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Sample records for correct aberrant cftr

  1. Targeted Correction and Restored Function of the CFTR Gene in Cystic Fibrosis Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Crane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed reprogramming and genome editing technologies make possible the derivation of corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cell sources—potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Starting with skin fibroblasts from patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, we derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines. We then utilized zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, designed to target the endogenous CFTR gene, to mediate correction of the inherited genetic mutation in these patient-derived lines via homology-directed repair (HDR. We observed an exquisitely sensitive, homology-dependent preference for targeting one CFTR allele versus the other. The corrected cystic fibrosis iPSCs, when induced to differentiate in vitro, expressed the corrected CFTR gene; importantly, CFTR correction resulted in restored expression of the mature CFTR glycoprotein and restoration of CFTR chloride channel function in iPSC-derived epithelial cells.

  2. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  3. Conformationally rigid histone deacetylase inhibitors correct DF508-CFTR protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Hutt, Darren M.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have shown partial efficacy toward correcting cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein function in ΔF508- CFTR models. While current treatment options for CF generally concentrate on disease symptoms such as management of inflammation...

  4. Pulse compressor with aberration correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankos, Marian [Electron Optica, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing an electron mirror-based pulse compressor attachment to new and retrofitted dynamic transmission electron microscopes (DTEMs) and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) cameras for improving the temporal resolution of these instruments from the characteristic range of a few picoseconds to a few nanoseconds and beyond, into the sub-100 femtosecond range. The improvement will enable electron microscopes and diffraction cameras to better resolve the dynamics of reactions in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. EOI’s pulse compressor technology utilizes the combination of electron mirror optics and a magnetic beam separator to compress the electron pulse. The design exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in the mirror in order to compress the temporally broadened beam. This system also simultaneously corrects the chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens for improved spatial resolution. This correction will be found valuable as the source size is reduced with laser-triggered point source emitters. With such emitters, it might be possible to significantly reduce the illuminated area and carry out ultrafast diffraction experiments from small regions of the sample, e.g. from individual grains or nanoparticles. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate pulse compressor architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between temporal resolution and electron bunch size to achieve the optimum design for two particular applications with market potential: increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of UEDs, and increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of DTEMs. Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key pulse compressor components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were folded

  5. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy

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    McVitie, S., E-mail: stephen.mcvitie@glasgow.ac.uk; McGrouther, D.; McFadzean, S.; MacLaren, D.A.; O’Shea, K.J.; Benitez, M.J.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale. - Highlights: • Demonstration of nanometre scale resolution in magnetic field free environment using aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • Implementation of differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz microscopy in aberration corrected STEM with improved sensitivity. • Quantitative imaging of magnetic induction of nanostructures in amorphous and cross-section samples.

  6. Guanylate cyclase 2C agonism corrects CFTR mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Kavisha; Huang, Yunjie; Mun, Kyushik; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Kessler, Marco M; Hannig, Gerhard; Kurtz, Caroline B; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Helmrath, Michael; Palermo, Joseph J; Clancy, John P; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2017-10-05

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder in which epithelium-generated fluid flow from the lung, intestine, and pancreas is impaired due to mutations disrupting CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel function. CF manifestations of the pancreas and lung are present in the vast majority of CF patients, and 15% of CF infants are born with obstructed gut or meconium ileus. However, constipation is a significantly underreported outcome of CF disease, affecting 47% of the CF patients, and management becomes critical in the wake of increasing life span of CF patients. In this study, we unraveled a potentially novel molecular role of a membrane-bound cyclic guanosine monophosphate-synthesizing (cGMP-synthesizing) intestinal enzyme, guanylate cyclase 2C (GCC) that could be targeted to ameliorate CF-associated intestinal fluid deficit. We demonstrated that GCC agonism results in functional rescue of murine F508del/F508del and R117H/R117H Cftr and CFTR mutants in CF patient-derived intestinal spheres. GCC coexpression and activation facilitated processing and ER exit of F508del CFTR and presented a potentially novel rescue modality in the intestine, similar to the CF corrector VX-809. Our findings identify GCC as a biological CFTR corrector and potentiator in the intestine.

  7. The correction of electron lens aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, P.W., E-mail: peter.hawkes@cemes.fr

    2015-09-15

    The progress of electron lens aberration correction from about 1990 onwards is chronicled. Reasonably complete lists of publications on this and related topics are appended. A present for Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek in the year of their 65th birthdays. By a happy coincidence, this review was completed in the year that both Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek reached the age of 65. It is a pleasure to dedicate it to the two leading actors in the saga of aberration corrector design and construction. They would both wish to associate their colleagues with such a tribute but it is the names of Haider and Krivanek (not forgetting Joachim Zach) that will remain in the annals of electron optics, next to that of Harald Rose. I am proud to know that both regard me as a friend as well as a colleague. - Highlights: • Geometrical aberration correction. • Chromatic aberration correction. • 50 pm resolution. • High-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. • Extensive bibliographies.

  8. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Veit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The most common cystic fibrosis (CF causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del, results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR at the apical plasma membrane (PM of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670 in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect.

  9. The correction of electron lens aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, P W

    2015-09-01

    The progress of electron lens aberration correction from about 1990 onwards is chronicled. Reasonably complete lists of publications on this and related topics are appended. A present for Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek in the year of their 65th birthdays. By a happy coincidence, this review was completed in the year that both Max Haider and Ondrej Krivanek reached the age of 65. It is a pleasure to dedicate it to the two leading actors in the saga of aberration corrector design and construction. They would both wish to associate their colleagues with such a tribute but it is the names of Haider and Krivanek (not forgetting Joachim Zach) that will remain in the annals of electron optics, next to that of Harald Rose. I am proud to know that both regard me as a friend as well as a colleague. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Binocular visual performance and summation after correcting higher order aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Zheleznyak, Len; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2012-12-01

    Although the ocular higher order aberrations degrade the retinal image substantially, most studies have investigated their effect on vision only under monocular conditions. Here, we have investigated the impact of binocular higher order aberration correction on visual performance and binocular summation by constructing a binocular adaptive optics (AO) vision simulator. Binocular monochromatic aberration correction using AO improved visual acuity and contrast sensitivity significantly. The improvement however, differed from that achieved under monocular viewing. At high spatial frequency (24 c/deg), the monocular benefit in contrast sensitivity was significantly larger than the benefit achieved binocularly. In addition, binocular summation for higher spatial frequencies was the largest in the presence of subject's native higher order aberrations and was reduced when these aberrations were corrected. This study thus demonstrates the vast potential of binocular AO vision testing in understanding the impact of ocular optics on habitual binocular vision.

  11. Aberration-corrected STEM: current performance and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellist, P D [Department of Physics, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Chisholm, M F [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Lupini, A R [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Borisevich, A [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Jr, W H Sides [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Pennycook, S J [Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Dellby, N [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Keyse, R [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Krivanek, O L [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Murfitt, M F [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Szilagyi, Z S [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)

    2006-02-22

    Through the correction of spherical aberration in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the resolving of a 78 pm atomic column spacing has been demonstrated along with information transfer to 61 pm. The achievement of this resolution required careful control of microscope instabilities, parasitic aberrations and the compensation of uncorrected, higher order aberrations. Many of these issues are improved in a next generation STEM fitted with a new design of aberration corrector, and an initial result demonstrating aberration correction to a convergence semi-angle of 40 mrad is shown. The improved spatial resolution and beam convergence allowed for by such correction has implications for the way in which experiments are performed and how STEM data should be interpreted.

  12. Numerical correction of aberrations via phase retrieval with speckle illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almoro, Percival; Gundu, Phanindra Narayan; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2009-01-01

    What we believe to be a novel technique for wavefront aberration measurement using speckle patterns is presented. The aberration correction is done numerically. A tilted lens is illuminated with a partially developed speckle field, and the transmitted light intensity is sampled at axially displaced...

  13. Prospects for electron beam aberration correction using sculpted phase masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiloh, Roy, E-mail: royshilo@post.tau.ac.il; Remez, Roei; Arie, Ady

    2016-04-15

    Technological advances in fabrication methods allowed the microscopy community to take incremental steps towards perfecting the electron microscope, and magnetic lens design in particular. Still, state of the art aberration-corrected microscopes are yet 20–30 times shy of the theoretical electron diffraction limit. Moreover, these microscopes consume significant physical space and are very expensive. Here, we show how a thin, sculpted membrane is used as a phase-mask to induce specific aberrations into an electron beam probe in a standard high resolution TEM. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate beam splitting, two-fold astigmatism, three-fold astigmatism, and spherical aberration. - Highlights: • Thin membranes can be used as aberration correctors in electron columns. • We demonstrate tilt, twofold-, threefold-astigmatism, and spherical aberrations. • Experimental and physical-optics simulation results are in good agreement. • Advantages in cost, size, nonmagnetism, and nearly-arbitrary correction.

  14. Generalized Alvarez lens for correction of laser aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFortune, K N

    2004-12-02

    The Alvarez lens (US Patent No. 3,305,294 [1]) is a compact aberration corrector. The original design emphasized in the patent consists of a pair of adjacent optical elements that provide a variable focus. A lens system with a variable effective focal length is nothing new. Such systems are widely used in cameras, for example. It is the compactness and simplicity of operation that is the key advantage of the Alvarez lens. All of the complexity is folded into the design and fabrication of the optical elements. As mentioned in the Alvarez patent [1] and elaborated upon in Palusinski et al. [2], if one is willing to fold even more complexity into the optical elements, it is possible to correct higher-order aberrations as well. There is no theoretical limit to the number or degree of wavefront distortions that can be corrected. The only limitation is that there must be a fixed relative magnitude of the aberrations. Independent correction of each component of the higher-order aberrations can not be performed without additional elements and degrees of freedom [3]. Under some circumstances, coupling may be observed between different aberrations. This can be mitigated with the appropriate choice of design parameters. New methods are available today that increase the practicality of making higher-order aberration correctors [4,5,6].

  15. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  16. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, O L; Corbin, G J; Dellby, N; Elston, B F; Keyse, R J; Murfitt, M F; Own, C S; Szilagyi, Z S; Woodruff, J W

    2008-02-01

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown.

  17. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivanek, O.L. [Nion Co., 1102 8th Street, Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)], E-mail: krivanek.ondrej@gmail.com; Corbin, G.J.; Dellby, N.; Elston, B.F.; Keyse, R.J.; Murfitt, M.F.; Own, C.S.; Szilagyi, Z.S.; Woodruff, J.W. [Nion Co., 1102 8th Street, Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown.

  18. Compounds that correct F508del-CFTR trafficking can also correct other protein trafficking diseases: an in vitro study using cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampson Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many genetic diseases are due to defects in protein trafficking where the mutant protein is recognized by the quality control systems, retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and degraded by the proteasome. In many cases, the mutant protein retains function if it can be trafficked to its proper cellular location. We have identified structurally diverse correctors that restore the trafficking and function of the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis, F508del-CFTR. Most of these correctors do not act directly as ligands of CFTR, but indirectly on other pathways to promote folding and correction. We hypothesize that these proteostasis regulators may also correct other protein trafficking diseases. Methods To test our hypothesis, we used stable cell lines or transient transfection to express 2 well-studied trafficking disease mutations in each of 3 different proteins: the arginine-vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2, also known as V2R, the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (KCNH2, also known as hERG, and finally the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (ABCC8, also known as SUR1. We treated cells expressing these mutant proteins with 9 structurally diverse F508del-CFTR correctors that function through different cellular mechanisms and assessed whether correction occurred via immunoblotting and functional assays. Results were deemed significantly different from controls by a one-way ANOVA (p  Results Here we show that F508del-CFTR correctors RDR1, KM60 and KM57 also correct some mutant alleles of other protein trafficking diseases. We also show that one corrector, the cardiac glycoside ouabain, was found to alter the glycosylation of all mutant alleles tested. Conclusions Correctors of F508del-CFTR trafficking might have broader applications to other protein trafficking diseases.

  19. Sub-ångstrom resolution using aberration corrected electron optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, P E; Dellby, N; Krivanek, O L

    2002-08-08

    Following the invention of electron optics during the 1930s, lens aberrations have limited the achievable spatial resolution to about 50 times the wavelength of the imaging electrons. This situation is similar to that faced by Leeuwenhoek in the seventeenth century, whose work to improve the quality of glass lenses led directly to his discovery of the ubiquitous "animalcules" in canal water, the first hints of the cellular basis of life. The electron optical aberration problem was well understood from the start, but more than 60 years elapsed before a practical correction scheme for electron microscopy was demonstrated, and even then the remaining chromatic aberrations still limited the resolution. We report here the implementation of a computer-controlled aberration correction system in a scanning transmission electron microscope, which is less sensitive to chromatic aberration. Using this approach, we achieve an electron probe smaller than 1 A. This performance, about 20 times the electron wavelength at 120 keV energy, allows dynamic imaging of single atoms, clusters of a few atoms, and single atomic layer 'rafts' of atoms coexisting with Au islands on a carbon substrate. This technique should also allow atomic column imaging of semiconductors, for detection of single dopant atoms, using an electron beam with energy below the damage threshold for silicon.

  20. Prospects for electron beam aberration correction using sculpted phase masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Roy; Remez, Roei; Arie, Ady

    2016-04-01

    Technological advances in fabrication methods allowed the microscopy community to take incremental steps towards perfecting the electron microscope, and magnetic lens design in particular. Still, state of the art aberration-corrected microscopes are yet 20-30 times shy of the theoretical electron diffraction limit. Moreover, these microscopes consume significant physical space and are very expensive. Here, we show how a thin, sculpted membrane is used as a phase-mask to induce specific aberrations into an electron beam probe in a standard high resolution TEM. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate beam splitting, two-fold astigmatism, three-fold astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Conformal dome aberration correction by designing the inner surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    The ray transmission models of optical domes were established, and the characteristics of the rays while passing through a hemispherical dome and a conformal dome were comparatively analysed. Acquiring the minimum deviated angles from the inner surface of the conformal dome was then determined to be the designing goal for reducing the dynamic aberrations. Based on this, the inner surface of the conformal dome was optimized and thus, the dynamic aberrations were reduced. Finally, a completely cooled conformal optical system was designed. The results show that the optical system have produced good imaging quality within all the fields of regard, which further illustrates that designing the inner surface of a conformal dome is an effective method for aberration correction.

  2. Revisiting Cross-Channel Information Transfer for Chromatic Aberration Correction

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Tiancheng

    2017-12-25

    Image aberrations can cause severe degradation in image quality for consumer-level cameras, especially under the current tendency to reduce the complexity of lens designs in order to shrink the overall size of modules. In simplified optical designs, chromatic aberration can be one of the most significant causes for degraded image quality, and it can be quite difficult to remove in post-processing, since it results in strong blurs in at least some of the color channels. In this work, we revisit the pixel-wise similarity between different color channels of the image and accordingly propose a novel algorithm for correcting chromatic aberration based on this cross-channel correlation. In contrast to recent weak prior-based models, ours uses strong pixel-wise fitting and transfer, which lead to significant quality improvements for large chromatic aberrations. Experimental results on both synthetic and real world images captured by different optical systems demonstrate that the chromatic aberration can be significantly reduced using our approach.

  3. Aberration correction for time-domain ultrasound diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, T. Douglas

    2002-07-01

    Extensions of a time-domain diffraction tomography method, which reconstructs spatially dependent sound speed variations from far-field time-domain acoustic scattering measurements, are presented and analyzed. The resulting reconstructions are quantitative images with applications including ultrasonic mammography, and can also be considered candidate solutions to the time-domain inverse scattering problem. Here, the linearized time-domain inverse scattering problem is shown to have no general solution for finite signal bandwidth. However, an approximate solution to the linearized problem is constructed using a simple delay-and-sum method analogous to "gold standard" ultrasonic beamforming. The form of this solution suggests that the full nonlinear inverse scattering problem can be approximated by applying appropriate angle- and space-dependent time shifts to the time-domain scattering data; this analogy leads to a general approach to aberration correction. Two related methods for aberration correction are presented: one in which delays are computed from estimates of the medium using an efficient straight-ray approximation, and one in which delays are applied directly to a time-dependent linearized reconstruction. Numerical results indicate that these correction methods achieve substantial quality improvements for imaging of large scatterers. The parametric range of applicability for the time-domain diffraction tomography method is increased by about a factor of 2 by aberration correction. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  4. Harmonic source wavefront aberration correction for ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianis, Scott W.; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed which uses a lower-frequency transmit to create a known harmonic acoustical source in tissue suitable for wavefront correction without a priori assumptions of the target or requiring a transponder. The measurement and imaging steps of this method were implemented on the Duke phased array system with a two-dimensional (2-D) array. The method was tested with multiple electronic aberrators [0.39π to 1.16π radians root-mean-square (rms) at 4.17 MHz] and with a physical aberrator 0.17π radians rms at 4.17 MHz) in a variety of imaging situations. Corrections were quantified in terms of peak beam amplitude compared to the unaberrated case, with restoration between 0.6 and 36.6 dB of peak amplitude with a single correction. Standard phantom images before and after correction were obtained and showed both visible improvement and 14 dB contrast improvement after correction. This method, when combined with previous phase correction methods, may be an important step that leads to improved clinical images. PMID:21303031

  5. Joint denoising, demosaicing, and chromatic aberration correction for UHD video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanov, Ljubomir; Philips, Wilfried; Damstra, Klaas Jan; Ellenbroek, Frank

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution video capture is crucial for numerous applications such as surveillance, security, industrial inspection, medical imaging and digital entertainment. In the last two decades, we are witnessing a dramatic increase of the spatial resolution and the maximal frame rate of video capturing devices. In order to achieve further resolution increase, numerous challenges will be facing us. Due to the reduced size of the pixel, the amount of light also reduces, leading to the increased noise level. Moreover, the reduced pixel size makes the lens imprecisions more pronounced, which especially applies to chromatic aberrations. Even in the case when high quality lenses are used some chromatic aberration artefacts will remain. Next, noise level additionally increases due to the higher frame rates. To reduce the complexity and the price of the camera, one sensor captures all three colors, by relying on Color Filter Arrays. In order to obtain full resolution color image, missing color components have to be interpolated, i.e. demosaicked, which is more challenging than in the case of lower resolution, due to the increased noise and aberrations. In this paper, we propose a new method, which jointly performs chromatic aberration correction, denoising and demosaicking. By jointly performing the reduction of all artefacts, we are reducing the overall complexity of the system and the introduction of new artefacts. In order to reduce possible flicker we also perform temporal video enhancement. We evaluate the proposed method on a number of publicly available UHD sequences and on sequences recorded in our studio.

  6. Effective object planes for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, R., E-mail: ryu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lentzen, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre, Research Centre Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Zhu, J. [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-01-15

    In aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, the image contrast depends sensitively on the focus value. With the point resolution extended to an information limit of below 0.1 nm, even a focus change of as small as one nanometer could give a significant change in image contrast. Therefore, it is necessary to consider in detail the optimum focus condition in order to take full advantage of aberration-correction. In this study, the thickness dependence of the minimum contrast focus has been investigated by dynamical image simulations for amorphous model structures of carbon, germanium, and tungsten, which were constructed by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculation results show that the minimum contrast focus varies with the object thickness, supporting the use of an effective object plane close to the midplane instead of the exit plane of a sample, as suggested by Bonhomme and Beorchia [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 16, 705 (1983)] and Lentzen [Microscopy and Microanalysis 12, 191 (2006)]. Thus supported particles and wedge-shaped crystals with symmetrical top and bottom surfaces could be imaged at a focus condition independent of the uneven bottom face. Image simulations of crystalline samples as a function of focus and thickness show: for an object thickness of less than 10 nm, the optimum focus condition is matched better if the midplane of the object, instead of the exit plane, is chosen as reference plane. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stringent focus condition is required for aberration-corrected TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum focus should be set with respect to the midplane of a sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The focus condition could be independent of the lateral position on a wedged sample.

  7. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, Urvi, E-mail: urvi.vyas@gmail.com; Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery is a noninvasive technique for causing selective tissue necrosis. Variations in density, thickness, and shape of the skull cause aberrations in the location and shape of the focal zone. In this paper, the authors propose a hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to achieve aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) to correct skull-caused phase aberrations. Methods: Skull-based numerical aberrations were obtained from a MR-guided focused ultrasound patient treatment and were added to all elements of the InSightec conformal bone focused ultrasound surgery transducer during transmission. In the first experiment, the 1024 aberrations derived from a human skull were condensed into 16 aberrations by averaging over the transducer area of 64 elements. In the second experiment, all 1024 aberrations were applied to the transducer. The aberrated MR-ARFI images were used in the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to find 16 estimated aberrations. These estimated aberrations were subtracted from the original aberrations to result in the corrected images. Each aberration experiment (16-aberration and 1024-aberration) was repeated three times. Results: The corrected MR-ARFI image was compared to the aberrated image and the ideal image (image with zero aberrations) for each experiment. The hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique resulted in an average increase in focal MR-ARFI phase of 44% for the 16-aberration case and 52% for the 1024-aberration case, and recovered 83% and 39% of the ideal MR-ARFI phase for the 16-aberrations and 1024-aberration case, respectively. Conclusions: Using one MR-ARFI image and noa priori information about the applied phase aberrations, the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique improved the maximum MR-ARFI phase of the beam's focus.

  8. Correction method of wavefront aberration on signal quality in holographic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Eri; Nakajima, Akihito; Akieda, Kensuke; Ohori, Tomohiro; Katakura, Kiyoto; Kondo, Yo; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2011-02-01

    One of the problems that affects the practical use of holographic memory is deterioration of the reproduced images due to aberration in the optical system. The medium must be interchangeable, and hence it is necessary to clarify the influence of aberration in the optical system on the signal quality and perform aberration correction for drive compatibility. In this study, aberration is introduced in the reference light beam during image reproduction, and the deterioration of the reproduced image signal is examined. In addition, for a basic study of aberration correction, the correction technique using a two-dimensional signal processing is studied.

  9. Studying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Knut W

    2008-07-25

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy-loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli-electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  10. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Fumio, E-mail: hosokawa@bio-net.co.jp [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka [JEOL (UK) Ltd., JEOL House, Silver Court, Watchmead, Welwyn Garden City, Herts AL7 1LT (United Kingdom); Shinkawa, Takao [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Sannomiya, Takumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field’s components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field’s derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. - Highlights: • The formula of partial coherence for aberration corrected TEM is derived. • Transfer functions are calculated with several residual aberrations. • The calculated transfer function shows the characteristic damping. • The odd-symmetric wave aberrations can cause the attenuation of image via coherence. • The examples of aberration corrected TEM image simulations are shown.

  11. Assessing the residual CFTR gene expression in human nasal epithelium cells bearing CFTR splicing mutations causing cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masvidal, Laia; Igreja, Susana; Ramos, Maria D; Alvarez, Antoni; de Gracia, Javier; Ramalho, Anabela; Amaral, Margarida D; Larriba, Sara; Casals, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    The major purpose of the present study was to quantify correctly spliced CFTR transcripts in human nasal epithelial cells from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients carrying the splicing mutations c.580-1G>T (712-1G>T) and c.2657+5G>A (2789+5G>A) and to assess the applicability of this model in CFTR therapeutic approaches. We performed the relative quantification of CFTR mRNA by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of these splicing mutations in four groups (wild type, CF-F508del controls, CF patients and CF carriers) of individuals. In addition, in vitro assays using minigene constructs were performed to evaluate the effect of a new CF complex allele c.[2657+5G>A; 2562T>G]. Ex vivo qPCR data show that the primary consequence of both mutations at the RNA level is the skipping of their neighboring exon (6 and 16, respectively). The CFTR minigenes results mimicked the ex vivo data, as exon 16 skipping is the main aberrant transcript, and the correctly spliced transcript level was observed in a similar proportion when the c.2657+5G>A mutation is present. In summary, we provide evidence that ex vivo quantitative transcripts analysis using RT/qPCR is a robust technology that could be useful for measuring the efficacy of therapeutic approaches that attempt to achieve an increase in CFTR gene expression.

  12. Refractive Changes Induced by Spherical Aberration in Laser Correction Procedures: An Adaptive Optics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, Alfredo; Martinez-Sorribes, Paula; Recuerda, Margarita

    2017-07-01

    To study the effect on vision of induced negative and positive spherical aberration within the range of laser vision correction procedures. In 10 eyes (mean age: 35.8 years) under cyclopegic conditions, spherical aberration values from -0.75 to +0.75 µm in 0.25-µm steps were induced by an adaptive optics system. Astigmatism and spherical refraction were corrected, whereas the other natural aberrations remained untouched. Visual acuity, depth of focus defined as the interval of vision for which the target was still perceived acceptable, contrast sensitivity, and change in spherical refraction associated with the variation in pupil diameter from 6 to 2.5 mm were measured. A refractive change of 1.60 D/µm of induced spherical aberration was obtained. Emmetropic eyes became myopic when positive spherical aberration was induced and hyperopic when negative spherical aberration was induced (R2 = 81%). There were weak correlations between spherical aberration and visual acuity or depth of focus (R2 = 2% and 3%, respectively). Contrast sensitivity worsened with the increment of spherical aberration (R2 = 59%). When pupil size decreased, emmetropic eyes became hyperopic when preexisting spherical aberration was positive and myopic when spherical aberration was negative, with an average refractive change of 0.60 D/µm of spherical aberration (R2 = 54%). An inverse linear correlation exists between the refractive state of the eye and spherical aberration induced within the range of laser vision correction. Small values of spherical aberration do not worsen visual acuity or depth of focus, but positive spherical aberration may induce night myopia. In addition, the changes in spherical refraction when the pupil constricts may worsen near vision when positive spherical aberration is induced or improve it when spherical aberration is negative. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(7):470-474.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Urvi; Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a technique to achieve phase aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (MR-ARFI) imaging to correct skull caused phase aberrations. This technique resulted in a 10% improvement of the focal intensity using only one MR-ARFI image.

  14. Criteria for correction of quadratic field-dependent aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyu; Burge, James H

    2002-11-01

    Aberrations of imaging systems can be described by using a polynomial expansion of the dependence on field position, or the off-axis distance of a point object. On-axis, or zero-order, aberrations can be calculated directly. It is well-known that aberrations with linear field dependence can be calculated and controlled by using the Abbe sine condition, which evaluates only on-axis behavior. We present a new set of relationships that fully describe the aberrations that depend on the second power of the field. A simple set of equations is derived by using Hamilton's characteristic functions and simplified by evaluating astigmatism in the pupil. The equations, which we call the pupil astigmatism criteria, use on-axis behavior to evaluate and control all aberrations with quadratic dependence on the field and arbitrary dependence on the pupil. These relations are explained and are validated by using several specific optical designs.

  15. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L. Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Batson, Philip E. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Devices and Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Materials Science, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dellby, Niklas [Nion Company, 11515 NE 118th Street, Kirkland, WA 98034 (United States); Krivanek, Ondrej L. [Nion Company, 11515 NE 118th Street, Kirkland, WA 98034 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper “In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday”, recently published in Ultramicroscopy. - Highlights: • We provide a brief history of the Cambridge project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction work and related research. • We summarize our corrector development work that followed the Cambridge project, and which was the first to reach higher spatial resolution than any non-corrected electron microscope.

  16. Nanofocusing with aberration-corrected rotationally parabolic refractive X-ray lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiboth, Frank; Wittwer, Felix; Scholz, Maria; Kahnt, Maik; Seyrich, Martin; Schropp, Andreas; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Garrevoet, Jan; Falkenberg, Gerald; Schroer, Christian G

    2018-01-01

    Wavefront errors of rotationally parabolic refractive X-ray lenses made of beryllium (Be CRLs) have been recovered for various lens sets and X-ray beam configurations. Due to manufacturing via an embossing process, aberrations of individual lenses within the investigated ensemble are very similar. By deriving a mean single-lens deformation for the ensemble, aberrations of any arbitrary lens stack can be predicted from the ensemble with \\bar{\\sigma} = 0.034λ. Using these findings the expected focusing performance of current Be CRLs are modeled for relevant X-ray energies and bandwidths and it is shown that a correction of aberrations can be realised without prior lens characterization but simply based on the derived lens deformation. The performance of aberration-corrected Be CRLs is discussed and the applicability of aberration-correction demonstrated over wide X-ray energy ranges.

  17. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albina Y. Borisevich; Andrew R. Lupini; Stephen J. Pennycook

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition...

  18. Ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography with monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert J. Zawadzki; Barry Cense; Yan Zhang; Stacey S. Choi; Donald T. Miller; John S. Werner

    2008-01-01

    .... Critical to the instrument's resolution is a customized achromatizing lens that corrects for the eye's longitudinal chromatic aberration and an ultra broadband light source (Δλ=112nm λ_0=~836 nm...

  19. Aberration-corrected imaging of active sites on industrial catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Chang, L-Y; Hetherington, CJD

    2007-01-01

    Picture perfect: Information about the local topologies of active sites on commercial nanoparticles can be gained with atomic resolution through spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A powder of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black was examined with two advanced TEM...... techniques based on recent developments in hardware (aberration correction) and computation (exit wavefunction restoration). (Figure Presented). © 2007 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA....

  20. Magnetic fluid based deformable mirror for aberration correction of liquid telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-qiu; Wu, Zhi-zheng; Kong, Xiang-hui; Zhang, Zhu; Liu, Mei

    2017-03-01

    A magnetic fluid based deformable mirror (MFDM) that could produce a large stroke more than 100 μm is designed and demonstrated experimentally with respect to the characteristics of the aberration of the liquid telescope. Its aberration correction performance is verified by the co-simulation using COMSOL and MATLAB. Furthermore, the stroke performance of the MFDM and the decentralized linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) mirror surface control approach are experimentally evaluated with a prototype of MFDM in an adaptive optics system to show its potential application for the large aberration correction of liquid telescopes.

  1. Deep Tissue Wavefront Estimation for Sensorless Aberration Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahimovic Emina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple light scattering in biological tissues limits the measurement depth for traditional wavefront sensor. The attenuated ballistic light and the background noise caused by the diffuse light give low signal to noise ratio for wavefront measurement. To overcome this issue, we introduced a wavefront estimation method based on a ray tracing algorithm to overcome this issue. With the knowledge of the refractive index of the medium, the wavefront is estimated by calculating optical path length of rays from the target inside of the samples. This method can provide not only the information of spherical aberration from the refractive-index mismatch between the medium and biological sample but also other aberrations caused by the irregular interface between them. Simulations based on different configurations are demonstrated in this paper.

  2. Membrane-based aberration-corrected tunable micro-lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Philipp; Ermantraut, Eugen; Mader, Daniel; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    We present measurements and simulations of membrane-based micro-lens stacks, tunable in focal length in the range of 10mm to 50mm without chromatic aberration. The pressure-actuated, liquid-filled, membrane-based micro-lenses are fabricated by an all-silicone molding approach and consist of three chambers separated by two highly flexible silicone-membranes. Based on the idea of the classical achromatic Fraunhofer doublet, two different liquids with suitable optical properties are used. Pressure-dependent surface topologies are measured by profilometry for determining the correlation between refraction and applied pressure. The profiles are fit to polynomials; the coefficients of the polynomials are pressure-dependent and fit to empirically determined functions which are then used as an input for optical ray-tracing. Using this approach, the focal length is tunable while compensating for chromatic aberration by suitably applied pressures.

  3. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Correcting dynamic residual aberrations of conformal optical systems using AO technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Lin; Huang, Yi-Fan; Du, Bao-Lin

    2009-07-01

    This paper analyses the dynamic residual aberrations of a conformal optical system and introduces adaptive optics (AO) correction technology to this system. The image sharpening AO system is chosen as the correction scheme. Communication between MATLAB and Code V is established via ActiveX technique in computer simulation. The SPGD algorithm is operated at seven zoom positions to calculate the optimized surface shape of the deformable mirror. After comparison of performance of the corrected system with the baseline system, AO technology is proved to be a good way of correcting the dynamic residual aberration in conformal optical design.

  4. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Advanced semiconductor characterization with aberration corrected electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvière, J. L.; Prestat, E.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Den Hertog, M.; Bougerol, C.; Cooper, D.; Zuo, J.

    2013-11-01

    Spherical aberration (Cs) correctors were demonstrated in the last years of the twentieth century and became commercially available a few years later. In Grenoble, we received our first probe corrector on a TEM/STEM machine in 2006. Cs-correctors have allowed us to improve the spatial resolution and the contrast of high resolution images both in TEM and STEM. The aim of the article is not to give a detailed description of Cs-correctors or a thorough analysis of their pros and cons but to illustrate what the benefits of the Cs-correctors have been in four areas: (i) atomic structure determination, (ii) polarity measurement, (iii) strain determination and (iv) interface analysis. Emphasis is put on the probe corrector although some comments on image correctors are given as well.

  6. Targeted Lesion Generation Through the Skull Without Aberration Correction Using Histotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukovich, Jonathan; Xu, Zhen; Kim, Yohan; Cao, Hui; Nguyen, Thai-Son; Pandey, Aditya; Hall, Timothy; Cain, Charles

    2016-02-18

    This study demonstrates the ability of histotripsy to generate targeted lesions through the skullcap without using aberration correction. Histotripsy therapy was delivered using a 500 kHz, 256-element hemispherical transducer with an aperture diameter of 30 cm and a focal distance of 15 cm fabricated in our lab. This transducer is theoretically capable of producing peak rarefactional pressures, based on linear estimation, (p-)LE, in the free field in excess of 200MPa with pulse durations 2 acoustic cycles. Three excised human skullcaps were used displaying attenuations of 73-81% of the acoustic pressure without aberration correction. Through all three skullcaps, compact lesions with radii less than 1mm were generated in red blood cell (RBC) agarose tissue phantoms without aberration correction, using estimated (p-)LE of 28-39MPa, a pulse repetition frequency of 1Hz, and a total number of 300 pulses. Lesion generation was consistently observed at the geometric focus of the transducer as the position of the skullcap with respect to the transducer was varied, and multiple patterned lesions were generated transcranially by mechanically adjusting the position of the skullcap with respect to the transducer to target different regions within. These results show that compact, targeted lesions with sharp boundaries can be generated through intact skullcaps using histotripsy with very short pulses without using aberration correction. Such capability has the potential to greatly simplify transcranial ultrasound therapy for non-invasive transcranial applications, as current ultrasound transcranial therapy techniques all require sophisticated aberration correction.

  7. Correcting the aero-optical aberration of the supersonic mixing layer with adaptive optics: concept validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Jiang, Zongfu; Yi, Shihe; Xie, Wenke; Liao, Tianhe

    2012-06-10

    We describe an adaptive optics (AO) system for correcting the aero-optical aberration of the supersonic mixing layer and test its performance with numerical simulations. The AO system is based on the measurement of distributed Strehl ratios and the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. The aero-optical aberration is computed by the direct numerical simulation of a two-dimensional supersonic mixing layer. When the SPGD algorithm is applied directly, the AO cannot give effective corrections. This paper suggests two strategies to improve the performance of the SPGD algorithm for use in aero-optics. The first one is using an iteration process keeping finite memory, and the second is based on the frozen hypothesis. With these modifications, the performance of AO is improved and the aero-optical aberration can be corrected to some noticeable extent. The possibility of experimental implementation is also discussed.

  8. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  9. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L Michael; Batson, Philip E; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L

    2015-10-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper "In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday", recently published in Ultramicroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Digital aberration correction of fluorescent images with coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-03-01

    Coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT) is an imaging method that permits digital holographic propagation of fluorescent light. The image formation process in CHIRPT is based on illuminating the specimen with a precisely controlled spatio-temporally varying intensity pattern. This pattern is formed by focusing a spatially coherent illumination beam to a line focus on a spinning modulation mask, and image relaying the mask plane to the focal plane of an objective lens. Deviations from the designed spatio-temporal illumination pattern due to imperfect mounting of the circular modulation mask onto the rotation motor induce aberrations in the recovered image. Here we show that these aberrations can be measured and removed non-iteratively by measuring the disk aberration phase externally. We also demonstrate measurement and correction of systematic optical aberrations in the CHIRPT microscope.

  11. Energy-based adaptive focusing of waves: application to noninvasive aberration correction of ultrasonic wavefields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Eric; Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2009-11-01

    An aberration correction method based on the maximization of the wave intensity at the focus of an emitting array is presented. The potential of this new adaptive focusing technique is investigated for ultrasonic focusing in biological tissues. The acoustic intensity is maximized noninvasively through direct measurement or indirect estimation of the beam energy at the focus for a series of spatially coded emissions. For ultrasonic waves, the acoustic energy at the desired focus can be indirectly estimated from the local displacements induced in tissues by the ultrasonic radiation force of the beam. Based on the measurement of these displacements, this method allows determination of the precise estimation of the phase and amplitude aberrations, and consequently the correction of aberrations along the beam travel path. The proof of concept is first performed experimentally using a large therapeutic array with strong electronic phase aberrations (up to 2pi). Displacements induced by the ultrasonic radiation force at the desired focus are indirectly estimated using the time shift of backscattered echoes recorded on the array. The phase estimation is deduced accurately using a direct inversion algorithm which reduces the standard deviation of the phase distribution from sigma = 1.89 radian before correction to sigma = 0.53 radian following correction. The corrected beam focusing quality is verified using a needle hydrophone. The peak intensity obtained through the aberrator is found to be -7.69 dB below the reference intensity obtained without any aberration. Using the phase correction, a sharp focus is restored through the aberrator with a relative peak intensity of -0.89 dB. The technique is tested experimentally using a linear transmit/receive array through a real aberrating layer. The array is used to automatically correct its beam quality, as it both generates the radiation force with coded excitations and indirectly estimates the acoustic intensity at the focus

  12. Energy-based adaptive focusing of waves: application to noninvasive aberration correction of ultrasonic wavefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Eric; Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2009-01-01

    An aberration correction method based on the maximization of the wave intensity at the focus of an emitting array is presented. The potential of this new adaptive focusing technique is investigated for ultrasonic focusing in biological tissues. The acoustic intensity is maximized non invasively through the direct measurement or indirect estimation of the beam energy at the focus for a series of spatially coded emissions. For ultrasonic waves, the acoustic energy at the desired focus can be indirectly estimated from the local displacements induced in tissues by the ultrasonic radiation force of the beam. Based on the measurement of these displacements, this method allows the precise estimation of the phase and amplitude aberrations and consequently the correction of aberrations along the beam travel path. The proof of concept is first performed experimentally using a large therapeutic array with strong electronic phase aberrations (up to 2π). Displacements induced by the ultrasonic radiation force at the desired focus are indirectly estimated using the time shift of backscattered echoes recorded on the array. The phase estimation is deduced accurately using a direct inversion algorithm which reduces the standard deviation of the phase distribution from σ = 1.89 before correction to σ = 0.53 following correction. The corrected beam focusing quality is verified using a needle hydrophone. The peak intensity obtained through the aberrator is found to be −7.69 dB below the reference intensity obtained without any aberration. Using the phase correction, a sharp focus is restored through the aberrator with a relative peak intensity of −0.89 dB. The technique is tested experimentally using a linear transmit/receive array through a real aberrating layer. The array is used to automatically correct its beam quality, as it both generates the radiation force with coded excitations and indirectly estimates the acoustic intensity at the focus with speckle tracking. This

  13. Aberration-corrected STEM for atomic-resolution imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, O L; Lovejoy, T C; Dellby, N

    2015-09-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes are able to form electron beams smaller than 100 pm, which is about half the size of an average atom. Probing materials with such beams leads to atomic-resolution images, electron energy loss and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra obtained from single atomic columns and even single atoms, and atomic-resolution elemental maps. We review briefly how such electron beams came about, and show examples of applications. We also summarize recent developments that are propelling aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes in new directions, such as complete control of geometric aberration up to fifth order, and ultra-high-energy resolution EELS that is allowing vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Dynamic aberration correction for conformal optics using model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinli; Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Wang, Rui; Hu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    For missiles and airplanes with high Mach number, traditional spherical or flat window can cause a lot of air drag. Conformal window that follow the general contour of surrounding surface can substantially decrease air drag and extend operational range. However, the local shape of conformal window changes across the Field Of Regard (FOR), leading to time-varying FOR-dependent wavefront aberration and degraded image. So the correction of dynamic aberration is necessary. In this paper, model-based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics (WSAO) algorithm is investigated both by simulation and experiment for central-obscured pupil. The algorithm is proved to be effective and the correction accuracy of using DM modes is higher than Lukosz modes. For dynamic aberration in our system, the SR can be better than 0.8 when the change of looking angle is less than 2° after t seconds which is the time delay of the control system.

  15. Effect of optical correction and remaining aberrations on peripheral resolution acuity in the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Linda; Manzanera, Silvestre; Prieto, Pedro M; Ayala, Diego B; Gorceix, Nicolas; Gustafsson, Jörgen; Unsbo, Peter; Artal, Pablo

    2007-10-01

    Retinal sampling poses a fundamental limit to resolution acuity in the periphery. However, reduced image quality from optical aberrations may also influence peripheral resolution. In this study, we investigate the impact of different degrees of optical correction on acuity in the periphery. We used an adaptive optics system to measure and modify the off-axis aberrations of the right eye of six normal subjects at 20 degrees eccentricity. The system consists of a Hartmann-Shack sensor, a deformable mirror, and a channel for visual testing. Four different optical corrections were tested, ranging from foveal sphero-cylindrical correction to full correction of eccentric low- and high-order monochromatic aberrations. High-contrast visual acuity was measured in green light using a forced choice procedure with Landolt C's, viewed via the deformable mirror through a 4.8-mm artificial pupil. The Zernike terms mainly induced by eccentricity were defocus and with- and against-the-rule astigmatism and each correction condition was successfully implemented. On average, resolution decimal visual acuity improved from 0.057 to 0.061 as the total root-mean-square wavefront error changed from 1.01 mum to 0.05 mum. However, this small tendency of improvement in visual acuity with correction was not significant. The results suggest that for our experimental conditions and subjects, the resolution acuity in the periphery cannot be improved with optical correction.

  16. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth.

  17. Device and method for creating Gaussian aberration-corrected electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorran, Benjamin; Linck, Martin

    2016-01-19

    Electron beam phase gratings have phase profiles that produce a diffracted beam having a Gaussian or other selected intensity profile. Phase profiles can also be selected to correct or compensate electron lens aberrations. Typically, a low diffraction order produces a suitable phase profile, and other orders are discarded.

  18. Octopole correction of geometric aberrations for high-current heavy-ion fusion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Haber, I.; Crandall, K.R.; Brandon, S.T.

    1989-03-17

    The success of heavy-ion fusion depends critically on the ability to focus heavy-ion beams to millimeter-size spots. Third-order geometric aberrations caused by fringe fields of the final focusing quadrupoles can significantly distort the focal spot size calculated by first-order theory. We present a method to calculate the locations and strengths of the octopoles that are needed to correct these aberrations. Calculation indicates that the strengths of the octopoles are substantially less than that of the final focusing quadrupoles. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  19. CD error caused by aberration and its possible compensation by optical proximity correction in extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jeong-Gu; Kim, In-Seon; Kim, Guk-Jin; No, Hee-Ra; Kim, Byung-Hun; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2017-03-01

    There has been reports of EUV scanner aberration effects to the patterns down to 18 nm half-pitch (hp). Maximum aberration of the latest EUV scanner is reported as 25 mλ. We believe that the first EUV mass production will be applied to the devices of 16 nm hp, so that we checked the aberration effects on 16 nm periodic line and space patterns and nonperiodic double and five-bar patterns. Coma aberrations of Z7, Z8, Z14 and Z15 Zernike polynomials (ZP) seems to be the dominant ones that make pattern distortion. Non-negligible critical dimension (CD) variation and position shift are obtained with the reported maximum 25 mλ of coma aberration. Optical proximity correction (OPC) is tried to see if this aberration effects can be minimized, so that we can make the desired patterns even though there is a non-correctable scanner aberration.

  20. The objective lens of the electron microscope with correction of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimurzaev, S B; Aldiyarov, N U; Yakushev, E M

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes the principle of operation of a relatively simple aberration corrector for the transmission electron microscope objective lens. The electron-optical system of the aberration corrector consists of the two main elements: an electrostatic mirror with rotational symmetry and a magnetic deflector formed by the round-shaped magnetic poles. The corrector operation is demonstrated by calculations on the example of correction of basic aberrations of the well-known objective lens with a bell-shaped distribution of the axial magnetic field. Two of the simplest versions of the corrector are considered: a corrector with a two-electrode electrostatic mirror and a corrector with a three-electrode electrostatic mirror. It is shown that using the two-electrode mirror one can eliminate either spherical or chromatic aberration of the objective lens, without changing the value of its linear magnification. Using a three-electrode mirror, it is possible to eliminate spherical and chromatic aberrations of the objective lens simultaneously, which is especially important in designing electron microscopes with extremely high resolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Real-time aberration correction simulation of multimode beam by SPGD algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Wenguang; Yan, Baozhu; Sun, Quan; Du, Shaojun

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the physical properties of multimode beam are analysed by using the theory of partially coherent light. Based on the spatial coherence measurement results of a multimode fiber laser, we provide a theoretical basis for aberration correction for multimode beams. To improve the beam quality of multimode lasers, phase correction of multimode laser based on a dual-phase-only liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is presented which is used as aberration correction device. The phase distribution was optimized by the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. In this paper the power in the bucket of the far field was used as the evaluation function and the multimode beam included multiple higher order Laguerre-Gaussian beam modes. The real-time aberration correction of Multimode beam by stochastic parallel gradient descent Algorithm is simulated studied and experimental analysed respectively. According to the results the parameters of stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm can be adjusted and the efficiency and practicability of the algorithm are determined.

  2. Combined phase screen aberration correction and minimum variance beamforming in medical ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziksari, Mahsa Sotoodeh; Asl, Babak Mohammadzadeh

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, applying adaptive beamforming to ultrasound imaging improves image quality in terms of resolution and contrast. One of the best adaptive beamformers in this field is the minimum variance (MV) beamformer which presents better resolution and edge definition compared to the traditional delay-and-sum (DAS) beamformer. However, in real situations, sound-velocity inhomogeneities cause phase aberration which leads to ambiguity in targets' location and degradation in resolution. This effect is a fundamental obstacle to utilize advantages of MV beamformer, although, in aberrating medium MV beamformer results in better performance compared to DAS. In this paper, two different levels of phase screens have been applied to simulate aberrator layers located close to the transducer. Also, prior to beamforming process, a conventional correction technique based on phase screen model is used. Simulations are performed in majority resolution of MV which has the lowest robustness. The results demonstrate that applying this correction method can retrieve the efficiency of the MV beamformer. Moreover, the method improves the performance of the MV in both terms of resolution and contrast. As corrected MV achieved at least 22% improvement in sidelobe reduction and 24% increase in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) with respect to the DAS corrected data. Also, according to experimental dataset 17% enhancement in CNR is yielded by MV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated computational aberration correction method for OCT and OCM (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Pande, Paritosh; South, Fredrick A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-02-01

    Aberrations in an optical system cause a reduction in imaging resolution and poor image contrast, and limit the imaging depth when imaging biological samples. Computational adaptive optics (CAO) provides an inexpensive and simpler alternative to the traditionally used hardware-based adaptive optics (HAO) techniques. In this paper, we present an automated computational aberration correction method for broadband interferometric imaging techniques, e.g. optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM). In the proposed method, the process of aberration correction is modeled as a filtering operation on the aberrant image using a phase filter in the Fourier domain. The phase filter is expressed as a linear combination of Zernike polynomials with unknown coefficients, which are estimated through an iterative optimization scheme based on maximizing an image sharpness metric. The Resilient backpropagation (Rprop) algorithm, which was originally proposed as an alternative to the gradient-descent-based backpropagation algorithm for training the weights in a multilayer feedforward neural network, is employed to optimize the Zernike polynomial coefficients because of its simplicity and the robust performance to the choice of various parameters. Stochastic selection of the number and type of Zernike modes is introduced at each optimization step to explore different trajectories to enable search for multiple optima in the multivariate search space. The method was validated on various tissue samples and shows robust performance for samples with different scattering properties, e.g. a phantom with subresolution particles, an ex vivo rabbit adipose tissue, and an in vivo photoreceptor layer of the human retina.

  4. Experimental setup for energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscopy (EFSCEM) in a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P; Behan, G; Kirkland, A I; Nellist, P D, E-mail: peng.wang@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging mode in electron microscopy. Spherical aberration corrected electron microscope instruments fitted with two aberration correctors can be used in this mode which provides improved depth resolution and selectivity compared to optical sectioning in a conventional scanning transmission geometry. In this article, we consider a confocal optical configuration for SCEM using inelastically scattered electrons. We lay out the necessary steps for achieving this new operational mode in a double aberration-corrected instrument with uncorrected chromatic aberration and present preliminary experimental results in such mode.

  5. Depth sectioning with the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina Y.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed. PMID:16492746

  6. Aberration correction in photoemission microscopy and applications in photonics and plasmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenenkamp, Rolf [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-09-28

    We report on the design, assembly, operation and application of an aberration-corrected photoemission electron microscope. The instrument used novel hyperbolic mirror-correctors with two and three electrodes that allowed simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. A spatial resolution of 5.4nm was obtained with this instrument in 2009, and 4.7nm in subsequent years. New imaging methodology was introduced involving interferometric imaging of light diffraction. This methodology was applied in nano-photonics and in the characterization of surface-plasmon polaritons. Photonic crystals and waveguides, optical antennas and new plasmonic devices such as routers, localizers and filters were designed and demonstrated using the new capabilities offered by the microscope.

  7. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy: the potential for nano- and interface science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Lupini, A.R.; Wang, L.G. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kadavanich, A. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dept. of Chemistry, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); McBride, J.R. [Dept. of Chemistry, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Rosenthal, S.J. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Puetter, R.C.; Yahil, A. [Pixon LLC, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Krivanek, O.L.; Dellby, N.; Nellist, P.D.L. [Nion Co., Kirkland, WA (United States); Duscher, G. [Solid State Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2003-04-01

    The sub-Aangstroem probe of an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope will enable imaging and analysis of nanostructures and interfaces with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In conjunction with first-principles theory, new insights are anticipated into the atomistic processes of growth and the subtle link between structure and functionality. We present initial results from the aberration-corrected microscopes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that indicate the kinds of studies that will become feasible in the near future. Examples include (1) the three-dimensional location and identification of individual dopant and impurity atoms in semiconductor interfaces, and their effect on local electronic structure; (2) the accurate reconstruction of surface atomic and electronic structure on nanocrystals, and the effect on optical properties; and (3) the ability to distinguish which configurations of catalyst atoms are active, and why. (orig.)

  8. Adaptive optical versus spherical aberration corrections for in vivo brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Liang, Yajie; Ji, Na

    2017-08-01

    Adjusting the objective correction collar is a widely used approach to correct spherical aberrations (SA) in optical microscopy. In this work, we characterized and compared its performance with adaptive optics in the context of in vivo brain imaging with two-photon fluorescence microscopy. We found that the presence of sample tilt had a deleterious effect on the performance of SA-only correction. At large tilt angles, adjusting the correction collar even worsened image quality. In contrast, adaptive optical correction always recovered optimal imaging performance regardless of sample tilt. The extent of improvement with adaptive optics was dependent on object size, with smaller objects having larger relative gains in signal intensity and image sharpness. These observations translate into a superior performance of adaptive optics for structural and functional brain imaging applications in vivo, as we confirmed experimentally.

  9. Effects of higher-order aberration correction on stereopsis at different viewing durations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Xiao, Fei; Zhao, Junlei; Zhao, Haoxin; Hu, Yiyun; Tang, Guomao; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    To better understand how the eye's optics affects stereopsis, we measured stereoacuity before and after higher-order aberration (HOA) correction with a binocular adaptive optics visual simulator. The HOAs were corrected either binocularly or monocularly in the better eye (the eye with better contrast sensitivity). A two-line stereo pattern served as the visual stimulus. Stereo thresholds at different viewing durations were obtained with the psychophysical method of constant stimuli. Binocular HOA correction led to significant improvement in stereoacuity. However, better eye HOA correction could bring either a bad degradation or a slight improvement in stereoacuity. As viewing duration increased, the stereo benefit approached the level of 1.0 for both binocular and better eye correction, suggesting that long viewing durations might weaken the effects of the eye's optical quality on stereopsis.

  10. Low-dose aberration corrected cryo-electron microscopy of organic specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, James E; Hetherington, Crispin; Kirkland, Angus; Chang, Lan-Yun; Stahlberg, Henning; Browning, Nigel

    2008-11-01

    Spherical aberration (C(s)) correction in the transmission electron microscope has enabled sub-angstrom resolution imaging of inorganic materials. To achieve similar resolution for radiation-sensitive organic materials requires the microscope to be operated under hybrid conditions: low electron dose illumination of the specimen at liquid nitrogen temperature and low defocus values. Initial images from standard inorganic and organic test specimens have indicated that under these conditions C(s)-correction can provide a significant improvement in resolution (to less than 0.16nm) for direct imaging of organic samples.

  11. Correction of 157-nm lens based on phase ring aberration extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meute, Jeff; Rich, Georgia K.; Conley, Will; Smith, Bruce W.; Zavyalova, Lena V.; Cashmore, Julian S.; Ashworth, Dominic; Webb, James E.; Rich, Lisa

    2004-05-01

    Early manufacture and use of 157nm high NA lenses has presented significant challenges including: intrinsic birefringence correction, control of optical surface contamination, and the use of relatively unproven materials, coatings, and metrology. Many of these issues were addressed during the manufacture and use of International SEMATECH"s 0.85NA lens. Most significantly, we were the first to employ 157nm phase measurement interferometry (PMI) and birefringence modeling software for lens optimization. These efforts yielded significant wavefront improvement and produced one of the best wavefront-corrected 157nm lenses to date. After applying the best practices to the manufacture of the lens, we still had to overcome the difficulties of integrating the lens into the tool platform at International SEMATECH instead of at the supplier facility. After lens integration, alignment, and field optimization were complete, conventional lithography and phase ring aberration extraction techniques were used to characterize system performance. These techniques suggested a wavefront error of approximately 0.05 waves RMS--much larger than the 0.03 waves RMS predicted by 157nm PMI. In-situ wavefront correction was planned for in the early stages of this project to mitigate risks introduced by the use of development materials and techniques and field integration of the lens. In this publication, we document the development and use of a phase ring aberration extraction method for characterizing imaging performance and a technique for correcting aberrations with the addition of an optical compensation plate. Imaging results before and after the lens correction are presented and differences between actual and predicted results are discussed.

  12. Investigation of focusing and correcting aberrations with binary amplitude and polarization modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Peter; Li, Yunqi; Dorrer, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the focusing and correcting wavefront aberration of an optical wave using binary amplitude and polarization modulation. Focusing is performed by selectively modulating the field in different zones of the pupil to obtain on-axis constructive interference at a given distance. The conventional Soret zone plate (binary amplitude profile) is expanded to a polarization Soret zone plate with twice the focusing efficiency. Binary pixelated devices that approximate the sinusoidal transmission profile of a Gabor zone plate by spatial dithering are also investigated with amplitude and polarization modulation. Wavefront aberrations are corrected by modulation of the field in the pupil plane to prevent destructive interference in the focal plane of an ideal focusing element. Polarization modulation improves the efficiency obtained by amplitude-only modulation, with a gain that depends on the aberration. Experimental results obtained with Cr-on-glass devices for amplitude modulation and liquid crystal devices operating in the Mauguin condition for polarization modulation are in very good agreement with simulations.

  13. A Monochromatic, Aberration-Corrected, Dual-Beam Low Energy Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. PMID:23582636

  14. Imaging Individual Molecules and Atoms by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    Spherical aberration correctors recently developed for transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) have enabled direct imaging of single molecules and atoms at low electron acceleration voltages. Here, we review some recent studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and fullerene nanopeapods using aberration-corrected TEM/STEM operated at 120 kV or lower voltages. Local structures of individual CNTs are visualized in details including various defects such as atomic vacancies and so-called Stone-Wales defects. Atomic-level structures of fullerene molecules inside CNTs are unambiguously visualized. Single atoms of lanthanides and calcium in nanopeapods are identified by using STEM-EELS operated at 60 kV.

  15. Chromatic aberration correction and deconvolution for UV sensitive imaging of fluorescent sterols in cytoplasmic lipid droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Faergeman, Nils J

    2008-01-01

    is in the UV region of the spectrum. Thus, one has to deal with chromatic aberration and low signal-to-noise ratio. We developed a method to correct for chromatic aberration between the UV channel and the red/green channel in multicolor imaging of DHE compared with the lipid droplet marker Nile Red in living...... macrophage foam cells and in adipocytes. We used deconvolution microscopy and developed image segmentation techniques to assess the DHE content of lipid droplets in both cell types in an automated manner. Pulse-chase studies and colocalization analysis were performed to monitor the redistribution of DHE upon...... and quantify sterol content of lipid droplets in living cells with potential for automated high content screening of cellular sterol transport....

  16. Numerical correction of anti-symmetric aberrations in single HRTEM images of weakly scattering 2D-objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Ossi; Geiger, Dorin; Lee, Zhongbo; Whitwick, Michael Brian; Chen, Ming-Wei; Kis, Andras; Kaiser, Ute

    2015-04-01

    Here, we present a numerical post-processing method for removing the effect of anti-symmetric residual aberrations in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of weakly scattering 2D-objects. The method is based on applying the same aberrations with the opposite phase to the Fourier transform of the recorded image intensity and subsequently inverting the Fourier transform. We present the theoretical justification of the method, and its verification based on simulated images in the case of low-order anti-symmetric aberrations. Ultimately the method is applied to experimental hardware aberration-corrected HRTEM images of single-layer graphene and MoSe₂ resulting in images with strongly reduced residual low-order aberrations, and consequently improved interpretability. Alternatively, this method can be used to estimate by trial and error the residual anti-symmetric aberrations in HRTEM images of weakly scattering objects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiological Adaptation of the Bacterium Lactococcus lactis in Response to the Production of Human CFTR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Anton; Wiederhold, Elena; Gandhi, Tejas; Breitling, Rainer; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    Biochemical and biophysical characterization of CFTR (the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is thwarted by difficulties to obtain sufficient quantities of correctly folded and functional protein. Here we have produced human CFTR in the prokaryotic expression host Lactococcus

  18. A novel system for correcting large-scale chromosomal aberrations: ring chromosome correction via reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyun; Plona, Kathleen; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 1 in 500 newborns are born with chromosomal abnormalities that include trisomies, translocations, large deletions, and duplications. There is currently no therapeutic approach for correcting such chromosomal aberrations in vivo or in vitro. When we attempted to produce induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models from patient-derived fibroblasts that contained ring chromosomes, we found that the ring chromosomes were eliminated and replaced by duplicated normal copies of chromosomes through a mechanism of uniparental isodisomy (Bershteyn et al. 2014, Nature 507:99). The discovery of this previously unforeseen system for aberrant chromosome correction during reprogramming enables us for the first time to model and understand this process of cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes during human patient somatic cell reprograming to iPSCs. This knowledge could lead to a potential therapeutic strategy to correct common large-scale chromosomal aberrations, termed "chromosome therapy".

  19. Sub-Angstrom Low Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Benner, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Lowering the electron energy in the transmission electron microscope allows for a significant improvement in contrast of light elements, and reduces knock-on damage for most materials. If low-voltage electron microscopes are defined as those with accelerating voltages below 100 kV, the introduction of aberration correctors and monochromators to the electron microscope column enables Ångstrom-level resolution, which was previously reserved for higher voltage instruments. Decreasing electron energy has three important advantages: 1) knock-on damage is lower, which is critically important for sensitive materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes; 2) cross sections for electron-energy-loss spectroscopy increase, improving signal-to-noise for chemical analysis; 3) elastic scattering cross sections increase, improving contrast in high-resolution, zero-loss images. The results presented indicate that decreasing the acceleration voltage from 200 kV to 80 kV in a monochromated, aberration-corrected microscope enhances the contrast while retaining sub-angstrom resolution. These improvements in low-voltage performance are expected to produce many new results and enable a wealth of new experiments in materials science. PMID:20598206

  20. Perfect X-ray focusing via fitting corrective glasses to aberrated optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiboth, Frank; Schropp, Andreas; Scholz, Maria; Wittwer, Felix; Rödel, Christian; Wünsche, Martin; Ullsperger, Tobias; Nolte, Stefan; Rahomäki, Jussi; Parfeniukas, Karolis; Giakoumidis, Stylianos; Vogt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Garrevoet, Jan; Falkenberg, Gerald; Galtier, Eric C; Ja Lee, Hae; Nagler, Bob; Schroer, Christian G

    2017-03-01

    Due to their short wavelength, X-rays can in principle be focused down to a few nanometres and below. At the same time, it is this short wavelength that puts stringent requirements on X-ray optics and their metrology. Both are limited by today's technology. In this work, we present accurate at wavelength measurements of residual aberrations of a refractive X-ray lens using ptychography to manufacture a corrective phase plate. Together with the fitted phase plate the optics shows diffraction-limited performance, generating a nearly Gaussian beam profile with a Strehl ratio above 0.8. This scheme can be applied to any other focusing optics, thus solving the X-ray optical problem at synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers.

  1. Atomic-scale chemical imaging of composition and bonding by aberration-corrected microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, D A; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Murfitt, M; Song, J H; Hwang, H Y; Silcox, J; Dellby, N; Krivanek, O L

    2008-02-22

    Using a fifth-order aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which provides a factor of 100 increase in signal over an uncorrected instrument, we demonstrated two-dimensional elemental and valence-sensitive imaging at atomic resolution by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy, with acquisition times of well under a minute (for a 4096-pixel image). Applying this method to the study of a La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayer, we found an asymmetry between the chemical intermixing on the manganese-titanium and lanthanum-strontium sublattices. The measured changes in the titanium bonding as the local environment changed allowed us to distinguish chemical interdiffusion from imaging artifacts.

  2. A 45-element continuous facesheet surface micromachined deformable mirror for optical aberration correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A 45-element continuous facesheet surface micromachined deformable mirror (DM is presented and is fabricated using the PolyMUMPs multi-user micro-electro-mechanical system processes. The effects of the structural parameters on the characteristics of the DM, such as its stroke, frequency and actuator coupling, are analyzed. In addition, the DM design has also been verified through experimental testing. This DM prototype has a surface figure of 0.5 μm and a fill factor of 95%. The DM can provide a 0.6 μm stroke with 5.9% actuator coupling. A static aberration correction based on this DM is also demonstrated, which acts as a reference for the potential adaptive optics (AO applications of the device.

  3. High-resolution characterization of multiferroic heterojunction using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhoushen; Ruan, Jieji; Xie, Lin; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wu, Di; Wang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Multiferroic tunnel junctions have been considered as potential candidates for nonvolatile memory devices. Understanding the atomic structure at the interface is crucial for optimizing the performances in such oxide electronics. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to measure the compositional profiles across the interfaces of different layers with atomic resolution. Two-dimensional elemental imaging with atomic resolution is demonstrated, and the influences of the interface sharpness, the terminal layer, and cation intermixing are investigated. An asymmetric sublattice intermixing at the Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 interface is observed, which can affect the local Mn valence and coupling. The reduction in the Mn valence at the interface is further studied using EELS near-edge fine structures.

  4. Quantification by aberration corrected (S)TEM of boundaries formed by symmetry breaking phase transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryvers, D., E-mail: nick.schryvers@uantwerpen.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Salje, E.K.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Nishida, M. [Department of Engineering Sciences for Electronics and Materials, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); De Backer, A. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Idrissi, H. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe, 2, B-1348, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Van Aert, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-05-15

    The present contribution gives a review of recent quantification work of atom displacements, atom site occupations and level of crystallinity in various systems and based on aberration corrected HR(S)TEM images. Depending on the case studied, picometer range precisions for individual distances can be obtained, boundary widths at the unit cell level determined or statistical evolutions of fractions of the ordered areas calculated. In all of these cases, these quantitative measures imply new routes for the applications of the respective materials. - Highlights: • Quantification of picometer displacements at ferroelastic twin boundary in CaTiO{sub 3.} • Quantification of kinks in meandering ferroelectric domain wall in LiNbO{sub 3}. • Quantification of column occupation in anti-phase boundary in Co-Pt. • Quantification of atom displacements at twin boundary in Ni-Ti B19′ martensite.

  5. Low-Beta insertions inducing chromatic aberrations in storage rings and their local and global correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2010-01-01

    The chromatic aberrations induced by low-β insertions can seriously limit the performance of circular colliders. The impact is twofold: (1) a substantial off-momentum beta-beating wave traveling around the ring and leading to a net reduction of the mechanical aperture of the lowbeta quadrupoles but also impacting on the hierarchy of the collimator and protection devices of the machine, (2) a huge non-linear chromaticity which, when combined with the magnetic imperfections of the machine, could substantially reduce the momentum acceptance of the ring by pushing slightly off-momentum particles towards non-linear resonances. These effects will be analyzed and illustrated in the framework of the LHC insertions upgrade Phase I [1] and a strategy for correction will be developed, requiring a deep modification of the LHC overall optics.

  6. Novel Hits in the Correction of ΔF508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Protein: Synthesis, Pharmacological, and ADME Evaluation of Tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidines for the Potential Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesci, Elisabetta; Bettinetti, Laura; Fanti, Paola; Galietta, Luis J V; La Rosa, Salvatore; Magnoni, Letizia; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Sardone, Gian Luca; Maccari, Laura

    2015-12-24

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disease caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with a prevalence of the ΔF508 mutation. Whereas the detailed mechanisms underlying disease have yet to be fully elucidated, recent breakthroughs in clinical trials have demonstrated that CFTR dysfunction can be corrected by drug-like molecules. On the basis of this success, a screening campaign was carried out, seeking new drug-like compounds able to rescue ΔF508-CFTR that led to the discovery of a novel series of correctors based on a tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine core. These molecules proved to be soluble, cell-permeable, and active in a disease relevant functional-assay. The series was then further optimized with emphasis on biological data from multiple cell systems while keeping physicochemical properties under strict control. The pharmacological and ADME profile of this corrector series hold promise for the development of more efficacious compounds to be explored for therapeutic use in CF.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Present status and future prospects of spherical aberration corrected TEM/STEM for study of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present status of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is described from the viewpoint of the observation of nanomaterials. Characteristic features in TEM and STEM are explained using the experimental data obtained by our group and other research groups. Cs correction up to the 3rd-order aberration of an objective lens has already been established and research interest is focused on correcting the 5th-order spherical aberration and the chromatic aberration in combination with the development of a monochromator below an electron gun for smaller point-to-point resolution in optics. Another fundamental area of interest is the limitation of TEM and STEM resolution from the viewpoint of the scattering of electrons in crystals. The minimum size of the exit-wave function below samples undergoing TEM imaging is determined from the calculation of scattering around related atomic columns in the crystals. STEM does not have this limitation because the resolution is, in principle, determined by the probe size. One of the future prospects of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is the possibility of extending the space around the sample holder by correcting the chromatic and spherical aberrations. This wider space will contribute to the ease of performing in situ experiments and various combinations of TEM and other analysis methods. High-resolution, in situ dynamic and 3D observations/analysis are the most important keywords in the next decade of high-resolution electron microscopy.

  8. Multi-physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T CFTR mutation revealed by clinical and cellular investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Raed; El-Seedy, Ayman; El-Moussaoui, Kamal; Pasquet, Marie-Claude; Adolphe, Catherine; Bieth, Eric; Languepin, Jeanne; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Kitzis, Alain; Ladevèze, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    This study combines a clinical approach and multiple level cellular analyses to determine the physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T (p.Lys464Asn) CFTR exon 10 mutation, detected in a CF patient with a frameshift deletion in trans and a TG(11)T(5) in cis. Minigene experiment, with different TG(m)T(n) alleles, and nasal cell mRNA extracts were used to study the impact of c.1392G>T on splicing in both in cellulo and in vivo studies. The processing and localization of p.Lys464Asn protein were evaluated, in cellulo, by western blotting analyses and confocal microscopy. Clinical and channel exploration tests were performed on the patient to determine the exact CF phenotype profile and the CFTR chloride transport activity. c.1392G>T affects exon 10 splicing by inducing its complete deletion and encoding a frameshift transcript. The polymorphism TG(11)T(5) aggravates the effects of this mutation on aberrant splicing. Analysis of mRNA obtained from parental airway epithelial cells confirmed these in cellulo results. At the protein level the p.Lys464Asn protein showed neither maturated form nor membrane localization. Furthermore, the in vivo channel tests confirmed the absence of CFTR activity. Thus, the c.1392G>T mutation alone or in association with the TG repeats and the poly T tract revealed obvious impacts on splicing and CFTR protein processing and functionality. The c.[T(5); 1392G>T] complex allele contributes to the CF phenotype by affecting splicing and inducing a severe misprocessing defect. These results demonstrate that the classical CFTR mutations classification is not sufficient: in vivo and in cellulo studies of a possible complex allele in a patient are required to provide correct CFTR mutation classification, adequate medical counseling, and adapted therapeutic strategies.

  9. Space active optics: in flight aberrations correction for the next generation of large space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2017-11-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. In this paper, we present an active optics system as a way to fulfill those two objectives. Indeed, active optics consists in controlling mirrors' deformations in order to improve the images quality [1]. The two main applications of active optics techniques are the in-situ compensation of phase errors in a wave front by using a corrector deformable mirror [2] and the manufacturing of aspherical mirrors by stress polishing or by in-situ stressing [3]. We will focus here on the wave-front correction. Indeed, the next generation of space telescopes will have lightweight primary mirrors; in consequence, they will be sensitive to the environment variations, inducing optical aberrations in the instrument. An active optics system is principally composed of a deformable mirror, a wave front sensor, a set of actuators deforming the mirror and control/command electronics. It is used to correct the wave-front errors due to the optical design, the manufacturing imperfections, the large lightweight primary mirrors' deflection in field gravity, the fixation devices, and the mirrors and structures' thermal distortions due to the local turbulence [4]. Active optics is based on the elasticity theory [5]; forces and/or load are used to deform a mirror. Like in adaptive optics, actuators can simply be placed under the optical surface [1,2], but other configurations have also been studied: a system's simplification, inducing a minimization of the number of actuators can be achieved by working on the mirror design [5]. For instance, in the so called Vase form Multimode Deformable Mirror [6], forces are applied on an external ring clamped on the pupil. With this method, there is no local effect due to the application of forces on the mirror's back face. Furthermore, the number of actuators needed to warp the mirror does not depend on the pupil size; it is a fully

  10. Aberration-corrected electron microscopy of MnAs and As nanocrystals and voids in annealed (Ga,Mn)As

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, András; Kasama, Takeshi; Sadowski, J.

    2011-01-01

    Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy is used to study voids and nano-crystalline MnAs and As phases formed during the annealing of Mn-doped GaAs. The effects of defocus and inner annular dark-field detector semi-angle on contrast of the nanocrystals are discussed....

  11. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  12. Symmetrical optical imaging system with bionic variable-focus lens for off-axis aberration correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    A bionic variable-focus lens with symmetrical layered structure was designed to mimic the crystalline lens. An optical imaging system based on this lens and with a symmetrical structure that mimics the human eye structure was proposed. The refractive index of the bionic variable-focus lens increases from outside to inside. The two PDMS lenses with a certain thickness were designed to improve the optical performance of the optical imaging system and minimise the gravity effect of liquid. The paper presents the overall structure of the optical imaging system and the detailed description of the bionic variable-focus lens. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity, the surface curvatures of the rear PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change in the focal length. The focal length range of the optical imaging system was 20.71-24.87 mm. The optical performance of the optical imaging system was evaluated by imaging experiments and analysed by ray tracing simulations. On the basis of test and simulation results, the optical performance of the system was quite satisfactory. Off-axis aberrations were well corrected, and the image quality was greatly improved.

  13. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L [York JEOL Nanocentre (United Kingdom); Shiju, N R; Brown, D R, E-mail: pgb500@york.ac.u [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  14. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  15. Multi-focus microscopy for aberration-corrected multi-color three-dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara

    Due to the classical conflict between spatial and temporal resolution, microscopy studies of fast events in living samples are often performed in 2D even when 3D imaging would be desirable and could provide new insights to biological function. This dissertation describes an instant 3D imaging system - a multi-focus microscope (MFM) - which provides high- resolution, aberration-corrected, multi-color fluorescence images of multiple focal planes simultaneously. Forming an instant focal series eliminates the need for multiple camera exposures and mechanical refocusing, allowing 3D imaging limited only by sample signal strength and the camera read-out rate for a single frame. A module containing the MFM optical components can easily be appended to the camera port of a commercial wide-field microscope. The excellent resolution and sensitivity of MFM is demonstrated on two different 3D biological imaging problems; neuronal imaging in the entire C.elegans embryo and mRNA imaging in cultured mammalian cells.

  16. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D., E-mail: marta.rossell@empa.ch

    2017-05-15

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. - Highlights: • The heterogeneous integration of high-quality compound semiconductors remains a challenge. • Lattice defects cause severe degradation of the semiconductor device performances. • Aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM allows atomic-scale characterization of defects. • An overview of lattice defects found in cubic semiconductors is presented. • Theoretical modelling and calculations are needed to determine the defect properties.

  17. Fabrication of polarization-independent waveguides deeply buried in lithium niobate crystal using aberration-corrected femtosecond laser direct writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Jia; Liu, Zhengming; Liao, Yang; Chu, Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2017-01-01

    Writing optical waveguides with femtosecond laser pulses provides the capability of forming three-dimensional photonic circuits for manipulating light fields in both linear and nonlinear manners. To fully explore this potential, large depths of the buried waveguides in transparent substrates are often desirable to facilitate achieving vertical integration of waveguides in a multi-layer configuration, which, however, is hampered by rapidly degraded axial resolution caused by optical aberration. Here, we show that with the correction of the spherical aberration, polarization-independent waveguides can be inscribed in a nonlinear optical crystal lithium niobate (LN) at depths up to 1400 μm, which is more than one order of magnitude deeper than the waveguides written with aberration uncorrected femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is beneficial for applications ranging from miniaturized nonlinear light sources to quantum information processing.

  18. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. In-situ heating studies of gold nanoparticles in an aberration corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, M J; Gai, P L; Boyes, E D [Department of Physics, University of York, Nanocentre, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Yoshida, K, E-mail: mw527@york.ac.u [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Nanocentre, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles have a high catalytic activity for CO oxidation at low temperatures providing they remain less than 5nm in diameter. Their structure and stability and the growth processes that occur during heating have been investigated using Angstrom resolution in-situ double aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy with a JEOL JEM-2200FS. Colloidal Au nanoparticles suspended in water, with mean diameters of 2nm and 5.6nm, have been deposited onto 3.5nm thin carbon supported on holey carbon grids and onto Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes. Dynamic in-situ high resolution AC-TEM images show competitive sintering processes on the different supports. Whilst the 5.6nm particles were observed to be very stable on the carbon, the 2nm particles showed sintering predominantly through particle migration and coalescence, with particle migration occurring as early as {approx}200{sup 0}C, peaking at {approx}500{sup 0}C. In contrast Au nanoparticles on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes were observed to coalesce at {approx}180{sup 0}C, before Ostwald Ripening became the dominant growth process at higher temperatures. It is believed that atoms and small clusters migrate away from their original particle before becoming trapped on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate. These trapped clusters then build up to form the small particles observed, before having sufficient energy to continue to migrate and join another larger particle at {approx}500{sup 0}C.

  20. Parallel direct laser writing in three dimensions with spatially dependent aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesacher, Alexander; Booth, Martin J

    2010-09-27

    We propose a hologram design process which aims at reducing aberrations in parallel three-dimensional direct laser writing applications. One principle of the approach is to minimise the diffractive power of holograms while retaining the degree of parallelisation. This reduces focal distortion caused by chromatic aberration. We address associated problems such as the zero diffraction order and aberrations induced by a potential refractive index mismatch between the immersion medium of the microscope objective and the fabrication substrate. Results from fabrication in diamond, fused silica and lithium niobate are presented.

  1. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: toshiaki.tanigaki.mv@hitachi.com; Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama 350-0395 (Japan); Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian [Corrected Electron Optical Systems GmbH, Englerstr. 28, D-69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Tonomura, Akira [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama 350-0395 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  2. Aberration corrected and monochromated environmental transmission electron microscopy: challenges and prospects for materials science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    The latest generation of environmental transmission electron microscopes incorporates aberration correctors and monochromators, allowing studies of chemical reactions and growth processes with improved spatial resolution and spectral sensitivity. Here, we describe the performance of such an instr...

  3. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis.

  4. CFTR: A new horizon in the pathomechanism and treatment of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking or bile acids strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  5. Increase of penetration depth in real-time clinical epi-optoacoustic imaging: clutter reduction and aberration correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Michael; Gashi, Kujtim; Peeters, Sara; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Gruenig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging will experience broadest clinical application if implemented in epi-style with the irradiation optics and the acoustic probe integrated in a single probe. This will allow most flexible imaging of the human body in a combined system together with echo ultrasound (US). In such a multimodal combination, the OA signal could provide functional information within the anatomical context shown in the US image, similar to what is already done with colour flow imaging. Up to date, successful deep epi-OA imaging was difficult to achieve, owing to clutter and acoustic aberrations. Clutter signals arise from strong optical absorption in the region of tissue irradiation and strongly reduce contrast and imaging depth. Acoustic aberrations are caused by the inhomogeneous speed of sound and degrade the spatial resolution of deep tissue structures, further reducing contrast and thus imaging depth. In past years we have developed displacement-compensated averaging (DCA) for clutter reduction based on the clutter decorrelation that occurs when palpating the tissue using the ultrasound probe. We have now implemented real-time DCA on a research ultrasound system to evaluate its clutter reduction performance in freehand scanning of human volunteers. Our results confirm that DCA significantly improves image contrast and imaging depth, making clutter reduction a basic requirement for a clinically successful combination of epi-OA and US imaging. In addition we propose a novel technique which allows automatic full aberration correction of OA images, based on measuring the effect of aberration spatially resolved using echo US. Phantom results demonstrate that this technique allows spatially invariant diffraction-limited resolution in presence of a strong aberrator.

  6. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  7. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. 3D printing of microlenses for aberration correction in GRIN microendoscopes

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea

    2017-11-02

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy provides high resolution information on the anatomy and function of cellular structures located several hundreds of microns deep within biological tissues. However, light scattering poses a fundamental limit to imaging of deeper areas (> 1.5 mm). Implantable microendoscopic probes based on graded index (GRIN) lenses are widely used tools to perform two-photon fluorescence microscopy in otherwise inaccessible regions[1], but the optical performances of with these probes are limited by intrinsic aberrations.

  9. Cas9/gRNA targeted excision of cystic fibrosis-causing deep-intronic splicing mutations restores normal splicing of CFTR mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Sanz

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. CRISPR mediated, template-dependent homology-directed gene editing has been used to correct the most common mutation, c.1521_1523delCTT / p.Phe508del (F508del which affects ~70% of individuals, but the efficiency was relatively low. Here, we describe a high efficiency strategy for editing of three different rare CFTR mutations which together account for about 3% of individuals with Cystic Fibrosis. The mutations cause aberrant splicing of CFTR mRNA due to the creation of cryptic splice signals that result in the formation of pseudoexons containing premature stop codons c.1679+1634A>G (1811+1.6kbA>G and c.3718-2477C>T (3849+10kbC>T, or an out-of-frame 5' extension to an existing exon c.3140-26A>G (3272-26A>G. We designed pairs of Cas9 guide RNAs to create targeted double-stranded breaks in CFTR either side of each mutation which resulted in high efficiency excision of the target genomic regions via non-homologous end-joining repair. When evaluated in a mini-gene splicing assay, we showed that targeted excision restored normal splicing for all three mutations. This approach could be used to correct aberrant splicing signals or remove disruptive transcription regulatory motifs caused by deep-intronic mutations in a range of other genetic disorders.

  10. [Analysis of tongue color under natural daylight based on chromatic aberration correction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-tuo; Zhang, Zhi-feng; Yan, Zhu-juan; Tu, Li-ping; Lu, Lu-ming; Shi, Mei-yu; Zhu, Feng-lan

    2009-05-01

    To establish an analytical method for tongue image acquisition under natural daylight based on L*a*b* error correction, and to observe the classification rules of tongue color using color error correction. The tongue images in 413 cases were collected under natural indoor daylight by using Nikon D70 digital SLR camera, and then the color error was adjusted by using Nikon Capture NX software correction according to Kodak Q-13 grey card. The classification and quantitative analysis of the tongue color after software correction was carried out depending on L*a*b* color space. The software correction method had good effects in adjusting the tongue color image error. The L* values of light red, deep red and cyanosis tongues decreased as compared with that of light white tongue (PL*a*b* error correction is accurate in color restoration and feasible to operate.

  11. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bayesian-based aberration correction and numerical diffraction for improved lensfree on-chip microscopy of biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexander; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Jin, Chao; Wang, Xiao Yu

    2015-05-01

    Lensfree on-chip microscopy is an emerging imaging technique that can be used to visualize and study biological specimens without the need for imaging lens systems. Important issues that can limit the performance of lensfree on-chip microscopy include interferometric aberrations, acquisition noise, and image reconstruction artifacts. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian-based method for performing aberration correction and numerical diffraction that accounts for all three of these issues to improve the effective numerical aperture (NA) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed microscopic image. The proposed method was experimentally validated using the USAF resolution target as well as real waterborne Anabaena flos-aquae samples, demonstrating improvements in NA by ~25% over the standard method, and improvements in SNR of 2.3 dB and 3.8 dB in the reconstructed image when compared to the reconstructed images produced using the standard method and a maximum likelihood estimation method, respectively.

  13. In situ observation on hydrogenation of Mg-Ni films using environmental transmission electron microscope with aberration correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Junko, E-mail: junko.matsuda@i2cner.kyushu-u.ac.jp [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Yoshida, Kenta [Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, The Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); Sasaki, Yukichi [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, The Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); Uchiyama, Naoki [ATSUMITEC CO., LTD., Ubumi 7111, Yuto-cho, Nishi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-0192 (Japan); Akiba, Etsuo [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-08-25

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to observe the hydrogenation of Mg-Ni films in a hydrogen atmosphere of 80–100 Pa. An aberration-corrected environmental TEM with a differential pumping system allows us to reveal the Angstrom-scale structure of the films in the initial stage of hydrogenation: first, nucleation and growth of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} crystals with a lattice spacing of 0.22 nm in an Mg-rich amorphous matrix of the film occurs within 20 s after the start of the high-resolution observation, then crystallization of MgH{sub 2} with a smaller spacing of 0.15 nm happens after approximately 1 min. Our in situ TEM method is also applicable to the analysis of other hydrogen-related materials.

  14. Atomic-scale observation of migration and coalescence of Au nanoclusters on YSZ surface by aberration-corrected STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Chen, Chunlin; Huang, Sumei

    2014-07-01

    Unraveling structural dynamics of noble metal nanoclusters on oxide supports is critical to understanding reaction process and origin of catalytic activity in heterogeneous catalysts. Here, we show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy can provide direct atomic-resolution imaging of surface migration, coalescence, and atomic rearrangement of Au clusters on an Y:ZrO₂ (YSZ) support. The high resolution enables us to reveal migration and coalescence process of Au clusters at the atomic scale, and to demonstrate that the coalesced clusters undergo a cooperative atomic rearrangement, which transforms the coherent into incoherent Au/YSZ interface. This approach can help to elucidate atomistic mechanism of catalytic activities and to develop novel catalysts with enhanced functionality.

  15. High-energy-resolution monochromator for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy/electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Ursin, Jonathan P; Bacon, Neil J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Hrncirik, Petr; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S

    2009-09-28

    An all-magnetic monochromator/spectrometer system for sub-30 meV energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope is described. It will link the energy being selected by the monochromator to the energy being analysed by the spectrometer, without resorting to decelerating the electron beam. This will allow it to attain spectral energy stability comparable to systems using monochromators and spectrometers that are raised to near the high voltage of the instrument. It will also be able to correct the chromatic aberration of the probe-forming column. It should be able to provide variable energy resolution down to approximately 10 meV and spatial resolution less than 1 A.

  16. Applications of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to thin oxide films and interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Luck, Julia T [ORNL; Torija, Maria [University of Minnesota; Sharma, M [University of Minnesota; Leighton, chris [University of Minnesota; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Murfitt, Matt [Nion Co; Dellby, Niklas [ORNL; Krivanek, Ondrej [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope allows spatial resolutions of the order of one ngstr m to be routinely achieved. When combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is possible to simultaneously map the structure, the chemistry and even the electronic properties of materials in one single experiment. Here we will apply these techniques to the characterization of thin films and interfaces based on complex oxides with the perovskite structure. The relatively large lattice parameter of these materials combined with the fact that most of them have absorption edges within the reach of the spectrometer optics makes these materials ideal for these experiments. We will show how it is possible to map the chemistry of interfaces atomic plane by atomic plane, including light element imaging such as O. Applications to cobaltite and titanate thin films will be described.

  17. Compositional Analysis With Atomic Column Spatial Resolution by 5th Order Aberration-corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, David [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Herrera, Miriam [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Alonso-Gonzalez, Pablo [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gonzalez, Yolanda [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gonzalez, Luisa [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Guerrero, M. P. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Pizarro, Joaquin [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Galindo, Pedro [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Molina, S. I. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain

    2011-01-01

    We show in this article that it is possible to obtain elemental compositional maps and profiles with atomic-column resolution across an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As multilayer structure from 5th-order aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The compositional profiles obtained from the analysis of HAADF-STEM images describe accurately the distribution of In in the studied multilayer in good agreement with Muraki's segregation model [Muraki, K., Fukatsu, S., Shiraki, Y. & Ito, R. (1992)]. Surface segregation of In atoms during molecular beam epitaxy and its influence on the energy levels in InGaAs/GaAs quantums wells.

  18. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  19. Opto-Mechanical Model of Arcuates for Astigmatism Correction. Low and High Order Aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro, Rafael; Palos, Fernando; Lanchares, Elena; Calvo, Begoña; Cristóbal, José Angel

    2011-01-01

    To develop a realistic model of the opto-mechanical behaviour of the cornea after curved relaxing incisions, and compare the astigmatism correction predicted by the model with that of the Lindstrom's nomogram. Methods: A three-dimensional finite element model of the anterior hemisphere of the ocular surface was generated, considering three parts: cornea, limbus and sclera. The corneal tissue was modeled as a quasiincompressible, anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive behaviour s...

  20. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  1. Canopy induced aberration correction in airborne electro-optical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, James A.; Sprague, Michaelene W.

    2011-11-01

    An increasing number of electro-optical systems are being used by pilots in tactical aircraft. This means that the afore mentioned systems must operate through the aircrafts canopy, unfortunately the canopy functions as a less than ideal lens element in the electro-optical sensor optical path. The canopy serves first and foremost as an aircraft structural component, considerations like minimizing the drag co-efficient and the ability to survive bird strikes take precedence over achieving optimal optical characteristics. This paper describes how the authors characterized the optical characteristics of an aircraft canopy. Families of modulation transfer functions were generated, for various viewing geometries through the canopy and for various electro-optical system entrance pupil diameters. These functions provided us with the means to significantly reduce the effect of the canopy "lens" on the performance of a representative electro-optical system, using an Astigmatic Corrector Lens. A comparison of the electro-optical system performance with and without correction is also presented.

  2. Correção das aberrações oculares nos retratamentos de LASIK personalizado e convencional Correction of ocular aberrations in custom and standard LASIK retreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Peltier Urbano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a correção das aberrações oculares nos retratamentos de LASIK personalizado e convencional. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo prospectivo, randomizado, de 74 olhos de 37 pacientes submetidos ao retratamento de LASIK para correção de miopia e astigmatismo. Cada paciente foi submetido ao retratamento de LASIK personalizado Zyoptix (Bausch & Lomb em um olho e convencional Planoscan (Bausch & Lomb no olho contralateral. Foi comparada a correção das aberrações oculares nos retratamentos personalizado e convencional. RESULTADOS: No sexto mês pós-operatório, os olhos submetidos ao retratamento Zyoptix apresentaram diminuição estatisticamente significativa do defocus, astigmatismo, coma, aberração esférica, segunda ordem, terceira ordem, alta ordem e aberrações totais. Os olhos submetidos ao retratamento Planoscan apresentaram diminuição estatisticamente significativa do defocus, segunda ordem e aberrações totais. CONCLUSÕES: O retratamento personalizado foi superior ao retratamento convencional para a correção das aberrações oculares de baixa e alta ordens.PURPOSE: To compare the correction of ocular aberrations between custom and standard LASIK retreatment. METHODS: Prospective, randomized trial with paired eye control of 74 eyes from 37 patients who underwent LASIK retreatment. Each patient underwent retreatment using Zyoptix LASIK (Bausch & Lomb in 1 eye and Planoscan LASIK (Bausch & Lomb in the fellow eye. Correction of ocular aberrations was compared between custom and standard LASIK retreatments. RESULTS: At 6 months, there was a statistically significant reduction in defocus, astigmatism, coma, spherical aberration, second, third, higher-order and total aberration in Zyoptix eyes. There was a statistically significant reduction in defocus, second-order and total aberration in Planoscan eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Custom retreatment was statistically superior than standard retreatment for correction of lower

  3. STEM imaging of 47-pm-separated atomic columns by a spherical aberration-corrected electron microscope with a 300-kV cold field emission gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hidetaka; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Ohashi, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Kondo, Yukihito; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2009-12-01

    A spherical aberration-corrected electron microscope has been developed recently, which is equipped with a 300-kV cold field emission gun and an objective lens of a small chromatic aberration coefficient. A dumbbell image of 47 pm spacing, corresponding to a pair of atomic columns of germanium aligned along the [114] direction, is resolved in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a 0.4-eV energy spread of the electron beam. The observed image was compared with a simulated image obtained by dynamical calculation.

  4. Active mirrors warped using Zernike polynomials for correcting off-axis aberrations of fixed primary mirrors. II. Optical testing and performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, G.; Lemaitre, G. R.; Bactivelane, T.; Wang, M.; Ferrari, M.; Mazzanti, S.; di Biagio, B.; Borra, E. F.

    1995-12-01

    We investigate the aspherization of an active mirror for correcting third and fifth-order aberrations. We use a stainless steel AISI 420 mirror with a controlled pressure load, two series of 12-punctual radial positions of force application distributed symmetrically in two concentric rings around the mirror. We obtain the wavefronts for Cv1, Sph3, Coma3, Astm3, Comatri, Astm5 as well as those of the added wavefronts. Although this active prototype mirror has general uses, our goal is to compensate the aberrations of a liquid mirror observing at large angles from the zenith.

  5. Modification of Deposited, Size-Selected MoS2 Nanoclusters by Sulphur Addition: An Aberration-Corrected STEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubiao Niu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2 is an earth-abundant material which has several industrial applications and is considered a candidate for platinum replacement in electrochemistry. Size-selected MoS2 nanoclusters were synthesised in the gas phase using a magnetron sputtering, gas condensation cluster beam source with a lateral time-of-flight mass selector. Most of the deposited MoS2 nanoclusters, analysed by an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF mode, showed poorly ordered layer structures with an average diameter of 5.5 nm. By annealing and the addition of sulphur to the clusters (by sublimation in the cluster source, the clusters were transformed into larger, crystalline structures. Annealing alone did not lead to crystallization, only to a cluster size increase by decomposition and coalescence of the primary clusters. Sulphur addition alone led to a partially crystalline structure without a significant change in the size. Thus, both annealing and sulphur addition processes were needed to obtain highly crystalline MoS2 nanoclusters.

  6. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Myung-Geun, E-mail: mghan@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Garlow, Joseph A. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marshall, Matthew S.J.; Tiano, Amanda L. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) are demonstrated in STEM mode combined with in situ electrical biasing in a TEM. • Electrostatic potential maps in ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC data. • Simultaneous EBIC and active SE-VC performed with atomic resolution STEM are demonstrated. - Abstract: The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fields and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.

  7. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  8. Green's function estimation in speckle using the decomposition of the time reversal operator: application to aberration correction in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Jean-Luc; Fink, Mathias

    2008-02-01

    The FDORT method (French acronym for decomposition of the time reversal operator using focused beams) is a time reversal based method that can detect point scatterers in a heterogeneous medium and extract their Green's function. It is particularly useful when focusing in a heterogeneous medium. This paper generalizes the theory of the FDORT method to random media (speckle), and shows that it is possible to extract Green's functions from the speckle signal using this method. Therefore it is possible to achieve a good focusing even if no point scatterers are present. Moreover, a link is made between FDORT and the Van Cittert-Zernike theorem. It is deduced from this interpretation that the normalized first eigenvalue of the focused time reversal operator is a well-known focusing criterion. The concept of an equivalent virtual object is introduced that allows the random problem to be replaced by an equivalent deterministic problem and leads to an intuitive understanding of FDORT in speckle. Applications to aberration correction are presented. The reduction of the variance of the Green's function estimate is discussed. Finally, it is shown that the method works well in the presence of strong interfering scatterers.

  9. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J; Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi; Häkkinen, Hannu; Palmer, Richard E

    2017-05-01

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au 144 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 60 provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were "weighed" by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123-151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au 144 (SR) 60 structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Atomic resolved phase map of monolayer MoS2 retrieved by spherical aberration-corrected transport of intensity equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Oshima, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    An atomic resolution phase map, which enables us to observe charge distribution or magnetic properties at an atomic scale, has been pointed out to be retrieved by transport of intensity equation (TIE) when taking two atomic-resolved transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of small defocus difference. In this work, we firstly obtained the atomic-resolved phase maps of an exfoliated molybdenum disulfide sheet using spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. We successfully observed 60° grain boundary of mechanically exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide sheet. The relative phase shift of a single molybdenum atomic column to the column consisting of two sulfur atoms was obtained to be about 0.01 rad on average, which was about half lower than the simulated TIE phase map, indicating that the individual atomic sites can be distinguished qualitatively. The appropriate condition for retrieving atomic-resolved TIE phase maps was briefly discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Improving imaging of the air-liquid interface in living mice by aberration-corrected optical coherence tomography (mOCT) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Pieper, Mario; Mall, Markus; König, Peter; Huettmann, Gereon

    2017-04-01

    Failure in mucociliary clearance is responsible for severe diseases like cystic fibroses, primary ciliary dyskinesia or asthma. Visualizing the mucous transport in-vivo will help to understanding transport mechanisms as well as developing and validating new therapeutic intervention. However, in-vivo imaging is complicated by the need of high spatial and temporal resolution. Recently, we developed microscopy optical coherence tomography (mOCT) for non-invasive imaging of the liquid-air interface in intact murine trachea from its outside. Whereas axial resolution of 1.5 µm is achieved by the spectral width of supercontinuum light source, lateral resolution is limited by aberrations caused by the cylindric shape of the trachea and optical inhomogenities of the tissue. Therefore, we extended our mOCT by a deformable mirror for compensation of the probe induced aberrations. Instead of using a wavefront sensor for measuring aberrations, we harnessed optimization of the image quality to determine the correction parameter. With the aberration corrected mOCT ciliary function and mucus transport was measured in wild type and βENaC overexpressing mice, which served as a model for cystic fibrosis.

  12. Exploring the atomic structure of 1.8 nm monolayer-protected gold clusters with aberration-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Jian, Nan; Ornelas, Isabel; Pattison, Alexander J. [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lahtinen, Tanja; Salorinne, Kirsi [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Häkkinen, Hannu [Department of Chemistry, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Department of Physics, Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Palmer, Richard E., E-mail: richardepalmerwork@yahoo.com [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Monolayer-protected (MP) Au clusters present attractive quantum systems with a range of potential applications e.g. in catalysis. Knowledge of the atomic structure is needed to obtain a full understanding of their intriguing physical and chemical properties. Here we employed aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM), combined with multislice simulations, to make a round-robin investigation of the atomic structure of chemically synthesised clusters with nominal composition Au{sub 144}(SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 60} provided by two different research groups. The MP Au clusters were “weighed” by the atom counting method, based on their integrated intensities in the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) regime and calibrated exponent of the Z dependence. For atomic structure analysis, we compared experimental images of hundreds of clusters, with atomic resolution, against a variety of structural models. Across the size range 123–151 atoms, only 3% of clusters matched the theoretically predicted Au{sub 144}(SR){sub 60} structure, while a large proportion of the clusters were amorphous (i.e. did not match any model structure). However, a distinct ring-dot feature, characteristic of local icosahedral symmetry, was observed in about 20% of the clusters. - Highlights: • Chemically synthesised gold clusters were “weighed” by atom counting to get true size. • Image simulations show a few percent of clusters have the predicted atomic structure. • But a specific ring-dot feature indicates local icosahedral order in many clusters.

  13. Transmembrane helical interactions in the CFTR channel pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhuma Das

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR gene affect CFTR protein biogenesis or its function as a chloride channel, resulting in dysregulation of epithelial fluid transport in the lung, pancreas and other organs in cystic fibrosis (CF. Development of pharmaceutical strategies to treat CF requires understanding of the mechanisms underlying channel function. However, incomplete 3D structural information on the unique ABC ion channel, CFTR, hinders elucidation of its functional mechanism and correction of cystic fibrosis causing mutants. Several CFTR homology models have been developed using bacterial ABC transporters as templates but these have low sequence similarity to CFTR and are not ion channels. Here, we refine an earlier model in an outward (OWF and develop an inward (IWF facing model employing an integrated experimental-molecular dynamics simulation (200 ns approach. Our IWF structure agrees well with a recently solved cryo-EM structure of a CFTR IWF state. We utilize cysteine cross-linking to verify positions and orientations of residues within trans-membrane helices (TMHs of the OWF conformation and to reconstruct a physiologically relevant pore structure. Comparison of pore profiles of the two conformations reveal a radius sufficient to permit passage of hydrated Cl- ions in the OWF but not the IWF model. To identify structural determinants that distinguish the two conformations and possible rearrangements of TMHs within them responsible for channel gating, we perform cross-linking by bifunctional reagents of multiple predicted pairs of cysteines in TMH 6 and 12 and 6 and 9. To determine whether the effects of cross-linking on gating observed are the result of switching of the channel from open to close state, we also treat the same residue pairs with monofunctional reagents in separate experiments. Both types of reagents prevent ion currents indicating that pore blockage is primarily responsible.

  14. In vitro and in vivo Functional Characterization of Gutless Recombinant SV40-derived CFTR Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Strayer, Marlene S; Sirninger, Jeffery; Braag, Sofia; Branco, Francisco; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Flotte, Terence R.; Strayer, David S.

    2009-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) respiratory failure caused by progressive airway obstruction and tissue damage is primarily a result of the aberrant inflammatory responses to lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite considerable improvement in patient survival, conventional therapies are mainly supportive. Recent progress towards gene therapy for CF has been encouraging; however, several factors such as immune response and transduced cell turnover remain as potential limitations to CF gene therapy. As alternative gene therapy vectors for CF we examined the feasibility of using SV40-derived vectors (rSV40s) which may circumvent some of these obstacles. To accommodate the large CFTR cDNA, we removed not only SV40 Tag genes, but also all capsid genes. We therefore tested whether “gutless” rSV40s could be packaged and were able to express a functional human CFTR cDNA. Results from our in vitro analysis determined that rSV40-CFTR was able to successfully result in the expression of CFTR protein which localized to the plasma membrane and restored channel function to CFTR deficient cells. Similarly in vivo experiments delivering rSV40-CFTR to the lungs of Cftr−/− mice resulted in a reduction of the pathology associated with intra-tracheal pseudomona aeruginosa challenge. rSV40-CFTR treated mice had had less weight loss when compared to control treated mice as well as demonstrably reduced lung inflammation as evidence by histology and reduced inflammatory cytokines in the BAL. The reduction in inflammatory cytokine levels led to an evident decrease in neutrophil influx to the airways. These results indicate that further study of the application of rSV40-CFTR to CF gene therapy is warranted. PMID:19890354

  15. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  16. Functional analysis of F508del CFTR in native human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Barneveld, Andrea; Stanke, Frauke; Tamm, Stephanie; Siebert, Benny; Brandes, Gudrun; Derichs, Nico; Ballmann, Manfred; Junge, Sibylle; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2010-11-01

    The major cystic fibrosis mutation F508del has been classified by experiments in animal and cell culture models as a temperature-sensitive mutant defective in protein folding, processing and trafficking, but literature data on F508del CFTR maturation and function in human tissue are inconsistent. In the present study the molecular pathology of F508del CFTR was characterized in freshly excised rectal mucosa by bioelectric measurement of the basic defect and CFTR protein analysis by metabolic labelling or immunoblot. The majority of investigated F508del homozygous subjects expressed low amounts of complex-glycosylated mature F508del CFTR and low residual F508del CFTR-mediated chloride secretory activity in the rectal mucosa. The finding that some F508del CFTR escapes the ER quality control in vivo substantiates the hope that the defective processing and trafficking of F508del CFTR can be corrected by pharmacological agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Decreasing Poly(ADP-ribose Polymerase activity restores ΔF508 CFTR trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Maria Anjos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Most cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR that prevent its trafficking from the ER to the plasma membrane and is associated with exaggerated inflammation, altered metabolism and diminished responses to oxidative stress. PARP-1 is activated by oxidative stress and causes energy depletion and cell dysfunction. Inhibition of this enzyme protects against excessive inflammation and recent studies have also implicated it in intracellular protein trafficking. We hypothesized that PARP-1 activity is altered in CF and affects trafficking and function of the most common CF mutant ΔF508 CFTR. Indeed, PARP-1 activity was 2.9-fold higher in CF (ΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelial primary cells than in non-CF cells, and similar results were obtained by comparing CF vs. non-CF bronchial epithelial cell lines (2.5-fold higher in CFBE41o- vs 16HBE14o-, P<0.002. A PARP-1 inhibitor (ABT-888, Veliparib partially restored CFTR channel activity in CFBE41o- cells overexpressing ΔF508 CFTR. Similarly, reducing PARP-1 activity by 85% in ileum from transgenic CF mice (Cftrtm1 Eur partially rescued ∆F508 CFTR activity to 7% of wild-type mouse levels, and similar correction (7.8% was observed in vivo by measuring salivary secretion. Inhibiting PARP-1 with ABT-888 or siRNA partially restored ΔF508 CFTR trafficking in cell lines, and most ΔF508 CFTR was complex glycosylated when heterologously expressed in PARP-1-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Finally, levels of the mature glycoform of CFTR were reduced by peroxynitrite, a strong activator of PARP-1. These results demonstrate that PARP-1 activity is increased in CF, and identify a novel pathway that could be targeted by proteostatic correctors of CFTR trafficking.

  18. Impact of corneal aberrations on through-focus image quality of presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses using an adaptive optics bench system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznyak, Len; Kim, Myoung Joon; MacRae, Scott; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2012-10-01

    To measure the impact of corneal aberrations on the through-focus image quality of presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs) using an adaptive optics IOL metrology system. Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA. Experimental study. An adaptive optics IOL metrology system comprising a model eye, wavefront sensor, deformable mirror, and an image-capturing device acquired through-focus images of a letter chart with 3.0 mm and 5.0 mm pupil diameters. The system was used to induce corneal astigmatism and higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in previously measured pseudophakic presbyopic eyes. A single-optic accommodating IOL (Crystalens HD (HD500), an apodized (Restor +3.0 diopter [D] SN6AD1) and full-aperture (Tecnis ZM900) diffractive multifocal IOL, and a monofocal IOL (Acrysof SN60AT) were evaluated. Image quality was quantified using the correlation-coefficient image-quality metric. The single-optic accommodating IOL and monofocal IOL performed similarly; however, with a 3.0 mm pupil, the former had better intermediate (1.50 D) image quality. The multifocal IOLs had bimodal through-focus image quality trends. Corneal astigmatism reduced through-focus image quality and depth of focus with all IOLs; however, the multifocal IOLs had the most severe decline in depth of focus. Ocular spherical aberration had the strongest impact on image quality when typical pseudophakic corneal HOAs were present. The uncorrected corneal astigmatism and HOAs in pseudophakic eyes significantly affected through-focus performance of presbyopia-correcting IOLs. Although multifocal IOLs significantly increased depth of focus, this benefit diminished when more than 0.75 D astigmatism remained uncorrected. Residual ocular spherical aberration had a significant effect on image quality in the presence of other corneal HOAs. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. “Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny” in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, K.W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Rose, H. [Materialwissenschaftliche Elektronenmikroskopie, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. - Highlights: • We scrutinize assertions made on the evolution of Cambridge Cs corrector project. • References [22-24] do not demonstrate improvement of resolution by Cs correction. • According to literature such improvement is only shown in reference [10] in 2001. • Corresponding evidence was published by Heidelberg project already in 1998. • The Heidelberg Cs corrector project antedates the Cambridge project by 3 years.

  20. Functional Repair of CFTR by CRISPR/Cas9 in Intestinal Stem Cell Organoids of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwank, G; Koo, B.K; Sasselli, V; Dekkers, J.F; Heo, I; Demircan, T; Sasaki, N; Boymans, S; Cuppen, E; van der Ent, C.K; Nieuwenhuis, E.E; Beekman, J.M; Clevers, H

    2013-01-01

    ...). This response is lost in organoids derived from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here we use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to correct the CFTR locus by homologous recombination in cultured intestinal stem cells of CF patients...

  1. Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4.5}I{sub 4.5} Nanowires: Structure Studies by HRTEM and Aberration Corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolosi, Valeria [University of Dublin - Trinity College, Department of Physics, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Nellist, Peter [University of Dublin - Trinity College, Department of Physics, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Sloan, Jeremy [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Mihailovic, Dragan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mo6, Teslova 30, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Green, Malcom [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Blau, Werner J [University of Dublin - Trinity College, Department of Physics, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Coleman, Jonathan N [University of Dublin - Trinity College, Department of Physics, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2006-02-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer diameter Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4.5}I{sub 4.5} nanowires and their superlattice packing in bundles have been studied by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). The individual nanowires are best described as one-dimensional Mo-chalcogenidehalide cluster polymers, composed of Mo octahedra, surrounded by iodine atoms and connected by bridging planes of 3 sulfur atoms. The nanowires are weakly bounded together into bundles by Van der Waals forces in a trigonal packing arrangement, with a nanowire to nanowire distance of 0.96 nm.

  2. Transfection of wild-type CFTR into cystic fibrosis lymphocytes restores chloride conductance at G1 of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, R D; Bubien, J K; Drumm, M L; Zheng, T; Peiper, S C; Collins, F S; Kirk, K L; Frizzell, R A; Rado, T A

    1992-01-01

    We complemented the Cl- conductance defect in cystic fibrosis lymphocytes by transfection with wild-type cDNA for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Stable transfectants were selected and subjected to molecular and functional analyses. We detected expression of endogenous CFTR mRNA in several CF and non-CF lymphoid cell lines by PCR. Expression from cDNA in the transfectants was demonstrated by amplifying vector-specific sequences. Both fluorescence and patch-clamp assays showed that transfectants expressing wild-type CFTR acquired properties previously associated with Cl- conductance (GCl) regulation in non-CF lymphocytes: (i) GCl was elevated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, (ii) cells fixed at G1 increase GCl in response to increased cellular cAMP or Ca2+, (iii) agonist-induced increases in GCl were lost as the cells progressed to the S phase of the cell cycle. The cell cycle and agonist dependent regulation of GCl was not observed in CF lymphocytes transfected with CFTR cDNA containing stop codons in all reading frames at exon 6. Our findings indicate that lymphocytes express functional CFTR since wild-type CFTR corrects the defects in Cl- conductance regulation found in CF lymphocytes. Evaluation of the mechanism of this novel, CFTR-mediated regulation of GCl during cell cycling should provide further insights into the function of CFTR. Images PMID:1372253

  3. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  4. Quorum Sensing Down-Regulation Counteracts the Negative Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on CFTR Channel Expression, Function and Rescue in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Émilie Maillé

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The function of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR channels is crucial in human airways. However unfortunately, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection has been shown to impair CFTR proteins in non-CF airway epithelial cells (AEC and to alter the efficiency of new treatments with CFTR modulators designed to correct the basic CFTR default in AEC from cystic fibrosis (CF patients carrying the F508del mutation. Our aim was first to compare the effect of laboratory strains, clinical isolates, engineered and natural mutants to determine the role of the LasR quorum sensing system in CFTR impairment, and second, to test the efficiency of a quorum sensing inhibitor to counteract the deleterious impact of P. aeruginosa both on wt-CFTR and on the rescue of F508del-CFTR by correctors. We first report that exoproducts from either the laboratory PAO1 strain or a clinical ≪Early≫ isolate (from an early stage of infection altered CFTR expression, localization and function in AEC expressing wt-CFTR. Genetic inactivation of the quorum-sensing LasR in PAO1 (PAO1ΔlasR or in a natural clinical mutant (≪Late≫ CF-adapted clinical isolate abolished wt-CFTR impairment. PAO1 exoproducts also dampened F508del-CFTR rescue by VRT-325 or Vx-809 correctors in CF cells, whereas PAO1ΔlasR had no impact. Importantly, treatment of P. aeruginosa cultures with a quorum sensing inhibitor (HDMF prevented the negative effect of P. aeruginosa exoproducts on wt-CFTR and preserved CFTR rescue by correctors in CF AEC. These findings indicate that LasR-interfering strategies could be of benefits to counteract the deleterious effect of P. aeruginosa in infected patients.

  5. Quorum Sensing Down-Regulation Counteracts the Negative Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on CFTR Channel Expression, Function and Rescue in Human Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillé, Émilie; Ruffin, Manon; Adam, Damien; Messaoud, Hatem; Lafayette, Shantelle L; McKay, Geoffrey; Nguyen, Dao; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    The function of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels is crucial in human airways. However unfortunately, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection has been shown to impair CFTR proteins in non-CF airway epithelial cells (AEC) and to alter the efficiency of new treatments with CFTR modulators designed to correct the basic CFTR default in AEC from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients carrying the F508del mutation. Our aim was first to compare the effect of laboratory strains, clinical isolates, engineered and natural mutants to determine the role of the LasR quorum sensing system in CFTR impairment, and second, to test the efficiency of a quorum sensing inhibitor to counteract the deleterious impact of P. aeruginosa both on wt-CFTR and on the rescue of F508del-CFTR by correctors. We first report that exoproducts from either the laboratory PAO1 strain or a clinical ≪Early≫ isolate (from an early stage of infection) altered CFTR expression, localization and function in AEC expressing wt-CFTR. Genetic inactivation of the quorum-sensing LasR in PAO1 (PAO1ΔlasR) or in a natural clinical mutant (≪Late≫ CF-adapted clinical isolate) abolished wt-CFTR impairment. PAO1 exoproducts also dampened F508del-CFTR rescue by VRT-325 or Vx-809 correctors in CF cells, whereas PAO1ΔlasR had no impact. Importantly, treatment of P. aeruginosa cultures with a quorum sensing inhibitor (HDMF) prevented the negative effect of P. aeruginosa exoproducts on wt-CFTR and preserved CFTR rescue by correctors in CF AEC. These findings indicate that LasR-interfering strategies could be of benefits to counteract the deleterious effect of P. aeruginosa in infected patients.

  6. COMMD1-mediated ubiquitination regulates CFTR trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Drévillon

    Full Text Available The CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein is a large polytopic protein whose biogenesis is inefficient. To better understand the regulation of CFTR processing and trafficking, we conducted a genetic screen that identified COMMD1 as a new CFTR partner. COMMD1 is a protein associated with multiple cellular pathways, including the regulation of hepatic copper excretion, sodium uptake through interaction with ENaC (epithelial sodium channel and NF-kappaB signaling. In this study, we show that COMMD1 interacts with CFTR in cells expressing both proteins endogenously. This interaction promotes CFTR cell surface expression as assessed by biotinylation experiments in heterologously expressing cells through regulation of CFTR ubiquitination. In summary, our data demonstrate that CFTR is protected from ubiquitination by COMMD1, which sustains CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Thus, increasing COMMD1 expression may provide an approach to simultaneously inhibit ENaC absorption and enhance CFTR trafficking, two major issues in cystic fibrosis.

  7. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häussler, Dietrich [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Houben, Lothar [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Essig, Stephanie [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Kurttepeli, Mert [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Dimroth, Frank [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jäger, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.jaeger@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) investigations have been applied to investigate the structure and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar cells are of particular interest since efficiencies well above 40% have been obtained for concentrator solar cells which are based on III-V compound semiconductors. In this methodologically oriented investigation, we explore the potential of combining aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field STEM imaging (HAADF-STEM) with spectroscopic techniques, such as EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), in order to analyze the effects of fast atom beam (FAB) and ion beam bombardment (IB) activation treatments on the structure and composition of bonding interfaces of wafer-bonded solar cells on Si substrates. Investigations using STEM/EELS are able to measure quantitatively and with high precision the widths and the fluctuations in element distributions within amorphous interface layers of nanometer extensions, including those of light elements. Such measurements allow the control of the activation treatments and thus support assessing electrical conductivity phenomena connected with impurity and dopant distributions near interfaces for optimized performance of the solar cells. - Highlights: • Aberration-corrected TEM and EELS reveal structural and elemental profiles across GaAs/Si bond interfaces in wafer-bonded GaInP/GaAs/Si - multi-junction solar cells. • Fluctuations in elemental concentration in nanometer-thick amorphous interface layers, including the disrubutions of light elements, are measured using EELS. • The projected widths of the interface layers are determined on the atomic scale from STEM-HAADF measurements. • The effects of atom and ion beam activation treatment on the bonding

  8. Functional repair of CFTR by CRISPR/Cas9 in intestinal stem cell organoids of cystic fibrosis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwank Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Single murine and human intestinal stem cells can be expanded in culture over long time periods as genetically and phenotypically stable epithelial organoids. Increased cAMP levels induce rapid swelling of such organoids by opening the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor receptor (CFTR). This response is lost in organoids derived from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here we use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to correct the CFTR locus by homologous recombination in cultured intestina...

  9. Characterisation of InAs/GaAs short period superlattices using column ratio mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-10-01

    The image processing technique of column ratio mapping was applied to aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field (HAADF) images of short period MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) grown InAs/GaAs superlattices. This method allowed the Indium distribution to be mapped and a more detailed assessment of interfacial quality to be made. Frozen-phonon multislice simulations were also employed to provide a better understanding of the experimental column ratio values. It was established that ultra-thin InAs/GaAs layers can be grown sufficiently well by MBE. This is despite the fact that the Indium segregated over 3-4 monolayers. Furthermore, the effect of the growth temperature on the quality of the layers was also investigated. It was demonstrated that the higher growth temperature resulted in a better quality superlattice structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Abnormal spatial diffusion of Ca2+ in F508del-CFTR airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becq Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In airway epithelial cells, calcium mobilization can be elicited by selective autocrine and/or paracrine activation of apical or basolateral membrane heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors linked to phospholipase C (PLC stimulation, which generates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG and induces Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER stores. Methods In the present study, we monitored the cytosolic Ca2+ transients using the UV light photolysis technique to uncage caged Ca2+ or caged IP3 into the cytosol of loaded airway epithelial cells of cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF origin. We compared in these cells the types of Ca2+ receptors present in the ER, and measured their Ca2+ dependent activity before and after correction of F508del-CFTR abnormal trafficking either by low temperature or by the pharmacological corrector miglustat (N-butyldeoxynojirimycin. Results We showed reduction of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R dependent-Ca2+ response following both correcting treatments compared to uncorrected cells in such a way that Ca2+ responses (CF+treatment vs wild-type cells were normalized. This normalization of the Ca2+ rate does not affect the activity of Ca2+-dependent chloride channel in miglustat-treated CF cells. Using two inhibitors of IP3R1, we observed a decrease of the implication of IP3R1 in the Ca2+ response in CF corrected cells. We observed a similar Ca2+ mobilization between CF-KM4 cells and CFTR-cDNA transfected CF cells (CF-KM4-reverted. When we restored the F508del-CFTR trafficking in CFTR-reverted cells, the specific IP3R activity was also reduced to a similar level as in non CF cells. At the structural level, the ER morphology of CF cells was highly condensed around the nucleus while in non CF cells or corrected CF cells the ER was extended at the totality of cell. Conclusion These results suggest reversal of the IP3R dysfunction in F508del-CFTR epithelial

  11. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione (R)-BPO-27 Inhibits CFTR Chloride Channel Gating by Competition with ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yonjung; Anderson, Marc O; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Min Goo; Namkung, Wan; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported that benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione BPO-27 [6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4',5':3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid] inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel with low nanomolar potency and reduces cystogenesis in a model of polycystic kidney disease. We used computational chemistry and patch-clamp to show that enantiomerically pure (R)-BPO-27 inhibits CFTR by competition with ATP, whereas (S)-BPO-27 is inactive. Docking computations using a homology model of CFTR structure suggested that (R)-BPO-27 binds near the canonical ATP binding site, and these findings were supported by molecular dynamics simulations showing a lower binding energy for the (R) versus (S) stereoisomers. Three additional lower-potency BPO-27 analogs were modeled in a similar fashion, with the binding energies predicted in the correct order. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed linear CFTR currents with a voltage-independent (R)-BPO-27 block mechanism. Single-channel recordings in inside-out patches showed reduced CFTR channel open probability and increased channel closed time by (R)-BPO-27 without altered unitary channel conductance. At a concentration of (R)-BPO-27 that inhibited CFTR chloride current by ∼50%, the EC50 for ATP activation of CFTR increased from 0.27 to 1.77 mM but was not changed by CFTRinh-172 [4-[[4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-[3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-thiazolidinylidene]methyl]benzoic acid], a thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor that acts at a site distinct from the ATP binding site. Our results suggest that (R)-BPO-27 inhibition of CFTR involves competition with ATP. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Development of Automated Patch Clamp Technique to Investigate CFTR Chloride Channel Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billet, Arnaud; Froux, Lionel; Hanrahan, John W; Becq, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    The chloride (Cl-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is defective in cystic fibrosis (CF), and mutation of its encoding gene leads to various defects such as retention of the misfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced stability at the plasma membrane, abnormal channel gating with low open probability, and thermal instability, which leads to inactivation of the channel at physiological temperature. Pharmacotherapy is one major therapeutic approach in the CF field and needs sensible and fast tools to identify promising compounds. The high throughput screening assays available are often fast and sensible techniques but with lack of specificity. Few works used automated patch clamp (APC) for CFTR recording, and none have compared conventional and planar techniques and demonstrated their capabilities for different types of experiments. In this study, we evaluated the use of planar parallel APC technique for pharmacological search of CFTR-trafficking correctors and CFTR function modulators. Using optimized conditions, we recorded both wt- and corrected F508del-CFTR Cl- currents with automated whole-cell patch clamp and compared the data to results obtained with conventional manual whole-cell patch clamp. We found no significant difference in patch clamp parameters such as cell capacitance and series resistance between automated and manual patch clamp. Also, the results showed good similarities of CFTR currents recording between the two methods. We showed that similar stimulation protocols could be used in both manual and automatic techniques allowing precise control of temperature, classic I/V relationship, and monitoring of current stability in time. In conclusion, parallel patch-clamp recording allows rapid and efficient investigation of CFTR currents with a variety of tests available and could be considered as new tool for medium throughput screening in CF pharmacotherapy.

  13. Restoration of CFTR Activity in Ducts Rescues Acinar Cell Function and Reduces Inflammation in Pancreatic and Salivary Glands of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mei; Szymczak, Mitchell; Ahuja, Malini; Zheng, Changyu; Yin, Hongen; Swaim, William; Chiorini, John A; Bridges, Robert J; Muallem, Shmuel

    2017-10-01

    Sjögren's syndrome and autoimmune pancreatitis are disorders with decreased function of salivary, lacrimal glands, and the exocrine pancreas. Nonobese diabetic/ShiLTJ mice and mice transduced with the cytokine BMP6 develop Sjögren's syndrome and chronic pancreatitis and MRL/Mp mice are models of autoimmune pancreatitis. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a ductal Cl- channel essential for ductal fluid and HCO3- secretion. We used these models to ask the following questions: is CFTR expression altered in these diseases, does correction of CFTR correct gland function, and most notably, does correcting ductal function correct acinar function? We treated the mice models with the CFTR corrector C18 and the potentiator VX770. Glandular, ductal, and acinar cells damage, infiltration, immune cells and function were measured in vivo and in isolated duct/acini. In the disease models, CFTR expression is markedly reduced. The salivary glands and pancreas are inflamed with increased fibrosis and tissue damage. Treatment with VX770 and, in particular, C18 restored salivation, rescued CFTR expression and localization, and nearly eliminated the inflammation and tissue damage. Transgenic overexpression of CFTR exclusively in the duct had similar effects. Most notably, the markedly reduced acinar cell Ca2+ signaling, Orai1, inositol triphosphate receptors, Aquaporin 5 expression, and fluid secretion were restored by rescuing ductal CFTR. Our findings reveal that correcting ductal function is sufficient to rescue acinar cell function and suggests that CFTR correctors are strong candidates for the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome and pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aberration-corrected X-ray spectrum imaging and Fresnel contrast to differentiate nanoclusters and cavities in helium-irradiated alloy 14YWT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Chad M; Miller, Michael K

    2014-04-01

    Helium accumulation negatively impacts structural materials used in neutron-irradiated environments, such as fission and fusion reactors. Next-generation fission and fusion reactors will require structural materials, such as steels, that are resistant to large neutron doses yet see service temperatures in the range most affected by helium embrittlement. Previous work has indicated the difficulty of experimentally differentiating nanometer-sized cavities such as helium bubbles from the Ti-Y-O rich nanoclusters (NCs) in radiation-tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Because the NCs are expected to sequester helium away from grain boundaries and reduce embrittlement, experimental methods to study simultaneously the NC and bubble populations are needed. In this study, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results combining high-collection-efficiency X-ray spectrum images (SIs), multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA), and Fresnel-contrast bright-field STEM imaging, have been used for such a purpose. Fresnel-contrast imaging, with careful attention to TEM-STEM reciprocity, differentiates bubbles from NCs. MVSA of X-ray SIs unambiguously identifies NCs. Therefore, combined Fresnel-contrast STEM and X-ray SI is an effective STEM-based method to characterize helium-bearing NFAs.

  15. Atomic-resolution study of dislocation structures and interfaces in poly-crystalline thin film CdTe using aberration-corrected STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Tadas; Colegrove, Eric; Buurma, Chris; Kim, Moon; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Commercial success of CdTe-based thin film photovoltaic devices stems from its nearly ideal direct band gap which very effectively couples to Sun's light spectrum as well as ease of manufacturing and low cost of these modules. However, to further improve the conversion efficiency beyond 20 percent, it is important to minimize the harmful effects of grain boundaries and lattice defects in CdTe. Direct atomic-scale characterization is needed in order identify the carrier recombination centers. Likewise, it is necessary to confirm that passivants in CdTe, such as Cl, are able to diffuse and bind to the target defects. In this study, we characterize dislocation structures and grain boundaries in poly-crystalline CdTe using aberration-corrected cold-field emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The chemical composition of Shockley partial, Frank and Lomer-Cottrell dislocations is examined via atomic column-resolved X-ray energy dispersive (XEDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopies (EELS). Segregation of Cl towards dislocation cores and grain boundaries is shown in CdCl2 treated samples. We also investigate interfaces in ultra-high-vacuum bonded CdTe bi-crystals with pre-defined misorientation angles which are intended to mimic grain boundaries. Funded by: DOE EERE Sunshot Award EE0005956.

  16. Migration of Single Iridium Atoms and Tri-iridium Clusters on MgO Surfaces. Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging and ab-initio Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Iddir, Hakim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Uzun, Alper [Koc Univ., Instanbul (Turkey); Curtiss, Larry A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ortalan, Volkan [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-06

    To address the challenge of fast, direct atomic-scale visualization of the diffusion of atoms and clusters on surfaces, we used aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high scan speeds (as little as ~0.1 s per frame) to visualize the diffusion of (1) a heavy atom (Ir) on the surface of a support consisting of light atoms, MgO(100), and (2) an Ir3 cluster on MgO(110). Sequential Z-contrast images elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, including the hopping of Ir1 and the rotational migration of Ir3 as two Ir atoms remain anchored to the surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided estimates of the diffusion energy barriers and binding energies of the iridium species to the surfaces. The results show how the combination of fast-scan STEM and DFT calculations allow real-time visualization and fundamental understanding of surface diffusion phenomena pertaining to supported catalysts and other materials.

  17. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001 interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The stacking faults (SFs in an AlSb/GaAs (001 interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps εxx and εyy, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values. Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in εxx and εyy strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30° PDs. A pair of 30° PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  18. Generation of novel AAV variants by directed evolution for improved CFTR delivery to human ciliated airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuping; Zhang, Liqun; Johnson, Jarrod S; Zhijian, Wu; Grieger, Joshua C; Ping-Jie, Xiao; Drouin, Lauren M; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Pickles, Raymond J; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been used to deliver CFTR to the airway epithelium of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, no significant CFTR function has been demonstrated likely due to low transduction efficiencies of the AAV vectors. To improve AAV transduction efficiency for human airway epithelium (HAE), we generated a chimeric AAV library and performed directed evolution of AAV on an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium. Two independent and novel AAV variants were identified that contained capsid components from AAV-1, AAV-6, and/or AAV-9. The transduction efficiencies of the two novel AAV variants for human ciliated airway epithelium were three times higher than that for AAV-6. The novel variants were then used to deliver CFTR to ciliated airway epithelium from CF patients. Here we show that our novel AAV variants, but not the parental, AAV provide sufficient CFTR delivery to correct the chloride ion transport defect to ~25% levels measured in non-CF cells. These results suggest that directed evolution of AAV on relevant in vitro models will enable further improvements in CFTR gene transfer efficiency and the development of an efficacious and safe gene transfer vector for CF lung disease.

  19. Heterogeneous spectrum of mutations in CFTR gene from Indian patients with congenital absence of the vas deferens and their association with cystic fibrosis genetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H; Mavuduru, R S; Singh, S K; Prasad, R

    2014-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is usually considered a rare disease in the Indian population. Two studies have reported on the frequency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in Indian males with congenital absence of the vas deferens (CAVD), however, data on the spectrum of CFTR gene mutations are still lacking. Therefore, the present study was designed to identify the spectrum of CFTR gene mutations as well as to investigate an association of CF genetic modifiers in the penetrance of CAVD in infertile Indian men. A total of 60 consecutive infertile males with a diagnosis of CAVD were subjected to CFTR gene analysis which revealed 13 different CFTR gene mutations and 1 intronic variant that led to aberrant splicing. p.Phe508del (n = 16) and p.Arg117His (n = 4) were among the most common severe forms of CFTR mutations identified. The IVS8-T5 allele, which is considered as a mild form of CFTR mutation, was found with an allelic frequency of 28.3%. Eight novel mutations were also identified in the CFTR gene from our patient cohort. It is noteworthy that the spectrum of CFTR gene mutation is heterogeneous, with exon 4 and exon 11 as hot spot regions. Moreover, we also found an association of the CF genetic modifiers, viz., transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and endothelial receptor type-A (EDNRA) genes with the CAVD phenotype. The findings are of considerable clinical significance because men suffering from infertility due to CAVD can decide to use artificial reproduction technology. The children of men with CAVD are at risk of carrying CFTR mutations; therefore, genetic counseling is a crucial step for such patients. With special reference to developing countries, such as India, where whole gene sequencing is not feasible, the outcome of our study will make the screening procedure for CFTR gene simpler and more cost-effective as we have identified hot spot regions of the CFTR gene which are more prone to mutation in Indian males with

  20. Role of CFTR in epithelial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Gray, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Salt and fluid absorption and secretion are two processes that are fundamental to epithelial function and whole body fluid homeostasis, and as such are tightly regulated in epithelial tissues. The CFTR anion channel plays a major role in regulating both secretion and absorption in a diverse range of epithelial tissues, including the airways, the GI and reproductive tracts, sweat and salivary glands. It is not surprising then that defects in CFTR function are linked to disease, including life-threatening secretory diarrhoeas, such as cholera, as well as the inherited disease, cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common life-limiting genetic diseases in Caucasian populations. More recently, CFTR dysfunction has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the hyper-responsiveness in asthma, underscoring its fundamental role in whole body health and disease. CFTR regulates many mechanisms in epithelial physiology, such as maintaining epithelial surface hydration and regulating luminal pH. Indeed, recent studies have identified luminal pH as an important arbiter of epithelial barrier function and innate defence, particularly in the airways and GI tract. In this chapter, we will illustrate the different operational roles of CFTR in epithelial function by describing its characteristics in three different tissues: the airways, the pancreas, and the sweat gland.

  1. Spherical aberration in contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskoog Pettersson, A; Jarkö, C; Alvin, A; Unsbo, P; Brautaset, R

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present studies was to investigate the effect on spherical aberration of different non custom-made contact lenses, both with and without aberration control. A wavefront analyser (Zywave, Bausch & Lomb) was used to measure the aberrations in each subject's right eye uncorrected and with the different contact lenses. The first study evaluated residual spherical aberration with a standard lens (Focus Dailies Disposable, Ciba Vision) and with an aberration controlled contact lens (ACCL) (Definition AC, Optical Connection Inc.). The second study evaluated the residual spherical aberrations with a monthly disposable silicone hydrogel lens with aberration reduction (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb). Uncorrected spherical aberration was positive for all pupil sizes in both studies. In the first study, residual spherical aberration was close to zero with the standard lens for all pupil sizes whereas the ACCL over-corrected spherical aberration. The results of the second study showed that the monthly disposable lens also over-corrected the aberration making it negative. The changes in aberration were statistically significant (plenses. Since the amount of aberration varies individually we suggest that aberrations should be measured with lenses on the eye if the aim is to change spherical aberration in a certain direction.

  2. A little CFTR goes a long way: CFTR-dependent sweat secretion from G551D and R117H-5T cystic fibrosis subjects taking ivacaftor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Jessica E; Wolfe, Marlene H; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Park, Il-Ho; Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Frisbee, Eric; Dunn, Colleen; Davies, Zoe; Milla, Carlos; Moss, Richard B; Thomas, Ewart A C; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    To determine if oral dosing with the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770, Kalydeco) improves CFTR-dependent sweating in CF subjects carrying G551D or R117H-5T mutations, we optically measured sweat secretion from 32-143 individually identified glands in each of 8 CF subjects; 6 F508del/G551D, one G551D/R117H-5T, and one I507del/R117H-5T. Two subjects were tested only (-) ivacaftor, 3 only (+) ivacaftor and 3 (+/-) ivacaftor (1-5 tests per condition). The total number of gland measurements was 852 (-) ivacaftor and 906 (+) ivacaftor. A healthy control was tested 4 times (51 glands). For each gland we measured both CFTR-independent (M-sweat) and CFTR-dependent (C-sweat); C-sweat was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevated [cAMP]i while blocking muscarinic receptors. Absent ivacaftor, almost all CF glands produced M-sweat on all tests, but only 1/593 glands produced C-sweat (10 tests, 5 subjects). By contrast, 6/6 subjects (113/342 glands) produced C-sweat in the (+) ivacaftor condition, but with large inter-subject differences; 3-74% of glands responded with C/M sweat ratios 0.04%-2.57% of the average WT ratio of 0.265. Sweat volume losses cause proportionally larger underestimates of CFTR function at lower sweat rates. The losses were reduced by measuring C/M ratios in 12 glands from each subject that had the highest M-sweat rates. Remaining losses were estimated from single channel data and used to correct the C/M ratios, giving estimates of CFTR function (+) ivacaftor  = 1.6%-7.7% of the WT average. These estimates are in accord with single channel data and transcript analysis, and suggest that significant clinical benefit can be produced by low levels of CFTR function.

  3. A little CFTR goes a long way: CFTR-dependent sweat secretion from G551D and R117H-5T cystic fibrosis subjects taking ivacaftor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Char

    Full Text Available To determine if oral dosing with the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770, Kalydeco improves CFTR-dependent sweating in CF subjects carrying G551D or R117H-5T mutations, we optically measured sweat secretion from 32-143 individually identified glands in each of 8 CF subjects; 6 F508del/G551D, one G551D/R117H-5T, and one I507del/R117H-5T. Two subjects were tested only (- ivacaftor, 3 only (+ ivacaftor and 3 (+/- ivacaftor (1-5 tests per condition. The total number of gland measurements was 852 (- ivacaftor and 906 (+ ivacaftor. A healthy control was tested 4 times (51 glands. For each gland we measured both CFTR-independent (M-sweat and CFTR-dependent (C-sweat; C-sweat was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevated [cAMP]i while blocking muscarinic receptors. Absent ivacaftor, almost all CF glands produced M-sweat on all tests, but only 1/593 glands produced C-sweat (10 tests, 5 subjects. By contrast, 6/6 subjects (113/342 glands produced C-sweat in the (+ ivacaftor condition, but with large inter-subject differences; 3-74% of glands responded with C/M sweat ratios 0.04%-2.57% of the average WT ratio of 0.265. Sweat volume losses cause proportionally larger underestimates of CFTR function at lower sweat rates. The losses were reduced by measuring C/M ratios in 12 glands from each subject that had the highest M-sweat rates. Remaining losses were estimated from single channel data and used to correct the C/M ratios, giving estimates of CFTR function (+ ivacaftor  = 1.6%-7.7% of the WT average. These estimates are in accord with single channel data and transcript analysis, and suggest that significant clinical benefit can be produced by low levels of CFTR function.

  4. Reduced sintering of mass-selected Au clusters on SiO2 by alloying with Ti: an aberration-corrected STEM and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yubiao; Schlexer, Philomena; Sebok, Bela; Chorkendorff, Ib; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Palmer, Richard E

    2018-01-12

    Au nanoparticles represent the most remarkable example of a size effect in heterogeneous catalysis. However, a major issue hindering the use of Au nanoparticles in technological applications is their rapid sintering. We explore the potential of stabilizing Au nanoclusters on SiO2 by alloying them with a reactive metal, Ti. Mass-selected Au/Ti clusters (400 000 amu) and Au2057 clusters (405 229 amu) were produced with a magnetron sputtering, gas condensation cluster beam source in conjunction with a lateral time-of-flight mass filter, deposited onto a silica support and characterised by XPS and LEIS. The sintering dynamics of mass-selected Au and Au/Ti alloy nanoclusters were investigated in real space and real time with atomic resolution aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM imaging, supported by model DFT calculations. A strong anchoring effect was revealed in the case of the Au/Ti clusters, because of a much increased local interaction with the support (by a factor 5 in the simulations), which strongly inhibits sintering, especially when the clusters are more than ∼0.60 nm apart. Heating the clusters at 100 °C for 1 h in a mixture of O2 and CO, to simulate CO oxidation conditions, led to some segregation in the Au/Ti clusters, but in line with the model computational investigation, Au atoms were still present on the surface. Thus size-selected, deposited nanoalloy Au/Ti clusters appear to be promising candidates for sustainable gold-based nanocatalysis.

  5. Reverse transcription-competitive multiplex PCR improves quantification of mRNA in clinical samples--application to the low abundance CFTR mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loitsch, S M; Kippenberger, S; Dauletbaev, N; Wagner, T O; Bargon, J

    1999-05-01

    To monitor gene therapy, we wished to quantify cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA. We developed a PCR-based method to measure CFTR mRNA in clinical samples. Expression was determined by reverse transcription-competitive multiplex PCR (RCMP) for CFTR and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) transcripts, and for serial dilutions of two internal cDNA standards consisting of CFTR and GAPDH mutants containing short deletions. The RCMP used simultaneous amplification of the gene of interest with a reporter gene in one reaction tube. The expression of CFTR was calculated with reference to the amount of GAPDH to correct for variations in initial RNA loading. Amplification of cDNAs derived from different amounts of RNA (1-4 microgram) gave similar GAPDH/CFTR ratios, with a coefficient of variation (CV) below 7.5%. RCMP was applied on nasal and bronchial brushings and shows a high variability of CFTR expression in non-cystic fibrosis donors. This method is precise and reproducible and advantageous for use with limited amounts of tissue, such as from biopsies or from nasal or bronchial brushings. Copyright 1999 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  6. The CF-modifying gene EHF promotes p.Phe508del-CFTR residual function by altering protein glycosylation and trafficking in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Frauke; van Barneveld, Andrea; Hedtfeld, Silke; Wölfl, Stefan; Becker, Tim; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2014-05-01

    The three-base-pair deletion c.1521_1523delCTT (p.Phe508del, F508del) in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the most frequent disease-causing lesion in cystic fibrosis (CF). The CFTR gene encodes a chloride and bicarbonate channel at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Altered ion transport of CFTR-expressing epithelia can be used to differentiate manifestations of the so-called CF basic defect. Recently, an 11p13 region has been described as a CF modifier by the North American CF Genetic Modifier Study Consortium. Selecting the epithelial-specific transcription factor EHF (ets homologous factor) as the likely candidate gene on 11p13, we have genotyped two intragenic microsatellites in EHF to replicate the 11p13 finding in the patient cohort of the European CF Twin and Sibling Study. We could observe an association of rare EHF haplotypes among homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, which exhibit a CF-untypical manifestation of the CF basic defect such as CFTR-mediated residual chloride secretion and low response to amiloride. We have reviewed transcriptome data obtained from intestinal epithelial samples of homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, which were stratified for their EHF genetic background. Transcripts that were upregulated among homozygotes for c.1521_1523delCTT in CFTR, who carry two rare EHF alleles, were enriched for genes that alter protein glycosylation and trafficking, both mechanisms being pivotal for the effective targeting of fully functional p.Phe508del-CFTR to the apical membrane of epithelial cells. We conclude that EHF modifies the CF phenotype by altering capabilities of the epithelial cell to correctly process the folding and trafficking of mutant p.Phe508del-CFTR.

  7. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali J Vetter

    Full Text Available The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  8. Bilateral Symmetry before and Six Months after Aberration-Free™ Correction with the SCHWIND AMARIS TotalTech Laser: Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelaez, Maria Clara; Vidal, Camila; Arba-Mosquera, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the preoperative and postoperative bilateral symmetry between OD and OS eyes that have undergone femto-LASIK using the Ziemer LDV femtosecond laser system, the SCHWIND AMARIS Excimer Laser and the Aberrationfree™ profiles implemented in the SCHWIND Custom Ablation Manager software. Methods A total of 25 LASIK patients were bilaterally evaluated at the six-month follow-up visit. In all cases standard examinations, pre- and postoperative analysis with corneal wavefront topography (OPTIKON Scout) were performed. Aberration-free™ aspheric treatments were devised using the Custom Ablation Manager software and ablations were performed by means of the SCHWIND AMARIS flying-spot excimer laser system (both SCHWIND eyetech- solutions). In all cases LASIK flaps were created using an LDV femtosecond laser (Ziemer Group). The OD/OS bilateral symmetry was evaluated in terms of corneal wavefront aberration. Results Preoperatively, 11 Zernike terms showed significant bilateral (OS-vs.-OD) symmetry, and only 6 Zernike terms were significantly different. Overall, 23 out of the 25 patients showed significant bilateral symmetry, and only 2 out of 25 patients showed significant differences. None of the aberration metrics changed from pre- to postoperative values by a clinically relevant amount. At the 6-month postoperative visit, 12 Zernike terms showed significant symmetry, and 8 terms were significantly different. Overall, 22 out of 25 patients showed significant bilateral symmetry (OS vs. OD), and only 3 out of 25 patients showed significant differences. Also, this postoperative examination revealed that 6 Zernike terms lost significant OS-vs.-OD symmetry, but 4 Zernike terms gained significant symmetry. Finally, 4 patients lost significant bilaterality, and 2 patients gained significant bilaterality: bilateral symmetry between eyes was better maintained in those patients with a clear preoperative bilateral symmetry. Conclusions Aberration-Free Treatments with

  9. Stellar aberration correction and thermoelastic compensation of Swarm μASC attitude observationsA comment to the Express Letter "Mysterious misalignments between geomagnetic and stellar reference frames seen in CHAMP and Swarm satellite measurements", by Stefan Maus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, M.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Jørgensen, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    The Swarm constellation of three satellites measures the magnetic signal of the Earth using both a Vector Field Magnetometer and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer. A Micro Advanced Stellar Compass (μASC) mounted on a common, supposedly stable, optical bench precisely determines its inertial attitude. However, comparison of the Inter Boresight Angle shows a relative attitude variation between the μASC Camera Head Units. These misalignments between Camera Head Units and a geomagnetic reference frame cannot be explained by incorrect aberration correction (as theorized by Maus). Herceg et al. found them to be caused by thermal gradient sensitivity of the optical bench system, opposing the underlying assumption of perfect platform stability. The results after applying thermal corrections show significant decrease in root mean square, with Inter Boresight Angle of thermally corrected data being nearly flat and clean from any variation caused by thermoelastic effects.

  10. In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function: Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, Jeffrey J.; Char, Jessica E.; Chen, Jonathan; Cho, Hyung-ju; Dunn, Colleen; Frisbee, Eric; Joo, Nam Soo; Milla, Carlos; Modlin, Sara E.; Park, Il-Ho; Thomas, Ewart A. C.; Tran, Kim V.; Verma, Rohan; Wolfe, Marlene H.

    2013-01-01

    To assess CFTR function in vivo, we developed a bioassay that monitors and compares CFTR-dependent and CFTR-independent sweat secretion in parallel for multiple (∼50) individual, identified glands in each subject. Sweating was stimulated by intradermally injected agonists and quantified by optically measuring spherical sweat bubbles in an oil-layer that contained dispersed, water soluble dye particles that partitioned into the sweat bubbles, making them highly visible. CFTR-independent secretion (M-sweat) was stimulated with methacholine, which binds to muscarinic receptors and elevates cytosolic calcium. CFTR-dependent secretion (C-sweat) was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevates cytosolic cAMP while blocking muscarinic receptors. A C-sweat/M-sweat ratio was determined on a gland-by-gland basis to compensate for differences unrelated to CFTR function, such as gland size. The average ratio provides an approximately linear readout of CFTR function: the heterozygote ratio is ∼0.5 the control ratio and for CF subjects the ratio is zero. During assay development, we measured C/M ratios in 6 healthy controls, 4 CF heterozygotes, 18 CF subjects and 4 subjects with ‘CFTR-related’ conditions. The assay discriminated all groups clearly. It also revealed consistent differences in the C/M ratio among subjects within groups. We hypothesize that these differences reflect, at least in part, levels of CFTR expression, which are known to vary widely. When C-sweat rates become very low the C/M ratio also tended to decrease; we hypothesize that this nonlinearity reflects ductal fluid absorption. We also discovered that M-sweating potentiates the subsequent C-sweat response. We then used potentiation as a surrogate for drugs that can increase CFTR-dependent secretion. This bioassay provides an additional method for assessing CFTR function in vivo, and is well suited for within-subject tests of systemic, CFTR-directed therapeutics. PMID:24204751

  11. Investigating the chemical and morphological evolution of GaAs capped InAs/InP quantum dots emitting at 1.5μm using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    The emission wavelength of InAs quantum dots grown on InP has been shown to shift to the technologically desirable 1.5μm with the deposition of 1–2 monolayers of GaAs on top of the quantum dots. Here, we use aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy to investigate morphological...... and compositional changes occurring to the quantum dots as a result of the deposition of 1.7 monolayers of GaAs on top of them, prior to complete overgrowth with InP. The results are compared with theoretical models describing the overgrowth process....

  12. Optical Aberrations and Wavefront

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Polat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The deviation of light to create normal retinal image in the optical system is called aberration. Aberrations are divided two subgroup: low-order aberrations (defocus: spherical and cylindrical refractive errors and high-order aberrations (coma, spherical, trefoil, tetrafoil, quadrifoil, pentafoil, secondary astigmatism. Aberrations increase with aging. Spherical aberrations are compensated by positive corneal and negative lenticular spherical aberrations in youth. Total aberrations are elevated by positive corneal and positive lenticular spherical aberrations in elderly. In this study, we aimed to analyze the basic terms regarding optic aberrations which have gained significance recently. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 306-11

  13. G551D-CFTR needs more bound actin than wild-type CFTR to maintain its presence in plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé, Pascal; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Teng, Ling; Benz, Nathalie; Taiya, Mehdi; Le Hir, Sophie; Férec, Claude

    2015-08-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is due to mutations in the CFTR gene. The missense mutation G551D (approx. 5% of cases) encodes a CFTR chloride channel with normal cell surface expression but with an altered chloride channel activity, leading to a severe phenotype. Our aim was to identify specific interacting proteins of G551D-CFTR which could explain the channel defect. Wild-type CFTR (Wt-CFTR) was co-immunoprecipitated from stably transfected HeLa cells and resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis. Among the detected spots, one was expressed at a high level. Mass Spectrometry revealed that it corresponded to actin which is known to be involved in the CFTR's channel function. To assess whether actin could be involved in the altered G551D-CFTR function, its basal expression was studied. Because actin expression was the same in wt- and in G551D-CFTR expressing cells, its interaction with both wt- and G551D-CFTR was studied by co-immunoprecipitation, and we found that a higher amount of actin was bound onto G551D-CFTR than onto Wt-CFTR. The role of actin upon wt- and G551D-CFTR function was further studied by patch-clamp experiments after cytochalasin D treatment of the cells. We found a decrease of the very weak currents in G551D-CFTR expressing cells. Because a higher amount of actin is bound onto G551D-CFTR than onto Wt-CFTR, it is likely to be not involved in the mutated CFTR's defect. Nevertheless, because actin is necessary to maintain the very weak global currents observed in G551D-CFTR expressing HeLa cells, we conclude that more actin is necessary to maintain G551D-CFTR in the plasma membrane than for Wt-CFTR. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  14. Quantitative atom column position analysis at the incommensurate interfaces of a (PbS){sub 1.14}NbS{sub 2} misfit layered compound with aberration-corrected HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrecht, M., E-mail: mag@technion.ac.il [Microanalysis of Materials, Institute of Materials Science, University of Kiel, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Spiecker, E., E-mail: erdmann.spiecker@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Microanalysis of Materials, Institute of Materials Science, University of Kiel, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Tillmann, K. [Ernst Ruska-Centre and Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jaeger, W. [Microanalysis of Materials, Institute of Materials Science, University of Kiel, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Aberration-corrected HRTEM is applied to explore the potential of NCSI contrast imaging to quantitatively analyse the complex atomic structure of misfit layered compounds and their incommensurate interfaces. Using the (PbS){sub 1.14}NbS{sub 2} misfit layered compound as a model system it is shown that atom column position analyses at the incommensurate interfaces can be performed with precisions reaching a statistical accuracy of {+-}6 pm. The procedure adopted for these studies compares experimental images taken from compound regions free of defects and interface modulations with a structure model derived from XRD experiments and with multi-slice image simulations for the corresponding NCSI contrast conditions used. The high precision achievable in such experiments is confirmed by a detailed quantitative analysis of the atom column positions at the incommensurate interfaces, proving a tetragonal distortion of the monochalcogenide sublattice. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Quantitative aberration-corrected HRTEM analysis of atomic column positions in (PbS){sub 1.14}NbS{sub 2} misfit layered compound reveals tetragonal distortion of the PbS subsystem. {yields} Detailed comparison of multi-slice simulations with the experimental NCSI contrast condition imaging results lead to a high precision (better than 10 pm) for determining the positions of atoms. {yields} Precision in gaining information of local structure at atomic scale is demonstrated, which may not be accessible by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction analysis.

  15. Aberration-corrected high resolution electron microscopy of the misfit layered compound (PbS)1.14NbS2

    OpenAIRE

    Garbrecht, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Konventionelle und aberrations-korrigierte Hochauflösungs-Transmissionselektronenmikroskopie (HRTEM) sowie Raster-TEM (STEM) und Elektronenbeugung (ED) wurde in dieser Arbeit experimentell auf den Fehlanpassungsschichtkristall (PbS)1.14NbS2 angewendet. Ziel war es, die individuellen Atomsäulenpositionen an den Grenzflächen des Systems mit einer Präzision im sub-Ångstrom Bereich bestimmen zu können. Mit der so erreichten Genauigkeit in der Bestimmung von Atomsäulenabständen sollten quantitati...

  16. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  17. Predominant constitutive CFTR conductance in small airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lytle Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are inflammation of the small airways (bronchiolitis and destruction of lung parenchyma (emphysema. These forms of disease arise from chronic prolonged infections, which are usually never present in the normal lung. Despite the fact that primary hygiene and defense of the airways presumably requires a well controlled fluid environment on the surface of the bronchiolar airway, very little is known of the fluid and electrolyte transport properties of airways of less than a few mm diameter. Methods We introduce a novel approach to examine some of these properties in a preparation of minimally traumatized porcine bronchioles of about 1 mm diameter by microperfusing the intact bronchiole. Results In bilateral isotonic NaCl Ringer solutions, the spontaneous transepithelial potential (TEP; lumen to bath of the bronchiole was small (mean ± sem: -3 ± 1 mV; n = 25, but when gluconate replaced luminal Cl-, the bionic Cl- diffusion potentials (-58 ± 3 mV; n = 25 were as large as -90 mV. TEP diffusion potentials from 2:1 NaCl dilution showed that epithelial Cl- permeability was at least 5 times greater than Na+ permeability. The anion selectivity sequence was similar to that of CFTR. The bionic TEP became more electronegative with stimulation by luminal forskolin (5 μM+IBMX (100 μM, ATP (100 μM, or adenosine (100 μM, but not by ionomycin. The TEP was partially inhibited by NPPB (100 μM, GlyH-101* (5–50 μM, and CFTRInh-172* (5 μM. RT-PCR gave identifying products for CFTR, α-, β-, and γ-ENaC and NKCC1. Antibodies to CFTR localized specifically to the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the small airways. Conclusion These results indicate that the small airway of the pig is characterized by a constitutively active Cl- conductance that is most likely due to CFTR.

  18. Evaluation of a systems biology approach to identify pharmacological correctors of the mutant CFTR chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Emanuela; Gorrieri, Giulia; Sirci, Francesco; Napolitano, Francesco; Carrella, Diego; Caci, Emanuela; Tomati, Valeria; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; di Bernardo, Diego; Galietta, Luis J V

    2016-07-01

    Mistrafficking of CFTR protein caused by F508del, the most frequent mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), can be corrected by cell incubation at low temperature, an effect that may be mediated by altered expression of proteostasis genes. To identify small molecules mimicking low temperature, we compared gene expression profiles of cells kept at 27°C with those previously generated from more than 1300 compounds. The resulting candidates were tested with a functional assay on a bronchial epithelial cell line. We found that anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids, such as mometasone, budesonide, and fluticasone, increased mutant CFTR function. However, this activity was not confirmed in primary bronchial epithelial cells. Actually, glucocorticoids enhanced Na(+) absorption, an effect that could further impair mucociliary clearance in CF airways. Our results suggest that rescue of F508del-CFTR by low temperature cannot be easily mimicked by small molecules and that compounds with closer transcriptional and functional effects need to be found. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lubiprostone activates non-CFTR-dependent respiratory epithelial chloride secretion in cystic fibrosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kelvin D; McKenzie, Karen R; Henderson, Mark J; Hawkins, Charles E; Vij, Neeraj; Zeitlin, Pamela L

    2008-11-01

    Periciliary fluid balance is maintained by the coordination of sodium and chloride channels in the apical membranes of the airways. In the absence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), chloride secretion is diminished and sodium reabsorption exaggerated. ClC-2, a pH- and voltage-dependent chloride channel, is present on the apical membranes of airway epithelial cells. We hypothesized that ClC-2 agonists would provide a parallel pathway for chloride secretion. Using nasal potential difference (NPD) measurements, we quantified lubiprostone-mediated Cl(-) transport in sedated cystic fibrosis null (gut-corrected), C57Bl/6, and A/J mice during nasal perfusion of lubiprostone (a putative ClC-2 agonist). Baseline, amiloride-inhibited, chloride-free gluconate-substituted Ringer with amiloride and low-chloride Ringer plus lubiprostone (at increasing concentrations of lubiprostone) were perfused, and the NPD was continuously recorded. A clear dose-response relationship was detected in all murine strains. The magnitude of the NPD response to 20 muM lubiprostone was -5.8 +/- 2.1 mV (CF, n = 12), -8.1 +/- 2.6 mV (C57Bl/6 wild-type, n = 12), and -5.3 +/- 1.2 mV (AJ wild-type, n = 8). A cohort of ClC-2 knockout mice did not respond to 20 muM lubiprostone (n = 6, P = 0.27). In C57Bl/6 mice, inhibition of CFTR with topical application of CFTR inhibitor-172 did not abolish the lubiprostone response, thus confirming the response seen is independent of CFTR regulation. RT-PCR confirmed expression of ClC-2 mRNA in murine lung homogenate. The direct application of lubiprostone in the CF murine nasal airway restores nearly normal levels of chloride secretion in nasal epithelia.

  20. F508del-CFTR rescue: a matter of cell stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieddu, Erika; Pollarolo, Benedetta; Merello, Luisa; Schenone, Silvia; Mazzei, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common inherited fatal disease affecting 70,000 people worldwide, with a median predicted age of survival of approximately 38 years. The deletion of Phenylalanine in position 508 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (F508del-CFTR) is the most common mutation in CF patients: the deleted protein, not properly folded, is degraded. To date no commercial drugs are available. Low temperature, some osmolytes and conditions able to induce heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression and heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibition result in F508del-CFTR rescue, hence restoring its physiological function: this review sheds light on the correlation between these several evidences. Interestingly, all these approaches have a role in the cell stress response (CSR), a set of cell reactions to stress. In addition, unpredictably, F508del-CFTR rescue has to be considered in the frame of CSR: entities that induce - or are induced during - the CSR are, in general, also able to correct trafficking defect of CFTR. Specifically, the low temperature induces, by definition, a CSR; osmolytes, such as glycerol and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), are products of the CSR; pharmacological correctors, such as Matrine and 4-phenylbutirric acid (4PBA), down-regulate the constitutive Hsc70 in favor of an up-regulation of the inducible chaperone Hsp70, another component of the CSR. The identification of a common mechanism of action for different types of correctors could drive the discovery of new active molecules in CF, overcoming methods clinically inapplicable, such as the low temperature.

  1. Function and regulation of TRPM7, as well as intracellular magnesium content, are altered in cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, F; Calvez, M L; Benz, N; Le Hir, S; Mignen, O; Buscaglia, P; Horgen, F D; Férec, C; Kerbiriou, M; Trouvé, P

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common fatal hereditary disorders, is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The CFTR gene product is a multidomain adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) protein that functions as a chloride (Cl(-)) channel that is regulated by intracellular magnesium [Mg(2+)]i. The most common mutations in CFTR are a deletion of a phenylalanine residue at position 508 (ΔF508-CFTR, 70-80 % of CF phenotypes) and a Gly551Asp substitution (G551D-CFTR, 4-5 % of alleles), which lead to decreased or almost abolished Cl(-) channel function, respectively. Magnesium ions have to be finely regulated within cells for optimal expression and function of CFTR. Therefore, the melastatin-like transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), which is responsible for Mg(2+) entry, was studies and [Mg(2+)]i measured in cells stably expressing wildtype CFTR, and two mutant proteins (ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR). This study shows for the first time that [Mg(2+)]i is decreased in cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR mutated proteins. It was also observed that the expression of the TRPM7 protein is increased; however, membrane localization was altered for both ΔF508del-CFTR and G551D-CFTR. Furthermore, both the function and regulation of the TRPM7 channel regarding Mg(2+) is decreased in the cells expressing the mutated CFTR. Ca(2+) influx via TRPM7 were also modified in cells expressing a mutated CFTR. Therefore, there appears to be a direct involvement of TRPM7 in CF physiopathology. Finally, we propose that the TRPM7 activator Naltriben is a new potentiator for G551D-CFTR as the function of this mutant increases upon activation of TRPM7 by Naltriben.

  2. Orkambi® and amplifier co‐therapy improves function from a rare CFTR mutation in gene‐edited cells and patient tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Ip, Wan; Ouyang, Hong; Villella, Adriana; Miller, John P; Lee, Po‐Shun; Kulleperuma, Kethika; Du, Kai; Di Paola, Michelle; Eckford, Paul DW; Laselva, Onofrio; Huan, Ling Jun; Wellhauser, Leigh; Li, Ellen; Ray, Peter N; Pomès, Régis; Moraes, Theo J; Gonska, Tanja; Ratjen, Felix; Bear, Christine E

    2017-01-01

    ...‐ CFTR , are unlikely to yield a robust Orkambi ® response. While  in silico  and biochemical studies confirmed that this mutation could be corrected and potentiated by lumacaftor and ivacaftor, respectively, this combination led to a minor...

  3. Ligand-based design, in silico ADME-Tox filtering, synthesis and biological evaluation to discover new soluble 1,4-DHP-based CFTR activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Sonja; Ermondi, Giuseppe; Medana, Claudio; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Galietta, Luis; Caron, Giulia

    2012-09-01

    The altered gating of the mutant CFTR chloride channel cystic fibrosis (CF) may be corrected by small molecules called potentiators. We present a molecular scale simulation system for the discovery of ΔF508-CFTR soluble potentiators. Results report the design, ADME-Tox prediction, synthesis, solubility determination and in vitro biological evaluation of two 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs). Compound 1 shows a promising ADME-Tox profile and good potency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization and modelling of the spatially- and spectrally-varying point-spread function in hyperspectral imaging systems for computational correction of axial optical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špiclin, Žiga; Bürmen, Miran; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging systems can vary significantly due to axial optical aberrations that originate from wavelength-induced index-of-refraction variations of the imaging optics. For systems that have a broad spectral range, the spatial resolution will vary significantly both with respect to the acquisition wavelength and with respect to the spatial position within each spectral image. Variations of the spatial resolution can be effectively characterized as part of the calibration procedure by a local image-based estimation of the pointspread function (PSF) of the hyperspectral imaging system. The estimated PSF can then be used in the image deconvolution methods to improve the spatial resolution of the spectral images. We estimated the PSFs from the spectral images of a line grid geometric caliber. From individual line segments of the line grid, the PSF was obtained by a non-parametric estimation procedure that used an orthogonal series representation of the PSF. By using the non-parametric estimation procedure, the PSFs were estimated at different spatial positions and at different wavelengths. The variations of the spatial resolution were characterized by the radius and the fullwidth half-maximum of each PSF and by the modulation transfer function, computed from images of USAF1951 resolution target. The estimation and characterization of the PSFs and the image deconvolution based spatial resolution enhancement were tested on images obtained by a hyperspectral imaging system with an acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range. The results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of the acquired spectral images can be significantly improved using the estimated PSFs and image deconvolution methods.

  5. Proteomic identification of calumenin as a G551D-CFTR associated protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Teng

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the Caucasian population. It is due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. To date, over 1910 mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene. Among these mutations, the CF-causing missense mutation G551D-CFTR (approx. 5% of cases encodes for a CFTR chloride channel with normal expression on the cell surface. Nevertheless, it is associated with severe disease due to its altered channel activation. The aim of the present study was to identify specific interacting proteins of G551D-CFTR. Co-immunoprecipitated proteins with G551D-CFTR were resolved by 2D-gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Mass Spectrometry revealed that calumenin was present in the protein complex linked to G551D-CFTR. Despite its basal expression was not modified in G551D-CFTR expressing cells when compared to Wt-CFTR expressing cells, it was more abundant in the G551D-CFTR complex detected by immunoprecipitation. The calumenin-CFTR interaction was also shown by Surface Plasmon Resonance and further confirmed by computational analysis of the predicted calumenin's partners. Because in our cellular model calumenin was found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER by immunofluorescence experiments, we suggest that calumenin is likely involved in the mutated CFTR's maturation. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that calumenin binds to CFTR and that it is increased in the G551D-CFTR complex. We suggest that it may be involved in the physiopathology of G551D-CFTR and that G551D-CFTR may follow a specific maturation and trafficking pathway. We also hypothesize that UPR may be triggered independently of the retention of G551D-CFTR in the ER because Grp78/Bip expression is increased in the cells. Finally, we propose here that Calumenin is a new CFTR chaperone.

  6. Intraocular Lens Multifocality Combined with the Compensation for Corneal Spherical Aberration:A New Concept ofPresbyopia-CorrectingIntraocular Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Friedrich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The outcomes of a prospective consecutive study aimed at evaluating the visual and refractive benefit after cataract surgery with the implantation of the aspheric diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL Tecnis ZMB00 (Abbott Medical Optics are reported. A total of 31 eyes of 19 patients (age range, 40 to 81 years underwent phacoemulsification surgery with implantation of this aspheric multifocal IOL. At 6 months after surgery, postoperative spherical equivalent was within ±1.00 D in 96.8% of eyes, with 94.7% of patients presenting a postoperative binocular far LogMAR uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA of 0.1 or better. Far best-corrected distance VA improved significantly (p < 0.01, with postoperative values of 0.1 or better in 96.8% of eyes. Postoperative near UCVA was 0.10 (equivalent to J1 or better in 93.55% of eyes. Furthermore, the IOL power was found to be very poorly correlated with the postoperative far LogMAR (r = 0.13 and near UCVA (r = 0.13. In conclusion, the aspheric diffractive multifocal IOL Tecnis ZMB00 provides a restoration of the far and near visual function after phacoemulsification surgery for cataract removal or presbyopia correction, which is predictable and independent from the optical power of the implanted IOL.

  7. The CFTR-Associated Ligand Arrests the Trafficking of the Mutant ΔF508 CFTR Channel in the ER Contributing to Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Bergbower

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The CFTR-Associated Ligand (CAL, a PDZ domain containing protein with two coiled-coil domains, reduces cell surface WT CFTR through degradation in the lysosome by a well-characterized mechanism. However, CAL’s regulatory effect on ΔF508 CFTR has remained almost entirely uninvestigated. Methods: In this study, we describe a previously unknown pathway for CAL by which it regulates the membrane expression of ΔF508 CFTR through arrest of ΔF508 CFTR trafficking in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER using a combination of cell biology, biochemistry and electrophysiology. Results: We demonstrate that CAL is an ER localized protein that binds to ΔF508 CFTR and is degraded in the 26S proteasome. When CAL is inhibited, ΔF508 CFTR retention in the ER decreases and cell surface expression of mature functional ΔF508 CFTR is observed alongside of enhanced expression of plasma membrane scaffolding protein NHERF1. Chaperone proteins regulate this novel process, and ΔF508 CFTR binding to HSP40, HSP90, HSP70, VCP, and Aha1 changes to improve ΔF508 CFTR cell surface trafficking. Conclusion: Our results reveal a pathway in which CAL regulates the cell surface availability and intracellular retention of ΔF508 CFTR.

  8. Screening of Two Neighboring CFTR Mutations in Iranian Infertile Men with Non-Obstructive Azoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Somayeh Heidari; Zohreh Hojati; Majid Motovali-Bashi

    2016-01-01

    The genetic association between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations and male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) is well established. Mutant CFTR, however may also be involved in the etiology of male infertility in non-CBAVD cases. The present study was conducted to estimate the frequency of ?I507 and ?F508 CFTR gene mutations in Iranian infertile males. We undertook the first study of association between these CFTR mut...

  9. Steviol reduces MDCK Cyst formation and growth by inhibiting CFTR channel activity and promoting proteasome-mediated CFTR degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowalit Yuajit

    Full Text Available Cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD involves cAMP-activated proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR chloride channel. This study aimed to investigate an inhibitory effect and detailed mechanisms of steviol and its derivatives on cyst growth using a cyst model in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. Among 4 steviol-related compounds tested, steviol was found to be the most potent at inhibiting MDCK cyst growth. Steviol inhibition of cyst growth was dose-dependent; steviol (100 microM reversibly inhibited cyst formation and cyst growth by 72.53.6% and 38.2±8.5%, respectively. Steviol at doses up to 200 microM had no effect on MDCK cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, steviol acutely inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current in MDCK epithelia, measured with the Ussing chamber technique, in a dose-dependent manner. Prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM also strongly inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current, in part by reducing CFTR protein expression in MDCK cells. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, abolished the effect of steviol on CFTR protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM markedly reduced CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Taken together, the data suggest that steviol retards MDCK cyst progression in two ways: first by directly inhibiting CFTR chloride channel activity and second by reducing CFTR expression, in part, by promoting proteasomal degradation of CFTR. Steviol and related compounds therefore represent drug candidates for treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  10. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  11. Determination of the incommensurate modulated structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.4}CuO{sub 6+δ} by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Binghui, E-mail: bhge@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yumei; Luo, Huiqian; Wen, Haihu [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yu, Rong; Cheng, Zhiying; Zhu, Jing [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The incommensurate modulated structure (IMS) of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.4}CuO{sub 6+δ} (BSLCO) has been studied by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy in combination with a high-dimensional (HD) space description. Two images are deconvoluted in the negative Cs imaging (NCSI) and positive Cs imaging (PCSI) modes. Similar results for the IMS have been obtained from two corresponding projected potential maps (PPMs), and the size of the dots representing atoms in the NCSI PPM is found to be smaller than that in the PCSI PPM. Considering that the object size is one of the factors that influence the precision of the structural determination, modulation functions for all unoverlapped atoms in BSLCO were determined on the basis of the NCSI PPM in combination with the HD space description. - Highlights: • Dots representing atoms in NCSI is found to be smaller than that in PCSI especially for heavy atoms. • Modulation functions of incommensurate modulated structure in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.4}CuO{sub 6+δ} has been determined by using a NCSI image.

  12. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  13. A rapid membrane potential assay to monitor CFTR function and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Rangan; Sivashanmugam, Perumal; Warner, Keith

    2013-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is an important regulator of ion transport and fluid secretion in humans. Mutations to CFTR cause cystic fibrosis, which is a common recessive genetic disorder in Caucasians. Involvement of CFTR has been noted in other important diseases, such as secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease. The assays to monitor CFTR function that have been described to date either are complicated or require specialized instrumentation and training for execution. In this report, we describe a rapid FlexStation-based membrane potential assay to monitor CFTR function. In this assay, agonist-mediated activation of CFTR results in membrane depolarization that can be monitored using a fluorescent membrane potential probe. Availability of a simple mix-and-read assay to monitor the function of this important protein might accelerate the discovery of CFTR ligands to study a variety of conditions.

  14. Environmental TEM in an Aberration Corrected Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    the microscope column. The effects of gas on the electron wave in the objective lens are not well understood and needs further attention. Imaging samples with a simple geometry, such as gold particles on a flat graphene substrate and analyzing the variations in contrast, provides a means for understanding......The increasing use of environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides exciting new possibilities for investigating chemical reactions and understanding both the interaction of fast electrons with gas molecules and the effect of the presence of gas on high......‐resolution imaging. A gaseous atmosphere in the pole‐piece gap of the objective lens of the microscope alters both the incoming electron wave prior to interaction with the sample and the outgoing wave below the sample. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 10‐20 nm), the gas in the environmental...

  15. CFTR, bicarbonate, and the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowitz, Drucy

    2015-10-01

    The gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) was identified in 1989, yet major pathophysiologic questions remain unanswered. There is emerging evidence that CFTR is a bicarbonate channel, a driver of chloride-bicarbonate exchange and through its action on local pH, a regulator of other ion channels and of proteins that function optimally in a neutral environment. In both the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, bicarbonate drives ionic content and fluid on epithelial surfaces, allows mucins to unfold and become slippery, and contributes to innate immunity. In the GI tract bicarbonate neutralizes gastric acid to support digestion and absorption. When CFTR is dysfunctional, lack of bicarbonate secretion disrupts these normal processes and thus leads directly to the clinical symptoms and signs of CF. This article synthesizes evidence from cell, animal, and human investigations that support these concepts. Bicarbonate secretion does not seem to be the same in all tissues and varies with physiologic demand. Thus, tissue type and whether conditions are baseline or stimulated needs to be taken into account when evaluating the evidence concerning the role of bicarbonate in the pathophysiology of CF as a regulator of local pH. Basic and applied research that focuses on the role of CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion helps explain many of the diverse clinical manifestations that are CF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bioelectric characterization of epithelia from neonatal CFTR knockout ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Fisher (John); S.R. Tyler (Scott); Y. Zhang (Yulong); B.J. Lee (Ben); X. Liu (Xiaoming); X. Sun (Xinying); H. Sui (Hongshu); B. Liang (Bo); M. Luo (Ma); W. Xie (Weiliang); I. Yi (Iasson); W. Zhou (Weili); Y. Song (Yiqing); N. Keiser (Nicholas); K. Wang (Kai); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); J.F. Engelhardt (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to

  17. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 enhances the protein expression of CFTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Won Lee

    Full Text Available Low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 have been observed in the serum of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. However, the effects of low serum IGF-1 on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, whose defective function is the primary cause of cystic fibrosis, have not been studied. Here, we show in human cells that IGF-1 increases the steady-state levels of mature wildtype CFTR in a CFTR-associated ligand (CAL- and TC10-dependent manner; moreover, IGF-1 increases CFTR-mediated chloride transport. Using an acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay, we have confirmed the binding of CAL and CFTR in the Golgi. We also show that CAL overexpression inhibits forskolin-induced increases in the cell-surface expression of CFTR. We found that IGF-1 activates TC10, and active TC10 alters the functional association between CAL and CFTR. Furthermore, IGF-1 and active TC10 can reverse the CAL-mediated reduction in the cell-surface expression of CFTR. IGF-1 does not increase the expression of ΔF508 CFTR, whose processing is arrested in the ER. This finding is consistent with our observation that IGF-1 alters the functional interaction of CAL and CFTR in the Golgi. However, when ΔF508 CFTR is rescued with low temperature or the corrector VRT-325 and proceeds to the Golgi, IGF-1 can increase the expression of the rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Our data support a model indicating that CAL-CFTR binding in the Golgi inhibits CFTR trafficking to the cell surface, leading CFTR to the degradation pathway instead. IGF-1-activated TC10 changes the interaction of CFTR and CAL, allowing CFTR to progress to the plasma membrane. These findings offer a potential strategy using a combinational treatment of IGF-1 and correctors to increase the post-Golgi expression of CFTR in cystic fibrosis patients bearing the ΔF508 mutation.

  18. Proteomic Identification of Calumenin as a G551D - CFTR Associated Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ling; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Taiya, Mehdi; Le Hir, Sophie; Mignen, Olivier; Benz, Nathalie; Trouvé, Pascal; Férec, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the Caucasian population. It is due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. To date, over 1910 mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene. Among these mutations, the CF-causing missense mutation G551D-CFTR (approx. 5% of cases) encodes for a CFTR chloride channel with normal expression on the cell surface. Nevertheless, it is associated with severe disease due to its altered channel activation. The aim of the present study was to identify specific interacting proteins of G551D-CFTR. Co-immunoprecipitated proteins with G551D-CFTR were resolved by 2D-gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass Spectrometry revealed that calumenin was present in the protein complex linked to G551D-CFTR. Despite its basal expression was not modified in G551D-CFTR expressing cells when compared to Wt-CFTR expressing cells, it was more abundant in the G551D-CFTR complex detected by immunoprecipitation. The calumenin-CFTR interaction was also shown by Surface Plasmon Resonance and further confirmed by computational analysis of the predicted calumenin’s partners. Because in our cellular model calumenin was found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by immunofluorescence experiments, we suggest that calumenin is likely involved in the mutated CFTR’s maturation. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that calumenin binds to CFTR and that it is increased in the G551D-CFTR complex. We suggest that it may be involved in the physiopathology of G551D-CFTR and that G551D-CFTR may follow a specific maturation and trafficking pathway. We also hypothesize that UPR may be triggered independently of the retention of G551D-CFTR in the ER because Grp78/Bip expression is increased in the cells. Finally, we propose here that Calumenin is a new CFTR chaperone. PMID:22768251

  19. Sweat chloride as a biomarker of CFTR activity: proof of concept and ivacaftor clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, Frank J; Van Goor, Fredrick; Zha, Jiuhong; Stone, Anne J; Dong, Qunming; Ordonez, Claudia L; Rowe, Steven M; Clancy, John Paul; Konstan, Michael W; Hoch, Heather E; Heltshe, Sonya L; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Campbell, Preston W; Ashlock, Melissa A

    2014-03-01

    We examined data from a Phase 2 trial {NCT00457821} of ivacaftor, a CFTR potentiator, in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with aG551D mutation to evaluate standardized approaches to sweat chloride measurement and to explore the use of sweat chloride and nasal potential difference (NPD) to estimate CFTR activity. Sweat chloride and NPD were secondary endpoints in this placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Standardization of sweat collection, processing,and analysis was employed for the first time. Sweat chloride and chloride ion transport (NPD) were integrated into a model of CFTR activity. Within-patient sweat chloride determinations showed sufficient precision to detect differences between dose-groups and assess ivacaftor treatment effects. Analysis of changes in sweat chloride and NPD demonstrated that patients treated with ivacaftor achieved CFTR activity equivalent to approximately 35%–40% of normal. Sweat chloride is useful in multicenter trials as a biomarker of CFTR activity and to test the effect of CFTR potentiators.

  20. CFTR: A new horizon in the pathomechanism and treatment of pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Michael A Gray; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage ch...

  1. An association study on contrasting cystic fibrosis endophenotypes recognizes KRT8 but not KRT18 as a modifier of cystic fibrosis disease severity and CFTR mediated residual chloride secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Tim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background F508del-CFTR, the most frequent disease-causing mutation among Caucasian cystic fibrosis (CF patients, has been characterised as a mutant defective in protein folding, processing and trafficking. We have investigated the two neighbouring cytokeratin genes KRT8 and KRT18 in a candidate gene approach to ask whether variants in KRT8 and/or KRT18 modify the impaired ion conductance known as the CF basic defect, and whether they are associated with correct trafficking of mutant CFTR and disease severity of CF. Methods We have selected contrasting F508del-CFTR homozygous patient subpopulations stratified for disease severity, comparing 13 concordant mildly affected sib pairs vs. 12 concordant severely affected sib pairs, or manifestation of the CF basic defect in intestinal epithelium, comparing 22 individuals who exhibit CFTR-mediated residual chloride secretion vs. 14 individuals who do not express any chloride secretion, for an association. The KRT8/KRT18 locus was initially interrogated with one informative microsatellite marker. Subsequently, a low density SNP map with four SNPs in KRT8 and two SNPs in KRT18, each selected for high polymorphism content, was used to localize the association signal. Results KRT8, but not KRT18, showed an association with CF disease severity (Pbest = 0.00131; Pcorr = 0.0185 and CFTR mediated residual chloride secretion (Pbest = 0.0004; Pcorr = 0.0069. Two major four-marker-haplotypes spanning 13 kb including the entire KRT8 gene accounted for 90% of chromosomes, demonstrating strong linkage disequilibrium at that locus. Absence of chloride secretion was associated with the recessive haplotype 1122 at rs1907671, rs4300473, rs2035878 and rs2035875. The contrasting haplotype 2211 was dominant for the presence of CFTR mediated residual chloride secretion. In consistency, the KRT8 haplotype 2211 was associated with mild CF disease while 1122 was observed as risk haplotype. Analysis of microsatellite

  2. An association study on contrasting cystic fibrosis endophenotypes recognizes KRT8 but not KRT18 as a modifier of cystic fibrosis disease severity and CFTR mediated residual chloride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Frauke; Hedtfeld, Silke; Becker, Tim; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2011-05-06

    F508del-CFTR, the most frequent disease-causing mutation among Caucasian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, has been characterised as a mutant defective in protein folding, processing and trafficking. We have investigated the two neighbouring cytokeratin genes KRT8 and KRT18 in a candidate gene approach to ask whether variants in KRT8 and/or KRT18 modify the impaired ion conductance known as the CF basic defect, and whether they are associated with correct trafficking of mutant CFTR and disease severity of CF. We have selected contrasting F508del-CFTR homozygous patient subpopulations stratified for disease severity, comparing 13 concordant mildly affected sib pairs vs. 12 concordant severely affected sib pairs, or manifestation of the CF basic defect in intestinal epithelium, comparing 22 individuals who exhibit CFTR-mediated residual chloride secretion vs. 14 individuals who do not express any chloride secretion, for an association. The KRT8/KRT18 locus was initially interrogated with one informative microsatellite marker. Subsequently, a low density SNP map with four SNPs in KRT8 and two SNPs in KRT18, each selected for high polymorphism content, was used to localize the association signal. KRT8, but not KRT18, showed an association with CF disease severity (Pbest=0.00131; Pcorr=0.0185) and CFTR mediated residual chloride secretion (Pbest=0.0004; Pcorr=0.0069). Two major four-marker-haplotypes spanning 13 kb including the entire KRT8 gene accounted for 90% of chromosomes, demonstrating strong linkage disequilibrium at that locus. Absence of chloride secretion was associated with the recessive haplotype 1122 at rs1907671, rs4300473, rs2035878 and rs2035875. The contrasting haplotype 2211 was dominant for the presence of CFTR mediated residual chloride secretion. In consistency, the KRT8 haplotype 2211 was associated with mild CF disease while 1122 was observed as risk haplotype. Analysis of microsatellite allele distributions on the SNP background suggests that the

  3. Signaling Cascade Involved in Rapid Stimulation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, Miriam; Ackermann, Benjamin W; Thome, Ulrich H; Laube, Mandy

    2017-08-19

    Impairment of mucociliary clearance with reduced airway fluid secretion leads to chronically inflamed airways. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is crucially involved in airway fluid secretion and dexamethasone (dexa) has previously been shown to elevate CFTR activity in airway epithelial cells. However, the pathway by which dexa increases CFTR activity is largely unknown. We aimed to determine whether the increase of CFTR activity by dexa is achieved by non-genomic signaling and hypothesized that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is involved in CFTR stimulation. Primary rat airway epithelial cells and human bronchial submucosal gland-derived Calu-3 cells were analyzed in Ussing chambers and kinase activation was determined by Western blots. Results demonstrated a critical involvement of PI3K and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling in the dexa-induced increase of CFTR activity, while serum and glucocorticoid dependent kinase 1 (SGK1) activity was not essential. We further demonstrated a reduced neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4-like (NEDD4L) ubiquitin E3 ligase activity induced by dexa, possibly responsible for the elevated CFTR activity. Finally, increases of CFTR activity by dexa were demonstrated within 30 min accompanied by rapid activation of AKT. In conclusion, dexa induces a rapid stimulation of CFTR activity which depends on PI3K/AKT signaling in airway epithelial cells. Glucocorticoids might thus represent, in addition to their immunomodulatory actions, a therapeutic strategy to rapidly increase airway fluid secretion.

  4. Cholic acid induces a Cftr dependent biliary secretion and liver growth response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A J A Bodewes

    Full Text Available The cause of Cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD, is unknown. It is well recognized that hepatic exposure to hydrophobic bile salts is associated with the development of liver disease. For this reason, we hypothesize that, CFTR dependent variations, in the hepatic handling of hydrophobic bile salts, are related to the development CFLD. To test our hypothesis we studied, in Cftr-/- and control mice, bile production, bile composition and liver pathology, in normal feeding condition and during cholate exposure, either acute (intravenous or chronic (three weeks via the diet. In Cftr-/- and control mice the basal bile production was comparable. Intravenous taurocholate increased bile production to the same extent in Cftr-/- and control mice. However, chronic cholate exposure increased the bile flow significantly less in Cftr-/- mice than in controls, together with significantly higher biliary bile salt concentration in Cftr-/- mice. Prolonged cholate exposure, however, did not induce CFLD like pathology in Cftr-/- mice. Chronic cholate exposure did induce a significant increase in liver mass in controls that was absent in Cftr-/- mice. Chronic cholate administration induces a cystic fibrosis-specific hepatobiliary phenotype, including changes in bile composition. These changes could not be associated with CFLD like pathological changes in CF mouse livers. However, chronic cholate administration induces liver growth in controls that is absent in Cftr-/- mice. Our findings point to an impaired adaptive homeotrophic liver response to prolonged hydrophobic bile salt exposure in CF conditions.

  5. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Andreas; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Dübbers, Angelika; Bruns, Reimer; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann

    2008-09-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl-) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotides to CFTR confer a cystic fibrosis phenotype on B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, R D; Berta, G; Rado, T A; Bubien, J K

    1992-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed at low levels in nonepithelial cells. Recently, we demonstrated that CFTR is responsible for cell cycle-dependent adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-responsive Cl- permeability in lymphocytes. Agonist responsiveness of cystic fibrosis (CF) lymphocytes was restored by transfection with plasmid containing wild type CFTR cDNA. CFTR mRNA is expressed in the B lymphoid cell line GM03299; however, quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicates that the level of CFTR mRNA is at least 1,000 times lower than in T84 cells. CFTR protein could not be detected by Western blot or by immunoprecipitation of in vitro phosphorylated protein. However, antisense oligonucleotides representing codons 1-12 of CFTR caused a complete inhibition of cell cycle-dependent Cl-permeability [as determined by 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-quinolinium fluorescence digital-imaging microscopy], thereby inducing normal cells to acquire a "CF phenotype." These studies provide direct evidence that a CFTR-associated Cl- permeability is present and measurable in lymphocytes, even though CFTR mRNA and protein are expressed at low levels.

  7. Osteoblast CFTR inactivation reduces differentiation and osteoprotegerin expression in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis-related bone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Stalvey

    Full Text Available Low bone mass and increased fracture risk are recognized complications of cystic fibrosis (CF. CF-related bone disease (CFBD is characterized by uncoupled bone turnover--impaired osteoblastic bone formation and enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption. Intestinal malabsorption, vitamin D deficiency and inflammatory cytokines contribute to CFBD. However, epidemiological investigations and animal models also support a direct causal link between inactivation of skeletal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR, the gene that when mutated causes CF, and CFBD. The objective of this study was to examine the direct actions of CFTR on bone. Expression analyses revealed that CFTR mRNA and protein were expressed in murine osteoblasts, but not in osteoclasts. Functional studies were then performed to investigate the direct actions of CFTR on osteoblasts using a CFTR knockout (Cftr-/- mouse model. In the murine calvarial organ culture assay, Cftr-/- calvariae displayed significantly less bone formation and osteoblast numbers than calvariae harvested from wildtype (Cftr+/+ littermates. CFTR inactivation also reduced alkaline phosphatase expression in cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts. Although CFTR was not expressed in murine osteoclasts, significantly more osteoclasts formed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ bone marrow cultures. Indirect regulation of osteoclastogenesis by the osteoblast through RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling was next examined. Although no difference in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (Rankl mRNA was detected, significantly less osteoprotegerin (Opg was expressed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ osteoblasts. Together, the Rankl:Opg ratio was significantly higher in Cftr-/- murine calvarial osteoblasts contributing to a higher osteoclastogenesis potential. The combined findings of reduced osteoblast differentiation and lower Opg expression suggested a possible defect in canonical Wnt signaling. In fact, Wnt3a and PTH-stimulated canonical Wnt

  8. Alteration of introns in a hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1 minigene convert Pre-mRNA [corrected] splicing to the aberrant pattern in multiple myeloma (MM: MM patients harbor similar changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available Aberrant pre-mRNA splice variants of hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1 have been identified in malignant cells from cancer patients. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that intronic sequence changes can underlie aberrant splicing. Deletions and mutations were introduced into HAS1 minigene constructs to identify regions that can influence aberrant intronic splicing, comparing the splicing pattern in transfectants with that in multiple myeloma (MM patients. Introduced genetic variations in introns 3 and 4 of HAS1 as shown here can promote aberrant splicing of the type detected in malignant cells from MM patients. HAS1Vd is a novel intronic splice variant first identified here. HAS1Vb, an intronic splice variant previously identified in patients, skips exon 4 and utilizes the same intron 4 alternative 3'splice site as HAS1Vd. For transfected constructs with unaltered introns 3 and 4, HAS1Vd transcripts are readily detectable, frequently to the exclusion of HAS1Vb. In contrast, in MM patients, HAS1Vb is more frequent than HAS1Vd. In the HAS1 minigene, combining deletion in intron 4 with mutations in intron 3 leads to a shift from HAS1Vd expression to HAS1Vb expression. The upregulation of aberrant splicing, exemplified here by the expression of HAS1Vb, is shown here to be influenced by multiple genetic changes in intronic sequences. For HAS1Vb, this includes enhanced exon 4 skipping and increased usage of alternative 3' splice sites. Thus, the combination of introduced mutations in HAS1 intron3 with introduced deletions in HAS1 intron 4 promoted a shift to an aberrant splicing pattern previously shown to be clinically significant. Most MM patients harbor genetic variations in intron 4, and as shown here, nearly half harbor recurrent mutations in HAS1 intron 3. Our work suggests that aberrant intronic HAS1 splicing in MM patients may rely on intronic HAS1 deletions and mutations that are frequent in MM patients but absent from healthy donors.

  9. Biophysical characterisation of calumenin as a charged F508del-CFTR folding modulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Tripathi

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR is a cyclic-AMP dependent chloride channel expressed at the apical surface of epithelial cells lining various organs such as the respiratory tract. Defective processing and functioning of this protein caused by mutations in the CFTR gene results in loss of ionic balance, defective mucus clearance, increased proliferation of biofilms and inflammation of human airways observed in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. The process by which CFTR folds and matures under the influence of various chaperones in the secretory pathway remains incompletely understood. Recently, calumenin, a secretory protein, belonging to the CREC family of low affinity calcium binding proteins has been identified as a putative CFTR chaperone whose biophysical properties and functions remain uncharacterized. We compared hydropathy, instability, charge, unfoldability, disorder and aggregation propensity of calumenin and other CREC family members with CFTR associated chaperones and calcium binding proteins, wild-type and mutant CFTR proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs. We observed that calumenin, along with other CREC proteins, was significantly more charged and less folded compared to CFTR associated chaperones. Moreover like IDPs, calumenin and other CREC proteins were found to be less hydrophobic and aggregation prone. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close link between calumenin and other CREC proteins indicating how evolution might have shaped their similar biophysical properties. Experimentally, calumenin was observed to significantly reduce F508del-CFTR aggregation in a manner similar to AavLEA1, a well-characterized IDP. Fluorescence microscopy based imaging analysis also revealed altered trafficking of calumenin in bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR, indicating its direct role in the pathophysiology of CF. In conclusion, calumenin is characterized as a charged protein exhibiting close similarity with

  10. Photon Sieve Bandwidth Broadening by Reduction of Chromatic Aberration Effects Using Second-Stage Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    thesis. 25 Still another manner in which to view chromatic aberration is in terms of Lateral Chromatic Aberration ( LCA ). Eq. 18 illustrates a...wavelength in addition to the in-focus location. This difference in height of images at two different colors is LCA (21:268). Aberration Correction

  11. Refractive surgery, optical aberrations, and visual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, R A; Howland, H C

    1997-01-01

    Visual optics is taking on new clinical significance. Given that current refractive procedures can and do induce large amounts of higher order ocular aberration that often affects the patient's daily visual function and quality of life, we can no longer relegate the considerations of ocular aberrations to academic discussions. Instead, we need to move toward minimizing (not increasing) the eye's aberrations at the same time we are correcting the eye's spherical and cylindrical refractive error. These are exciting times in refractive surgery, which need to be tempered by the fact that after all the research, clinical, and marketing dust settles, the level to which we improve the quality of the retinal image will be guided by the trade-off between cost and the improvement in the quality of life that refractive surgery offers.

  12. Study of ocular aberrations with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athaide, Helaine Vinche Zampar; Campos, Mauro; Costa, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Aging has various effects on visual system. Vision deteriorate, contrast sensitivity decreases and ocular aberrations apparently make the optical quality worse across the years. To prospective evaluate ocular aberrations along the ages. Three hundred and fifteen patients were examined, 155 were male (39.36%) and 160 were female (60.63%). Ages ranged from 5 to 64 year-old, the study was performed from February to November, 2004. Patients were divided into 4 age-groups according to IBGE (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística) classification: 68 patients from 5 to 14 year-old, 55 patients from 15 to 24 year-old, 116 from 25 to 44 year-old and 76 from 45 to 67 year-old. All patients had the following characteristics: best corrected visual acuity > 20/25, emmetropia or spherical equivalent < 3.50 SD, refractive astigmatism < 1.75 CD on cycloplegic refraction, normal ophthalmologic exam and no previous ocular surgeries. This protocol was approved by Federal University of São Paulo Institutional Review Board. Total optical aberrations were measured by H-S sensor LadarWave Custom Cornea Wavefront System (Alcon Laboratories Inc, Orlando, FLA, USA) and were statistically analysed. Corneal aberrations were calculated using CT-View software Version 6.89 (Sarver and Associates, Celebration, FL, USA). Lens aberrations were calculated by subtraction. High-order (0.32 e 0.48 microm) and ocular spherical aberrations (0.02 e 0.26 microm) increased respectively in child and middle age groups. High order (0.27 microm) and corneal spherical aberrations (0.05 microm) did not show changes with age. Lens showed a statistically significant spherical aberration increase (from -0.02 to 0.22 microm). Vertical (from 0.10 to -0.07 microm) and horizontal coma (from 0.01 to -0.12 microm) presented progressively negative values with aging. High-order and spherical aberrations increased with age due to lens contribution. The cornea did not affect significantly changes observed on ocular

  13. Describing ocular aberrations with wavefront vergence maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jayoung; Thibos, Larry N; Iskander, D Robert

    2009-05-01

    A common optometric problem is to specify the eye's ocular aberrations in terms of Zernike coefficients and to reduce that specification to a prescription for the optimum sphero-cylindrical correcting lens. The typical approach is first to reconstruct wavefront phase errors from measurements of wavefront slopes obtained by a wavefront aberrometer. This paper applies a new method to this clinical problem that does not require wavefront reconstruction. Instead, we base our analysis of axial wavefront vergence as inferred directly from wavefront slopes. The result is a wavefront vergence map that is similar to the axial power maps in corneal topography and hence has a potential to be favoured by clinicians. We use our new set of orthogonal Zernike slope polynomials to systematically analyse details of the vergence map analogous to Zernike analysis of wavefront maps. The result is a vector of slope coefficients that describe fundamental aberration components. Three different methods for reducing slope coefficients to a spherocylindrical prescription in power vector forms are compared and contrasted. When the original wavefront contains only second order aberrations, the vergence map is a function of meridian only and the power vectors from all three methods are identical. The differences in the methods begin to appear as we include higher order aberrations, in which case the wavefront vergence map is more complicated. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of vergence map representation of ocular aberrations.

  14. Lumacaftor-Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del CFTR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wainwright, Claire E; Elborn, J Stuart; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting disease that is caused by defective or deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity. Phe508del is the most common CFTR mutation. METHODS: We conducted two phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled studies that were designed to assess the effects of lumacaftor (VX-809), a CFTR corrector, in combination with ivacaftor (VX-770), a CFTR potentiator, in patients 12 years of age or older who had cystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. In both studies, patients were randomly...... treatment and placebo with respect to the mean absolute improvement in the percentage of predicted FEV1 ranged from 2.6 to 4.0 percentage points (Ppulmonary exacerbations...

  15. Structure and Dynamics of NBD1 from CFTR Characterized Using Crystallography and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, H.A.; Wang, C.; Zhao, X.; Hamuro, Y.; Conners, K.; Kearins, M.C.; Lu, F.; Sauder, J.M.; Molnar, K.S.; Coales, S.J.; Maloney, P.C.; Guggino, W.B.; Wetmore, D.R.; Weber, P.C.; Hunt, J.F. (SGX); (ExSAR); (Cystic); (JHU-MED); (Columbia)

    2012-04-30

    The {Delta}F508 mutation in nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the predominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Previous biophysical studies on human F508 and {Delta}F508 domains showed only local structural changes restricted to residues 509-511 and only minor differences in folding rate and stability. These results were remarkable because {Delta}F508 was widely assumed to perturb domain folding based on the fact that it prevents trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the previously reported crystal structures did not come from matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs, and the {Delta}F508 structure contained additional mutations that were required to obtain sufficient protein solubility. In this article, we present additional biophysical studies of NBD1 designed to address these ambiguities. Mass spectral measurements of backbone amide {sup 1}H/{sup 2}H exchange rates in matched F508 and {Delta}F508 constructs reveal that {Delta}F508 increases backbone dynamics at residues 509-511 and the adjacent protein segments but not elsewhere in NBD1. These measurements also confirm a high level of flexibility in the protein segments exhibiting variable conformations in the crystal structures. We additionally present crystal structures of a broader set of human NBD1 constructs, including one harboring the native F508 residue and others harboring the {Delta}F508 mutation in the presence of fewer and different solubilizing mutations. The only consistent conformational difference is observed at residues 509-511. The side chain of residue V510 in this loop is mostly buried in all non-{Delta}F508 structures but completely solvent exposed in all {Delta}F508 structures. These results reinforce the importance of the perturbation {Delta}F508 causes in the surface topography of NBD1 in a region likely to mediate contact with the transmembrane domains of CFTR. However, they also suggest that increased

  16. The HDAC inhibitor SAHA does not rescue CFTR membrane expression in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergougnoux, Anne; Petit, Aurélie; Knabe, Lucie; Bribes, Estelle; Chiron, Raphaël; De Sario, Albertina; Claustres, Mireille; Molinari, Nicolas; Vachier, Isabelle; Taulan-Cadars, Magali; Bourdin, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    The development of suitable Cystic Fibrosis (CF) models for preclinical bench tests of therapeutic candidates is challenging. Indeed, the validation of molecules to rescue the p.Phe508del-CFTR channel (encoded by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator gene carrying the p.Phe508del mutation) requires taking into account their overall effects on the epithelium. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), was previously shown to be a CFTR corrector via proteostasis modulation in CFTR-deficient immortalized cells. Here, we tested SAHA effects on goblet cell metaplasia using an ex vivo model based on the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture of differentiated airway epithelial cells obtained by nasal scraping from CF patients and healthy controls. Ex vivo epithelium grew successfully in ALI cultures with significant rise in the expression of CFTR and of markers of airway epithelial differentiation compared to monolayer cell culture. SAHA decreased CFTR transcript and protein levels in CF and non-CF epithelia. Whereas SAHA induced lysine hyperacetylation, it did not change histone modifications at the CFTR promoter. SAHA reduced MUC5AC and MUC5B expression and inhibited goblet epithelial cell differentiation. Similar effects were obtained in CF and non-CF epithelia. All the effects were fully reversible within five days from SAHA withdrawal. We conclude that, ex vivo, SAHA modulate the structure of airway epithelia without specific effect on CFTR gene and protein suggesting that HDACi cannot be useful for CF treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA) of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Allen, Stephanie K

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother's bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5-1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence) or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence). We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11-12 weeks of gestation). Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM) and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC) alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene. The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays.

  18. Lubiprostone activates CFTR, but not ClC-2, via the prostaglandin receptor (EP(4)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, Yohei; Moran, Aurelia R; MacDonald, Kelvin D

    2012-09-28

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of lubiprostone activation of epithelial chloride transport. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid approved for the treatment of constipation [1]. There is uncertainty, however, as to how lubiprostone increases epithelial chloride transport. Direct stimulation of ClC-2 and CFTR chloride channels as well as stimulation of these channels via the EP(4) receptor has been described [2-5]. To better define this mechanism, two-electrode voltage clamp was used to assay Xenopus oocytes expressing ClC-2, with or without co-expression of the EP(4) receptor or β adrenergic receptor (βAR), for changes in conductance elicited by lubiprostone. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and either βAR or the EP(4) receptor were also studied. In oocytes co-expressing ClC-2 and βAR conductance was stimulated by hyperpolarization and acidic pH (pH = 6), but there was no response to the β adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. Oocytes expressing ClC-2 only or co-expressing ClC-2 and EP(4) did not respond to the presence of 0.1, 1, or 10 μM lubiprostone in the superperfusate. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and βAR did not respond to hyperpolarization, acidic pH, or 1 μM lubiprostone. However, conductance was elevated by isoproterenol and inhibited by CFTR(inh)172. Co-expression of CFTR and EP(4) resulted in lubiprostone-stimulated conductance, which was also sensitive to CFTR(inh)172. The EC(50) for lubiprostone mediated CFTR activation was ~10 nM. These results demonstrate no direct action of lubiprostone on either ClC-2 or CFTR channels expressed in oocytes. However, the results confirm that CFTR can be activated by lubiprostone via the EP(4) receptor in oocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimizing nasal potential difference analysis for CFTR modulator development: assessment of ivacaftor in CF subjects with the G551D-CFTR mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Rowe

    Full Text Available Nasal potential difference (NPD is used as a biomarker of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC activity. We evaluated methods to detect changes in chloride and sodium transport by NPD based on a secondary analysis of a Phase II CFTR-modulator study. Thirty-nine subjects with CF who also had the G551D-CFTR mutation were randomized to receive ivacaftor (Kalydeco™; also known as VX-770 in four doses or placebo twice daily for at least 14 days. All data were analyzed by a single investigator who was blinded to treatment assignment. We compared three analysis methods to determine the best approach to quantify changes in chloride and sodium transport: (1 the average of both nostrils; (2 the most-polarized nostril at each visit; and (3 the most-polarized nostril at screening carried forward. Parameters of ion transport included the PD change with zero chloride plus isoproterenol (CFTR activity, the basal PD, Ringer's PD, and change in PD with amiloride (measurements of ENaC activity, and the delta NPD (measuring CFTR and ENaC activity. The average and most-polarized nostril at each visit were most sensitive to changes in chloride and sodium transport, whereas the most-polarized nostril at screening carried forward was less discriminatory. Based on our findings, NPD studies should assess both nostrils rather than a single nostril. We also found that changes in CFTR activity were more readily detected than changes in ENaC activity, and that rigorous standardization was associated with relatively good within-subject reproducibility in placebo-treated subjects (± 2.8 mV. Therefore, we have confirmed an assay of reasonable reproducibility for detecting chloride-transport improvements in response to CFTR modulation.

  20. Are changes in ocular aberrations with age a significant problem for refractive surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Susana

    2002-01-01

    We discuss current knowledge about the change of aberrations with aging, cataract surgery, and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Based on this evidence, we speculate about the long-term expectations for postoperative LASIK eyes in terms of aberrations. Standard myopic LASIK surgery produces a significant increase in aberrations, particularly corneal spherical aberration, which changes to positive values. Aberrations increase with age, and in particular, the spherical aberration of the crystalline lens shifts toward positive values. Therefore, no compensatory effect is expected to occur with age after standard myopic LASIK, but rather the unusually high amount of aberrations in postoperative LASIK patients is expected to worsen with age. The amount of aberrations in patients after cataract surgery with implantation of standard intraocular lenses (IOLs) is higher than in normal young subjects. If an ideal customized ablation (not inducing aberrations and reducing naturally existing aberrations) is ever possible, the perfect correction will not last (due to the change of aberrations with age), and aberrations of the crystalline lens corrected on the cornea are likely to reappear after conventional cataract surgery. Potential benefits of customized IOLs for cataract surgery and improved optics in older patients are discussed.

  1. Cysteine string protein promotes proteasomal degradation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by increasing its interaction with the C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein and promoting CFTR ubiquitylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Béla Z; Watts, Rebecca J; Aridor, Meir; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2009-02-13

    Cysteine string protein (Csp) is a J-domain-containing protein whose overexpression blocks the exit of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Another method of blocking ER exit, the overexpression of Sar1-GTP, however, yielded twice as much immature CFTR compared with Csp overexpression. This finding suggested that Csp not only inhibits CFTR ER exit but also facilitates the degradation of immature CFTR. This was confirmed by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, which returned the level of immature CFTR to that found in cells expressing Sar1-GTP only. CspH43Q, which does not interact with Hsc70/Hsp70 efficiently, did not promote CFTR degradation, suggesting that the pro-degradative effect of Csp requires Hsc70/Hsp70 binding/activation. In agreement with this, Csp overexpression increased the amount of Hsc70/Hsp70 co-immunoprecipitated with CFTR, whereas overexpression of CspH43Q did not. The Hsc70/Hsp70 binding partner C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) can target CFTR for proteasome-mediated degradation. Csp overexpression also increased the amount of CHIP co-immunoprecipitated with CFTR. In addition, CHIP interacted directly with Csp, which was confirmed by in vitro binding experiments. Csp overexpression also increased CFTR ubiquitylation and reduced the half-life of immature CFTR. These findings indicate that Csp not only regulates the exit of CFTR from the ER, but that this action is accompanied by Hsc70/Hsp70 and CHIP-mediated CFTR degradation.

  2. Very mild disease phenotype of congenic CftrTgH(neoimHgu cystic fibrosis mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard-Marek Sabine

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major boost to cystic fibrosis disease research was given by the generation of various mouse models using gene targeting in embryonal stem cells. Moreover, the introduction of the same mutation on different inbred strains generating congenic strains facilitated the search for modifier genes. From the original CftrTgH(neoimHgu mouse model with a divergent genetic background (129/Sv, C57BL/6, HsdOla:MF1 two inbred mutant mouse strains CF/1-CftrTgH(neoimHgu and CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu had been generated using strict brother × sister mating. CF/1-CftrTgH(neoimHgu and CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu mice were fertile and showed normal growth and lifespan. In this work the CftrTgH(neoimHgu insertional mutation was backcrossed from CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu onto the inbred backgrounds C57BL/6J and DBA/2J generating congenic animals in order to clarify the differential impact of the Cftr mutation and the genetic background on the disease phenotype of the cystic fibrosis mutant mice. Clinical and electrophysiological features of the two congenic strains were compared with those of CF/1-CftrTgH(neoimHgu and CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu and wild type controls. Results Under the standardized housing conditions of the animal facility, the four mouse strains CF/1-CftrTgH(neoimHgu, CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu, D2.129P2(CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu and B6.129P2(CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu exhibited normal life expectancy. Growth of congenic cystic fibrosis mice was comparable with that of wild type controls. All mice but D2.129P2(CF/3-CftrTgH(neoimHgu females were fertile. Short circuit current measurements revealed characteristic response profiles of the HsdOla:MF1, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J backgrounds in nose, ileum and colon. All cystic fibrosis mouse lines showed the disease-typical hyperresponsiveness to amiloride in the respiratory epithelium. The mean chloride secretory responses to carbachol or forskolin were 15–100% of those of the cognate wild type control animals

  3. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in maturation stage ameloblasts, odontoblasts and bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronckers, Antonius; Kalogeraki, Lida; Jorna, Huub J N; Wilke, Martina; Bervoets, Theodore J; Lyaruu, Donacian M; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Denbesten, Pamela; de Jonge, Hugo

    2010-04-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have mild defects in dental enamel. The gene mutated in these patients is CFTR, a Cl(-) channel involved in transepithelial salt and water transport and bicarbonate secretion. We tested the hypothesis that Cftr channels are present and operating in the plasma membranes of mouse ameloblasts. Tissue sections of young mouse jaws and fetal human jaws were immunostained with various anti-Cftr antibodies. Specificity of the antibodies was validated in Cftr-deficient murine and human tissues. Immunostaining for Cftr was obtained in the apical plasma membranes of mouse maturation ameloblasts of both incisor and molar tooth germs. A granular intracellular immunostaining of variable intensity was also noted in bone cells and odontoblasts. In Cftr-deficient mice the incisors were chalky white and eroded much faster than in wild type mice. Histologically, only maturation ameloblasts of incisors were structurally affected in Cftr-deficient mice. Some antibody species gave also a positive cytosolic staining in Cftr-deficient cells. Transcripts of Cftr were found in maturation ameloblasts, odontoblasts and bone cells. Similar data were obtained in forming human dentin and bone. We conclude that Cftr protein locates in the apical plasma membranes of mouse maturation ameloblasts. In mouse incisors Cftr is critical for completion of enamel mineralization and conceivably functions as a regulator of pH during rapid crystal growth. Osteopenia found in CF patients as well as in Cftr-deficient mice is likely associated with defective Cftr operating in bone cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Potentiation of ΔF508- and G551D-CFTR-Mediated Cl- Current by Novel Hydroxypyrazolines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Park

    Full Text Available The most common mutation of CFTR, affecting approximately 90% of CF patients, is a deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del, ΔF508. Misfolding of ΔF508-CFTR impairs both its trafficking to the plasma membrane and its chloride channel activity. To identify small molecules that can restore channel activity of ΔF508-CFTR, we synthesized and evaluated eighteen novel hydroxypyrazoline analogues as CFTR potentiators. To elucidate potentiation activities of hydroxypyrazolines for ΔF508-CFTR, CFTR activity was measured using a halide-sensitive YFP assay, Ussing chamber assay and patch-clamp technique. Compounds 7p, 7q and 7r exhibited excellent potentiation with EC50 value <10 μM. Among the compounds, 7q (a novel CFTR potentiator, CP7q showed the highest potentiation activity with EC50 values of 0.88 ± 0.11 and 4.45 ± 0.31 μM for wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR, respectively. In addition, CP7q significantly potentiated chloride conductance of G551D-CFTR, a CFTR gating mutant; its maximal potentiation activity was 1.9 fold higher than the well-known CFTR potentiator genistein. Combination treatment with CP7q and VX-809, a corrector of ΔF508-CFTR, significantly enhanced functional rescue of ΔF508-CFTR compared with VX-809 alone. CP7q did not alter the cytosolic cAMP level and showed no cytotoxicity at the concentration showing maximum efficacy. The hydroxypyrazolines may be potential development candidates for drug therapy of cystic fibrosis.

  5. Adeno-associated virus-targeted disruption of the CFTR gene in cloned ferrets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Xingshen; Yan, Ziying; Yi, Yaling; Li, Ziyi; Lei, Diana; Rogers, Christopher S; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yulong; Welsh, Michael J; Leno, Gregory H; Engelhardt, John F

    2008-01-01

    .... In this study, we describe the production of a CFTR gene-deficient model in the domestic ferret using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting in fibroblasts, followed by nuclear transfer cloning...

  6. Biophysical Characterisation of Calumenin as a Charged F508del-CFTR Folding Modulator: e104970

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rashmi Tripathi; Nathalie Benz; Bridget Culleton; Pascal Trouvé; Claude Férec

    2014-01-01

      The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic-AMP dependent chloride channel expressed at the apical surface of epithelial cells lining various organs such as the respiratory tract...

  7. Biophysical characterisation of calumenin as a charged F508del-CFTR folding modulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tripathi, Rashmi; Benz, Nathalie; Culleton, Bridget; Trouvé, Pascal; Férec, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic-AMP dependent chloride channel expressed at the apical surface of epithelial cells lining various organs such as the respiratory tract...

  8. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  9. Substance P stimulates CFTR-dependent fluid secretion by mouse tracheal submucosal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianowski, Juan P; Choi, Jae Young; Wine, Jeffrey J; Hanrahan, John W

    2008-11-01

    The mucosa of the proximal airways defends itself and the lower airways from inhaled irritants such as capsaicinoids, allergens, and infections by several mechanisms. Sensory nerves monitor the luminal microenvironment and release the tachykinin substance P (SP) to stimulate mucus secretion. Here, we have studied the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in SP stimulation by comparing mouse airway submucosal gland responses in wild-type (WT) and CFTR-/- mice. Capsaicinoids (chili pepper oil) increased fluid secretion by glands from WT mice five-fold, and this response was abolished by exposing the basolateral aspect of the tracheas to L-732,138 (10 micromol/l), a specific antagonist of the neurokinin-1 receptor. Secretion was also stimulated 25-fold by basolateral application of SP, and this response was strongly inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)172. In contrast, submucosal glands from CFTR knockout mice failed to secrete when stimulated by SP (1 micromol/l), although those from wild-type control littermates were responsive. SP stimulation of wild-type glands was also abolished by clotrimazole (25 micromol/l), a blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that SP mediates local responses to capsaicinoids through a mechanism involving coordinated activation of CFTR and K(+) channels. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which CFTR-dependent responses to substance P have been directly demonstrated. Since CFTR regulation is qualitatively similar in human and mouse glands, loss of this local regulation in CF may contribute to reduced innate defenses in CF airways.

  10. Some gating potentiators, including VX-770, diminish ΔF508-CFTR functional expression

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, Guido; Avramescu, Radu G.; Perdomo, Doranda; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Bagdany, Miklos; Apaja, Pirjo M.; Borot, Florence; Szollosi, Daniel; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Hegedus, Tamas; Verkman, Alan S.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) that result in reduced anion conductance at the apical membrane of secretory epithelia. Treatment of CF patients carrying the G551D gating mutation with the potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor) largely restores channel activity and has shown substantial clinical benefit. However, most CF patients carry the ΔF508 mutation, which impairs CFTR folding, processing, function, and stability. Studies in homozygous ΔF508 C...

  11. Relating the disease mutation spectrum to the evolution of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Rishishwar

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, and accordingly the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein has perhaps the best characterized disease mutation spectrum with more than 1,500 causative mutations having been identified. In this study, we took advantage of that wealth of mutational information in an effort to relate site-specific evolutionary parameters with the propensity and severity of CFTR disease-causing mutations. To do this, we devised a scoring scheme for known CFTR disease-causing mutations based on the Grantham amino acid chemical difference matrix. CFTR site-specific evolutionary constraint values were then computed for seven different evolutionary metrics across a range of increasing evolutionary depths. The CFTR mutational scores and the various site-specific evolutionary constraint values were compared in order to evaluate which evolutionary measures best reflect the disease-causing mutation spectrum. Site-specific evolutionary constraint values from the widely used comparative method PolyPhen2 show the best correlation with the CFTR mutation score spectrum, whereas more straightforward conservation based measures (ConSurf and ScoreCons show the greatest ability to predict individual CFTR disease-causing mutations. While far greater than could be expected by chance alone, the fraction of the variability in mutation scores explained by the PolyPhen2 metric (3.6%, along with the best set of paired sensitivity (58% and specificity (60% values for the prediction of disease-causing residues, were marginal. These data indicate that evolutionary constraint levels are informative but far from determinant with respect to disease-causing mutations in CFTR. Nevertheless, this work shows that, when combined with additional lines of evidence, information on site-specific evolutionary conservation can and should be used to guide site-directed mutagenesis experiments by more narrowly

  12. Cigarette smoke-induced Ca2+ release leads to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Julia E; Sheridan, John T; Polk, William; Davies, Catrin M; Tarran, Robert

    2014-03-14

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects 64 million people and is currently the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease includes both emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and in the case of chronic bronchitis represents an inflammatory response of the airways that is associated with mucus hypersecretion and obstruction of small airways. Recently, it has emerged that exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) leads to an inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, causing airway surface liquid dehydration, which may play a role in the development of chronic bronchitis. CS rapidly clears CFTR from the plasma membrane and causes it to be deposited into aggresome-like compartments. However, little is known about the mechanism(s) responsible for the internalization of CFTR following CS exposure. Our studies revealed that CS triggered a rise in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) that may have emanated from lysosomes. Furthermore, chelation of cytoplasmic Ca(2+), but not inhibition of protein kinases/phosphatases, prevented CS-induced CFTR internalization. The macrolide antibiotic bafilomycin A1 inhibited CS-induced Ca(2+) release and prevented CFTR clearance from the plasma membrane, further linking cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and CFTR internalization. We hypothesize that CS-induced Ca(2+) release prevents normal sorting/degradation of CFTR and causes internalized CFTR to reroute to aggresomes. Our data provide mechanistic insight into the potentially deleterious effects of CS on airway epithelia and outline a hitherto unrecognized signaling event triggered by CS that may affect the long term transition of the lung into a hyper-inflammatory/dehydrated environment.

  13. Computational design of a PDZ domain peptide inhibitor that rescues CFTR activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle E Roberts

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is an epithelial chloride channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The most prevalent CFTR mutation, ΔF508, blocks folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recent work has shown that some ΔF508-CFTR channel activity can be recovered by pharmaceutical modulators ("potentiators" and "correctors", but ΔF508-CFTR can still be rapidly degraded via a lysosomal pathway involving the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL, which binds CFTR via a PDZ interaction domain. We present a study that goes from theory, to new structure-based computational design algorithms, to computational predictions, to biochemical testing and ultimately to epithelial-cell validation of novel, effective CAL PDZ inhibitors (called "stabilizers" that rescue ΔF508-CFTR activity. To design the "stabilizers", we extended our structural ensemble-based computational protein redesign algorithm K* to encompass protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. The computational predictions achieved high accuracy: all of the top-predicted peptide inhibitors bound well to CAL. Furthermore, when compared to state-of-the-art CAL inhibitors, our design methodology achieved higher affinity and increased binding efficiency. The designed inhibitor with the highest affinity for CAL (kCAL01 binds six-fold more tightly than the previous best hexamer (iCAL35, and 170-fold more tightly than the CFTR C-terminus. We show that kCAL01 has physiological activity and can rescue chloride efflux in CF patient-derived airway epithelial cells. Since stabilizers address a different cellular CF defect from potentiators and correctors, our inhibitors provide an additional therapeutic pathway that can be used in conjunction with current methods.

  14. Acquired defects in CFTR-dependent β-adrenergic sweat secretion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Clifford A; Tidwell, Sherry; Liu, Bo; Accurso, Frank J; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2014-02-25

    Smoking-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with acquired systemic cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. Recently, sweat evaporimetry has been shown to efficiently measure β-adrenergic sweat rate and specifically quantify CFTR function in the secretory coil of the sweat gland. To evaluate the presence and severity of systemic CFTR dysfunction in smoking-related lung disease using sweat evaporimetry to determine CFTR-dependent sweat rate. We recruited a cohort of patients consisting of healthy never smokers (N = 18), healthy smokers (12), COPD smokers (25), and COPD former smokers (12) and measured β-adrenergic sweat secretion rate with evaporative water loss, sweat chloride, and clinical data (spirometry and symptom questionnaires). β-adrenergic sweat rate was reduced in COPD smokers (41.9 ± 3.4, P sweat chloride was significantly greater in COPD smokers (32.8 ± 3.3, P sweat rate and female gender (β = 0.26), age (-0.28), FEV1% (0.35), dyspnea (-0.3), and history of smoking (-0.27; each P sweat rate was significantly reduced in COPD patients, regardless of smoking status, reflecting acquired CFTR dysfunction and abnormal gland secretion in the skin that can persist despite smoking cessation. β-adrenergic sweat rate and sweat chloride are associated with COPD severity and clinical symptoms, supporting the hypothesis that CFTR decrements have a causative role in COPD pathogenesis.

  15. Quantitation of normal CFTR mRNA in CF patients with splice-site mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Olsen, J.C.; Silverman, L.M. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified two mutations in introns of the CFTR gene associated with partially active splice sites and unusual clinical phenotypes. One mutation in intron 19 (3849+10 kb C to T) is common in CF patients with normal sweat chloride values; an 84 bp sequence from intron 19, which contains a stop codon, is inserted between exon 19 and exon 20 in most nasal CFTR transcripts. The other mutation in intron 14B (2789+5 G to A) is associated with elevated sweat chloride levels, but mild pulmonary disease; exon 14B (38 bp) is spliced out of most nasal CFTR transcipts. The remaining CFTR cDNA sequences, other than the 84 bp insertion of exon 14B deletion, are identical to the published sequence. To correlate genotype and phenotype, we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the levels of normally-spliced CFTR mRNA in nasal epithelia from these patients. CFTR cDNA was amplified (25 cycles) by using primers specific for normally-spliced species, {gamma}-actin cDNA was amplified as a standard.

  16. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRusch, Jessica; Jung, Jinsei; General, Ignacio J; Lewis, Michele D; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B; Amann, Stephen T; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C

    2014-07-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, pbicarbonate permeability are altered by CFTRBD variants through multiple mechanisms. CFTRBD variants

  17. The K+ channel opener 1-EBIO potentiates residual function of mutant CFTR in rectal biopsies from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva K Roth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of strategies to improve mutant CFTR function remains a key priority in the development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF. Previous studies demonstrated that the K⁺ channel opener 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolone (1-EBIO potentiates CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in cultured cells and mouse colon. However, the effects of 1-EBIO on wild-type and mutant CFTR function in native human colonic tissues remain unknown. METHODS: We studied the effects of 1-EBIO on CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in rectal biopsies from 47 CF patients carrying a wide spectrum of CFTR mutations and 57 age-matched controls. Rectal tissues were mounted in perfused micro-Ussing chambers and the effects of 1-EBIO were compared in control tissues, CF tissues expressing residual CFTR function and CF tissues with no detectable Cl⁻ secretion. RESULTS: Studies in control tissues demonstrate that 1-EBIO activated CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in the absence of cAMP-mediated stimulation and potentiated cAMP-induced Cl⁻ secretion by 39.2±6.7% (P<0.001 via activation of basolateral Ca²⁺-activated and clotrimazole-sensitive KCNN4 K⁺ channels. In CF specimens, 1-EBIO potentiated cAMP-induced Cl⁻ secretion in tissues with residual CFTR function by 44.4±11.5% (P<0.001, but had no effect on tissues lacking CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ conductance. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that 1-EBIO potentiates Cl⁻secretion in native CF tissues expressing CFTR mutants with residual Cl⁻ channel function by activation of basolateral KCNN4 K⁺ channels that increase the driving force for luminal Cl⁻ exit. This mechanism may augment effects of CFTR correctors and potentiators that increase the number and/or activity of mutant CFTR channels at the cell surface and suggests KCNN4 as a therapeutic target for CF.

  18. Are optical aberrations during accommodation a significant problem for refractive surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Pablo; Fernández, Enrique J; Manzanera, Silvestre

    2002-01-01

    To study the limits to a perfect ideal customized wavefront correction due to the change of aberrations during accommodation. METHODS. We measured the dynamic changes of ocular aberrations during accommodation in normal eyes with a real-time Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. Those results were used in computer simulations to predict the benefit of a perfect customized correction. Due to the continuous changes of the aberrations over time, an ideal perfect static correction will not provide stable aberration-free optics. For example, when the eye accommodates to near objects, due to the changing aberrations, the eye will become aberrated again. An alternative correction using the aberration pattern for a slightly accommodated condition could provide a better-correction in a larger accommodative range, although at the cost of non-perfect correction for far vision. Due to the dynamic nature of ocular optics, a static perfect correction, for instance performed in customized refractive surgery, would not remain perfect for every condition occurring during normal accommodation.

  19. Characterization of primary rat nasal epithelial cultures in CFTR knockout rats as a model for CF sinus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipirneni, Kiranya E; Cho, Do-Yeon; Skinner, Daniel F; Zhang, Shaoyan; Mackey, Calvin; Lim, Dong-Jin; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2017-11-01

    The objectives of the current experiments were to develop and characterize primary rat nasal epithelial cultures and evaluate their usefulness as a model of cystic fibrosis (CF) sinonasal transepithelial transport and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. Laboratory in vitro and animal studies. CFTR+/+ and CFTR-/- rat nasal septal epithelia (RNSE) were cultured on semipermeable supports at an air-liquid interface to confluence and full differentiation. Monolayers were mounted in Ussing chambers for pharmacologic manipulation of ion transport and compared to similar filters containing murine (MNSE) and human (HSNE) epithelia. Histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were completed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of CFTR+/+ RNSE, MNSE, and HSNE was performed to evaluate relative CFTR gene expression. Forskolin-stimulated anion transport (ΔIsc in μA/cm2 ) was significantly greater in epithelia derived from CFTR+/+ when compared to CFTR-/- animals (100.9 ± 3.7 vs. 10.5 ± 0.9; P rats at 4 months. CFTR expression was similar among species. The successful development of the CFTR-/- rat enables improved evaluation of CF sinus disease based on characteristic abnormalities of ion transport. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E384-E391, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR post-translational turnover and in its plasma membrane stability in airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ferru-Clément

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is a chloride channel that is expressed on the apical plasma membrane (PM of epithelial cells. The most common deleterious allele encodes a trafficking-defective mutant protein undergoing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD and presenting lower PM stability. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR turnover and trafficking in a human bronchiolar epithelial cell line (CFBE41o- expressing wild-type CFTR. Cdc42 is a small GTPase of the Rho family that fulfils numerous cell functions, one of which is endocytosis and recycling process via actin cytoskeleton remodelling. When we treated cells with chemical inhibitors such as ML141 against Cdc42 and wiskostatin against the downstream effector N-WASP, we observed that CFTR channel activity was inhibited, in correlation with a decrease in CFTR amount at the cell surface and an increase in dynamin-dependent CFTR endocytosis. Anchoring of CFTR to the cortical cytoskeleton was then presumably impaired by actin disorganization. When we performed siRNA-mediated depletion of Cdc42, actin polymerization was not impacted, but we observed actin-independent consequences upon CFTR. Total and PM CFTR amounts were increased, resulting in greater activation of CFTR. Pulse-chase experiments showed that while CFTR degradation was slowed, CFTR maturation through the Golgi apparatus remained unaffected. In addition, we observed increased stability of CFTR in PM and reduction of its endocytosis. This study highlights the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway at several levels of CFTR biogenesis and trafficking: (i Cdc42 is implicated in the first steps of CFTR biosynthesis and processing; (ii it contributes to the stability of CFTR in PM via its anchoring to cortical actin; (iii it promotes CFTR endocytosis and presumably its sorting toward lysosomal degradation.

  1. [Influence of age on optical aberrations of the human eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, M; Wirbelauer, C; Pham, D T

    2006-07-01

    Currently the influence of age on corneal and ocular aberrations is still insufficiently known. The aim of this clinical study was to compare age-related aberrations of human eyes. In a prospective study 98 eyes of 49 healthy patients ranging from 17 to 65 years of age (38.6+/-10.0 years) were consecutively examined. The best corrected visual acuity ranged from 0.8 to 1.6; 48 eyes were emmetropic (SE+/-0.5 D), 42 eyes myopic (SE +0.5 to +3.88 D). The corneal aberrations were derived from corneal topography (Keratron Scout, Optikon). The measurement of ocular aberrations was performed with a Tscherning wavefront aberrometer (ORK, Schwind). The aberrations of the Zernike coefficients and RMS values (1st to 4th order) were determined. The mean corneal and ocular Zernike coefficients of higher order were smaller than 0.2 microm. There was an evident decrease of wavefront aberrations with increasing order. Higher order corneal aberrations were larger than the corresponding ocular aberrations. With increasing age higher optical errors increased in complexity, and the correlation of corneal and ocular aberrations decreased with significant differences. Although the corneal ocular RMS value of the 3rd and 4th order correlated in the younger group (r=0.51, p=0.0001), there was no correlation in the older group (r=-0.48, p=0.832). The influence of age caused a significant increase of ocular aberrations of the 3rd and 4th order, in particular a tenfold extension of coma (C07) (p=0.002), a twofold extension of spherical aberration (C12) (p=0.0001), and an increase of the 3rd and 4th order RMS values (p=0.001). Increased age induced an increase in optical aberrations of the eye, which demonstrates the influence of the lens on ocular aberrations. The combination of corneal and ocular diagnostic methods is recommendable for a better understanding of visual performance.

  2. Lubiprostone Activates CFTR, but not ClC-2, via the Prostaglandin Receptor (EP4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, Yohei; Moran, Aurelia R.; MacDonald, Kelvin D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of lubiprostone activation of epithelial chloride transport. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid approved for the treatment of constipation [1]. There is uncertainty, however, as to how lubiprostone increases epithelial chloride transport. Direct stimulation of ClC-2 and CFTR chloride channels as well as stimulation of these channels via the EP4 receptor has been described [2; 3; 4; 5]. To better define this mechanism, two-electrode voltage clamp was used to assay Xenopus oocytes expressing ClC-2, with or without co-expression of the EP4 receptor or β adrenergic receptor (βAR), for changes in conductance elicited by lubiprostone. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and either βAR or the EP4 receptor were also studied. In oocytes co-expressing ClC-2 and βAR conductance was stimulated by hyperpolarization and acidic pH (pH=6), but there was no response to the β adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. Oocytes expressing ClC-2 only or co-expressing ClC-2 and EP4 did not respond to the presence of 0.1, 1, or 10 µM lubiprostone in the superperfusate. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and βAR did not respond to hyperpolarization, acidic pH, or 1µM lubiprostone. However, conductance was elevated by isoproterenol and inhibited by CFTRinh172. Co-expression of CFTR and EP4 resulted in lubiprostone-stimulated conductance, which was also sensitive to CFTRinh172. The EC50 for lubiprostone mediated CFTR activation was ~ 10 nM. These results demonstrate no direct action of lubiprostone on either ClC-2 or CFTR channels expressed in oocytes. However, the results confirm that CFTR can be activated by lubiprostone via the EP4 receptor in oocytes. PMID:22960173

  3. Instability of the insertional mutation in CftrTgH(neoimHgu cystic fibrosis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Julia R

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major boost to the cystic fibrosis disease research was given by the generation of various mouse models using gene targeting in embryonal stem cells. Moreover, the introduction of the same mutation on different inbred strains generating congenic strains facilitated the search for modifier genes. From the original CftrTgH(neoimHgu CF mouse model we have generated using strict brother × sister mating two inbred CftrTgH(neoimHgu mouse lines (CF/1 and CF/3. Thereafter, the insertional mutation was introgressed from CF/3 into three inbred backgrounds (C57BL/6, BALB/c, DBA/2J generating congenic animals. In every backcross cycle germline transmission of the insertional mutation was monitored by direct probing the insertion via Southern RFLP. In order to bypass this time consuming procedure we devised an alternative PCR based protocol whereby mouse strains are differentiated at the Cftr locus by Cftr intragenic microsatellite genotypes that are tightly linked to the disrupted locus. Results Using this method we were able to identify animals carrying the insertional mutation based upon the differential haplotypic backgrounds of the three inbred strains and the mutant CftrTgH(neoimHgu at the Cftr locus. Moreover, this method facilitated the identification of the precise vector excision from the disrupted Cftr locus in two out of 57 typed animals. This reversion to wild type status took place without any loss of sequence revealing the instability of insertional mutations during the production of congenic animals. Conclusions We present intragenic microsatellite markers as a tool for fast and efficient identification of the introgressed locus of interest in the recipient strain during congenic animal breeding. Moreover, the same genotyping method allowed the identification of a vector excision event, posing questions on the stability of insertional mutations in mice.

  4. CFTR negatively regulates cyclooxygenase-2-PGE(2) positive feedback loop in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Chen, Hui; Guo, Jing Hui; Tsang, Lai Ling; Yu, Mei Kuen; Xu, Wen Ming; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent anion channel mostly expressed in epithelia. Accumulating evidence suggests that CF airway epithelia are overwhelmed by excessive inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins (PGs), which eventually lead to the over-inflammatory condition observed in CF lung disease. However, the exact underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we observed increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and over-production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in human CF bronchial epithelia cell line (CFBE41o--) with elevated NF-κB activity compared to a wild-type airway epithelial cell line (16HBE14o--). Moreover, we demonstrated that CFTR knockout mice had inherently higher levels of COX-2 and NF-κB activity, supporting the notion that lack of CFTR results in hyper-inflammatory signaling. In addition, we identified a positive feedback loop for production of PGE(2) involving PKA and transcription factor, CREB. More importantly, overexpression of wild-type CFTR significantly suppressed COX-2 expression in CFBE41o- cells, and wild-type CFTR protein expression was significantly increased when 16HBE14o-- cells were challenged with LPS as well as PGE(2), indicating possible involvement of CFTR in negative regulation of COX-2/PGE(2). In conclusion, CFTR is a negative regulator of PGE(2)-mediated inflammatory response, defect of which may result in excessive activation of NF-κB, leading to over production of PGE(2) as seen in inflammatory CF tissues. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pathophysiologic consequences following inhibition of a CFTR-dependent developmental cascade in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson Janet E

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Examination of late gestation developmental genes in vivo may be limited by early embryonic lethality and compensatory mechanisms. This problem is particularly apparent in evaluating the developmental role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene in the cystic fibrosis (CF phenotype. A previously described transient in utero knockout (TIUKO technology was used to address the developmental role of CFTR in the rat lung. Results Rat fetuses transiently treated with antisense cftr in utero developed pathology that replicated aspects of the human CF phenotype. The TIUKO CF rat developed lung fibrosis, chronic inflammation, reactive airway disease, and the CF Antigen (MRP8/14, a marker for CF in human patients, was expressed. Conclusions The transient in utero antisense technology can be used to evaluate genes that exhibit either early lethality or compensating gene phenotypes. In the lung CFTR is part of a developmental cascade for normal secretory cell differentiation. Absence of CFTR results in a constitutive inflammatory process that is involved in some aspects of CF pathophysiology.

  6. A novel treatment of cystic fibrosis acting on-target: cysteamine plus epigallocatechin gallate for the autophagy-dependent rescue of class II-mutated CFTR

    OpenAIRE

    Tosco, A.; De Gregorio, F.; Esposito, S.; Stefano, D; Sana, I; Ferrari, E.; Sepe, A.; Salvadori, L.; Buonpensiero, P.; Di Pasqua, A.; Grassia, R; Leone, C.A.; Guido, S; Rosa, G.; Lusa, S

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the combination of two safe proteostasis regulators, cysteamine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can be used to improve deficient expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in patients homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Here we provide the proof-of-concept that this combination treatment restored CFTR function and reduced lung inflammation (P

  7. Association of sweat chloride concentration at time of diagnosis and CFTR genotype with mortality and cystic fibrosis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKone, Edward F; Velentgas, Priscilla; Swenson, Anna J; Goss, Christopher H

    2015-09-01

    The extent to which sweat chloride concentration predicts survival and clinical phenotype independently of CFTR genotype in cystic fibrosis is not well understood. We analyzed the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry data using Cox regression to examine the relationship between sweat chloride concentration (sweat chloride, CFTR genotype, and measures of lung function and growth. When included in the same model, CFTR genotype, but not sweat chloride, was independently associated with survival and with lung function, height, and BMI. Among patients with unclassified CFTR genotype, sweat chloride was an independent predictor of survival (Sweat chloride concentration may be a useful predictor of mortality and clinical phenotype when CFTR genotype functional class is unclassified. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation method of an influence of wavefront aberration on signal quality in holographic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akieda, Kensuke; Nakajima, Akihito; Ohori, Tomohiro; Katakura, Kiyoto; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2010-11-01

    One of the problems that affects the practical use of holographic memory is deterioration of the reproduced images due to aberration in the optical system. The medium used in holographic memory systems must be interchangeable, and hence, it is necessary to clarify the influence of aberration in the optical system on the signal quality and perform aberration correction for drive compatibility. In this study, aberration is introduced in the reference light beam during image reproduction, and the deterioration of the reproduced image signal is examined.

  9. CFTR Expression in Human Neutrophils and the Phagolysosomal Chlorination Defect in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Richard G.; Valentine, Vincent G.; Lanson, Nicholas A.; Leidal, Kevin; Zhang, Qiang; Lombard, Gisele; Thompson, Connie; Viswanathan, Anand; Nauseef, William M.; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, Guoshun

    2010-01-01

    Production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in neutrophils, a critical oxidant involved in bacterial killing, requires chloride anions. Because the primary defect of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the loss of chloride transport function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), we hypothesized that CF neutrophils may be deficient in chlorination of bacterial components due to limited chloride supply to the phagolysosomal compartment. Multiple approaches, including RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining, and immunoblotting, were used to demonstrate that CFTR is expressed in resting neutrophils at the mRNA and protein levels. Probing fractions of resting neutrophils isolated by Percoll gradient fractionation and free flow electrophoresis for CFTR revealed its presence exclusively in secretory vesicles. The CFTR chloride channel was also detected in phagolysosomes, a special organelle formed after phagocytosis. Interestingly, HL-60 cells, a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, upregulated CFTR when induced to differentiate into neutrophils with DMSO, strongly suggesting its potential role in mature neutrophil function. Analyses by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that neutrophils from CF patients had a defect in their ability to chlorinate bacterial proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolically pre-labeled with 13C-L-tyrosine, unveiling defective intraphagolysosomal HOCl production. In contrast, both normal and CF neutrophils exhibited normal extracellular production of HOCl when stimulated with phorbol ester, indicating that CF neutrophils had the normal ability to produce this oxidant in the extracellular medium. This report provides the evidence to suggest that CFTR channel expression in neutrophils and its dysfunction affects neutrophil chlorination of phagocytosed bacteria. PMID:16922501

  10. Changes of higher-order aberrations with the use of various mydriatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyung; Lim, Taehyung; Kim, Myoung Joon; Tchah, Hungwon

    2009-11-01

    Advances in corneal refractive surgery have allowed ophthalmologists to correct ocular higher-order aberrations. To obtain more information on the ocular aberrations generated from the optical axis, mydriasis is required. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in higher-order aberrations with the use of various mydriatics. Higher-order aberrations were measured in 21 eyes of 21 subjects (age range 24-37 years; 13 males, 8 females). Repeated measurements were conducted before and after the installation of three different mydriatics: 10% phenylephrine, 1% tropicamide, or 1% cyclopentolate. At a pupil size of 6 mm, the average root mean square value of higher-order aberrations (HO-RMS) was 0.430 mum in undilated eyes, and 0.413, 0.410, and 0.477 mum after installation of phenylephrine, tropicamide, and cyclopentolate, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the HO-RMS between the four conditions. There was a significant difference in the spherical aberration between the undilated or phenylephrine-treated eyes, compared to those treated with tropicamide or cyclopentolate. Cycloplegic mydriatics seemed to shift spherical aberration in a positive direction. These results suggest that mydriatics may affect higher-order aberrations, especially spherical aberration, and this should be considered when performing wavefront analysis and when correcting wavefront errors.

  11. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  12. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica LaRusch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF, a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002. Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005 and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001. WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in

  13. Theory of aberration fields for general optical systems with freeform surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P; Thompson, Kevin P

    2014-11-03

    This paper utilizes the framework of nodal aberration theory to describe the aberration field behavior that emerges in optical systems with freeform optical surfaces, particularly φ-polynomial surfaces, including Zernike polynomial surfaces, that lie anywhere in the optical system. If the freeform surface is located at the stop or pupil, the net aberration contribution of the freeform surface is field constant. As the freeform optical surface is displaced longitudinally away from the stop or pupil of the optical system, the net aberration contribution becomes field dependent. It is demonstrated that there are no new aberration types when describing the aberration fields that arise with the introduction of freeform optical surfaces. Significantly it is shown that the aberration fields that emerge with the inclusion of freeform surfaces in an optical system are exactly those that have been described by nodal aberration theory for tilted and decentered optical systems. The key contribution here lies in establishing the field dependence and nodal behavior of each freeform term that is essential knowledge for effective application to optical system design. With this development, the nodes that are distributed throughout the field of view for each aberration type can be anticipated and targeted during optimization for the correction or control of the aberrations in an optical system with freeform surfaces. This work does not place any symmetry constraints on the optical system, which could be packaged in a fully three dimensional geometry, without fold mirrors.

  14. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Debrand

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA in the mother's bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5-1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence.We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11-12 weeks of gestation. Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene.The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays.

  15. Impact of astigmatism and high-order aberrations on subjective best focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Susana; Velasco-Ocana, Miriam; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Sawides, Lucie; Hernandez, Martha; Marin, Gildas

    2015-08-01

    We studied the role of native astigmatism and ocular aberrations on best-focus setting and its shift upon induction of astigmatism in 42 subjects (emmetropes, myopes, hyperopes, with-the-rule [WTR] and against-the-rule [ATR] myopic astigmats). Stimuli were presented in a custom-developed adaptive optics simulator, allowing correction for native aberrations and astigmatism induction (+1 D; 6-mm pupil). Best-focus search consisted on randomized-step interleaved staircase method. Each subject searched best focus for four different images, and four different conditions (with/without aberration correction, with/without astigmatism induction). The presence of aberrations induced a significant shift in subjective best focus (0.4 D; p < 0.01), significantly correlated (p = 0.005) with the best-focus shift predicted from optical simulations. The induction of astigmatism produced a statistically significant shift of the best-focus setting in all groups under natural aberrations (p = 0.001), and in emmetropes and in WTR astigmats under corrected aberrations (p < 0.0001). Best-focus shift upon induced astigmatism was significantly different across groups, both for natural aberrations and AO-correction (p < 0.0001). Best focus shifted in opposite directions in WTR and ATR astigmats upon induction of astigmatism, symmetrically with respect to the best-focus shift in nonastigmatic myopes. The shifts are consistent with a bias towards vertical and horizontal retinal blur in WTR and ATR astigmats, respectively, indicating adaptation to native astigmatism.

  16. The human CFTR protein expressed in CHO cells activates aquaporin-3 in a cAMP-dependent pathway: study by digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Jourdain, P.

    2013-12-11

    The transmembrane water movements during cellular processes and their relationship to ionic channel activity remain largely unknown. As an example, in epithelial cells it was proposed that the movement of water could be directly linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity through a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore, or be dependent on aquaporin. Here, we used digital holographic microscopy (DHM) an interferometric technique to quantify in situ the transmembrane water fluxes during the activity of the epithelial chloride channel, CFTR, measured by patch-clamp and iodide efflux techniques. We showed that the water transport measured by DHM is fully inhibited by the selective CFTR blocker CFTRinh172 and is absent in cells lacking CFTR. Of note, in cells expressing the mutated version of CFTR (F508del-CFTR), which mimics the most common genetic alteration encountered in cystic fibrosis, we also show that the water movement is profoundly altered but restored by pharmacological manipulation of F508del-CFTR-defective trafficking. Importantly, whereas activation of this endogenous water channel required a cAMP-dependent stimulation of CFTR, activation of CFTR or F508del-CFTR by two cAMP-independent CFTR activators, genistein and MPB91, failed to trigger water movements. Finally, using a specific small-interfering RNA against the endogenous aquaporin AQP3, the water transport accompanying CFTR activity decreased. We conclude that water fluxes accompanying CFTR activity are linked to AQP3 but not to a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore in the CFTR protein.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reduces VX-809 Stimulated F508del-CFTR Chloride Secretion by Airway Epithelial Cells.

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    Bruce A Stanton

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the lungs of 85% of adult patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Previously, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa reduced wt-CFTR Cl secretion by airway epithelial cells. Recently, a new investigational drug VX-809 has been shown to increase F508del-CFTR Cl secretion in human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells, and, in combination with VX-770, to increase FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second by an average of 3-5% in CF patients homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation. We propose that P. aeruginosa infection of CF lungs reduces VX-809 + VX-770- stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and thereby reduces the clinical efficacy of VX-809 + VX-770.F508del-CFBE cells and primary cultures of CF-HBE cells (F508del/F508del were exposed to VX-809 alone or a combination of VX-809 + VX-770 for 48 hours and the effect of P. aeruginosa on F508del-CFTR Cl secretion was measured in Ussing chambers. The effect of VX-809 on F508del-CFTR abundance was measured by cell surface biotinylation and western blot analysis. PAO1, PA14, PAK and 6 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (3 mucoid and 3 non-mucoid significantly reduced drug stimulated F508del-CFTR Cl secretion, and plasma membrane F508del-CFTR.The observation that P. aeruginosa reduces VX-809 and VX-809 + VX-770 stimulated F508del CFTR Cl secretion may explain, in part, why VX-809 + VX-770 has modest efficacy in clinical trials.

  18. Adeno-associated virus–targeted disruption of the CFTR gene in cloned ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingshen; Yan, Ziying; Yi, Yaling; Li, Ziyi; Lei, Diana; Rogers, Christopher S.; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Yulong; Welsh, Michael J.; Leno, Gregory H.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Somatic cell gene targeting combined with nuclear transfer cloning presents tremendous potential for the creation of new, large-animal models of human diseases. Mouse disease models often fail to reproduce human phenotypes, underscoring the need for the generation and study of alternative disease models. Mice deficient for CFTR have been poor models for cystic fibrosis (CF), lacking many aspects of human CF lung disease. In this study, we describe the production of a CFTR gene–deficient model in the domestic ferret using recombinant adeno-associated virus–mediated gene targeting in fibroblasts, followed by nuclear transfer cloning. As part of this approach, we developed a somatic cell rejuvenation protocol using serial nuclear transfer to produce live CFTR-deficient clones from senescent gene-targeted fibroblasts. We transferred 472 reconstructed embryos into 11 recipient jills and obtained 8 healthy male ferret clones heterozygous for a disruption in exon 10 of the CFTR gene. To our knowledge, this study represents the first description of genetically engineered ferrets and describes an approach that may be of substantial utility in modeling not only CF, but also other genetic diseases. PMID:18324338

  19. Dual activation of CFTR and CLCN2 by lubiprostone in murine nasal epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffhauer, Eric S; Vij, Neeraj; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Kang, Po Wei; Walker, Doug; Lee, Seakwoo; Zeitlin, Pamela L

    2013-03-01

    Multiple sodium and chloride channels on the apical surface of nasal epithelial cells contribute to periciliary fluid homeostasis, a function that is disrupted in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Among these channels is the chloride channel CLCN2, which has been studied as a potential alternative chloride efflux pathway in the absence of CFTR. The object of the present study was to use the nasal potential difference test (NPD) to quantify CLCN2 function in an epithelial-directed TetOn CLCN2 transgenic mouse model (TGN-K18rtTA-hCLCN2) by using the putative CLCN2 pharmacological agonist lubiprostone and peptide inhibitor GaTx2. Lubiprostone significantly increased chloride transport in the CLCN2-overexpressing mice following activation of the transgene by doxycycline. This response to lubiprostone was significantly inhibited by GaTx2 after CLCN2 activation in TGN-CLCN2 mice. Cftr(-/-) and Clc2(-/-) mice showed hyperpolarization indicative of chloride efflux in response to lubiprostone, which was fully inhibited by GaTx2 and CFTR inhibitor 172 + GlyH-101, respectively. Our study reveals lubiprostone as a pharmacological activator of both CFTR and CLCN2. Overexpression and activation of CLCN2 leads to improved mouse NPD readings, suggesting it is available as an alternative pathway for epithelial chloride secretion in murine airways. The utilization of CLCN2 as an alternative chloride efflux channel could provide clinical benefit to patients with CF, especially if the pharmacological activator is administered as an aerosol.

  20. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR... intended as an aid in confirmatory diagnostic testing of individuals with suspected cystic fibrosis (CF...

  1. Analysis of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene in patients with obstructive azoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L.F. Bernardino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD accounts for 1%-2% of sterility in men. A high incidence of mutations, as well as the involvement of the 5T variant of the T tract length in intron 8 of the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR gene, have been previously described in males with CBAVD. Herein we report the screening for mutations and for the 5T variant of the CFTR gene in 17 patients with CBAVD and three others with non-CABVD obstructive azoospermia. In the CBAVD group, three patients (15% were compound heterozygotes for mutations, and five patients (25% had a mutation in one allele and the 5T variant in the other; the 5T variant was also present in two other patients, one of them being homozygous. The most frequent mutation was DF508, present on five chromosomes (12.5%. A novel missense mutation (A399D was detected in a Japanese CBVAD patient. Our results yield further evidence for a strong association between male obstructive azoospermia caused by CBAVD and mutation/5T variant in the CFTR gene. The search for CFTR mutations in such patients is thus recommended for genetic counseling of couples who undergo assisted fertilization due to CBAVD.

  2. Small molecule correctors of F508del-CFTR discovered by structure-based virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalid, Ori; Mense, Martin; Fischman, Sharon; Shitrit, Alina; Bihler, Hermann; Ben-Zeev, Efrat; Schutz, Nili; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Thomas, Philip J.; Bridges, Robert J.; Wetmore, Diana R.; Marantz, Yael; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2010-12-01

    Folding correctors of F508del-CFTR were discovered by in silico structure-based screening utilizing homology models of CFTR. The intracellular segment of CFTR was modeled and three cavities were identified at inter-domain interfaces: (1) Interface between the two Nucleotide Binding Domains (NBDs); (2) Interface between NBD1 and Intracellular Loop (ICL) 4, in the region of the F508 deletion; (3) multi-domain interface between NBD1:2:ICL1:2:4. We hypothesized that compounds binding at these interfaces may improve the stability of the protein, potentially affecting the folding yield or surface stability. In silico structure-based screening was performed at the putative binding-sites and a total of 496 candidate compounds from all three sites were tested in functional assays. A total of 15 compounds, representing diverse chemotypes, were identified as F508del folding correctors. This corresponds to a 3% hit rate, tenfold higher than hit rates obtained in corresponding high-throughput screening campaigns. The same binding sites also yielded potentiators and, most notably, compounds with a dual corrector-potentiator activity (dual-acting). Compounds harboring both activity types may prove to be better leads for the development of CF therapeutics than either pure correctors or pure potentiators. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of structure-based discovery of CFTR modulators.

  3. Comprehensive and accurate mutation scanning of the CFTR gene by two-dimensional DNA electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Hofstra, RMW; Scheffer, H; Uitterlinden, AG; Mullaart, E; Buys, CHCM; Vijg, J

    1996-01-01

    The large number of possible disease causing mutations in the 27 exons of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has severely limited direct diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and carriers by mutation detection. Here we show that in principle testing for

  4. Screening of Two Neighboring CFTR Mutations in Iranian Infertile Men with Non-Obstructive Azoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Heidari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The genetic association between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations and male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD is well established. Mutant CFTR, however may also be involved in the etiology of male infertility in non-CBAVD cases. The present study was conducted to estimate the frequency of ΔI507 and ΔF508 CFTR gene mutations in Iranian infertile males. We undertook the first study of association between these CFTR mutations and non-obstructive azoospermia in Iran. In this case-control study, 100 fertile healthy fathers and 100 non-obstructive azoospermia’s men were recruited from Isfahan Infertility Center (IIC and Sari Saint Mary’s Infertility Center, between 2008 and 2009. Screening of F508del and I507del mutations was carried out by the multiplex-ARMS-PCR. Significance of differences in mutation frequencies between the patient and control groups was assessed by Fisher’s exact test. The ΔF508 was detected in three patients. However there are no significant association was found between the presence of this mutated allele and infertility [OR=9.2 (allele-based and 7.2 (individual-based, P=0.179]. None of the samples carried the ΔI507 mutation. Altogether, we show that neither ΔI507 nor ΔF508 is involved in this population of Iranian infertile males with non-obstructive azoospermia.

  5. Temporal dynamics of ocular aberrations: monocular vs binocular vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira-Agudelo, A; Lundström, L; Artal, P

    2009-05-01

    The temporal dynamics of ocular aberrations are important for the evaluation of, e.g. the accuracy of aberration estimates, the correlation to visual performance, and the requirements for real-time correction with adaptive optics. Traditionally, studies on the eye's dynamic behavior have been performed monocularly, which might have affected the results. In this study we measured aberrations and their temporal dynamics both monocularly and binocularly in the relaxed and accommodated state for six healthy subjects. Temporal frequencies up to 100 Hz were measured with a fast-acquisition Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor having an open field-of-view configuration which allowed fixation to real targets. Wavefront aberrations were collected in temporal series of 5 s duration during binocular and monocular vision with fixation targets at 5 m and 25 cm distance. As expected, a larger temporal variability was found in the root-mean-square wavefront error when the eye accommodated, mainly for frequencies lower than 30 Hz. A statistically-significant difference in temporal behavior between monocular and binocular viewing conditions was found. However, on average it was too small to be of practical importance, although some subjects showed a notably higher variability for the monocular case during near vision. We did find differences in pupil size with mono- and binocular vision but the pupil size temporal dynamics did not behave in the same way as the aberrations' dynamics.

  6. Optical aberrations induced by subclinical decentrations of the ablation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, Michael; Kaemmerer, Maik; Riedel, Peter; Mierdel, Peter; Krinke, Hans-Eberhard; Seiler, Theo

    2000-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the effect of currently used ablation profiles along with eccentric ablations on the increase of higher order aberrations observed after PRK. Material and Methods: The optical aberrations of 10 eyes were tested before and after PRK. Refractive surgery was performed using a ArF-excimer laser system. In all cases, the ablation zone was 6 mm or larger. The spherical equivalent of the correction was ranging from -2.5 D to -6.0 D. The measured wavefront error was compared to numerical simulations done with the reduced eye model and currently used ablation profiles as well as compared with experimental results obtained from ablation on PMMA balls. Results: The aberration measurements result in a considerable change of the spherical- and coma-like wavefront errors. This result was in good correlation with the numerical simulations and the experimental results. Furthermore, it has been derived that the major contribution on the induced higher order aberrations are a result of the small decentration (less than 1.0 mm) of the ablation zone. Conclusions: Higher order spherical- and coma-like aberrations after PRK are mainly determined by the decentration of the ablation zone during laser refractive surgery. However, future laser systems should use efficient eye-tracking systems and aspherical ablation profiles to overcome this problem.

  7. CFTR genotype and clinical outcomes of adult patients carried as cystic fibrosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadia, Luciana Cardoso; de Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida; Pereira, Monica Corso; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2014-05-01

    There are nearly 2000 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF). These mutations are classified into six classes; on the one hand, the first three classes cause severe disease involvement in early childhood, on the other hand, the Class IV, V and VI mutations cause minor severe disease in the same age. Nowadays, with therapeutic advances in CF management and competence of pediatricians, physicians of adults have to deal with two groups of CF patients: (i) adults diagnosed in childhood with severe mutations and (ii) adults who initiated symptoms in adulthood and with Class IV, V and VI mutations. The aim of this study was to analyze adults from a clinical center, treated as CF disease, screening the CFTR genotype and evaluating the clinical characteristics. Thirty patients followed as CF disease at the University Hospital were enrolled. After a complete molecular CFTR negative screening and sweat test levels between 40 and 59mEq/L, five patients were characterized as non-CF disease and were excluded. Molecular screening was performed by CFTR gene sequencing/MLPA or by specific mutation screening. Clinical data was obtained from medical records. The patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients with Class I, II and III mutations in two CFTR alleles; (2) genotype with at least one allele of Class IV, V or VI CFTR mutations and, (3) non-identified CFTR mutation+one patient with one allele with CFTR mutation screened (Class I). There was an association of CFTR class mutation and sodium/chloride concentration in the sweat test (sodium: p=0.040; chloride: p=0.016), onset of digestive symptoms (p=0.012), lung function parameter (SpO2 - p=0.016), Bhalla score (p=0.021), age at diagnosis (p=0.008) and CF-related diabetes (p=0.029). There was an association between Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic colonization (as clinical marker for the lung disease status) and lung impairment (FEV1% - p=0.027; Bhalla score - p=0.021), CF

  8. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  9. Aberration corrected STEM to study an ancient hair dyeing formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarche, G.; Van Elslande, E.; Castaing, J.; Walter, P.

    2014-05-01

    Lead-based chemistry was initiated in ancient Egypt for cosmetic preparation more than 4000 years ago. Here, we study a hair-dyeing recipe using lead salts described in text since Greco-Roman times. We report direct evidence about the shape and distribution of PbS nanocrystals that form within the hair during blackening.

  10. The Art of Optical Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Clarissa Eileen Kenney

    Art and optics are inseparable. Though seemingly opposite disciplines, the combination of art and optics has significantly impacted both culture and science as they are now known. As history has run its course, in the sciences, arts, and their fruitful combinations, optical aberrations have proved to be a problematic hindrance to progress. In an effort to eradicate aberrations the simple beauty of these aberrational forms has been labeled as undesirable and discarded. Here, rather than approach aberrations as erroneous, these beautiful forms are elevated to be the photographic subject in a new body of work, On the Bright Side. Though many recording methods could be utilized, this work was composed on classic, medium-format, photographic film using white-light, Michelson interferometry. The resulting images are both a representation of the true light rays that interacted on the distorted mirror surfaces (data) and the artist's compositional eye for what parts of the interferogram are chosen and displayed. A detailed description of the captivating interdisciplinary procedure is documented and presented alongside the final artwork, CCD digital reference images, and deformable mirror contour maps. This alluring marriage between the arts and sciences opens up a heretofore minimally explored aspect of the inextricable art-optics connection. It additionally provides a fascinating new conversation on the importance of light and optics in photographic composition.

  11. Glucocorticoids Distinctively Modulate the CFTR Channel with Possible Implications in Lung Development and Transition into Extrauterine Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Laube

    Full Text Available During fetal development, the lung is filled with fluid that is secreted by an active Cl- transport promoting lung growth. The basolateral Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1 participates in Cl- secretion. The apical Cl- channels responsible for secretion are unknown but studies suggest an involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. CFTR is developmentally regulated with a high expression in early fetal development and a decline in late gestation. Perinatal lung transition is triggered by hormones that stimulate alveolar Na+ channels resulting in fluid absorption. Little is known on how hormones affect pulmonary Cl- channels. Since the rise of fetal cortisol levels correlates with the decrease in fetal CFTR expression, a causal relation may be assumed. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of glucocorticoids on pulmonary Cl- channels. Alveolar cells from fetal and adult rats, A549 cells, bronchial Calu-3 and 16HBE14o- cells, and primary rat airway cells were studied with real-time quantitative PCR and Ussing chambers. In fetal and adult alveolar cells, glucocorticoids strongly reduced Cftr expression and channel activity, which was prevented by mifepristone. In bronchial and primary airway cells CFTR mRNA expression was also reduced, whereas channel activity was increased which was prevented by LY-294002 in Calu-3 cells. Therefore, glucocorticoids strongly reduce CFTR expression while their effect on CFTR activity depends on the physiological function of the cells. Another apical Cl- channel, anoctamin 1 showed a glucocorticoid-induced reduction of mRNA expression in alveolar cells and an increase in bronchial cells. Furthermore, voltage-gated chloride channel 5 and anoctamine 6 mRNA expression were increased in alveolar cells. NKCC1 expression was reduced by glucocorticoids in alveolar and bronchial cells alike. The results demonstrate that glucocorticoids differentially modulate pulmonary Cl

  12. Glucocorticoids Distinctively Modulate the CFTR Channel with Possible Implications in Lung Development and Transition into Extrauterine Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Mandy; Bossmann, Miriam; Thome, Ulrich H

    2015-01-01

    During fetal development, the lung is filled with fluid that is secreted by an active Cl- transport promoting lung growth. The basolateral Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1) participates in Cl- secretion. The apical Cl- channels responsible for secretion are unknown but studies suggest an involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is developmentally regulated with a high expression in early fetal development and a decline in late gestation. Perinatal lung transition is triggered by hormones that stimulate alveolar Na+ channels resulting in fluid absorption. Little is known on how hormones affect pulmonary Cl- channels. Since the rise of fetal cortisol levels correlates with the decrease in fetal CFTR expression, a causal relation may be assumed. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of glucocorticoids on pulmonary Cl- channels. Alveolar cells from fetal and adult rats, A549 cells, bronchial Calu-3 and 16HBE14o- cells, and primary rat airway cells were studied with real-time quantitative PCR and Ussing chambers. In fetal and adult alveolar cells, glucocorticoids strongly reduced Cftr expression and channel activity, which was prevented by mifepristone. In bronchial and primary airway cells CFTR mRNA expression was also reduced, whereas channel activity was increased which was prevented by LY-294002 in Calu-3 cells. Therefore, glucocorticoids strongly reduce CFTR expression while their effect on CFTR activity depends on the physiological function of the cells. Another apical Cl- channel, anoctamin 1 showed a glucocorticoid-induced reduction of mRNA expression in alveolar cells and an increase in bronchial cells. Furthermore, voltage-gated chloride channel 5 and anoctamine 6 mRNA expression were increased in alveolar cells. NKCC1 expression was reduced by glucocorticoids in alveolar and bronchial cells alike. The results demonstrate that glucocorticoids differentially modulate pulmonary Cl- channels and are likely

  13. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kosak, Steven T.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms. CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for ...

  14. Chloride transporting capability of Calu-3 epithelia following persistent knockdown of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVinish, L J; Cope, G; Ropenga, A; Cuthbert, A W

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Calu-3 cells are derived from serous cells of human lung submucosal glands, a prime target for therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF). Calu-3 cells can be cultured to form epithelia capable of transepithelial transport of chloride. A CF Calu-3 cell is not available. Experimental approach: A retroviral vector was used to cause persistent down regulation of CFTR using siRNA methodology, in Calu-3 cells. A Calu-3 cell line with CFTR content less than 5% of the original line has been established. Epithelia grown using the modified cells have been used in comparative studies of transporting capability. Key results: All aspects of cAMP activated chloride secretion were attenuated in the epithelia with reduced CFTR content. However transporting capability was reduced less than the CFTR content. From studies with the CFTR channel inhibitor, GlyH-101, it was concluded that wild type Calu-3 cells have a reserve of CFTR channels not located in the membrane, but available for replacement, while in the modified Calu-3 cell line there was little or no reserve. Lubiprostone, a putative ClC-2 activator, increased transepithelial chloride secretion in both modified and wild type Calu-3 epithelia. Modified Calu-3 epithelia with the residual CFTR currents blocked with GlyH-101 responded equally well to lubiprostone as those without the blocking agent. Conclusions and implications: It appears that lubiprostone is capable of stimulating a non-CFTR dependent transepithelial chloride secretion in Calu-3 monolayers, with obvious implications for CF therapy. Cell lines, however, do not always reflect the behaviour of the native tissue with integrity. PMID:17339840

  15. In vivo and in vitro ivacaftor response in cystic fibrosis patients with residual CFTR function: N-of-1 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Meghan E; Illek, Beate; Ly, Ngoc P; Zlock, Lorna; Olshansky, Sabrina; Moreno, Courtney; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Nielson, Dennis W

    2017-04-01

    Ivacaftor, a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator, decreases sweat chloride concentration, and improves pulmonary function in 6% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with specific CFTR mutations. Ivacaftor increases chloride transport in many other CFTR mutations in non-human cells, if CFTR is in the epithelium. Some CF patients have CFTR in the epithelium with residual CFTR function. The effect of ivacaftor in these patients is unknown. This was a series of randomized, crossover N-of-1 trials of ivacaftor and placebo in CF patients ≥8 years old with potential residual CFTR function (intermediate sweat chloride concentration, pancreatic sufficient, or mild bronchiectasis on chest CT). Human nasal epithelium (HNE) was obtained via nasal brushing and cultured. Sweat chloride concentration change was the in vivo outcome. Chloride current change in HNE cultures with ivacaftor was the in vitro outcome. Three subjects had decreased sweat chloride concentration (-14.8 to -40.8 mmol/L, P < 0.01). Two subjects had unchanged sweat chloride concentration. Two subjects had increased sweat chloride concentration (+23.8 and +27.3 mmol/L, P < 0.001); both were heterozygous for A455E and pancreatic sufficient. Only subjects with decreased sweat chloride concentration had increased chloride current in HNE cultures. Some CF patients with residual CFTR function have decreased sweat chloride concentration with ivacaftor. Increased chloride current in HNE cultures among subjects with decreased sweat chloride concentrations may predict clinical response to ivacaftor. Ivacaftor can increase sweat chloride concentration in certain mutations with unclear clinical effect. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:472-479. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The effect of ambroxol on chloride transport, CFTR and ENaC in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Hussain, Rashida; Strid, Hilja; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2013-11-01

    Ambroxol, a mucokinetic anti-inflammatory drug, has been used for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). The respiratory epithelium is covered by the airway surface liquid (ASL), the thickness and composition of which is determined by Cl(-) efflux via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Na(+) influx via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). In cells expressing wt-CFTR, ambroxol increased the Cl(-) conductance, but not the bicarbonate conductance of the CFTR channels. We investigated whether treatment with ambroxol enhances chloride transport and/or CFTR and ENaC expression in CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE) cells. CFBE cells were treated with 100 µM ambroxol for 2, 4 or 8 h. mRNA expression for CFTR and ENaC subunits was analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); protein expression was measured by Western blot. The effect of ambroxol on Cl(-) transport was measured by Cl(-) efflux measurements with a fluorescent chloride probe. Ambroxol significantly stimulated Cl(-) efflux from CFBE cells (a sixfold increase after 8 h treatment), and enhanced the expression of the mRNA of CFTR and α-ENaC, and of the CFTR protein. No significant difference was observed in β-ENaC after exposure to ambroxol, whereas mRNA expression of γ-ENaC was reduced. No significant effects of ambroxol on the ENaC subunits were observed by Western blot. Ambroxol did not significantly affect the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Upregulation of CFTR and enhanced Cl(-) efflux after ambroxol treatment should promote transepithelial ion and water transport, which may improve hydration of the mucus, and therefore be beneficial to CF-patients. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. Correlation between CFTR gene mutations in Iranian men with congenital absence of the vas deferens and anatomical genital phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radpour, Ramin; Gourabi, Hamid; Gilani, Mohamad Ali Sadighi; Dizaj, Ahmad Vosough

    2008-01-01

    Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) and congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens (CUAVD) are 2 causes of male sterility; these phenotypes are found in 1%-2% of men investigated for infertility and approximately 10% of men with azoospermia. To study the correlation between genital phenotype and cystic fibrosis genotype in men lacking at least 1 vas deferens, we evaluated the role of different CFTR gene mutations in the morphologic genital phenotype of 119 infertile men with bilateral or unilateral absence of the vas deferens (112 CBAVD and 7 CUAVD patients). Renal, scrotal, and transrectal ultrasonography were systematically performed. CFTR mutations and (TG)m(T)n polymorphism were analyzed, and epididymal and seminal vesicular abnormalities and testicular volume were compared among men with 2, 1, or no CFTR gene mutation, with or without the 5T allele. Our results showed that patients with CBAVD and renal agenesis have the same reproductive tract abnormalities as those with CUAVD, and reproductive tract abnormalities were independent of the subtypes of CFTR genotype in patients with absence of the vas deferens and CFTR gene mutations. Seminal vesicles did not differ between patients with or without CFTR gene mutation, but epididymal abnormalities were more frequent in CBAVD men without the mutation. Low testicular volume was observed in CBAVD men without the CFTR and IVS8-5T mutations, so we can hypothesize that a testicular factor (genetic or environmental) rather than CFTR gene mutations plays a role in determining the phenotype. Further studies using common diagnostic criteria are required to confirm our observations.

  18. Nonlinear spline wavefront reconstruction from Shack-Hartmann intensity measurements through small aberration approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Elisabeth; de Visser, Cornelis C; Verhaegen, Michel

    2017-09-01

    We propose an extension of the Spline based ABerration Reconstruction (SABRE) method to Shack-Hartmann (SH) intensity measurements, through small aberration approximations of the focal spot models. The original SABRE for SH slope measurements is restricted to the use of linear spline polynomials, due to the limited amount of data, and the resolution of its reconstruction is determined by the number of lenslets. In this work, a fast algorithm is presented that directly processes the pixel information of the focal spots, allowing the employment of nonlinear polynomials for high accuracy reconstruction. In order to guarantee the validity of the small aberration approximations, the method is applied in two correction steps, with a first compensation of large, low-order aberrations through the gradient-based linear SABRE followed by compensation of the remaining high-order aberrations with the intensity-based nonlinear SABRE.

  19. CFTR Mutations Spectrum and the Efficiency of Molecular Diagnostics in Polish Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziętkiewicz, Ewa; Rutkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Klimek, Barbara; Voelkel, Katarzyna; Witt, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene (CFTR). In light of the strong allelic heterogeneity and regional specificity of the mutation spectrum, the strategy of molecular diagnostics and counseling in CF requires genetic tests to reflect the frequency profile characteristic for a given population. The goal of the study was to provide an updated comprehensive estimation of the distribution of CFTR mutations in Polish CF patients and to assess the effectiveness of INNOLiPA_CFTR tests in Polish population. The analyzed cohort consisted of 738 patients with the clinically confirmed CF diagnosis, prescreened for molecular defects using INNOLiPA_CFTR panels from Innogenetics. A combined efficiency of INNOLiPA CFTR_19 and CFTR_17_TnUpdate tests was 75.5%; both mutations were detected in 68.2%, and one mutation in 14.8% of the affected individuals. The group composed of all the patients with only one or with no mutation detected (109 and 126 individuals, respectively) was analyzed further using a mutation screening approach, i.e. SSCP/HD (single strand conformational polymorphism/heteroduplex) analysis of PCR products followed by sequencing of the coding sequence. As a result, 53 more mutations were found in 97 patients. The overall efficiency of the CF allele detection was 82.5% (7.0% increase compared to INNOLiPA tests alone). The distribution of the most frequent mutations in Poland was assessed. Most of the mutations repetitively found in Polish patients had been previously described in other European populations. The most frequent mutated allele, F508del, represented 54.5% of Polish CF chromosomes. Another eight mutations had frequencies over 1%, 24 had frequencies between 1 and 0.1%; c.2052-2053insA and c.3468+2_3468+3insT were the most frequent non-INNOLiPA mutations. Mutation distribution described herein is also relevant to the Polish diaspora. Our study also demonstrates that the reported efficiency of

  20. Current insights into the role of PKA phosphorylation in CFTR channel activity and the pharmacological rescue of cystic fibrosis disease-causing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephanie; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel gating is predominantly regulated by protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation. In addition to regulating CFTR channel activity, PKA phosphorylation is also involved in enhancing CFTR trafficking and mediating conformational changes at the interdomain interfaces of the protein. The major cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutation is the deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del); it causes many defects that affect CFTR trafficking, stability, and gating at the cell surface. Due to the multiple roles of PKA phosphorylation, there is growing interest in targeting PKA-dependent signaling for rescuing the trafficking and functional defects of F508del-CFTR. This review will discuss the effects of PKA phosphorylation on wild-type CFTR, the consequences of CF mutations on PKA phosphorylation, and the development of therapies that target PKA-mediated signaling.

  1. The BHVI-EyeMapper: peripheral refraction and aberration profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C; Holden, Brien A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, -3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (-2.00 to -5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to -5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development.

  2. Reducing starbursts in highly aberrated eyes with pupil miosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renfeng; Kollbaum, Pete; Thibos, Larry; Lopez-Gil, Norberto; Bradley, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that marginal ray deviations determine perceived starburst sizes, and to explore different strategies for decreasing starburst size in highly aberrated eyes. Perceived size of starburst images and visual acuities were measured psychophysically for eyes with varying levels of spherical aberration, pupil sizes, and defocus. Computationally, we use a polychromatic eye model including the typical levels of higher order aberrations (HOAs) for keratoconic and post-LASIK eyes to quantify the image quality (the visually weighted Strehl ratio derived from the optical transfer function, VSOTF) with different pupil sizes at both photopic and mesopic light levels. For distance corrected post-LASIK and keratoconic eyes with a night-time pupil (e.g., 7 mm), the starburst diameter is about 1.5 degrees (1 degree for normal presbyopic eyes), which can be reduced to ≤0.25 degrees with pupil sizes ≤3 mm. Starburst size is predicted from the magnitude of the longitudinal spherical aberration. Refracting the eye to focus the pupil margin also removed starbursts, but, unlike small pupils, significantly degraded visual acuity. Reducing pupil diameter to 3 mm improved image quality for these highly aberrated eyes by about 2.7 ×  to 1.7 ×  relative to the natural pupils when light levels were varied from 0.1 to 1000 cd m-2 , respectively. Subjects with highly aberrated eyes observed larger starbursts around bright lights at night predictable by the deviated marginal rays. These were effectively attenuated by reducing pupil diameters to ≤3 mm, which did not cause a drop in visual acuity or modelled image quality even at mesopic light levels. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  3. CFTR inactivation by lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellec, Jessica; Bacchetta, Marc; Losa, Davide; Anegon, Ignacio; Chanson, Marc; Nguyen, Tuan Huy

    2015-01-01

    Polarized airway epithelial cell cultures modelling Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) defect are crucial for CF and biomedical research. RNA interference has proven its value to generate knockdown models for various pathologies. More recently, genome editing using CRISPR-Cas9 artificial endonuclease was a valuable addition to the toolbox of gene inactivation. Calu-3 cells and primary HAECs were transduced with HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors (LVV) encoding small hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequence or CRISPR-Cas9 components targeting CFTR alongside GFP. After sorting of GFP-positive cells, CFTR expression was measured by RT-qPCR and Western blot in polarized or differentiated cells. CFTR channel function was assessed in Ussing chambers. Il-8 secretion, proliferation and cell migration were also studied in transduced cells. shRNA interference and CRISPRCas9 strategies efficiently decreased CFTR expression in Calu-3 cells. Strong CFTR knockdown was confirmed at the functional level in CRISPR-Cas9-modified cells. CFTR-specific shRNA sequences did not reduce gene expression in primary HAECs, whereas CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene modification activity was correlated with a reduction of transepithelial secretion and response to a CFTR inhibitor. CFTR inactivation in the CRISPR-Cas9-modified Calu-3 cells did not affect migration and proliferation but slightly increased basal interleukin-8 secretion. We generated CFTR inactivated cell lines and demonstrated that CRISPR-Cas9 vectorised in a single LVV efficiently promotes CFTR inactivation in primary HAECs. These results provide a new protocol to engineer CF primary epithelia with their isogenic controls and pave the way for manipulation of CFTR expression in these cultures.

  4. CFTR and Anoctamin 1 (ANO1) contribute to cAMP amplified exocytosis and insulin secretion in human and murine pancreatic beta-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene lead to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although patients with CF often have disturbances in glucose metabolism including impaired insulin release, no previous studies have tested the hypothesis that CFTR has a biological function in pancreatic beta-cells. Methods Experiments were performed on islets and single beta-cells from human donors and NMRI-mice. Detection of CFTR was investigated using PCR and confocal microscopy. Effects on insulin secretion were measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA). The patch-clamp technique was used to measure ion channel currents and calcium-dependent exocytosis (as changes in membrane capacitance) on single cells with high temporal resolution. Analysis of ultrastructure was done on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Results We detected the presence of CFTR and measured a small CFTR conductance in both human and mouse beta-cells. The augmentation of insulin secretion at 16.7 mM glucose by activation of CFTR by cAMP (forskolin (FSK) or GLP-1) was significantly inhibited when CFTR antagonists (GlyH-101 and/or CFTRinh-172) were added. Likewise, capacitance measurements demonstrated reduced cAMP-dependent exocytosis upon CFTR-inhibition, concomitant with a decreased number of docked insulin granules. Finally, our studies demonstrate that CFTR act upstream of the chloride channel Anoctamin 1 (ANO1; TMEM16A) in the regulation of cAMP- and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusion Our work demonstrates a novel function for CFTR as a regulator of pancreatic beta-cell insulin secretion and exocytosis, and put forward a role for CFTR as regulator of ANO1 and downstream priming of insulin granules prior to fusion and release of insulin. The pronounced regulatory effect of CFTR on insulin secretion is consistent with impaired insulin secretion in patients with CF. PMID:24885604

  5. [Aerosol administration of a replication defective recombinant adenovirus expressing normal human cDNA-CFTR in the respiratory tractus in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, G; Calmard, L; Thouvenot, D; Levrey, H; Jagneaux, V; Poitevin, F; Malcus, C; Accart, N; Séné, C; Layani, M P; Aymard, M; Bienvenu, J; Courtney, M; Döring, G; Gilly, B; Gilly, R; Lamy, D; Morel, Y; Paulin, C; Perraud, F; Rodillon, L; So, S; Touraine, F; Schatz, C; Pavirani, A

    1996-01-01

    At present it is conceivable to think that gene therapy represents a way to treat or even prevent the respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis. Consistent to such a concept, there is sufficient evidence that Ad-CFTR, a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus expressing the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator cDNA, can vectorize the expression of a functional CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) to the nasal and airway epithelia. The clinical protocol was designed to assess the safety of single escalating doses of a replication defective adenovirus expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Ad-CFTR) when administered to the tracheobronchial portion of the airways and whether biological efficacy of CFTR delivery could be demonstrated. Six cystic fibrosis patients received nasal instillation and subsequent aerosol (Optineb, Air Liquide, Paris, France) administration of Ad-CFTR the following day. Doses (pfu) applied to the nose were 10(5) (patients SG and PB), 10(7) (patients FP and EP) and 4 x 10(8) (patients DS and FG), while aerosolised doses were 10(7) (patients SG and PB), 10(8) (patients FP and EP) and 5.4 x 10(8) (patients DS and FG), respectively. No acute toxic effects, no increase in the titer of anti-adenovirus antibodies and no spreading or shedding of Ad-CFTR were detected. In one patient Ad-CFTR DNA was found in the urine and blood two days after aerosolisation. Ad-CFTR DNA was detected in nasal and bronchial brush samples, in BAL, in saliva and tonsils 21, 8, 14 and 4 days post virus administration, respectively. Ad-CFTR mRNA (RT-PCR on bronchial cells) and CFTR protein (immunochemistry on nasal and bronchial cells) were detected up to 14 days following Ad-CFTR administration. These results show that the nebulisation of Ad-CFTR is a possible approach for treating the respiratory manifestation of cystic fibrosis.

  6. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  7. Pathophysiology of MDS: genomic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Motoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and their apoptosis, and show a propensity to progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Although MDS are recognized as neoplastic diseases caused by genomic aberrations of hematopoietic cells, the details of the genetic abnormalities underlying disease development have not as yet been fully elucidated due to difficulties in analyzing chromosomal abnormalities. Recent advances in comprehensive analyses of disease genomes including whole-genome sequencing technologies have revealed the genomic abnormalities in MDS. Surprisingly, gene mutations were found in approximately 80-90% of cases with MDS, and the novel mutations discovered with these technologies included previously unknown, MDS-specific, mutations such as those of the genes in the RNA-splicing machinery. It is anticipated that these recent studies will shed new light on the pathophysiology of MDS due to genomic aberrations.

  8. Clinical importance of spherical and chromatic aberration on the accommodative response in contact lens wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, M.; Lindskoog Pettersson, A.; Rosén, R.; Nilsson, M.; Unsbo, P.; Brautaset, R.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accommodation response under both mono- and polychromatic light while varying the amount of spherical aberration. It is thought that chromatic and spherical aberrations are directional cues for the accommodative system and could affect response time, velocity or lag. Spherical aberration is often eliminated in modern contact lenses in order to enhance image quality in the unaccommodated eye. This study was divided into two parts. The first part was done to evaluate the amount of spherical and other Zernike aberrations in the unaccommodated eye when uncorrected and with two types of correction (trial lens and spherical-aberration controlled contact lens) and the second part evaluated the dynamic accommodation responses obtained when wearing each of the corrections under polychromatic and monochromatic conditions. Measurements of accommodation showed no significant differences in time, velocity and lag of accommodation after decreasing the spherical aberration with a contact lens, neither in monochromatic nor polychromatic light. It is unlikely that small to normal changes of spherical aberration in white light or monochromatic mid-spectral light affect directional cues for the accommodative system, not in white light or mid-spectral monochromatic light, since the accommodative response did not show any change.

  9. [Comparative studies of wavefront aberration and contrast sensitivity after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming-bing; Liu, Yi-zhi; Yu, Qiang; Liu, Xia-lin; Yuan, Zhao-hui; Wang, Yu-lin; Liu, Tian

    2007-09-01

    To study the difference of the contrast sensitivity and wavefront aberration of two eyes who undergone phacoemulsification and intraocular transplantation respectively. Sixty-three patients with cataract were included in the study. With the consent of the patients, one eye was implanted SA60AT intraocular lens and another eye was implanted Tennis Z9001 intraocular lens after phacoemulsification. One and three months post-surgery, the best corrected visual acuity was recorded by computer and comprehensive optometry. Contrast sensitivity was analyzed by CSV-1000. The corneal aberration was measured by Option Keratron Scout. The whole ocular aberration was evaluated by Allegretto Waver Analyzer at pupillary diameter 4 mm and 6 mm. The best corrected visual acuity and the corneal spherical aberration, corneal coma aberration and RMS had no significant difference between the two groups. After one and three months, the contrast sensitivity of 3, 6, 12, 18c/d had statistic significance between the eye with and without glare through univariate split-plot analysis. The Z9001 contrast sensitivity value was much higher than the SA60AT groups. The results of Zernike polynomials C12, RMS4 and RMSh had statistic significance between the two groups through T-test. The Z9001 group value was much lower than the SA60AT groups. The Z9001 intraocular lens transplantation can reduce total ocular aberration, special the spherical aberration and improve visual acuity.

  10. Analysis of nodal aberration properties in off-axis freeform system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haodong; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Chao; Liu, Tao

    2016-08-20

    Freeform surfaces have the advantage of balancing off-axis aberration. In this paper, based on the framework of nodal aberration theory (NAT) applied to the coaxial system, the third-order astigmatism and coma wave aberration expressions of an off-axis system with Zernike polynomial surfaces are derived. The relationship between the off-axis and surface shape acting on the nodal distributions is revealed. The nodal aberration properties of the off-axis freeform system are analyzed and validated by using full-field displays (FFDs). It has been demonstrated that adding Zernike terms, up to nine, to the off-axis system modifies the nodal locations, but the field dependence of the third-order aberration does not change. On this basis, an off-axis two-mirror freeform system with 500 mm effective focal length (EFL) and 300 mm entrance pupil diameter (EPD) working in long-wave infrared is designed. The field constant aberrations induced by surface tilting are corrected by selecting specific Zernike terms. The design results show that the nodes of third-order astigmatism and coma move back into the field of view (FOV). The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves are above 0.4 at 20 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) which meets the infrared reconnaissance requirement. This work provides essential insight and guidance for aberration correction in off-axis freeform system design.

  11. ABSOLUTE CONFIGURATION AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ENANTIOMERS OF CFTR INHIBITOR BPO-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David S; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Battula, Sailaja; Yao, Chenjuan; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Fettinger, James C; Kurth, Mark J; Verkman, A S

    2013-05-09

    We previously reported benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione (BPO) inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel and showed their efficacy in a model of polycystic kidney disease. Here, we separated the enantiomers of lead compound BPO-27, (1), which contains a single chiral center, and determined their absolute configuration, activity and metabolic stability. Following separation by chiral supercritical fluid chromatography, the R enantiomer, as determined by x-ray crystallography, inhibited CFTR chloride conductance with IC50 ~ 4 nM, while S enantiomer was inactive. In vitro metabolic stability in hepatic microsomes showed both enantiomers as stable, with <5 % metabolism in 4 h. Following bolus interperitoneal administration in mice, serum (R)-1 decayed with t1/2 ~ 1.6 h and gave sustained therapeutic concentrations in kidney.

  12. CFTR depletion results in changes in fatty acid composition and promotes lipogenesis in intestinal Caco 2/15 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Mailhot

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fatty acid composition (FA in plasma and tissue lipids frequently occurs in homozygous and even in heterozygous carriers of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutations. The mechanism(s underlying these abnormalities remained, however, poorly understood despite the potentially CFTR contributing role.The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of CFTR depletion on FA uptake, composition and metabolism using the intestinal Caco-2/15 cell line. shRNA-mediated cftr gene silencing induced qualitative and quantitative modifications in FA composition in differentiated enterocytes as determined by gas-liquid chromatography. With the cftr gene disruption, there was a 1,5 fold increase in the total FA amount, largely attributable to monounsaturated and saturated FA compared to controls. The activity of delta-7 desaturase, estimated by the 16:1(n-7/16:0, was significantly higher in knockdown cells and consistent with the striking elevation of the n-7 FA family. When incubated with [14C]-oleic acid, CFTR-depleted cells were capable of quick incorporation and export to the medium concomitantly with the high protein expression of L-FABP known to promote intracellular FA trafficking. Accordingly, lipoprotein vehicles (CM, VLDL, LDL and HDL, isolated from CFTR knockdown cells, exhibited higher levels of radiolabeled FA. Moreover, in the presence of [14C]-acetate, knockdown cells exhibited enhanced secretion of newly synthesized phospholipids, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters and free FA, thereby suggesting a stimulation of the lipogenic pathway. Conformably, gene expression of SREBP-1c, a key lipogenic transcription factor, was increased while protein expression of the phosphorylated and inactive form of acetylCoA carboxylase was reduced, confirming lipogenesis induction. Finally, CFTR-depleted cells exhibited lower gene expression of transcription factors (PPARalpha, LXRalpha, LXRbeta and RXRalpha

  13. Campylobacter jejuni infection suppressed Cl⁻ secretion induced by CFTR activation in T-84 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoro, Sachie; Shimohata, Takaaki; Hatayama, Syo; Sato, Yuri; Matsumoto, Mari; Iba, Hitomi; Aihara, Mutsumi; Uebanso, Takashi; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu; Yamasaki, Shinji; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni causes foodborne disease associated with abdominal pain, gastroenteritis, and diarrhea. These symptoms are induced by bacterial adherence and invasion of host epithelial cells. C. jejuni infection can occur with a low infective dose, suggesting that C. jejuni may have evolved strategies to cope with the bacterial clearance system in the gastrointestinal tract. The mucosa layer is the first line of defense against bacteria. Mucus conditions are maintained by water and anion (especially Cl(-)) movement. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the main Cl(-) channel transporting Cl(-) to the lumen. Mutations in CFTR result in dehydrated secreted mucus and bacterial accumulation in the lungs, and recent studies suggest that closely related pathogenic bacteria also may survive in the intestine. However, the relationship between C. jejuni infection and CFTR has been little studied. Here, we used an (125)I(-) efflux assay and measurement of short-circuit current to measure Cl(-) secretion in C. jejuni-infected T-84 human intestinal epithelial cells. The basic state of Cl(-) secretion was unchanged by C. jejuni infection, but CFTR activator was observed to induce Cl(-) secretion suppressed in C. jejuni-infected T-84 cells. The suppression of activated Cl(-) secretion was bacterial dose-dependent and duration-dependent. A similar result was observed during infection with other C. jejuni strains. The mechanism of suppression may occur by affecting water movement or mucus condition in the intestinal tract. A failure of mucus barrier function may promote bacterial adhesion or invasion of host intestinal epithelial cells, thereby causing bacterial preservation in the host intestinal tract. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lubiprostone Activates CFTR, but not ClC-2, via the Prostaglandin Receptor (EP4)

    OpenAIRE

    Norimatsu, Yohei; Moran, Aurelia R.; MacDonald, Kelvin D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of lubiprostone activation of epithelial chloride transport. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid approved for the treatment of constipation [1]. There is uncertainty, however, as to how lubiprostone increases epithelial chloride transport. Direct stimulation of ClC-2 and CFTR chloride channels as well as stimulation of these channels via the EP4 receptor has been described [2; 3; 4; 5]. To better define this mechanism, two-electrode volt...

  15. CFTR-dependent chloride efflux in cystic fibrosis mononuclear cells is increased by ivacaftor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Lorenzo; D'Oria, Susanna; Favia, Maria; Castellani, Stefano; Santostasi, Teresa; Polizzi, Angela M; Mariggiò, Maria A; Gallo, Crescenzio; Casavola, Valeria; Montemurro, Pasqualina; Leonetti, Giuseppina; Manca, Antonio; Conese, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) potentiator ivacaftor (Kalydeco®) improves clinical outcome in G551D cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we have investigated whether ivacaftor has a clinical impact on non-G551D gating mutations and function of circulating leukocytes as well. Seven patients were treated with ivacaftor and evaluated at baseline, and at 1-3 and 6 months. Besides clinical and systemic inflammatory parameters, circulating mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for CFTR-dependent chloride efflux by spectrofluorimetry, neutrophils for oxidative burst by cytofluorimetry and HVCN1 mRNA expression by real time PCR. Ivacaftor determined a significant decrease in sweat chloride concentrations at all time points during treatment. Body mass index (BMI), FEV1 , and FVC showed an increasing trend. While C-reactive protein decreased significantly at 2 months, the opposite behavior was noticed for circulating monocytes. CFTR activity in MNC was found to increase significantly at 3 and 6 months. Neutrophil oxidative burst peaked at 2 months and then decreased to baseline. HVCN1 mRNA expression was significantly higher than baseline at 1-3 months and decreased after 6 months of treatment. The chloride efflux in MNC correlated positively with both FEV1 and FVC. On the other hand, sweat chloride correlated positively with CRP and WBC, and negatively with both respiratory function tests. A cluster analysis confirmed that sweat chloride, FEV1 , FVC, BMI, and MNC chloride efflux behaved as a single entity over time. In patients with non-G551D mutations, ivacaftor improved both chloride transport in sweat ducts and chloride efflux in MNC, that is, functions directly imputed to CFTR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Anthropological features of the CFTR gene: Its variability in an African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Ciminelli, Bianca; Bombieri, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Belpinati, Francesca; Pompei, Fiorenza; Maselli, Roberta; Simporé, Jacques; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Modiano, Guido

    2011-03-01

    The CFTR gene (Cystic Fibrosis conductance Transmembrane Regulator) is the gene responsible for Cystic Fibrosis, the most common severe autosomal recessive disease in Europeans. It has been extensively explored in several European and European-derived populations, but poorly studied in the other major human groups. To characterize the variability of the CFTR gene in an African population. Using DGGE, all 27 exons (4443 bp) and 2184 bp of the flanking intronic regions of the CFTR gene were studied in a random sample of 45 Mossì from Burkina Faso (Western sub-Saharan Africa). Sixteen variable sites were found: 13 SNPs (one in the promoter region, four non-synonymous and five synonymous in the exons and three in the introns) and three intronic STRs. Only the promoter site ( - 94 G/T), slightly polymorphic in the present survey, was not variable in different European populations. Comparison between Western Africans, Eastern Africans, Europeans and Eastern Asians showed that alleles at two intronic STRs (T(n) and (TG)(m) in intron 8), four exonic (M470V, 2694 T/G, 4002 A/G and 4521 G/A) and one intronic (875+40 A/G) SNPs have very different frequencies among at least two major human groups. Moreover, the overall degree of non-synonymous variability in Mossì is much lower than that in Europeans. A possible interpretation of this finding is proposed. The CFTR gene has been since long hypothesized to have undergone selection in Europeans. The present study by comparing Africans and Europeans for the overall variability of the gene supports this hypothesis.

  17. Three novel mutations in the CFTR gene identified in Galician patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana-Díez, P; Colón, C; Alonso-Fernández, J R; Solar, A; Barros-Tizón, J C; Barros-Casas, D; Sirvent, J; Carracedo, A; Barros, F

    2008-11-01

    We report three novel CFTR missense mutations detected in Spanish patients from Galicia (North West of Spain). In the first case, a patient homozygous for a novel S1045Y mutation died due to pulmonary problems. In the other two cases, both heterozygous for novel mutations combined with the F508del mutation, clinical symptoms were different depending on the mutation, detected as M595I and A107V.

  18. Contrast sensitivity with soft contact lenses compensated for spherical aberration in high ametropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brabander, J; Chateau, N; Bouchard, F; Guidollet, S

    1998-01-01

    In optical systems, it is usual to compensate for longitudinal spherical aberration. In order to increase image quality, lens surfaces can be made aspheric to bring all object light rays into focus at the image plane. Theoretically, soft contact lenses with high power and spherical surfaces show significant amounts of spherical aberration. The use of spherical aberration-free soft contact lenses could therefore improve retinal image quality in the case of high ametropia. However, because of ocular aberration, accommodation effects, pupil dynamics, contact lens flexure, and positioning, the computation of the spherical aberration induced when a contact lens is placed on the eye is complicated. In this study, the spatial contrast sensitivity (CS) of 61 high ametropes wearing soft contact lenses with, and without, in-air spherical aberration compensation is measured. A slightly better overall performance was found with the standard lenses. There was no significant influence by the type of ametropia, age, and gender. If individual results are considered, clinically significant differences between the two lens groups are observed in approximately 30% of the cases. It seems that correcting in-air soft contact lens spherical aberration systematically is of no clinical interest. However, selective manipulation of spherical aberration could, in high power soft contact lenses, significantly improve CS in individuals.

  19. Longevity and plasticity of CFTR provide an argument for noncanonical SNP organization in hominid DNA.

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    Aubrey E Hill

    Full Text Available Like many other ancient genes, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has survived for hundreds of millions of years. In this report, we consider whether such prodigious longevity of an individual gene--as opposed to an entire genome or species--should be considered surprising in the face of eons of relentless DNA replication errors, mutagenesis, and other causes of sequence polymorphism. The conventions that modern human SNP patterns result either from purifying selection or random (neutral drift were not well supported, since extant models account rather poorly for the known plasticity and function (or the established SNP distributions found in a multitude of genes such as CFTR. Instead, our analysis can be taken as a polemic indicating that SNPs in CFTR and many other mammalian genes may have been generated--and continue to accrue--in a fundamentally more organized manner than would otherwise have been expected. The resulting viewpoint contradicts earlier claims of 'directional' or 'intelligent design-type' SNP formation, and has important implications regarding the pace of DNA adaptation, the genesis of conserved non-coding DNA, and the extent to which eukaryotic SNP formation should be viewed as adaptive.

  20. Potent, metabolically stable benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione (BPO) CFTR inhibitors for polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David S; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Yao, Chenjuan; Kurth, Mark J; Verkman, A S

    2011-08-11

    We previously reported the discovery of pyrimido-pyrrolo-quinoxalinedione (PPQ) inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel and showed their efficacy in an organ culture model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) (J. Med. Chem. 2009, 52, 6447-6455). Here, we report related benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione (BPO) CFTR inhibitors. To establish structure-activity relationships and select lead compound(s) with improved potency, metabolic stability, and aqueous solubility compared to the most potent prior compound 8 (PPQ-102, IC(50) ∼ 90 nM), we synthesized 16 PPQ analogues and 11 BPO analogues. The analogues were efficiently synthesized in 5-6 steps and 11-61% overall yield. Modification of 8 by bromine substitution at the 5-position of the furan ring, replacement of the secondary amine with an ether bridge, and carboxylation, gave 6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4',5':3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid 42 (BPO-27), which fully inhibited CFTR with IC(50) ∼ 8 nM and, compared to 8, had >10-fold greater metabolic stability and much greater polarity/aqueous solubility. In an embryonic kidney culture model of PKD, 42 prevented cyst growth with IC(50) ∼ 100 nM. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinediones such as 42 are potential development candidates for antisecretory therapy of PKD.

  1. Oxidative stress caused by pyocyanin impairs CFTR Cl(-) transport in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fischer, Horst; Kim, Eun-Jin; Barber, Katharine J; Mills, Aaron D; Kurth, Mark J; Gruenert, Dieter C; Suh, Jung H; Machen, Terry E; Illek, Beate

    2008-12-15

    Pyocyanin (N-methyl-1-hydroxyphenazine), a redox-active virulence factor produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is known to compromise mucociliary clearance. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to pyocyanin increased the rate of cellular release of H(2)O(2) threefold above the endogenous H(2)O(2) production. Real-time measurements of the redox potential of the cytosolic compartment using the redox sensor roGFP1 showed that pyocyanin (100 microM) oxidized the cytosol from a resting value of -318+/-5 mV by 48.0+/-4.6 mV within 2 h; a comparable oxidation was induced by 100 microM H(2)O(2). Whereas resting Cl(-) secretion was slightly activated by pyocyanin (to 10% of maximal currents), forskolin-stimulated Cl(-) secretion was inhibited by 86%. The decline was linearly related to the cytosolic redox potential (1.8% inhibition/mV oxidation). Cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells homozygous for DeltaF508 CFTR failed to secrete Cl(-) in response to pyocyanin or H(2)O(2), indicating that these oxidants specifically target the CFTR and not other Cl(-) conductances. Treatment with pyocyanin also decreased total cellular glutathione levels to 62% and cellular ATP levels to 46% after 24 h. We conclude that pyocyanin is a key factor that redox cycles in the cytosol, generates H(2)O(2), depletes glutathione and ATP, and impairs CFTR function in Pseudomonas-infected lungs.

  2. Oxidative Stress By Pyocyanin Impairs CFTR Cl- Transport In Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fischer, Horst; Kim, Eun-Jin; Barber, Katharine J.; Mills, Aaron D.; Kurth, Mark J.; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Suh, Jung H.; Machen, Terry E.; Illek, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Pyocyanin (N-methyl-1-hydroxyphenazine), a redox-active virulence factor produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is known to compromise mucociliary clearance. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to pyocyanin increased the rate of cellular release of H2O2 3-fold above the endogenous H2O2 production. Real-time measurements of the redox-potential of the cytosolic compartment using the redox sensor roGFP1 showed that pyocyanin (100 μM) oxidized the cytosol from a resting value of -318 ± 5 mV by 48.0 ± 4.6 mV within 2 hours; a comparable oxidation was induced by 100 μM H2O2. While resting Cl- secretion was slightly activated by pyocyanin (to 10% of maximal currents), forskolin-stimulated Cl- secretion was inhibited by 86%. The decline was linearly related to the cytosolic redox potential (1.8% inhibition/mV oxidation). CF bronchial epithelial cells homozygous for ΔF508 CFTR failed to secrete Cl- in response to pyocyanin or H2O2 indicating that these oxidants specifically target CFTR and not other Cl- conductances. Treatment with pyocyanin also decreased total cellular glutathione levels to 62% and cellular ATP levels to 46% after 24 hours. We conclude that pyocyanin is a key factor that redox cycles in the cytosol, generates H2O2, depletes glutathione and ATP, and impairs CFTR function in Pseudomonas infected lungs. PMID:18845244

  3. CFTR gene mutations and polymorphism are associated with non-obstructive azoospermia: From case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingying; Jin, Jiamin; Wang, Shasha; Zhang, Fuxing; Dai, Yongdong; Shi, Libing; Zhang, Songying

    2017-08-30

    A variety of experimental studies have yielded evidence that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein participates in the process of spermatogenesis. However, the association between CFTR gene and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) disease remained to be a question. First, we reviewed available data from the PubMed and Embase databases before May 2016 to find the most common mutations of CFTR gene in NOA patients. Second, an original case-control study was conducted on NOA patients (n=100) and a control group consisting of fertile males (n=100), selected from August 2015 to March 2017, to detect CFTR gene mutations and polymorphism. Peripheral blood samples from NOA patients and normal controls were analyzed for the presence of specific sequences of CFTR gene by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by direct sequencing. From our comprehensive review, 12 case-control studies were found concerning the relation between CFTR gene mutations and polymorphism and NOA disease. Fifty-four mutations were mentioned and IVS8 poly-T, TG repeats, F508del and R117H mutations were the most common ones. Based on that, we detected IVS8 poly-T, TG repeats, F508del, R117H and M470V mutations in our case control study. We found that the T5 allele was present at a significantly higher rate in NOA patients than in the control group (5.00% versus 0.00%, pmutations were not found in either group. In conclusion, the polyvariant mutant genes of CFTR: T5 allele and TG12-T5-V470 genotype are correlated with NOA, but F508del and R117H mutations have low possibility to be associated with NOA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. ΔF508 CFTR surface stability is regulated by DAB2 and CHIP-mediated ubiquitination in post-endocytic compartments.

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    Lianwu Fu

    Full Text Available The ΔF508 mutant form of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508 CFTR that is normally degraded by the ER-associated degradative pathway can be rescued to the cell surface through low-temperature (27°C culture or small molecular corrector treatment. However, it is unstable on the cell surface, and rapidly internalized and targeted to the lysosomal compartment for degradation. To understand the mechanism of this rapid turnover, we examined the role of two adaptor complexes (AP-2 and Dab2 and three E3 ubiquitin ligases (c-Cbl, CHIP, and Nedd4-2 on low-temperature rescued ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis and degradation in human airway epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that siRNA depletion of either AP-2 or Dab2 inhibits ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis by 69% and 83%, respectively. AP-2 or Dab2 depletion also increases the rescued protein half-life of ΔF508 CFTR by ~18% and ~91%, respectively. In contrast, the depletion of each of the E3 ligases had no effect on ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis, whereas CHIP depletion significantly increased the surface half-life of ΔF508 CFTR. To determine where and when the ubiquitination occurs during ΔF508 CFTR turnover, we monitored the ubiquitination of rescued ΔF508 CFTR during the time course of CFTR endocytosis. Our results indicate that ubiquitination of the surface pool of ΔF508 CFTR begins to increase 15 min after internalization, suggesting that CFTR is ubiquitinated in a post-endocytic compartment. This post-endocytic ubiquination of ΔF508 CFTR could be blocked by either inhibiting endocytosis, by siRNA knockdown of CHIP, or by treating cells with the CFTR corrector, VX-809. Our results indicate that the post-endocytic ubiquitination of CFTR by CHIP is a critical step in the peripheral quality control of cell surface ΔF508 CFTR.

  5. Stimulation of wild-type, F508del- and G551D-CFTR chloride channels by non toxic modified pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazine derivatives

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    Luc eDannhoffer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis is a major inherited disorder involving abnormalities of fluid and electrolyte transport in a number of different organs due to abnormal function of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR protein. We recently identified a family of CFTR activators, which contains the hit: RP107 [7-n-butyl-6-(4-hydroxyphenyl[5H]-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazine]. Here, we further evaluated the effect of the chemical modifications of the RP107-OH radical on CFTR activation. The replacement of the OH radical by a fluorine atom at position 2 (RP193 or 4 (RP185 significantly decreased the toxicity of the compounds without altering the ability to activate CFTR, especially for RP193. The non-toxic compound RP193 has no effect on cAMP production but stimulates the channel activity of wild-type CFTR in stably transfected CHO cells, in human bronchial epithelial NuLi-1 cells and in primary culture of human bronchial epithelial cells. Whole cell and single patch clamp recordings showed that RP193 induced a linear, time and voltage-independent current, which was fully inhibited by two different and selective CFTR inhibitors (CFTRinh-172 and GPinh-5a. Moreover, RP193 stimulates CFTR in temperature-rescued CuFi-1 (F508del/F508del human bronchial epithelial cells and in CHO cells stably expressing G551D-CFTR. This study shows that it is feasible to reduce cytotoxicity of chemical compounds without affecting their potency to activate CFTR and to rescue the class 2 F508del-CFTR and class 3 G551D-CFTR CF mutant activities.

  6. Ocular Chromatic Aberrations and Their Effects on Polychromatic Retinal Image Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao

    Previous studies of ocular chromatic aberrations have concentrated on chromatic difference of focus (CDF). Less is known about the chromatic difference of image position (CDP) in the peripheral retina and no experimental attempt has been made to measure the ocular chromatic difference of magnification (CDM). Consequently, theoretical modelling of human eyes is incomplete. The insufficient knowledge of ocular chromatic aberrations is partially responsible for two unsolved applied vision problems: (1) how to improve vision by correcting ocular chromatic aberration? (2) what is the impact of ocular chromatic aberration on the use of isoluminance gratings as a tool in spatial-color vision?. Using optical ray tracing methods, MTF analysis methods of image quality, and psychophysical methods, I have developed a more complete model of ocular chromatic aberrations and their effects on vision. The ocular CDM was determined psychophysically by measuring the tilt in the apparent frontal parallel plane (AFPP) induced by interocular difference in image wavelength. This experimental result was then used to verify a theoretical relationship between the ocular CDM, the ocular CDF and the entrance pupil of the eye. In the retinal image after correcting the ocular CDF with existing achromatizing methods, two forms of chromatic aberration (CDM and chromatic parallax) were examined. The CDM was predicted by theoretical ray tracing and measured with the same method used to determine ocular CDM. The chromatic parallax was predicted with a nodal ray model and measured with the two-color vernier alignment method. The influence of these two aberrations on polychromatic MTF were calculated. Using this improved model of ocular chromatic aberration, luminance artifacts in the images of isoluminance gratings were calculated. The predicted luminance artifacts were then compared with experimental data from previous investigators. The results show that: (1) A simple relationship exists between

  7. Ocular aberrations and wavefront aberrometry: A review

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    Holly A. Unterhorst

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wavefront aberrations can be described as deviations of the wavefront exiting the eye froma reference wavefront that is aberration free and diffraction limited. Ocular aberrations canbe sub-categorised as lower and higher order aberrations. Ocular aberrations have promptedinterest amongst the ocular healthcare community owing to their influences on the visualfunctioning of patients as well as differences observed in ocular aberrations through the useof refractive surgery both pre- and post-operatively. Uncompensated refractive error remainsone of the most common reasons for which patients consult optometrists. Compensationof refractive error, or lower order aberrations, has become a routine procedure during anoptometric examination. However, there are some patients who experience visual symptomseven after their refractive errors have been compensated via spectacles or contact lenses.Higher-order aberrations may be the source of these visual disturbances. Refractive surgeryhas been found to influence and even induce various changes in higher-order aberrationspost-operatively, which in turn has led to increased interest in wavefront aberrations and howthe measurement of these aberrations can improve diagnosis and treatment within optometryand ophthalmology.

  8. Aberration characteristics of plane-parallel compensator plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, I. E.

    1984-02-01

    A specially constructed plane parallel compensator plate in a ring telescope catodioptric objective does not affect the size of the dead zone in the pupil and will not only eliminate parasitic flare or bright spots but also allow the relative aperture of each mirror and of the entire objective to be substantially enlarged. Such a plate consists of two elements, the smaller one with a diameter equal to that of the secondary mirror placed at the center of the larger one so as to face that mirror. Here the aberration characteristics of this compensator are analyzed according to the laws of geometric optics for wide beams of light rays. Five different compensator configurations are conceived on this basis for complete correction of spherical aberration, with the appropriate formulas given for calculating the necessary plate thickness.

  9. Co action of CFTR and AQP1 increases permeability of peritoneal epithelial cells on estrogen-induced ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

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    Jin Pei-Yin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS is an iatrogenic complication associated with fertility drugs. It is characterized by increased vascular permeability and substantial fluid shift with accumulation in the body cavity. The pathogenesis of OHSS remains obscure, and no definitive treatments are currently available. Results Using western blot and short-circuit current (Isc techniques, we investigate the potential coactions of analysis in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and aquaporin 1 (AQP1 on the hyper permeability of body cavity peritoneal epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of OHSS. The rats develop OHSS symptoms, with the up regulation of both CFTR and AQP1 expression and enhanced CFTR channel activity in peritoneal epithelial cells, can also be mimicked by administration of estrogen, alone in ovariectomized rats. Administration of progesterone suppresses CFTR activity, OHSS symptoms as well as CFTR and AQP1 expression. Besides, AQP1 inhibitor, HgCl2, can suppress CFTR channel activity. Therefore, antisera against CFTR or AQP1 to OHSS animals may result in alleviation of the symptom. Conclusion This study confirms the coactions of CFTR and AQP1 play a critical role in the development and progression of increased peritoneal epithelial permeability in severe OHSS. These findings may provide grounds for ameliorating assisted reproduction treatment strategy to reduce the risk of OHSS in in vitro fertilization (IVF.

  10. Attenuation of Phosphorylation-dependent Activation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by Disease-causing Mutations at the Transmission Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephanie; Yang, Donghe; Miles, Andrew J; Eckford, Paul D W; Molinski, Steven; Wallace, B A; Bear, Christine E

    2017-02-03

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a multidomain membrane protein that functions as a phosphorylation-regulated anion channel. The interface between its two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains and coupling helices conferred by intracellular loops extending from the channel pore domains has been referred to as a transmission interface and is thought to be critical for the regulated channel activity of CFTR. Phosphorylation of the regulatory domain of CFTR by protein kinase A (PKA) is required for its channel activity. However, it was unclear if phosphorylation modifies the transmission interface. Here, we studied purified full-length CFTR protein using spectroscopic techniques to determine the consequences of PKA-mediated phosphorylation. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that purified full-length wild-type CFTR is folded and structurally responsive to phosphorylation. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence studies of CFTR showed that phosphorylation reduced iodide-mediated quenching, consistent with an effect of phosphorylation in burying tryptophans at the transmission interface. Importantly, the rate of phosphorylation-dependent channel activation was compromised by the introduction of disease-causing mutations in either of the two coupling helices predicted to interact with nucleotide binding domain 1 at the interface. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation modifies the interface between the catalytic and pore domains of CFTR and that this modification facilitates CFTR channel activation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Aberrations of magnetooptical system of SALO recirculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guk, I. S.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Kononenko, S. G.; Peev, F. A.; Tarasenko, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of spatial and chromatic aberrations on the parameters of the 730 MeV beam extracted from a SALO recirculator is studied using numerical simulation. The influence of fringing fields and the heterogeneity of the guide field of dipole magnets on the beam parameters at the extraction point is studied for different orders and types of aberrations. Estimates of the contributions of the different types of aberrations to the extracted beam emittance are presented.

  12. Corneal spherical aberration and its impact on choosing an intraocular lens for cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayyari, Tarfah M; Fawzy, Samah M; Al-Saleh, Ahmed A

    2014-10-01

    To analyze the post operative results of targeting zero spherical aberration by selecting the best-fit aspheric intraocular lens (IOL), based on preoperative corneal spherical aberration of patients with phacoemulsification surgery. AlHokama Eye Specialist Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. From the 1st of October 2012 until the 10th of April 2013. Fifty-three eyes, were subjected to phacoemulsification cataract surgery and divided into two groups, 34 eyes were implanted with aspheric IOLs based on their corneal spherical aberration targeting post operative zero total spherical aberration, whereas 19 eyes were implanted with neutral aspheric IOLs regardless of their corneal spherical aberrations (CSAs). As a pre and post routine examination, patients underwent: slit lamp testing, intraocular pressure (IOP) measuring, fundus examination, best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), manifest refraction, pupillometry, axial length, contrast sensitivity, and corneal aberration measurement using Pentacam HR (OCULUS, Germany) at the 6-mm optical zone. Post operatively, visual function questionnaire (VF-14) was asked to all patients. Fifty-three eyes of 45 patients, whose age ranged from 45 to 90 years old, were available for analysis, the selected group was implanted with: Tecnis ZA9003 or ZCB00 (Abbott Medical Optics) IOLs in 17 eyes with corneal spherical aberration of more than 0.27 μm, AcrySof IQ SN60WF (Alcon Laboratories Inc.) IOLs were implanted in 4 eyes with CSA = (0.2-0.27) μm, and Rayner 970C, 920H or 620H IOLs with spherical aberration (SA) = 0 in 13 eyes with CSA less than 0.20 μm. The other group of 19 eyes was implanted with aspheric IOLs that have zero spherical aberration (Rayner 970C or 920H) regardless of their CSA. Root mean square (RMS) of total corneal aberration positively correlates to the pupil diameter (P = 0.0031, r = 0.3989). A low negative correlation was found between the corneal spherical aberration of the fourth ordered (Z40

  13. Optimizing coronagraph designs to minimize their contrast sensitivity to low-order optical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joseph J.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2003-11-01

    The presence of optical aberrations in the entrance pupil of a coronagraph causes the stellar light to scatter about the occulting spot, reducing the effective contrast achievable. Even if these aberrations are sufficiently corrected with a deformable mirror to enable planet detection, small drifts in the optical alignment of the telescope introduce additional low-order aberrations. The design parameters of the coronagraph itself (e.g. occulting spot size, Lyot stop diameter, etc.) affect how these aberrations impact the contrast in the focal plane. In this study, we examine the sensitivity of contrast to low-order optical errors for several coronagraph concepts over their respective design parameters. By combining these sensitivities with the telescope throughput, we show that for each coronagraph concept there is an optimum selection of the design parameters that provides efficient, high-contrast imaging at the inner working distance in the presence of alignment errors.

  14. Aberrations of varied line-space grazing incidence gratings in converging light beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettrick, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the imaging properties of several designs for varied-line space gratings in converging beams of light in grazing-incidence spectrometers are presented. An explicit model is defined for the case of a plane-reflection grating intercepting light that converges and is reflected to a stigmatic point associated with the zero-order image of the grating. Smooth spatial variation of the grating constant then permits aberration correction. The aberrations are expressed as polynomials in the grating lens coordinates using power series expansions. Application of the model is illustrated in terms of aberrations experienced with the short wavelength spectrometer on the EUVE satellite. Attention is given to straight and parallel in-plane grooves, curved groove in-plane designs and off-plane grooves. Aberrations due to dispersions and misalignment are also considered.

  15. Cigarette smoke exposure reveals a novel role for the MEK/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway in regulation of CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Balsiger, Robert; Tyrrell, Jean; Boyaka, Prosper N; Tarran, Robert; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2015-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator plays a key role in maintenance of lung fluid homeostasis. Cigarette smoke decreases CFTR expression in the lung but neither the mechanisms leading to CFTR loss, nor potential ways to prevent its loss have been identified to date. The molecular mechanisms leading to down-regulation of CFTR by cigarette smoke were determined using pharmacologic inhibitors and silencing ribonucleic acids (RNAs). Using human bronchial epithelial cells, here we show that cigarette smoke induces degradation of CFTR that is attenuated by lysosomal inhibitors, but not proteasome inhibitors. Cigarette smoke can activate multiple signaling pathways in airway epithelial cells, including the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK (MEK: mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase Erk1/2: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 MAPK: Mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway regulating cell survival. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the loss of plasma membrane CFTR upon cigarette smoke exposure. Similarly, decreased expression of Erk1/2 using silencing RNAs prevented the suppression of CFTR protein by cigarette smoke. Conversely, specific inhibitors of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPK pathways had no effect on CFTR decrease after cigarette smoke exposure. In addition, inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the reduction of the airway surface liquid observed upon cigarette smoke exposure of primary human airway epithelial cells. Finally, addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited activation of Erk1/2 by cigarette smoke and precluded the cigarette smoke-induced decrease of CFTR. These results show that the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway regulates plasma membrane CFTR in human airway cells. The MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway should be considered as a target for strategies to maintain/restore CFTR expression in the lung of smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. POTENT, METABOLICALLY STABLE BENZOPYRIMIDO-PYRROLO-OXAZINEDIONE (BPO) CFTR INHIBITORS FOR POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David S.; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Yao, Chenjuan; Kurth, Mark J.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of pyrimido-pyrrolo-quinoxalinedione (PPQ) inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel and showed their efficacy in an organ culture model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) (Tradtrantip et al., J. Med. Chem. 52, 6447–6455, 2009). Here, we report related benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione (BPO) CFTR inhibitors. To establish structure-activity relationships and select lead compound(s) with improved potency, metabolic stability and aqueous solubility compared to the most potent prior compound 8 (PPQ-102, IC50 ~ 90 nM), we synthesized 16 PPQ analogs and 11 BPO analogs. The analogs were efficiently synthesized in 5–6 steps and 11–61 % overall yield. Modification of 8 by bromine substitution at the 5-position of the furan ring, replacement of the secondary amine with an ether bridge, and carboxylation, gave 6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4',5':3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid 42 (BPO-27), which fully inhibited CFTR with IC50 ~ 8 nM, and, compared to 8, had >10-fold greater metabolic stability and much greater polarity / aqueous solubility. In an embryonic kidney culture model of PKD 42 prevented cyst growth with IC50 ~ 100 nM. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinediones such as 42 are potential development candidates for anti-secretory therapy of PKD. PMID:21707078

  17. Distribution of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mutations in a Cohort of Patients Residing in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siryani, Issa; Jama, Mohamed; Rumman, Nisreen; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Kannan, Moein; Lyon, Elaine; Hindiyeh, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited life-threatening disorder that causes severe damage to the lungs and the digestive system. In Palestine, mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator gene (CFTR) that contributes to the clinical presentation of CF are ill defined. A cohort of thirty three clinically diagnosed CF patients from twenty one different Palestinian families residing in the central and southern part of Palestine were incorporated in this study. Sweat chloride testing was performed using the Sweat Chek Conductivity Analyzer (ELITECH Group, France) to confirm the clinical diagnosis of CF. In addition, nucleic acid from the patients' blood samples was extracted and the CFTR mutation profiles were assessed by direct sequencing of the CFTR 27 exons and the intron-exon boundaries. For patient's DNA samples where no homozygous or two heterozygous CFTR mutations were identified by exon sequencing, DNA samples were tested for deletions or duplications using SALSA MLPA probemix P091-D1 CFTR assay. Sweat chloride testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis of CF in those patients. All patients had NaCl conductivity >60 mmol/l. In addition, nine different CFTR mutations were identified in all 21 different families evaluated. These mutations were c.1393-1G>A, F508del, W1282X, G85E, c.313delA, N1303K, deletion exons 17a-17b-18, deletion exons 17a-17b and Q1100P. c.1393-1G>A was shown to be the most frequent occurring mutation among tested families. We have profiled the underling mutations in the CFTR gene of a cohort of 21 different families affected by CF. Unlike other studies from the Arab countries where F508del was reported to be the most common mutation, in southern/central Palestine, the c.1393-1G>A appeared to be the most common. Further studies are needed per sample size and geographic distribution to account for other possible CFTR genetic alterations and their frequencies. Genotype/phenotype assessments are also

  18. Effect of methods of myopia correction on visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and depth of focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nio, YK; Jansonius, NM; Wijdh, RHJ; Beekhuis, WH; Worst, JGF; Noorby, S; Kooijman, AC

    2003-01-01

    Purpose. To psychophysically measure spherical and irregular aberrations in patients with various types of myopia correction. Setting: Laboratory of Experimental Ophthalmology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. Methods: Three groups of patients with low myopia correction

  19. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinon T. Kokkalis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  20. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  1. Measuring chromatic aberrations in imaging systems using plasmonic nano-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2015-01-01

    Chromatic aberration in optical systems arises from the wavelength dependence of a glass's refractive index. Polychromatic rays incident upon an optical surface are refracted at slightly different angles and in traversing an optical system follow distinct paths creating images displaced according to color. Although arising from dispersion, it manifests as a spatial distortion correctable only with compound lenses with multiple glasses and accumulates in complicated imaging systems. While chromatic aberration is measured with interferometry, simple methods are attractive for their ease of use and low cost. In this letter we retrieve the longitudinal chromatic focal shift of high numerical aperture (NA) microscope objectives from the extinction spectra of metallic nanoparticles within the focal plane. The method is accurate for high NA objectives with apochromatic correction, and enables rapid assessment of the chromatic aberration of any complete microscopy systems, since it is straightforward to implement

  2. Comparison of wavefront aberration changes in the anterior corneal surface after laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzonetti, Luca; Iarossi, Giancarlo; Valente, Paola; Volpi, Marzia; Petrocelli, Gianni; Scullica, Luigi

    2004-09-01

    To compare changes in anterior corneal wavefront aberrations after myopic laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Institute of Ophthalmology, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. This prospective study included 36 eyes of 25 myopic patients: 18 eyes of 12 patients had LASEK and 18 eyes of 13 patients, LASIK. The topography data (CSO EyeMap, version 6.2) were used to calculate corneal aberrations with 3.0 mm and 7.0 mm pupils before and 3 months after surgery. Total corneal aberrations increased similarly after LASEK and LASIK with the 7.0 mm pupil but did not change with the 3.0 mm pupil. Coma-like and spherical-like aberrations changed similarly after both procedures, but spherical-like aberrations increased after LASEK with the 3.0 mm pupil (P.05, independent t test), in individual eyes with an achieved correction less than 7.50 diopters (D), spherical-like aberrations increased more after LASEK than after LASIK. In this preliminary study, myopic LASEK and LASIK changed total and higher-order corneal aberrations. In both procedures, changes in spherical-like aberrations were dependent on the achieved correction. However, in individual eyes, spherical-like aberrations increased more after LASEK than after LASIK for low-moderate achieved correction, suggesting that these procedures may induce the same optical changes in the anterior corneal surface in different ways.

  3. [Monochromatic aberration in accommodation. Dynamic wavefront analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, M; Dawczynski, J; Jurkutat, S; Vollandt, R; Strobel, J

    2011-06-01

    Monochromatic aberrations may influence the visual acuity of the eye. They are not stable and can be affected by different factors. The subject of the following paper is the dynamic investigation of the changes in wavefront aberration with accommodation. Dynamic measurement of higher and lower order aberrations was performed with a WASCA Wavefront Analyzer (Carl-Zeiss-Meditec) and a specially constructed target device for aligning objects in far and near distances on 25 subjects aged from 15 to 27 years old. Wavefront aberrations showed some significant changes in accommodation. In addition to the characteristic sphere reaction accompanying miosis and changes in horizontal prism (Z(1) (1)) in the sense of a convergence movement of the eyeball also occurred. Furthermore defocus rose (Z(2) (0)) and astigmatism (Z(2) (-2)) changed. In higher-order aberrations a decrease in coma-like Zernike polynomials (Z(3) (-1), Z(3) (1)) was found. The most obvious change appeared in spherical aberration (Z(4) (0)) which increased and changed from positive to negative. In addition the secondary astigmatism (Z(4) (-2)) and quadrafoil (Z(4) (4)) rise also increased. The total root mean square (RMS), as well as the higher-order aberrations (RMS-HO) significantly increased in accommodation which is associated with a theoretical reduction of visual acuity. An analysis of the influence of pupil size on aberrations showed significant increases in defocus, spherical aberration, quadrafoil, RMS and RMS HO by increasing pupil diameter. By accommodation-associated miosis, the growing aberrations are partially compensated by focusing on near objects. Temporal analysis of the accommodation process with dynamic wavefront analysis revealed significant delays in pupil response and changing of prism in relation to the sphere reaction. In accommodation to near objects a discrete time ahead of third order aberrations in relation to the sphere response was found. Using dynamic wavefront measurement

  4. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P. W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M.; Greenberger, P. A.; MacLean, J.; Walden, S. M.; Slavin, R. G.; Cutting, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met strict criteria for the diagnosis of ABPA and had normal sweat electrolytes (< or = 40 mmol/liter). One patient carried two CF mutations (deltaF508/R347H), and five were found to carry one CF mutation (four deltaF508; one R117H). The frequency of the deltaF508 mutation in patients with ABPA was significantly higher than in 53 Caucasian patients with chronic bronchitis (P < .0003) and the general population (P < .003). These results suggest that CFTR plays an etiologic role in a subset of ABPA patients. PMID:8659542

  5. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  6. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  7. Measurements of CFTR-mediated Cl- secretion in human rectal biopsies constitute a robust biomarker for Cystic Fibrosis diagnosis and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Sousa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic Fibrosis (CF is caused by ∼1,900 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene encoding for a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl(- channel expressed in several epithelia. Clinical features are dominated by respiratory symptoms, but there is variable organ involvement thus causing diagnostic dilemmas, especially for non-classic cases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further establish measurement of CFTR function as a sensitive and robust biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of CF, we herein assessed cholinergic and cAMP-CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion in 524 freshly excised rectal biopsies from 118 individuals, including patients with confirmed CF clinical diagnosis (n=51, individuals with clinical CF suspicion (n=49 and age-matched non-CF controls (n=18. Conclusive measurements were obtained for 96% of cases. Patients with "Classic CF", presenting earlier onset of symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency, severe lung disease and low Shwachman-Kulczycki scores were found to lack CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion (<5%. Individuals with milder CF disease presented residual CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion (10-57% and non-CF controls show CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion ≥ 30-35% and data evidenced good correlations with various clinical parameters. Finally, comparison of these values with those in "CF suspicion" individuals allowed to confirm CF in 16/49 individuals (33% and exclude it in 28/49 (57%. Statistical discriminant analyses showed that colonic measurements of CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion are the best discriminator among Classic/Non-Classic CF and non-CF groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Determination of CFTR-mediated Cl(- secretion in rectal biopsies is demonstrated here to be a sensitive, reproducible and robust predictive biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of CF. The method also has very high potential for (pre-clinical trials of CFTR-modulator therapies.

  8. Cystic fibrosis and the role of gastrointestinal outcome measures in the new era of therapeutic CFTR modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewes, Frank A J A; Verkade, Henkjan J; Taminiau, Jan A J M; Borowitz, Drucy; Wilschanski, Michael

    With the development of new drugs that directly affect CFTR protein function, clinical trials are being designed or initiated for a growing number of patients with cystic fibrosis. The currently available and accepted clinical endpoints, FEV1 and BMI, have limitations. The aim of this report is to

  9. Allosteric coupling between the intracellular coupling helix 4 and regulatory sites of the first nucleotide-binding domain of CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jennifer E; Farber, Patrick J; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), leading to folding and processing defects and to chloride channel gating misfunction. CFTR is regulated by ATP binding to its cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, NBD1 and NBD2, and by phosphorylation of the NBD1 regulatory insert (RI) and the regulatory extension (RE)/R region. These regulatory effects are transmitted to the rest of the channel via NBD interactions with intracellular domain coupling helices (CL), particularly CL4. Using a sensitive method for detecting inter-residue correlations between chemical shift changes in NMR spectra, an allosteric network was revealed within NBD1, with a construct lacking RI. The CL4-binding site couples to the RI-deletion site and the C-terminal residues of NBD1 that precede the R region in full-length CFTR. Titration of CL4 peptide into NBD1 perturbs the conformational ensemble in these sites with similar titration patterns observed in F508del, the major CF-causing mutant, and in suppressor mutants F494N, V510D and Q637R NBD1, as well as in a CL4-NBD1 fusion construct. Reciprocally, the C-terminal mutation, Q637R, perturbs dynamics in these three sites. This allosteric network suggests a mechanism synthesizing diverse regulatory NBD1 interactions and provides biophysical evidence for the allosteric coupling required for CFTR function.

  10. Allosteric coupling between the intracellular coupling helix 4 and regulatory sites of the first nucleotide-binding domain of CFTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Dawson

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, leading to folding and processing defects and to chloride channel gating misfunction. CFTR is regulated by ATP binding to its cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, NBD1 and NBD2, and by phosphorylation of the NBD1 regulatory insert (RI and the regulatory extension (RE/R region. These regulatory effects are transmitted to the rest of the channel via NBD interactions with intracellular domain coupling helices (CL, particularly CL4. Using a sensitive method for detecting inter-residue correlations between chemical shift changes in NMR spectra, an allosteric network was revealed within NBD1, with a construct lacking RI. The CL4-binding site couples to the RI-deletion site and the C-terminal residues of NBD1 that precede the R region in full-length CFTR. Titration of CL4 peptide into NBD1 perturbs the conformational ensemble in these sites with similar titration patterns observed in F508del, the major CF-causing mutant, and in suppressor mutants F494N, V510D and Q637R NBD1, as well as in a CL4-NBD1 fusion construct. Reciprocally, the C-terminal mutation, Q637R, perturbs dynamics in these three sites. This allosteric network suggests a mechanism synthesizing diverse regulatory NBD1 interactions and provides biophysical evidence for the allosteric coupling required for CFTR function.

  11. Increased higher-order optical aberrations after laser refractive surgery: a problem of subclinical decentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, M; Kaemmerer, M; Mierdel, P; Seiler, T

    2001-03-01

    To study the clinical and theoretical effects of subclinical decentrations on the optical performance of the eye after photorefractive laser surgery. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Dresden, Dresden, Germany. Ocular aberrations were determined before and 1 month after uneventful photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with the Multiscan laser (Schwind) in 10 eyes of 8 patients. The corrections ranged from -2.5 to -6.0 diopters, and ablation zones of 6.0 mm and larger were used. The measured wavefront errors were compared to numerical simulations using the individually determined decentrations and currently used ablation profiles. The PRK-induced aberrations were significantly greater than the preoperative aberrations. The numerically calculated increase in the higher-order optical aberrations correlated with the clinical results, demonstrating a major increase in coma- and spherical-like aberrations. Subclinical decentration (less than 1.0 mm) was found to be a major factor in increased coma-like and spherical-like aberrations after corneal laser surgery. To minimize higher-order optical errors, special efforts to center the ablation zone are necessary; for example, by eye-tracking systems that consider the visual axis.

  12. Clinical results after implantation of a spherical aberration-free intraocular lens: effect of contrast sensitivity and wavefront aberration--a clinical comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-A; Kim, Chan-Young; Na, Kyung-Sun; Park, Shin-Hae; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2009-01-01

    To compare the clinical results of the spherical aberration-free Akreos AO (Bausch & Lomb) with the Akreos Adapt (Bausch & Lomb), the parent model of spherical optic design. Fifty patients (100 eyes) were randomly assigned to bilaterally receive Akreos AO or Akreos Adapt intraocular lenses (IOLs) after phacoemulsification. At 6 months postoperatively, best-corrected contrast sensitivities were determined at 3, 4.8, 7.5, 12 and 19 cycles per degree using a Visual Capacity Analyzer (L2 Informatique) under mesopic (5 cd/m(2)) and photopic (100 cd/m(2)) conditions with undilated pupils. Wavefront analysis of total aberration was performed with the WaveScan WaveFront System (Advanced Medical Optics VISX). Postoperative contrast sensitivities were not statistically different under mesopic and photopic conditions. On the other hand, fourth-order spherical aberration was lower in the AO group than the Adapt group with only a marginal difference (p = 0.048). Other higher-order aberrations such as coma and trefoil were not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.657, 0.614). The questionnaire on subjective visual quality in terms of glare disability, distant vision and night driving did not reveal an improved visual function in the AO group. The spherical aberration-free Akreos AO IOL did not show improved visual quality compared with its spherical counterpart. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR allelic variants relate to shifts in faecal microbiota of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Schippa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF. CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. METHODS: Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. RESULTS: Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1 presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2 disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a 'systemic disease', linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis.

  14. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione CFTR inhibitor (R)-BPO-27 for antisecretory therapy of diarrheas caused by bacterial enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cil, Onur; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Gillespie, Anne Marie; Lee, Sujin; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Yin, Jianyi; Tse, Ming; Zachos, Nicholas C; Lin, Ruxian; Donowitz, Mark; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-02-01

    Secretory diarrheas caused by bacterial enterotoxins, including cholera and traveler's diarrhea, remain a major global health problem. Inappropriate activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel occurs in these diarrheas. We previously reported that the benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione (R)-BPO-27 inhibits CFTR chloride conductance with low-nanomolar potency. Here, we demonstrate using experimental mouse models and human enterocyte cultures the potential utility of (R)-BPO-27 for treatment of secretory diarrheas caused by cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins. (R)-BPO-27 fully blocked CFTR chloride conductance in epithelial cell cultures and intestine after cAMP agonists, cholera toxin, or heat-stable enterotoxin of E. coli (STa toxin), with IC50 down to ∼5 nM. (R)-BPO-27 prevented cholera toxin and STa toxin-induced fluid accumulation in small intestinal loops, with IC50 down to 0.1 mg/kg. (R)-BPO-27 did not impair intestinal fluid absorption or inhibit other major intestinal transporters. Pharmacokinetics in mice showed >90% oral bioavailability with sustained therapeutic serum levels for >4 h without the significant toxicity seen with 7-d administration at 5 mg/kg/d. As evidence to support efficacy in human diarrheas, (R)-BPO-27 blocked fluid secretion in primary cultures of enteroids from human small intestine and anion current in enteroid monolayers. These studies support the potential utility of (R)-BPO-27 for therapy of CFTR-mediated secretory diarrheas.-Cil, O., Phuan, P.-W., Gillespie, A. M., Lee, S., Tradtrantip, L., Yin, J., Tse, M., Zachos, N. C., Lin, R., Donowitz, M., Verkman, A. S. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione CFTR inhibitor (R)-BPO-27 for antisecretory therapy of diarrheas caused by bacterial enterotoxins. © FASEB.

  15. Higher-Order Aberrations After Cyclopentolate, Tropicamide, and Artificial Tear Drops Application in Normal Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshekarizadeh, Negin; Hashemi, Hassan; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Mirzajani, Ali; Yekta, Abbasali; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2016-09-30

    To determine the effect of cyclopentolate, tropicamide, and artificial tear drops on higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in normal eyes with OPD-Scan III (Nidek Inc., Tokyo, Japan). In this study, 189 eyes of individuals aged 20 to 35 years were selected as samples. Inclusion criteria were a corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, a minimum size of about 5 mm for the pupil in the dark, hyperopia and myopia less than 5 D, and astigmatism less than 2 D. Moreover, participants with pathological eye problems, a history of intraocular surgery, and ocular diseases affecting the accommodation, pupil size, and corneal surface were excluded. Higher-order aberrations of the participants were assessed by the OPD-Scan III before and after cyclopentolate (Colircuss), tropicamide (Mydrax 0.5%), and artificial tears (Tearlose) drop instillation. After instilling cyclopentolate drops, the mean of the total root mean square (RMS) increased from 4.580 to 6.335 D, total spherical aberration increased from 0.155 to 0.381 D, and total coma increased from 0.195 to 0.369 D; the increases were significant for total RMS and total spherical aberration, but a significant relationship was not seen with total coma. After tropicamide, the mean aberrations of total RMS increased from 4.301 to 4.568 D, total spherical aberration increased from 0.146 to 0.160 D, and total coma increased from 0.213 to 0.230 D; the increase was only significant for total coma. On the other hand, after artificial tears, the average of all aberrations decreased in a nonsignificant manner. Most changes of mean aberrations were related to cyclopentolate drops. Tropicamide and artificial tears had the second and third rank according to their effect on mean errors. As a result, it seems that ocular accommodation is the most important impact on HOA than pupil size. However, the pupil size is the second factor for HOAs.

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in uranium and coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, G.; Arndt, D.; Kotschy-Lang, N.; Obe, G. [Robert Koch Inst., Berlin (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral lymphocytes from 66 Wismut uranium miners (WUM) and 29 Ruhr coal miners (RGM) were cultured and analysed for structural chromosomal aberrations in Giemsa-stained M1 metaphases. Cytogenetic data from 23 male white-collar workers from public services were used as a historical control group. The frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in WUM and RCM were quite similar. Compared with public services workers, WUM and RCM had significantly higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. It is concluded that chromosomal aberrations in WUM are not induced by radioactive particles inhaled during underground mining but as in RCM rather result from factors such as age, lifestyle, illnesses, medications and diagnostic irradiations.

  17. An aberrant precision account of autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Rees, Geraint; Friston, Karl J

    2014-01-01

    ... (Pellicano and Burr, 2012). In response, we suggested that when Bayesian inference is grounded in its neural instantiation-namely, predictive coding-many features of autistic perception can be attributed to aberrant precision...

  18. Epigenetic aberrations in myeloid malignancies (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shinichiro

    2013-09-01

    The development of novel technologies, such as massively parallel DNA sequencing, has led to the identification of several novel recurrent gene mutations, such as DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt)3a, ten-eleven-translocation oncogene family member 2 (TET2), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2, additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat X chromosome (UTX) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other myeloid malignancies. These findings strongly suggest a link between recurrent genetic alterations and aberrant epigenetic regulations, resulting from an abnormal DNA methylation and histone modification status. This review focuses on the current findings of aberrant epigenetic signatures by these newly described genetic alterations. Moreover, epigenetic aberrations resulting from transcription factor aberrations, such as mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) rearrangement, ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) overexpression, chromosomal translocations and the downregulation of PU.1 are also described.

  19. Thermodynamic study of the native and phosphorylated regulatory domain of the CFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasini, Carlotta, E-mail: marasini@ge.ibf.cnr.it [Istituto di Biofisica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via De Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy); Galeno, Lauretta; Moran, Oscar [Istituto di Biofisica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via De Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFTR mutations produce cystic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloride transport depends on the regulatory domain phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulatory domain is intrinsically disordered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary structure and protein stability change upon phosphorylation. -- Abstract: The regulatory domain (RD) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the defective protein in cystic fibrosis, is the region of the channel that regulates the CFTR activity with multiple phosphorylation sites. This domain is an intrinsically disordered protein, characterized by lack of stable or unique tertiary structure. The disordered character of a protein is directly correlated with its function. The flexibility of RD may be important for its regulatory role: the continuous conformational change may be necessary for the progressive phosphorylation, and thus activation, of the channel. However, the lack of a defined and stable structure results in a considerable limitation when trying to in build a unique molecular model for the RD. Moreover, several evidences indicate significant structural differences between the native, non-phosphorylated state, and the multiple phosphorylated state of the protein. The aim of our work is to provide data to describe the conformations and the thermodynamic properties in these two functional states of RD. We have done the circular dichroism (CD) spectra in samples with a different degree of phosphorylation, from the non-phosphorylated state to a bona fide completely phosphorylated state. Analysis of CD spectra showed that the random coil and {beta}-sheets secondary structure decreased with the polypeptide phosphorylation, at expenses of an increase of {alpha}-helix. This observation lead to interpret phosphorylation as a mechanism favoring a more structured state. We also studied the thermal denaturation curves of the protein in the two

  20. CFTR H609R mutation in Ecuadorian patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Quiles, María Rosa; Glover, Guillermo; Mondéjar-López, Pedro; Pastor-Vivero, María Dolores; Fernández-Sánchez, Asunción; Sánchez-Solís, Manuel

    2009-07-01

    Mutation epidemiology in each ethnic group is important for cystic fibrosis diagnosis and genetic counselling. To date, little has been reported on the prevalence of cystic fibrosis in the Ecuadorian population where the mutation distribution appears to differ from that of Europe. We present a series of four Ecuadorian patients homozygous for the H609R mutation in the CFTR gene. This is the first report of detection of this mutation in the Ecuadorian population. Taking advantage of the homozygous status of the patients, an evaluation of the most important clinical parameters is presented. From the diagnostic point of view, the information provided by our study is of relevance in designing an appropriate strategy for genetic testing of patients in Ecuador and in European countries where immigration from Ecuador is common.

  1. NF kappaB expression increases and CFTR and MUC1 expression decreases in the endometrium of infertile patients with hydrosalpinx: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrosalpinx are associated with infertility, due to reduced rates of implantation and increased abortion rates. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, nuclear factor kappa B (NF KappaB and mucin-1 (MUC-1, and analyze the correlation between the expression of CFTR and NF KappaB or MUC1, in the endometrium of infertile women with and without hydrosalpinx. Methods Thirty-one infertile women with laparoscopy-confirmed unilateral or bilateral hydrosalpinx and 20 infertile women without hydrosalpinx or pelvic inflammatory disease (control group were recruited. Endometrial biopsy samples were collected and the expression of CFTR, NF KappaB and MUC1 were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Results CFTR, NF KappaB and MUC1 mRNA and protein expression tended to increase in the secretory phase compared to the proliferative phase in both groups; however, these differences were not significantly different. The endometrium of infertile patients with hydrosalpinx had significantly higher NF KappaB mRNA and protein expression, and significantly lower CFTR and MUC1 mRNA and protein expression, compared to control infertile patients. A positive correlation was observed between CFTR and MUC1 mRNA expression (r = 0.65, P CFTR mRNA and NF KappaB mRNA expression (r = −0.59, P Conclusions Increased NF KappaB expression and decreased CFTR and MUC1 expression in the endometrium of infertile patients with hydrosalpinx reinforce the involvement of a molecular mechanism in the regulation of endometrial receptivity.

  2. Combined bicarbonate conductance-impairing variants in CFTR and SPINK1 variants are associated with chronic pancreatitis in patients without cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Larusch, Jessica; Sun, Xiumei; Aloe, Amy; Lamb, Janette; Hawes, Robert; Cotton, Peter; Brand, Randall E; Anderson, Michelle A; Money, Mary E; Banks, Peter A; Lewis, Michele D; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; Disario, James; Burton, Frank R; Gardner, Timothy B; Amann, Stephen T; Gelrud, Andres; George, Ryan; Rockacy, Matthew J; Kassabian, Sirvart; Martinson, Jeremy; Slivka, Adam; Yadav, Dhiraj; Oruc, Nevin; Barmada, M Michael; Frizzell, Raymond; Whitcomb, David C

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) is a complex inflammatory disorder associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. In individuals without cystic fibrosis (CF), variants of CFTR that inhibit bicarbonate conductance but maintain chloride conductance might selectively impair secretion of pancreatic juice, leading to trypsin activation and pancreatitis. We investigated whether sequence variants in the gene encoding the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor SPINK1 further increase the risk of pancreatitis in these patients. We screened patients and controls for variants in SPINK1 associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis and in all 27 exons of CFTR. The final study group included 53 patients with sporadic ICP, 27 probands with familial ICP, 150 unrelated controls, 375 additional controls for limited genotyping. CFTR wild-type and p.R75Q were cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells, and relative conductances of HCO(3)(-) and Cl(-) were measured. SPINK1 variants were identified in 36% of subjects and 3% of controls (odds ratio [OR], 18.1). One variant of CFTR not associated with CF, p.R75Q, was found in 16% of subjects and 5.3% of controls (OR, 3.4). Coinheritance of CFTR p.R75Q and SPINK1 variants occurred in 8.75% of patients and 0.38% of controls (OR, 25.1). Patch-clamp recordings of cells that expressed CFTR p.R75Q showed normal chloride currents but significantly reduced bicarbonate currents (P = .0001). The CFTR variant p.R75Q causes a selective defect in bicarbonate conductance and increases risk of pancreatitis. Coinheritance of p.R75Q or CF causing CFTR variants with SPINK1 variants significantly increases the risk of ICP. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Trypsin Reduces Pancreatic Ductal Bicarbonate Secretion by Inhibiting CFTR Cl- channel and Luminal Anion Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallagi, Petra; Venglovecz, Viktória; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Borka, Katalin; Korompay, Anna; Ózsvári, Béla; Judák, Linda; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Geisz, Andrea; Schnúr, Andrea; Maléth, József; Takács, Tamás; Gray, Mike A.; Argent, Barry E.; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims The effects of trypsin on pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDEC) vary among species and depend on localization of proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2). Bicarbonate secretion is similar in human and guinea pig PDEC; we compared its localization in these cell types and isolated guinea pig ducts to study the effects of trypsin and a PAR-2 agonist on this process. Methods PAR-2 localization was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in guinea pig and human pancreatic tissue samples (from 15 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 15 without pancreatic disease). Functions of guinea pig PDEC were studied by microperfusion of isolated ducts, measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i, and patch clamp analysis. The effect of pH on trypsinogen autoactivation was assessed using recombinant human cationic trypsinogen. Results PAR-2 localized to the apical membrane of human and guinea pig PDEC. Trypsin increased [Ca2+]i and pHi, and inhibited secretion of bicarbonate by the luminal anion exchanger and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Autoactivation of human cationic trypsinogen accelerated when the pH was reduced from 8.5 to 6.0. PAR-2 expression was strongly down-regulated, at transcriptional and protein levels, in the ducts of patients with chronic pancreatitis, consistent with increased activity of intraductal trypsin. Importantly, in PAR-2 knockout mice, the effects of trypsin were PAR-2 dependent. Conclusions Trypsin reduces pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion via PAR-2–dependent inhibition of the apical anion exchanger and the CFTR Cl- channel. This could contribute to the development of chronic pancreatitis, decreasing luminal pH and promoting premature activation of trypsinogen in the pancreatic ducts. PMID:21893120

  4. Hesperidin stimulates CFTR-mediated chloride secretion and ciliary beat frequency in sinonasal epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbell, Christopher; Zhang, Shaoyan; Skinner, Daniel; Fortenberry, James; Sorscher, Eric J.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacologic agents designed to promote mucociliary clearance (MCC) in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) represent a novel therapeutic strategy. The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether the natural bioflavonoid hesperidin 1) increases transepithelial chloride (Cl−) secretion in vitro and in vivo, 2) enhances ciliary beat frequency (CBF), and 3) exerts its mechanistic effects through cAMP/PKA dependent pathways. Study Design In vitro and in vivo study. Setting Laboratory. Subjects and Methods Transepithelial Cl− transport (Ussing chamber) and CBF were investigated in primary murine nasal septal (MNSE) and human sinonasal epithelial (HSNE) cultures. In vivo activity was measured using the murine nasal potential difference (NPD) assay. CFTR R-domain phosphorylation and cAMP levels were investigated to rule out a cAMP/PKA dependent mechanism of activation. Results Hesperidin significantly increased CFTR-mediated Cl− transport (change in short-circuit current, ΔISC) in both MNSE [13.51+/−0.77 vs. 4.4+/−0.66 (control); phesperidin [−2.3+/−1.0 vs. −0.8+/−0.8mV (control), pHesperidin significantly increased CBF (ratio of pre to post-treatment) with both basal ((1.31+/−0.07 vs. 0.93+/−0.06 (control); p<0.05), apical (1.72+/−0.09 vs. 1.40+/−0.07, control; p<0.05) and basal + apical delivery (2.26+/−0.18 vs. 1.60+/−0.21, respectively; p<0.05). Conclusion Our in vitro and in vivo investigations provide strong support for future testing of this robust Cl− secretagogue and CBF activator in human clinical trials for CRS. PMID:20723778

  5. mRNA-based detection of rare CFTR mutations improves genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in populations with high genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, V; Ramalho, A S; Igreja, S; Amaral, M D

    2017-03-01

    Even with advent of next generation sequencing complete sequencing of large disease-associated genes and intronic regions is economically not feasible. This is the case of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Yet, to confirm a CF diagnosis, proof of CFTR dysfunction needs to be obtained, namely by the identification of two disease-causing mutations. Moreover, with the advent of mutation-based therapies, genotyping is an essential tool for CF disease management. There is, however, still an unmet need to genotype CF patients by fast, comprehensive and cost-effective approaches, especially in populations with high genetic heterogeneity (and low p.F508del incidence), where CF is now emerging with new diagnosis dilemmas (Brazil, Asia, etc). Herein, we report an innovative mRNA-based approach to identify CFTR mutations in the complete coding and intronic regions. We applied this protocol to genotype individuals with a suspicion of CF and only one or no CFTR mutations identified by routine methods. It successfully detected multiple intronic mutations unlikely to be detected by CFTR exon sequencing. We conclude that this is a rapid, robust and inexpensive method to detect any CFTR coding/intronic mutation (including rare ones) that can be easily used either as primary approach or after routine DNA analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm.

  7. Computational genes: a tool for molecular diagnosis and therapy of aberrant mutational phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova Zoya

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A finite state machine manipulating information-carrying DNA strands can be used to perform autonomous molecular-scale computations at the cellular level. Results We propose a new finite state machine able to detect and correct aberrant molecular phenotype given by mutated genetic transcripts. The aberrant mutations trigger a cascade reaction: specific molecular markers as input are released and induce a spontaneous self-assembly of a wild type protein or peptide, while the mutational disease phenotype is silenced. We experimentally demostrated in in vitro translation system that a viable protein can be autonomously assembled. Conclusion Our work demostrates the basic principles of computational genes and particularly, their potential to detect mutations, and as a response thereafter administer an output that suppresses the aberrant disease phenotype and/or restores the lost physiological function.

  8. Calculation of aberration coefficients by ray tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, M; Lencová, B

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present an approach for the calculation of aberration coefficients using accurate ray tracing. For a given optical system, intersections of a large number of trajectories with a given plane are computed. In the Gaussian image plane the imaging with the selected optical system can be described by paraxial and aberration coefficients (geometric and chromatic) that can be calculated by least-squares fitting of the analytical model on the computed trajectory positions. An advantage of such a way of computing the aberration coefficients is that, in comparison with the aberration integrals and the differential algebra method, it is relatively easy to use and its complexity stays almost constant with the growing complexity of the optical system. This paper shows a tested procedure for choosing proper initial conditions and computing the coefficients of the fifth-order geometrical and third-order, first-degree chromatic aberrations by ray tracing on an example of a weak electrostatic lens. The results are compared with the values for the same lens from a paper Liu [Ultramicroscopy 106 (2006) 220-232].

  9. Effects of chalazion excision on ocular aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabermoghaddam, Ali A; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Abrishami, Mojtaba

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to compare higher-order aberrations before and after upper lid chalazion excision. Fourteen eyes from 12 patients (8 females, mean age: 28.7 ± 2.7 years) with upper lid chalazion were enrolled in this prospective interventional case series. Chalazia were excised by standard transconjunctival vertical incision. Ocular aberrations were evaluated by aberrometry (ZyWave) before and 2 months after chalazion excision. Root mean square of total higher-order aberrations decreased from 0.67 ± 0.12 to 0.43 ± 0.15 μm (P = 0.012) after excision. The root mean square of Zernike orders in the vertical and horizontal trefoil and horizontal coma were decreased after excision. Orbscan IIz tomography showed a statistically significant decrease in 5 mm zone irregularity (P = 0.027) and an increase in minimum simulated keratometry after surgery (P = 0.046). Chalazion increases higher-order aberrations, as measured by the Hartmann-Shack aberrometer, which could affect the preoperative evaluation and results of refractive surgery, especially wavefront-guided approaches. Chalazion excision could reduce ocular aberrations and is recommended before refractive surgeries.

  10. Les vésicules extracellulaires comme vecteurs de macromolécules bioactives : modèle du transporteur ABCC7 (CFTR) et application à la biothérapie de la mucoviscidose

    OpenAIRE

    Vituret, Cyrielle

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease in which its prognosis depends on the lung damage. It is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), resulting in a dysfunctional CFTR protein normally located at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells. This thesis is a study of a novel therapeutic approach to use extracellular vesicles (EVs), microvesicles and exosomes, as transfer vectors for CFTR mRNA and protein to target cells. The proof of concept for ...

  11. Effect of Spherical Aberration on the Optical Quality after Implantation of Two Different Aspherical Intraocular Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lasta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the effect of spherical aberration on optical quality in eyes with two different aspherical intraocular lenses. Methods. 120 eyes of 60 patients underwent phacoemulsification. In patients’ eyes, an aberration-free IOL (Aspira-aA; Human Optics or an aberration-correcting aspherical IOL (Tecnis ZCB00; Abott Medical Optics was randomly implanted. After surgery, contrast sensitivity and wavefront measurements as well as tilt and decentration measurements were performed. Results. Contrast sensitivity was significantly higher in eyes with Aspira lens under mesopic conditions with 12 cycles per degree (CPD and under photopic conditions with 18 CPD (p=0.02. Wavefront measurements showed a higher total spherical aberration with a minimal pupil size of 4 mm in the Aspira group (0.05 ± 0.03 than in the Tecnis group (0.03 ± 0.02 (p=0.001. Strehl ratio was higher in eyes with Tecnis (0.28 ± 0.17 with a minimal pupil size larger than 5 mm than that with Aspira (0.16 ± 0.14 (p=0.04. In pupils with a minimum diameter of 4 mm spherical aberration had a significant effect on Strehl ratio, but not in pupils with a diameter less than 4 mm. Conclusions. Optical quality was better in eyes with the aberration-correcting Tecnis IOL when pupils were large. In contrast, this could not be shown in eyes with pupils under 4 mm or larger. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03224728.

  12. Exaggerated translation causes synaptic and behavioural aberrations associated with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Emanuela; Huynh, Thu N; MacAskill, Andrew F; Carter, Adam G; Pierre, Philippe; Ruggero, Davide; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Klann, Eric

    2013-01-17

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are an early onset, heterogeneous group of heritable neuropsychiatric disorders with symptoms that include deficits in social interaction skills, impaired communication abilities, and ritualistic-like repetitive behaviours. One of the hypotheses for a common molecular mechanism underlying ASDs is altered translational control resulting in exaggerated protein synthesis. Genetic variants in chromosome 4q, which contains the EIF4E locus, have been described in patients with autism. Importantly, a rare single nucleotide polymorphism has been identified in autism that is associated with increased promoter activity in the EIF4E gene. Here we show that genetically increasing the levels of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in mice results in exaggerated cap-dependent translation and aberrant behaviours reminiscent of autism, including repetitive and perseverative behaviours and social interaction deficits. Moreover, these autistic-like behaviours are accompanied by synaptic pathophysiology in the medial prefrontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus. The autistic-like behaviours displayed by the eIF4E-transgenic mice are corrected by intracerebroventricular infusions of the cap-dependent translation inhibitor 4EGI-1. Our findings demonstrate a causal relationship between exaggerated cap-dependent translation, synaptic dysfunction and aberrant behaviours associated with autism.

  13. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca2+ -activated Cl- channels and K+ channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    pancreatic secretion. In the present study we aim to identify Cl(-) and K(+) channels in human pancreatic ducts and their regulation by purinergic receptors. Human pancreatic duct epithelia formed by Capan-1 or CFPAC-1 cells were studied in open-circuit Ussing chambers. In Capan-1 cells, ATP/UTP effects were.......1). The apical effects of ATP/UTP were greatly potentiated by the IK channel opener DC-EBIO. Determination of RNA and protein levels revealed that Capan-1 cells have high expression of TMEM16A (ANO1), a likely CaCC candidate. We conclude that in human pancreatic duct cells ATP/UTP regulates via purinergic...... dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have...

  14. Sweat chloride and immunoreactive trypsinogen in infants carrying two CFTR mutations and not affected by cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Carlo; Tridello, Gloria; Tamanini, Anna; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-07-01

    Newborns with raised immunotrypsinogen levels who have non-pathological sweat chloride values and carry two cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutations of which at least one is not acknowledged to be cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing are at risk of developing clinical manifestations consistent with CFTR-related disorders or even CF. It is not known whether newborns with similar genotypes and normal immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) may share the same risk. This study found that newborns with these characteristics and normal IRT have lower sweat chloride values than those with raised IRT (p=0.007). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. An aberrant precision account of autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca P Lawson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by problems with social-communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviour. A recent and controversial article presented a compelling normative explanation for the perceptual symptoms of autism in terms of a failure of Bayesian inference (Pellicano and Burr, 2012. In response, we suggested that when Bayesian interference is grounded in its neural instantiation – namely, predictive coding – many features of autistic perception can be attributed to aberrant precision (or beliefs about precision within the context of hierarchical message passing in the brain (Friston et al., 2013. Here, we unpack the aberrant precision account of autism. Specifically, we consider how empirical findings – that speak directly or indirectly to neurobiological mechanisms – are consistent with the aberrant encoding of precision in autism; in particular, an imbalance of the precision ascribed to sensory evidence relative to prior beliefs.

  16. [Detection of complex chromosomal aberrations in patients with multiple myeloma using multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan-qiang; Chen, Li-juan; Zhu, Yu; Qiu, Hai-rong; Wang, Rong; Xu, Jia-ren; Lu, Hua; Li, Jian-yong

    2010-08-01

    To explore the value of multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) in the detection of the complex chromosomal aberrations (CCAs) in multiple myeloma (MM). M-FISH was used in 10 MM patients with CCAs detected by conventional cytogenetics (CC) using R-banding to refine the rearrangement of CCAs and identify the characteristics of marker chromosome. M-FISH confirmed the 29 structural aberrations shown by CC analysis, and also confirmed the specific source of 21 types of chromosomal aberration, which were not detected by CC analysis. Among them, t(2;15)(q33;q22), t(6;7)(q23;q34), t(8;11) (q24;q23), t(1;14)(q10;q32) and t(X;1)(q26;q25) were new chromosomal aberrations. The median survival time of 9 MM patients with CCAs was 23 months and evidently shorter than that of MM patients without CCAs, with the mean survival time being 34 months. M-FISH could refine CCAs in MM patients, find or correct the missed or misidentified abnormalities analyzed by CC. It has provided one of the essential methods for the research of chromosomal aberrations in MM.

  17. Optical aberrations in professional baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschen, David G; Laby, Daniel M; Kirschen, Matthew P; Applegate, Raymond; Thibos, Larry N

    2010-03-01

    To determine the presence, type, and size of optical higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in professional athletes with superior visual acuity and to compare them with those in an age-matched population of nonathletes. Vero Beach and Fort Myers, Florida, USA. Players from 2 professional baseball teams were studied. Each player's optical aberrations were measured with a naturally dilated 4.0 mm pupil using a Z-Wave aberrometer and a LADARWave aberrometer. One hundred sixty-two players (316 eyes) were evaluated. The HOAs were less than 0.026 mum in all cases. Spherical aberration C(4,0) was the largest aberration with both aberrometers. There were small but statistically significant differences between the aberrometers in mean values for trefoil C(3,3) and C(3,-3) and secondary astigmatism C(4,2). Although statistically significant, the differences were clinically insignificant, being similar at approximately 0.031 diopter (D) of spherical power. A statistically significant difference was found between the professional baseball players and the control population in trefoil C(3,-3). These differences were clinically insignificant, similar to 0.071 D of spherical power. Professional baseball players have small higher-order optical aberrations when tested with naturally dilated pupils. No clinically significant differences were found between the 2 aberrometers. Statistically significant differences in trefoil were found between the players and the control population; however, the difference was clinically insignificant. It seems as though the visual system of professional baseball players is limited by lower-order aberrations and that the smaller HOAs do not enhance visual function over that in a control population. Copyright 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez K; de Mendonca E; Matute X; Chaustre I; Villalón M; Takiff H

    2016-01-01

    Karen Sánchez,1 Elizabeth de Mendonca,1 Xiorama Matute,2 Ismenia Chaustre,2 Marlene Villalón,3 Howard Takiff4 1Unit of Genetic and Forensic Studies, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), 2Hospital JM de los Ríos, 3Hospital José Ignacio Baldo, Algodonal, National Reference Unit, 4Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC), Caracas, Venezuela. Abstract: The mutations in the CFTR gene found in ...

  19. Higher order aberrations in amblyopic children and their role in refractory amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Dias-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Some studies have hypothesized that an unfavourable higher order aberrometric profile could act as an amblyogenic mechanism and may be responsible for some amblyopic cases that are refractory to conventional treatment or cases of “idiopathic” amblyopia. This study compared the aberrometric profile in amblyopic children to that of children with normal visual development and compared the aberrometric profile in corrected amblyopic eyes and refractory amblyopic eyes with that of healthy eyes. Methods: Cross-sectional study with three groups of children – the CA group (22 eyes of 11 children with unilateral corrected amblyopia, the RA group (24 eyes of 13 children with unilateral refractory amblyopia and the C group (28 eyes of 14 children with normal visual development. Higher order aberrations were evaluated using an OPD-Scan III (NIDEK. Comparisons of the aberrometric profile were made between these groups as well as between the amblyopic and healthy eyes within the CA and RA groups. Results: Higher order aberrations with greater impact in visual quality were not significantly higher in the CA and RA groups when compared with the C group. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in the higher order aberrometric profile between the amblyopic and healthy eyes within the CA and RA groups. Conclusions: Contrary to lower order aberrations (e.g., myopia, hyperopia, primary astigmatism, higher order aberrations do not seem to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of amblyopia. Therefore, these are likely not the cause of most cases of refractory amblyopia.

  20. CFTR and/or pancreatitis susceptibility genes mutations as risk factors of pancreatitis in cystic fibrosis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitch, Natacha; Hubert, Dominique; Gameiro, Christine; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Houriez, Florence; Martinez, Brigitte; Honoré, Isabelle; Chapron, Jeanne; Kanaan, Reem; Dusser, Daniel; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Currently, factors that promote the occurrence of pancreatitis episodes in patients affected with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic sufficiency (PS) are largely unknown. Six genes involved in pancreatitis or in ion transport into the pancreatic duct were investigated by next generation sequencing in 59 adult CF-PS patients with two identified CF mutations. Data on predisposing environmental factors were also recorded. 19 experienced at least one episode of acute pancreatitis (AP) (AP+) and 40 patients did not (AP-). No influence of environmental factor was evidenced. No specific CFTR genotype was found predictive of pancreatitis. Patients sharing the same CFTR genotype may or may not experience AP episodes. Frequent and rare missense variants were found in 78.9% patients in group AP+ and 67.5% in group AP- but a few of them were pathogenic. AP or recurrent AP (RAP) is a frequent complication in our series of adult CF-PS patients. The majority of mild CFTR mutations found in group AP+ were located in the first transmembrane region. No clear other genetic factor could be found predictive of AP/RAP. Further experiments in large homogenous cohorts of CF-PS patients, including whole genome sequencing, may identify genetic predisposing factors to pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Karen; de Mendonca, Elizabeth; Matute, Xiorama; Chaustre, Ismenia; Villalón, Marlene; Takiff, Howard

    2016-01-01

    The mutations in the CFTR gene found in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have geographic differences, but there are scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in a group of Venezuelan patients with CF. The 27 exons of the CFTR gene from 110 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program were amplified and sequenced. A total of 36 different mutations were identified, seven with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del (27.27%), p.Gly542* (3.18%), c.2988+1G>A (3.18%), p.Arg334Trp (1.36%), p.Arg1162* (1.36%), c.1-8G>C (1.36%), and p.[Gly628Arg;Ser1235Arg](1.36). In 40% of patients, all with a clinical diagnosis of CF, no mutations were found. This report represents the largest cohort of Venezuelan patients with CF ever examined, and includes a wider mutation panel than has been previously studied in this population. Mutations common in Southern European populations predominate, and several new mutations were discovered, but no mutations were found in 40% of the cohort. PMID:27022295

  2. Digital holographic interferometer with correction of distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevryugin, A. A.; Pulkin, S. A.; Tursunov, I. M.; Venediktov, D. V.; Venediktov, V. Y.

    2015-10-01

    The paper considers the use of holographic interferometer for hologram re-recording with correction of distortions. Each optical system contains some beam path deviations, called aberrations of the optical system. They are seen in the resulting interference pattern as a distortion of fringes. While increasing the sensitivity of the interference pattern by N times at the same time we introduce new aberrations, caused by re-recording setup in addition to aberrations that are already presented on the interferogram, caused by initial recording, also multiplied by N times. In this experiment we decided to use a modified setup with spatially combined interferograms with use of matrix spatial light modulator and digital image processing of the interferograms recorded by CCD or CMOS camera.

  3. Correct Models

    OpenAIRE

    Blacher, René

    2010-01-01

    Ce rapport complete les deux rapports précédents et apporte une explication plus simple aux résultats précédents : à savoir la preuve que les suites obtenues sont aléatoires.; In previous reports, we have show how to transform a text $y_n$ in a random sequence by using functions of Fibonacci $T_q$. Now, in this report, we obtain a clearer result by proving that $T_q(y_n)$ has the IID model as correct model. But, it is necessary to define correctly a correct model. Then, we study also this pro...

  4. Identification of an iron permease, cFTR1, in cyanobacteria involved in the iron reduction/re-oxidation uptake pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Qiu, Guo-Wei; Lou, Wen-Jing; Li, Zheng-Ke; Jiang, Hai-Bo; Price, Neil M; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are globally important primary producers and abundant in many iron-limited aquatic environments. The ways in which they take up iron are largely unknown, but reduction of Fe3+ is an important step in the process. Here we report a special iron permease in Synechocystis, cFTR1, that is required for Fe3+ uptake following Fe2+ re-oxidation. The expression of cFTR1 is induced by iron starvation, and a mutant lacking the gene is abnormally sensitive to iron starvation. The cFTR1 protein localizes to the plasma membrane and contains the iron-binding motif "REXXE". Point-directed mutagenesis of the REXXE motif results in a sensitivity to Fe-deficiency. Measurements of iron (55 Fe) uptake rate show that cFTR1 takes up Fe3+ rather than Fe2+ . The function of cFTR1 in Synechocystis could be genetically complemented by the iron permease, Ftr1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that is known to transport Fe3+ produced by the oxidation of Fe2+ via a multicopper oxidase. Unlike yeast Ftr1p, cyanobacterial cFTR1 probably obtains Fe3+ primarily from the oxidation of Fe2+ by oxygen. Growth assays show that the cFTR1 is required during oxygenic, photoautotrophic growth but not when oxygen production is inhibited during photoheterotrophic growth. In cyanobacteria, iron reduction/re-oxidation uptake pathway may represent their adaptation to oxygenated environments. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Chromosomal aberrations induced by Markhamia tomentosa (Benth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Markhamia tomentosa (Benth.) K. Schum. Ex Engl. (Bignoniaceae) is used traditionally in the treatment of pain, oedema, pulmonary troubles and cancer. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the ethanolic extract of the leaves of M. tomentosa was investigated using the Allium cepa root chromosomal aberration assay.

  7. Anti-forensics of chromatic aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Owen; Stamm, Matthew C.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a number of information forensic techniques have been developed to identify digital image manipulation and falsification. Recent research has shown, however, that an intelligent forger can use anti-forensic countermeasures to disguise their forgeries. In this paper, an anti-forensic technique is proposed to falsify the lateral chromatic aberration present in a digital image. Lateral chromatic aberration corresponds to the relative contraction or expansion between an image's color channels that occurs due to a lens's inability to focus all wavelengths of light on the same point. Previous work has used localized inconsistencies in an image's chromatic aberration to expose cut-and-paste image forgeries. The anti-forensic technique presented in this paper operates by estimating the expected lateral chromatic aberration at an image location, then removing deviations from this estimate caused by tampering or falsification. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate that our anti-forensic technique can be used to effectively disguise evidence of an image forgery.

  8. Funciones de los canales iónicos CFTR y ENAC en la fibrosis quística

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra G. Palma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available La fibrosis quística se debe a la ausencia o defecto del canal transmembrana regulador de la fibrosis quística (CFTR, un canal de cloruro codificado en el gen cftr que juega un papel clave en la homeostasis del agua e iones. El CFTR es activado por el AMPc y se localiza en las membranas apicales y basolaterales de las vías aéreas, intestino y glándulas exocrinas. Una de sus funciones primarias en los pulmones es mantener la capa de líquido superficial a través de su función de canal y regular el canal epitelial de sodio sensible al amiloride (ENaC. Se han identificado más de 1900 mutaciones en el gen cftr. La enfermedad se caracteriza por secreciones viscosas en las glándulas exocrinas y por niveles elevados de cloruro de sodio en el sudor. En la fibrosis quística el CFTR no funciona y el ENaC está desregulado; el resultado es un aumento en la reabsorción de sodio y agua con la formación de un líquido viscoso. En las glándulas sudoríparas tanto el Na+ como el Cl- se retienen en el lumen causando una pérdida de electrolitos durante la sudoración y el NaCl se elimina al sudor. Así, los niveles elevados de NaCl son la base del test del sudor inducido por pilocarpina, un método de diagnóstico para la enfermedad. En esta revisión se discuten los movimientos de Cl- y Na+ en las glándulas sudoríparas y pulmón así como el papel del ENaC en la patogénesis de la enfermedad.

  9. Contralateral eye surgery with adjustable suture for management of third nerve palsy with aberrant regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Thi Thanh Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant regeneration of the third nerve following its palsy is commonly seen after trauma and compressive lesions. This phenomenon is thought to result due to misdirection of the regenerating axons. Surgical management is a great challenge in the third nerve palsy owing to multiple muscle involvement and is often accompanied by ptosis and poor Bell's phenomenon. We present a case of a 27-year-old male who developed isolated complete third nerve palsy of the left eye following head trauma. Features of aberrant regeneration were seen after 6 months, namely, inverse Duane's sign and Pseudo-Von Graefe's sign. He underwent recess-resect procedure in the unaffected eye with adjustable suture technique which not only corrected the deviation but also the ptosis by utilizing the oculomotor synkinesis. Thus, contralateral eye surgery combined with adjustable suture technique resulted in an accurate alignment of the eye and obviated the need for ptosis correction.

  10. Higher-order aberrations and anisometropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Andreas; Atchison, David A; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2013-01-01

    Myopia incidence is increasing around the world. Myopization is considered to be caused by a variety of factors. One consideration is whether higher-order aberrations (HOA) influence myopization. More knowledge of optics in anisometropic eyes might give further insight into the development of refractive error. To analyze the possible influence of HOA on refractive error development, we compared HOA between anisometropes and isometropes. We analyzed HOA up to the 4th order for both eyes of 20 anisometropes (mean age: 43 ± 17 years) and 20 isometropes (mean age: 33 ± 17 years). HOA were measured with the Shack-Hartman i.Profiler (Carl Zeiss, Germany) and were recalculated for a 4 mm pupil. Mean spherical equivalent (MSE) was based on the subjective refraction. Anisometropia was defined as ≥1 D interocular difference in MSE. The mean absolute differences between right and left eyes in spherical equivalent were 0.28 ± 0.21 D in the isometropic group and 2.81 ± 2.04 D in the anisometropic group. Interocular differences in HOA were compared with the interocular difference in MSE using correlations. For isometropes oblique trefoil, vertical coma, horizontal coma and spherical aberration showed significant correlations between the two eyes. In anisometropes, all analyzed higher-order aberrations correlated significantly between the two eyes except oblique secondary astigmatism and secondary astigmatism. When analyzing anisometropes and isometropes separately, no significant correlations were found between interocular differences of higher-order aberrations and MSE. For isometropes and anisometropes combined, tetrafoil correlated significantly with MSE in left eyes. The present study could not show that interocular differences of higher-order aberrations increase with increasing interocular difference in MSE.

  11. Cystic fibrosis gene repair: correction of ΔF508 using ZFN and CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNA gene editing tools

    OpenAIRE

    Hollywood, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive monogenic disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene with the ΔF508 mutation accounting for approximately 70% of all CF cases worldwide. This thesis investigates whether existing zinc finger nucleases designed in this lab and CRISPR/gRNAs designed in this thesis can mediate efficient homology-directed repair (HDR) with appropriate donor repair plasmids to correct CF-causing mutations in a C...

  12. Aberration-accounting calibration for 3D single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabriel, Clément; Bourg, Nicolas; Dupuis, Guillaume; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    We propose a straightforward sample-based technique to calibrate the axial detection in 3D single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). Using microspheres coated with fluorescent molecules, the calibration curves of PSF-shaping- or intensity-based measurements can be obtained for any required depth range from a few hundreds of nanometers to several tens of microns. This experimental method takes into account the effect of the spherical aberration without requiring computational correction.

  13. Chromatic aberration compensation in numerical reconstruction of digital holograms by Fresnel-Bluestein propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Diego; Velasquez, Daniel; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-12-15

    In this Letter, we present a method for chromatic compensation in numerical reconstruction of digitally recorded holograms based on Fresnel-Bluestein propagation. The proposed technique is applied to correct the chromatic aberration that arises in the reconstruction of RGB holograms of both millimeter- and micrometer-sized objects. The results show the feasibility of this strategy to remove the wavelength dependence of the size of the numerically propagated wavefields.

  14. Scattering compensation by focus scanning holographic aberration probing (F-SHARP) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Jouhanneau, Jean-Sébastien; Poulet, James; Judkewitz, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microscopy is an indispensable tool for researchers, allowing them to closely investigate different organisms, revealing new features and phenomena in biomedical research. Although very useful, conventional imaging techniques that rely only on ballistic, unaffected photons to form images inside inhomogeneous media, like biological tissue, are eventually limited up to the diffusion regime of optical propagation where scattering becomes dominant and no ballistic light can be detected. Adaptive optics and nonlinear optimization methods that rely on so called guide stars have been employed to overcome this problem and image deeper inside biological tissue. These techniques attempt to recover the optimal wavefront that will enhance the image quality or that will render a focus spot inside the scattering biological tissue. In order to achieve that, they have to iterate through each correction mode (e.g. each pixel on a wavefront shaper) thus trading off measurement time with wavefront resolution. Here we present a new turbidity suppression approach, termed Focus Scanning Holographic Aberration Probing (F-SHARP or F♯) that allows us to directly measure the amplitude and phase of the scattered light distribution at the focal plane (scattered E-field PSF). Knowledge of the E-field enables rapid correction of both aberration and scattering with a high resolution. We demonstrate the power of F-SHARP by correcting for aberration and scattering and imaging neuronal structures through the larval zebrafish and mouse brain and through thinned mouse skull in vivo.

  15. Treatment burden in patients with at least one class IV or V CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewulf, Jonas; Vermeulen, François; Wanyama, Simeon; Thomas, Muriel; Proesmans, Marijke; Dupont, Lieven; De Boeck, Kris

    2015-12-01

    CFTR mutations are grouped according to disease-causing mechanism. Several studies demonstrated that patients having at least one mutation of class IV/V, present with a milder phenotype, but little is known about their relative treatment burden. We compared treatment burden between patients with two class I, II, or III mutations and patients with at least one mutation of class IV/V in the 2010 database of the Belgian CF Registry. We calculated a "Treatment Burden Index" (TBI) by assigning long term therapies to categories low, medium and high intensity, for differential weighing in the total score. There were 779 patients with two known class I/II/III mutations and 94 patients with at least one class IV/V mutation. Compared to class I/II/III, class IV/V patients had a lower median number of clinic visits (4 vs. 5; P class IV/V patients with pancreatic insufficiency (n = 31) were considered. This study clearly demonstrates the significantly lower treatment burden in patients with CF and at least one class IV/V mutation compared to patients with two class I/II/III mutations and contributes to providing better individual counseling at time of diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Theoretical investigation of aberrations upon ametropic human eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bo; Chen, Ying-Ling; Lewis, J. W. L.; Baker, Kevin

    2003-11-01

    The human eye aberrations are important for visual acuity and ophthalmic diagnostics and surgical procedures. Reported monochromatic aberration data of the normal 20/20 human eyes are scarce. There exist even fewer reports of the relation between ametropic conditions and aberrations. We theoretically investigate the monochromatic and chromatic aberrations of human eyes for refractive errors of -10 to +10 diopters. Schematic human eye models are employed using optical design software for axial, index, and refractive types of ametropia.

  17. Differentiated Effects of Sensory Activities as Abolishing Operations via Non-Contingent Reinforcement on Academic and Aberrant Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancil, G. Richmond; Haydon, Todd; Boman, Marty

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of sensory activities used as antecedent interventions on the percentage correct on academic tasks and rate of aberrant behavior in three elementary aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Study activities were conducted in an after school program for children with ASD where…

  18. Chromatic aberration and the roles of double-opponent and color-luminance neurons in color vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, Tony

    How does the visual cortex encode color? I summarize a theory in which cortical double-opponent color neurons perform a role in color constancy and a complementary set of color-luminance neurons function to selectively correct for color fringes induced by chromatic aberration in the eye. The theory

  19. Spherical aberration from trajectories in real and hard-edge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3)–(4) by comparing with spherical aberration obtained from the ensemble of particle trajectories. The scaled field gives the same focal length. 3. Particle trajectory. 3.1 Ray equation with aberration. The particle trajectory in a solenoid magnet with aberrations is governed by the third-order paraxial ray equation given in eq.

  20. Generalized beam quality factor of aberrated truncated Gaussian laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors outline a theory for the calculation of the beam quality factor of an aberrated laser beam. They provide closed form equations that show that the beam quality factor of an aberrated Gaussian beam depends on all primary aberrations except...

  1. Publisher Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Dose, Janina; Gentschew, Liljana

    2018-01-01

    The original version of this Article contained an error in the spelling of the author Robert Häsler, which was incorrectly given as Robert Häesler. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article....

  2. The aberrant retroesophageal right subclavian artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seres-Sturm, M; Maros, T N; Seres-Sturm, L

    1985-01-01

    Two cases with arteria lusoria were found at 278 routine dissections. These arteria arise as the last branches of the aortic arch and have a retroesophageal position. At the crossing point, the esophagus narrows due to the groove caused by the artery. The appearance of this malposition is the consequence of the perturbation in the organo-genesis of the right dorsal aorta and fourth branchial artery. The aberration can lead to disphagia lusoria.

  3. Retrotracheal aberrant left brachiocephalic vein: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Adalet E.; Haliloglu, Mithat; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ariyurek, Macit O. [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-03-15

    We present a child with double aberrant left brachiocephalic vein (ALBCV) that was an incidental finding on CT. The anterior and thin branch was above the aortic arch and behind the truncus brachiocephalicus and drained into the superior vena cava (SVC). The posterior and thick branch of the ALBCV coursed posterior to the trachea and oesophagus and joined with the azygos vein before draining into the SVC. To our knowledge, retrotracheal ALBCV has not been previously described. (orig.)

  4. Aberrant attachment of orbicularis oculi: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal Ritu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A morphological peculiarity was observed in the form of an aberrant lateral bony attachment of the orbital part of the Orbicularis oculi muscle on the zygomatic bone, during routine dissection of a cadaver of an adult male of Indian origin. Fibers of this part of the muscle are not known to show any lateral attachment on bone. This paper discusses the presentation, probable embryological cause and clinical implications of this unusual finding.

  5. Modelling of optical aberrations caused by light propagation in mouse cranial bone using second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan; Kner, Peter; Mortensen, Luke J.

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging through the bone to image into the bone marrow or the brain is an emerging need in the scientific community. Due to the highly scattering nature of bone, bone thinning or removal is typically required to enhance the resolution and signal intensity at the imaging plane. The optical aberrations and scattering in the bone significantly affect the resolution and signal to noise ratio of deep tissue microscopy. Multiphoton microscopy uses long wavelength (nearinfrared and infrared) excitation light to reduce the effects of scattering. However, it is still susceptible to optical aberrations and scattering since the light propagates through several layers of media with inhomogeneous indices of refraction. Mechanical removal of bone is highly invasive, laborious, and cannot be applied in experiments where imaging inside of the bone is desired. Adaptive optics technology can compensate for these optical aberrations and potentially restore the diffraction limited point spread function of the system even in deep tissue. To design an adaptive optics system, a priori knowledge of the sample structure assists selection of the proper correction element and sensing methods. In this work we present the characterization of optical aberrations caused by mouse cranial bone, using second harmonic generation imaging of bone collagen. We simulate light propagation through the bone, calculate aberrations and determine the correction that can be achieved using a deformable mirror.

  6. Effect of coma and spherical aberration on depth-of-focus measured using adaptive optics and computationally blurred images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Richard; Benard, Yohann; Lopez-Gil, Norberto

    2012-03-01

    To compare the effect of primary spherical aberration and vertical coma on depth of focus measured with 2 methods. Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, and Université Paris-Sud, Orsay, France. Evaluation of technology. The subjective depth of focus, defined as the interval of vision for which the target was still perceived acceptable, was evaluated using 2 methods. In the first method, the subject changed the defocus term by reshaping the mirror, which also corrected the subject's aberrations and induced a certain value of coma or primary spherical aberration. In the second procedure, the subject changed the displayed images, which were calculated for various defocuses and with the desired aberration using a numerical eye model. Depth of focus was measured using a 0.18 diopter (D) step in 4 nonpresbyopic subjects corrected for the entire eye aberrations with a 6.0 mm and 3.0 mm pupil and with the addition of 0.3 μm and 0.6 μm of positive primary spherical aberration or vertical coma. There was good concordance between the depth of focus measured with both methods (differences within 1/3 D, r(2) = 0.88). Image-quality metrics failed to predict the subjective depth of focus (r(2) < 0.41). These data confirm that defocus in the retinal image can be generated by optical or computational methods and that both can be used to assess the effect of higher-order aberrations on depth of focus. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automated aberration compensation in high numerical aperture systems for arbitrary laser modes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Julian; Waller, Erik H.; von Freymann, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Since a large number of optical systems and devices are based on differently shaped focal intensity distributions (point-spread-functions, PSF), the PSF's quality is crucial for the application's performance. E.g., optical tweezers, optical potentials for trapping of ultracold atoms as well as stimulated-emission-depletion (STED) based microscopy and lithography rely on precisely controlled intensity distributions. However, especially in high numerical aperture (NA) systems, such complex laser modes are easily distorted by aberrations leading to performance losses. Although different approaches addressing phase retrieval algorithms have been recently presented[1-3], fast and automated aberration compensation for a broad variety of complex shaped PSFs in high NA systems is still missing. Here, we report on a Gerchberg-Saxton[4] based algorithm (GSA) for automated aberration correction of arbitrary PSFs, especially for high NA systems. Deviations between the desired target intensity distribution and the three-dimensionally (3D) scanned experimental focal intensity distribution are used to calculate a correction phase pattern. The target phase distribution plus the correction pattern are displayed on a phase-only spatial-light-modulator (SLM). Focused by a high NA objective, experimental 3D scans of several intensity distributions allow for characterization of the algorithms performance: aberrations are reliably identified and compensated within less than 10 iterations. References 1. B. M. Hanser, M. G. L. Gustafsson, D. A. Agard, and J. W. Sedat, "Phase-retrieved pupil functions in wide-field fluorescence microscopy," J. of Microscopy 216(1), 32-48 (2004). 2. A. Jesacher, A. Schwaighofer, S. Frhapter, C. Maurer, S. Bernet, and M. Ritsch-Marte, "Wavefront correction of spatial light modulators using an optical vortex image," Opt. Express 15(9), 5801-5808 (2007). 3. A. Jesacher and M. J. Booth, "Parallel direct laser writing in three dimensions with spatially dependent

  8. Chromatic aberration and polychromatic image quality with diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Sowmya; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry N

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of target distance on polychromatic image quality in a virtual model eye implanted with hybrid refractive-diffractive intraocular lenses (IOLs). School of Optometry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA. Experimental study. A pseudophakic model eye was constructed by incorporating a phase-delay map for a diffractive optical element into a reduced eye model incorporating ocular chromatic aberration, pupil apodization, and higher-order monochromatic aberrations. The diffractive element was a monofocal IOL with a +3.2 diopter (D) diffractive power or 2 types of bifocal IOLs (nonapodized or apodized) with a +2.92 D addition (add) power. Polychromatic point-spread functions and image quality for white and monochromatic light were quantified for a series of target vergences, wavelengths, and pupil diameters using modulation transfer functions and image-quality metrics. Ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration was largely corrected by the monofocal design and by both bifocal designs for near targets. In the bifocal design, add power and the ratio of distance:near image quality changed significantly with wavelength and pupil size. Also, image quality for distance was better with the apodized design. Achromatization by the diffractive IOL provided significant improvement in polychromatic retinal image quality. Along with apodization and higher-order aberrations, it can significantly affect the near-distance balance provided by a diffractive multifocal IOL. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical treatment of aberrant aortic origin of coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooij, Marlotte; Vliegen, Hubert W; de Graaf, Michiel A; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant origin of the coronary arteries is rare but can be life threatening. It is an important cause of sudden death in athletes and other young adults, and may be treated surgically. Consensus exists that interarterial left coronary artery (LCA) should be surgically repaired. For interarterial right coronary artery (RCA), the discussion remains open. The purpose of this study was to analyse our surgical experience. From 2001 until 2014, 31 patients were operated for interarterial RCA, interarterial LCA or intraseptal course of the LCA. Twenty-six patients had interarterial RCA, 4 patients interarterial LCA and 1 patient an intraseptal course of the LCA. Median age at operation was 38 years (range 9-66 years). Twenty-eight patients had previous or current symptoms. The most important were a life-threatening event with resuscitation in 3 and myocardial infarction in 3 others. Surgical repair of interarterial RCA consisted of unroofing of the ostium with or without reimplantation in 25 patients and CABG on the RCA with a venous graft in 1 patient. Reconstruction of interarterial LCA consisted of ostium reconstruction of the LCA with a venous patch in 4 patients. The patient with an intraseptal course had a complete release of the LCA out of the septum and reimplantation in the correct coronary sinus. Follow-up was done by analysis of outpatient records, direct patient contact, echocardiography, electrocardiography, CT-angiography and an exercise test. Median follow-up was 6 years (range 0-11 years). One patient was lost to follow-up. No early or late mortality occurred. Three patients had ischaemia with ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia shortly after surgery. Two were immediately reoperated, 1 had a stent implantation 1.5 months after release of intraseptal LCA. Two of these patients show a slight dysfunction of the left ventricle at follow-up. All other patients are asymptomatic. Surgery for aberrant origin of coronary arteries is safe. There is

  10. Missense variants in CFTR nucleotide-binding domains predict quantitative phenotypes associated with cystic fibrosis disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masica, David L; Sosnay, Patrick R; Raraigh, Karen S; Cutting, Garry R; Karchin, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    Predicting the impact of genetic variation on human health remains an important and difficult challenge. Often, algorithmic classifiers are tasked with predicting binary traits (e.g. positive or negative for a disease) from missense variation. Though useful, this arrangement is limiting and contrived, because human diseases often comprise a spectrum of severities, rather than a discrete partitioning of patient populations. Furthermore, labeling variants as causal or benign can be error prone, which is problematic for training supervised learning algorithms (the so-called garbage in, garbage out phenomenon). We explore the potential value of training classifiers using continuous-valued quantitative measurements, rather than binary traits. Using 20 variants from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) nucleotide-binding domains and six quantitative measures of cystic fibrosis (CF) severity, we trained classifiers to predict CF severity from CFTR variants. Employing cross validation, classifier prediction and measured clinical/functional values were significantly correlated for four of six quantitative traits (correlation P-values from 1.35 × 10(-4) to 4.15 × 10(-3)). Classifiers were also able to stratify variants by three clinically relevant risk categories with 85-100% accuracy, depending on which of the six quantitative traits was used for training. Finally, we characterized 11 additional CFTR variants using clinical sweat chloride testing, two functional assays, or all three diagnostics, and validated our classifier using blind prediction. Predictions were within the measured sweat chloride range for seven of eight variants, and captured the differential impact of specific variants on the two functional assays. This work demonstrates a promising and novel framework for assessing the impact of genetic variation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Analysis of the CFTR gene in Venezuelan cystic fibrosis patients, identification of six novel cystic fibrosis-causing genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez K

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Karen Sánchez,1 Elizabeth de Mendonca,1 Xiorama Matute,2 Ismenia Chaustre,2 Marlene Villalón,3 Howard Takiff4 1Unit of Genetic and Forensic Studies, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC, 2Hospital JM de los Ríos, 3Hospital José Ignacio Baldo, Algodonal, National Reference Unit, 4Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (IVIC, Caracas, Venezuela. Abstract: The mutations in the CFTR gene found in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF have geographic differences, but there are scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in a group of Venezuelan patients with CF. The 27 exons of the CFTR gene from 110 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program were amplified and sequenced. A total of 36 different mutations were identified, seven with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del (27.27%, p.Gly542* (3.18%, c.2988+1G.A (3.18%, p.Arg334Trp (1.36%, p.Arg1162* (1.36%, c.1-8G.C (1.36%, and p.[Gly628Arg;Ser1235Arg](1.36. In 40% of patients, all with a clinical diagnosis of CF, no mutations were found. This report represents the largest cohort of Venezuelan patients with CF ever examined, and includes a wider mutation panel than has been previously studied in this population. Mutations common in Southern European populations predominate, and several new mutations were discovered, but no mutations were found in 40% of the cohort. Keywords: c.49_50dupTT, c.3963+1G.A, p.Asp373Asn, p.Glu815*, p.Asn900Lys, p.Trp277*

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ...

  13. Influence of ocular chromatic aberration and pupil size on transverse resolution in ophthalmic adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Enrique J.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2005-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables visualization of the living human retina with unprecedented high axial resolution. The transverse resolution of existing OCT approaches is relatively modest as compared to other retinal imaging techniques. In this context, the use of adaptive optics (AO) to correct for ocular aberrations in combination with OCT has recently been demonstrated to notably increase the transverse resolution of the retinal OCT tomograms. AO is required when imaging is performed through moderate and large pupil sizes. A fundamental difference of OCT as compared to other imaging techniques is the demand of polychromatic light to accomplish high axial resolution. In ophthalmic OCT applications, the performance is therefore also limited by ocular chromatic aberrations. In the current work, the effects of chromatic and monochromatic ocular aberrations on the quality of retinal OCT tomograms, especially concerning transverse resolution, sensitivity and contrast, are theoretically studied and characterized. The repercussion of the chosen spectral bandwidth and pupil size on the final transverse resolution of OCT tomograms is quantitatively examined. It is found that losses in the intensity of OCT images obtained with monochromatic aberration correction can be up to 80 %, using a pupil size of 8 mm diameter in combination with a spectral bandwidth of 120 nm full width at half maximum for AO ultrahigh resolution OCT. The limits to the performance of AO for correction of monochromatic aberrations in OCT are established. The reduction of the detected signal and the resulting transverse resolution caused by chromatic aberration of the human eye is found to be strongly dependent on the employed bandwidth and pupil size. Comparison of theoretical results with experimental findings obtained in living human eyes is also provided.

  14. Correction note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Correction note for Sanders, M., Calam, R., Durand, M., Liversidge, T. and Carmont, S. A. (2008), Does self-directed and web-based support for parents enhance the effects of viewing a reality television series based on the Triple P - Positive Parenting Programme?. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49: 924-932. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01901.x. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  15. Dendrimer-based selective autophagy-induction rescues ΔF508-CFTR and inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Mackenzie Brockman

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a genetic disorder caused by mutation(s in the CF-transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr gene. The most common mutation, ΔF508, leads to accumulation of defective-CFTR protein in aggresome-bodies. Additionally, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa, a common CF pathogen, exacerbates obstructive CF lung pathology. In the present study, we aimed to develop and test a novel strategy to improve the bioavailability and potentially achieve targeted drug delivery of cysteamine, a potent autophagy-inducing drug with anti-bacterial properties, by developing a dendrimer (PAMAM-DEN-based cysteamine analogue.We first evaluated the effect of dendrimer-based cysteamine analogue (PAMAM-DENCYS on the intrinsic autophagy response in IB3-1 cells and observed a significant reduction in Ub-RFP and LC3-GFP co-localization (aggresome-bodies by PAMAM-DENCYS treatment as compared to plain dendrimer (PAMAM-DEN control. Next, we observed that PAMAM-DENCYS treatment shows a modest rescue of ΔF508-CFTR as the C-form. Moreover, immunofluorescence microscopy of HEK-293 cells transfected with ΔF508-CFTR-GFP showed that PAMAM-DENCYS is able to rescue the misfolded-ΔF508-CFTR from aggresome-bodies by inducing its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We further verified these results by flow cytometry and observed significant (p<0.05; PAMAM-DEN vs. PAMAM-DENCYS rescue of membrane-ΔF508-CFTR with PAMAM-DENCYS treatment using non-permeabilized IB3-1 cells immunostained for CFTR. Finally, we assessed the autophagy-mediated bacterial clearance potential of PAMAM-DENCYS by treating IB3-1 cells infected with PA01-GFP, and observed a significant (p<0.01; PAMAM-DEN vs. PAMAM-DENCYS decrease in intracellular bacterial counts by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Also, PAMAM-DENCYS treatment significantly inhibits the growth of PA01-GFP bacteria and demonstrates potent mucolytic properties.We demonstrate here the efficacy of dendrimer-based autophagy

  16. CFTR-associated ligand is a negative regulator of Mrp2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Soroka, Carol J; Harry, Kathy; Boyer, James L

    2017-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that transports a wide variety of organic anions across the apical membrane of epithelial cells. The expression of Mrp2 on the plasma membrane is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-associated ligand (CAL) interacts with transmembrane proteins via its PDZ domain and reduces their cell surface expression by increasing lysosomal degradation and intracellular retention. Our results showed that CAL is localized at the trans-Golgi network of rat hepatocytes. The expression of CAL is increased, and Mrp2 expression is decreased, in the liver of mice deficient in sodium/hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1. To determine whether CAL interacts with Mrp2 and is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of Mrp2, we used glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with or without the COOH-terminal PDZ binding motif of Mrp2 as the bait in GST pull-down assays. We demonstrated that Mrp2 binds to CAL via its COOH-terminal PDZ-binding motif in GST pull-down assays, an interaction verified by coimmunoprecipitation of these two proteins in cotransfected COS-7 cells. In COS-7 and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with Mrp2 alone, only a mature, high-molecular-mass band of Mrp2 was detected. However, when cells were cotransfected with Mrp2 and CAL, Mrp2 was expressed as both mature and immature forms. Biotinylation and streptavidin pull-down assays confirmed that CAL dramatically reduces the expression level of total and cell surface Mrp2 in Huh-7 cells. Our findings suggest that CAL interacts with Mrp2 and is a negative regulator of Mrp2 expression. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Genomic sequencing in cystic fibrosis newborn screening: what works best, two-tier predefined CFTR mutation panels or second-tier CFTR panel followed by third-tier sequencing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert J; Sciortino, Stan; Liu, Ruiling; Bishop, Tracey; Alikhani Koupaei, Rasoul; Feuchtbaum, Lisa

    2017-10-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to model the performance of several known two-tier, predefined mutation panels and three-tier algorithms for cystic fibrosis (CF) screening utilizing the ethnically diverse California population.MethodsThe cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations identified among the 317 CF cases in California screened between 12 August 2008 and 18 December 2012 were used to compare the expected CF detection rates for several two- and three-tier screening approaches, including the current California approach, which consists of a population-specific 40-mutation panel followed by third-tier sequencing when indicated.ResultsThe data show that the strategy of using third-tier sequencing improves CF detection following an initial elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen and detection of only one mutation on a second-tier panel.ConclusionIn a diverse population, the use of a second-tier panel followed by third-tier CFTR gene sequencing provides a better detection rate for CF, compared with the use of a second-tier approach alone, and is an effective way to minimize the referrals of CF carriers for sweat testing. Restricting screening to a second-tier testing to predefined mutation panels, even broad ones, results in some missed CF cases and demonstrates the limited utility of this approach in states that have diverse multiethnic populations.

  18. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to raise the awareness of the influence of coma-like higher-order aberrations (HOAs) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics. Eleven eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics and with low lenticular astigmatism (LA) were selected for astigmatism analysis and for treatment simulations with topography-guided custom ablation. Vector analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of coma-like corneal HOAs to RA. Two different strategies were used for simulated treatments aiming to regularize irregular corneal optics: With both strategies correction of anterior corneal surface irregularities (corneal HOAs) were intended. Correction of total corneal astigmatism (TCA) and RA was intended as well with strategies 1 and 2, respectively. Axis of discrepant astigmatism (RA minus TCA minus LA) correlated strongly with axis of coma. Vertical coma influenced RA by canceling the effect of the with-the-rule astigmatism and increasing the effect of the against-the-rule astigmatism. After simulated correction of anterior corneal HOAs along with TCA and RA (strategies 1 and 2), only a small amount of anterior corneal astigmatism (ACA) and no TCA remained after strategy 1, while considerable amount of ACA and TCA remained after strategy 2. Coma-like corneal aberrations seem to contribute a considerable astigmatic component to RA in eyes with coma-like-aberrations dominant corneal optics. If topography-guided ablation is programmed to correct the corneal HOAs and RA, the astigmatic component caused by the coma-like corneal HOAs will be treated twice and will result in induced astigmatism. Disregarding RA and treating TCA along with the corneal HOAs is recommended instead.

  19. Genomic aberrations in borderline ovarian tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Ben

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the scientific literature, less than 30 borderline ovarian tumors have been karyotyped and less than 100 analyzed for genomic imbalances by CGH. Methods We report a series of borderline ovarian tumors (n = 23 analyzed by G-banding and karyotyping as well as high resolution CGH; in addition, the tumors were analyzed for microsatellite stability status and by FISH for possible 6q deletion. Results All informative tumors were microsatellite stable and none had a deletion in 6q27. All cases with an abnormal karyotype had simple chromosomal aberrations with +7 and +12 as the most common. In three tumors with single structural rearrangements, a common breakpoint in 3q13 was detected. The major copy number changes detected in the borderline tumors were gains from chromosome arms 2q, 6q, 8q, 9p, and 13q and losses from 1p, 12q, 14q, 15q, 16p, 17p, 17q, 19p, 19q, and 22q. The series included five pairs of bilateral tumors and, in two of these pairs, informative data were obtained as to their clonal relationship. In both pairs, similarities were found between the tumors from the right and left side, strongly indicating that bilaterality had occurred via a metastatic process. The bilateral tumors as a group showed more aberrations than did the unilateral ones, consistent with the view that bilaterality is a sign of more advanced disease. Conclusion Because some of the imbalances found in borderline ovarian tumors seem to be similar to imbalances already known from the more extensively studied overt ovarian carcinomas, we speculate that the subset of borderline tumors with detectable imbalances or karyotypic aberrations may contain a smaller subset of tumors with a tendency to develop a more malignant phenotype. The group of borderline tumors with no imbalances would, in this line of thinking, have less or no propensity for clonal evolution and development to full-blown carcinomas.

  20. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  1. Ocular aberrations in barn owl eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmening, Wolf M; Vobig, Michael A; Walter, Peter; Wagner, Hermann

    2007-10-01

    Optical quality in barn owl eyes is presented in terms of measuring the ocular wavefront aberrations with a standard Tscherning-type wavefront aberrometer under natural viewing conditions. While accommodative state was uncontrolled, all eyes were focused within 0.4D with respect to the plane of the aberrometer. Total RMS wavefront error was between 0.06 and 0.15 microm (mean: 0.10 microm, STD: 0.03 microm, defocus cancelled) for a 6 mm pupil. The results suggest that image quality in barn owl eyes is excellent.

  2. Aberration-free volumetric high-speed imaging of in vivo retina

    CERN Document Server

    Hillmann, Dierck; Hain, Carola; Sudkamp, Helge; Franke, Gesa; Pfäffle, Clara; Winter, Christian; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2016-01-01

    Research and medicine rely on non-invasive optical techniques to image living tissue with high resolution in space and time. But so far a single data acquisition could not provide entirely diffraction-limited tomographic volumes of rapidly moving or changing targets, which additionally becomes increasingly difficult in the presence of aberrations, e.g., when imaging retina in vivo. We show, that a simple interferometric setup based on parallelized optical coherence tomography acquires volumetric data with 10 billion voxels per second, exceeding previous imaging speeds by an order of magnitude. This allows us to computationally obtain and correct defocus and aberrations resulting in entirely diffraction-limited volumes. As demonstration, we imaged living human retina with clearly visible nerve fiber layer, small capillary networks, and photoreceptor cells, but the technique is also applicable to obtain phase-sensitive volumes of other scattering structures at unprecedented acquisition speeds.

  3. Clusters of Cl- channels in CFTR-expressing Sf9 cells switch spontaneously between slow and fast gating modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Price, E. M.; Gabriel, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), which was raised by exposing the cells to 10 µM forskolin. Thirdly, recordings of currents through single channels in excised outside-out membrane patches of CFTR-infected cells revealed channels which were clearly different from the native insect chloride...... channel. Excised outside-out patches of CFTR-infected and forskolin-stimulated cells exhibited wave-like gating kinetics of well-resolved current transitions. All-point Gaussian distributions revealed contributions from several (five to nine) identical channels. Such channels, in excised outside......-out patches, studied with a pipette [Cl-] = 40 mM and a bath [Cl-] = 150 mM, rectified the current in agreement with simple electrodiffusion and with a single-channel Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz permeability, P Cl = 1.34 · 10-14 ± 0.23 · 10-14cm3/s (n = 5), corresponding to a physiological single-channel conductance...

  4. Generalized Doppler and aberration kernel for frequency-dependent cosmological observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasini, Siavash; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2017-11-01

    We introduce a frequency-dependent Doppler and aberration transformation kernel for the harmonic multipoles of a general cosmological observable with spin weight s , Doppler weight d and arbitrary frequency spectrum. In the context of cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies, the frequency-dependent formalism allows to correct for the motion-induced aberration and Doppler effects on individual frequency maps with different masks. It also permits to deboost background radiations with non-blackbody frequency spectra, like extragalactic foregrounds and CMB spectra with primordial spectral distortions. The formalism can also be used to correct individual E and B polarization modes and account for motion-induced E/B mixing of polarized observables with d ≠1 at different frequencies. We apply the generalized aberration kernel on polarized and unpolarized specific intensity at 100 and 217 GHz and show that the motion-induced effects typically increase with the frequency of observation. In all-sky CMB experiments, the frequency-dependence of the motion-induced effects for a blackbody spectrum are overall negligible. However in a cut-sky analysis, ignoring the frequency dependence can lead to percent level error in the polarized and unpolarized power spectra over all angular scales. In the specific cut-sky used in our analysis (b >4 5 ° ,fsky≃14 % ), and for the dipole-inferred velocity β =0.00123 typically attributed to our peculiar motion, the Doppler and aberration effects can change polarized and unpolarized power spectra of specific intensity in the CMB rest frame by 1 - 2 % , but we find the polarization cross-leakage between E and B modes to be negligible.

  5. Aberrant Myokine Signaling in Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Nakamori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1 and 2 (DM2 are dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by a toxic gain of function of expanded CUG and CCUG repeats, respectively. Although both disorders are clinically similar, congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM, a severe DM form, is found only in DM1. CDM is also characterized by muscle fiber immaturity not observed in adult DM, suggesting specific pathological mechanisms. Here, we revealed upregulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in CDM muscles. We also found a correlation between muscle immaturity and not only IL-6 expression but also expanded CTG repeat length and CpG methylation status upstream of the repeats. Aberrant CpG methylation was associated with transcriptional dysregulation at the repeat locus, increasing the toxic RNA burden that upregulates IL-6. Because the IL-6 pathway is involved in myocyte maturation and muscle atrophy, our results indicate that enhanced RNA toxicity contributes to severe CDM phenotypes through aberrant IL-6 signaling. : Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM manifests characteristic genetic (very large CTG repeat expansions, epigenetic (CpG hypermethylation upstream of the repeat, and phenotypic (muscle immaturity features not seen in adult DM. Nakamori et al. find phenotype-genotype and epigenotype correlation in CDM muscle and reveal involvement of the IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in the disease process. Keywords: CTCF, ER stress, IL-6, muscular dystrophy, NF-κB, trinucleotide, cytokine, splicing

  6. Effect of Quartic Phase Optical Aberration on Laser Beam Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, A.; Bouafia, M.; Boubetra, Dj.

    2009-09-01

    Laser beam quality is related to the aberration effect. Quartic phase aberration, more commonly known as spherical aberration, can result from aberrated optical components such as beam expanding telescopes, focusing or collimating lenses, or other conventional optical elements; from thermal focusing or thermal blooming in high power laser windows, lenses, amplifier rods, optical isolators, and other absorbing media. In general any kind of quartic aberration will lead to increased far field beam spread, degraded laser beam focusability and increased values of the beam quality. Currently, a well established quality parameter for laser beams is the M2 factor. This paper presents a new mathematical set for the spherical aberration coefficient C4 of Gaussian beams. The main idea comes from the estimation of the laser beam quality factor M2 given by Siegman. We show that this coefficient concerns only the case of geometrical optics.

  7. Primary aberration coefficients for axial gradient-index lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bociort, Florian

    1999-08-01

    As for homogeneous lenses, for axial gradients the analysis of the Seidel and chromatic aberration coefficients can be very useful in lens design. However, at present few commercial optical design programs list the Seidel aberrations of GRIN lenses and none of them lists the chromatic aberrations. In order to facilitate the computer implementation of the chromatic aberrations of axial GRIN lenses a new mathematical derivation for the axial and lateral color coefficients is presented. Also, new qualitative insight into the properties of axial GRIN lenses is obtained by introducing the thin-lens approximation in the aberration expressions. Within the domain of validity of this approximation, the primary aberrations of an axial GRIN lens are equivalent to those of a pair of homogeneous aspherical lens in contact, having a common plane surface and having refractive indices and Abbe numbers equal to the corresponding axial GRIN values at the two end surfaces.

  8. A Monte-Carlo Model for the Formation of Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cornforth, Michael N.; Loucas, Brad D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    multi-centrics were also recorded. Conclusion: High-LET DNA damage affects the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. The ratio of rings to dicentrics is correct for the genomic size cut-offs corresponding to available experimental data. The present work predicts a relative abundance of small rings following irradiation by heavy ions.

  9. Low abundance of sweat duct Cl− channel CFTR in both healthy and cystic fibrosis athletes with exceptionally salty sweat during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Karla K. V.; Pollack, Brian P.; Millard-Stafford, Mindy; McCarty, Nael A.

    2011-01-01

    To understand potential mechanisms explaining interindividual variability observed in human sweat sodium concentration ([Na+]), we investigated the relationship among [Na+] of thermoregulatory sweat, plasma membrane expression of Na+ and Cl− transport proteins in biopsied human eccrine sweat ducts, and basal levels of vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone. Lower ductal luminal membrane expression of the Cl− channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was observed in immunofluorescent staining of sweat glands from healthy young adults identified as exceptionally “salty sweaters” (SS) (n = 6, P sweat [Na+] (control, n = 6). Genetic testing of healthy subjects did not reveal any heterozygotes (“carriers”) for any of the 39 most common disease-causing CFTR mutations in the United States. SS had higher baseline plasma [AVP] compared with control (P = 0.029). Immunostaining to investigate a potential relationship between higher plasma [AVP] (and sweat [Na+]) and ductal membrane aquaporin-5 revealed for all groups a relatively sparse and location-dependent ductal expression of the water channel with localization primarily to the secretory coil. Availability of CFTR for NaCl transport across the ductal membrane appears related to the significant physiological variability observed in sweat salt concentration in apparently healthy humans. At present, a heritable link between healthy salty sweaters and the most prevalent disease-causing CFTR mutations cannot be established. PMID:21228336

  10. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor, a novel agent for the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients who are homozygous for the F580del CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Hanna, Cameron; Giovane, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting up to 90,000 people worldwide. Approximately 73% of patients are homozygous for the F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] mutation. Traditionally treatment has only included supportive care. Therefore, there is a need for safe and effective novel therapies targeting the underlying molecular defects seen with CF. Areas covered: In 2016, the Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission approved LUM/IVA (Orkambi), a CFTR modulator that includes both a CFTR corrector and potentiator, for CF patients homozygous for the F508del CFTR mutation. This article reviews the pharmacologic features, clinical efficacy, and safety of LUM/IVA and summarize the available pre-clinical and clinical data of LUM/IVA use. Expert commentary: LUM/IVA showed modest, but significant improvements from baseline in percent predicted FEV1 (ppFEV1) as well as a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations by 35% It was shown to be safe for short- and long-term use. Currently, LUM/IVA is the only oral agent in its class available and represents a milestone the development of therapies for the management of CF. Nonetheless, pharmacoeconomic data are necessary to justify its high cost before is use becomes standard of care.

  11. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun (Cystic); (UAB); (JHU); (Columbia); (Lilly)

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  12. Hydronephrosis by an Aberrant Renal Artery: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byoung Seok; Jeong, Taek Kyun; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Nam Ho; Choi, Ki Chul; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2003-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction is usually intrinsic and is most common in children. Aberrant renal arteries are present in about 30% of individuals. Aberrant renal arteries to the inferior pole cross anteriorly to the ureter and may cause hydronephrosis. To the best of our knowledge, although there are some papers about aberrant renal arteries producing ureteropelvic junction obstruction, there is no report of a case which is diagnosed by the new modalities, such as computed tomography an...

  13. Higher order aberrations of the eye: Part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Oberholzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is the first in a series of two articles that provide a comprehensive literature review of higher order aberrations (HOAs of the eye. The present article mainly explains the general principles of such HOAs as well as HOAs of importance, and the measuring apparatus used to measure HOAs of the eye. The second article in the series discusses factors contributing to variable results in measurements of HOAs of the eye.Keywords: Higher order aberrations; wavefront aberrations; aberrometer

  14. Human axial chromatic aberration found not to decline with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, C

    1982-01-01

    Millodot (1976) reported a dramatic decline in the amount of axial chromatic aberration of the human eye with age. The present study represents a failure to replicate that finding using a more standard procedure. No difference in chromatic aberration was found between a young and an older group of observers. Also, the chromatic aberrations of two observers which had been measured 25 years previously showed no decline when these measurements were repeated, even though their ages at first and second testing straddled the period over which Millodot reported the most change in chromatic aberration.

  15. Lubiprostone activates Cl- secretion via cAMP signaling and increases membrane CFTR in the human colon carcinoma cell line, T84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mei; Venkatasubramanian, Jayashree; Boonkaewwan, Chaiwat; Ganesan, Nivetha; Syed, Asma; Benya, Richard V; Rao, Mrinalini C

    2011-02-01

    Lubiprostone, used clinically (b.i.d.) to treat constipation, has been reported to increase transepithelial Cl(-) transport in T84 cells by activating ClC-2 channels. To identify the underlying signaling pathway, we explored the effects of short-term and overnight lubiprostone treatment on second messenger signaling and Cl(-) transport. Cl(-) transport was assessed either as I(sc) across T84 monolayers grown on Transwells and mounted in Ussing chambers or by the iodide efflux assay. [cAMP](i) was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and [Ca(2+)](i) by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Quantitation of apical cell surface CFTR protein levels was assessed by Western blotting and biotinylation with the EZ-Link Sulfo-NHS-LC-LC-Biotin. ClC-2 mRNA level was studied by RT-PCR. Lubiprostone and the cAMP stimulator, forskolin, caused comparable and maximal increases of I(sc) in T84 cells. The I(sc) effects of lubiprostone and forskolin were each suppressed if the tissue had previously been treated with the other agent. These responses were unaltered even if the monolayers were treated with lubiprostone overnight. Lubiprostone-induced increases in iodide efflux were ~80% of those obtained with forskolin. Lubiprostone increased [cAMP](i). H89, bumetanide, or CFTR(inh)-172 greatly attenuated lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) secretion, whereas the ClC-2 inhibitor CdCl(2) did not. Compared to controls, FSK-treatment increased membrane-associated CFTR by 1.9 fold, and lubiprostone caused a 2.6-fold increase in apical membrane CFTR as seen by immunoblotting following cell surface biotinylation. Lubiprostone activates Cl(-) secretion in T84 cells via cAMP, protein kinase A, and by increasing apical membrane CFTR protein.

  16. Aberrant intestinal microbiota in individuals with prediabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Tremaroli, Valentina; Caesar, Robert

    2018-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Individuals with type 2 diabetes have aberrant intestinal microbiota. However, recent studies suggest that metformin alters the composition and functional potential of gut microbiota, thereby interfering with the diabetes-related microbial signatures. We tested whether specific gut...... among individuals with prediabetes (mean log2 fold change -1.74 (SEM 0.41), p adj  = 2 × 10-3 and -1.65 (SEM 0.34), p adj  = 4 × 10-4, respectively). Faecal transfer from donors with prediabetes or screen-detected, drug-naive type 2 diabetes to germfree Swiss Webster or conventional C57BL/6 J mice did...... with prediabetes, overweight, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and low-grade inflammation and 134 age- and sex-matched individuals with normal glucose regulation. RESULTS: We found that five bacterial genera and 36 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were differentially abundant between individuals...

  17. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  18. Diet, aberrant crypt foci and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, W R; Archer, M C; Corpet, D E; Medline, A; Minkin, S; Stamp, D; Yin, Y; Zhang, X M

    1993-11-01

    We have used the aberrant crypt focus (ACF) assay to test and develop hypotheses linking diet and colon cancer. The hypotheses were suggested by epidemiological studies that identified possible dietary factors associated with colorectal cancer risk. The ACF assay was used to quantitate the effect of the dietary factors on the initiation and growth of these putative precursors of colon cancers in experimental animals. Using this approach we have developed 3 new hypotheses for the role of diet in colorectal cancer. These are (1) a risk associated with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in caramelized sugar, (2) a risk associated with some factor in thermolyzed casein, and (3) a risk associated with single nutrient boluses of sucrose and fructose. The importance of these hypotheses has still to be tested in long term carcinogenesis experiments, in analytic epidemiology studies and then, perhaps, in intervention trials.

  19. Étude cytogenetique des aberrations chromosomiques chez des ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After 48 hours of culture in the presence of BrdU, the samples underwent the whole procedure of the metaphase cytogenetic analysis technique. Results: The 22 technicians totaled 4856 metaphases containing 421 chromosomal aberrations and 28 sister chromatid exchanges. It was noted the complex aberrations ...

  20. An aberrant uterus: Case report | Ondieki | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of an aberrant uterus is presented and literature reviewed. The patient presented with abnormal uterine bleeding, left iliac fossa pain and was managed by excising the aberrant uterus. This case was an enigma as it didn't present in the classical way one with anomalies of the uterus would present. Despite ...

  1. Aberrant Breast in a Rare Site: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Yeniay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant breast tissue is an anomaly in the embryogenesis of the breast that is found along the mammary ridge or out of that line. We report a case of a 71-year-old female patient with an abdominal aberrant breast tissue found incidentally in a piece of mesenteric biopsy. The histological features were consistent with breast tissue.

  2. On the benefit of the negative-spherical-aberration imaging technique for quantitative HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, C.L., E-mail: c.jia@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Houben, L.; Thust, A.; Barthel, J. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Employing an aberration corrector in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, the spherical aberration C{sub S} can be tuned to negative values, resulting in a novel imaging technique, which is called the negative C{sub S} imaging (NCSI) technique. The image contrast obtained with the NCSI technique is compared quantitatively with the image contrast formed with the traditional positive C{sub S} imaging (PCSI) technique. For the case of thin objects negative C{sub S} images are superior to positive C{sub S} images concerning the magnitude of the obtained contrast, which is due to constructive rather than destructive superposition of fundamental contrast contributions. As a consequence, the image signal obtained with a negative spherical aberration is significantly more robust against noise caused by amorphous surface layers, resulting in a measurement precision of atomic positions which is by a factor of 2-3 better at an identical noise level. The quantitative comparison of the two alternative C{sub S}-corrected imaging modes shows that the NCSI mode yields significantly more precise results in quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of thin objects than the traditional PCSI mode.

  3. Global coordinates and exact aberration calculations applied to physical optics modeling of complex optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, G.; Barnard, C.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Historically, wave optics computer codes have been paraxial in nature. Folded systems could be modeled by ''unfolding'' the optical system. Calculation of optical aberrations is, in general, left for the analyst to do with off-line codes. While such paraxial codes were adequate for the simpler systems being studied 10 years ago, current problems such as phased arrays, ring resonators, coupled resonators, and grazing incidents optics require a major advance in analytical capability. This paper describes extension of the physical optics codes GLAD and GLAD V to include a global coordinate system and exact ray aberration calculations. The global coordinate system allows components to be positioned and rotated arbitrarily. Exact aberrations are calculated for components in aligned or misaligned configurations by using ray tracing to compute optical path differences and diffraction propagation. Optical path lengths between components and beam rotations in complex mirror systems are calculated accurately so that coherent interactions in phased arrays and coupled devices may be treated correctly.

  4. A resolution insensitive to geometrical aberrations by using incoherent illumination and interference imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Peng; Fink, Mathias; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Claude Boccara, A.

    2017-05-01

    This contribution is another opportunity to acknowledge the influence of Roger Maynard on our research work when he pushed one of us (ACB) to explore the field of waves propagating in complex media rather than limiting ourselves to the wavelength scale of thermal waves or near field phenomena. Optical tomography is used for imaging in-depth scattering media such as biological tissues. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) plays an important role in imaging biological samples. Coupling OCT with adaptive optics (AO) in order to correct eye aberrations has led to cellular imaging of the retina. By using our approach called Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) we show that, with spatially incoherent illumination, the width of the point-spread function (PSF) that governs the resolution is not affected by aberrations that induce only a reduction of the signal level. We will describe our approach by starting with the PSF experimental data followed by a simple theoretical analysis, and numerical calculations. Finally full images obtained through or inside scattering and aberrating media will be shown.

  5. Identification of candidate driver genes in common focal chromosomal aberrations of microsatellite stable colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Burghel

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Chromosomal instability (CIN is a major driving force of microsatellite stable (MSS sporadic CRC. CIN tumours are characterised by a large number of somatic chromosomal copy number aberrations (SCNA that frequently affect oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. The main aim of this work was to identify novel candidate CRC driver genes affected by recurrent and focal SCNA. High resolution genome-wide comparative genome hybridisation (CGH arrays were used to compare tumour and normal DNA for 53 sporadic CRC cases. Context corrected common aberration (COCA analysis and custom algorithms identified 64 deletions and 32 gains of focal minimal common regions (FMCR at high frequency (>10%. Comparison of these FMCR with published genomic profiles from CRC revealed common overlap (42.2% of deletions and 34.4% of copy gains. Pathway analysis showed that apoptosis and p53 signalling pathways were commonly affected by deleted FMCR, and MAPK and potassium channel pathways by gains of FMCR. Candidate tumour suppressor genes in deleted FMCR included RASSF3, IFNAR1, IFNAR2 and NFKBIA and candidate oncogenes in gained FMCR included PRDM16, TNS1, RPA3 and KCNMA1. In conclusion, this study confirms some previously identified aberrations in MSS CRC and provides in silico evidence for some novel candidate driver genes.

  6. Identification of candidate driver genes in common focal chromosomal aberrations of microsatellite stable colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghel, George J; Lin, Wei-Yu; Whitehouse, Helen; Brock, Ian; Hammond, David; Bury, Jonathan; Stephenson, Yvonne; George, Rina; Cox, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a major driving force of microsatellite stable (MSS) sporadic CRC. CIN tumours are characterised by a large number of somatic chromosomal copy number aberrations (SCNA) that frequently affect oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. The main aim of this work was to identify novel candidate CRC driver genes affected by recurrent and focal SCNA. High resolution genome-wide comparative genome hybridisation (CGH) arrays were used to compare tumour and normal DNA for 53 sporadic CRC cases. Context corrected common aberration (COCA) analysis and custom algorithms identified 64 deletions and 32 gains of focal minimal common regions (FMCR) at high frequency (>10%). Comparison of these FMCR with published genomic profiles from CRC revealed common overlap (42.2% of deletions and 34.4% of copy gains). Pathway analysis showed that apoptosis and p53 signalling pathways were commonly affected by deleted FMCR, and MAPK and potassium channel pathways by gains of FMCR. Candidate tumour suppressor genes in deleted FMCR included RASSF3, IFNAR1, IFNAR2 and NFKBIA and candidate oncogenes in gained FMCR included PRDM16, TNS1, RPA3 and KCNMA1. In conclusion, this study confirms some previously identified aberrations in MSS CRC and provides in silico evidence for some novel candidate driver genes.

  7. Hydronephrosis by an Aberrant Renal Artery: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Seok; Jeong, Taek Kyun; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Nam Ho; Choi, Ki Chul; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2003-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction is usually intrinsic and is most common in children. Aberrant renal arteries are present in about 30% of individuals. Aberrant renal arteries to the inferior pole cross anteriorly to the ureter and may cause hydronephrosis. To the best of our knowledge, although there are some papers about aberrant renal arteries producing ureteropelvic junction obstruction, there is no report of a case which is diagnosed by the new modalities, such as computed tomography angiogram (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA). We describe a 36-year-old woman with right hydronephrosis. Kidney ultrasonogram and excretory urogram revealed right hydronephrosis. CTA and MRA clearly displayed an aberrant renal artery and hydronephrosis. The patient underwent surgical exploration. For the evaluation of hydronephrosis by an aberrant renal artery, use of CTA and MRA is advocated. PMID:12760271

  8. Image based method for aberration measurement of lithographic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuang; Tao, Bo; Guo, Yongxing; Li, Gongfa

    2018-01-01

    Information of lens aberration of lithographic tools is important as it directly affects the intensity distribution in the image plane. Zernike polynomials are commonly used for a mathematical description of lens aberrations. Due to the advantage of lower cost and easier implementation of tools, image based measurement techniques have been widely used. Lithographic tools are typically partially coherent systems that can be described by a bilinear model, which entails time consuming calculations and does not lend a simple and intuitive relationship between lens aberrations and the resulted images. Previous methods for retrieving lens aberrations in such partially coherent systems involve through-focus image measurements and time-consuming iterative algorithms. In this work, we propose a method for aberration measurement in lithographic tools, which only requires measuring two images of intensity distribution. Two linear formulations are derived in matrix forms that directly relate the measured images to the unknown Zernike coefficients. Consequently, an efficient non-iterative solution is obtained.

  9. A large-scale study of the random variability of a coding sequence: a study on the CFTR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, Guido; Bombieri, Cristina; Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Belpinati, Francesca; Giorgi, Silvia; Georges, Marie des; Scotet, Virginie; Pompei, Fiorenza; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Guittard, Caroline; Audrézet, Marie Pierre; Begnini, Angela; Toepfer, Michael; Macek, Milan; Ferec, Claude; Claustres, Mireille; Pignatti, Pier Franco

    2005-02-01

    Coding single nucleotide substitutions (cSNSs) have been studied on hundreds of genes using small samples (n(g) approximately 100-150 genes). In the present investigation, a large random European population sample (average n(g) approximately 1500) was studied for a single gene, the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator). The nonsynonymous (NS) substitutions exhibited, in accordance with previous reports, a mean probability of being polymorphic (q > 0.005), much lower than that of the synonymous (S) substitutions, but they showed a similar rate of subpolymorphic (q < 0.005) variability. This indicates that, in autosomal genes that may have harmful recessive alleles (nonduplicated genes with important functions), genetic drift overwhelms selection in the subpolymorphic range of variability, making disadvantageous alleles behave as neutral. These results imply that the majority of the subpolymorphic nonsynonymous alleles of these genes are selectively negative or even pathogenic.

  10. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP. This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1 genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. Results. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S gene polymorphism. IVS1−37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Conclusion. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  11. The CFTR Met 470 allele is associated with lower birth rates in fertile men from a population isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülüm Kosova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although little is known about the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene in reproductive physiology, numerous variants in this gene have been implicated in etiology of male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD. Here, we studied the fertility effects of three CBAVD-associated CFTR polymorphisms, the (TGm and polyT repeat polymorphisms in intron 8 and Met470Val in exon 10, in healthy men of European descent. Homozygosity for the Met470 allele was associated with lower birth rates, defined as the number of births per year of marriage (P = 0.0029. The Met470Val locus explained 4.36% of the phenotypic variance in birth rate, and men homozygous for the Met470 allele had 0.56 fewer children on average compared to Val470 carrier men. The derived Val470 allele occurs at high frequencies in non-African populations (allele frequency = 0.51 in HapMap CEU, whereas it is very rare in African population (Fst = 0.43 between HapMap CEU and YRI. In addition, haplotypes bearing Val470 show a lack of genetic diversity and are thus longer than haplotypes bearing Met470 (measured by an integrated haplotype score [iHS] of -1.93 in HapMap CEU. The fraction of SNPs in the HapMap Phase2 data set with more extreme Fst and iHS measures is 0.003, consistent with a selective sweep outside of Africa. The fertility advantage conferred by Val470 relative to Met470 may provide a selective mechanism for these population genetic observations.

  12. Impact of the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor on airway microbiota in cystic fibrosis patients carrying a G551D mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Bernarde

    Full Text Available Airway microbiota composition has been clearly correlated with many pulmonary diseases, and notably with cystic fibrosis (CF, an autosomal genetic disorder caused by mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Recently, a new molecule, ivacaftor, has been shown to re-establish the functionality of the G551D-mutated CFTR, allowing significant improvement in lung function.The purpose of this study was to follow the evolution of the airway microbiota in CF patients treated with ivacaftor, using quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons, in order to identify quantitative and qualitative changes in bacterial communities. Three G551D children were followed up longitudinally over a mean period of more than one year covering several months before and after initiation of ivacaftor treatment.129 operational taxonomy units (OTUs, representing 64 genera, were identified. There was no significant difference in total bacterial load before and after treatment. Comparison of global community composition found no significant changes in microbiota. Two OTUs, however, showed contrasting dynamics: after initiation of ivacaftor, the relative abundance of the anaerobe Porphyromonas 1 increased (p<0.01 and that of Streptococcus 1 (S. mitis group decreased (p<0.05, possibly in relation to the anti-Gram-positive properties of ivacaftor. The anaerobe Prevotella 2 correlated positively with the pulmonary function test FEV-1 (r=0.73, p<0.05. The study confirmed the presumed positive role of anaerobes in lung function.Several airway microbiota components, notably anaerobes (obligate or facultative anaerobes, could be valuable biomarkers of lung function improvement under ivacaftor, and could shed light on the pathophysiology of lung disease in CF patients.

  13. An unusual case of left aberrant innominate artery with right aortic arch: evaluation with high-resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Giulio [University Rene Descartes-Paris 5, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Gesualdo, Francesco; Brunelle, Francis; Ou, Phalla [University Rene Descartes-Paris 5, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2008-01-15

    A left aberrant innominate (brachiocephalic) artery is an angiographically well-known entity that may cause tracheal compression. We report a male newborn who was admitted for further investigation of a prenatally suspected major vessel anomaly. High-resolution CT was used to completely assess the abnormal anatomy and the relationship with the airway, as well as to guide the surgical approach for its correction. (orig.)

  14. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis poststroke: More new granule cells but aberrant morphology and impaired spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, Florus; Ceanga, Mihai; Rudolph, Max; Niv, Fanny; Witte, Otto W; Redecker, Christoph; Kunze, Albrecht; Keiner, Silke

    2017-01-01

    Stroke significantly stimulates neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus, though the functional role of this postlesional response is mostly unclear. Recent findings suggest that newborn neurons generated in the context of stroke may fail to correctly integrate into pre-existing networks. We hypothesized that increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus following stroke is associated with aberrant neurogenesis and impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. To address these questions we used the middle cerebral artery occlusion model (MCAO) in mice. Animals were housed either under standard conditions or with free access to running wheels. Newborn granule cells were labelled with the thymidine analoque EdU and retroviral vectors. To assess memory performance, we employed a modified version of the Morris water maze (MWM) allowing differentiation between hippocampus dependent and independent learning strategies. Newborn neurons were morphologically analyzed using confocal microscopy and Neurolucida system at 7 weeks. We found that neurogenesis was significantly increased following MCAO. Animals with MCAO needed more time to localize the platform and employed less hippocampus-dependent search strategies in MWM versus controls. Confocal studies revealed an aberrant cell morphology with basal dendrites and an ectopic location (e.g. hilus) of new granule cells born in the ischemic brain. Running increased the number of new neurons but also enhanced aberrant neurogenesis. Running, did not improve the general performance in the MWM but slightly promoted the application of precise spatial search strategies. In conclusion, ischemic insults cause hippocampal-dependent memory deficits which are associated with aberrant neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus indicating ischemia-induced maladaptive plasticity in the hippocampus.

  15. Aberrant light directly impairs mood and learning through melanopsin-expressing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGates, Tara A; Altimus, Cara M; Wang, Hui; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Yang, Sunggu; Zhao, Haiqing; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Weber, E Todd; Hattar, Samer

    2012-11-22

    The daily solar cycle allows organisms to synchronize their circadian rhythms and sleep-wake cycles to the correct temporal niche. Changes in day-length, shift-work, and transmeridian travel lead to mood alterations and cognitive function deficits. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption underlie mood and cognitive disorders associated with irregular light schedules. Whether irregular light schedules directly affect mood and cognitive functions in the context of normal sleep and circadian rhythms remains unclear. Here we show, using an aberrant light cycle that neither changes the amount and architecture of sleep nor causes changes in the circadian timing system, that light directly regulates mood-related behaviours and cognitive functions in mice. Animals exposed to the aberrant light cycle maintain daily corticosterone rhythms, but the overall levels of corticosterone are increased. Despite normal circadian and sleep structures, these animals show increased depression-like behaviours and impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning. Administration of the antidepressant drugs fluoxetine or desipramine restores learning in mice exposed to the aberrant light cycle, suggesting that the mood deficit precedes the learning impairments. To determine the retinal circuits underlying this impairment of mood and learning, we examined the behavioural consequences of this light cycle in animals that lack intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. In these animals, the aberrant light cycle does not impair mood and learning, despite the presence of the conventional retinal ganglion cells and the ability of these animals to detect light for image formation. These findings demonstrate the ability of light to influence cognitive and mood functions directly through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

  16. Interaction between Corneal and Internal Ocular Aberrations Induced by Orthokeratology and Its Influential Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingzhong; Me, Rao; Yu, Yunjie; Shi, Guangsen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the interaction between corneal, internal, and total wavefront aberrations (WAs) and their influential factors during orthokeratology (OK) treatment in Chinese adolescents. Methods Thirty teenagers (n = 30 eyes) were enrolled in the study; spherical equivalent refraction (SE), corneal curvature radius (CCR), central corneal thickness (CCT), WAs, and the difference in limbal transverse diameter and OK lens diameter (ΔLLD) were detected before and after one-month OK treatment. Every component of WAs was measured simultaneously by iTrace aberrometer. The influential factors of OK-induced WAs were analyzed. Results SE and CCT decreased while CCR increased significantly (P < 0.01). Higher-order aberrations (HOAs), Spherical aberrations (SAs), and coma increased significantly (P < 0.01). Corneal horizontal coma (Z31-C) and corneal spherical aberrations (Z40-C) increased (P < 0.01). The HOAs, coma, SAs, Z31-C, Z31-T, Z40-C, and Z40-T were positively correlated with SE and CCR (P < 0.01). Z3−1-C showed negative correlations with (ΔLLD) and positive correlations with SE (P < 0.05). Conclusions The increase in OK-induced HOAs is mainly attributed to Z31 and Z40 of cornea. Z3−1 in the internal component showed a compensative effect on the corneal vertical coma. The degree of myopic correction and increase in CCR may be the essential influential factors of the increase in Z31 and Z40. The appropriate size of the OK lens may be helpful to decrease OK-induced vertical coma. PMID:28845432

  17. Higher-Order Wavefront Aberrations for Populations of Young Emmetropes and Myopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Bao

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: Human eyes have systematical higher order aberrations in population, and factors that cause bilateral symmetry of wavefront aberrations between the right and left eyes made important contribution to the systematical aberrations.

  18. The Mechanisms of Aberrant Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Samuel; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Chris; Knowles, Tuomas

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the development of a kinetic theory for understanding the aberrant loss of solubility of proteins. The failure to maintain protein solubility results often in the assembly of organized linear structures, commonly known as amyloid fibrils, the formation of which is associated with over 50 clinical disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A true microscopic understanding of the mechanisms that drive these aggregation processes has proved difficult to achieve. To address this challenge, we apply the methodologies of chemical kinetics to the biomolecular self-assembly pathways related to protein aggregation. We discuss the relevant master equation and analytical approaches to studying it. In particular, we derive the underlying rate laws in closed-form using a self-consistent solution scheme; the solutions that we obtain reveal scaling behaviors that are very generally present in systems of growing linear aggregates, and, moreover, provide a general route through which to relate experimental measurements to mechanistic information. We conclude by outlining a study of the aggregation of the Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide. The study identifies the dominant microscopic mechanism of aggregation and reveals previously unidentified therapeutic strategies.

  19. Chromosome aberrations in solid tumors have a stochastic nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Mauro A.A. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-anexo, Porto Alegre 90035-003 (Brazil) and Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre 90035-903 (Brazil) and Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil) and Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, Canoas 92420-280 (Brazil)]. E-mail: mauro@ufrgs.br; Onsten, Tor G.H. [Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre 90035-903 (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, Canoas 92420-280 (Brazil); Moreira, Jose C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-anexo, Porto Alegre 90035-003 (Brazil); Almeida, Rita M.C. de [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil)

    2006-08-30

    An important question nowadays is whether chromosome aberrations are random events or arise from an internal deterministic mechanism, which leads to the delicate task of quantifying the degree of randomness. For this purpose, we have defined several Shannon information functions to evaluate disorder inside a tumor and between tumors of the same kind. We have considered 79 different kinds of solid tumors with 30 or more karyotypes retrieved from the Mitelman Database of Chromosome Aberrations in Cancer. The Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival was also obtained for each solid tumor type in order to correlate data with tumor malignance. The results here show that aberration spread is specific for each tumor type, with high degree of diversity for those tumor types with worst survival indices. Those tumor types with preferential variants (e.g. high proportion of a given karyotype) have shown better survival statistics, indicating that aberration recurrence is a good prognosis. Indeed, global spread of both numerical and structural abnormalities demonstrates the stochastic nature of chromosome aberrations by setting a signature of randomness associated to the production of disorder. These results also indicate that tumor malignancy correlates not only with karyotypic diversity taken from different tumor types but also taken from single tumors. Therefore, by quantifying aberration spread, we could confront diverse models and verify which of them points to the most likely outcome. Our results suggest that the generating process of chromosome aberrations is neither deterministic nor totally random, but produces variations that are distributed between these two boundaries.

  20. The Compact Hyperspectral Aberration-corrected Platform (CHAP), an instrument for microspacecraft. Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In-situ analysis of solar system bodies plays a crucial role in understanding the evolution of our planet, setting the stage for life's origins. As has been...

  1. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Lozano, J G; Pennycook, T J; Jones, L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2015-06-04

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures.

  2. Broadband aberration-free focusing reflector for acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aixia; Qu, Shaobo; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Jiang, Wei; Feng, Mingde

    2017-11-01

    An aberration-free focusing reflector (AFR) for acoustic waves is proposed with the aim to eliminate spherical aberration and coma simultaneously. Meanwhile, the AFR can focus acoustic waves with low dispersion in a wide frequency range of 14-50 kHz. The broadband aberration-free focusing effect is originated from an elliptical reflection phase gradient profile, which is achieved by milling different depths of axisymmetric grooves on a planoconcave-like brass plate using the ray theory. Theoretical and numerical results are in good agreement. The designed AFR can find broad engineering, industrial and medical applications.

  3. Simple numerical chromosome aberrations in two pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, C U; Pandis, N; Bjerre, P

    1993-01-01

    -secreting adenoma, three aberrant clones were detected, giving the karyotype 45,X, -Y[20]/47,XY, +Y[6]/45,XY, -21[3]/46,XY[21]. One cell had the chromosome complement 46,X, -Y, +9; no other nonclonal aberrations were detected. The only hitherto published case of pituitary adenoma analyzed by banding techniques (Rey...... et al. [1986]: Cancer Genet Cytogenet 23:171-174) also had only numerical clonal changes that included extra copies of chromosome 9. We conclude that pituitary adenomas may be karyotypically characterized by numerical aberrations and that trisomy 9 seems to be the best candidate for a primary...

  4. Cellular origin of prognostic chromosomal aberrations in AML patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Jensen, H.; Jendholm, J.; Rapin, N.

    2015-01-01

    chromosomal structural rearrangements and single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Conventional AML diagnostics and recent seminal next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have identified more than 200 recurrent genetic aberrations presenting in various combinations in individual patients. Significantly, many...... of these aberrations occur in normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs/HPCs) before definitive leukemic transformation through additional acquisition of a few (that is, mostly 1 or 2) leukemia-promoting driver aberrations. NGS studies on sorted bone marrow (BM) populations of AML patients with a normal...

  5. Aberrations of Genetic Material as Biomarkers of Ionizing Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milacic, S.

    2004-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is the most powerful mutagen in environmental and working conditions. The result of genotoxic effect of radiation is the development of chromosome aberrations. The structural chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes are dicentric, ring, acentric fragment. The observation of chromosome aberration frequency in lymphocyte karyotype is the conclusive method to assess the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. Our study compared the incidence of chromosome aberrations in occupationally exposed healthy medical workers and in non-exposed healthy population. We analyzed the effect of working place, dose by thermo luminescence personal dosimeter (TLD), duration of occupational exposure (DOE) and age to the sum of aberrant cells and aberrations. four-year study included 462 subjects, mean-aged 42.3 years, who were occupational exposed to ionizing radiation and 95 subjects, mean-aged 35,2 years, who were not exposed to ionizing radiation, during the same time period and from the same territory. All of them possess thermo luminescence personal dosimeter (TLD) which is read by scanner for thermo luminescence dosimeters. Modified Moorheard's micro method for peripheral blood lymphocytes and conventional cytogenetic technique of chromosome aberration analysis were used for analysis of chromosome aberrations. Stained preparations (Giemsa) are observed in immersion by light microscope. The karyotype of 200 lymphocytes in metaphase is analyzed the most characteristic aberration: dicentric, then the ring and acentric fragments. The increased incidence of chromosome aberrations was found to tbe 21.6% in the exposed group and 2.1% in the controls, while the findings within the limits (non-specific chromosome lesions-gaps breaks, elongations, and exchanges) were equal in both groups (22%). Among occupationally exposed medical workers, the highest incidence was found in nuclear medicine workers (42.6%), then in orthopedists (27.08%). There is highly

  6. Distribution of CFTR mutations in Eastern Hungarians: relevance to genetic testing and to the introduction of newborn screening for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivady, Gergely; Madar, Laszlo; Nagy, Bela; Gonczi, Ferenc; Ajzner, Eva; Dzsudzsak, Erika; Dvořáková, Lenka; Gombos, Eva; Kappelmayer, Janos; Macek, Milan; Balogh, Istvan

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of an updated distribution of CFTR mutations in a representative cohort of 40 CF patients with the classical form of the disease drawn from Eastern Hungary. Due to the homogeneity of the Hungarian population our data are generally applicable to other regions of the country, including the sizeable diaspora. We utilized the recommended "cascade" CFTR mutation screening approach, initially using a commercial assay, followed by examination of the common "Slavic" deletion CFTRdele2,3(21kb). Subsequently, the entire CFTR coding region of the CFTR gene was sequenced in patients with yet unidentified mutations. The Elucigene CF29(Tm) v2 assay detected 81.25% of all CF causing mutations. An addition of the CFTRdele2,3(21kb) increased the mutation detection rate to 86.25%. DNA sequencing enabled us to identify mutations on 79/80 CF alleles. Mutations [CFTRdele2,3(21kb), p.Gln685ThrfsX4 (2184insA) were found at an unusually high frequency, each comprising 5.00% of all CF alleles. We have identified common CF causing mutations in the Hungarian population with the most common mutations (p.Phe508del, p.Asn1303Lys, CFTRdele2,3(21kb), 2184insA, p.Gly542X, and p.Leu101X), comprising over 93.75% of all CF alleles. Obtained data are applicable to the improvement of DNA diagnostics in Hungary and beyond, and are the necessary prerequisite for the introduction of a nationwide "two tier" CF newborn screening program. Copyright © 2011 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Histamine 1 receptor-Gβγ-cAMP/PKA-CFTR pathway mediates the histamine-induced resetting of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Kim, Young-Beom; Kim, Woong Bin; Lee, Seung Won; Oh, Seog Bae; Han, Hee-Chul; Lee, C Justin; Colwell, Christopher S; Kim, Yang In

    2016-05-06

    Recent evidence indicates that histamine, acting on histamine 1 receptor (H1R), resets the circadian clock in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) through the activation of CaV1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from ryanodine receptor-mediated internal stores. In the current study, we explored the underlying mechanisms with various techniques including Ca(2+)- and Cl(-)-imaging and extracellular single-unit recording. Our hypothesis was that histamine causes Cl(-) efflux through cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to elicit membrane depolarization needed for the activation of CaV1.3 Ca(2+) channels in SCN neurons. We found that histamine elicited Cl(-) efflux and increased [Ca(2+)]i in dissociated mouse SCN cells. Both of these events were suppressed by bumetanide [Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter isotype 1 (NKCC1) blocker], CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor), gallein (Gβγ protein inhibitor) and H89 [protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor]. By itself, H1R activation with 2-pyridylethylamine increased the level of cAMP in the SCN and this regulation was prevented by gallein. Finally, histamine-evoked phase shifts of the circadian neural activity rhythm in the mouse SCN slice were blocked by bumetanide, CFTRinh-172, gallein or H89 and were not observed in NKCC1 or CFTR KO mice. Taken together, these results indicate that histamine recruits the H1R-Gβγ-cAMP/PKA pathway in the SCN neurons to activate CaV1.3 channels through CFTR-mediated Cl(-) efflux and ultimately to phase-shift the circadian clock. This pathway and NKCC1 may well be potential targets for agents designed to treat problems resulting from the disturbance of the circadian system.

  8. Mutation Analysis of Exons 10 and 17a of CFTR Gene in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis in Kermanshah Province, Western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahami, Abbas; Alibakhshi, Reza; Ghadiri, Keyghobad; Sadeghi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance among Caucasian populations. So far, more than 1950 different mutations were identified in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR gene has 27 exons. The type and distribution of mutations vary widely among different countries and/or ethnic groups. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis was performed on exon10 and exon17a of CFTR gene in CF patients in the Kermanshah province, western Iran. We tested 27 patients admitted to the medical genetics laboratory of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. The patients were from different cities of Kermanshah province. All the patients had the clinical signals and two positive sweat tests. After filling agreement forms and questionnaire, the peripheral blood sampling and DNA extraction were done. DNA samples were extracted. PCR and sequencing special PCR were done. Finally analysis of the results with DNA sequencing analysis version 5.2 software was performed. CFTR mutations analysis identified 4 different mutations in our CF patients. The disease-causing mutations were p.F508del (ΔF508) (14.81%), p.S466X (1.85%), and p.T1036I (1.85%). M470V polymorphism with frequency of 74.1% was found in 23 patients (17 homozygous and 6 heterozygous). Three disease-causing mutations in CF patients in the present study account for approximately 18.51% of mutations. The frequency of p.F508del, the most common mutation was 16-18.1% in Iranian population. The results of the present study can be applied for genetic counseling, population screening and prenatal diagnosis.

  9. 78 FR 75449 - Miscellaneous Corrections; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... cross- references, correcting grammatical errors, revising language for clarity and consistency, and... practice. Specifically, these amendments are to correct grammatical errors and to revise cross-references.... The final rule contained minor errors in grammar, punctuation, and referencing. This document corrects...

  10. Spectrum of CFTR gene mutations in Ecuadorian cystic fibrosis patients: the second report of the p.H609R mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sofía C; Aguirre, Santiago J; Flores, Sofía; Maldonado, Claudio; Mejía, Juan; Salinas, Lilian

    2017-11-01

    High heterogeneity in the CFTR gene mutations disturbs the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). In order to improve the diagnosis of CF in our country, the present study aims to define a panel of common CFTR gene mutations by sequencing 27 exons of the gene in Ecuadorian Cystic Fibrosis patients. Forty-eight Ecuadorian individuals with suspected/confirmed CF diagnosis were included. Twenty-seven exons of CFTR gene were sequenced to find sequence variations. Prevalence of pathogenic variations were determined and compared with other countries' data. We found 70 sequence variations. Eight of these are CF-causing mutations: p.F508del, p.G85E, p.G330E, p.A455E, p.G970S, W1098X, R1162X, and N1303K. Also this study is the second report of p.H609R in Ecuadorian population. Mutation prevalence differences between Ecuadorian population and other Latin America countries were found. The panel of mutations suggested as an initial screening for the Ecuadorian population with cystic fibrosis should contain the mutations: p.F508del, p.G85E, p.G330E, p.A455E, p.G970S, W1098X, R1162X, and N1303K. © 2017 NETLAB Laboratorios Especializados. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Extensive sequence analysis of CFTR, SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G and SERPINA1 suggests an oligogenic basis for cystic fibrosis-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M D; Trujillano, D; Olivar, R; Sotillo, F; Ossowski, S; Manzanares, J; Costa, J; Gartner, S; Oliva, C; Quintana, E; Gonzalez, M I; Vazquez, C; Estivill, X; Casals, T

    2014-07-01

    The term cystic fibrosis (CF)-like disease is used to describe patients with a borderline sweat test and suggestive CF clinical features but without two CFTR(cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutations. We have performed the extensive molecular analysis of four candidate genes (SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G and SERPINA1) in a cohort of 10 uncharacterized patients with CF and CF-like disease. We have used whole-exome sequencing to characterize mutations in the CFTR gene and these four candidate genes. CFTR molecular analysis allowed a complete characterization of three of four CF patients. Candidate variants in SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G and SERPINA1 in six patients with CF-like phenotypes were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and were further supported by in silico predictive analysis, pedigree studies, sweat test in other family members, and analysis in CF patients and healthy subjects. Our results suggest that CF-like disease probably results from complex genotypes in several genes in an oligogenic form, with rare variants interacting with environmental factors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. CFTR Mutation Analysis of a Caucasian Father with Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens, a Taiwanese Mother, and Twins Resulting from ICSI Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Sun Chiang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF, caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene, is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases in Caucasians. We screened for the CFTR gene mutation in a Caucasian father with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD, a Taiwanese mother, and twins resulting from an intracytoplasmic single sperm injection (ICSI procedure. DNA fragments that showed abnormal banding patterns on temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis analysis followed by analysis of DNA sequence was used. The Caucasian father with CBAVD had ΔF508 and p.L375F mutations. The two children were heterozygous for the ΔF508 and p.L375F mutations, respectively. Mutation analysis of the CFTR gene should always be recommended for infertile couples seeking ICSI. The possibility of the children resulting from ICSI being a victim or carrier of CBAVD or CF, especially when the father is Caucasian with CBAVD, should be discussed during genetic counseling.

  13. Early Development of Children with Sex Chromosome Aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka-Ilse, Katerina; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Arthur Retlaw and Associates, Inc., Suite 2080, 1603 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201. A prospective study was made of the early development of 42 children with sex chromosome aberrations. (Author)

  14. Impact of primary aberrations on coherent lidar performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Iversen, Theis Faber Quist

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate the performance of a monostatic coherent lidar system in which the transmit beam is under the influence of primary phase aberrations: spherical aberration (SA) and astigmatism. The experimental investigation is realized by probing the spatial weighting function...... of the lidar system using different optical transceiver configurations. A rotating belt is used as a hard target. Our study shows that the lidar weighting function suffers from both spatial broadening and shift in peak position in the presence of aberration. It is to our knowledge the first experimental...... demonstration of these tendencies. Furthermore, our numerical and experimental results show good agreement. We also demonstrate how the truncation of the transmit beam affects the system performance. It is both experimentally and numerically proven that aberration effects have profound impact on the antenna...

  15. Chromosome aberrations in pesticide-exposed greenhouse workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, B F; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Gamborg, M O

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of subtoxic exposure to pesticides causing chromosome aberrations in greenhouse workers. METHODS: In a cross-sectional and prospective study design chromosome aberration frequencies in cultured lymphocytes were examined for 116...... greenhouse workers exposed to a complex mixture of almost 50 insecticides, fungicides, and growth regulators and also for 29 nonsmoking, nonpesticide-exposed referents. RESULTS: The preseason frequencies of chromosome aberrations were slightly but not statistically significantly elevated for the greenhouse...... workers when they were compared with the referents. After a summer season of pesticide spraying in the greenhouses, the total frequencies of cells with chromosome aberrations were significantly higher than in the preseason samples (P=0.02) and also higher than for the referents (P=0.05). This finding...

  16. Aberrant internal carotid artery in the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Keun Tak; Kang, Hyun Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The knowledge about the aberrant internal carotid artery (ICA) in the middle ear is essential for clinicians, because a misdiagnosis of the aberrant ICA could have serious consequences such as excessive aural bleeding during a middle ear surgery. A 38-year-old woman presented with tinnitus and hearing difficulties of the left ear that had started 5 years ago. During otoscopy, an anteroinferior bluish mass was seen in the tympanic space. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a left-side aberrant ICA with bony dehiscence of the carotid canal in the middle ear and a reduced diameter of the tympanic ICA. Herein we report a case of an aberrant ICA in the middle ear. We also review the literature regarding this important vascular anomaly of the temporal bone which may lead to disastrous surgical complications.

  17. Not Always Black and White: Colour Aberrations in the Dovekie

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DARIUSZ JAKUBAS; KATARZYNA WOJCZULANIS-JAKUBAS

    2012-01-01

    We describe four records of colour aberrations in the dovekie (Alle alle). During six years of studies of breeding ecology in two large dovekie colonies in West Spitsbergen, we recorded one albino chick...

  18. Are persistent delusions in schizophrenia associated with aberrant salience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafeef Abboud

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: These findings do not support the hypothesis that persistent delusions are related to aberrant motivational salience processing in TRS patients. However, they do support the view that patients with schizophrenia have impaired reward learning.

  19. [Cystic dystrophy on aberrant pancreas. Contribution of ultrasound-endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, J; Palazzo, L; Chikli, F; Doll, J; Chome, J

    1989-06-01

    Cystic dystrophy of aberrant pancreatic tissue without chronic pancreatitis is a rare disease described by Potet and Duclert in 1970. Clinical diagnosis is possible by endoscopy and intraluminalsonography; we report the first case diagnosed by intraluminalsonography.

  20. Performance of a phase-conjugate-engine implementing a finite-bit phase correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Wilks, S; Young, P; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olivier, S

    2003-10-23

    This article examines the achievable Strehl ratio when a finite-bit correction to an aberrated wave-front is implemented. The phase-conjugate-engine (PCE) used to measure the aberrated wavefront consists of a quadrature interferometric wave-front sensor, a liquid-crystal spatial-light-modulator and computer hardware/software to calculate and apply the correction. A finite-bit approximation to the conjugate phase is calculated and applied to the spatial light modulator to remove the aberrations from the optical beam. The experimentally determined Strehl ratio of the corrected beam is compared with analytical expressions for the expected Strehl ratio and shown to be in good agreement with those predictions.

  1. Corneal aberrations before and after small-incision cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao, Antonio; Tejedor, Jaime; Artal, Pablo

    2004-12-01

    To study the effect of small-incision cataract surgery on the optical aberrations of the cornea. Corneal topography was measured before and after cataract surgery on 70 eyes of 70 patients. Monofocal foldable IOLs were implanted after phacoemulsification through a clear-cornea, 3.5-mm incision without suture. Corneal aberrations, up to the fifth order and 6-mm pupil, were calculated by ray-tracing from the corneal topography. Pre- and postoperative aberrations were compared in each patient and the optical changes induced by surgery investigated. The root mean square of the wave aberration slightly increased on average after surgery (pre, 0.65 +/- 0.46 microm; post, 0.85 +/- 0.63 microm). Most aberration terms were similar, averaged across the 70 patients, before and after surgery (spherical aberration: pre, 0.32 +/- 0.12 microm, and post, 0.34 +/- 0.19 microm; astigmatism: pre, 0.9 +/- 0.8 D, and post, 1.1 +/- 1.0 D; coma: pre, 0.27 +/- 0.18 microm, and post, 0.32 +/- 0.33 microm). However, in each patient, there were changes after surgery in the magnitude (either increasing or decreasing) and/or orientation of aberrations. The mean induced astigmatism was -1.0 +/- 0.9 D at the orientation of the surgical meridian. Induced trefoil also showed a predominant pattern at this direction. Patients with nasal incisions experienced larger changes. Small-incision surgery does not systematically degrade the optical quality of the anterior corneal surface. However, it introduces changes in some aberrations, especially in nonrotationally symmetric terms such as astigmatism, coma, and trefoil. The incision site plays a main role in the corneal changes after surgery.

  2. Modified matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassani, Kh; Ziafi, H Hooshmand, E-mail: hassanikh@ut.ac.ir [Optics Research Lab 3, Department of Physics, University of Tehran, PO Box 14395/547, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We introduce a modification to the matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations with simple and inexpensive equipment available in educational optics labs. This method can help instructors and students to observe and estimate lens aberrations in real time. It is also a semi-quantitative tool for primary tests in research labs. In this work by comparing a single lens with a doublet, we can clearly demonstrate the superior quality of the doublet over the single lens, and estimate their conic constants.

  3. Analysis of four aberrometers for evaluating lower and higher order aberrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Cade

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the measurements of lower and higher order aberrations (HOA of 4 commonly used aberrometers. SETTING: Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Boston, USA. DESIGN: Prospective, cross-sectional study, in a controlled, single-blinded fashion. METHODS: Multiple readings were obtained in 42 eyes of 21 healthy volunteers, at a single visit, with each of the following aberrometers: Alcon LADARWave®, Visx WaveScan®, B & L Zywave®, and Wavelight Allegro Analyzer®. Results were compared and analyzed in regards to the lower and HOA, to the different wavefront sensing devices and software, Tscherning and Hartmann-Shack and between the Fourier and Zernike algorithms. Statistical analysis included Bland-Altman plots, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC, multiple comparison tests with Analysis of Variance and Kruskal-Wallis. Significant level was set to p<0.05 and alpha level correction was adjusted under the Bonferroni criteria. RESULTS: Most measurements of all 4 aberrometers were comparable. However, statistically significant differences were found between the aberrometers in total HOA (tHOA, spherical aberration (SA, horizontal coma and astigmatism (2,2. LADARwave and Wavescan showed significant differences in tHOA (P<0.001, ICC = 0.549, LoA = 0.19±0.5 and in SA (P<0.001, ICC = 0.733, LoA = 0.16±0.37. Wavescan showed a significant difference compared to Zywave (p<0.001, ICC = 0.920, LoA = 0.09±0.13 in SA. Comparisons between Allegro Analyzer and Zywave demonstrated significant differences in both Horizontal Coma (3,1 (p<0.001, ICC = -0.207, LoA = -0.15±0.48 and Astigmatism (2,2 (P = 0.003, ICC = -0.965, LoA = 0.2±2.5. Allegro Analyzer also differed from Wavescan in Horizontal Coma (3,1 (P<0.001, ICC = 0.725, LoA = -0.07±0.25. CONCLUSIONS: Although some measurements were comparable predominately in the lower order aberrations, significant differences were found in the tHOA, SA, horizontal coma and astigmatism. Our analysis

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  5. Simulated prototype of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens for presbyopia correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vives, Cari; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa; Cerviño-Expósito, Alejandro; Madrid-Costa, David; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the visual impact of adding different spherical aberration values to an Implantable Collamer Lens phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) to increase the depth of focus using an adaptive optics visual simulator. University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. Experimental study. Wavefront aberrations in -3.00 D and -6.00 diopter (D) pIOLs were measured in vitro. Afterward, different simulated pIOL experimental prototypes were created along with variances in the spherical aberration. An adaptive optics visual simulator was used to simulate vision after the implantation of the different pIOL prototypes from their wavefront aberrations. The corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and depth of focus were measured in 3.0 and 4.5 mm pupils. In a 3.0 mm pupil, the CDVA achieved with -3.00 and -6.00 D pIOLs and all pIOL prototypes evaluated was above 20/20 except for a -6.00 D pIOL + spherical aberration 4 at 50% CDVA contrast, which decreased to 20/25. However, in a 4.5 mm pupil, the CDVA obtained with the pIOL prototypes decreased significantly and was more pronounced when the spherical aberration induced was negative. The depth of focus increment was larger with the highest spherical aberration added and with a small pupil. Nevertheless, it was independent of the sign of the added spherical aberration. The outcomes show that residual negative spherical aberration after pIOL implantation will disrupt the CDVA. However, some residual positive spherical aberration after pIOL implantation increased the depth of focus with excellent CDVA, providing a possible pIOL design for young presbyopic patients. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Volumetric optical coherence microscopy enabled by aberrated optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Liu, Siyang; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging technique that enables high resolution, non-invasive imaging of 3D cell cultures and biological tissues. Volumetric imaging with OCM suffers a trade-off between high transverse resolution and poor depth-of-field resulting from defocus, optical aberrations, and reduced signal collection away from the focal plane. While defocus and aberrations can be compensated with computational methods such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) or computational adaptive optics (CAO), reduced signal collection must be physically addressed through optical hardware. Axial scanning of the focus is one approach, but comes at the cost of longer acquisition times, larger datasets, and greater image reconstruction times. Given the capabilities of CAO to compensate for general phase aberrations, we present an alternative method to address the signal collection problem without axial scanning by using intentionally aberrated optical hardware. We demonstrate the use of an astigmatic spectral domain (SD-)OCM imaging system to enable single-acquisition volumetric OCM in 3D cell culture over an extended depth range, compared to a non-aberrated SD-OCM system. The transverse resolution of the non-aberrated and astigmatic imaging systems after application of CAO were 2 um and 2.2 um, respectively. The depth-range of effective signal collection about the nominal focal plane was increased from 100 um in the non-aberrated system to over 300 um in the astigmatic system, extending the range over which useful data may be acquired in a single OCM dataset. We anticipate that this method will enable high-throughput cellular-resolution imaging of dynamic biological systems over extended volumes.

  7. Sixth-order wave aberration theory of ultrawide-angle optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Cao, Yiqing

    2017-10-20

    In this paper, we develop sixth-order wave aberration theory of ultrawide-angle optical systems like fisheye lenses. Based on the concept and approach to develop wave aberration theory of plane-symmetric optical systems, we first derive the sixth-order intrinsic wave aberrations and the fifth-order ray aberrations; second, we present a method to calculate the pupil aberration of such kind of optical systems to develop the extrinsic aberrations; third, the relation of aperture-ray coordinates between adjacent optical surfaces is fitted with the second-order polynomial to improve the calculation accuracy of the wave aberrations of a fisheye lens with a large acceptance aperture. Finally, the resultant aberration expressions are applied to calculate the aberrations of two design examples of fisheye lenses; the calculation results are compared with the ray-tracing ones with Zemax software to validate the aberration expressions.

  8. Lipid mapping of colonic mucosa by cluster TOF-SIMS imaging and multivariate analysis in cftr knockout mice[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulet, Marc; Seyer, Alexandre; Edelman, Aleksander; Brunelle, Alain; Fritsch, Janine; Ollero, Mario; Laprévote, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The cftr knockout mouse model of cystic fibrosis (CF) shows intestinal obstruction; malabsorption and inflammation; and a fatty acid imbalance in intestinal mucosa. We performed a lipid mapping of colon sections from CF and control (WT) mice by cluster time of flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging to localize lipid alterations. Data were processed either manually or by multivariate statistical methods. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a particular localization for cholesteryl sulfate at the epithelial border, C16:1 fatty acid in Lieberkühn glands, and C18:0 fatty acid in lamina propria and submucosa. Significant increases in vitamin E (vE) and C16:0 fatty acid in the epithelial border of CF colon were detected. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partitioning clustering allowed us to characterize different structural regions of colonic mucosa according to variations in C14:0, C16:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C20:3, C20:4, and C22:6 fatty acids; phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositol glycerolipids; cholesterol; vitamin E; and cholesteryl sulfate. PCA on spectra from Lieberkühn glands led to separation of CF and WT individuals. This study shows for the first time the spatial distribution of lipids in colonic mucosa and suggests TOF-SIMS plus multivariate analyses as a powerful tool to investigate disease-related tissue spatial lipid signatures. PMID:20616379

  9. Enhanced neural function in highly aberrated eyes following perceptual learning with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Barbot, Antoine; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2017-03-01

    Highly aberrated keratoconic (KC) eyes do not elicit the expected visual advantage from customized optical corrections. This is attributed to the neural insensitivity arising from chronic visual experience with poor retinal image quality, dominated by low spatial frequencies. The goal of this study was to investigate if targeted perceptual learning with adaptive optics (AO) can stimulate neural plasticity in these highly aberrated eyes. The worse eye of 2 KC subjects was trained in a contrast threshold test under AO correction. Prior to training, tumbling 'E' visual acuity and contrast sensitivity at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 c/deg were measured in both the trained and untrained eyes of each subject with their routine prescription and with AO correction for a 6mm pupil. The high spatial frequency requiring 50% contrast for detection with AO correction was picked as the training frequency. Subjects were required to train on a contrast detection test with AO correction for 1h for 5 consecutive days. During each training session, threshold contrast measurement at the training frequency with AO was conducted. Pre-training measures were repeated after the 5 training sessions in both eyes (i.e., post-training). After training, contrast sensitivity under AO correction improved on average across spatial frequency by a factor of 1.91 (range: 1.77-2.04) and 1.75 (1.22-2.34) for the two subjects. This improvement in contrast sensitivity transferred to visual acuity with the two subjects improving by 1.5 and 1.3 lines respectively with AO following training. One of the two subjects denoted an interocular transfer of training and an improvement in performance with their routine prescription post-training. This training-induced visual benefit demonstrates the potential of AO as a tool for neural rehabilitation in patients with abnormal corneas. Moreover, it reveals a sufficient degree of neural plasticity in normally developed adults who have a long history of abnormal visual

  10. The Etiology of Presbyopia, Contributing Factors, and Future Correction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickenbotham, Adam Lyle

    Presbyopia has been a complicated problem for clinicians and researchers for centuries. Defining what constitutes presbyopia and what are its primary causes has long been a struggle for the vision and scientific community. Although presbyopia is a normal aging process of the eye, the continuous and gradual loss of accommodation is often dreaded and feared. If presbyopia were to be considered a disease, its global burden would be enormous as it affects more than a billion people worldwide. In this dissertation, I explore factors associated with presbyopia and develop a model for explaining the onset of presbyopia. In this model, the onset of presbyopia is associated primarily with three factors; depth of focus, focusing ability (accommodation), and habitual reading (or task) distance. If any of these three factors could be altered sufficiently, the onset of presbyopia could be delayed or prevented. Based on this model, I then examine possible optical methods that would be effective in correcting for presbyopia by expanding depth of focus. Two methods that have been show to be effective at expanding depth of focus include utilizing a small pupil aperture or generating higher order aberrations, particularly spherical aberration. I compare these two optical methods through the use of simulated designs, monitor testing, and visual performance metrics and then apply them in subjects through an adaptive optics system that corrects aberrations through a wavefront aberrometer and deformable mirror. I then summarize my findings and speculate about the future of presbyopia correction.

  11. Synthesis and functionalization of a triaryldiamine-base