking workstation for water pump assembly line in Electrical Industrial Company (EICO) / Baghdad. A computer program, WinOWAS, was used for the study. In real life workstation was found that more than 26% of the working postures observed were classified as either AC2 (slight...

  19. Thermal optical path difference analysis of off-axis lens ray trace foot-print at Cassegrain telescope correct lens assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Chia-Yen; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chan, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The Cassegrain telescope system in this study, is discussion correct lens thermal OPD (Optical Path Difference) effect optical performance. The correct lens assembly are includes several components such as correct lens, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The heat transfer from surrounding to the correct lens barrel will causes optical system aberration. Meanwhile, the off-axis rays path of the OPD must consider lens incidence point and emergence point. The correct lens temperature distribution is calculate the lens barrel heat transfer analysis, the thermal distortion and stress are solve by FEM (Finite Element Method) software. The temperature calculation results can be weighting to each incidence ray path and calculate thermal OPD. The thermal OPD on Z-direction can be fitted by rigid body motion and Zernike polynomial. The fitting results can be used to evaluate the thermal effect on correct lens assembly in telescope system.

  20. Structure and Function of the Bi-Directional Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke V. Morimoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellum is a locomotive organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid environments. The flagellum is a supramolecular complex composed of about 30 different proteins and consists of at least three parts: a rotary motor, a universal joint, and a helical filament. The flagellar motor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is powered by an inward-directed electrochemical potential difference of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. The flagellar motor consists of a rotor made of FliF, FliG, FliM and FliN and a dozen stators consisting of MotA and MotB. FliG, FliM and FliN also act as a molecular switch, enabling the motor to spin in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions. Each stator is anchored to the peptidoglycan layer through the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB and acts as a proton channel to couple the proton flow through the channel with torque generation. Highly conserved charged residues at the rotor–stator interface are required not only for torque generation but also for stator assembly around the rotor. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor.

  1. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  2. Correct self-assembling of spatial frequencies in super-resolution synthetic aperture digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturzo, Melania; Ferraro, Pietro

    2009-12-01

    Synthetic aperture enlargement is obtained, in lensless digital holography, by introducing a diffraction grating between the object and the CCD camera with the aim of getting super-resolution. We demonstrate here that the spatial frequencies are naturally self-assembled in the reconstructed image plane when the NA is increased synthetically at its maximum extent of three times. By this approach it possible to avoid the use of the grating transmission formula in the numerical reconstruction process, thus reducing significantly the noise in the final super-resolved image. Demonstrations are reported in 1D and 2D with an optical target and a biological sample, respectively.

  3. A study of bacterial flagellar bundling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Heather; Lobaton, Edgar; Méndez-Diez, Stefan; Tlupova, Svetlana; Cortez, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), use multiple flagella often concentrated at one end of their bodies to induce locomotion. Each flagellum is formed in a left-handed helix and has a motor at the base that rotates the flagellum in a corkscrew motion. We present a computational model of the flagellar motion and their hydrodynamic interaction. The model is based on the equations of Stokes flow to describe the fluid motion. The elasticity of the flagella is modeled with a network of elastic springs while the motor is represented by a torque at the base of each flagellum. The fluid velocity due to the forces is described by regularized Stokeslets and the velocity due to the torques by the associated regularized rotlets. Their expressions are derived. The model is used to analyze the swimming motion of a single flagellum and of a group of three flagella in close proximity to one another. When all flagellar motors rotate counterclockwise, the hydrodynamic interaction can lead to bundling. We present an analysis of the flow surrounding the flagella. When at least one of the motors changes its direction of rotation, the same initial conditions lead to a tumbling behavior characterized by the separation of the flagella, changes in their orientation, and no net swimming motion. The analysis of the flow provides some intuition for these processes.

  4. Instability of hooks during bacterial flagellar swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C.; Henry Fu Team

    2016-11-01

    In bacteria, a flexible hook transmits torque from the rotary motor at the cell body to the flagellum. Previously, the hook has been modeled as a Kirchhoff rod between the cell body and rotating flagellum. To study effects of the hook's flexibility on the bacteria's swimming speed and trajectory for wide range hook stiffnesses and flagellum configurations, we develop an efficient simplified spring model for the hook by linearizing the Kirchhoff rod. We treat the hydrodynamics of the cell body and helical flagellum using resistance matrices calculated by the method of regularized Stokeslets. We investigate flagellar and swimming dynamics for a range of hook flexibilities and flagellar orientations relative to the cell body and compare the results to models without hook flexibility. We investigate in detail parameters corresponding to E. coli and Vibrio alginolyticus. Generally, the flagellum changes orientation relative to the cell body, undergoing an orbit with the period of the motor rotation. We find that as the hook stiffness decreases, steady-state orbits of the flagellum first become unstable before the hook buckles, which may suggest a new mechanism of flick initiation in run-reverse-flick motility. We also find that for some parameter ranges, there are multiple stable steady state orbits, which may have implications for the tumbling and turning of bacteria.

  5. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-07-29

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001.

  6. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  7. Density Functional Theory with Modified Dispersion Correction for Metals Applied to Self-Assembled Monolayers of Thiols on Au(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Andersson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using sound physical principles we modify the DFT-D2 atom pairwise semiempirical dispersion correction to density functional theory to work for metallic systems and in particular self-assembled monolayers of thiols on gold surfaces. We test our approximation for two functionals PBE-D and revPBE-D for lattice parameters and cohesive energies for Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au, adsorption energies of CO on (111 surfaces of Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au, and adsorption energy of benzene on Ag(111 and Au(111. Agreement with experimental data is substantially improved. We apply the method to self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au(111 and find reasonable agreement for PBE-D and revPBE-D for both physisorption of n-alkanethiols as well as dissociative chemisorption of dimethyl disulfide as an Au-adatom-dithiolate complex. By modifying the C6 coefficient for Au, we obtain quantitative agreement for physisorption and chemisorption for both PBE-D and revPBE-D using the same set of parameters. Our results confirm that inclusion of dispersion forces is crucial for any quantitative analysis of the thiol and thiolate bonds to the gold surface using quantum chemical calculations.

  8. Computational modelling of genome-wide [corrected] transcription assembly networks using a fluidics analogy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousry Y Azmy

    Full Text Available Understanding how a myriad of transcription regulators work to modulate mRNA output at thousands of genes remains a fundamental challenge in molecular biology. Here we develop a computational tool to aid in assessing the plausibility of gene regulatory models derived from genome-wide expression profiling of cells mutant for transcription regulators. mRNA output is modelled as fluid flow in a pipe lattice, with assembly of the transcription machinery represented by the effect of valves. Transcriptional regulators are represented as external pressure heads that determine flow rate. Modelling mutations in regulatory proteins is achieved by adjusting valves' on/off settings. The topology of the lattice is designed by the experimentalist to resemble the expected interconnection between the modelled agents and their influence on mRNA expression. Users can compare multiple lattice configurations so as to find the one that minimizes the error with experimental data. This computational model provides a means to test the plausibility of transcription regulation models derived from large genomic data sets.

  9. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    CERN Document Server

    Oriola, David; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive crosslinkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatiotemporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagell...

  10. FliH and FliI ensure efficient energy coupling of flagellar type III protein export in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru; Kinoshita, Miki; Inoue, Yumi; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Ihara, Kunio; Koya, Satomi; Hara, Noritaka; Nishioka, Noriko; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, flagellar proteins are exported via its specific export apparatus from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure. The flagellar export apparatus consists of a transmembrane (TM) export gate complex and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlhA is a TM export gate protein and plays important roles in energy coupling of protein translocation. However, the energy coupling mechanism remains unknown. Here, we performed a cross-complementation assay to measure robustness of the energy transduction system of the export apparatus against genetic perturbations. Vibrio FlhA restored motility of a Salmonella ΔflhA mutant but not that of a ΔfliH-fliI flhB(P28T) ΔflhA mutant. The flgM mutations significantly increased flagellar gene expression levels, allowing Vibrio FlhA to exert its export activity in the ΔfliH-fliI flhB(P28T) ΔflhA mutant. Pull-down assays revealed that the binding affinities of Vibrio FlhA for FliJ and the FlgN-FlgK chaperone-substrate complex were much lower than those of Salmonella FlhA. These suggest that Vibrio FlhA requires the support of FliH and FliI to efficiently and properly interact with FliJ and the FlgN-FlgK complex. We propose that FliH and FliI ensure robust and efficient energy coupling of protein export during flagellar assembly.

  11. Flagellar oscillation: a commentary on proposed mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, David M

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia have a remarkably uniform internal 'engine' known as the '9+2' axoneme. With few exceptions, the function of cilia and flagella is to beat rhythmically and set up relative motion between themselves and the liquid that surrounds them. The molecular basis of axonemal movement is understood in considerable detail, with the exception of the mechanism that provides its rhythmical or oscillatory quality. Some kind of repetitive 'switching' event is assumed to occur; there are several proposals regarding the nature of the 'switch' and how it might operate. Herein I first summarise all the factors known to influence the rate of the oscillation (the beating frequency). Many of these factors exert their effect through modulating the mean sliding velocity between the nine doublet microtubules of the axoneme, this velocity being the determinant of bend growth rate and bend propagation rate. Then I explain six proposed mechanisms for flagellar oscillation and review the evidence on which they are based. Finally, I attempt to derive an economical synthesis, drawing for preference on experimental research that has been minimally disruptive of the intricate structure of the axoneme. The 'provisional synthesis' is that flagellar oscillation emerges from an effect of passive sliding direction on the dynein arms. Sliding in one direction facilitates force-generating cycles and dynein-to-dynein synchronisation along a doublet; sliding in the other direction is inhibitory. The direction of the initial passive sliding normally oscillates because it is controlled hydrodynamically through the alternating direction of the propulsive thrust. However, in the absence of such regulation, there can be a perpetual, mechanical self-triggering through a reversal of sliding direction due to the recoil of elastic structures that deform as a response to the prior active sliding. This provisional synthesis may be a useful basis for further examination of the problem.

  12. The flagellar adenylate kinases of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (ADK) are key enzymes involved in cell energy management. Trypanosomatids present the highest number of variants in a single cell in comparison with the rest of the living organisms. In this work, we characterized two flagellar ADKs from Trypanosoma cruzi, called TcADK1 and TcADK4, which are also located in the cell cytosol. Interestingly, TcADK1 presents a stage-specific expression. This variant was detected in epimastigotes cells, and was completely absent in trypomastigotes and amastigotes, while TcADK4 is present in the major life cycle stages of T. cruzi. Both variants are also regulated, in opposite ways, along the parasite growth curve suggesting that their expression depends on the intra- and extracellular conditions. Both, TcADK1 and TcADK4 present N-terminal extension that could be responsible for their subcellular localization. The presence of ADK variants in the flagellum would be critical for the provision of energy in a process of high ATP consumption such as cell motility.

  13. Escherichia coli flagellar genes as target sites for integration and expression of genetic circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Juhas

    Full Text Available E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site.

  14. In situ ellipsometric study of surface immobilization of flagellar filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurunczi, S., E-mail: kurunczi@mfa.kfki.hu [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Nemeth, A.; Huelber, T. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Kozma, P. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Petrik, P. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Jankovics, H. [Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Sebestyen, A. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Vonderviszt, F. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Institute of Enzymology, Karolina ut 29-33, Budapest, H-1113 (Hungary); and others

    2010-10-15

    Protein filaments composed of thousands of subunits are promising candidates as sensing elements in biosensors. In this work in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to monitor the surface immobilization of flagellar filaments. This study is the first step towards the development of layers of filamentous receptors for sensor applications. Surface activation is performed using silanization and a subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Structure of the flagellar filament layers immobilized on activated and non-activated Si wafer substrates is determined using a two-layer effective medium model that accounted for the vertical density distribution of flagellar filaments with lengths of 300-1500 nm bound to the surface. The formation of the first interface layer can be explained by the multipoint covalent attachment of the filaments, while the second layer is mainly composed of tail pinned filaments floating upwards with the free parts. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy, covalent immobilization resulted in an increased surface density compared to absorption.

  15. The load-response of the flagellar beat

    CERN Document Server

    Klindt, Gary S; Wanger, Christian; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella exhibit regular bending waves that perform mechanical work on the surrounding fluid, to propel cellular swimmers and pump fluids inside organisms. Here, we quantify a force-velocity relationship of the beating flagellum, by exposing flagellated \\emph{Chlamydomonas} cells to controlled microfluidic flows. A simple theory of flagellar limit-cycle oscillations, calibrated by measurements in the absence of flow, reproduces this relationship quantitatively. We derive a link between the chemo-mechanical efficiency of the flagellar beat and its ability to synchronize to oscillatory flows.

  16. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  18. Efficient Spatiotemporal Analysis of the Flagellar Waveform of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Bayly, P.V.; Lewis, B L; Kemp, P.S.; Pless, R.B.; Dutcher, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    The 9 + 2 axoneme is a microtubule-based machine that powers the oscillatory beating of cilia and flagella. Its highly regulated movement is essential for the normal function of many organs; ciliopathies cause congenital defects, chronic respiratory tract infections and infertility. We present an efficient method to obtain a quantitative description of flagellar motion, with high spatial and temporal resolution, from high speed video recording of bright field images. This highly automated tec...

  19. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  20. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-07-29

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues.

  1. Self-Powered Forward Error-Correcting Biosensor Based on Integration of Paper-Based Microfluidics and Self-Assembled Quick Response Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mingquan; Liu, Keng-Ku; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2016-10-01

    This paper extends our previous work on silver-enhancement based self-assembling structures for designing reliable, self-powered biosensors with forward error correcting (FEC) capability. At the core of the proposed approach is the integration of paper-based microfluidics with quick response (QR) codes that can be optically scanned using a smart-phone. The scanned information is first decoded to obtain the location of a web-server which further processes the self-assembled QR image to determine the concentration of target analytes. The integration substrate for the proposed FEC biosensor is polyethylene and the patterning of the QR code on the substrate has been achieved using a combination of low-cost ink-jet printing and a regular ballpoint dispensing pen. A paper-based microfluidics channel has been integrated underneath the substrate for acquiring, mixing and flowing the sample to areas on the substrate where different parts of the code can self-assemble in presence of immobilized gold nanorods. In this paper we demonstrate the proof-of-concept detection using prototypes of QR encoded FEC biosensors.

  2. San Martín, C., Correction: Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly. Viruses 2012, 4, 847-877.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It has come to my attention that my article "Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly" (Viruses 2012, 4, 847-877 [1] contains an inaccurate statement. On page 864, the caption for Figure 7 reads: "There are four potential cleavage sites in pTP but they have not been experimentally verified". However, three of these sites have been experimentally confirmed in vitro using recombinant AVP and pTP, as described in Webster A, Leith I.R., Hay R.T.: Activation of adenovirus-coded protease and processing of preterminal protein. J. Virol. 1994, 68, 7292-7300 [2].

  3. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  4. Dynamic Model and Motion Mechanism of Magnetotactic Bacteria with Two Lateral Flagellar Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cenyu Yang; Chuanfang Chen; Qiufeng Ma; Longfei Wu; Tao Song

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic Bacteria (MTB) propel themselves by rotating their flagella and swim along the magnetic field lines.To analyze the motion of MTB,MTB magneto-ovoid strain MO-1 cells,each with two bundles of flagella,were taken as research object.The six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DoF) dynamic model of MO-1 was established based on the Newton-Euler dynamic equations.In particular,the interaction between the flagellum and fluid was considered by the resistive force theory.The simulated motion trajectory of MTB was found to consist of two kinds of helices:small helices resulting from the imbalance of force due to flagellar rotation,and large helices arising from the different directions of the rotation axis of the cell body and the propulsion axis of the flagellum.The motion behaviours of MTB in various magnetic fields were studied,and the simulation results agree well with the experiment results.In addition,the rotation frequency of the flagella was estimated at 1100 Hz,which is consistent with the average rotation rate for Na+-driven flagellar motors.The included angle of the magnetosome chain was predicted at 40° that is located within 20° to 60° range of the observed results.The results indicate the correctness of the dynamic model,which may aid research on the operation and control of MTB-propelled micro-actuators.Meanwhile,the motion behaviours of MTB may inspire the development of micro-robots with new driving mechanisms.

  5. Evaluation of strategies to control Fab light chain dimer during mammalian expression and purification: A universal one-step process for purification of correctly assembled Fab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Jennifer; Keen, Jenny; Nayyar, Kalpana; Birkett, Neil; Bond, Nicholas; Bannister, David; Tigue, Natalie; Higazi, Daniel; Kemp, Benjamin; Vaughan, Tristan; Kippen, Alistair; Buchanan, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Fabs are an important class of antibody fragment as both research reagents and therapeutic agents. There are a plethora of methods described for their recombinant expression and purification. However, these do not address the issue of excessive light chain production that forms light chain dimers nor do they describe a universal purification strategy. Light chain dimer impurities and the absence of a universal Fab purification strategy present persistent challenges for biotechnology applications using Fabs, particularly around the need for bespoke purification strategies. This study describes methods to address light chain dimer formation during Fab expression and identifies a novel CH 1 affinity resin as a simple and efficient one-step purification for correctly assembled Fab.

  6. Second-chance signal transduction explains cooperative flagellar switching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry G Zot

    Full Text Available The reversal of flagellar motion (switching results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit. To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1 the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2 the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910 The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv-vii.

  7. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii.

  8. Optimization of flagellar swimming by a model sperm

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2014-01-01

    The swimming of a bead-spring chain in a viscous incompressible fluid as a model of a sperm is studied in the framework of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The optimal mode in the class of planar flagellar strokes of small amplitude is determined on the basis of a generalized eigenvalue problem involving two matrices which can be evaluated from the mobility matrix of the set of spheres constituting the chain. For an elastic chain with a cargo constraint for its spherical head, the actuating forces yielding a nearly optimal stroke can be determined. These can be used in a Stokesian dynamics simulation of large amplitude swimming.

  9. Biochemical characterization of tektins from sperm flagellar doublet microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Tektins, protein components of stable protofilaments from sea urchin sperm flagellar outer doublet microtubules (Linck, R. W., and G. L. Langevin, 1982, J. Cell Sci., 58:1-22), are separable by preparative SDS PAGE into 47-, 51-, and 55-kD equimolar components. High resolution two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping reveals 63-67% coincidence among peptides of the 51-kD tektin chain and its 47- and 55-kD counterparts, greater than 70% coincidence between the 47- and 55-kD tektins, but little ...

  10. Are there intracellular Ca2+ oscillations correlated with flagellar beating in human sperm? A three vs. two-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkidi, G; Montoya, F; Hernández-Herrera, P; Ríos-Herrera, W A; Müller, M F; Treviño, C L; Darszon, A

    2017-09-01

    -specific plasma membrane Ca2+ channel blocker. N/A. Analysis in 3D needs a very fast image acquisition rate to correctly sample a volume containing swimming sperm. This condition requires a very short exposure time per image making it necessary to use an image intensifier which also increases noise. The lengthy analysis time required to obtain reliable results limited the number of cells that could be analyzed. The possibility of recording flagellar [Ca2+]i oscillations described here may open a new avenue to better understand ciliary and flagellar beating that are fundamental for mucociliary clearance, oocyte transport, fertilization, cerebrospinal fluid pressure regulation and developmental left-right symmetry breaking in the embryonic node. This work was supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT) (grants 253952 to G.C.; 156667 to F.M.M. and Fronteras 71 39908-Q to A.D. and Post-doctoral scholarships 366844 to P.H.-H. and 291028 to F.M.) and the Dirección General de Asuntos del Personal Académico of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (DGAPA-UNAM) (grants CJIC/CTIC/4898/2016 to F.M. and IN205516 to A.D.). There are no conflicts of interest to declare.

  11. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  12. An Element of Determinism in a Stochastic Flagellar Motor Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Li; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus uses a single polar flagellum to navigate in an aqueous environment. Similar to Escherichia coli cells, the polar flagellar motor has two states; when the motor is counter-clockwise, the cell swims forward and when the motor is clockwise, the cell swims backward. V. alginolyticus also incorporates a direction randomization step at the start of the forward swimming interval by flicking its flagellum. To gain an understanding on how the polar flagellar motor switch is regulated, distributions of the forward $\\Delta_{f}$ and backward $\\Delta_{b}$ intervals are investigated herein. We found that the steady-state probability density functions, $P(\\Delta_{f})$ and $P(\\Delta_{b})$, of freely swimming bacteria are strongly peaked at a finite time, suggesting that the motor switch is not Poissonian. The short-time inhibition is sufficiently strong and long lasting, i.e., several hundred milliseconds for both intervals, which is readily observed and characterized. Treating motor re...

  13. Structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke S; Yagi, Toshiki; Harris, Sarah A; Ohki, Shin-ya; Yura, Kei; Shimizu, Youské; Honda, Shinya; Kamiya, Ritsu; Burgess, Stan A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-11-04

    Flagellar dyneins are essential microtubule motors in eukaryotes, as they drive the beating motions of cilia and flagella. Unlike myosin and kinesin motors, the track binding mechanism of dyneins and the regulation between the strong and weak binding states remain obscure. Here we report the solution structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein-c/DHC9 (dynein-c MTBD). The structure reveals a similar overall helix-rich fold to that of the MTBD of cytoplasmic dynein (cytoplasmic MTBD), but dynein-c MTBD has an additional flap, consisting of an antiparallel b sheet. The flap is positively charged and highly flexible. Despite the structural similarity to cytoplasmic MTBD, dynein-c MTBD shows only a small change in the microtubule- binding affinity depending on the registry change of coiled coil-sliding, whereby lacks the apparent strong binding state. The surface charge distribution of dynein-c MTBD also differs from that of cytoplasmic MTBD, which suggests a difference in the microtubule-binding mechanism.

  14. EscO, a Functional and Structural Analog of the Flagellar FliJ Protein, Is a Positive Regulator of EscN ATPase Activity of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Injectisome

    OpenAIRE

    Romo-Castillo, Mariana; Andrade, Angel; Espinosa, Norma; Monjarás Feria, Julia; Soto, Eduardo; Díaz-Guerrero, Miguel; González-Pedrajo, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein molecular devices used by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. A T3SS is also used for protein export in flagellar assembly, which promotes bacterial motility. The two systems are evolutionarily related, possessing highly conserved components in their export apparatuses. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs a T3SS, encoded by genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LE...

  15. Step-wise loss of bacterial flagellar torsion confers progressive phagocytic evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustin R Lovewell

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis of bacteria by innate immune cells is a primary method of bacterial clearance during infection. However, the mechanisms by which the host cell recognizes bacteria and consequentially initiates phagocytosis are largely unclear. Previous studies of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa have indicated that bacterial flagella and flagellar motility play an important role in colonization of the host and, importantly, that loss of flagellar motility enables phagocytic evasion. Here we use molecular, cellular, and genetic methods to provide the first formal evidence that phagocytic cells recognize bacterial motility rather than flagella and initiate phagocytosis in response to this motility. We demonstrate that deletion of genes coding for the flagellar stator complex, which results in non-swimming bacteria that retain an initial flagellar structure, confers resistance to phagocytic binding and ingestion in several species of the gamma proteobacterial group of Gram-negative bacteria, indicative of a shared strategy for phagocytic evasion. Furthermore, we show for the first time that susceptibility to phagocytosis in swimming bacteria is proportional to mot gene function and, consequently, flagellar rotation since complementary genetically- and biochemically-modulated incremental decreases in flagellar motility result in corresponding and proportional phagocytic evasion. These findings identify that phagocytic cells respond to flagellar movement, which represents a novel mechanism for non-opsonized phagocytic recognition of pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Boyang; Yang, Jing; Gollub, Jerry P; Arratia, Paulo E

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  17. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    CERN Document Server

    Nirody, Jasmine A; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor is not universal, but rather increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  18. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    CERN Document Server

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

  19. TbFlabarin, a flagellar protein of Trypanosoma brucei, highlights differences between Leishmania and Trypanosoma flagellar-targeting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetaud, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Michèle; M'Bang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Crobu, Lucien; Blancard, Corinne; Sterkers, Yvon; Pages, Michel; Bastien, Patrick; Merlin, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    TbFlabarin is the Trypanosoma brucei orthologue of the Leishmania flagellar protein LdFlabarin but its sequence is 33% shorter than LdFlabarin, as it lacks a C-terminal domain that is indispensable for LdFlabarin to localize to the Leishmania flagellum. TbFlabarin is mainly expressed in the procyclic forms of the parasite and localized to the flagellum, but only when two palmitoylable cysteines at positions 3 and 4 are present. TbFlabarin is more strongly attached to the membrane fraction than its Leishmania counterpart, as it resists complete solubilization with as much as 0.5% NP-40. Expression ablation by RNA interference did not change parasite growth in culture, its morphology or apparent motility. Heterologous expression showed that neither TbFlabarin in L. amazonensis nor LdFlabarin in T. brucei localized to the flagellum, revealing non-cross-reacting targeting signals between the two species.

  20. Specificity of motor components in the dual flagellar system of Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian; Held, Susanne; Windel, Natalie; Paulick, Anja; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai M

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are intricate nanomachines in which the stator units and rotor component FliM may be dynamically exchanged during function. Similar to other bacterial species, the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32 possesses a complete secondary flagellar system along with a corresponding stator unit. Expression of the secondary system occurs during planktonic growth in complex media and leads to the formation of a subpopulation with one or more additional flagella at random positions in addition to the primary polar system. We used physiological and phenotypic characterizations of defined mutants in concert with fluorescent microscopy on labelled components of the two different systems, the stator proteins PomB and MotB, the rotor components FliM(1) and FliM(2), and the auxiliary motor components MotX and MotY, to determine localization, function and dynamics of the proteins in the flagellar motors. The results demonstrate that the polar flagellum is driven by a Na(+)-dependent FliM(1)/PomAB/MotX/MotY flagellar motor while the secondary system is rotated by a H(+)-dependent FliM(2)/MotAB motor. The components were highly specific for their corresponding motor and are unlikely to be extensively swapped or shared between the two flagellar systems under planktonic conditions. The results have implications for both specificity and dynamics of flagellar motor components. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Analysis of the Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) Database of the International Space Station On-Orbit Electrical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program is investigating and developing technologies to support human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task is part of the Supportability Project managed by the Exploration Technology Development Program. CLEAR is aimed at enabling a flight crew to diagnose and repair electronic circuits in space yet minimize logistics spares, equipment, and crew time and training. For insight into actual space repair needs, in early 2008 the project examined the operational experience of the International Space Station (ISS) program. CLEAR examined the ISS on-orbit Problem Reporting and Corrective Action database for electrical and electronic system problems. The ISS has higher than predicted reliability yet, as expected, it has persistent problems. A goal was to identify which on-orbit electrical problems could be resolved by a component-level replacement. A further goal was to identify problems that could benefit from the additional diagnostic and test capability that a component-level repair capability could provide. The study indicated that many problems stem from a small set of root causes that also represent distinct component problems. The study also determined that there are certain recurring problems where the current telemetry instrumentation and built-in tests are unable to completely resolve the problem. As a result, the root cause is listed as unknown. Overall, roughly 42 percent of on-orbit electrical problems on ISS could be addressed with a component-level repair. Furthermore, 63 percent of on-orbit electrical problems on ISS could benefit from additional external diagnostic and test capability. These results indicate that in situ component-level repair in combination with diagnostic and test capability can be expected to increase system availability and reduce logistics. The CLEAR approach can increase the flight crew s ability to act decisively to resolve problems while reducing

  2. Activation of the Campylobacter jejuni FlgSR two-component system is linked to the flagellar export apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Stephanie N; Hendrixson, David R

    2009-04-01

    Activation of sigma(54)-dependent gene expression essential for formation of flagella in Campylobacter jejuni requires the components of the inner membrane-localized flagellar export apparatus and the FlgSR two-component regulatory system. In this study, we characterized the FlgS sensor kinase and how activation of the protein is linked to the flagellar export apparatus. We found that FlgS is localized to the C. jejuni cytoplasm and that His141 of FlgS is essential for autophosphorylation, phosphorelay to the cognate FlgR response regulator, motility, and expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes. Mutants with incomplete flagellar export apparatuses produced wild-type levels of FlgS and FlgR, but they were defective for signaling through the FlgSR system. By using genetic approaches, we found that FlgSR activity is linked to and downstream of the flagellar export apparatus in a regulatory cascade that terminates in expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes. By analyzing defined flhB and fliI mutants of C. jejuni that form flagellar export apparatuses that are secretion incompetent, we determined that formation of the apparatus is required to contribute to the signal sensed by FlgS to terminate in activation of expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes. Considering that the flagellar export apparatuses of Escherichia coli and Salmonella species influence sigma(28)-dependent flagellar gene expression, our work expands the signaling activity of the apparatuses to include sigma(54)-dependent pathways of C. jejuni and possibly other motile bacteria. This study indicates that these apparatuses have broader functions beyond flagellar protein secretion, including activation of essential two-component regulatory systems required for expression of sigma(54)-dependent flagellar genes.

  3. Cross-complementation study of the flagellar type III export apparatus membrane protein FlhB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive S Barker

    Full Text Available The bacterial type III export apparatus is found in the flagellum and in the needle complex of some pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In the needle complex its function is to secrete effector proteins for infection into Eukaryotic cells. In the bacterial flagellum it exports specific proteins for the building of the flagellum during its assembly. The export apparatus is composed of about five membrane proteins and three soluble proteins. The mechanism of the export apparatus is not fully understood. The five membrane proteins are well conserved and essential. Here a cross-complementation assay was performed: substituting in the flagellar system of Salmonella one of these membrane proteins, FlhB, by the FlhB ortholog from Aquifex aeolicus (an evolutionary distant hyperthermophilic bacteria or a chimeric protein (AquSalFlhB made by the combination of the trans-membrane domain of A. aeolicus FlhB with the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB dramatically reduced numbers of flagella and motility. From cells expressing the chimeric AquSalFlhB protein, suppressor mutants with enhanced motility were isolated and the mutations were identified using whole genome sequencing. Gain-of-function mutations were found in the gene encoding FlhA, another membrane protein of the type III export apparatus. Also, mutations were identified in genes encoding 4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase, ubiquinone/menaquinone biosynthesis methyltransferase, and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate synthase, which are required for ubiquinone biosynthesis. The mutations were shown by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography to reduce the quinone pool of the cytoplasmic membrane. Ubiquinone biosynthesis could be restored for the strain bearing a mutated gene for 4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase by the addition of excess exogenous 4-hydroxybenzoate. Restoring the level of ubiquinone reduced flagella biogenesis with the AquSalFlhB chimera

  4. Cross-Complementation Study of the Flagellar Type III Export Apparatus Membrane Protein FlhB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Clive S.; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial type III export apparatus is found in the flagellum and in the needle complex of some pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In the needle complex its function is to secrete effector proteins for infection into Eukaryotic cells. In the bacterial flagellum it exports specific proteins for the building of the flagellum during its assembly. The export apparatus is composed of about five membrane proteins and three soluble proteins. The mechanism of the export apparatus is not fully understood. The five membrane proteins are well conserved and essential. Here a cross-complementation assay was performed: substituting in the flagellar system of Salmonella one of these membrane proteins, FlhB, by the FlhB ortholog from Aquifex aeolicus (an evolutionary distant hyperthermophilic bacteria) or a chimeric protein (AquSalFlhB) made by the combination of the trans-membrane domain of A. aeolicus FlhB with the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB dramatically reduced numbers of flagella and motility. From cells expressing the chimeric AquSalFlhB protein, suppressor mutants with enhanced motility were isolated and the mutations were identified using whole genome sequencing. Gain-of-function mutations were found in the gene encoding FlhA, another membrane protein of the type III export apparatus. Also, mutations were identified in genes encoding 4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase, ubiquinone/menaquinone biosynthesis methyltransferase, and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate synthase, which are required for ubiquinone biosynthesis. The mutations were shown by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography to reduce the quinone pool of the cytoplasmic membrane. Ubiquinone biosynthesis could be restored for the strain bearing a mutated gene for 4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase by the addition of excess exogenous 4-hydroxybenzoate. Restoring the level of ubiquinone reduced flagella biogenesis with the AquSalFlhB chimera demonstrating that the

  5. Electrochemistry of Ferrocenyl Dendrimer−β-Cyclodextrin Assemblies at the Interface of an Aqueous Solution and a Molecular Printboard: Addition/correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, C.A.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Ravoo, B.J.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2007-01-01

    Water-soluble supramolecular assemblies of redox-active ferrocenyl-decorated (Fc) poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers and β-cyclodextrin (βCD) were adsorbed at self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of βCD (“molecular printboards”). The dendrimers form a stable monolayer at the βCD SAM owing to

  6. Structural insights into bacterial flagellar hooks similarities and specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Ho; Barker, Clive S.; Bulieris, Paula V.; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    Across bacteria, the protein that makes the flagellar hook, FlgE, has a high variability in amino acid residue composition and sequence length. We hereby present the structure of two fragments of FlgE protein from Campylobacter jejuni and from Caulobacter crescentus, which were obtained by X-ray crystallography, and a high-resolution model of the hook from Caulobacter. By comparing these new structures of FlgE proteins, we show that bacterial hook can be divided in two distinct parts. The first part comprises domains that are found in all FlgE proteins and that will make the basic structure of the hook that is common to all flagellated bacteria. The second part, hyper-variable both in size and structure, will be bacteria dependent. To have a better understanding of the C. jejuni hook, we show that a special strain of Salmonella enterica, which was designed to encode a gene of flgE that has the extra domains found in FlgE from C. jejuni, is fully motile. It seems that no matter the size of the hook protein, the hook will always have a structure made of 11 protofilaments. PMID:27759043

  7. Transient pauses of the bacterial flagellar motor at low load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, A. L.; Pedaci, F.; Berry, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is the molecular machine responsible for the swimming and chemotaxis of many species of motile bacteria. The BFM is bidirectional, and changes in the rotation direction of the motor are essential for chemotaxis. It has previously been observed that many species of bacteria also demonstrate brief pauses in rotation, though the underlying cause of such events remains poorly understood. We examine the rotation of Escherichia coli under low mechanical load with high spatial and temporal resolution. We observe and characterize transient pauses in rotation in a strain which lacks a functional chemosensory network, showing that such events are a phenomenon separate from a change in rotational direction. Rotating at low load, the BFM of E. coli exhibits about 10 pauses s-1, lasting on average 5 ms, during which time the rotor diffuses with net forwards rotation. Replacing the wild type stators with Na+ chimera stators has no substantial effect on the pausing. We discuss possible causes of such events, which are likely a product of a transient change in either the stator complex or the rotor.

  8. Architecture of the flagellar apparatus and related structures in the type species of Peridinium, em>P. cinctum (Dinophyceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calado, A.C.; Hansen, Gert; Moestrup, Øjvind

    1999-01-01

    The ultrastructure of Peridinium cinctum, was examined by serial sectioning with particular emphasis on the detailed construction of the flagellar apparatus. The pusular system of P. cinctum included two sac pusules in open connection with the flagellar canals; disorganized material was found ins...

  9. Properties of sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor: A two-state model approach

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is one of the ion-driven molecular machines, which drives the rotation of flagellar filaments and enable bacteria to swim in viscous solutions. Understanding its mechanism is one challenge in biophysics. Based on previous models and inspired by the idea used in description of motor proteins, in this study one two-state model is provided. Meanwhile, according to corresponding experimental data, mathematical relationship between BFM membrane voltage and pH value of the environment, and relationship between internal and external sodium concentrations are given. Therefore, with model parameter values obtained by fitting theoretical results of torque-speed relation to recent experimental data, many biophysical properties of bacterial flagellar motor can be obtained for any pH values and any external sodium concentrations. Including the rotation speed, stall torque (i.e. the torque generated by BFM), rotation dispersion, and rotation randomness. In this study, the single-stator BFM w...

  10. Zipping and Entanglement in Flagellar Bundle of E. Coli: Role of Motile Cell Body

    CERN Document Server

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The course of a peritrichous bacterium such as E. coli crucially depends on the level of synchronization and self-organization of several rotating flagella. However, the rotation of each flagellum generates counter body movements which in turn affect the flagellar dynamics. Using a detailed numerical model of an E. coli, we demonstrate that flagellar entanglement, besides fluid flow relative to the moving body, dramatically changes the dynamics of flagella from that compared to anchored flagella. In particular, bundle formation occurs through a zipping motion in a remarkably rapid time, affected little by initial flagellar orientation. A simplified analytical model supports our observations. Finally, we illustrate how entanglement, hydrodynamic interactions, and body movement contribute to zipping and bundling.

  11. Flagellar coordination in Chlamydomonas cells held on micropipettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüffer, U; Nultsch, W

    1998-01-01

    The two flagella of Chlamydomonas are known to beat synchronously: During breaststroke beating they are generally coordinated in a bilateral way while in shock responses during undulatory beating coordination is mostly parallel [Rüffer and Nultsch, 1995: Botanica Acta 108:169-276]. Analysis of a great number of shock responses revealed that in undulatory beats also periods of bilateral coordination are found and that the coordination type may change several times during a shock response, without concomitant changes of the beat envelope and the beat period. In normal wt cells no coordination changes are found during breaststroke beating, but only short temporary asynchronies: During 2 or 3 normal beats of the cis flagellum, the trans flagellum performs 3 or 4 flat beats with a reduced beat envelope and a smaller beat period, resulting in one additional trans beat. Long periods with flat beats of the same shape and beat period are found in both flagella of the non-phototactic mutant ptx1 and in defective wt 622E cells. During these periods, the coordination is parallel, the two flagella beat alternately. A correlation between normal asynchronous trans beats and the parallel-coordinated beats in the presumably cis defective cells and also the undulatory beats is discussed. In the cis defective cells, a perpetual spontaneous change between parallel beats with small beat periods (higher beat frequency) and bilateral beats with greater beat periods (lower beat frequency) are observed and render questionable the existence of two different intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella cis and trans. Asynchronies occur spontaneously but may also be induced by light changes, either step-up or step-down, but not by both stimuli in turn as breaststroke flagellar photoresponses (BFPRs). Asynchronies are not involved in phototaxis. They are independent of the BFPRs, which are supposed to be the basis of phototaxis. Both types of coordination must be assumed to be regulated

  12. Biochemical characterization of tektins from sperm flagellar doublet microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linck, R W; Stephens, R E

    1987-04-01

    Tektins, protein components of stable protofilaments from sea urchin sperm flagellar outer doublet microtubules (Linck, R. W., and G. L. Langevin, 1982, J. Cell Sci., 58:1-22), are separable by preparative SDS PAGE into 47-, 51-, and 55-kD equimolar components. High resolution two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping reveals 63-67% coincidence among peptides of the 51-kD tektin chain and its 47- and 55-kD counterparts, greater than 70% coincidence between the 47- and 55-kD tektins, but little obvious similarity to either alpha- or beta-tubulin. With reverse-phase HPLC on a C18 column, using 6 M guanidine-HCl solubilization and a 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid/CH3CN gradient system (Stephens, R. E., 1984, J. Cell Biol. 90:37a [Abstr.]), the relatively less hydrophobic 51-kD tektin elutes at greater than 45% CH3CN, immediately followed by the 55-kD chain. The 47-kD tektin is substantially more hydrophobic, eluting between the two tubulins. The amino acid compositions of the tektins are very similar to each other but totally distinct from tubulin chains, being characterized by a greater than 50% higher arginine plus lysine content (in good agreement with the number of tryptic peptides) and about half the content of glycine, histidine, proline, and tyrosine. The proline content correlates well with the fact that tektin filaments have twice as much alpha-helical content as tubulin. Total hydrophobic amino acid content correlates with HPLC elution times for the tektins but not tubulins. The average amino acid composition of the tektins indicates that they resemble intermediate filament proteins, as originally postulated from structural, solubility, and electrophoretic properties. Tektins have higher cysteine and tryptophan contents than desmin and vimentin, which characteristically have only one residue of each, more closely resembling certain keratins in these amino acids.

  13. Knockdown of Inner Arm Protein IC138 in Trypanosoma brucei Causes Defective Motility and Flagellar Detachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne S Wilson

    Full Text Available Motility in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is conferred by a single flagellum, attached alongside the cell, which moves the cell forward using a beat that is generated from tip-to-base. We are interested in characterizing components that regulate flagellar beating, in this study we extend the characterization of TbIC138, the ortholog of a dynein intermediate chain that regulates axonemal inner arm dynein f/I1. TbIC138 was tagged In situ-and shown to fractionate with the inner arm components of the flagellum. RNAi knockdown of TbIC138 resulted in significantly reduced protein levels, mild growth defect and significant motility defects. These cells tended to cluster, exhibited slow and abnormal motility and some cells had partially or fully detached flagella. Slight but significant increases were observed in the incidence of mis-localized or missing kinetoplasts. To document development of the TbIC138 knockdown phenotype over time, we performed a detailed analysis of flagellar detachment and motility changes over 108 hours following induction of RNAi. Abnormal motility, such as slow twitching or irregular beating, was observed early, and became progressively more severe such that by 72 hours-post-induction, approximately 80% of the cells were immotile. Progressively more cells exhibited flagellar detachment over time, but this phenotype was not as prevalent as immotility, affecting less than 60% of the population. Detached flagella had abnormal beating, but abnormal beating was also observed in cells with no flagellar detachment, suggesting that TbIC138 has a direct, or primary, effect on the flagellar beat, whereas detachment is a secondary phenotype of TbIC138 knockdown. Our results are consistent with the role of TbIC138 as a regulator of motility, and has a phenotype amenable to more extensive structure-function analyses to further elucidate its role in the control of flagellar beat in T. brucei.

  14. Pseudomonas syringae coordinates production of a motility-enabling surfactant with flagellar assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using a sensitive assay, we observed low levels of an unknown surfactant produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that was undetectable with traditional methods. Much larger quantities of this surfactant were produced by cells colonizing a porous hydrated paper surface than on agar surfac...

  15. A protein thermometer controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather D Kamp

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable. Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as

  16. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform

    OpenAIRE

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to o...

  17. Characterization of the flagellar biosynthesis regulatory geneflbD in Azospirillum brasilense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A flagellar gene cluster fragment includingflbD of Azospirillum brasilense was cloned and sequenced, The flbD mutant strain was found to be nonmotile-losing both polar and lateral flagella (Fla-Laf-), Motility and flagella were regained by complementation with plasmid-borne multicopy flbD, but altered with larger swarming circle and fewer lateral flagella on the semisolid plate, This result indicated that FIbD plays an important role in the regulation of both polar and lateral flagellar biosynthesis in A.brasilense.

  18. EscO, a functional and structural analog of the flagellar FliJ protein, is a positive regulator of EscN ATPase activity of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli injectisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Castillo, Mariana; Andrade, Angel; Espinosa, Norma; Monjarás Feria, Julia; Soto, Eduardo; Díaz-Guerrero, Miguel; González-Pedrajo, Bertha

    2014-06-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein molecular devices used by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. A T3SS is also used for protein export in flagellar assembly, which promotes bacterial motility. The two systems are evolutionarily related, possessing highly conserved components in their export apparatuses. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs a T3SS, encoded by genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, to colonize the human intestine and cause diarrheal disease. In the present work, we investigated the role of the LEE-encoded EscO protein (previously Orf15 or EscA) in T3SS biogenesis. We show that EscO shares similar properties with the flagellar FliJ and the Yersinia YscO protein families. Our findings demonstrate that EscO is essential for secretion of all categories of T3SS substrates. Consistent with its central role in protein secretion, it was found to interact with the ATPase EscN and its negative regulator, EscL, of the export apparatus. Moreover, we show that EscO stimulates EscN enzymatic activity; however, it is unable to upregulate ATP hydrolysis in the presence of EscL. Remarkably, EscO partially restored the swimming defect of a Salmonella flagellar fliJ mutant and was able to stimulate the ATPase activity of FliI. Overall, our data indicate that EscO is the virulence counterpart of the flagellar FliJ protein.

  19. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  20. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to other mutations affecting the N-DRC, drc3 does not suppress flagellar paralysis caused by loss of radial spokes. Cryo–electron tomography revealed that the drc3 mutant lacks a portion of the N-DRC linker domain, including the L1 protrusion, part of the distal lobe, and the connection between these two structures, thus localizing DRC3 to this part of the N-DRC. This and additional considerations enable us to assign DRC3 to the L1 protrusion. Because the L1 protrusion is the only non-dynein structure in contact with the dynein g motor domain in wild-type axonemes and this is the only N-DRC–dynein connection missing in the drc3 mutant, we conclude that DRC3 interacts with dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform. PMID:26063732

  1. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelas, J. Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M. Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A.; Marconi, Verónica I.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  2. Structural changes of the paraflagellar rod during flagellar beating in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Miranda Rocha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan member of the Kinetoplastidae family characterized for the presence of specific and unique structures that are involved in different cell activities. One of them is the paraflagellar rod (PFR, a complex array of filaments connected to the flagellar axoneme. Although the function played by the PFR is not well established, it has been shown that silencing of the synthesis of its major proteins by either knockout of RNAi impairs and/or modifies the flagellar motility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present results obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM of replicas of quick-frozen, freeze-fractured, deep-etched and rotary-replicated cells to obtain detailed information of the PFR structures in regions of the flagellum in straight and in bent state. The images obtained show that the PFR is not a fixed and static structure. The pattern of organization of the PFR filament network differs between regions of the flagellum in a straight state and those in a bent state. Measurements of the distances between the PFR filaments and the filaments that connect the PFR to the axoneme as well as of the angles between the intercrossed filaments supported this idea. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Graphic computation based on the information obtained allowed the proposal of an animated model for the PFR structure during flagellar beating and provided a new way of observing PFR filaments during flagellar beating.

  3. Codon-based phylogenetics introduces novel flagellar gene markers to oomycete systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robideau, Gregg P; Rodrigue, Nicolas; André Lévesque, C

    2014-10-01

    Oomycete systematics has traditionally been reliant on ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sequences. Here we report the use of two single-copy protein-coding flagellar genes, PF16 and OCM1, in oomycete systematics, showing their utility in phylogenetic reconstruction and species identification. Applying a recently proposed mutation-selection model of codon substitution, the phylogenetic relationships inferred by flagellar genes are largely in agreement with the current views of oomycete evolution, whereas nucleotide- and amino acid-level models produce biologically implausible reconstructions. Interesting parallels exist between the phylogeny inferred from the flagellar genes and zoospore ontology, providing external support for the tree obtained using the codon model. The resolution achieved for species identification is ample using PF16, and quite robust using OCM1, and the described PCR primers are able to amplify both genes for a range of oomycete genera. Altogether, when analyzed with a rich codon substitution model, these flagellar genes provide useful markers for the oomycete molecular toolbox.

  4. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M; Sanderson, Michael J; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B

    2015-08-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to other mutations affecting the N-DRC, drc3 does not suppress flagellar paralysis caused by loss of radial spokes. Cryo-electron tomography revealed that the drc3 mutant lacks a portion of the N-DRC linker domain, including the L1 protrusion, part of the distal lobe, and the connection between these two structures, thus localizing DRC3 to this part of the N-DRC. This and additional considerations enable us to assign DRC3 to the L1 protrusion. Because the L1 protrusion is the only non-dynein structure in contact with the dynein g motor domain in wild-type axonemes and this is the only N-DRC-dynein connection missing in the drc3 mutant, we conclude that DRC3 interacts with dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform.

  5. Non-equilibrium effect in the allosteric regulation of the bacterial flagellar switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangbin; Shi, Hui; He, Rui; Wang, Renjie; Zhang, Rongjing; Yuan, Junhua

    2017-07-01

    The switching mechanism of the flagellar motor provides the basis for the motile behaviour of flagellated bacteria. Its highly sensitive response has previously been understood in terms of equilibrium models, either the classical two-state concerted allosteric model, or more generally, the Ising-type conformation spread model. Here, we systematically study motor switching under various load conditions from high to zero load, under different proton motive force (pmf) conditions and varying the number of torque-generating units (stators). In doing so, we reveal the signature of a non-equilibrium effect. To consistently account for the motor-switching dependence on each those conditions, a previously neglected non-equilibrium effect--the energy input from the motor torque--has to be incorporated into models of the flagellar switch. We further show that this effect increases the sensitivity of the flagellar switch. Exploiting a very small fraction of the energy expense of the flagellar motor for functional regulation increases its sensitivity greatly. Similar mechanisms are expected to be found in other protein complexes.

  6. Minimum Information Loss Based Multi-kernel Learning for Flagellar Protein Recognition in Trypanosoma Brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosma brucei (T. Brucei) is an important pathogen agent of African trypanosomiasis. The flagellum is an essential and multifunctional organelle of T. Brucei, thus it is very important to recognize the flagellar proteins from T. Brucei proteins for the purposes of both biological research and drug design. In this paper, we investigate computationally recognizing flagellar proteins in T. Brucei by pattern recognition methods. It is argued that an optimal decision function can be obtained as the difference of probability functions of flagella protein and the non-flagellar protein for the purpose of flagella protein recognition. We propose to learn a multi-kernel classification function to approximate this optimal decision function, by minimizing the information loss of such approximation which is measured by the Kull back-Leibler (KL) divergence. An iterative multi-kernel classifier learning algorithm is developed to minimize the KL divergence for the problem of T. Brucei flagella protein recognition, experiments show its advantage over other T. Brucei flagellar protein recognition and multi-kernel learning methods. © 2014 IEEE.

  7. Dynamics in the Dual Fuel Flagellar Motor of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenzinger, Susanne; Thormann, Kai M

    2017-01-01

    The stator is an eminent component of the flagellar motor and determines a number of the motor's properties, such as the rotation-energizing coupling ion (H(+) or Na(+)) or the torque that can be generated. The stator consists of several units located in the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the flagellar drive shaft. Studies on flagellar motors of several bacterial species have provided evidence that the number as well as the retention time of stators coupled to the motor is highly dynamic and depends on the environmental conditions. Notably, numerous species possess more than a single distinct set of stators. It is likely that the presence of different stator units enables these bacteria to adjust the flagellar motor properties and function to meet the environmental requirements. One of these species is Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 that is equipped with a single polar flagellum and two stator units, the Na(+)-dependent PomAB and the H(+)-dependent MotAB. Here, we describe a method to determine stator dynamics by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating how bacteria can change the composition of an intricate molecular machine according to environmental conditions.

  8. Identification of flagellar motility genes in Yersinia ruckeri by transposon mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evenhuis, Jason P:; LaPatra, Scott E.; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that flagellar secretion is required for production of secreted lipase activity in the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri and that neither of these activities is necessary for virulence in rainbow trout. Our results suggest a possible mechanism for the emergence of nonmotile biotype...

  9. Identification of Archaea-specific chemotaxis proteins which interact with the flagellar apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Judith

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea share with bacteria the ability to bias their movement towards more favorable locations, a process known as taxis. Two molecular systems drive this process: the motility apparatus and the chemotaxis signal transduction system. The first consists of the flagellum, the flagellar motor, and its switch, which allows cells to reverse the rotation of flagella. The second targets the flagellar motor switch in order to modulate the switching frequency in response to external stimuli. While the signal transduction system is conserved throughout archaea and bacteria, the archaeal flagellar apparatus is different from the bacterial one. The proteins constituting the flagellar motor and its switch in archaea have not yet been identified, and the connection between the bacterial-like chemotaxis signal transduction system and the archaeal motility apparatus is unknown. Results Using protein-protein interaction analysis, we have identified three proteins in Halobacterium salinarum that interact with the chemotaxis (Che proteins CheY, CheD, and CheC2, as well as the flagella accessory (Fla proteins FlaCE and FlaD. Two of the proteins belong to the protein family DUF439, the third is a HEAT_PBS family protein. In-frame deletion strains for all three proteins were generated and analyzed as follows: a photophobic responses were measured by a computer-based cell tracking system b flagellar rotational bias was determined by dark-field microscopy, and c chemotactic behavior was analyzed by a swarm plate assay. Strains deleted for the HEAT_PBS protein or one of the DUF439 proteins proved unable to switch the direction of flagellar rotation. In these mutants, flagella rotate only clockwise, resulting in exclusively forward swimming cells that are unable to respond to tactic signals. Deletion of the second DUF439 protein had only minimal effects. HEAT_PBS proteins could be identified in the chemotaxis gene regions of all motile haloarchaea

  10. Sequential development of flagellar defects in spermatids and epididymal spermatozoa of selenium-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gary E; Winfrey, Virginia P; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2004-03-01

    In this study cauda epididymal spermatozoa of rats maintained on a selenium-deficient diet for 5 and 7 months exhibited an array of flagellar defects. Spermatids and spermatozoa were analyzed by light and electron microscopy to define the appearance of flagellar abnormalities during spermiogenesis and post-testicular sperm development. Late spermatids of selenium-deficient rats displayed normal structural organization of the flagellar plasma membrane, axoneme, outer dense fibers, fibrous sheath and annulus, but they exhibited a premature termination of the mitochondrial sheath. A comparison of late spermatids and caput epididymal spermatozoa revealed that a late step in flagellar differentiation was the structural remodeling of the annulus and its accompanying fusion with both the fibrous sheath and the mitochondrial sheath. In selenium-deficient animals, however, the annulus failed to fuse with the mitochondrial sheath, generating an apparent weak point in the flagellum. After epididymal passage, cauda epididymal spermatozoa of selenium-deficient animals also exhibited extensive flagellar disorganization resulting from the apparent sliding and extrusion of specific outer dense fiber-doublet microtubule complexes from the proximal and the distal ends of the mitochondrial sheath and the accompanying loss of the midpiece plasma membrane. Only fiber complex number 4 was extruded proximally, whereas fibers 4, 5, 6 and 7 were extruded from the mitochondrial sheath-deficient posterior midpiece. Axonemal fibers 8, 9, 1, 2 and 3 retained their normal geometric relationships. These data suggest that the known loss of male fertility in selenium deficiency results from the sequential development of sperm defects expressed during both spermiogenesis and maturation in the epididymis.

  11. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tropini

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does

  12. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropini, Carolina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does not prevent

  13. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajikawa, A.; Satoh, E.; Leer, R.J.; Yamamoto, S.; Igimi, S.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization

  14. Induction of phospholipase- and flagellar synthesis in Serratia liquefaciens is controlled by expression of the flagellar master operon flhD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, M; Eberl, L; Christiansen, Gunna;

    1995-01-01

    . Expression of flagella is demonstrated to follow a growth-phase-dependent pattern. Cloning, complementation studies and DNA-sequencing analysis has identified a genetic region in Serratia liquefaciens which exhibits extensive homology to the Escherichia coli flhD flagellar master operon. Interruption...... of the chromosomal flhD operon in S. liquefaciens results in non-flagellated and phospholipase-negative cells, but the synthesis of other exoenzymes is not affected. By placing the flhD operon under the control of a foreign inducible promoter we have shown that increased transcription through the flhD operon leads...

  15. Identification of multicomponent histidine-aspartate phosphorelay system controlling flagellar and motility gene expression in Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Leang, Ching; Inoue, Kengo; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-03-30

    Geobacter species play an important role in the natural biogeochemical cycles of aquatic sediments and subsurface environments as well as in subsurface bioremediation by oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. Flagellum-based motility is considered to be critical for Geobacter species to locate fresh sources of Fe(III) oxides. Functional and comparative genomic approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical methods, identified key regulators for flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. A master transcriptional regulator, designated FgrM, is a member of the enhancer-binding protein family. The fgrM gene in the most studied strain of Geobacter species, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL-1, is truncated by a transposase gene, preventing flagellar biosynthesis. Integrating a functional FgrM homolog restored flagellar biosynthesis and motility in G. sulfurreducens DL-1 and enhanced the ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Interrupting the fgrM gene in G. sulfurreducens strain KN400, which is motile, removed the capacity for flagellar production and inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. FgrM, which is also a response regulator of the two-component His-Asp phosphorelay system, was phosphorylated by histidine kinase GHK4, which was essential for flagellar production and motility. GHK4, which is a hybrid kinase with a receiver domain at the N terminus, was phosphorylated by another histidine kinase, GHK3. Therefore, the multicomponent His-Asp phosphorelay system appears to control flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species.

  16. The phylogeny of swimming kinematics: The environment controls flagellar waveforms in sperm motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Burton, Lisa; Zimmer, Richard; Hosoi, Anette; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, phylogenetic and molecular analyses have dominated the study of ecology and evolution. However, physical interactions between organisms and their environment, a fundamental determinant of organism ecology and evolution, are mediated by organism form and function, highlighting the need to understand the mechanics of basic survival strategies, including locomotion. Focusing on spermatozoa, we combined high-speed video microscopy and singular value decomposition analysis to quantitatively compare the flagellar waveforms of eight species, ranging from marine invertebrates to humans. We found striking similarities in sperm swimming kinematics between genetically dissimilar organisms, which could not be uncovered by phylogenetic analysis. The emergence of dominant waveform patterns across species are suggestive of biological optimization for flagellar locomotion and point toward environmental cues as drivers of this convergence. These results reinforce the power of quantitative kinematic analysis to understand the physical drivers of evolution and as an approach to uncover new solutions for engineering applications, such as micro-robotics.

  17. Cell-body rocking is a dominant mechanism for flagellar synchronization in a swimming alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Veikko F; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2013-11-05

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas swims with two flagella that can synchronize their beat. Synchronized beating is required to swim both fast and straight. A long-standing hypothesis proposes that synchronization of flagella results from hydrodynamic coupling, but the details are not understood. Here, we present realistic hydrodynamic computations and high-speed tracking experiments of swimming cells that show how a perturbation from the synchronized state causes rotational motion of the cell body. This rotation feeds back on the flagellar dynamics via hydrodynamic friction forces and rapidly restores the synchronized state in our theory. We calculate that this "cell-body rocking" provides the dominant contribution to synchronization in swimming cells, whereas direct hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella contribute negligibly. We experimentally confirmed the two-way coupling between flagellar beating and cell-body rocking predicted by our theory.

  18. Bio-hybrid micro/nanodevices powered by flagellar motor: challenges and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo eKim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular motors, which are precision-engineered by nature, offer exciting possibilities for bio-hybrid engineered systems. They could enable real applications ranging from micro/nano fluidics, to biosensing, to medical diagnoses. This review describes the fundamental biological insights and fascinating potentials of these remarkable sensing and actuation machines, in particular bacterial flagellar motors, as well as their engineering perspectives with regard to applications in bio-engineered hybrid systems and nanobiotechnology.

  19. Analysis of flagellar bending in hamster spermatozoa: characterization of an effective stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinukawa, Masashi; Ohmuro, Junko; Baba, Shoji A; Murashige, Sunao; Okuno, Makoto; Nagata, Masao; Aoki, Fugaku

    2005-12-01

    The mechanism by which flagella generate the propulsive force for movement of hamster spermatozoa was analyzed quantitatively. Tracing points positioned 30, 60, 90, and 120 microm from the head-midpiece junction on the flagellum revealed that they all had zigzag trajectories. These points departed from and returned to the line that crossed the direction of progression. They moved along the concave side (but not the convex side) of the flagellar envelope that was drawn by tracing the trajectory of the entire flagellum. To clarify this asymmetry, the bending rate was analyzed by measuring the curvatures of points 30, 60, 90, and 120 microm from the head-midpiece junction. The bending rate was not constant through the cycle of flagellar bending. The rate was higher when bending was in the direction described by the curve of the hook-shaped head (defined as a principal bend [P-bend]) to the opposite side (R-bend). We measured a lower bending rate in the principal direction (R-bend to P-bend). To identify the point at which the propulsive force is generated efficiently within the cycle of flagellar bending, we calculated the propulsive force generated at each point on the flagellum. The value of the propulsive force was positive whenever the flagellum bent from an R-bend to a P-bend (when the bending rate was lowest). By contrast, the propulsive force value was zero or negative when the flagellum bent in the other direction (when the bending rate was higher). These results indicate that flagellar bending in hamster spermatozoa produces alternate effective and ineffective strokes during propulsion.

  20. Flagellar biosynthesis exerts temporal regulation of secretion of specific Campylobacter jejuni colonization and virulence determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero-Tobon, Angelica M; Hendrixson, David R

    2014-09-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni flagellum exports both proteins that form the flagellar organelle for swimming motility and colonization and virulence factors that promote commensal colonization of the avian intestinal tract or invasion of human intestinal cells respectively. We explored how the C. jejuni flagellum is a versatile secretory organelle by examining molecular determinants that allow colonization and virulence factors to exploit the flagellum for their own secretion. Flagellar biogenesis was observed to exert temporal control of secretion of these proteins, indicating that a bolus of secretion of colonization and virulence factors occurs during hook biogenesis with filament polymerization itself reducing secretion of these factors. Furthermore, we found that intramolecular and intermolecular requirements for flagellar-dependent secretion of these proteins were most reminiscent to those for flagellin secretion. Importantly, we discovered that secretion of one colonization and virulence factor, CiaI, was not required for invasion of human colonic cells, which counters previous hypotheses for how this protein functions during invasion. Instead, secretion of CiaI was essential for C. jejuni to facilitate commensal colonization of the natural avian host. Our work provides insight into the versatility of the bacterial flagellum as a secretory machine that can export proteins promoting diverse biological processes.

  1. Emergence of flagellar beating from the collective behavior of individual ATP-powered dyneins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdeo, S.; Onck, P. R.

    2016-10-01

    Flagella are hair-like projections from the surface of eukaryotic cells, and they play an important role in many cellular functions, such as cell-motility. The beating of flagella is enabled by their internal architecture, the axoneme, and is powered by a dense distribution of motor proteins, dyneins. The dyneins deliver the required mechanical work through the hydrolysis of ATP. Although the dynein-ATP cycle, the axoneme microstructure, and the flagellar-beating kinematics are well studied, their integration into a coherent picture of ATP-powered flagellar beating is still lacking. Here we show that a time-delayed negative-work-based switching mechanism is able to convert the individual sliding action of hundreds of dyneins into a regular overall beating pattern leading to propulsion. We developed a computational model based on a minimal representation of the axoneme consisting of two representative doublet microtubules connected by nexin links. The relative sliding of the microtubules is incorporated by modeling two groups of ATP-powered dyneins, each responsible for sliding in opposite directions. A time-delayed switching mechanism is postulated, which is key in converting the local individual sliding action of multiple dyneins into global beating. Our results demonstrate that an overall nonreciprocal beating pattern can emerge with time due to the spatial and temporal coordination of the individual dyneins. These findings provide insights in the fundamental working mechanism of axonemal dyneins and could possibly open new research directions in the field of flagellar motility.

  2. The Bacillus subtilis flagellar regulatory protein sigma D: overproduction, domain analysis and DNA-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y F; Helmann, J D

    1995-06-16

    Flagellar biosynthesis requires an alternative sigma (sigma) subunit of RNA polymerase to allow recognition of the promoters for flagellin and other late genes of the flagellar regulon. We have now overproduced and characterized Bacillus subtilis sigma D: the prototype of the sigma 28 family of flagellar sigma factors. Limited protease digestion studies indicate that sigma D contains an amino-terminal domain, comprising conserved regions 1.2 and 2, and a carboxyl-terminal domain containing conserved regions 3.2 and 4. The protease-sensitive region between these two domains correlates with a region of very low sequence conservation among bacterial sigma factors. Unlike the primary sigma factor, sigma D binds to DNA. In non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the sigma D-DNA complex has an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 1 microM. Binding of sigma D to the promoter for flagellin, PD-6, appears to lead to an altered DNA structure near the -35 and -10 recognition elements as detected by DNase I footprinting and by the enhanced reactivity of several bases to dimethylsulfate.

  3. FlhG employs diverse intrinsic domains and influences FlhF GTPase activity to numerically regulate polar flagellar biogenesis in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbronson, Connor J; Ribardo, Deborah A; Balaban, Murat; Knauer, Carina; Bange, Gert; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-01-01

    Flagellation in polar flagellates is one of the rare biosynthetic processes known to be numerically regulated in bacteria. Polar flagellates must spatially and numerically regulate flagellar biogenesis to create flagellation patterns for each species that are ideal for motility. FlhG ATPases numerically regulate polar flagellar biogenesis, yet FlhG orthologs are diverse in motif composition. We discovered that Campylobacter jejuni FlhG is at the center of a multipartite mechanism that likely influences a flagellar biosynthetic step to control flagellar number for amphitrichous flagellation, rather than suppressing activators of flagellar gene transcription as in Vibrio and Pseudomonas species. Unlike other FlhG orthologs, the FlhG ATPase domain was not required to regulate flagellar number in C. jejuni. Instead, two regions of C. jejuni FlhG that are absent or significantly altered in FlhG orthologs are involved in numerical regulation of flagellar biogenesis. Additionally, we found that C. jejuni FlhG influences FlhF GTPase activity, which may mechanistically contribute to flagellar number regulation. Our work suggests that FlhG ATPases divergently evolved in each polarly flagellated species to employ different intrinsic domains and extrinsic effectors to ultimately mediate a common output - precise numerical control of polar flagellar biogenesis required to create species-specific flagellation patterns optimal for motility.

  4. Architecture of the Flagellar Switch Complex of Escherichia coli: Conformational Plasticity of FliG and Implications for Adaptive Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun A; Panushka, Joseph; Meyer, Trevor; Carlisle, Ryan; Baker, Samantha; Ide, Nicholas; Lynch, Michael; Crane, Brian R; Blair, David F

    2017-03-01

    Structural models of the complex that regulates the direction of flagellar rotation assume either ~34 or ~25 copies of the protein FliG. Support for ~34 came from cross-linking experiments identifying an inter-subunit contact most consistent with that number; support for ~25 came from the observation that flagella can assemble and rotate when FliG is genetically fused to FliF, for which the accepted number is ~25. Here, we have undertaken cross-linking and other experiments to address more fully the question of FliG number. The results indicate a copy number of ~25 for FliG. An interaction between the C-terminal and middle domains, which has been taken to support a model with ~34 copies, is also supported. To reconcile the interaction with a FliG number of ~25, we hypothesize conformational plasticity in an inter-domain segment of FliG that allows some subunits to bridge gaps created by the number mismatch. This proposal is supported by mutant phenotypes and other results indicating that the normally helical segment adopts a more extended conformation in some subunits. The FliG amino-terminal domain is organized in a regular array with dimensions matching a ring in the upper part of the complex. The model predicts that FliG copy number should be tied to that of FliF, whereas FliM copy number can increase or decrease according to the number of FliG subunits that adopt the extended conformation. This has implications for the phenomenon of adaptive switch remodeling, in which FliM the copy number varies to adjust the bias of the switch.

  5. Modeling Torque Versus Speed, Shot Noise, and Rotational Diffusion of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Yu, Howard; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a minimal physical model for the flagellar motor that enables bacteria to swim. Our model explains the experimentally measured torque-speed relationship of the proton-driven E. coli motor at various pH and temperature conditions. In particular, the dramatic drop of torque at high rotation speeds (the “knee”) is shown to arise from saturation of the proton flux. Moreover, we show that shot noise in the proton current dominates the diffusion of motor rotation at low loads. This suggests a new way to probe the discreteness of the energy source, analogous to measurements of charge quantization in superconducting tunnel junctions.

  6. Flagellar apparatus and nuclear chambers of the green dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert; Moestrup, Øjvind

    2005-01-01

    and the nucleus, albeit in a very reduced and unique form. Microtubules nucleated from the R3 flagellar root associated with the nuclear fibrous connective and terminated at the nucleus, a novel arrangement not known in any other dinoflagellate. Although overlooked by previous researchers, nuclear chambers were...... present in G. chlorophorum similar to those reported in Gymnodinium aureolum and Gymnodinium nolleri. In contrast to the type species of Gymnodinium, Gymnodinium fuscum, only one nuclear pore was present per chamber. The presence of a feeding tube (peduncle) suggests that G. chlorophorum is mixotrophic...

  7. From Conformational Spread to Allosteric and Cooperative models of E. coli flagellar motor

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzotta, Alberto; Celani, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli swims using flagella activated by rotary motors. The direction of rotation of the motors is indirectly regulated by the binding of a single messenger protein. The conformational spread model has been shown to accurately describe the equilibrium properties as well as the dynamics of the flagellar motor. In this paper we study this model from an analytic point of view. By exploiting the separation of timescales observed in experiments, we show how to reduce the conformational spread model to a coarse-grained, cooperative binding model. We show that this simplified model reproduces very well the dynamics of the motor switch.

  8. From conformational spread to allosteric and cooperative models of E. coli flagellar motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotta, A.; Adorisio, M.; Celani, A.

    2017-02-01

    Escherichia coli swims using flagella activated by rotary motors. The direction of rotation of the motors is indirectly regulated by the binding of a single messenger protein. The conformational spread model has been shown to accurately describe the equilibrium properties as well as the dynamics of the flagellar motor. In this paper we study this model from an analytic point of view. By exploiting the separation of timescales observed in experiments, we show how to reduce the conformational spread model to a coarse-grained, cooperative binding model. We show that this simplified model reproduces very well the dynamics of the motor switch.

  9. Modeling torque versus speed, shot noise, and rotational diffusion of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Yu, Howard; Wingreen, Ned S

    2009-12-11

    We present a minimal physical model for the flagellar motor that enables bacteria to swim. Our model explains the experimentally measured torque-speed relationship of the proton-driven E. coli motor at various pH and temperature conditions. In particular, the dramatic drop of torque at high rotation speeds (the "knee") is shown to arise from saturation of the proton flux. Moreover, we show that shot noise in the proton current dominates the diffusion of motor rotation at low loads. This suggests a new way to probe the discreteness of the energy source, analogous to measurements of charge quantization in superconducting tunnel junctions.

  10. A numerical study of the effects of fluid rheology and stroke kinematics on flagellar swimming in complex fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanbin; Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2016-11-01

    It is observed in experiments that as the fluid rheology is changed, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits changes in both flagellar kinematics and the swimming speed. To understand this phenomenon, we develop a computational model of the swimmer, using flagellar strokes fit from experimental data. We conduct numerical simulations by changing strokes and fluid rheology independently to dissect the effects of these two factors. We discover that stroke patterns extracted from viscoelastic fluids generate much lower stress and have higher efficiency at the cost of lower swimming speed. We also discover that higher fluid elasticity hinders swimming for a fixed stroke pattern.

  11. Nonlinear instability in flagellar dynamics: a novel modulation mechanism in sperm migration?

    KAUST Repository

    Gadelha, H.

    2010-05-12

    Throughout biology, cells and organisms use flagella and cilia to propel fluid and achieve motility. The beating of these organelles, and the corresponding ability to sense, respond to and modulate this beat is central to many processes in health and disease. While the mechanics of flagellum-fluid interaction has been the subject of extensive mathematical studies, these models have been restricted to being geometrically linear or weakly nonlinear, despite the high curvatures observed physiologically. We study the effect of geometrical nonlinearity, focusing on the spermatozoon flagellum. For a wide range of physiologically relevant parameters, the nonlinear model predicts that flagellar compression by the internal forces initiates an effective buckling behaviour, leading to a symmetry-breaking bifurcation that causes profound and complicated changes in the waveform and swimming trajectory, as well as the breakdown of the linear theory. The emergent waveform also induces curved swimming in an otherwise symmetric system, with the swimming trajectory being sensitive to head shape-no signalling or asymmetric forces are required. We conclude that nonlinear models are essential in understanding the flagellar waveform in migratory human sperm; these models will also be invaluable in understanding motile flagella and cilia in other systems.

  12. Role of flgA for Flagellar Biosynthesis and Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Sung; Park, Changwon; Kim, Yun-Ji

    2015-11-01

    The complex roles of flagella in the pathogenesis of Campylobacter jejuni, a major cause of worldwide foodborne diarrheal disease, are important. Compared with the wild-type, an insertional mutation of the flgA gene (cj0769c) demonstrated significant decrease in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168 on major food contact surfaces, such as polystyrene, stainless steel, and borosilicate glass. The flgA mutant was completely devoid of flagella and non-motile whereas the wild-type displayed the full-length flagella and motility. In addition, the biofilm formation of the wild-type was inversely dependent on the viscosity of the media. These results support that flagellar-mediated motility plays a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168. Moreover, our adhesion assay suggests that it plays an important role during biofilm maturation after initial attachment. Furthermore, C. jejuni NCTC11168 wild-type formed biofilm with a net-like structure of extracellular fiber-like material, but such a structure was significantly reduced in the biofilm of the flgA mutant. It supports that the extracellular fiber-like material may play a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni. This study demonstrated that flgA is essential for flagellar biosynthesis and motility, and plays a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168.

  13. Salmonella Enteritidis flagellar mutants have a colonization benefit in the chicken oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Martel, An; Bosseler, Leslie; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Thompson, Arthur; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2017-02-01

    Egg borne Salmonella Enteritidis is still a major cause of human food poisoning. Eggs can become internally contaminated following colonization of the hen's oviduct. In this paper we aimed to analyze the role of flagella of Salmonella Enteritidis in colonization of the hen's oviduct. Using a transposon library screen we showed that mutants lacking functional flagella are significantly more efficient in colonizing the hen's oviduct in vivo. A micro-array analysis proved that transcription of a number of flagellar genes is down-regulated inside chicken oviduct cells. Flagella contain flagellin, a pathogen associated molecular pattern known to bind to Toll-like receptor 5, activating a pro-inflammatory cascade. In vitro tests using primary oviduct cells showed that flagellin is not involved in invasion. Using a ligated loop model, a diminished inflammatory reaction was seen in the oviduct resulting from injection of an aflagellated mutant compared to the wild-type. It is hypothesized that Salmonella Enteritidis downregulates flagellar gene expression in the oviduct and consequently prevents a flagellin-induced inflammatory response, thereby increasing its oviduct colonization efficiency.

  14. Complete structure of the bacterial flagellar hook reveals extensive set of stabilizing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Barker, Clive S.; Yoon, Young-Ho; Wolf, Matthias; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar hook is a tubular helical structure made by the polymerization of multiple copies of a protein, FlgE. Here we report the structure of the hook from Campylobacter jejuni by cryo-electron microscopy at a resolution of 3.5 Å. On the basis of this structure, we show that the hook is stabilized by intricate inter-molecular interactions between FlgE molecules. Extra domains in FlgE, found only in Campylobacter and in related bacteria, bring more stability and robustness to the hook. Functional experiments suggest that Campylobacter requires an unusually strong hook to swim without its flagella being torn off. This structure reveals details of the quaternary organization of the hook that consists of 11 protofilaments. Previous study of the flagellar filament of Campylobacter by electron microscopy showed its quaternary structure made of seven protofilaments. Therefore, this study puts in evidence the difference between the quaternary structures of a bacterial filament and its hook. PMID:27811912

  15. Metachronal waves in the flagellar beating of Volvox and their hydrodynamic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Douglas R; Polin, Marco; Pedley, Timothy J; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-07-06

    Groups of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are capable of coordinating their beating over large scales, routinely exhibiting collective dynamics in the form of metachronal waves. The origin of this behavior--possibly influenced by both mechanical interactions and direct biological regulation--is poorly understood, in large part due to a lack of quantitative experimental studies. Here we characterize in detail flagellar coordination on the surface of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, an emerging model organism for flagellar dynamics. Our studies reveal for the first time that the average metachronal coordination observed is punctuated by periodic phase defects during which synchrony is partial and limited to specific groups of cells. A minimal model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators can reproduce semi-quantitatively the characteristics of the average metachronal dynamics, and the emergence of defects. We systematically study the model's behaviour by assessing the effect of changing intrinsic rotor characteristics, including oscillator stiffness and the nature of their internal driving force, as well as their geometric properties and spatial arrangement. Our results suggest that metachronal coordination follows from deformations in the oscillators' limit cycles induced by hydrodynamic stresses, and that defects result from sufficiently steep local biases in the oscillators' intrinsic frequencies. Additionally, we find that random variations in the intrinsic rotor frequencies increase the robustness of the average properties of the emergent metachronal waves.

  16. Autonomously responsive pumping by a bacterial flagellar forest: A mean-field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, James D.; Fu, Henry C.

    2017-09-01

    This study is motivated by a microfluidic device that imparts a magnetic torque on an array of bacterial flagella. Bacterial flagella can transform their helical geometry autonomously in response to properties of the background fluid, which provides an intriguing mechanism allowing their use as an engineered element for the regulation or transport of chemicals in microscale applications. The synchronization of flagellar phase has been widely studied in biological contexts, but here we examine the synchronization of flagellar tilt, which is necessary for effective pumping. We first examine the effects of helical geometry and tilt on the pumping flows generated by a single rotating flagellum. Next, we explore a mean-field model for an array of helical flagella to understand how collective tilt arises and influences pumping. The mean-field methodology allows us to take into account possible phase differences through a time-averaging procedure and to model an infinite array of flagella. We find array separation distances, magnetic field strengths, and rotation frequencies that produce nontrivial self-consistent pumping solutions. For individual flagella, pumping is reversed when helicity or rotation is reversed; in contrast, when collective effects are included, self-consistent tilted pumping solutions become untilted nonpumping solutions when helicity or rotation is reversed.

  17. Seroprevalence in chickens against campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) in selected areas of the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Poultry products are regarded as a major source for human infection with this microorganism. We have demonstrated that the flagellar capping protein (FliD) of C. jejuni is highl...

  18. Regulation of sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis caused by egg-derived substance(s) in sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masaya; Kitamura, Makoto; Nakajima, Ayako; Sri Susilo, Endang; Takemura, Akihiro; Okuno, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    The sea cucumber Holothuria atra is a broadcast spawner. Among broadcast spawners, fertilization occurs by means of an egg-derived substance(s) that induces sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis. Holothuria atra sperm were quiescent in seawater, but exhibited flagellar motility activation near eggs with chorion (intact eggs). In addition, they moved in a helical motion toward intact eggs as well as a capillary filled with the water layer of the egg extracts, suggesting that an egg-derived compound(s) causes motility activation and chemotaxis. Furthermore, demembranated sperm flagella were reactivated in high pH (> 7.8) solution without cAMP, and a phosphorylation assay using (gamma-32P)ATP showed that axonemal protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation also occurred in a pH-dependent manner. These results suggest that the activation of sperm motility in holothurians is controlled by pH-sensitive changes in axonemal protein phosphorylation. Ca2+ concentration affected the swimming trajectory of demembranated sperm, indicating that Ca2+-binding proteins present at the flagella may be associated with regulation of flagellar waveform. Moreover, the phosphorylation states of several axonemal proteins were Ca2+-sensitive, indicating that Ca2+ impacts both kinase and phosphatase activities. In addition, in vivo sperm protein phosphorylation occurred after treatment with a water-soluble egg extract. Our results suggest that one or more egg-derived compounds activate motility and subsequent chemotactic behavior via Ca2+-sensitive flagellar protein phosphorylation.

  19. Coordinated switching of bacterial flagellar motors: evidence for direct motor-motor coupling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-01-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW), under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors' response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggest that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single E. coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed. PMID:25167320

  20. Acid extrusion from human spermatozoa is mediated by flagellar voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishko, Polina V; Botchkina, Inna L; Fedorenko, Andriy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2010-02-05

    Human spermatozoa are quiescent in the male reproductive system and must undergo activation once introduced into the female reproductive tract. This process is known to require alkalinization of sperm cytoplasm, but the mechanism responsible for transmembrane proton extrusion has remained unknown because of the inability to measure membrane conductance in human sperm. Here, by successfully patch clamping human spermatozoa, we show that proton channel Hv1 is their dominant proton conductance. Hv1 is confined to the principal piece of the sperm flagellum, where it is expressed at unusually high density. Robust flagellar Hv1-dependent proton conductance is activated by membrane depolarization, an alkaline extracellular environment, endocannabinoid anandamide, and removal of extracellular zinc, a potent Hv1 blocker. Hv1 allows only outward transport of protons and is therefore dedicated to inducing intracellular alkalinization and activating spermatozoa. The importance of Hv1 for sperm activation makes it an attractive target for controlling male fertility.

  1. Evidence for loss of a partial flagellar glycolytic pathway during trypanosomatid evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W B Brown

    Full Text Available Classically viewed as a cytosolic pathway, glycolysis is increasingly recognized as a metabolic pathway exhibiting surprisingly wide-ranging variations in compartmentalization within eukaryotic cells. Trypanosomatid parasites provide an extreme view of glycolytic enzyme compartmentalization as several glycolytic enzymes are found exclusively in peroxisomes. Here, we characterize Trypanosoma brucei flagellar proteins resembling glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK: we show the latter associates with the axoneme and the former is a novel paraflagellar rod component. The paraflagellar rod is an essential extra-axonemal structure in trypanosomes and related protists, providing a platform into which metabolic activities can be built. Yet, bioinformatics interrogation and structural modelling indicate neither the trypanosome PGK-like nor the GAPDH-like protein is catalytically active. Orthologs are present in a free-living ancestor of the trypanosomatids, Bodo saltans: the PGK-like protein from B. saltans also lacks key catalytic residues, but its GAPDH-like protein is predicted to be catalytically competent. We discuss the likelihood that the trypanosome GAPDH-like and PGK-like proteins constitute molecular evidence for evolutionary loss of a flagellar glycolytic pathway, either as a consequence of niche adaptation or the re-localization of glycolytic enzymes to peroxisomes and the extensive changes to glycolytic flux regulation that accompanied this re-localization. Evidence indicating loss of localized ATP provision via glycolytic enzymes therefore provides a novel contribution to an emerging theme of hidden diversity with respect to compartmentalization of the ubiquitous glycolytic pathway in eukaryotes. A possibility that trypanosome GAPDH-like protein additionally represents a degenerate example of a moonlighting protein is also discussed.

  2. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 can produce a second flagellar apparatus, which is important for root colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Barahona

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The genomic sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of a 41 kb cluster of genes that encode the production of a second flagellar apparatus. Among 2535 pseudomonads strains with sequenced genomes, these genes are only present in the genomes of F113 and other six strains, all but one belonging to the P. fluorescens cluster of species, in the form of a genetic island. The genes are homologous to the flagellar genes of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. Regulation of these genes is mediated by the flhDC master operon, instead of the typical regulation in pseudomonads, which is through fleQ. Under laboratory conditions, F113 does not produce this flagellum and the flhDC operon is not expressed. However, ectopic expression of the flhDC operon is enough for its production, resulting in a hypermotile strain. This flagellum is also produced under laboratory conditions by the kinB and algU mutants. Genetic analysis has shown that kinB strongly represses the expression of the flhDC operon. This operon is activated by the Vfr protein probably in a c-AMP dependent way. The strains producing this second flagellum are all hypermotile and present a tuft of polar flagella instead of the single polar flagellum produced by the wild-type strain. Phenotypic variants isolated from the rhizosphere produce this flagellum and mutation of the genes encoding it, results in a defect in competitive colonization, showing its importance for root colonization.

  3. An unusual promoter controls cell-cycle regulation and dependence on DNA replication of the Caulobacter fliLM early flagellar operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, C M; Shapiro, L

    1993-09-01

    Transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crecentus is programmed to occur during the predivisional stage of the cell cycle. The mechanism of activation of Class II flagellar genes, the highest identified genes in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy, is unknown. As a step toward understanding this process, we have defined cis-acting sequences necessary for expression of a Class II flagellar operon, fliLM. Deletion analysis indicated that a 55 bp DNA fragment was sufficient for normal, temporally regulated promoter activity. Transcription from this promoter-containing fragment was severely reduced when chromosomal DNA replication was inhibited. Extensive mutational analysis of the promoter region from -42 to -5 identified functionally important nucleotides at -36 and -35, between -29 and -22, and at -12, which correlates well with sequences conserved between fliLM and the analogous regions of two other Class II flagellar operons. The promoter sequence does not resemble that recognized by any known bacterial sigma factor. Models for regulation of Caulobacter early flagellar promoters are discussed in which RNA polymerase containing a novel sigma subunit interacts with an activation factor bound to the central region of the promoter.

  4. iAssembler: a package for de novo assembly of Roche-454/Sanger transcriptome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs have played significant roles in gene discovery and gene functional analysis, especially for non-model organisms. For organisms with no full genome sequences available, ESTs are normally assembled into longer consensus sequences for further downstream analysis. However current de novo EST assembly programs often generate large number of assembly errors that will negatively affect the downstream analysis. In order to generate more accurate consensus sequences from ESTs, tools are needed to reduce or eliminate errors from de novo assemblies. Results We present iAssembler, a pipeline that can assemble large-scale ESTs into consensus sequences with significantly higher accuracy than current existing assemblers. iAssembler employs MIRA and CAP3 assemblers to generate initial assemblies, followed by identifying and correcting two common types of transcriptome assembly errors: 1 ESTs from different transcripts (mainly alternatively spliced transcripts or paralogs are incorrectly assembled into same contigs; and 2 ESTs from same transcripts fail to be assembled together. iAssembler can be used to assemble ESTs generated using the traditional Sanger method and/or the Roche-454 massive parallel pyrosequencing technology. Conclusion We compared performances of iAssembler and several other de novo EST assembly programs using both Roche-454 and Sanger EST datasets. It demonstrated that iAssembler generated significantly more accurate consensus sequences than other assembly programs.

  5. The Flagellar Regulator fliT Represses Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 through flhDC and fliZ

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Che Hung; Leanne Haines; Craig Altier

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1), comprising a type III section system that translocates effector proteins into host cells, is essential for the enteric pathogen Salmonella to penetrate the intestinal epithelium and subsequently to cause disease. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we found that a Tn10 disruption in the flagellar fliDST operon induced SPI1 expression when the strain was grown under conditions designed to repress SPI1, by mimicking the environment of the large intesti...

  6. An amino-terminal secretion signal is required for YplA export by the Ysa, Ysc, and flagellar type III secretion systems of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sasha M; Young, Glenn M

    2005-09-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1B maintains three distinct type III secretion (TTS) systems, which independently operate to target proteins to extracellular sites. The Ysa and Ysc systems are prototypical contact-dependent TTS systems that translocate toxic effectors to the cytosols of targeted eukaryotic host cells during infection. The flagellar TTS system is utilized during the assembly of the flagellum and is required for secretion of the virulence-associated phospholipase YplA to the bacterial milieu. When ectopically produced, YplA is also a secretion substrate for the Ysa and Ysc TTS systems. In this study, we define elements that allow YplA recognition and export by the Ysa, Ysc, and flagellar TTS systems. Fusion of various amino-terminal regions of YplA to Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) lacking its native secretion signal demonstrated that the first 20 amino acids or corresponding mRNA codons of YplA were sufficient for export of YplA-PhoA chimeras by each TTS system. Export of native YplA by each of the three TTS systems was also found to depend on the integrity of its amino terminus. Introduction of a frameshift mutation or deletion of yplA sequences encoding the amino-terminal 20 residues negatively impacted YplA secretion. Deletion of other yplA regions was tolerated, including that resulting in the removal of amino acid residues 30 through 40 of the polypeptide and removal of the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA. This work supports a model in which independent and distantly related TTS systems of Y. enterocolitica recognize protein substrates by a similar mechanism.

  7. Association of Lis1 with outer arm dynein is modulated in response to alterations in flagellar motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein regulatory factor Lis1, which induces a persistent tight binding to microtubules and allows for transport of cargoes under high-load conditions, is also present in motile cilia/flagella. We observed that Lis1 levels in flagella of Chlamydomonas strains that exhibit defective motility due to mutation of various axonemal substructures were greatly enhanced compared with wild type; this increase was absolutely dependent on the presence within the flagellum of the outer arm dynein α heavy chain/light chain 5 thioredoxin unit. To assess whether cells might interpret defective motility as a “high-load environment,” we reduced the flagellar beat frequency of wild-type cells through enhanced viscous load and by reductive stress; both treatments resulted in increased levels of flagellar Lis1, which altered the intrinsic beat frequency of the trans flagellum. Differential extraction of Lis1 from wild-type and mutant axonemes suggests that the affinity of outer arm dynein for Lis1 is directly modulated. In cytoplasm, Lis1 localized to two punctate structures, one of which was located near the base of the flagella. These data reveal that the cell actively monitors motility and dynamically modulates flagellar levels of the dynein regulatory factor Lis1 in response to imposed alterations in beat parameters. PMID:22855525

  8. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  9. Effects of osmolality on sperm morphology, motility and flagellar wave parameters in Northern pike (Esox lucius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, S M Hadi; Rodina, Marek; Viveiros, Ana T M; Cosson, Jacky; Gela, David; Boryshpolets, Sergei; Linhart, Otomar

    2009-07-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) spermatozoa are uniflagellated cells differentiated into a head without acrosome, a midpiece and a flagellar tail region flanked by a fin structure. Total, flagellar, head and midpiece lengths of spermatozoa were measured and show mean values of 34.5, 32.0, 1.32, 1.17 microm, respectively, with anterior and posterior widths of the midpiece measuring 0.8 and 0.6 microm, respectively. The osmolality of seminal plasma ranged from 228 to 350 mOsmol kg(-1) (average: 283.88+/-33.05). After triggering of sperm motility in very low osmolality medium (distilled water), blebs appeared along the flagellum. At later periods in the motility phase, the tip of the flagellum became curled into a loop shape which resulted in a shortening of the flagellum and a restriction of wave development to the proximal part (close to head). Spermatozoa velocity and percentage of motile spermatozoa decreased rapidly as a function of time postactivation and depended on the osmolality of activation media (Ppike is inhibited due to high osmolality in the seminal plasma. Osmolality of activation medium affects the percentage of motile sperm and spermatozoa velocity due to changes in flagellar wave parameters.

  10. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of PseC, an Aminotransferase Involved in the Biosynthesis of Pseudaminic Acid, an Essential Flagellar Modification in Helicobacter Pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenhofen,I.; Lunin, V.; Julien, J.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.; Brisson, J.; Aubry, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori flagellin is heavily glycosylated with the novel sialic acid-like nonulosonate, pseudaminic acid (Pse). The glycosylation process is essential for assembly of functional flagellar filaments and consequent bacterial motility. As motility is a key virulence factor for this and other important pathogens, the Pse biosynthetic pathway offers potential for novel therapeutic targets. From recent NMR analyses, we determined that the conversion of UDP-a-D-GlcNAc to the central intermediate in the pathway, UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-AltNAc, proceeds by formation of UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-arabino-4-hexulose by the dehydratase/epimerase PseB (HP0840) followed with amino transfer by the aminotransferase, PseC (HP0366). The central role of PseC in the H. pylori Pse biosynthetic pathway prompted us to determine crystal structures of the native protein, its complexes with pyridoxal phosphate alone and in combination with the UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-{beta}-L-AltNAc product, the latter being converted to the external aldimine form in the enzyme's active site. In the binding site, the AltNAc sugar ring adopts a 4C1 chair conformation which is different from the predominant 1C4 form found in solution. The enzyme forms a homodimer where each monomer contributes to the active site, and these structures have permitted the identification of key residues involved in stabilization, and possibly catalysis, of the {beta}-L-arabino intermediate during the amino transfer reaction. The essential role of Lys183 in the catalytic event was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. This work presents for the first time a nucleotide-sugar aminotransferase co-crystallized with its natural ligand, and in conjunction with the recent functional characterization of this enzyme, will assist in elucidating the aminotransferase reaction mechanism within the Pse biosynthetic pathway.

  12. Antiprotozoal glutathione derivatives with flagellar membrane binding activity against T. brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunes, Sylvie; Yardley, Vanessa; Croft, Simon L; D'Silva, Claudius

    2017-02-15

    A new series of N-substituted S-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)glutathione dibutyl diesters were synthesized to improve in vitro anti-protozoal activity against the pathogenic parasites Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. The results obtained indicate that N-substituents enhance the inhibitory properties of glutathione diesters whilst showing reduced toxicity against KB cells as in the cases of compounds 5, 9, 10, 16, 18 and 19. We suggest that the interaction of N-substituted S-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) glutathione dibutyl diesters with T. b. brucei occurs mainly by weak hydrophobic interactions such as London and van der Waals forces. A QSAR study indicated that the inhibitory activity of the peptide is associated negatively with the average number of C atoms, NC and positively to SZX, the ZX shadow a geometric descriptor related to molecular size and orientation of the compound. HPLC-UV studies in conjunction with optical microscopy indicate that the observed selectivity of inhibition of these compounds against bloodstream form T. b. brucei parasites in comparison to L. donovani under the same conditions is due to intracellular uptake via endocytosis in the flagellar pocket. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Partial analysis of the flagellar antigenic determinant recognized by a monoclonal antibody to Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédouet, L; Arnold, F; Robreau, G; Batina, P; Talbot, F; Malcoste, R

    1998-01-01

    In order to count Clostridium tyrobutyricum spores in milk after membrane filtration, murine 21E7-B12 monoclonal antibody was produced. Elution of the monoclonal antibody from this antigen, the flagellar filament protein, by carbohydrate ligands was used to study the epitope structure. A competitive elution of an anti-dextran monoclonal antibody by carbohydrate ligands served as a control in order to validate the immunological tool applied to flagellin epitope study. The carbohydrate moiety of flagellin contained D-glucose and N-acetyl-glucosamine in a molar ration of 11:1 as determined by gas-liquid chromatography and 2 low-abundancy unidentified compounds. In ELISA, D-glucose and N-acetyl-glucosamine did not dissociate the antibody-flagellin complex contrary to maltose, maltotriose, maltotetraose and maltopentaose. The efficiency of elution increased from the dimer to the pentamer and became nil for maltohexaose and maltoheptaose. The fact that the hexamer and heptamer could not react with the 21E7-B12 monoclonal antibody could be explained by a drastic conformational change. The over-all stretched maltopentaose switch to a helical-shaped maltoheptaose which could not fit the 21E7-B12 monoclonal antibody antigen-combining site. Thus, flagellin epitope may contain alpha (1-->4) linked glucose residues plus either N-actyl-glucosamine or an unidentified compound that maintain it in an extended shape.

  14. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  15. Identification of α-11 giardin as a flagellar and surface component of Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Lee, Hye Yeon; Lee, Mi-Ae; Yong, Tai-Soon; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2013-10-01

    Giardia lamblia is a protozoan pathogen with distinct cytoskeletal structures, including median bodies and eight flagella. In this study, we examined components comprising G. lamblia flagella. Crude flagellar extracts were prepared from G. lamblia trophozoites, and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. The 19 protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, identifying ten metabolic enzymes, six distinct giardins, Giardia trophozoite antigen 1, translational initiation factor eIF-4A, and an extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2. Among the identified proteins, we studied α-11 giardin which belongs to a group of cytoskeletal proteins specific to Giardia. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR indicated that expression of α-11 giardin is not significantly increased during encystation of G. lamblia. Immunofluorescence assays using anti-α-11 giardin antibodies revealed that α-11 giardin protein mainly localized to the plasma membranes and basal bodies of the anterior flagella of G. lamblia trophozoites, suggesting that α-11 giardin is a genuine component of the G. lamblia cytoskeleton.

  16. Characterization of the ATP-phosphohydrolase activity of bovine spermatozoa flagellar extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L G; Smithwick, E B

    1975-02-01

    The ATP-phosphohydrolase activity of extracts prepared from bovine spermatozoa flagella (BSFE), was characterized with respect to enzyme, substrate, activator ion and salt concentration, temperature dependence and time stability. BSFE required the presence of a divalent cation for activity: Mg++ or Ca++ could function as activator; Mn++, Zn++ and Cd++ could not. EDTA, but not EGTA, was inhibitory to enzymatic activity. Ca++ inhibited the Mg++ stimulated activity. ATP was dephosphorylated more rapidly than GTP greater than CTP greater than ITP, and ADP was dephosphorylated at 40% of the rate of ATP. The magnesium activated ATPase was stimulated by potassium and inhibited by sodium ions. Activation of BSFE ATP-phosphohydrolase was maximal in the presence of Mg++ and ATP in equimolar concentrations and K+ (0.05-0.3 M) at 30 degrees C. Although the enzymatic activity of the extract was found to decrease rapidly with time, it could be maintained for up to three days by the addition of 2-beta-mercaptoethanol to the bovine spermatozoa flagellar extracts.

  17. A SAS-6-like protein suggests that the Toxoplasma conoid complex evolved from flagellar components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Scheumann, Nicole; Beatty, Wandy; Beck, Josh R; Tran, Johnson Q; Yau, Candace; Bradley, Peter J; Gull, Keith; Wickstead, Bill; Morrissette, Naomi S

    2013-07-01

    SAS-6 is required for centriole biogenesis in diverse eukaryotes. Here, we describe a novel family of SAS-6-like (SAS6L) proteins that share an N-terminal domain with SAS-6 but lack coiled-coil tails. SAS6L proteins are found in a subset of eukaryotes that contain SAS-6, including diverse protozoa and green algae. In the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, SAS-6 localizes to the centriole but SAS6L is found above the conoid, an enigmatic tubulin-containing structure found at the apex of a subset of alveolate organisms. Loss of SAS6L causes reduced fitness in Toxoplasma. The Trypanosoma brucei homolog of SAS6L localizes to the basal-plate region, the site in the axoneme where the central-pair microtubules are nucleated. When endogenous SAS6L is overexpressed in Toxoplasma tachyzoites or Trypanosoma trypomastigotes, it forms prominent filaments that extend through the cell cytoplasm, indicating that it retains a capacity to form higher-order structures despite lacking a coiled-coil domain. We conclude that although SAS6L proteins share a conserved domain with SAS-6, they are a functionally distinct family that predates the last common ancestor of eukaryotes. Moreover, the distinct localization of the SAS6L protein in Trypanosoma and Toxoplasma adds weight to the hypothesis that the conoid complex evolved from flagellar components.

  18. RflM functions as a transcriptional repressor in the autogenous control of the Salmonella Flagellar master operon flhDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Hanna M; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T

    2013-09-01

    Motility of bacteria like Salmonella enterica is a highly regulated process that responds to a variety of internal and external stimuli. A hierarchy of three promoter classes characterizes the Salmonella flagellar system, and the onset of flagellar gene expression depends on the oligomeric regulatory complex and class 1 gene product FlhD(4)C(2). The flhDC promoter is a target for a broad range of transcriptional regulators that bind within the flhDC promoter region and either negatively or positively regulate flhDC operon transcription. In this work, we demonstrate that the RflM protein is a key component of flhDC regulation. Transposon mutagenesis was performed to investigate a previously described autoinhibitory effect of the flagellar master regulatory complex FlhD(4)C(2). RflM is a LuxR homolog that functions as a flagellar class 1 transcriptional repressor. RflM was found to be the negative regulator of flhDC expression that is responsible for the formerly described autoinhibitory effect of the FlhD(4)C(2) complex on flhDC operon transcription (K. Kutsukake, Mol. Gen. Genet. 254:440-448, 1997). We conclude that upon commencement of flagellar gene expression, the FlhD(4)C(2) complex initiates a regulatory feedback loop by activating rflM gene expression. rflM encodes a transcriptional repressor, RflM, which fine-tunes flhDC expression levels.

  19. RESEARCH OF MOVEMENT NAVIGATION BASED ON ASSEMBLY CONSTRAINT RECOGNITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The requirements and features of virtual assembly movement navigator are analyzed to help operators flexibly manipulate virtual objects, precisely locate or assemble virtual parts in virtual environment. With the degree-of-freedom analysis, the assembly constraint hierarchical model is constructed and the system's constraints are built dynamically. Thus, all objects in virtual environment can be located reasonally by the navigator. Moreover, the assembly constraint recognition in the process of assembly and movement correction is also discussed.

  20. The alternative sigma factor HrpL negatively modulates the flagellar system in the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora under hrp-inducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesbron, Sophie; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Tharaud, Michel; Barny, Marie-Anne; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2006-04-01

    In this work we present evidence of an opposite regulation in the phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora between the virulence-associated Type III secretion system (TTSS) and the flagellar system. Using loss-of-function mutants we show that motility enhanced the virulence of wild-type bacteria relative to a nonmotile mutant when sprayed on apple seedlings with unwounded leaves. Then we demonstrated through analyses of motility, flagellin export and visualization of flagellar filament that HrpL, the positive key regulator of the TTSS, also down-regulates the flagellar system. Such a dual regulation mediated by an alternative sigma factor of the TTSS appears to be a level of regulation between virulence and motility not yet described among Proteobacteria.

  1. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twine Susan M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes, and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI. These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5 has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism

  2. Entropy and information in flagellar axoneme cybernetics: a radial spokes integrative function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibert, Christian

    2003-04-01

    Radial spokes and the consequences of their relationships with the central apparatus seem to play a very important role in the regulation of axonemal activity. We modeled their behavior and observed that it appears to differ in the cilium and the flagellum with respect to the development of bending as a function of time. Specifically, our calculation raises the question of the real function of the radial spokes in the regulation of the axoneme, because a given curvature of the flagellar axoneme may correspond to two opposite of their tilts. The stable nil/low amplitude shear points that we had characterized along the flagellum allowed us to describe their axoneme as a series of modules [Cibert, 2002: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 51:89-111]. We observed that a nil/low shearing point moves along each module during beating when a new bend is created at the base of the flagellum [Cibert, 2001: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 49:161-175]. We propose that the structural gradients of isoforms of tubulin could be basic verniers that act as structural references for the axonemal machinery during the beating. This allowed us to interpret the axonemal organization as a segmented structure, that could be analyzed according to the complexion(1) theory and Shannon's information theory, which associate entropy and probability in the creation of information. The important consequence of this interpretation is that regulation of the axonemal machinery appears to be due to the upstream and downstream cross-talk between the axonemal segments that do not involve any dedicated integrative structure but depend on the energy level of the entire length of each module.

  3. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio M Durante

    Full Text Available The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases, which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s, we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites.

  4. Nonequivalence of membrane voltage and ion-gradient as driving forces for the bacterial flagellar motor at low load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chien-Jung; Leake, Mark C; Pilizota, Teuta; Berry, Richard M

    2007-07-01

    Many bacterial species swim using flagella. The flagellar motor couples ion flow across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation. Ion flow is driven by both a membrane potential (V(m)) and a transmembrane concentration gradient. To investigate their relation to bacterial flagellar motor function we developed a fluorescence technique to measure V(m) in single cells, using the dye tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester. We used a convolution model to determine the relationship between fluorescence intensity in images of cells and intracellular dye concentration, and calculated V(m) using the ratio of intracellular/extracellular dye concentration. We found V(m) = -140 +/- 14 mV in Escherichia coli at external pH 7.0 (pH(ex)), decreasing to -85 +/- 10 mV at pH(ex) 5.0. We also estimated the sodium-motive force (SMF) by combining single-cell measurements of V(m) and intracellular sodium concentration. We were able to vary the SMF between -187 +/- 15 mV and -53 +/- 15 mV by varying pH(ex) in the range 7.0-5.0 and extracellular sodium concentration in the range 1-85 mM. Rotation rates for 0.35-microm- and 1-microm-diameter beads attached to Na(+)-driven chimeric flagellar motors varied linearly with V(m). For the larger beads, the two components of the SMF were equivalent, whereas for smaller beads at a given SMF, the speed increased with sodium gradient and external sodium concentration.

  5. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Ignacio M; Cámara, María de Los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites.

  6. Ultrastructure of the harmful unarmored dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides (Dinophyceae) with reference to the apical groove and flagellar apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwataki, Mitsunori; Hansen, Gert; Moestrup, Øjvind;

    2010-01-01

    The external and internal ultrastructure of the harmful unarmored dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef has been examined with special reference to the apical groove and three-dimensional structure of the flagellar apparatus. The apical groove is U-shaped and connected to the anterior...... sulcal extension on the dorsal side of the epicone. The eyespot is located dorsally and composed of two layers of globules situated within the chloroplast. A narrow invagination of the plasma membrane is associated with the eyespot. The nuclear envelope has normal nuclear pores similar to other...

  7. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani, Neda; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Farhangi, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori–specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid c...

  8. FliZ is a global regulatory protein affecting the expression of flagellar and virulence genes in individual Xenorhabdus nematophila bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Jubelin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in the expression of various bacterial genes has been shown to result in the presence of individuals with different phenotypes within clonal bacterial populations. The genes specifying motility and flagellar functions are coordinately regulated and form a complex regulon, the flagellar regulon. Complex interplay has recently been demonstrated in the regulation of flagellar and virulence gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. We show here that FliZ, a DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila, affecting not only hemolysin production and virulence in insects, but efficient swimming motility. RNA-Seq analysis identified FliZ as a global regulatory protein controlling the expression of 278 Xenorhabdus genes either directly or indirectly. FliZ is required for the efficient expression of all flagellar genes, probably through its positive feedback loop, which controls expression of the flhDC operon, the master regulator of the flagellar circuit. FliZ also up- or downregulates the expression of numerous genes encoding non-flagellar proteins potentially involved in key steps of the Xenorhabdus lifecycle. Single-cell analysis revealed the bimodal expression of six identified markers of the FliZ regulon during exponential growth of the bacterial population. In addition, a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RT-qPCR quantification showed that this bimodality generated a mixed population of cells either expressing ("ON state" or not expressing ("OFF state" FliZ-dependent genes. Moreover, studies of a bacterial population exposed to a graded series of FliZ concentrations showed that FliZ functioned as a rheostat, controlling the rate of transition between the "OFF" and "ON" states in individuals. FliZ thus plays a key role in cell fate decisions, by transiently creating individuals with different potentials for motility and host interactions.

  9. Chemotactic Control of the Two Flagellar Systems of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Is Mediated by Different Sets of CheY and FliM Proteins▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Ana Martínez; Ballado, Teresa; de la Mora, Javier; Poggio, Sebastian; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2007-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides expresses two different flagellar systems, a subpolar flagellum (fla1) and multiple polar flagella (fla2). These structures are encoded by different sets of flagellar genes. The chemotactic control of the subpolar flagellum (fla1) is mediated by three of the six different CheY proteins (CheY6, CheY4, or CheY3). We show evidence that CheY1, CheY2, and CheY5 control the chemotactic behavior mediated by fla2 flagella and that RSP6099 encodes the fla2 FliM protein. PMID:17890312

  10. Sabot assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  11. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  12. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome

  13. The CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelay system is regulated by quorum sensing and controls flagellar motility in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    Full Text Available Bacteria respond to their environment via signal transduction pathways, often two-component type systems that function through phosphotransfer to control expression of specific genes. Phosphorelays are derived from two-component systems but are comprised of additional components. The essential cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay in Caulobacter crescentus has been well studied and is important in orchestrating the cell cycle, polar development and flagellar biogenesis. Although cckA, chpT and ctrA homologues are widespread among the Alphaproteobacteria, relatively few is known about their function in the large and ecologically significant Roseobacter clade of the Rhodobacterales. In this study the cckA-chpT-ctrA system of the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 was investigated. Our results reveal that the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes positively control flagellar biosynthesis. In contrast to C. crescentus, the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes in Ruegeria sp. KLH11 are non-essential and do not affect bacterial growth. Gene fusion and transcript analyses provide evidence for ctrA autoregulation and the control of motility-related genes. In KLH11, flagellar motility is controlled by the SsaRI system and acylhomoserine lactone (AHL quorum sensing. SsaR and long chain AHLs are required for cckA, chpT and ctrA gene expression, providing a regulatory link between flagellar locomotion and population density in KLH11.

  14. The flagellar master operon flhDC is a pleiotropic regulator involved in motility and virulence of the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To investigate the function of the master flagellar operon flhDC in the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri and compare the effect of flhD mutation to a naturally occurring mutation causing loss-of-motility in emergent biotype 2 (BT2) strains. Methods and Results: In this study isogenic Y. ruckeri ...

  15. Dump assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  16. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  17. Probabilistic error correction for RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hai-Son; Schulz, Marcel H; McCauley, Brenna M; Hinman, Veronica F; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2013-05-01

    Sequencing of RNAs (RNA-Seq) has revolutionized the field of transcriptomics, but the reads obtained often contain errors. Read error correction can have a large impact on our ability to accurately assemble transcripts. This is especially true for de novo transcriptome analysis, where a reference genome is not available. Current read error correction methods, developed for DNA sequence data, cannot handle the overlapping effects of non-uniform abundance, polymorphisms and alternative splicing. Here we present SEquencing Error CorrEction in Rna-seq data (SEECER), a hidden Markov Model (HMM)-based method, which is the first to successfully address these problems. SEECER efficiently learns hundreds of thousands of HMMs and uses these to correct sequencing errors. Using human RNA-Seq data, we show that SEECER greatly improves on previous methods in terms of quality of read alignment to the genome and assembly accuracy. To illustrate the usefulness of SEECER for de novo transcriptome studies, we generated new RNA-Seq data to study the development of the sea cucumber Parastichopus parvimensis. Our corrected assembled transcripts shed new light on two important stages in sea cucumber development. Comparison of the assembled transcripts to known transcripts in other species has also revealed novel transcripts that are unique to sea cucumber, some of which we have experimentally validated. Supporting website: http://sb.cs.cmu.edu/seecer/.

  18. AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Henry C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome assembly is difficult due to repeated sequences within the genome, which create ambiguities and cause the final assembly to be broken up into many separate sequences (contigs. Long range linking information, such as mate-pairs or mapping data, is necessary to help assembly software resolve repeats, thereby leading to a more complete reconstruction of genomes. Prior work has used optical maps for validating assemblies and scaffolding contigs, after an initial assembly has been produced. However, optical maps have not previously been used within the genome assembly process. Here, we use optical map information within the popular de Bruijn graph assembly paradigm to eliminate paths in the de Bruijn graph which are not consistent with the optical map and help determine the correct reconstruction of the genome. Results We developed a new algorithm called AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment. AGORA is the first algorithm to use optical map information directly within the de Bruijn graph framework to help produce an accurate assembly of a genome that is consistent with the optical map information provided. Our simulations on bacterial genomes show that AGORA is effective at producing assemblies closely matching the reference sequences. Additionally, we show that noise in the optical map can have a strong impact on the final assembly quality for some complex genomes, and we also measure how various characteristics of the starting de Bruijn graph may impact the quality of the final assembly. Lastly, we show that a proper choice of restriction enzyme for the optical map may substantially improve the quality of the final assembly. Conclusions Our work shows that optical maps can be used effectively to assemble genomes within the de Bruijn graph assembly framework. Our experiments also provide insights into the characteristics of the mapping data that most affect the performance of our algorithm, indicating the

  19. Seroprevalence in Chickens against Campylobacter jejuni Flagellar Capping Protein (FliD) in Selected Areas of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H-Y; Hiett, K L; Line, J E; Jagne, J F; Lauer, D C

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a causative pathogen of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Infected poultry products are regarded as a major source for human C. jejuni infection. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) is highly conserved among C. jejuni strains/isolates and is antigenic as analysed by immunoblot. In this study, we used the FliD protein as a probe to survey the prevalence of C. jejuni antibodies in chickens from two areas in the United States. A total of 394 samples were tested. Sera from layer breeders of 44-52 weeks of age tested 100% positive, while 4- to 6-week broilers from 22 premises showed 7-100% positivity. These results demonstrate that anti-FliD antibodies were prevalent in the poultry population in the areas of serum samples collected. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  1. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  2. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  3. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  4. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 Can Produce a Second Flagellar Apparatus, Which Is Important for Plant Root Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Muriel, Candela; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The genomic sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of a 41 kb cluster of genes that encode the production of a second flagellar apparatus. Among 2,535 pseudomonads strains with sequenced genomes, these genes are only present in the genomes of F113 and other six strains, all but one belonging to the P. fluorescens cluster of species, in the form of a genetic island. The genes are homologous to the flagellar genes of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. Regulation of these genes is mediated by the flhDC master operon, instead of the typical regulation in pseudomonads, which is through fleQ. Under laboratory conditions, F113 does not produce this flagellum and the flhDC operon is not expressed. However, ectopic expression of the flhDC operon is enough for its production, resulting in a hypermotile strain. This flagellum is also produced under laboratory conditions by the kinB and algU mutants. Genetic analysis has shown that kinB strongly represses the expression of the flhDC operon. This operon is activated by the Vfr protein probably in a c-AMP dependent way. The strains producing this second flagellum are all hypermotile and present a tuft of polar flagella instead of the single polar flagellum produced by the wild-type strain. Phenotypic variants isolated from the rhizosphere produce this flagellum and mutation of the genes encoding it, results in a defect in competitive colonization, showing its importance for root colonization. PMID:27713729

  5. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Neda; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Farhangi, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori-specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) as a vaccination target. The hpaA gene was inserted into pET28a (+) as cloning and expression vectors respectively. The recombinant plasmid (pET-hpaA) was subjected to sequencing other than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digestion analysis. Protein expression was induced by adding 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside to cultures of E. coli strain BL21 transformed with pET-hpaA. Protein expression assessed with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Protein purification of flagellar sheath adhesion was by FPLC. The restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification analysis showed that the hpaA gene of 730 bp was amplified from H. pylori DNA and sequencing analysis of the pET-hpaA confirmed the cloning accuracy and in frame insertion of hpaA fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the expression of an approximately 29,000 Da protein. Sequencing results along with SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the expression of recombinant hpaA in the heterologous E. coli BL21. Conclusion A prokaryotic expression system for hpaA gene was successfully constructed. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant protein is an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine.

  6. BASIC: A Simple and Accurate Modular DNA Assembly Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2017-01-01

    Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC) is a simple, accurate, and robust DNA assembly method. The method is based on linker-mediated DNA assembly and provides highly accurate DNA assembly with 99 % correct assemblies for four parts and 90 % correct assemblies for seven parts [1]. The BASIC standard defines a single entry vector for all parts flanked by the same prefix and suffix sequences and its idempotent nature means that the assembled construct is returned in the same format. Once a part has been adapted into the BASIC format it can be placed at any position within a BASIC assembly without the need for reformatting. This allows laboratories to grow comprehensive and universal part libraries and to share them efficiently. The modularity within the BASIC framework is further extended by the possibility of encoding ribosomal binding sites (RBS) and peptide linker sequences directly on the linkers used for assembly. This makes BASIC a highly versatile library construction method for combinatorial part assembly including the construction of promoter, RBS, gene variant, and protein-tag libraries. In comparison with other DNA assembly standards and methods, BASIC offers a simple robust protocol; it relies on a single entry vector, provides for easy hierarchical assembly, and is highly accurate for up to seven parts per assembly round [2].

  7. Interactive Assembly Guide using Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard; Larsen, Christian Lindequist

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an Augmented Reality system for aiding a pump assembling process at Grundfos, one of the leading pump producers. Stable pose estimation of the pump is required in order to augment the graphics correctly. This is achieved by matching image edges with synthesized edges from CAD...... norm. A dynamic visualization of the augmented graphics provides the user with guidance. Usability tests show that the accuracy of the system is sufficient for assembling the pump....

  8. Peculiarities of application the method of autogenic training in the correction of eating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Shebanova, Vitaliya

    2014-01-01

    The article presented peculiarities of applying the method of autogenic training in the correction of eating disorders. Described stages of correction work with desadaptive eating behavior. Author makes accent on the rules self-assembly formula intentions.

  9. Detection of flagellar antigen of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in canine faeces with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)--new prospects for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, J D; Bech-Nielsen, S; Stills, H F

    1994-01-01

    A new diagnostic procedure was developed to detect the flagellar antigen of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in canine faecal specimens and was tested on faecal samples from random-source dogs obtained from the local dog pound. Extraction of acid-soluble proteins was performed on faecal specimens and the extracted material was evaluated using species-specific monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The assay detected all C. jejuni or C. coli infected specimens compared with direct selective faecal culture. One of 18 faecal specimens culture-negative for C. jejuni was identified as positive by the assay, i.e. a false positive rate of 1 of 18 (5.6%) and a corresponding specificity of 94.4%. These results suggest that the screening procedure developed to detect flagellar antigens of C. jejuni and C. coli in canine faecal samples should be further investigated as a diagnostic alternative to culture.

  10. A Bacillus flagellar motor that can use both Na+ and K+ as a coupling ion is converted by a single mutation to use only Na+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Terahara

    Full Text Available In bacteria, the sodium ion (Na(+ cycle plays a critical role in negotiating the challenges of an extremely alkaline and sodium-rich environment. Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow optimally at high pH values use Na(+ for solute uptake and flagellar rotation because the proton (H(+ motive force is insufficient for use at extremely alkaline pH. Only three types of electrically driven rotary motors exist in nature: the F-type ATPase, the V-type ATPase, and the bacterial flagellar motor. Until now, only H(+ and Na(+ have been reported as coupling ions for these motors. Here, we report that the alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus alcalophilus Vedder 1934 can grow not only under a Na(+-rich and potassium ion (K(+-poor condition but also under the opposite condition in an extremely alkaline environment. In this organism, swimming performance depends on concentrations of Na(+, K(+ or Rb(+. In the absence of Na(+, swimming behavior is clearly K(+- dependent. This pattern was confirmed in swimming assays of stator-less Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli mutants expressing MotPS from B. alcalophilus (BA-MotPS. Furthermore, a single mutation in BA-MotS was identified that converted the naturally bi-functional BA-MotPS to stators that cannot use K(+ or Rb(+. This is the first report that describes a flagellar motor that can use K(+ and Rb(+ as coupling ions. The finding will affect the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and the molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity, the field of the evolution of environmental changes and stresses, and areas of nanotechnology.

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws and ... Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  14. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  15. Development of a Novel Rapid Immunodiagnostic Kit Based on Flagellar 40 kDa Antigen Epitope for the Detection of Typhoid Fever in Indian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To aid the clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever in India, where most hospitals and primary health centres have no facilities for culture, we report on the development of a novel and rapid immunodiagnostic kit for the direct detection of Salmonella Typhi—specific IgG antibodies against S. Typhi flagellar H antigen. The disease often does not show a specific clinical picture, and can be confused with other febrile illness such as malaria, dengue fever and Staphylococcus aureus. To overcome the problem of cross reactivity specific epitope of the flagellar H antigen was immobilised on the testing kit strip eliminating chances of cross reactivity and false positive results thereby increasing the specificity of the test. Since the immunodiagnostic kit, uses the flagellar H antigen from bacteria present in our country, the antibodies present in the serum of patients of our country will have maximum binding affinity, enhancing the sensitivity of our test kit. The immunodiagnostic kit on analysis gave a positive result with clinically diagnosed typhoid positive patient serum and negative results were obtained with the sera of clinically diagnosed malaria, abscess of Staphylococcus aureus and Visceral leishmaniasis (Kala-azar patients.

  16. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-PLC in Trypanosoma brucei forms a linear array on the exterior of the flagellar membrane before and after activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Orla; Webb, Helena; O'Byrne, Robert; Brabazon, Elaine; Treumann, Achim; Sunter, Jack D; Carrington, Mark; Voorheis, H Paul

    2009-06-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) that cleaves the GPI-anchor of the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG). Its location in trypanosomes has been controversial. Here, using confocal microscopy and surface labelling techniques, we show that the GPI-PLC is located exclusively in a linear array on the outside of the flagellar membrane, close to the flagellar attachment zone, but does not co-localize with the flagellar attachment zone protein, FAZ1. Consequently, the GPI-PLC and the VSG occupy the same plasma membrane leaflet, which resolves the topological problem associated with the cleavage reaction if the VSG and the GPI-PLC were on opposite sides of the membrane. The exterior location requires the enzyme to be tightly regulated to prevent VSG release under basal conditions. During stimulated VSG release in intact cells, the GPI-PLC did not change location, suggesting that the release mechanism involves lateral diffusion of the VSG in the plane of the membrane to the fixed position of the GPI-PLC.

  17. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  18. pH regulates genes for flagellar motility, catabolism, and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Lisa M; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bondurant, Sandra S; Radmacher, Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 were compared as a function of steady-state external pH. Cultures were grown to an optical density at 600 nm of 0.3 in potassium-modified Luria-Bertani medium buffered at pH 5.0, 7.0, and 8.7. For each of the three pH conditions, cDNA from RNA of five independent cultures was hybridized to Affymetrix E. coli arrays. Analysis of variance with an alpha level of 0.001 resulted in 98% power to detect genes showing a twofold difference in expression. Normalized expression indices were calculated for each gene and intergenic region (IG). Differential expression among the three pH classes was observed for 763 genes and 353 IGs. Hierarchical clustering yielded six well-defined clusters of pH profiles, designated Acid High (highest expression at pH 5.0), Acid Low (lowest expression at pH 5.0), Base High (highest at pH 8.7), Base Low (lowest at pH 8.7), Neutral High (highest at pH 7.0, lower in acid or base), and Neutral Low (lowest at pH 7.0, higher at both pH extremes). Flagellar and chemotaxis genes were repressed at pH 8.7 (Base Low cluster), where the cell's transmembrane proton potential is diminished by the maintenance of an inverted pH gradient. High pH also repressed the proton pumps cytochrome o (cyo) and NADH dehydrogenases I and II. By contrast, the proton-importing ATP synthase F1Fo and the microaerophilic cytochrome d (cyd), which minimizes proton export, were induced at pH 8.7. These observations are consistent with a model in which high pH represses synthesis of flagella, which expend proton motive force, while stepping up electron transport and ATPase components that keep protons inside the cell. Acid-induced genes, on the other hand, were coinduced by conditions associated with increased metabolic rate, such as oxidative stress. All six pH-dependent clusters included envelope and periplasmic proteins, which directly experience external pH. Overall, this study showed that (i) low pH accelerates acid

  19. Assembly of IFT trains at the ciliary base depends on IFT74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason M; Cochran, Deborah A; Craige, Branch; Kubo, Tomohiro; Witman, George B

    2015-06-15

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) moves IFT trains carrying cargoes from the cell body into the flagellum and from the flagellum back to the cell body. IFT trains are composed of complexes IFT-A and IFT-B and cargo adaptors such as the BBSome. The IFT-B core proteins IFT74 and IFT81 interact directly through central and C-terminal coiled-coil domains, and recently it was shown that the N termini of these proteins form a tubulin-binding module important for ciliogenesis. To investigate the function of IFT74 and its domains in vivo, we have utilized Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ift74 mutants. In a null mutant, lack of IFT74 destabilized IFT-B, leading to flagella assembly failure. In this null background, expression of IFT74 lacking 130 amino acids (aa) of the charged N terminus stabilized IFT-B and promoted slow assembly of nearly full-length flagella. A further truncation (lacking aa 1-196, including part of coiled-coil 1) also stabilized IFT-B, but failure in IFT-A/IFT-B interaction within the pool at the base of the flagellum prevented entry of IFT-A into the flagellum and led to severely decreased IFT injection frequency and flagellar-assembly defects. Decreased IFT-A in these short flagella resulted in aggregates of stalled IFT-B in the flagella. We conclude that IFT74 is required to stabilize IFT-B; aa 197-641 are sufficient for this function in vivo. The N terminus of IFT74 may be involved in, but is not required for, tubulin entry into flagella. It is required for association of IFT-A and IFT-B at the base of the flagellum and flagellar import of IFT-A.

  20. 24 CFR 3282.406 - Required manufacturer correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required manufacturer correction... Handling and Remedial Actions § 3282.406 Required manufacturer correction. A manufacturer required to... by the manufacturer, including an error in design or assembly of any component or system...

  1. In situ localization of N and C termini of subunits of the flagellar nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) using SNAP tag and cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kangkang; Awata, Junya; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Witman, George B; Porter, Mary E; Nicastro, Daniela

    2015-02-27

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has reached nanoscale resolution for in situ three-dimensional imaging of macromolecular complexes and organelles. Yet its current resolution is not sufficient to precisely localize or identify most proteins in situ; for example, the location and arrangement of components of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), a key regulator of ciliary/flagellar motility that is conserved from algae to humans, have remained elusive despite many cryo-ET studies of cilia and flagella. Here, we developed an in situ localization method that combines cryo-ET/subtomogram averaging with the clonable SNAP tag, a widely used cell biological probe to visualize fusion proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Using this hybrid approach, we precisely determined the locations of the N and C termini of DRC3 and the C terminus of DRC4 within the three-dimensional structure of the N-DRC in Chlamydomonas flagella. Our data demonstrate that fusion of SNAP with target proteins allowed for protein localization with high efficiency and fidelity using SNAP-linked gold nanoparticles, without disrupting the native assembly, structure, or function of the flagella. After cryo-ET and subtomogram averaging, we localized DRC3 to the L1 projection of the nexin linker, which interacts directly with a dynein motor, whereas DRC4 was observed to stretch along the N-DRC base plate to the nexin linker. Application of the technique developed here to the N-DRC revealed new insights into the organization and regulatory mechanism of this complex, and provides a valuable tool for the structural dissection of macromolecular complexes in situ.

  2. Comparing de novo assemblers for 454 transcriptome data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaxter Mark L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roche 454 pyrosequencing has become a method of choice for generating transcriptome data from non-model organisms. Once the tens to hundreds of thousands of short (250-450 base reads have been produced, it is important to correctly assemble these to estimate the sequence of all the transcripts. Most transcriptome assembly projects use only one program for assembling 454 pyrosequencing reads, but there is no evidence that the programs used to date are optimal. We have carried out a systematic comparison of five assemblers (CAP3, MIRA, Newbler, SeqMan and CLC to establish best practices for transcriptome assemblies, using a new dataset from the parasitic nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis. Results Although no single assembler performed best on all our criteria, Newbler 2.5 gave longer contigs, better alignments to some reference sequences, and was fast and easy to use. SeqMan assemblies performed best on the criterion of recapitulating known transcripts, and had more novel sequence than the other assemblers, but generated an excess of small, redundant contigs. The remaining assemblers all performed almost as well, with the exception of Newbler 2.3 (the version currently used by most assembly projects, which generated assemblies that had significantly lower total length. As different assemblers use different underlying algorithms to generate contigs, we also explored merging of assemblies and found that the merged datasets not only aligned better to reference sequences than individual assemblies, but were also more consistent in the number and size of contigs. Conclusions Transcriptome assemblies are smaller than genome assemblies and thus should be more computationally tractable, but are often harder because individual contigs can have highly variable read coverage. Comparing single assemblers, Newbler 2.5 performed best on our trial data set, but other assemblers were closely comparable. Combining differently optimal assemblies

  3. Late steps in cytoplasmic maturation of assembly-competent axonemal outer arm dynein in Chlamydomonas require interaction of ODA5 and ODA10 in a complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Anudariya B; Mitchell, David R

    2015-10-15

    Axonemal dyneins are multisubunit enzymes that must be preassembled in the cytoplasm, transported into cilia by intraflagellar transport, and bound to specific sites on doublet microtubules, where their activity facilitates microtubule sliding-based motility. Outer dynein arms (ODAs) require assembly factors to assist their preassembly, transport, and attachment to cargo (specific doublet A-tubule sites). In Chlamydomonas, three assembly factors--ODA5, ODA8, and ODA10--show genetic interactions and have been proposed to interact in a complex, but we recently showed that flagellar ODA8 does not copurify with ODA5 or ODA10. Here we show that ODA5 and ODA10 depend on each other for stability and coexist in a complex in both cytoplasmic and flagellar extracts. Immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy reveal that ODA10 in flagella localizes strictly to a proximal region of doublet number 1, which completely lacks ODAs in Chlamydomonas. Studies of the in vitro binding of ODAs to axonemal doublets reveal a role for the ODA5/ODA10 assembly complex in cytoplasmic maturation of ODAs into a form that can bind to doublet microtubules.

  4. Differential Light Chain Assembly Influences Outer Arm Dynein Motor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBella, Linda M.; Gorbatyuk, Oksana; Sakato, Miho; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Tctex1 and Tctex2 were originally described as potential distorters/sterility factors in the non-Mendelian transmission of t-haplotypes in mice. These proteins have since been identified as subunits of cytoplasmic and/or axonemal dyneins. Within the Chlamydomonas flagellum, Tctex1 is a subunit of inner arm I1. We have now identified a second Tctex1-related protein (here termed LC9) in Chlamydomonas. LC9 copurifies with outer arm dynein in sucrose density gradients and is missing only in those strains completely lacking this motor. Zero-length cross-linking of purified outer arm dynein indicates that LC9 interacts directly with both the IC1 and IC2 intermediate chains. Immunoblot analysis revealed that LC2, LC6, and LC9 are missing in an IC2 mutant strain (oda6-r88) that can assemble outer arms but exhibits significantly reduced flagellar beat frequency. This defect is unlikely to be due to lack of LC6, because an LC6 null mutant (oda13) exhibits only a minor swimming abnormality. Using an LC2 null mutant (oda12-1), we find that although some outer arm dynein components assemble in the absence of LC2, they are nonfunctional. In contrast, dyneins from oda6-r88, which also lack LC2, retain some activity. Furthermore, we observed a synthetic assembly defect in an oda6-r88 oda12-1 double mutant. These data suggest that LC2, LC6, and LC9 have different roles in outer arm assembly and are required for wild-type motor function in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. PMID:16195342

  5. The Sensor Kinase GacS Negatively Regulates Flagellar Formation and Motility in a Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The GacS/GacA two component system regulates various traits related to the biocontrol potential of plant-associated pseudomonads. The role of the sensor kinase, GacS, differs between strains in regulation of motility. In this study, we determined how a gacS mutation changed cell morphology and motility in Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The gacS mutant cells were elongated in stationary-phase compared to the wild type and the complemented gacS mutant, but cells did not differ in length in logarithmic phase. The gacS mutant had a two-fold increase in the number of flagella compared with the wild type strain; flagella number was restored to that of the wild type in the complemented gacS mutant. The more highly flagellated gacS mutant cells had greater swimming motilities than that of the wild type strain. Enhanced flagella formation in the gacS mutant correlated with increased expression of three genes, fleQ, fliQ and flhF, involved in flagellar formation. Expression of these genes in the complemented gacS mutant was similar to that of the wild type. These findings show that this root-colonizing pseudomonad adjusts flagella formation and cell morphology in stationary-phase using GacS as a major regulator.

  6. Function of FlhB, a Membrane Protein Implicated in the Bacterial Flagellar Type III Secretion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Barker, Clive S.; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene) in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants. PMID:23874605

  7. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Meshcheryakov

    Full Text Available The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants.

  8. Serine 26 in the PomB Subunit of the Flagellar Motor Is Essential for Hypermotility of Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halang, Petra; Vorburger, Thomas; Steuber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is motile by means of its single polar flagellum which is driven by the sodium-motive force. In the motor driving rotation of the flagellar filament, a stator complex consisting of subunits PomA and PomB converts the electrochemical sodium ion gradient into torque. Charged or polar residues within the membrane part of PomB could act as ligands for Na+, or stabilize a hydrogen bond network by interacting with water within the putative channel between PomA and PomB. By analyzing a large data set of individual tracks of swimming cells, we show that S26 located within the transmembrane helix of PomB is required to promote very fast swimming of V. cholerae. Loss of hypermotility was observed with the S26T variant of PomB at pH 7.0, but fast swimming was restored by decreasing the H+ concentration of the external medium. Our study identifies S26 as a second important residue besides D23 in the PomB channel. It is proposed that S26, together with D23 located in close proximity, is important to perturb the hydration shell of Na+ before its passage through a constriction within the stator channel. PMID:25874792

  9. Validation of a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis system for Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus through characterization of a flagellar mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouws, Luc F M; Simões-Araújo, Jean L; Hemerly, Adriana S; Baldani, José I

    2008-04-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium, which was originally isolated from the interior of sugarcane plants. The genome of strain PAL5 of G. diazotrophicus has been completely sequenced and a next step is the functional characterization of its genes. The aim of this study was to establish an efficient mutagenesis method, using the commercial Tn5 transposon EZ::Tn5Tnp Transposome (Epicentre). Up to 1 x 10(6) mutants per microgram of transposome were generated in a single electroporation experiment. Insertion-site flanking sequences were amplified by inverse PCR and sequenced for 31 mutants. For ten of these mutants, both insertion flanks could be identified, confirming the 9 bp duplication that is typical for Tn5 transposition. Insertions occurred in a random fashion and were genetically stable for at least 50 generations. One mutant had an insertion in a homolog of the flagellar gene flgA, and was therefore predicted to be affected in flagella-dependent traits and used to validate the applied mutagenesis methodology. This mutant lacked flagella and was non-motile on soft agar. Interestingly, it was also strongly affected in the ability to form biofilm on glass wool.

  10. Distinct Roles of Soluble and Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclases in the Regulation of Flagellar Motility in Ciona Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogiku Shiba

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC is a key enzyme that synthesizes cyclic AMP (cAMP at the onset of the signaling pathway to activate sperm motility. Here, we showed that both transmembrane AC (tmAC and soluble AC (sAC are distinctly involved in the regulation of sperm motility in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. A tmAC inhibitor blocked both cAMP synthesis and the activation of sperm motility induced by the egg factor sperm activating and attracting factor (SAAF, as well as those induced by theophylline, an inhibitor of phoshodiesterase. It also significantly inhibited cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of a set of proteins at motility activation. On the other hand, a sAC inhibitor does not affect on SAAF-induced transient increase of cAMP, motility activation or protein phosphorylation, but it reduced swimming velocity to half in theophylline-induced sperm. A sAC inhibitor KH-7 induced circular swimming trajectory with smaller diameter and significantly suppressed chemotaxis of sperm to SAAF. These results suggest that tmAC is involved in the basic mechanism for motility activation through cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation, whereas sAC plays distinct roles in increase of flagellar beat frequency and in the Ca2+-dependent chemotactic movement of sperm.

  11. Serine 26 in the PomB subunit of the flagellar motor is essential for hypermotility of Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Halang

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is motile by means of its single polar flagellum which is driven by the sodium-motive force. In the motor driving rotation of the flagellar filament, a stator complex consisting of subunits PomA and PomB converts the electrochemical sodium ion gradient into torque. Charged or polar residues within the membrane part of PomB could act as ligands for Na+, or stabilize a hydrogen bond network by interacting with water within the putative channel between PomA and PomB. By analyzing a large data set of individual tracks of swimming cells, we show that S26 located within the transmembrane helix of PomB is required to promote very fast swimming of V. cholerae. Loss of hypermotility was observed with the S26T variant of PomB at pH 7.0, but fast swimming was restored by decreasing the H+ concentration of the external medium. Our study identifies S26 as a second important residue besides D23 in the PomB channel. It is proposed that S26, together with D23 located in close proximity, is important to perturb the hydration shell of Na+ before its passage through a constriction within the stator channel.

  12. Flagellar movement in two bacteria of the family rickettsiaceae: a re-evaluation of motility in an evolutionary perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vannini

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae have always been largely studied not only for their importance in the medical field, but also as model systems in evolutionary biology. In fact, they share a recent common ancestor with mitochondria. The most studied species, belonging to genera Rickettsia and Orientia, are hosted by terrestrial arthropods and include many human pathogens. Nevertheless, recent findings show that a large part of Rickettsiaceae biodiversity actually resides outside the group of well-known pathogenic bacteria. Collecting data on these recently described non-conventional members of the family is crucial in order to gain information on ancestral features of the whole group. Although bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae, and of the whole order Rickettsiales, are formally described as non-flagellated prokaryotes, some recent findings renewed the debate about this feature. In this paper we report the first finding of members of the family displaying numerous flagella and active movement inside their host cells. These two new taxa are hosted in aquatic environments by protist ciliates and are described here by means of ultrastructural and molecular characterization. Data here reported suggest that the ancestor of Rickettsiales displayed flagellar movement and re-evaluate the hypothesis that motility played a key-role in the origin of mitochondria. Moreover, our study highlights that the aquatic environment represents a well exploited habitat for bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae. Our results encourage a deep re-consideration of ecological and morphological traits of the family and of the whole order.

  13. Function of the conserved FHIPEP domain of the flagellar type III export apparatus, protein FlhA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Clive S; Inoue, Tomoharu; Meshcheryakova, Irina V; Kitanobo, Seiya; Samatey, Fadel A

    2016-04-01

    The Type III flagellar protein export apparatus of bacteria consists of five or six membrane proteins, notably FlhA, which controls the export of other proteins and is homologous to the large family of FHIPEP export proteins. FHIPEP proteins contain a highly-conserved cytoplasmic domain. We mutagenized the cloned Salmonella flhA gene for the 692 amino acid FlhA, changing a single, conserved amino acid in the 68-amino acid FHIPEP region. Fifty-two mutations at 30 positions mostly led to loss of motility and total disappearance of microscopically visible flagella, also Western blot protein/protein hybridization showed no detectable export of hook protein and flagellin. There were two exceptions: a D199A mutant strain, which produced short-stubby flagella; and a V151L mutant strain, which did not produce flagella and excreted mainly un-polymerized hook protein. The V151L mutant strain also exported a reduced amount of hook-cap protein FlgD, but when grown with exogenous FlgD it produced polyhooks and polyhook-filaments. A suppressor mutant in the cytoplasmic domain of the export apparatus membrane protein FlhB rescued export of hook-length control protein FliK and facilitated growth of full-length flagella. These results suggested that the FHIPEP region is part of the gate regulating substrate entry into the export apparatus pore.

  14. The Azospirillum brasilense rpoN gene is involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrate assimilation, ammonium uptake, and flagellar biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcamps, A; Van Dommelen, A; Stigter, J; Vanderleyden, J; de Bruijn, F J

    1996-05-01

    The rpoN (ntrA) gene (encoding sigma 54) of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was isolated by using conserved rpoN primers and the polymerase chain reaction, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the RpoN protein was found to share a high degree of homology with other members of the sigma 54 family. Two additional open reading frames were found in the Azospirillum brasilense rpoN region, with significant similarity to equivalent regions surrounding the rpoN locus in other bacteria. An rpoN mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was constructed by gene replacement and found to be defective in nitrogen fixation, nitrate assimilation, and ammonium uptake. Lack of ammonium uptake was also found in previously isolated Azospirillum brasilense ntrB and ntrC mutants, further supporting the role of the ntr system in this process. In addition, the rpoN mutant was found to be nonmotile, suggesting a role of RpoN in Azospirillum brasilense flagellar biosynthesis.

  15. Flagellar movement in two bacteria of the family rickettsiaceae: a re-evaluation of motility in an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Claudia; Boscaro, Vittorio; Ferrantini, Filippo; Benken, Konstantin A; Mironov, Timofei I; Schweikert, Michael; Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Fokin, Sergei I; Sabaneyeva, Elena V; Petroni, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae have always been largely studied not only for their importance in the medical field, but also as model systems in evolutionary biology. In fact, they share a recent common ancestor with mitochondria. The most studied species, belonging to genera Rickettsia and Orientia, are hosted by terrestrial arthropods and include many human pathogens. Nevertheless, recent findings show that a large part of Rickettsiaceae biodiversity actually resides outside the group of well-known pathogenic bacteria. Collecting data on these recently described non-conventional members of the family is crucial in order to gain information on ancestral features of the whole group. Although bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae, and of the whole order Rickettsiales, are formally described as non-flagellated prokaryotes, some recent findings renewed the debate about this feature. In this paper we report the first finding of members of the family displaying numerous flagella and active movement inside their host cells. These two new taxa are hosted in aquatic environments by protist ciliates and are described here by means of ultrastructural and molecular characterization. Data here reported suggest that the ancestor of Rickettsiales displayed flagellar movement and re-evaluate the hypothesis that motility played a key-role in the origin of mitochondria. Moreover, our study highlights that the aquatic environment represents a well exploited habitat for bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae. Our results encourage a deep re-consideration of ecological and morphological traits of the family and of the whole order.

  16. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  17. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  18. Mitotic spindle assembly: May the force be with you

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesbeen, R.G.H.P. van

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on multiple pathways required for assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle. Proper assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle is essential for the generation of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments and correct segregation of the sister chromatids. Defec

  19. WORK STRATEGY TO MADE AN OUTLINE ASSEMBLY DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIHTEŢCHI Ioan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented a detailed study on an existent assembly, used in a new work. Learning stages showed in this project offer to students, futures design engineers, a solid base to correct graphic achievement in assembly and component parts, indifferently about them complexity. Proposed methodology used in this sample aimed ordering and systematization of technical thinking of futures engineers.

  20. Broad-minded links cell cycle-related kinase to cilia assembly and hedgehog signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyuk Wan; Norman, Ryan X; Tran, John; Fuller, Kimberly P; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T

    2010-02-16

    Recent findings indicate that mammalian Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction occurs within primary cilia, although the cell biological mechanisms underlying both Shh signaling and ciliogenesis have not been fully elucidated. We show that an uncharacterized TBC domain-containing protein, Broad-minded (Bromi), is required for high-level Shh responses in the mouse neural tube. We find that Bromi controls ciliary morphology and proper Gli2 localization within the cilium. By use of a zebrafish model, we further show that Bromi is required for proper association between the ciliary membrane and axoneme. Bromi physically interacts with cell cycle-related kinase (CCRK), whose Chlamydomonas homolog regulates flagellar length. Biochemical and genetic interaction data indicate that Bromi promotes CCRK stability and function. We propose that Bromi and CCRK control the structure of the primary cilium by coordinating assembly of the axoneme and ciliary membrane, allowing Gli proteins to be properly activated in response to Shh signaling.

  1. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  2. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  3. Error Correction in Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. Grace Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Error correction is an important issue in foreign language acquisition. This paper investigates how students feel about the way in which error correction should take place in a Chinese-as-a foreign-language classroom, based on empirical data of a large scale. The study shows that there is a general consensus that error correction is necessary. In terms of correction strategy, the students preferred a combination of direct and indirect corrections, or a direct only correction. The former choice indicates that students would be happy to take either so long as the correction gets done.Most students didn't mind peer correcting provided it is conducted in a constructive way. More than halfofthe students would feel uncomfortable ifthe same error they make in class is corrected consecutively more than three times. Taking these findings into consideration, we may want to cncourage peer correcting, use a combination of correction strategies (direct only if suitable) and do it in a non-threatening and sensitive way. It is hoped that this study would contribute to the effectiveness of error correction in a Chinese language classroom and it may also have a wider implication on other languages.

  4. Epitope mapping of Campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) by chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Telli, Arife Ezgi; Jagne, Jarra F; Benson, Christopher L; Hiett, Kelli L; Line, John E

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The flagellum, composed of more than 35 proteins, is responsible for colonization of C. jejuni in the host gastrointestinal tract as well as inducing protective antibodies against the homologous serotype. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the flagellar capping protein (FliD) is an immunodominant protein that reacted strongly to sera from field chickens. In this communication, we mapped linear immunoreactive epitopes on FliD using a set of 158 synthetic peptides of 15-mer overlapping with 11 amino acid residues on peptide microarrays with sera from field chickens. The results from peptide microarrays showed (1) no cross-reactivity of the immobilized peptides with the secondary anti-chicken antibody in the control incubation, and (2) heterogeneous patterns of sera reacting to the immobilized peptides. The peptides that reacted to more than three chicken sera and had higher averages of fluorescence units were selected for further validation by the peptide ELISA. The results showed peptides 24, 91 and 92 had relatively high reactivity and less variation among 64 individual serum samples, indicating these peptides represented the shared immunodominant epitopes on the C. jejuni FliD protein. These peptides were also recognized by sera from chickens immunized with the purified recombinant FliD protein. The findings of the specific shared linear immunodominant epitopes on FliD in this study provide a rationale for further evaluation to determine their utility as epitope vaccines covering multiple serotypes for chicken immunization, and subsequently, for providing safer poultry products for human consumption.

  5. Protein kinase C is likely to be involved in zoosporogenesis and maintenance of flagellar motility in the peronosporomycete zoospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Tofazzal; von Tiedemann, Andreas; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2011-08-01

    The motility of zoospores is critical in the disease cycles of Peronosporomycetes that cause devastating diseases in plants, fishes, vertebrates, and microbes. In the course of screening for secondary metabolites, we found that ethyl acetate extracts of a marine Streptomyces sp. strain B5136 rapidly impaired the motility of zoospores of the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola at 0.1 μg/ml. The active principle in the extracts was identified as staurosporine, a known broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). In the presence of staurosporine (2 nM), zoospores moved very slowly in their axis or spun in tight circles, instead of displaying straight swimming in a helical fashion. Compounds such as K-252a, K-252b, and K-252c structurally related to staurosporine also impaired the motility of zoospores in a similar manner but at varying doses. Among the 22 known kinase inhibitors tested, the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine was the most potent to arrest the motility of zoospores at concentrations starting from 5 nM. Inhibitors that targeted kinase pathways other than PKC pathways did not practically show any activity in impairing zoospore motility. Interestingly, both staurosporine (5 nM) and chelerythrine (10 nM) also inhibited the release of zoospores from the P. viticola sporangia in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, staurosporine completely suppressed downy mildew disease in grapevine leaves at 2 μM, suggesting the potential of small-molecule PKC inhibitors for the control of peronosporomycete phytopathogens. Taken together, these results suggest that PKC is likely to be a key signaling mediator associated with zoosporogenesis and the maintenance of flagellar motility in peronosporomycete zoospores.

  6. The Type VI Secretion System Modulates Flagellar Gene Expression and Secretion in Citrobacter freundii and Contributes to Adhesion and Cytotoxicity to Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyun; Hao, Shuai; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Guangxia; Xiao, Di; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a virulence factor-releasing system contributes to virulence development of various pathogens and is often activated upon contact with target cells. Citrobacter freundii strain CF74 has a complete T6SS genomic island (GI) that contains clpV, hcp-2, and vgr T6SS genes. We constructed clpV, hcp-2, vgr, and T6SS GI deletion mutants in CF74 and analyzed their effects on the transcriptome overall and, specifically, on the flagellar system at the levels of transcription and translation. Deletion of the T6SS GI affected the transcription of 84 genes, with 15 and 69 genes exhibiting higher and lower levels of transcription, respectively. Members of the cell motility class of downregulated genes of the CF74ΔT6SS mutant were mainly flagellar genes, including effector proteins, chaperones, and regulators. Moreover, the production and secretion of FliC were also decreased in clpV, hcp-2, vgr, or T6SS GI deletion mutants in CF74 and were restored upon complementation. In swimming motility assays, the mutant strains were found to be less motile than the wild type, and motility was restored by complementation. The mutant strains were defective in adhesion to HEp-2 cells and were restored partially upon complementation. Further, the CF74ΔT6SS, CF74ΔclpV, and CF74Δhcp-2 mutants induced lower cytotoxicity to HEp-2 cells than the wild type. These results suggested that the T6SS GI in CF74 regulates the flagellar system, enhances motility, is involved in adherence to host cells, and induces cytotoxicity to host cells. Thus, the T6SS plays a wide-ranging role in C. freundii.

  7. Two new species of Piaroa (Arachnida: Schizomida, Hubbardiidae) from Colombia, with comments on the genus taxonomy and the flagellar setae pattern of Hubbardiinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-González, Jairo A; Delgado-Santa, Leonardo; De Armas, Luis F

    2014-08-14

    Two new species of the genus Piaroa Villarreal, Tourinho & Giupponi, 2008, P. escalerete sp. nov. and P. bacata sp. nov. are described from Valle del Cauca, and Cundinamarca departments, Colombia, respectively. The female flagellum is fully illustrated for a Piaroa species for the first time; the generic diagnosis is also emended and the relationships of the new species with those previously described are discussed. New characters for Piaroa species, a new nomenclature for the chitinized arch and a reinterpretation of the Hubbardiinae flagellar setae pattern are proposed. A distribution map of the known species of Piaroa is provided. 

  8. PANDAseq: paired-end assembler for illumina sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masella Andre P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Illumina paired-end reads are used to analyse microbial communities by targeting amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene. Publicly available tools are needed to assemble overlapping paired-end reads while correcting mismatches and uncalled bases; many errors could be corrected to obtain higher sequence yields using quality information. Results PANDAseq assembles paired-end reads rapidly and with the correction of most errors. Uncertain error corrections come from reads with many low-quality bases identified by upstream processing. Benchmarks were done using real error masks on simulated data, a pure source template, and a pooled template of genomic DNA from known organisms. PANDAseq assembled reads more rapidly and with reduced error incorporation compared to alternative methods. Conclusions PANDAseq rapidly assembles sequences and scales to billions of paired-end reads. Assembly of control libraries showed a 4-50% increase in the number of assembled sequences over naïve assembly with negligible loss of "good" sequence.

  9. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  10. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  11. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  12. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  13. Single-particle study of protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    A study of protein assembly in solution with single-particle imaging and reconstruction techniques using cryoelectron microscopy is reported. The human glutamine synthetase enzyme, important in brain metabolism, and previously assumed to be assembled into a homogeneous quaternary structure, is found to be heterogeneous, with three oligomeric states that co-exist at room temperature. This result corrects an old structural and kinetic model determined by ensemble averaging techniques that assumed a homogeneous system. Unexpectedly fast protein dissociation kinetics results from a stabilized transition state.

  14. Composite fan stator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donges, G.L.

    1993-07-13

    A composite fan stator assembly is described for a gas turbine engine having at least two fan rotor stages, the composite stator assembly comprising: an annular composite fan case assembly including an access port, the fan case assembly circumferentially disposed around first and second fan rotor stage locations, a composite fan stator stage supported by and extending radially inward of the fan case assembly and axially disposed between the two fan rotor stage locations, the fan stator stage includes at least one removable vane segment accessible for removal through the access port for assembly and reassembly, the composite fan case assembly including a separable composite forward fan case assembly and a separable composite aft fan case assembly spaced axially aft of the forward fan case assembly, the forward fan case assembly being bolted to the aft fan case assembly, wherein the composite fan stator stage is axially and radially trapped and supported by the forward and aft fan case assemblies. A composite stator vane assembly comprising: a composite inner shroud, a composite outer shroud disposed radially outward of the inner shroud, a plurality of vanes disposed between the shrouds, the vanes including a suction side and a pressure side and radially inner and outer roots, the roots extending through platforms of corresponding ones of the inner and outer shrouds, four box-type attachment elements corresponding to curved suction and pressure sides of the inner and outer roots, the box-type attachment elements having two connected legs angled with respect to each other, a first one of the legs extending along, conforming to the curve of, and bonded to a corresponding one of the airfoil root sides, and a second one of the legs extending along and bonded to a composite shroud surface.

  15. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression.

  16. A flagellar sheath protein of Helicobacter pylori is identical to HpaA, a putative N-acetylneuraminyllactose-binding hemagglutinin, but is not an adhesin for AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A C; Logan, R P; Foynes, S; Cockayne, A; Wren, B W; Penn, C W

    1997-09-01

    The gene encoding a 29-kDa flagellar sheath protein was cloned and found to be similar to hpaA, reported to encode an N-acetylneuraminyllactose-binding fibrillar hemagglutinin (D. G. Evans, T. K. Karjalainen, D. J. Evans, Jr., D. Y. Graham, and C. H. Lee, J. Bacteriol. 175:674-683, 1993). The transcriptional start was mapped by primer extension from Helicobacter pylori mRNA, indicating an active consensus promoter at a location different from that suggested by Evans et al. Immunogold labelling of the flagellar sheath with a monoclonal antibody to HpaA was demonstrated in four strains, contrary to previous reports of a surface (D. G. Evans, T. K. Karjalainen, D. J. Evans, Jr., D. Y. Graham, and C. H. Lee, J. Bacteriol. 175:674-683, 1993) or a cytoplasmic (P. W. O'Toole, L. Janzon, P. Doig, J. Huang, M. Kostrzynska, and T. J. Trust, J. Bacteriol. 177:6049-6057, 1995) locale. Agglutination of erythrocytes and adherence to AGS cells by a delta hpaA mutant were no different from those of the parent strain, confirming a recent finding of O'Toole et al.

  17. Diophantine Correct Open Induction

    CERN Document Server

    Raffer, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    We give an induction-free axiom system for diophantine correct open induction. We relate the problem of whether a finitely generated ring of Puiseux polynomials is diophantine correct to a problem about the value-distribution of a tuple of semialgebraic functions with integer arguments. We use this result, and a theorem of Bergelson and Leibman on generalized polynomials, to identify a class of diophantine correct subrings of the field of descending Puiseux series with real coefficients.

  18. Misalignment corrections in optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Deqiang

    Optical interconnects are considered a promising solution for long distance and high bitrate data transmissions, outperforming electrical interconnects in terms of loss and dispersion. Due to the bandwidth and distance advantage of optical interconnects, longer links have been implemented with optics. Recent studies show that optical interconnects have clear advantages even at very short distances---intra system interconnects. The biggest challenge for such optical interconnects is the alignment tolerance. Many free space optical components require very precise assembly and installation, and therefore the overall cost could be increased. This thesis studied the misalignment tolerance and possible alignment correction solutions for optical interconnects at backplane or board level. First the alignment tolerance for free space couplers was simulated and the result indicated the most critical alignments occur between the VCSEL, waveguide and microlens arrays. An in-situ microlens array fabrication method was designed and experimentally demonstrated, with no observable misalignment with the waveguide array. At the receiver side, conical lens arrays were proposed to replace simple microlens arrays for a larger angular alignment tolerance. Multilayer simulation models in CodeV were built to optimized the refractive index and shape profiles of the conical lens arrays. Conical lenses fabricated with micro injection molding machine and fiber etching were characterized. Active component VCSOA was used to correct misalignment in optical connectors between the board and backplane. The alignment correction capability were characterized for both DC and AC (1GHz) optical signal. The speed and bandwidth of the VCSOA was measured and compared with a same structure VCSEL. Based on the optical inverter being studied in our lab, an all-optical flip-flop was demonstrated using a pair of VCSOAs. This memory cell with random access ability can store one bit optical signal with set or

  19. CORRECTING WRITTEN WORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction During the teaching and learning process, teachers often check how much students have understood through written assignments. In this article I’d like to describe one method of correcting students’ written work by using a variety of symbols to indicate where students have gone wrong, then asking students to correct their work themselves.

  20. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  1. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  2. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  3. Development of a Drosophila cell-based error correction assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Salemi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate transmission of the genome through cell division requires microtubules from opposing spindle poles to interact with protein super-structures called kinetochores that assemble on each sister chromatid. Most kinetochores establish erroneous attachments that are destabilized through a process called error correction. Failure to correct improper kinetochore-microtubule (kt-MT interactions before anaphase onset results in chromosomal instability (CIN, which has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor adaptation. Thus, it is important to characterize the molecular basis of error correction to better comprehend how CIN occurs and how it can be modulated. An error correction assay has been previously developed in cultured mammalian cells in which incorrect kt-MT attachments are created through the induction of monopolar spindle assembly via chemical inhibition of kinesin-5. Error correction is then monitored following inhibitor wash out. Implementing the error correction assay in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells would be valuable because kt-MT attachments are easily visualized and the cells are highly amenable to RNAi and high-throughput screening. However, Drosophila kinesin-5 (Klp61F is unaffected by available small molecule inhibitors. To overcome this limitation, we have rendered S2 cells susceptible to kinesin-5 inhibitors by functionally replacing Klp61F with human kinesin-5 (Eg5. Eg5 expression rescued the assembly of monopolar spindles typically caused by Klp61F depletion. Eg5-mediated bipoles collapsed into monopoles due to the activity of kinesin-14 (Ncd when treated with the kinesin-5 inhibitor S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC. Furthermore, bipolar spindles reassembled and error correction was observed after STLC wash out. Importantly, error correction in Eg5-expressing S2 cells was dependent on the well-established error correction kinase Aurora B. This system provides a powerful new cell-based platform for studying error correction and

  4. Development of a Drosophila cell-based error correction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Jeffrey D; McGilvray, Philip T; Maresca, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate transmission of the genome through cell division requires microtubules from opposing spindle poles to interact with protein super-structures called kinetochores that assemble on each sister chromatid. Most kinetochores establish erroneous attachments that are destabilized through a process called error correction. Failure to correct improper kinetochore-microtubule (kt-MT) interactions before anaphase onset results in chromosomal instability (CIN), which has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor adaptation. Thus, it is important to characterize the molecular basis of error correction to better comprehend how CIN occurs and how it can be modulated. An error correction assay has been previously developed in cultured mammalian cells in which incorrect kt-MT attachments are created through the induction of monopolar spindle assembly via chemical inhibition of kinesin-5. Error correction is then monitored following inhibitor wash out. Implementing the error correction assay in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells would be valuable because kt-MT attachments are easily visualized and the cells are highly amenable to RNAi and high-throughput screening. However, Drosophila kinesin-5 (Klp61F) is unaffected by available small molecule inhibitors. To overcome this limitation, we have rendered S2 cells susceptible to kinesin-5 inhibitors by functionally replacing Klp61F with human kinesin-5 (Eg5). Eg5 expression rescued the assembly of monopolar spindles typically caused by Klp61F depletion. Eg5-mediated bipoles collapsed into monopoles due, in part, to kinesin-14 (Ncd) activity when treated with the kinesin-5 inhibitor S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC). Furthermore, bipolar spindles reassembled and error correction was observed after STLC wash out. Importantly, error correction in Eg5-expressing S2 cells was dependent on the well-established error correction kinase Aurora B. This system provides a powerful new cell-based platform for studying error correction and CIN.

  5. misFinder: identify mis-assemblies in an unbiased manner using reference and paired-end reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Leung, Henry C M; Wang, Rongjie; Chin, Francis Y L; Yiu, Siu Ming; Quan, Guangri; Li, Yajie; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Qinghua; Liu, Bo; Dong, Yucui; Zhou, Guohui; Wang, Yadong

    2015-11-16

    Because of the short read length of high throughput sequencing data, assembly errors are introduced in genome assembly, which may have adverse impact to the downstream data analysis. Several tools have been developed to eliminate these errors by either 1) comparing the assembled sequences with some similar reference genome, or 2) analyzing paired-end reads aligned to the assembled sequences and determining inconsistent features alone mis-assembled sequences. However, the former approach cannot distinguish real structural variations between the target genome and the reference genome while the latter approach could have many false positive detections (correctly assembled sequence being considered as mis-assembled sequence). We present misFinder, a tool that aims to identify the assembly errors with high accuracy in an unbiased way and correct these errors at their mis-assembled positions to improve the assembly accuracy for downstream analysis. It combines the information of reference (or close related reference) genome and aligned paired-end reads to the assembled sequence. Assembly errors and correct assemblies corresponding to structural variations can be detected by comparing the genome reference and assembled sequence. Different types of assembly errors can then be distinguished from the mis-assembled sequence by analyzing the aligned paired-end reads using multiple features derived from coverage and consistence of insert distance to obtain high confident error calls. We tested the performance of misFinder on both simulated and real paired-end reads data, and misFinder gave accurate error calls with only very few miscalls. And, we further compared misFinder with QUAST and REAPR. misFinder outperformed QUAST and REAPR by 1) identified more true positive mis-assemblies with very few false positives and false negatives, and 2) distinguished the correct assemblies corresponding to structural variations from mis-assembled sequence. misFinder can be freely downloaded

  6. In Helicobacter pylori auto-inducer-2, but not LuxS/MccAB catalysed reverse transsulphuration, regulates motility through modulation of flagellar gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty Neil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LuxS may function as a metabolic enzyme or as the synthase of a quorum sensing signalling molecule, auto-inducer-2 (AI-2; hence, the mechanism underlying phenotypic changes upon luxS inactivation is not always clear. In Helicobacter pylori, we have recently shown that, rather than functioning in recycling methionine as in most bacteria, LuxS (along with newly-characterised MccA and MccB, synthesises cysteine via reverse transsulphuration. In this study, we investigated whether and how LuxS controls motility of H. pylori, specifically if it has its effects via luxS-required cysteine metabolism or via AI-2 synthesis only. Results We report that disruption of luxS renders H. pylori non-motile in soft agar and by microscopy, whereas disruption of mccAHp or mccBHp (other genes in the cysteine provision pathway does not, implying that the lost phenotype is not due to disrupted cysteine provision. The motility defect of the ΔluxSHp mutant was complemented genetically by luxSHp and also by addition of in vitro synthesised AI-2 or 4, 5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione (DPD, the precursor of AI-2. In contrast, exogenously added cysteine could not restore motility to the ΔluxSHp mutant, confirming that AI-2 synthesis, but not the metabolic effect of LuxS was important. Microscopy showed reduced number and length of flagella in the ΔluxSHp mutant. Immunoblotting identified decreased levels of FlaA and FlgE but not FlaB in the ΔluxSHp mutant, and RT-PCR showed that the expression of flaA, flgE, motA, motB, flhA and fliI but not flaB was reduced. Addition of DPD but not cysteine to the ΔluxSHp mutant restored flagellar gene transcription, and the number and length of flagella. Conclusions Our data show that as well as being a metabolic enzyme, H. pylori LuxS has an alternative role in regulation of motility by modulating flagellar transcripts and flagellar biosynthesis through production of the signalling molecule AI-2.

  7. Probabilistic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fern, J; Fern, Jesse; Terilla, John

    2002-01-01

    There are well known necessary and sufficient conditions for a quantum code to correct a set of errors. We study weaker conditions under which a quantum code may correct errors with probabilities that may be less than one. We work with stabilizer codes and as an application study how the nine qubit code, the seven qubit code, and the five qubit code perform when there are errors on more than one qubit. As a second application, we discuss the concept of syndrome quality and use it to suggest a way that quantum error correction can be practically improved.

  8. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  9. Assembly of primary cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Veland, Iben R; Schrøder, Jacob M

    2008-01-01

    in primary cilia assembly or function have been associated with a panoply of disorders and diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, left-right asymmetry defects, hydrocephalus, and Bardet Biedl Syndrome. Here we provide an up-to-date review focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly...

  10. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  11. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  12. Laser bottom hole assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Gustafason

    2001-02-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

  14. Liaison concatenation – A method to obtain feasible assembly sequences from 3D-CAD product

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M V A Raju Bahubalendruni; Bibhuti Bhusan Biswal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of optimized assembly sequence from the available feasible assembly sequences is significantly essential to achieve cost-effective manufacturing process. To achieve this, at the outset, generation of feasible assembly sequences with topological, geometrical, precedence and stability conditions should be generated. The increase of part count in a product results huge number of assembly sequences, the Liaison matrix/Liaison graph generated based on the connections between the assembly components eliminates nonpossible assembly sequences at the initial phase. There exist methods namely cut-set method to eliminate the non-possible assembly sequences using liaison graph. In this paper a new approach to eliminate the non-possible assembly sequences based on liaisons is described and the correctness of the methodology is illustrated with an example. The methodology to obtain the feasible assembly sequences is also briefly described and presented. An algorithm to interface with the CAD environment is described briefly.

  15. 杜氏盐藻鞭毛内运输蛋白88在鞭毛组装过程中的功能分析及其原核表达%Functional analysis of intraflagellar transport protein 88 from Dunaliella salina during flagellar regeneration and its prokaryotic expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩康; 石科; 毛丽红; 李庆华; 龚方华; 蒋海丽; 薛乐勋

    2013-01-01

    afterwards decreased rapidly. Prokaryotic expressed IFT88 was successfully obtained and there was a remarkable band of 90 000. Conclusion:The cDNA of IFT88 from Dunaliella salina has been successfully cloned and IFT88 may be involved in flagellar assembly.

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Corrective Jaw ...

  17. Correction of Neonatal Hypovolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moskalev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of hydroxyethyl starch solution (6% refortane, Berlin-Chemie versus fresh frozen plasma used to correct neonatal hypovolemia.Materials and methods. In 12 neonatal infants with hypoco-agulation, hypovolemia was corrected with fresh frozen plasma (10 ml/kg body weight. In 13 neonates, it was corrected with 6% refortane infusion in a dose of 10 ml/kg. Doppler echocardiography was used to study central hemodynamic parameters and Doppler study was employed to examine regional blood flow in the anterior cerebral and renal arteries.Results. Infusion of 6% refortane and fresh frozen plasma at a rate of 10 ml/hour during an hour was found to normalize the parameters of central hemodynamics and regional blood flow.Conclusion. Comparative analysis of the findings suggests that 6% refortane is the drug of choice in correcting neonatal hypovolemia. Fresh frozen plasma should be infused in hemostatic disorders. 

  18. Corrected Age for Preemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Corrected Age For Preemies Page Content Article Body If your ...

  19. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  20. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  1. Constrained space camera assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  2. Correctness is not enough

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The usual aim of spreadsheet audit is to verify correctness. There are two problems with this: first, it is often difficult to tell whether the spreadsheets in question are correct, and second, even if they are, they may still give the wrong results. These problems are explained in this paper, which presents the key criteria for judging a spreadsheet and discusses how those criteria can be achieved

  3. Adaptable DC offset correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  4. Molecular self-assembly at solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José María; de Parga, Amadeo L Vázquez; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2011-11-23

    Self-assembly, the process by which objects initially distributed at random arrange into well-defined patterns exclusively due to their local mutual interactions without external intervention, is generally accepted to be the most promising method for large-scale fabrication of functional nanostructures. In particular, the ordering of molecular building-blocks deposited at solid surfaces is relevant for the performance of many organic electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or photovoltaic solar cells. However, the fundamental knowledge on the nature and strength of the intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions that govern the ordering of molecular adsorbates is, in many cases, rather scarce. In most cases, the structure and morphology of the organic-metal interface is not known and it is just assumed to be the same as in the bulk, thereby implicitly neglecting the role of the surface on the assembly. However, this approximation is usually not correct, and the evidence gathered over the last decades points towards an active role of the surface in the assembly, leading to self-assembled structures that only in a few occasions can be understood by considering just intermolecular interactions in solid or gas phases. In this work we review several examples from our recent research demonstrating the apparently endless variety of ways in which the surface might affect the assembly of organic adsorbates.

  5. Identification of the t Complex–encoded Cytoplasmic Dynein Light Chain Tctex1 in Inner Arm I1 Supports the Involvement of Flagellar Dyneins in Meiotic Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Alistair; Olds-Clarke, Patricia; King, Stephen M.

    1998-01-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein light chain Tctex1 is a candidate for one of the distorter products involved in the non-Mendelian transmission of mouse t haplotypes. It has been unclear, however, how the t-specific mutations in this protein, which is found associated with cytoplasmic dynein in many tissues, could result in a male germ cell–specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate that Tctex1 is not only a cytoplasmic dynein component, but is also present both in mouse sperm and Chlamydomonas flagella. Genetic and biochemical dissection of the Chlamydomonas flagellum reveal that Tctex1 is a previously undescribed component of inner dynein arm I1. Combined with the recent identification of another putative t complex distorter, Tctex2, within the outer dynein arm, these results support the hypothesis that transmission ratio distortion (meiotic drive) of mouse t haplotypes involves dysfunction of both flagellar inner and outer dynein arms but does not require the cytoplasmic isozyme. PMID:9490726

  6. Refining the Binding of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Master Regulator, FlhD4C2, on a Base-Specific Level ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Barker, Clive S.; Matsumura, Philip; Belas, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Escherichia coli flagellar master regulator, FlhD4C2, binds to the promoter regions of flagellar class II genes, yet, despite extensive analysis of the FlhD4C2-regulated promoter region, a detailed consensus sequence has not emerged. We used in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches to determine the nucleotides in the class II promoter, fliAp, required for the binding and function of FlhD4C2. FlhD4C2 protects 48 bp (positions −76 to −29 relative to the σ70-dependent transcriptional start site) in the fliA promoter. We divided the 48-bp footprint region into 5 sections to determine the requirement of each DNA segment for the binding and function of FlhD4C2. Results from an in vitro binding competition assay between the wild-type FlhD4C2-protected fragment and DNA fragments possessing mutations in one section of the 48-bp protected region showed that only one-third of the 48 bp protected by FlhD4C2 is required for FlhD4C2 binding and fliA promoter activity. This in vitro binding result was also seen in vivo with fliA promoter-lacZ fusions carrying the same mutations. Only seven bases (A12, A15, T34, A36, T37, A44, and T45) are absolutely required for the promoter activity. Moreover, A12, A15, T34, T37, and T45 within the 7 bases are highly specific to fliA promoter activity, and those bases form an asymmetric recognition site for FlhD4C2. The implications of the asymmetry of the FlhD4C2 binding site and its potential impact on FlhD4C2 are discussed. PMID:21685294

  7. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Imhof

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature.

  8. Dynamic nanoparticle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libing; Xu, Liguang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2012-11-20

    Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic, and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple levels of hierarchy of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously form superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display the ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the "bottom-up" fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces)are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable super structures with a nearly constant number of NPs or Class 2 where the total number of NPs changes, while the organizational motif in the final superstructure remains the same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of

  9. DC source assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  10. Modular assembled space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Budinoff, Jason; MacEwen, Howard; Matthews, Gary; Postman, Marc

    2013-09-01

    We present a new approach to building a modular segmented space telescope that greatly leverages the heritage of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope. The modular design in which mirror segments are assembled into identical panels allows for economies of scale and for efficient space assembly that make a 20-m aperture approach cost effective. This assembly approach can leverage NASA's future capabilities and has the power to excite the public's imagination. We discuss the science drivers, basic architecture, technology, and leveraged NASA infrastructure, concluding with a proposed plan for going forward.

  11. CORRECTING STUDENTS’ HOMEWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionI have been teaching English for ten years and like many other teachers in middle schools.I teach threebig classes each year.Before I had the opportunity to further my study in the SMSTT project run jointlyby the British Council and the State Education Commission of China at Southwest China TeachersUniversity.I found it somewhat difficult to correct students homework since I had so many students.Now I still have three big classes.but I have found it casier to correct students homework since I havebeen combining the techniques learned in the project with my own successful experience.In this article.I attempt to discuss my approach to correcting students homework.I hope that it will be of some use tothose who have not vet had the opportunity to further their training.

  12. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... statebased on an idealized mechanical model to be adapted to the original limit state by the model correction factor. Reliable approximations are obtained by iterative use of gradient information on the original limit state function analogously to previous response surface approaches. However, the strength...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  13. Designing Assemblies Of Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, F. W.; Kennedy, D.; Butler, R.; Aston, G.; Anderson, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    VICONOPT calculates vibrations and instabilities of assemblies of prismatic plates. Designed for efficient, accurate analysis of buckling and vibration, and for optimum design of panels of composite materials. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Correction of ocular dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, I P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine results with elective surgical correction of enophthalmos. The study was a retrospective assessment in a university-based referral practice. A consecutive sample of 10 patients who developed ocular dystopia following orbital trauma was examined. The main outcome measures were a subjective evaluation by patients and objective measurements of patients' eye position. The intervention was three-dimensional orbital reconstruction with titanium plates. It is concluded that satisfactory correction of enophthalmos and ocular dystopia can be achieved with elective surgery using titanium plates. In addition, intraoperative measurements of eye position in three planes increases the precision of surgery.

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of

  16. Visualisation in Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Štefan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at visualisation types in assembly. Broad usage of artificial visualisation in assembly is held down mainly for economic reasons. One of the possible solutions is usage of the presented light visualisation method. This simple method of light visualisation is convenient when vibration orientation is not working properly and artificial visualisation is economically ineffective. Described principle of orientation is a technical solution of the author.

  17. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  18. An investigation of Hebbian phase sequences as assembly graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gomes Almeida Filho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hebb proposed that synapses between neurons that fire synchronously are strengthened, forming cell assemblies and phase sequences. The former, on a shorter scale, are ensembles of synchronized cells that function transiently as a closed processing system; the latter, on a larger scale, correspond to the sequential activation of cell assemblies able to represent percepts and behaviors. Nowadays, the recording of large neuronal populations allows for the detection of multiple cell assemblies. Within Hebb’s theory, the next logical step is the analysis of phase sequences. Here we detected phase sequences as consecutive assembly activation patterns, and then analyzed their graph attributes in relation to behavior. We investigated action potentials recorded from the adult rat hippocampus and neocortex before, during and after novel object exploration (experimental periods. Within assembly graphs, each assembly corresponded to a node, and each edge corresponded to the temporal sequence of consecutive node activations. The sum of all assembly activations was proportional to firing rates, but the activity of individual assemblies was not. Assembly repertoire was stable across experimental periods, suggesting that novel experience does not create new assemblies in the adult rat. Assembly graph attributes, on the other hand, varied significantly across behavioral states and experimental periods, and were separable enough to correctly classify experimental periods (Naïve Bayes classifier; maximum AUROCs ranging from 0.55 to 0.99 and behavioral states (waking, slow wave sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep; maximum AUROCs s ranging from 0.64 to 0.98. Our findings agree with Hebb’s view that assemblies correspond to primitive building blocks of representation, nearly unchanged in the adult, while phase sequences are labile across behavioral states and change after novel experience. The results are compatible with a role for phase sequences in behavior

  19. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, Mario M.; Oliveira, Monica G.N.; Ferreira Junior, Decio B.M.; Santos, Barbara O. dos; Santos, Jorge E. dos, E-mail: mongeor@eletronuclear.gov.b [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. - ELETRONUCLEAR, Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  20. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  1. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oihane Irazoki

    Full Text Available Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  2. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Mayola, Albert; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  3. Refraction corrections for surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  4. Renormalons and Power Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Even for short-distance dominated observables the QCD perturbation expansion is never complete. The divergence of the expansion through infrared renormalons provides formal evidence of this fact. In this article we review how this apparent failure can be turned into a useful tool to investigate power corrections to hard processes in QCD.

  5. Radiative Corrections and Z'

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Radiative corrections to parity violating deep inelastic electron scattering are reviewed including a discussion of the renormalization group evolution of the weak mixing angle. Recently obtained results on hypothetical Z' bosons - for which parity violating observables play an important role - are also presented.

  6. General forecasting correcting formula

    OpenAIRE

    Harin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A general forecasting correcting formula, as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts, is created. The formula provides new forecasting resources and new possibilities for expansion of forecasting including economic forecasting into the areas of municipal needs, middle-size and small-size business and, even, to individual forecasting.

  7. ERRORS AND CORRECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    To err is human . Since the 1960s, most second language teachers or language theorists have regarded errors as natural and inevitable in the language learning process . Instead of regarding them as terrible and disappointing, teachers have come to realize their value. This paper will consider these values, analyze some errors and propose some effective correction techniques.

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) ...

  10. Corrections for collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1953-01-01

    In the ”Directions and Hints” for collaborators in Flora Malesiana, which has been forwarded to all collaborators, two corrections should be made, viz: 1) p. 12; Omit the explanatory notes under Jamaica Plain, Mass., and Cambridge, Mass. 2) p. 13; Add as number 12a; Stockholm, Paleobotaniska Avdelni

  11. General forecasting correcting formula

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A general forecasting correcting formula, as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts, is created. The formula provides new forecasting resources and new possibilities for expansion of forecasting including economic forecasting into the areas of municipal needs, middle-size and small-size business and, even, to individual forecasting.

  12. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  13. 77 FR 37877 - Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules, From the People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... International Trade Administration Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules... determination in the antidumping duty investigation of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, whether or not... (202) 482-4406, respectively. Correction In the Federal Register notice Crystalline...

  14. Absence of all components of the flagellar export and synthesis machinery differentially alters virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in models of typhoid fever, survival in macrophages, tissue culture invasiveness, and calf enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C K; Ikeda, J S; Darnell, S C; Watson, P R; Bispham, J; Wallis, T S; Weinstein, D L; Metcalf, E S; O'Brien, A D

    2001-09-01

    In this study, we constructed an flhD (the master flagellar regulator gene) mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the strain to that of the wild-type strain in a series of assays that included the mouse model of typhoid fever, the mouse macrophage survival assay, an intestinal epithelial cell adherence and invasion assay, and the calf model of enterocolitis. We found that the flhD mutant was more virulent than its parent in the mouse and displayed slightly faster net growth between 4 and 24 h of infection in mouse macrophages. Conversely, the flhD mutant exhibited diminished invasiveness for human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells, as well as a reduced capacity to induce fluid secretion and evoke a polymorphonuclear leukocyte response in the calf ligated-loop assay. These findings, taken with the results from virulence assessment assays done on an fljB fliC mutant of serovar Typhimurium that does not produce flagellin but does synthesize the flagellar secretory apparatus, indicate that neither the presence of flagella (as previously reported) nor the synthesis of the flagellar export machinery are necessary for pathogenicity of the organism in the mouse. Conversely, the presence of flagella is required for the full invasive potential of the bacterium in tissue culture and for the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the calf intestine, while the flagellar secretory components are also necessary for the induction of maximum fluid secretion in that enterocolitis model. A corollary to this conclusion is that, as has previously been surmised but not demonstrated in a comparative investigation of the same mutant strains, the mouse systemic infection and macrophage assays measure aspects of virulence different from those of the tissue culture invasion assay, and the latter is more predictive of findings in the calf enterocolitis model.

  15. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  16. Integrated Quality Control of Precision Assemblies using Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro

    coor-dinate measuring machines (CMMs) when working with complex and fragile parts. This Ph.D. project at DTU Mechanical Engineering concerns the applicability of CT for quality control of precision assem-blies. Investigations to quantify the accuracy of CT measurements, reference artefacts to correct...

  17. Radiative corrections to DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold

    2008-01-01

    Early deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments at SLAC discovered partons, identified them as quarks and gluons, and restricted the set of the candidate theories for strong interactions to those exhibiting the asymptotic freedom property. The next generation DIS experiments at FNAL and CERN confirmed the predictions of QCD for the size of the scaling violation effects in the nucleon structure functions. The QCD fits to their data resulted in determining the momentum distributions of the point-like constituents of nucleons. Interpretation of data coming from all these experiments and, in the case of the SLAC experiments, even an elaboration of the running strategies, would not have been possible without a precise understanding of the electromagnetic radiative corrections. In this note I recollect the important milestones, achieved in the period preceding the HERA era, in the high precision calculations of the radiative corrections to DIS, and in the development of the methods of their experimental control. ...

  18. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  19. Correcting Duporcq's theorem☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawratil, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In 1898, Ernest Duporcq stated a famous theorem about rigid-body motions with spherical trajectories, without giving a rigorous proof. Today, this theorem is again of interest, as it is strongly connected with the topic of self-motions of planar Stewart–Gough platforms. We discuss Duporcq's theorem from this point of view and demonstrate that it is not correct. Moreover, we also present a revised version of this theorem. PMID:25540467

  20. Congenitally corrected transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debich-Spicer Diane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial connections, usually accompanied by other cardiovascular malformations. Incidence has been reported to be around 1/33,000 live births, accounting for approximately 0.05% of congenital heart malformations. Associated malformations may include interventricular communications, obstructions of the outlet from the morphologically left ventricle, and anomalies of the tricuspid valve. The clinical picture and age of onset depend on the associated malformations, with bradycardia, a single loud second heart sound and a heart murmur being the most common manifestations. In the rare cases where there are no associated malformations, congenitally corrected transposition can lead to progressive atrioventricular valvar regurgitation and failure of the systemic ventricle. The diagnosis can also be made late in life when the patient presents with complete heart block or cardiac failure. The etiology of congenitally corrected transposition is currently unknown, and with an increase in incidence among families with previous cases of congenitally corrected transposition reported. Diagnosis can be made by fetal echocardiography, but is more commonly made postnatally with a combination of clinical signs and echocardiography. The anatomical delineation can be further assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and catheterization. The differential diagnosis is centred on the assessing if the patient is presenting with isolated malformations, or as part of a spectrum. Surgical management consists of repair of the associated malformations, or redirection of the systemic and pulmonary venous return associated with an arterial switch procedure, the so-called double switch approach. Prognosis is defined by the associated malformations, and on the timing and approach to palliative surgical care.

  1. In vitro kinetochore assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miell, Matthew D D; Straight, Aaron F

    2016-01-01

    The kinetochore is the primary site of interaction between chromosomes and microtubules of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. The kinetochore is a complex of more than 100 proteins that transiently assemble during mitosis at a single defined region on each chromosome, known as the centromere. Kinetochore assembly and activity must be tightly regulated to ensure proper microtubule interaction and faithful chromosome segregation because perturbation of kinetochores often results in aneuploidy and cell lethality. As such, cell free and reconstituted systems to analyze kinetochore formation and function are invaluable in probing the biochemical activities of kinetochores. In vitro approaches to studying kinetochores have enabled the manipulation of kinetochore protein structure, function, interactions and regulation that are not possible in cells. Here we outline a cell-free approach for the assembly of centromeres and recruitment of functional kinetochores that enables their manipulation and analysis. PMID:27193846

  2. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The authors show how certification assembles ‘sustainable’ territories through a complex layering of regulatory authority in which both government and nongovernment entities claim rule-making authority, sometimes working together, sometimes in parallel, sometimes competitively. It is argued...... that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...... dynamic in assembling sustainable territories, and that certification always involves state agencies in determining how the key elements that comprise it are defined. Whereas some state agencies have been suspicious of sustainability certification, others have embraced it or even used it to extend...

  3. Power module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeremy B [Torrance, CA; Newson, Steve [Redondo Beach, CA

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  4. Blade attachment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  5. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  6. Low inductance connector assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  7. Self assembling proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  8. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Interactive Assembly Process Planner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖华飞; 张林鍹; 肖田元; 曾理; 古月

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of the virtual assembly support system (VASS), a new system that can provide designers and assembly process engineers with a simulation and visualization environment where they can evaluate the assemblability/disassemblability of products, and thereby use a computer to intuitively create assembly plans and interactively generate assembly process charts. Subassembly planning and assembly priority reasoning techniques were utilized to find heuristic information to improve the efficiency of assembly process planning. Tool planning was implemented to consider tool requirements in the product design stage. New methods were developed to reduce the computation amount involved in interference checking. As an important feature of the VASS, human interaction was integrated into the whole process of assembly process planning, extending the power of computer reasoning by including human expertise, resulting in better assembly plans and better designs.

  10. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  11. A Method for Designing Assembly Tolerance Networks of Mechanical Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing mechanical assemblies, assembly tolerance design is an important issue which must be seriously considered by designers. Assembly tolerances reflect functional requirements of assembling, which can be used to control assembling qualities and production costs. This paper proposes a new method for designing assembly tolerance networks of mechanical assemblies. The method establishes the assembly structure tree model of an assembly based on its product structure tree model. On this basis, assembly information model and assembly relation model are set up based on polychromatic sets (PS theory. According to the two models, the systems of location relation equations and interference relation equations are established. Then, using methods of topologically related surfaces (TTRS theory and variational geometric constraints (VGC theory, three VGC reasoning matrices are constructed. According to corresponding relations between VGCs and assembly tolerance types, the reasoning matrices of tolerance types are also established by using contour matrices of PS. Finally, an exemplary product is used to construct its assembly tolerance networks and meanwhile to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G; O'Connell, Christopher B; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-09-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that on mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes the formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores.

  13. Chicago aberration correction work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, V.D., E-mail: vnlbeck@earthlink.net [1 Hobby Drive, Ridgefield, CT 06877-01922 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The author describes from his personal involvement the many improvements to electron microscopy Albert Crewe and his group brought by minimizing the effects of aberrations. The Butler gun was developed to minimize aperture aberrations in a field emission electron gun. In the 1960s, Crewe anticipated using a spherical aberration corrector based on Scherzer's design. Since the tolerances could not be met mechanically, a method of moving the center of the octopoles electrically was developed by adding lower order multipole fields. Because the corrector was located about 15 cm ahead of the objective lens, combination aberrations would arise with the objective lens. This fifth order aberration would then limit the aperture of the microscope. The transformation of the off axis aberration coefficients of a round lens was developed and a means to cancel anisotropic coma was developed. A new method of generating negative spherical aberration was invented using the combination aberrations of hexapoles. Extensions of this technique to higher order aberrations were developed. An electrostatic electron mirror was invented, which allows the cancellation of primary spherical aberration and first order chromatic aberration. A reduction of chromatic aberration by two orders of magnitude was demonstrated using such a system. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crewe and his group made significant advances in aberration correction and reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A deeper understanding of the quadrupole octopole corrector was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A scheme to correct spherical aberration using hexapoles was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromatic aberration was corrected using a uniform field mirror.

  14. Industrial Assembly Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Buch, Jacob Pørksen; Iversen, Thorbjørn Mosekjær;

    This technical report presents 13 different industrial assembly tasks, which are composed of 70 different operations. The report is written to provide an overview and do as such not contain product specific information such as object weights, dimensions etc. The operations are classified into a set...

  15. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...

  16. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  17. Assemblies of Polyoxometalates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of Polyoxometalates Polyoxometalates, or POMs for short, come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some of them are among the largest inorganic molecules known today. These molecules can be highly symmetrical and, as the name already implies, consist of (mainly) metal (molybdenum, tungsten,

  18. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may r...

  19. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly ma...

  20. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may require t...

  1. Industrial Assembly Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Buch, Jacob Pørksen; Iversen, Thorbjørn Mosekjær

    This technical report presents 13 different industrial assembly tasks, which are composed of 70 different operations. The report is written to provide an overview and do as such not contain product specific information such as object weights, dimensions etc. The operations are classified into a set...

  2. Metaphase Spindle Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun M. Kapoor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A microtubule-based bipolar spindle is required for error-free chromosome segregation during cell division. In this review I discuss the molecular mechanisms required for the assembly of this dynamic micrometer-scale structure in animal cells.

  3. Dump valve assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A dump valve assembly comprising a body having a bore defined by a tapered wall and a truncated spherical valve member adapted to seat along a spherical surface portion thereof against said tapered wall. Means are provided for pivoting said valve member between a closed position engagable with said tapered wall and an open position disengaged therefrom.

  4. Supramolecular Assemblies in Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, J.; Tietz, C.; Jelezko, F.; Gerken, U.; Schuler, S.; Götze, B.; Volkmer, A.

    2002-10-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus contains a wealth of supramolecular assemblies that are optimized for charge and energy transfer. Various techniques have been applied to investigate these functions that rely on the electronic interaction among pigment molecules. In this contribution we will present single-molecule studies of pigment protein complexes. They reveal new information about electronic interactions between chlorophyll molecules in light harvesting complexes.

  5. Beyond the Assembly Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Rebecca; Guild, Todd

    1985-01-01

    Describes how Hughes Aircraft trainers followed four steps in meeting the challenges of a flexible manufacturing environment: needs assessment, design strategy, pilot evaluation, and follow-through. Within this environment, 50 self-paced training products were developed for one of the company's wire and back plane harness assembly departments. (CT)

  6. America's Assembly Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor...

  7. America's Assembly Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor and pro...

  8. HOW CORRECTION CAN MOTIVATE LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionMistakes and their correction generally follow one another in the language classroom.Most teachersthink that correction is a necessary part of teaching;while most students agree that making mistakesis a necessary part of learning.Although both teachers and students maintain that correction andmistakes are necessary,we often find that some correction helps students’ learning and some does not.Correction can make students lose confidence and interest in learning.In order to try and find outmore about why this happens I surveyed students attitudes towards mistakes and correction.

  9. Experimental repetitive quantum error correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Philipp; Barreiro, Julio T; Monz, Thomas; Nebendahl, Volckmar; Nigg, Daniel; Chwalla, Michael; Hennrich, Markus; Blatt, Rainer

    2011-05-27

    The computational potential of a quantum processor can only be unleashed if errors during a quantum computation can be controlled and corrected for. Quantum error correction works if imperfections of quantum gate operations and measurements are below a certain threshold and corrections can be applied repeatedly. We implement multiple quantum error correction cycles for phase-flip errors on qubits encoded with trapped ions. Errors are corrected by a quantum-feedback algorithm using high-fidelity gate operations and a reset technique for the auxiliary qubits. Up to three consecutive correction cycles are realized, and the behavior of the algorithm for different noise environments is analyzed.

  10. Calculating correct compilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Hutton, Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present a new approach to the problem of calculating compilers. In particular, we develop a simple but general technique that allows us to derive correct compilers from high-level semantics by systematic calculation, with all details of the implementation of the compilers...... falling naturally out of the calculation process. Our approach is based upon the use of standard equational reasoning techniques, and has been applied to calculate compilers for a wide range of language features and their combination, including arithmetic expressions, exceptions, state, various forms...

  11. [Correction of hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M

    1998-12-01

    A thorough evaluation of both urethral and penile malformation are mandatory for the choice of the best surgical treatment of patients with hypospadias. The site and the size of the urethral meatus, the presence of a chordee and of a velamentous distal urethra must be carefully assessed. In distal (glandular and coronal) hypospadias, the meatal advancement with glanduloplasty is the treatment of choice. In proximal hypospadias with chordee, the transverse preputial island flap according to the Duckett's technique allows a one-stage hypospadias repair. The awareness of the possible psychologic impact of genital malformations in childhood recommends an early correction of hypospadias, if possible during the first year of life.

  12. [Correction of paralytic lagophthalmos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskusnykh, N S; Grusha, Y O

    2015-01-01

    Current options for correction of paralytic lagophthalmos are either temporary (external eyelid weight placement, hyaluronic acid gel or botulinum toxin A injection) or permanent (various procedures for narrowing of the palpebral fissure, upper eyelid weights or spring implantation). Neuroplastic surgery (cross-facial nerve grafting, nerve anastomoses) and muscle transposition surgery is not effective enough. The majority of elderly and medically compromised patients should not be considered for such complicated and long procedures. Upper eyelid weight implantation thus appears the most reliable and simple treatment.

  13. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  14. Bacterial Flagellar Motor: A Splendid Molecular Motor%细菌鞭毛马达--一种卓越的分子机器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓国宏; 徐启旺; 刘俊康; 丛严广

    2000-01-01

    鞭毛马达(flagellar motor)是一种分子旋转马达,它在细菌鞭毛的结构与功能中起着中心作用.鞭毛马达的结构已基本清楚,主要由Mot A、Mot B、Fli G、Fli M和Fli N 5种蛋白组成定子(stator)和转子(rotor),其驱动力来自于跨膜的H+或Na+流.目前对鞭毛马达的旋转动力学及旋转力矩产生机制已有初步的了解.鞭毛马达可作为研究分子旋转马达的理想模型,对其深入研究将有助于认识生物能量转化利用及细胞运动的机制并具有广泛的生物学意义.

  15. Chemotactic response with a constant delay-time mechanism in Ciona spermatozoa revealed by a high time resolution analysis of flagellar motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Miyashiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During their chemotactic swimming toward eggs, sperm cells detect their species-specific chemoattractant and sense concentration gradients by unknown mechanisms. After sensing the attractant, sperm cells commonly demonstrate a series of responses involving different swimming patterns by changing flagellar beats, gradually approaching a swimming path toward the eggs, which is the source of chemoattractants. Shiba et al. observed a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in Ciona spermatozoa after sensing chemoattractants; however, the biochemical processes occurring inside the sperm cells are unclear. In the present study, we focused on the timing and sensing mechanism of chemical signal detection in Ciona. One of the most crucial problems to be solved is defining the initial epoch of chemotactic responses. We adopted a high rate of video recording (600 Hz for detailed analysis of sperm motion and a novel method for detecting subtle signs of beat forms and moving paths of sperm heads. From these analyses, we estimated a virtual sensing point of the attractant before initiation of motility responses and found that the time delay from sensing to motility responses was almost constant. To evaluate the efficiency of this constant delay model, we performed computer simulation of chemotactic behaviors of Ciona spermatozoa.

  16. Chemotactic response with a constant delay-time mechanism in Ciona spermatozoa revealed by a high time resolution analysis of flagellar motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashiro, Daisuke; Shiba, Kogiku; Miyashita, Tahahiro; Baba, Shoji A.; Yoshida, Manabu; Kamimura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During their chemotactic swimming toward eggs, sperm cells detect their species-specific chemoattractant and sense concentration gradients by unknown mechanisms. After sensing the attractant, sperm cells commonly demonstrate a series of responses involving different swimming patterns by changing flagellar beats, gradually approaching a swimming path toward the eggs, which is the source of chemoattractants. Shiba et al. observed a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in Ciona spermatozoa after sensing chemoattractants; however, the biochemical processes occurring inside the sperm cells are unclear. In the present study, we focused on the timing and sensing mechanism of chemical signal detection in Ciona. One of the most crucial problems to be solved is defining the initial epoch of chemotactic responses. We adopted a high rate of video recording (600 Hz) for detailed analysis of sperm motion and a novel method for detecting subtle signs of beat forms and moving paths of sperm heads. From these analyses, we estimated a virtual sensing point of the attractant before initiation of motility responses and found that the time delay from sensing to motility responses was almost constant. To evaluate the efficiency of this constant delay model, we performed computer simulation of chemotactic behaviors of Ciona spermatozoa. PMID:25572419

  17. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Navazo, Ana; Barahona, Emma; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  18. Chemotactic response with a constant delay-time mechanism in Ciona spermatozoa revealed by a high time resolution analysis of flagellar motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashiro, Daisuke; Shiba, Kogiku; Miyashita, Tahahiro; Baba, Shoji A; Yoshida, Manabu; Kamimura, Shinji

    2015-01-08

    During their chemotactic swimming toward eggs, sperm cells detect their species-specific chemoattractant and sense concentration gradients by unknown mechanisms. After sensing the attractant, sperm cells commonly demonstrate a series of responses involving different swimming patterns by changing flagellar beats, gradually approaching a swimming path toward the eggs, which is the source of chemoattractants. Shiba et al. observed a rapid increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in Ciona spermatozoa after sensing chemoattractants; however, the biochemical processes occurring inside the sperm cells are unclear. In the present study, we focused on the timing and sensing mechanism of chemical signal detection in Ciona. One of the most crucial problems to be solved is defining the initial epoch of chemotactic responses. We adopted a high rate of video recording (600 Hz) for detailed analysis of sperm motion and a novel method for detecting subtle signs of beat forms and moving paths of sperm heads. From these analyses, we estimated a virtual sensing point of the attractant before initiation of motility responses and found that the time delay from sensing to motility responses was almost constant. To evaluate the efficiency of this constant delay model, we performed computer simulation of chemotactic behaviors of Ciona spermatozoa.

  19. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  20. Using Online Annotations to Support Error Correction and Corrective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn

    2009-01-01

    Giving feedback on second language (L2) writing is a challenging task. This research proposed an interactive environment for error correction and corrective feedback. First, we developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis system called "Online Annotator for EFL Writing". The system consisted of five facilities: Document Maker,…

  1. Research on assembly reliability control technology for computer numerical control machine tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, although more and more companies focus on improving the quality of computer numerical control machine tools, its reliability control still remains as an unsolved problem. Since assembly reliability control is very important in product reliability assurance in China, a new key assembly processes extraction method based on the integration of quality function deployment; failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis; and fuzzy theory for computer numerical control machine tools is proposed. Firstly, assembly faults and assembly reliability control flow of computer numerical control machine tools are studied. Secondly, quality function deployment; failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis; and fuzzy theory are integrated to build a scientific extraction model, by which the key assembly processes meeting both customer functional demands and failure data distribution can be extracted, also an example is given to illustrate the correctness and effectiveness of the method. Finally, the assembly reliability monitoring system is established based on key assembly processes to realize and simplify this method.

  2. Top-down assembly design using assembly features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石万凯; DENEUX; Dominique; 等

    2002-01-01

    The primary task of top-down assembly desig is to define a product's detailed physical description satisfying its functional requirements identified during the functional design phase.The implementation of this design process requires two things,that is ,product functional representation and a general assembly model.Product functions are not only the formulation of a customer's needs,but also the input data of assembly design.A general assembly model is to support the evolving process of the elaboration of a product structure.The assembly feature of extended concept is taken as a functional carrier,which is a generic relation among assembly-modeled entities.The model of assembly features describes the link between product functions and form features of parts.On the basis of this link,the propagation of design modifications is discussed so as to preserve the functionality and the coherence of the assembly model.The formal model of assembly design process describes the top-down process of creating an assembly model.This formal model is represented by the combination of assembly feature operations,the assembly model and the evaluation process.A design case study is conducted to verify the applicability of the presented approaches.

  3. An Improved Genome Assembly of Azadirachta indica A. Juss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraja M. Krishnan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss., an evergreen tree of the Meliaceae family, is known for its medicinal, cosmetic, pesticidal and insecticidal properties. We had previously sequenced and published the draft genome of a neem plant, using mainly short read sequencing data. In this report, we present an improved genome assembly generated using additional short reads from Illumina and long reads from Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencer. We assembled short reads and error-corrected long reads using Platanus, an assembler designed to perform well for heterozygous genomes. The updated genome assembly (v2.0 yielded 3- and 3.5-fold increase in N50 and N75, respectively; 2.6-fold decrease in the total number of scaffolds; 1.25-fold increase in the number of valid transcriptome alignments; 13.4-fold less misassembly and 1.85-fold increase in the percentage repeat, over the earlier assembly (v1.0. The current assembly also maps better to the genes known to be involved in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. Together, the data represent an improved assembly of the A. indica genome.

  4. DIME: a novel framework for de novo metagenomic sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Yu, Ning; Ding, Xiaojun; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed next generation sequencing platforms not only decrease the cost for metagenomics data analysis, but also greatly enlarge the size of metagenomic sequence datasets. A common bottleneck of available assemblers is that the trade-off between the noise of the resulting contigs and the gain in sequence length for better annotation has not been attended enough for large-scale sequencing projects, especially for the datasets with low coverage and a large number of nonoverlapping contigs. To address this limitation and promote both accuracy and efficiency, we develop a novel metagenomic sequence assembly framework, DIME, by taking the DIvide, conquer, and MErge strategies. In addition, we give two MapReduce implementations of DIME, DIME-cap3 and DIME-genovo, on Apache Hadoop platform. For a systematic comparison of the performance of the assembly tasks, we tested DIME and five other popular short read assembly programs, Cap3, Genovo, MetaVelvet, SOAPdenovo, and SPAdes on four synthetic and three real metagenomic sequence datasets with various reads from fifty thousand to a couple million in size. The experimental results demonstrate that our method not only partitions the sequence reads with an extremely high accuracy, but also reconstructs more bases, generates higher quality assembled consensus, and yields higher assembly scores, including corrected N50 and BLAST-score-per-base, than other tools with a nearly theoretical speed-up. Results indicate that DIME offers great improvement in assembly across a range of sequence abundances and thus is robust to decreasing coverage.

  5. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  6. Optical Space Telescope Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Space Telescope Assembly (OSTA) task is to demonstrate the technology readiness of assembling large space telescopes on orbit in 2015. This task is an...

  7. 78 FR 34245 - Miscellaneous Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... office, correcting and adding missing cross-references, correcting grammatical errors, revising language... the name of its human capital office, correcting and adding missing cross-references,...

  8. Power corrections, renormalons and resummation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, M.

    1996-08-01

    I briefly review three topics of recent interest concerning power corrections, renormalons and Sudakov resummation: (a) 1/Q corrections to event shape observables in e(+)e(-) annihilation, (b) power corrections in Drell-Yan production and (c) factorial divergences that arise in resummation of large infrared (Sudakov) logarithms in moment or `real` space.

  9. Radiation camera motion correction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  10. 75 FR 16516 - Dates Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Office of the Federal Register Dates Correction Correction In the Notices section... through 15499, the date at the top of each page is corrected to read ``Monday, March 29, 2010''....

  11. Weak Interactions between Salmonella enterica FlhB and Other Flagellar Export Apparatus Proteins Govern Type III Secretion Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L McMurry

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellum contains its own type III secretion apparatus that coordinates protein export with assembly at the distal end. While many interactions among export apparatus proteins have been reported, few have been examined with respect to the differential affinities and dynamic relationships that must govern the mechanism of export. FlhB, an integral membrane protein, plays critical roles in both export and the substrate specificity switching that occurs upon hook completion. Reported herein is the quantitative characterization of interactions between the cytoplasmic domain of FlhB (FlhBC and other export apparatus proteins including FliK, FlhAC and FliI. FliK and FlhAC bound with micromolar affinity. KD for FliI binding in the absence of ATP was 84 nM. ATP-induced oligomerization of FliI induced kinetic changes, stimulating fast-on, fast-off binding and lowering affinity. Full length FlhB purified under solubilizing, nondenaturing conditions formed a stable dimer via its transmembrane domain and stably bound FliH. Together, the present results support the previously hypothesized central role of FlhB and elucidate the dynamics of protein-protein interactions in type III secretion.

  12. Anomaly corrected heterotic horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, A.; Gutowski, J. B.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider supersymmetric near-horizon geometries in heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We identify the conditions for the horizons to admit enhancement of supersymmetry. We show that solutions which undergo supersymmetry enhancement exhibit an {s}{l}(2,{R}) symmetry, and we describe the geometry of their horizon sections. We also prove a modified Lichnerowicz type theorem, incorporating α' corrections, which relates Killing spinors to zero modes of near-horizon Dirac operators. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are no AdS2 solutions in heterotic supergravity up to second order in α' for which the fields are smooth and the internal space is smooth and compact without boundary. We investigate a class of nearly supersymmetric horizons, for which the gravitino Killing spinor equation is satisfied on the spatial cross sections but not the dilatino one, and present a description of their geometry.

  13. Anomaly Corrected Heterotic Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Fontanella, A; Papadopoulos, G

    2016-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric near-horizon geometries in heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We identify the conditions for the horizons to admit enhancement of supersymmetry. We show that solutions which undergo supersymmetry enhancement exhibit an sl(2,R) symmetry, and we describe the geometry of their horizon sections. We also prove a modified Lichnerowicz type theorem, incorporating $\\alpha'$ corrections, which relates Killing spinors to zero modes of near-horizon Dirac operators. Furthermore, we demonstrate that there are no AdS2 solutions in heterotic supergravity up to second order in $\\alpha'$ for which the fields are smooth and the internal space is smooth and compact without boundary. We investigate a class of nearly supersymmetric horizons, for which the gravitino Killing spinor equation is satisfied on the spatial cross sections but not the dilatino one, and present a description of their geometry.

  14. Catalytic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T; Hsieh, M H; Brun, Todd; Devetak, Igor; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2006-01-01

    We develop the theory of entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting (EAQEC) codes, a generalization of the stabilizer formalism to the setting in which the sender and receiver have access to pre-shared entanglement. Conventional stabilizer codes are equivalent to dual-containing symplectic codes. In contrast, EAQEC codes do not require the dual-containing condition, which greatly simplifies their construction. We show how any quaternary classical code can be made into a EAQEC code. In particular, efficient modern codes, like LDPC codes, which attain the Shannon capacity, can be made into EAQEC codes attaining the hashing bound. In a quantum computation setting, EAQEC codes give rise to catalytic quantum codes which maintain a region of inherited noiseless qubits. We also give an alternative construction of EAQEC codes by making classical entanglement assisted codes coherent.

  15. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the

  16. Karect: accurate correction of substitution, insertion and deletion errors for next-generation sequencing data

    KAUST Repository

    Allam, Amin

    2015-07-14

    Motivation: Next-generation sequencing generates large amounts of data affected by errors in the form of substitutions, insertions or deletions of bases. Error correction based on the high-coverage information, typically improves de novo assembly. Most existing tools can correct substitution errors only; some support insertions and deletions, but accuracy in many cases is low. Results: We present Karect, a novel error correction technique based on multiple alignment. Our approach supports substitution, insertion and deletion errors. It can handle non-uniform coverage as well as moderately covered areas of the sequenced genome. Experiments with data from Illumina, 454 FLX and Ion Torrent sequencing machines demonstrate that Karect is more accurate than previous methods, both in terms of correcting individual-bases errors (up to 10% increase in accuracy gain) and post de novo assembly quality (up to 10% increase in NGA50). We also introduce an improved framework for evaluating the quality of error correction.

  17. BayesHammer: Bayesian clustering for error correction in single-cell sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolenko, Sergey I; Korobeynikov, Anton I; Alekseyev, Max A

    2013-01-01

    Error correction of sequenced reads remains a difficult task, especially in single-cell sequencing projects with extremely non-uniform coverage. While existing error correction tools designed for standard (multi-cell) sequencing data usually come up short in single-cell sequencing projects, algorithms actually used for single-cell error correction have been so far very simplistic.We introduce several novel algorithms based on Hamming graphs and Bayesian subclustering in our new error correction tool BAYESHAMMER. While BAYESHAMMER was designed for single-cell sequencing, we demonstrate that it also improves on existing error correction tools for multi-cell sequencing data while working much faster on real-life datasets. We benchmark BAYESHAMMER on both k-mer counts and actual assembly results with the SPADES genome assembler.

  18. Low inductance busbar assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann

    2010-09-21

    A busbar assembly for electrically coupling first and second busbars to first and second contacts, respectively, on a power module is provided. The assembly comprises a first terminal integrally formed with the first busbar, a second terminal integrally formed with the second busbar and overlapping the first terminal, a first bridge electrode having a first tab electrically coupled to the first terminal and overlapping the first and second terminals, and a second tab electrically coupled to the first contact, a second bridge electrode having a third tab electrically coupled to the second terminal, and overlapping the first and second terminals and the first tab, and a fourth tab electrically coupled to the second contact, and a fastener configured to couple the first tab to the first terminal, and the third tab to the second terminal.

  19. Acquiring Correct Knowledge for Natural Language Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Reiter, E; Sripada, S G; 10.1613/jair.1176

    2011-01-01

    Natural language generation (NLG) systems are computer software systems that produce texts in English and other human languages, often from non-linguistic input data. NLG systems, like most AI systems, need substantial amounts of knowledge. However, our experience in two NLG projects suggests that it is difficult to acquire correct knowledge for NLG systems; indeed, every knowledge acquisition (KA) technique we tried had significant problems. In general terms, these problems were due to the complexity, novelty, and poorly understood nature of the tasks our systems attempted, and were worsened by the fact that people write so differently. This meant in particular that corpus-based KA approaches suffered because it was impossible to assemble a sizable corpus of high-quality consistent manually written texts in our domains; and structured expert-oriented KA techniques suffered because experts disagreed and because we could not get enough information about special and unusual cases to build robust systems. We bel...

  20. Composite airfoil assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  1. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  2. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Modifications to the statutes of the association Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda...

  3. OH Module Assembly Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, P.J.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-16

    There is an OR module assembly stand in use at IB4. This design has been approved by safety, as presented by Mike Foley, and has been successfully used. Another one is needed at the D-zero assembly building, but some modifications need to be made. This report will show that the new modified design is at least as strong, if not stronger, than the older IB4 design in every aspect. Since the weight distribution of the OR modules on the sling is indeterminate, this report compares three cases of support for the entire assembly: the lowest two beams only, the lowest four beams only, and all six beams. In each of these cases, the new design is stronger than the old design in maximum allowable weight. The ability of the the cradle to support the weight is also shown. For all of the failure conditions except for two, the cradle is stronger than the beams that it supports. In the two excepted situations, the calculated limit of the cradle is less than the beams it supports. This is because no credit is taken for the sling and strongback, which in reality will relieve much of the horizontal load.

  4. IAHS Third Scientific Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) convened its Third Scientific Assembly in Baltimore, Md., May 10-19, 1989. The Assembly was attended by about 450 scientists and engineers. The attendance was highest from the U.S., as could be expected; 37 were from Canada; 22 each, Netherlands and United Kingdom; 14, Italy; 12, China; 10, Federal Republic of Germany; 8 each from France, the Republic of South Africa, and Switzerland; 7, Austria; 6 each, Finland and Japan; others were scattered among the remainder of 48 countries total.one of the cosponsors and also handled business matters for the Assembly. Other cosponsors included the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (IAMAP), United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and U.K. Overseas Development Authority (ODA). U.S. federal agencies serving as cosponsors included the Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, National Weather Service, Department of Agriculture, Department of State, and U.S. Geological Survey.

  5. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  6. Assembly of Drosophila centromeric nucleosomes requires CID dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Colmenares, Serafin U; Karpen, Gary H

    2012-01-27

    Centromeres are essential chromosomal regions required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The composition and organization of centromeric nucleosomes containing the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a fundamental, unresolved issue. Using immunoprecipitation of CID mononucleosomes and cysteine crosslinking, we demonstrate that centromeric nucleosomes contain CID dimers in vivo. Furthermore, CID dimerization and centromeric targeting require a residue implicated in formation of the four-helix bundle, which mediates intranucleosomal H3 dimerization and nucleosome integrity. Taken together, our findings suggest that CID nucleosomes are octameric in vivo and that CID dimerization is essential for correct centromere assembly.

  7. Correcting Reflux Laparoscopically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Poulin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Most operations in the abdominal cavity and chest can be performed using minimally invasive techniques. As yet it has not been determined which laparoscopic procedures are preferable to the same operations done through conventional laparotomy. However, most surgeons who have completed the learning curves of these procedures believe that most minimally invasive techniques will be scientifically recognized soon. The evolution, validation and justification of advanced laparoscopic surgical methods seem inevitable. Most believe that the trend towards procedures that minimize or eliminate the trauma of surgery while adhering to accepted surgical principles is irreversible. The functional results of laparoscopic antireflux surgery in the seven years since its inception have been virtually identical to the success curves generated with open fundoplication in past years. Furthermore, overall patient outcomes with laparoscopic procedures have been superior to outcomes with the traditional approach. Success is determined by patient selection and operative technique. Patient evaluation should include esophagogastroduodenoscopy, barium swallow, 24 h pH study and esophageal motility study. Gastric emptying also should be evaluated. Patients who have abnormal propulsion in the esophagus should not receive a complete fundoplication (Nissen because it adds a factor of obstruction. Dor or Toupet procedures are adequate alternatives. Prokinetic agents, dilation or pyloroplasty are used for pyloric obstruction ranging from little to more severe. Correcting reflux laparoscopically is more difficult in patients with obesity, peptic strictures, paraesophageal hernias, short esophagus, or a history of previous upper abdominal or antireflux surgery.

  8. Crystallographic and molecular dynamics analysis of loop motions unmasking the peptidoglycan-binding site in stator protein MotB of flagellar motor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril F Reboul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The C-terminal domain of MotB (MotB-C shows high sequence similarity to outer membrane protein A and related peptidoglycan (PG-binding proteins. It is believed to anchor the power-generating MotA/MotB stator unit of the bacterial flagellar motor to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. We previously reported the first crystal structure of this domain and made a puzzling observation that all conserved residues that are thought to be essential for PG recognition are buried and inaccessible in the crystal structure. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that peptidoglycan binding is preceded by, or accompanied by, some structural reorganization that exposes the key conserved residues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the structure of a new crystalline form (Form B of Helicobacter pylori MotB-C. Comparisons with the existing Form A revealed conformational variations in the petal-like loops around the carbohydrate binding site near one end of the β-sheet. These variations are thought to reflect natural flexibility at this site required for insertion into the peptidoglycan mesh. In order to understand the nature of this flexibility we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the MotB-C dimer. The results are consistent with the crystallographic data and provide evidence that the three loops move in a concerted fashion, exposing conserved MotB residues that have previously been implicated in binding of the peptide moiety of peptidoglycan. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our structural analysis provides a new insight into the mechanism by which MotB inserts into the peptidoglycan mesh, thus anchoring the power-generating complex to the cell wall.

  9. The non-flagellar type III secretion system evolved from the bacterial flagellum and diversified into host-cell adapted systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie S Abby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs are essential components of two complex bacterial machineries: the flagellum, which drives cell motility, and the non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS, which delivers effectors into eukaryotic cells. Yet the origin, specialization, and diversification of these machineries remained unclear. We developed computational tools to identify homologous components of the two systems and to discriminate between them. Our analysis of >1,000 genomes identified 921 T3SSs, including 222 NF-T3SSs. Phylogenomic and comparative analyses of these systems argue that the NF-T3SS arose from an exaptation of the flagellum, i.e. the recruitment of part of the flagellum structure for the evolution of the new protein delivery function. This reconstructed chronology of the exaptation process proceeded in at least two steps. An intermediate ancestral form of NF-T3SS, whose descendants still exist in Myxococcales, lacked elements that are essential for motility and included a subset of NF-T3SS features. We argue that this ancestral version was involved in protein translocation. A second major step in the evolution of NF-T3SSs occurred via recruitment of secretins to the NF-T3SS, an event that occurred at least three times from different systems. In rhizobiales, a partial homologous gene replacement of the secretin resulted in two genes of complementary function. Acquisition of a secretin was followed by the rapid adaptation of the resulting NF-T3SSs to multiple, distinct eukaryotic cell envelopes where they became key in parasitic and mutualistic associations between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Our work elucidates major steps of the evolutionary scenario leading to extant NF-T3SSs. It demonstrates how molecular evolution can convert one complex molecular machine into a second, equally complex machine by successive deletions, innovations, and recruitment from other molecular systems.

  10. Soluble components of the flagellar export apparatus, FliI, FliJ, and FliH, do not deliver flagellin, the major filament protein, from the cytosol to the export gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajó, Ráchel; Liliom, Károly; Muskotál, Adél; Klein, Agnes; Závodszky, Péter; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Dobó, József

    2014-11-01

    Flagella, the locomotion organelles of bacteria, extend from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior. External flagellar proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm and exported by the flagellar type III secretion system. Soluble components of the flagellar export apparatus, FliI, FliH, and FliJ, have been implicated to carry late export substrates in complex with their cognate chaperones from the cytoplasm to the export gate. The importance of the soluble components in the delivery of the three minor late substrates FlgK, FlgL (hook-filament junction) and FliD (filament-cap) has been convincingly demonstrated, but their role in the transport of the major filament component flagellin (FliC) is still unclear. We have used continuous ATPase activity measurements and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies to characterize interactions between the soluble export components and flagellin or the FliC:FliS substrate-chaperone complex. As controls, interactions between soluble export component pairs were characterized providing Kd values. FliC or FliC:FliS did not influence the ATPase activity of FliI alone or in complex with FliH and/or FliJ suggesting lack of interaction in solution. Immobilized FliI, FliH, or FliJ did not interact with FliC or FliC:FliS detected by QCM. The lack of interaction in the fluid phase between FliC or FliC:FliS and the soluble export components, in particular with the ATPase FliI, suggests that cells use different mechanisms for the export of late minor substrates, and the major substrate, FliC. It seems that the abundantly produced flagellin does not require the assistance of the soluble export components to efficiently reach the export gate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Failure of granular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Welker, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates granular assemblies subjected to increasing external forces in the quasi-static limit. In this limit, the system’s evolution depends on static properties of the system, but is independent of the particles’ inertia. At the failure, which occurs at a certain value of the external forces, the particles’ motions increase quickly. In this thesis, the properties of granular systems during the weakening process and at the failure are investigated with the Discrete Element Meth...

  12. Composite nuclear fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollard, W.J.; Ferrari, H.M.

    1982-04-27

    An open lattice elongated nuclear fuel assembly including small diameter fuel rods disposed in an array spaced a selected distance above an array of larger diameter fuel rods for use in a nuclear reactor having liquid coolant flowing in an upward direction. Plenums are preferably provided in the upper portion of the upper smaller diameter fuel rods and in the lower portion of the lower larger diameter fuel rods. Lattice grid structures provide lateral support for the fuel rods and preferably the lowest grid about the upper rods is directly and rigidly affixed to the highest grid about the lower rods.

  13. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    The ability to assemble NPs into ordered structures that are expected to yield collective physical or chemical properties has afforded new and exciting opportunities in the field of nanotechnology. Among the various configurations of nanoparticle assemblies, two-dimensional (2D) NP patterns and one-dimensional (1D) NP arrays on surfaces are regarded as the ideal assembly configurations for many technological devices, for example, solar cells, magnetic memory, switching devices, and sensing devices, due to their unique transport phenomena and the cooperative properties of NPs in assemblies. To realize the potential applications of NP assemblies, especially in nanodevice-related applications, certain key issues must still be resolved, for example, ordering and alignment, manipulating and positioning in nanodevices, and multicomponent or hierarchical structures of NP assemblies for device integration. Additionally, the assembly of NPs with high precision and high levels of integration and uniformity for devices with scaled-down dimensions has become a key and challenging issue. Two-dimensional NP patterns and 1D NP arrays are obtained using traditional lithography techniques (top-down strategies) or interfacial assembly techniques (bottom-up strategies). However, a formidable challenge that persists is the controllable assembly of NPs in desired locations over large areas with high precision and high levels of integration. The difficulty of this assembly is due to the low efficiency of small features over large areas in lithography techniques or the inevitable structural defects that occur during the assembly process. The combination of self-assembly strategies with existing nanofabrication techniques could potentially provide effective and distinctive solutions for fabricating NPs with precise position control and high resolution. Furthermore, the synergistic combination of spatially mediated interactions between nanoparticles and prestructures on surfaces may play

  14. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petkau-Milroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins.

  15. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Cromdal, Jakob; Broth, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction...... exchanges. Through detailed multimodal analysis of participants’ actions, it is shown how instructors systematically elaborate their corrective instructions to include relevant information about the trouble and remedial action – a practice we refer to as unpacking corrections. It is proposed...... that the practice of unpacking the local particulars of corrections (i) provides for the instructional character of the interaction, and (ii) is highly sensitive to the relevant physical and mobile contingencies. These findings contribute to the existing literature on the interactional organisation of correction...

  16. Gravitational Correction to Vacuum Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2015-01-01

    We consider the gravitational correction to (electronic) vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational background field. The Dirac propagators for the virtual fermions are modified to include the leading gravitational correction (potential term) which corresponds to a coordinate-dependent fermion mass. The mass term is assumed to be uniform over a length scale commensurate with the virtual electron-positron pair. The on-mass shell renormalization condition ensures that the gravitational correction vanishes on the mass shell of the photon, i.e., the speed of light is unaffected by the quantum field theoretical loop correction, in full agreement with the equivalence principle. Nontrivial corrections are obtained for off-shell, virtual photons. We compare our findings to other works on generalized Lorentz transformations and combined quantum-electrodynamic gravitational corrections to the speed of light which have recently appeared in the literature.

  17. Food systems in correctional settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smoyer, Amy; Kjær Minke, Linda

    Food is a central component of life in correctional institutions and plays a critical role in the physical and mental health of incarcerated people and the construction of prisoners' identities and relationships. An understanding of the role of food in correctional settings and the effective...... management of food systems may improve outcomes for incarcerated people and help correctional administrators to maximize their health and safety. This report summarizes existing research on food systems in correctional settings and provides examples of food programmes in prison and remand facilities......, including a case study of food-related innovation in the Danish correctional system. It offers specific conclusions for policy-makers, administrators of correctional institutions and prison-food-service professionals, and makes proposals for future research....

  18. Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhuo; Fan, Hen; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-01-01

    The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

  19. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inanç Birol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  20. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Inanç; Chu, Justin; Mohamadi, Hamid; Jackman, Shaun D; Raghavan, Karthika; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Raymond, Anthony; Warren, René L

    2015-01-01

    De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG) paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  1. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  2. Processor register error correction management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  3. Comparison of Topographic Correction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Richter

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of topographic correction methods is conducted for Landsat-5 TM, Landsat-7 ETM+, and SPOT-5 imagery from different geographic areas and seasons. Three successful and known methods are compared: the semi-empirical C correction, the Gamma correction depending on the incidence and exitance angles, and a modified Minnaert approach. In the majority of cases the modified Minnaert approach performed best, but no method is superior in all cases.

  4. Intelligent electrical harness connector assembly using Bell Helicopter Textron's 'Wire Harness Automated Manufacturing System'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, D. W.

    Bell Helicopter Textron, Incorporated (BHTI) installed two Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-11 computers and an American Can Inc. Ink Jet printer in 1980 as the cornerstone of the Wire Harness Automated Manufacturing System (WHAMS). WHAMS is based upon the electrical assembly philosophy of continuous filament harness forming. This installation provided BHTI with a 3 to 1 return-on-investment by reducing wire and cable identification cycle time by 80 percent and harness forming, on dedicated layout tooling, by 40 percent. Yet, this improvement in harness forming created a bottle neck in connector assembly. To remove this bottle neck, BHTI has installed a prototype connector assembly cell that integrates the WHAMS' data base and innovative computer technologies to cut harness connector assembly cycle time. This novel connector assembly cell uses voice recognition, laser identification, and animated computer graphics to help the electrician in the correct assembly of harness connectors.

  5. Food systems in correctional settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smoyer, Amy; Kjær Minke, Linda

    Food is a central component of life in correctional institutions and plays a critical role in the physical and mental health of incarcerated people and the construction of prisoners' identities and relationships. An understanding of the role of food in correctional settings and the effective mana......, including a case study of food-related innovation in the Danish correctional system. It offers specific conclusions for policy-makers, administrators of correctional institutions and prison-food-service professionals, and makes proposals for future research....

  6. Progress of EMBarrel assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalifour, M

    2002-01-01

    The assembly of the sixteen "M" modules into a vertical axis cylinder has been achieved last Friday, completing the first wheel of the Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter (see picture). With this, an important milestone in the construction of the ATLAS detector has been reached. Future steps are the rotation of the cylinder axis into horizontal position, in order to integrate the presamplers and heat exchangers by the end of October. The transportation of the wheel and its insertion into the cryostat is the next major milestone, and is planned for the beginning of 2003. The construction of the modules (the so-called "P" modules) of the second wheel is ongoing at Saclay, Annecy and CERN, and will be completed in the coming months. The assembly of the second wheel should start at CERN in February, and its insertion in the cryostat is scheduled for June 2003. This achievement is the result of a successful collaboration of all institutes involved in the construction of the EM Barrel, namely Annecy, Saclay and CE...

  7. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  8. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  9. ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Auditorium on Wednesday 3 October 2001 at 14.30 hrs The Agenda comprises:   Opening Remarks (P. Levaux) Some aspects of risk in a pension fund (C. Cuénoud) Annual Report 2000: Presentation and results (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the Report are available from divisional secretariats. Results of the actuarial reviews (G. Maurin) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (P. Levaux) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2000 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel. + 41 22 767 91 94; e-mail Graziella.Praire@cern.ch) The English version will be published next week.

  10. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  11. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Nikolay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors.

  12. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  13. Coded nanoscale self-assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prathyush Samineni; Debabrata Goswami

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate coded self-assembly in nanostructures using the code seeded at the component level through computer simulations. Defects or cavities occur in all natural assembly processes including crystallization and our simulations capture this essential aspect under surface minimization constraints for self-assembly. Our bottom-up approach to nanostructures would provide a new dimension towards nanofabrication and better understanding of defects and crystallization process.

  14. Pluribus - Exploring the Limits of Error Correction Using a Suffix Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Daniel; LaFramboise, Thomas; Grama, Ananth; Koyuturk, Mehmet

    2016-06-29

    Next generation sequencing technologies enable efficient and cost-effective genome sequencing. However, sequencing errors increase the complexity of the de novo assembly process, and reduce the quality of the assembled sequences. Many error correction techniques utilizing substring frequencies have been developed to mitigate this effect. In this paper, we present a novel and effective method called PLURIBUS, for correcting sequencing errors using a generalized suffix trie. PLURIBUS utilizes multiple manifestations of an error in the trie to accurately identify errors and suggest corrections. We show that PLURIBUS produces the least number of false positives across a diverse set of real sequencing datasets when compared to other methods. Furthermore, PLURIBUS can be used in conjunction with other contemporary error correction methods to achieve higher levels of accuracy than either tool alone. These increases in error correction accuracy are also realized in the quality of the contigs that are generated during assembly. We explore, in-depth, the behavior of PLURIBUS, to explain the observed improvement in accuracy and assembly performance. PLURIBUS is freely available at http://compbio.

  15. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  16. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  17. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heuy Gap; Jhung, Myung Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-01

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Assembly line performance and modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rane, Arun B; Sunnapwar, Vivek K

    2017-01-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations...

  19. Multi-position photovoltaic assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2003-03-18

    The invention is directed to a PV assembly, for use on a support surface, comprising a base, a PV module, a multi-position module support assembly, securing the module to the base at shipping and inclined-use angles, a deflector, a multi-position deflector support securing the deflector to the base at deflector shipping and deflector inclined-use angles, the module and deflector having opposed edges defining a gap therebetween. The invention permits transport of the PV assemblies in a relatively compact form, thus lowering shipping costs, while facilitating installation of the PV assemblies with the PV module at the proper inclination.

  20. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  1. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  2. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lene; Broth, Mathias; Cromdal, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction exchan...

  3. Feature Referenced Error Correction Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A feature referenced error correction apparatus utilizing the multiple images of the interstage level image format to compensate for positional...images and by the generation of an error correction signal in response to the sub-frame registration errors. (Author)

  4. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  5. Cilium assembly and disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like, immotile organelle present on most types of mammalian cells, which interprets extracellular signals that regulate growth and development. Although once considered a vestigial organelle, the primary cilium is now the focus of considerable interest. We now know that ciliary defects lead to a panoply of human diseases, termed ciliopathies, and the loss of this organelle may be an early signature event during oncogenic transformation. Ciliopathies include numerous seemingly unrelated developmental syndromes, with involvement of the retina, kidney, liver, pancreas, skeletal system and brain. Recent studies have begun to clarify the key mechanisms that link cilium assembly and disassembly to the cell cycle, and suggest new possibilities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27350441

  6. Photovoltaic cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Panitz, Janda K. G.; Sharp, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    A photovoltaic assembly for converting high intensity solar radiation into lectrical energy in which a solar cell is separated from a heat sink by a thin layer of a composite material which has excellent dielectric properties and good thermal conductivity. This composite material is a thin film of porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in which the pores have been substantially filled with an electrophoretically-deposited layer of a styrene-acrylate resin. This composite provides electrical breakdown strengths greater than that of a layer consisting essentially of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and has a higher thermal conductivity than a layer of styrene-acrylate alone.

  7. Genome assembly quality: Assessment and improvement using the neutral indel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meader, Stephen; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Locke, Devin; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton

    2010-01-01

    We describe a statistical and comparative-genomic approach for quantifying error rates of genome sequence assemblies. The method exploits not substitutions but the pattern of insertions and deletions (indels) in genome-scale alignments for closely related species. Using two- or three-way alignments, the approach estimates the amount of aligned sequence containing clusters of nucleotides that were wrongly inserted or deleted during sequencing or assembly. Thus, the method is well-suited to assessing fine-scale sequence quality within single assemblies, between different assemblies of a single set of reads, and between genome assemblies for different species. When applying this approach to four primate genome assemblies, we found that average gap error rates per base varied considerably, by up to sixfold. As expected, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences contained lower, but still substantial, predicted numbers of errors, arguing for caution in regarding BACs as the epitome of genome fidelity. We then mapped short reads, at approximately 10-fold statistical coverage, from a Bornean orangutan onto the Sumatran orangutan genome assembly originally constructed from capillary reads. This resulted in a reduced gap error rate and a separation of error-prone from high-fidelity sequence. Over 5000 predicted indel errors in protein-coding sequence were corrected in a hybrid assembly. Our approach contributes a new fine-scale quality metric for assemblies that should facilitate development of improved genome sequencing and assembly strategies. PMID:20305016

  8. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction

    OpenAIRE

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome–microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the...

  9. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  10. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ...—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP...

  11. The Bicycle Assembly Line Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    "The Bicycle Assembly Line Game" is a team-based, in-class activity that helps students develop a basic understanding of continuously operating processes. Each team of 7-10 students selects one of seven prefigured bicycle assembly lines to operate. The lines are run in real-time, and the team that operates the line that yields the…

  12. Newnes electronics assembly pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Produced in association with the Engineering Training Authority with contributions from dozens of people in the electronics industry. The material covers common skills in electrical and electronic engineering and concentrates mainly on wiring and assembly. 'Newnes Electronics Assembly Pocket Book' is for electronics technicians, students and apprentices.

  13. Assembly sequencing with toleranced parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latombe, J.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Robotics Lab.; Wilson, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1995-02-21

    The goal of assembly sequencing is to plan a feasible series of operations to construct a product from its individual parts. Previous research has thoroughly investigated assembly sequencing under the assumption that parts have nominal geometry. This paper considers the case where parts have toleranced geometry. Its main contribution is an efficient procedure that decides if a product admits an assembly sequence with infinite translations that is feasible for all possible instances of the components within the specified tolerances. If the product admits one such sequence, the procedure can also generate it. For the cases where there exists no such assembly sequence, another procedure is proposed which generates assembly sequences that are feasible only for some values of the toleranced dimensions. If this procedure produces no such sequence, then no instance of the product is assemblable. Finally, this paper analyzes the relation between assembly and disassembly sequences in the presence of toleranced parts. This work assumes a simple, but non-trivial tolerance language that falls short of capturing all imperfections of a manufacturing process. Hence, it is only one step toward assembly sequencing with toleranced parts.

  14. Fuel cell sub-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang V.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

  15. Integrating genome assemblies with MAIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, J.F.; Winterbach, W.; Van den Broek, M.; Daran, J.M.; Reinders, M.J.T.; De Ridder, D.

    2010-01-01

    De novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome with next-generation sequencing data is still a challenging task. Over the past few years several assemblers have been developed, often suitable for one specific type of sequencing data. The number of known genomes is expanding rapidly, therefore it becomes po

  16. What was the Assembly Line?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David

    2010-01-01

    The assembly line is still evolving a century after its invention, and it was not a distinct historical stage, nor was it part of an inevitable sequence that followed "Taylorism."......The assembly line is still evolving a century after its invention, and it was not a distinct historical stage, nor was it part of an inevitable sequence that followed "Taylorism."...

  17. The Bicycle Assembly Line Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    "The Bicycle Assembly Line Game" is a team-based, in-class activity that helps students develop a basic understanding of continuously operating processes. Each team of 7-10 students selects one of seven prefigured bicycle assembly lines to operate. The lines are run in real-time, and the team that operates the line that yields the…

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  19. Generalised geometry for string corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Coimbra, André; Triendl, Hagen; Waldram, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present a general formalism for incorporating the string corrections in generalised geometry, which necessitates the extension of the generalised tangent bundle. Not only are such extensions obstructed, string symmetries and the existence of a well-defined effective action require a precise choice of the (generalised) connection. The action takes a universal form given by a generalised Lichnerowitz--Bismut theorem. As examples of this construction we discuss the corrections linear in $\\alpha'$ in heterotic strings and the absence of such corrections for type II theories.

  20. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  1. Analysis of Alternative Rework Strategies for Printed Wiring Assembly Manufacturing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Driels, Morris; Klegka, John S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting the cost of test, diagnosis, and rework activities in the manufacture of printed wiring assemblies (PWA's). Rework is defined as all actions taken to correct or improve the basic assembly process. These actions may include those of inspectors and solder touchup technicians who do not add value to the PWA, but whose actions are required in order to produce acceptable yields from the manufacturing process. Two alternative rework strategies for cont...

  2. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-10-15

    The 'simple' view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust--yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design.

  3. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-26

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed

  4. Tile Calorimete Pre-Assembly Summary and Barrel Assembly Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Proudfoot, J; Liablin, M V; Topilin, N D

    2004-01-01

    The barrel survey results from the pre-assembly in Building 185 are reviewed. From these and the models developed to calculate the cylinder geometry we propose a minimal modification to the shimming plan for the barrel calorimeter assembly in the Atlas cavern. At the precision of this calculation, we expect the tile calorimeter to be almost entirely within it design envelope. The focus of this note is the radial envelope. Based on the pre-assembly experience the tile calorimeter will fit comfortably within its envelope along the beam line.

  5. Spelling Correction in Agglutinative Languages

    CERN Document Server

    Oflazer, K

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to spelling correction in agglutinative languages that is based on two-level morphology and a dynamic programming based search algorithm. Spelling correction in agglutinative languages is significantly different than in languages like English. The concept of a word in such languages is much wider that the entries found in a dictionary, owing to {}~productive word formation by derivational and inflectional affixations. After an overview of certain issues and relevant mathematical preliminaries, we formally present the problem and our solution. We then present results from our experiments with spelling correction in Turkish, a Ural--Altaic agglutinative language. Our results indicate that we can find the intended correct word in 95\\% of the cases and offer it as the first candidate in 74\\% of the cases, when the edit distance is 1.

  6. Dispersion based beam tilt correction

    CERN Document Server

    Guetg, Marc W; Prat, Eduard; Reiche, Sven

    2013-01-01

    In Free Electron Lasers (FEL), a transverse centroid misalignment of longitudinal slices in an electron bunch reduces the effective overlap between radiation field and electron bunch and therefore the FEL performance. The dominant sources of slice misalignments for FELs are the incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation within bunch compressors as well as transverse wake fields in the accelerating cavities. This is of particular importance for over-compression which is required for one of the key operation modes for the SwissFEL planned at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The centroid shift is corrected using corrector magnets in dispersive sections, e.g. the bunch compressors. First and second order corrections are achieved by pairs of sextupole and quadrupole magnets in the horizontal plane while skew quadrupoles correct to first order in the vertical plane. Simulations and measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility are done to investigate the proposed correction scheme for SwissFEL. This paper pres...

  7. General correcting formula of forecasting?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A general correcting formula of forecasting (as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts) is proposed. The formula provides new forecasting resources and areas of application including economic forecasting.

  8. Quantum corrections for Boltzmann equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.; Levy; PETER

    2008-01-01

    We present the lowest order quantum correction to the semiclassical Boltzmann distribution function,and the equation satisfied by this correction is given. Our equation for the quantum correction is obtained from the conventional quantum Boltzmann equation by explicitly expressing the Planck constant in the gradient approximation,and the quantum Wigner distribution function is expanded in pow-ers of Planck constant,too. The negative quantum correlation in the Wigner dis-tribution function which is just the quantum correction terms is naturally singled out,thus obviating the need for the Husimi’s coarse grain averaging that is usually done to remove the negative quantum part of the Wigner distribution function. We also discuss the classical limit of quantum thermodynamic entropy in the above framework.

  9. General correcting formula of forecasting?

    OpenAIRE

    Harin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A general correcting formula of forecasting (as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts) is proposed. The formula provides new forecasting resources and areas of application including economic forecasting.

  10. Error correcting coding for OTN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Larsen, Knud J.; Pedersen, Lars A.

    2010-01-01

    Forward error correction codes for 100 Gb/s optical transmission are currently receiving much attention from transport network operators and technology providers. We discuss the performance of hard decision decoding using product type codes that cover a single OTN frame or a small number...... of such frames. In particular we argue that a three-error correcting BCH is the best choice for the component code in such systems....

  11. Radiative corrections to Bose condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. (Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, La Habana. Inst. de Matematica, Cibernetica y Computacion)

    1985-04-01

    The Bose condensation of the scalar field in a theory behaving in the Coleman-Weinberg mode is considered. The effective potential of the model is computed within the semiclassical approximation in a dimensional regularization scheme. Radiative corrections are shown to introduce certain ..mu..-dependent ultraviolet divergences in the effective potential coming from the Many-Particle theory. The weight of radiative corrections in the dynamics of the system is strongly modified by the charge density.

  12. Proving Program Correctness. Volume V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Task 2. Proving Program Correctness (P.I.: J.C. Reynolds). This group is working towards programming languaje designs which increase the probability...certain syntactic difficulties: the natural abstract syntax is ambiguous, and syntactic correctness is violated by certain beta reductions. 3 - These...concept of a functor to express a-sp- priat : restrictions on implicit conversion functions. In a similar v-’.1n, we can use the concept of a natural

  13. Part identification in robotic assembly using vision system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabantaray, Bunil Kumar; Biswal, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision system acts an important role in making robotic assembly system autonomous. Identification of the correct part is an important task which needs to be carefully done by a vision system to feed the robot with correct information for further processing. This process consists of many sub-processes wherein, the image capturing, digitizing and enhancing, etc. do account for reconstructive the part for subsequent operations. Interest point detection of the grabbed image, therefore, plays an important role in the entire image processing activity. Thus it needs to choose the correct tool for the process with respect to the given environment. In this paper analysis of three major corner detection algorithms is performed on the basis of their accuracy, speed and robustness to noise. The work is performed on the Matlab R2012a. An attempt has been made to find the best algorithm for the problem.

  14. Sister chromatid tension and the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezi, Luigi; Musacchio, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a feedback control system that monitors the state of kinetochore/microtubule attachment during mitosis and halts cell cycle progression until all chromosomes are properly aligned at the metaphase plate. The state of chromosome-microtubule attachment is implicated as a crucial factor in the checkpoint response. On the contrary, lack of tension in the centromere-kinetochore region of sister chromatids has been shown to regulate a pathway of correction of undesired chromosome-microtubule connections, while the presence of tension is believed to promote the stabilization of attachments. We discuss how tension-sensitive phenomena, such as attachment correction and stabilization, relate to the SAC and we speculate on the existence of a single pathway linking error correction and SAC activation.

  15. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  16. Quantum error correction for beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-07-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) and fault-tolerant quantum computation represent one of the most vital theoretical aspects of quantum information processing. It was well known from the early developments of this exciting field that the fragility of coherent quantum systems would be a catastrophic obstacle to the development of large-scale quantum computers. The introduction of quantum error correction in 1995 showed that active techniques could be employed to mitigate this fatal problem. However, quantum error correction and fault-tolerant computation is now a much larger field and many new codes, techniques, and methodologies have been developed to implement error correction for large-scale quantum algorithms. In response, we have attempted to summarize the basic aspects of quantum error correction and fault-tolerance, not as a detailed guide, but rather as a basic introduction. The development in this area has been so pronounced that many in the field of quantum information, specifically researchers who are new to quantum information or people focused on the many other important issues in quantum computation, have found it difficult to keep up with the general formalisms and methodologies employed in this area. Rather than introducing these concepts from a rigorous mathematical and computer science framework, we instead examine error correction and fault-tolerance largely through detailed examples, which are more relevant to experimentalists today and in the near future.

  17. Geometric correction methods for Timepix based large area detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlicka, J.; Dudak, J.; Karch, J.; Krejci, F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro radiography with the hybrid pixel detectors provides versatile tool for the object inspection in various fields of science. It has proven itself especially suitable for the samples with low intrinsic attenuation contrast (e.g. soft tissue in biology, plastics in material sciences, thin paint layers in cultural heritage, etc.). The limited size of single Medipix type detector (1.96 cm2) was recently overcome by the construction of large area detectors WidePIX assembled of Timepix chips equipped with edgeless silicon sensors. The largest already built device consists of 100 chips and provides fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 14.3 cm2 without any physical gaps between sensors. The pixel resolution of this device is 2560 × 2560 pixels (6.5 Mpix). The unique modular detector layout requires special processing of acquired data to avoid occurring image distortions. It is necessary to use several geometric compensations after standard corrections methods typical for this type of pixel detectors (i.e. flat-field, beam hardening correction). The proposed geometric compensations cover both concept features and particular detector assembly misalignment of individual chip rows of large area detectors based on Timepix assemblies. The former deals with larger border pixels in individual edgeless sensors and their behaviour while the latter grapple with shifts, tilts and steps between detector rows. The real position of all pixels is defined in Cartesian coordinate system and together with non-binary reliability mask it is used for the final image interpolation. The results of geometric corrections for test wire phantoms and paleo botanic material are presented in this article.

  18. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections - III. [O iii] bolometric corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Alison; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present quasar bolometric corrections using the [O III] λ 5007 narrow emission line luminosity based on the detailed spectral energy distributions of 53 bright quasars at low to moderate redshift (0.0345 diversity, introduces scatter into the L_{[O III]}-Liso relationship. We found that the {[O III]} bolometric correction can be significantly improved by adding a term including the equivalent width ratio R_{Fe II} ≡ EW_{{Fe II}}/EW_{Hβ }, which is an EV1 indicator. Inclusion of R_{Fe II} in predicting Liso is significant at nearly the 3σ level and reduces the scatter and systematic offset of the luminosity residuals. Typically, {[O III]} bolometric corrections are adopted for Type 2 sources where the quasar continuum is not observed and in these cases, R_{Fe II} cannot be measured. We searched for an alternative measure of EV1 that could be measured in the optical spectra of Type 2 sources but were unable to identify one. Thus, the main contribution of this work is to present an improved {[O III]} bolometric correction based on measured bolometric luminosities and highlight the EV1 dependence of the correction in Type 1 sources.

  19. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zongxuan (Troy, MI)

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  20. Research on overall assembling and welding process of steel box girder tuyere blocks of Taizhou Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shiguang; Li Hongtao; Wang Chao

    2012-01-01

    This article presents in detail the assembling and welding process technique of the steel box girder tuyere blocks of Taizhou Bridge. The application of this process technique effectively solves the problem of welding stress release in tuyere block assembling and welding without increasing the number of turns of the blocks and overhead welding, thus avoiding possible structural deformation due to excessive accumulation of internal welding stress, greatly reducing the repeated deformation and correction work during assembling and welding, and ensuring the weld seam quality and overall dimensions of tuvere blocks of Taizhou Bridze.

  1. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2010-07-26

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  2. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2013-01-01

    How-things-work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of the individual parts and the interactions across the parts based on their geometry and a few user-specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences, and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions across parts. We demonstrate our system on a wide variety of assemblies. © 2013 ACM 0001-0782/13/01.

  3. Assembly line performance and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Arun B.; Sunnapwar, Vivek K.

    2017-03-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations. In this thesis, a methodology is proposed to reduce cycle time and time loss due to important factors like equipment failure, shortage of inventory, absenteeism, set-up, material handling, rejection and fatigue to improve output within given cost constraints. Various relationships between these factors, corresponding cost and output are established by scientific approach. This methodology is validated in three different vehicle assembly plants. Proposed methodology may help practitioners to optimize the assembly line using lean techniques.

  4. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  5. Optimizing k-mer size using a variant grid search to enhance de novo genome assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Soyeon; Bird, David McK

    2016-01-01

    Largely driven by huge reductions in per-base costs, sequencing nucleic acids has become a near-ubiquitous technique in laboratories performing biological and biomedical research. Most of the effort goes to re-sequencing, but assembly of de novogenerated, raw sequence reads into contigs that span as much of the genome as possible is central to many projects. Although truly complete coverage is not realistically attainable, maximizing the amount of sequence that can be correctly assembled into contigs contributes to coverage. Here we compare three commonly used assembly algorithms (ABySS, Velvet and SOAPdenovo2), and show that empirical optimization of k-mer values has a disproportionate influence on de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome, the nematode parasite Meloidogynechitwoodi. Each assembler was challenged with about 40 million Iluumina II paired-end reads, and assemblies performed under a range of k-mer sizes. In each instance, the optimal k-mer was 127, although based on N50 values,ABySS was more efficient than the others. That the assembly was not spurious was established using the “Core Eukaryotic Gene Mapping Approach”, which indicated that 98.79% of the M. chitwoodi genome was accounted for by the assembly. Subsequent gene finding and annotation are consistent with this and suggest that k-mer optimization contributes to the robustness of assembly. PMID:28104957

  6. Hear Exchange Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc; Miller, Jeffrey; Tonon, Thomas S.

    2003-05-27

    A heat exchange assembly comprises a plurality of plates disposed in a spaced-apart arrangement, each of the plurality of plates includes a plurality of passages extending internally from a first end to a second end for directing flow of a heat transfer fluid in a first plane, a plurality of first end-piece members equaling the number of plates and a plurality of second end-piece members also equaling the number of plates, each of the first and second end-piece members including a recessed region adapted to fluidly connect and couple with the first and second ends of the plate, respectively, and further adapted to be affixed to respective adjacent first and second end-piece members in a stacked formation, and each of the first and second end-piece members further including at least one cavity for enabling entry of the heat transfer fluid into the plate, exit of the heat transfer fluid from the plate, or 180.degree. turning of the fluid within the plate to create a serpentine-like fluid flow path between points of entry and exit of the fluid, and at least two fluid conduits extending through the stacked plurality of first and second end-piece members for providing first fluid connections between the parallel fluid entry points of adjacent plates and a fluid supply inlet, and second fluid connections between the parallel fluid exit points of adjacent plates and a fluid discharge outlet so that the heat transfer fluid travels in parallel paths through each respective plate.

  7. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called digital materials. We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  8. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called "digital materials." We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  9. Verifying the correct composition of distributed components: Formalisation and Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Henrio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides formal definitions characterizing well-formed composition of components in order to guarantee their safe deployment and execution. Our work focuses on the structural aspects of component composition; it puts together most of the concepts common to many component models, but never formalized as a whole. Our formalization characterizes correct component architectures made of functional and non-functional aspects, both structured as component assemblies. Interceptor chains can be used for a safe and controlled interaction between the two aspects. Our well-formed components guarantee a set of properties ensuring that the deployed component system has a correct architecture and can run safely. Finally, those definitions constitute the formal basis for our Eclipse-based environment for the development and specification of component-based applications.

  10. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, O L; Corbin, G J; Dellby, N; Elston, B F; Keyse, R J; Murfitt, M F; Own, C S; Szilagyi, Z S; Woodruff, J W

    2008-02-01

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown.

  11. Progress of the ITER Correction Coils in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, J; Han, S; Yu, X; Du, S; Li, C; Fang, C; Wang, L; Zheng, W; Liu, L; Wen, J; Li, H; Libeyre, P; Dolgetta, N; Cormany, C; Sgobba, S

    2014-01-01

    The ITER Correction Coils (CC) include three sets of six coils each, distributed symmetrically around the tokamak to correct error fields. Each pair of coils, located on opposite sides of the tokamak, is series connected with polarity to produce asymmetric fields. The manufacturing of these superconducting coils is undergoing qualification of the main fabrication processes: winding into multiple pancakes, welding helium inlet/outlet on the conductor jacket, turn and ground insulation, vacuum pressure impregnation, inserting into an austenitic stainless steel case, enclosure welding, and assembling the terminal service box. It has been proceeding by an intense phase of R\\&D, trials tests, and final adjustment of the tooling. This paper mainly describes the progress in ASIPP for the CC manufacturing process before and on qualification phase and the status of corresponding equipment which are ordered or designed for each process. Some test results for the key component and procedure are also presented.

  12. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  13. Analysis of Illumina Microbial Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia; Foster, Brian; Froula, Jeff; LaButti, Kurt; Sczyrba, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Woyke, Tanja

    2010-05-28

    Since the emerging of second generation sequencing technologies, the evaluation of different sequencing approaches and their assembly strategies for different types of genomes has become an important undertaken. Next generation sequencing technologies dramatically increase sequence throughput while decreasing cost, making them an attractive tool for whole genome shotgun sequencing. To compare different approaches for de-novo whole genome assembly, appropriate tools and a solid understanding of both quantity and quality of the underlying sequence data are crucial. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of short-read Illumina sequence assembly strategies for bacterial and archaeal genomes. Different types of Illumina libraries as well as different trim parameters and assemblers were evaluated. Results of the comparative analysis and sequencing platforms will be presented. The goal of this analysis is to develop a cost-effective approach for the increased throughput of the generation of high quality microbial genomes.

  14. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  15. Local stretch zeroing NMO correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, N.; Siahkoohi, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method of normal move-out (NMO) correction called local stretch zeroing (LSZ) method that avoids NMO stretch. The method eliminates the theoretical curves that generate interpolated data samples responsible for NMO stretch. Pre-correction time sampling interval is preserved by reassigning and zero padding of true data samples. The optimum mute zone selection feature of the LSZ method eliminates all interfering reflection events at far offsets. The resulted stacked section from the LSZ method contains generally higher frequency components than a normal stack, and preserves most of the shallow reflectors. The LSZ method requires that zero-offset width of the time gate, i.e. zero-offset time difference between two adjacent reflections, be larger than the dominant period. The major shortcoming of the method occurs when CMP data are over- or under-NMO corrected. Both synthetic and real world examples show the efficiency of the LSZ method over the conventional NMO (CNMO) correction. The method loses its superiority when CMP data are over- or under-NMO corrected.

  16. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  17. Assembly delay line pulse generators

    CERN Document Server

    1971-01-01

    Assembly of six of the ten delay line pulse generators that will power the ten kicker magnet modules. One modulator part contains two pulse generators. Capacitors, inductances, and voltage dividers are in the oil tank on the left. Triggered high-pressure spark gap switches are on the platforms on the right. High voltage pulse cables to the kicker magnet emerge under the spark gaps. In the centre background are the assembled master gaps.

  18. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  19. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  20. DecGPU: distributed error correction on massively parallel graphics processing units using CUDA and MPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchao; Schmidt, Bertil; Maskell, Douglas L

    2011-03-29

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the high-throughput production of sequence data (reads) at low cost. However, these reads are significantly shorter and more error-prone than conventional Sanger shotgun reads. This poses a challenge for the de novo assembly in terms of assembly quality and scalability for large-scale short read datasets. We present DecGPU, the first parallel and distributed error correction algorithm for high-throughput short reads (HTSRs) using a hybrid combination of CUDA and MPI parallel programming models. DecGPU provides CPU-based and GPU-based versions, where the CPU-based version employs coarse-grained and fine-grained parallelism using the MPI and OpenMP parallel programming models, and the GPU-based version takes advantage of the CUDA and MPI parallel programming models and employs a hybrid CPU+GPU computing model to maximize the performance by overlapping the CPU and GPU computation. The distributed feature of our algorithm makes it feasible and flexible for the error correction of large-scale HTSR datasets. Using simulated and real datasets, our algorithm demonstrates superior performance, in terms of error correction quality and execution speed, to the existing error correction algorithms. Furthermore, when combined with Velvet and ABySS, the resulting DecGPU-Velvet and DecGPU-ABySS assemblers demonstrate the potential of our algorithm to improve de novo assembly quality for de-Bruijn-graph-based assemblers. DecGPU is publicly available open-source software, written in CUDA C++ and MPI. The experimental results suggest that DecGPU is an effective and feasible error correction algorithm to tackle the flood of short reads produced by next-generation sequencing technologies.

  1. DecGPU: distributed error correction on massively parallel graphics processing units using CUDA and MPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Bertil

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the high-throughput production of sequence data (reads at low cost. However, these reads are significantly shorter and more error-prone than conventional Sanger shotgun reads. This poses a challenge for the de novo assembly in terms of assembly quality and scalability for large-scale short read datasets. Results We present DecGPU, the first parallel and distributed error correction algorithm for high-throughput short reads (HTSRs using a hybrid combination of CUDA and MPI parallel programming models. DecGPU provides CPU-based and GPU-based versions, where the CPU-based version employs coarse-grained and fine-grained parallelism using the MPI and OpenMP parallel programming models, and the GPU-based version takes advantage of the CUDA and MPI parallel programming models and employs a hybrid CPU+GPU computing model to maximize the performance by overlapping the CPU and GPU computation. The distributed feature of our algorithm makes it feasible and flexible for the error correction of large-scale HTSR datasets. Using simulated and real datasets, our algorithm demonstrates superior performance, in terms of error correction quality and execution speed, to the existing error correction algorithms. Furthermore, when combined with Velvet and ABySS, the resulting DecGPU-Velvet and DecGPU-ABySS assemblers demonstrate the potential of our algorithm to improve de novo assembly quality for de-Bruijn-graph-based assemblers. Conclusions DecGPU is publicly available open-source software, written in CUDA C++ and MPI. The experimental results suggest that DecGPU is an effective and feasible error correction algorithm to tackle the flood of short reads produced by next-generation sequencing technologies.

  2. De novo assembly of Dekkera bruxellensis: a multi technology approach using short and long-read sequencing and optical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Remi-Andre; Bunikis, Ignas; Tiukova, Ievgeniia; Holmberg, Kicki; Lötstedt, Britta; Pettersson, Olga Vinnere; Passoth, Volkmar; Käller, Max; Vezzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    It remains a challenge to perform de novo assembly using next-generation sequencing (NGS). Despite the availability of multiple sequencing technologies and tools (e.g., assemblers) it is still difficult to assemble new genomes at chromosome resolution (i.e., one sequence per chromosome). Obtaining high quality draft assemblies is extremely important in the case of yeast genomes to better characterise major events in their evolutionary history. The aim of this work is two-fold: on the one hand we want to show how combining different and somewhat complementary technologies is key to improving assembly quality and correctness, and on the other hand we present a de novo assembly pipeline we believe to be beneficial to core facility bioinformaticians. To demonstrate both the effectiveness of combining technologies and the simplicity of the pipeline, here we present the results obtained using the Dekkera bruxellensis genome. In this work we used short-read Illumina data and long-read PacBio data combined with the extreme long-range information from OpGen optical maps in the task of de novo genome assembly and finishing. Moreover, we developed NouGAT, a semi-automated pipeline for read-preprocessing, de novo assembly and assembly evaluation, which was instrumental for this work. We obtained a high quality draft assembly of a yeast genome, resolved on a chromosomal level. Furthermore, this assembly was corrected for mis-assembly errors as demonstrated by resolving a large collapsed repeat and by receiving higher scores by assembly evaluation tools. With the inclusion of PacBio data we were able to fill about 5 % of the optical mapped genome not covered by the Illumina data.

  3. Optimizing information in Next-Generation-Sequencing (NGS) reads for improving de novo genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsunglin; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Lee, Wen-Bin; Chiang, Jung-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Next-Generation-Sequencing is advantageous because of its much higher data throughput and much lower cost compared with the traditional Sanger method. However, NGS reads are shorter than Sanger reads, making de novo genome assembly very challenging. Because genome assembly is essential for all downstream biological studies, great efforts have been made to enhance the completeness of genome assembly, which requires the presence of long reads or long distance information. To improve de novo genome assembly, we develop a computational program, ARF-PE, to increase the length of Illumina reads. ARF-PE takes as input Illumina paired-end (PE) reads and recovers the original DNA fragments from which two ends the paired reads are obtained. On the PE data of four bacteria, ARF-PE recovered >87% of the DNA fragments and achieved >98% of perfect DNA fragment recovery. Using Velvet, SOAPdenovo, Newbler, and CABOG, we evaluated the benefits of recovered DNA fragments to genome assembly. For all four bacteria, the recovered DNA fragments increased the assembly contiguity. For example, the N50 lengths of the P. brasiliensis contigs assembled by SOAPdenovo and Newbler increased from 80,524 bp to 166,573 bp and from 80,655 bp to 193,388 bp, respectively. ARF-PE also increased assembly accuracy in many cases. On the PE data of two fungi and a human chromosome, ARF-PE doubled and tripled the N50 length. However, the assembly accuracies dropped, but still remained >91%. In general, ARF-PE can increase both assembly contiguity and accuracy for bacterial genomes. For complex eukaryotic genomes, ARF-PE is promising because it raises assembly contiguity. But future error correction is needed for ARF-PE to also increase the assembly accuracy. ARF-PE is freely available at http://140.116.235.124/~tliu/arf-pe/.

  4. Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    1. The first photograph on p12 of News in Physics Educaton January 2004 is of Prof. Paul Black and not Prof. Jonathan Osborne, as stated. 2. The review of Flowlog on p209 of the March 2004 issue wrongly gives the maximum sampling rate of the analogue inputs as 25 kHz (40 ms) instead of 25 kHz (40 µs) and the digital inputs as 100 kHz (10 ms) instead of 100 kHz (10 µs). 3. The letter entitled 'A trial of two energies' by Eric McIldowie on pp212-4 of the March 2004 issue was edited to fit the space available. We regret that a few small errors were made in doing this. Rather than detail these, the interested reader can access the whole of the original letter as a Word file from the link below.

  5. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Sukcharanjit S, Tan AS, Loo AV, Chan XL, Wang CY. The effect of a forced-air warming blanket on patients’ end-tidal and transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressures during eye surgery under local anaesthesia: a single-blind, randomised controlled trial. Anaesthesia 2015; 70: 1390–4. In the article [1] by Sukcharanjit et al., data in the ‘Systolic blood pressure; mmHg’ row in Table 1 is listed incorrectly. It should be: 158.0 (14.3) in the Forced air warmer column and 160.9 (15.6) in the Heated Overblanket column.

  6. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-29

    Because of a production error, the photographs of pierre Chambon and Harald zur Hausen, which appeared on pages 1116 and 1117 of last week's issue (22 November), were transposed. Here's what you should have seen: Chambon is on the left, zur Hausen on the right.

  7. Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Synsedimentary deformation in the Jurassic of southeastern Utah—A case of impact shaking? COMMENT Geology, v. 27, p. 661 (July 1999) The sentence on p. 661, first column, second paragraph, line one, should read: The 1600 m of Pennsylvania Paradox Formation is 75 90% salt in Arches National Park. The sentence on p. 661, second column, third paragraph, line seven, should read: This high-pressured ydrothermal solution created the clastic dikes, chert nodules from reprecipitated siliceous cement that have been called “siliceous impactites” (Kriens et al., 1997), and much of the present structure at Upheaval Dome by further faulting.

  8. Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The feature article “Neutrons for new drugs” (August pp26-29) stated that neutron crystallography was used to determine the structures of “wellknown complex biological molecules such as lysine, insulin and trypsin”.

  9. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    From left to right: Luis, Carmen, Mario, Christian and José listening to speeches by theorists Alvaro De Rújula and Luis Alvarez-Gaumé (right) at their farewell gathering on 15 May.We unfortunately cut out a part of the "Word of thanks" from the team retiring from Restaurant No. 1. The complete message is published below: Dear friends, You are the true "nucleus" of CERN. Every member of this extraordinary human mosaic will always remain in our affections and in our thoughts. We have all been very touched by your spontaneous generosity. Arrivederci, Mario Au revoir,Christian Hasta Siempre Carmen, José and Luis PS: Lots of love to the theory team and to the hidden organisers. So long!

  10. Local Correction of Boolean Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Alon, Noga

    2011-01-01

    A Boolean function f over n variables is said to be q-locally correctable if, given a black-box access to a function g which is "close" to an isomorphism f_sigma of f, we can compute f_sigma(x) for any x in Z_2^n with good probability using q queries to g. We observe that any k-junta, that is, any function which depends only on k of its input variables, is O(2^k)-locally correctable. Moreover, we show that there are examples where this is essentially best possible, and locally correcting some k-juntas requires a number of queries which is exponential in k. These examples, however, are far from being typical, and indeed we prove that for almost every k-junta, O(k log k) queries suffice.

  11. String-Corrected Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, Veronika; Maloney, Alexander; Rangamani, Mukund

    2005-02-07

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect -- the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive! The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  12. String-corrected black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, Veronika E. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Maloney, Alexander [SLAC and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Rangamani, Mukund [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect - the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive{exclamation_point} The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  13. Aberration Correction in Electron Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Harald H

    2005-01-01

    The resolution of conventional electron microscopes is limited by spherical and chromatic aberrations. Both defects are unavoidable in the case of static rotationally symmetric electromagnetic fields (Scherzer theorem). Multipole correctors and electron mirrros have been designed and built, which compensate for these aberrations. The principles of correction will be demonstrated for the tetrode mirror, the quadrupole-octopole corrector and the hexapole corrector. Electron mirrors require a magnetic beam separator free of second-order aberrations. The multipole correctors are highly symmetric telescopic systems compensating for the defects of the objective lens. The hexapole corrector has the most simple structure yet eliminates only the spherical aberration, whereas the mirror and the quadrupole-octopole corrector are able to correct for both aberrations. Chromatic correction is achieved in the latter corrector by cossed electric and magnetic quadrupoles acting as first-order Wien filters. Micrographs obtaine...

  14. Classical Corrections in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram; Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    An important element in a model of non-singular string cosmology is a phase in which classical corrections saturate the growth of curvature in a deSitter-like phase with a linearly growing dilaton (an `algebraic fixed point'). As the form of the classical corrections is not well known, here we look for evidence, based on a suggested symmetry of the action, scale factor duality and on conformal field theory considerations, that they can produce this saturation. It has previously been observed that imposing scale factor duality on the $O(\\alpha')$ corrections is not compatible with fixed point behavior. Here we present arguments that these problems persist to all orders in $\\alpha'$. We also present evidence for the form of a solution to the equations of motion using conformal perturbation theory, examine its implications for the form of the effective action and find novel fixed point structure.

  15. Classical corrections in string cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1999-07-01

    An important element in a model of non-singular string cosmology is a phase in which classical corrections saturate the growth of curvature in a deSitter-like phase with a linearly growing dilaton (an `algebraic fixed point'). As the form of the classical corrections is not well known, here we look for evidence, based on a suggested symmetry of the action, scale factor duality and on conformal field theory considerations, that they can produce this saturation. It has previously been observed that imposing scale factor duality on the O(alpha') corrections is not compatible with fixed point behavior. Here we present arguments that these problems persist to all orders in alpha'. We also present evidence for the form of a solution to the equations of motion using conformal perturbation theory, examine its implications for the form of the effective action and find novel fixed point structure.

  16. Binary Error Correcting Network Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiwen; Li, Shuo-Yen Robert

    2011-01-01

    We consider network coding for networks experiencing worst-case bit-flip errors, and argue that this is a reasonable model for highly dynamic wireless network transmissions. We demonstrate that in this setup prior network error-correcting schemes can be arbitrarily far from achieving the optimal network throughput. We propose a new metric for errors under this model. Using this metric, we prove a new Hamming-type upper bound on the network capacity. We also show a commensurate lower bound based on GV-type codes that can be used for error-correction. The codes used to attain the lower bound are non-coherent (do not require prior knowledge of network topology). The end-to-end nature of our design enables our codes to be overlaid on classical distributed random linear network codes. Further, we free internal nodes from having to implement potentially computationally intensive link-by-link error-correction.

  17. String-Corrected Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, V.

    2005-01-12

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect--the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive. The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  18. Automatic orientation correction for radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Luo, Jiebo; Wang, Xiaohui

    2006-03-01

    In picture archiving and communications systems (PACS), images need to be displayed in standardized ways for radiologists' interpretations. However, for most radiographs acquired by computed radiography (CR), digital radiography (DR), or digitized films, the image orientation is undetermined because of the variation of examination conditions and patient situations. To address this problem, an automatic orientation correction method is presented. It first detects the most indicative region for orientation in a radiograph, and then extracts a set of low-level visual features sensitive to rotation from the region. Based on these features, a trained classifier based on a support vector machine is employed to recognize the correct orientation of the radiograph and reorient it to a desired position. A large-scale experiment has been conducted on more than 12,000 radiographs covering a large variety of body parts and projections to validate the method. The overall performance is quite promising, with the success rate of orientation correction reaching 95.2%.

  19. Gravitomagnetic corrections on gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Forte, L; Garufi, F; Milano, L

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational waveforms and production could be considerably affected by gravitomagnetic corrections considered in relativistic theory of orbits. Beside the standard periastron effect of General Relativity, new nutation effects come out when c^{-3} corrections are taken into account. Such corrections emerge as soon as matter-current densities and vector gravitational potentials cannot be discarded into dynamics. We study the gravitational waves emitted through the capture, in the gravitational field of massive binary systems (e.g. a very massive black hole on which a stellar object is inspiralling) via the quadrupole approximation, considering precession and nutation effects. We present a numerical study to obtain the gravitational wave luminosity, the total energy output and the gravitational radiation amplitude. From a crude estimate of the expected number of events towards peculiar targets (e.g. globular clusters) and in particular, the rate of events per year for dense stellar clusters at the Galactic Cen...

  20. When correction turns positive: processing corrective prosody in Dutch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana V Dimitrova

    Full Text Available Current research on spoken language does not provide a consistent picture as to whether prosody, the melody and rhythm of speech, conveys a specific meaning. Perception studies show that English listeners assign meaning to prosodic patterns, and, for instance, associate some accents with contrast, whereas Dutch listeners behave more controversially. In two ERP studies we tested how Dutch listeners process words carrying two types of accents, which either provided new information (new information accents or corrected information (corrective accents, both in single sentences (experiment 1 and after corrective and new information questions (experiment 2. In both experiments corrective accents elicited a sustained positivity as compared to new information accents, which started earlier in context than in single sentences. The positivity was not modulated by the nature of the preceding question, suggesting that the underlying neural mechanism likely reflects the construction of an interpretation to the accented word, either by identifying an alternative in context or by inferring it when no context is present. Our experimental results provide strong evidence for inferential processes related to prosodic contours in Dutch.