WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronary risk facts

  1. Facts and values in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, Frank B.

    1998-01-01

    Risk, as commonly understood, is a complex melange of facts, values, and fears. While this complexity of public risk perception is now broadly recognized, its implications are insufficiently explored. Public risk perceptions offer p poor guide for public policymaking. Popular assessments of risk are tainted by misinformation and unreliable heuristics. While subjective considerations, often called values, play a role in public perception of risk, those 'values' are often inappropriate for government decisionmaking. Reliance on public perceptions of risk means more premature deaths. Public risk perception also is systematically skewed contrary to the interests of the disadvantaged. Strict probabilistic risk measures generally provide a superior guide for government regulatory policy

  2. Cardiovascular risk scores for coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Murat; Kardesoglu, Ejder; Aparci, Mustafa; Isilak, Zafer; Uz, Omer; Yiginer, Omer; Ozmen, Namik; Cingozbay, Bekir Yilmaz; Uzun, Mehmet; Cebeci, Bekir Sitki

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare frequently used cardiovascular risk scores in predicting the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3-vessel disease. In 350 consecutive patients (218 men and 132 women) who underwent coronary angiography, the cardiovascular risk level was determined using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the Modified Framingham Risk Score (MFRS), the Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) score, and the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The area under the curve for receiver operating characteristic curves showed that FRS had more predictive value than the other scores for CAD (area under curve, 0.76, P MFRS, PROCAM, and SCORE) may predict the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis.The FRS had better predictive value than the other scores.

  3. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  4. At-Risk Students Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Montana's definition of a basic system of quality public elementary and secondary schools includes educational programs for at-risk students (20-9-309, MCA). State statute defines an at-risk student as a "student who is affected by environmental conditions that negatively impact the student's educational performance or threaten a student's…

  5. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... of coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed the original data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States and Europe to estimate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Over 6 to 10 years of follow-up, 5249 incident total coronary cases...... associated with risk of coronary heart disease....

  6. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    INFO (1980 to July 2015; articles in English and published articles only), and bibliographies. Information on aim, study design, sample size, inclusion and exclusion criteria, assessment methods of psychological risk factors, and results of crude and adjusted regression analyses were abstracted independently......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  7. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease in type 2 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery ... CAD, Group II: 48 type 2DM patients with developed CAD, Group III: 40 age and ...

  8. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper M; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke Bøgelund

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  9. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan Hamdy

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary ..... Early detection of the disease and timely interventions can reduce the morbidity ..... additional risk factor of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Is diet an essential risk factor for coronary heart disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension and diet each play a major role in the development of coronary heart attacks in most industrialized nations. In some countries where cigarette smoking and hypertension are prevalent there is a low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hyperlipidaemia resulting from national food habits appears to be the essential factor in the high rates of CHD in developed countries.

  11. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  12. Socio-economic status, risk factors and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of socio-economic status (SES) indicators and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence was examined in 5620 subjects aged 20 ... The SES indicators had Iitlle or no independent effect on CHD prevalence in multivariate logistic analyses after, inclusion of the standard RFs.

  13. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (48.5 %), fatty food consumption (47.5 %), obesity (38 %) and smoking (37 %), respectively. Other less ... Keywords: Risk factors, Prevalence, Coronary artery disease, Diabetes, Southern Punjab ... developing world, including Pakistan [1]. The.

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...

  15. Coronary CT angiography in clinical triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, J Tobias; Hove, Jens D; Kristensen, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test if cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can be used in the triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease. DESIGN: The diagnostic value of 64-detector CCTA was evaluated in 400 patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction using...... invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as the reference method. The relation between the severity of disease by CCTA and a combined endpoint of death, re-hospitalization due to new myocardial infarction, or symptom-driven coronary revascularization was assessed. RESULTS: CCTA detects significant (>50...... in patients with high likelihood of coronary artery disease and could, in theory, be used to triage high risk patients. As many obstacles remain, including logistical and safety issues, our study does not support the use of CCTA as an additional diagnostic test before ICA in an all-comer NSTEMI population....

  16. Coronary collaterals and risk for restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Pascal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefit of the coronary collateral circulation (natural bypass network on survival is well established. However, data derived from smaller studies indicates that coronary collaterals may increase the risk for restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was to explore the impact of the collateral circulation on the risk for restenosis. Methods We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science databases (2001 to 15 July 2011. Random effects models were used to calculate summary risk ratios (RR for restenosis. The primary endpoint was angiographic restenosis > 50%. Results A total of 7 studies enrolling 1,425 subjects were integrated in this analysis. On average across studies, the presence of a good collateralization was predictive for restenosis (risk ratio (RR 1.40 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.80; P = 0.009. This risk ratio was consistent in the subgroup analyses where collateralization was assessed with intracoronary pressure measurements (RR 1.37 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.83; P = 0.038 versus visual assessment (RR 1.41 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.99; P = 0.049. For the subgroup of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD, the RR for restenosis with 'good collaterals' was 1.64 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.35 compared to 'poor collaterals' (P = 0.008. For patients with acute myocardial infarction, however, the RR for restenosis with 'good collateralization' was only 1.23 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.69; P = 0.212. Conclusions The risk of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is increased in patients with good coronary collateralization. Assessment of the coronary collateral circulation before PCI may be useful for risk stratification and for the choice of antiproliferative measures (drug-eluting stent instead bare-metal stent, cilostazol.

  17. Coronary Microvascular Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women With Angina Pectoris and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Naja Dam; Michelsen, Marie Mide; Peña, Adam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of women with angina-like chest pain have no obstructive coronary artery disease when evaluated with coronary angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a possible explanation and associated with a poor prognosis. This study evaluated the prevalence of coronary...... microvascular dysfunction and the association with symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, psychosocial factors, and results from diagnostic stress testing. METHODS AND RESULTS: After screening 3568 women, 963 women with angina-like chest pain and a diagnostic coronary angiogram without significant coronary.......01), hypertension (P=0.02), current smoking (Ppain characteristics or results from diagnostic stress testing...

  18. Pharmacological undertreatment of coronary risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Skov, Lone; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have increased prevalence of coronary risk factors and limited recent results have suggested that these risk factors are undertreated in patients with psoriasis. This may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases observed in patients with psoriasis....

  19. [Comparison of 64 MDCT coronary CTA and coronary angiography in the detection of coronary artery stenosis in low risk patients with stable angina and acute coronary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalas, G; Sarran, A; Amabile, N; Chaumoitre, K; Marciano-Chagnaud, S; Jacquier, A; Paganelli, F; Panuel, M

    2009-09-01

    To determine the accuracy of 64 MDCT coronary CTA (CCTA) compared to coronary angiography in low risk patients with stable angina and acute coronary syndrome and determine the number of significant coronary artery stenoses ( 50%) in these patients. Materials and methods. Fifty-five patients underwent CCTA using a 32 MDCT unit with z flying focus allowing the acquisition of 64 slices of 0.6 mm thickness as well as coronary angiography (gold standard). Nine patients were excluded due to prior coronary artery bypass surgery (n=4), insufficient breath hold (n=3), calcium scoring>1000 (n=1) and delay between both examinations over 4 months (n=1). Forty-six patients: 27 males and 19 females were included. CCTA results were compared to coronary angiography per segment and artery with threshold detection of stenoses 50%. The degree of correlation between both examinations was performed using a regression analysis with a Pearson correlation coefficient<0.05 considered significant. The overall accuracy of CCTA was 90%; limitations related to the presence of calcifications, motion artifacts or insufficient vessel opacification. The correlation for all analyzed segments was 96.4%. Thirty-eight of 50 significant stenoses seen on coronary angiography were correctly detected on CCTA. Sensitivity, specificity, PPVC and NPV for detection of stenoses 50% were 76%, 98.3%, 80.3% and 97.7% respectively. Evaluation per segment had a NPV of 96.8% (interventricular and diagonal segments) to 100% (main trunk). Our results for specificity and NPV are similar to reports from the literature. This suggests that CCTA in this clinical setting may replace coronary angiography.

  20. Prediabetes is not a risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyung-Min; Cho, Young-Rak; Lee, Seung-Whan; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Won, Ki-Bum; Ann, Soe Hee; Kim, Yong-Giun; Kim, Shin-Jae; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Young-Hak; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Jung, Chang Hee; Koh, Eun Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Kim, Min-Seon; Lee, Ki-Up; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jaewon; Lee, Sang-Gon

    2017-09-15

    There are limited data regarding the influence of glycemic status on the risk of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis on coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in asymptomatic individuals. We analyzed 6434 asymptomatic individuals who underwent CCTA. The degree and extent of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis were assessed by CCTA, and ≥50% diameter stenosis was defined as significant. Of study participants, 2197 (34.1%), 3122 (48.5%), and 1115 (17.3%) were categorized as normal, prediabetic and diabetic individuals, respectively. Compared with normal individuals, there were no statistically differences in the adjusted odds ratios of prediabetic individuals for significant coronary artery stenosis (0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.22, p=0.888), any plaque (0.96, 95% CI 0.86-1.07, p=0.483), calcified plaque (0.90, 95% CI 0.79-1.01, p=0.080), non-calcified plaque (1.02, 95% CI 0.88-1.17, p=0.803), and mixed plaque (1.00, 95% CI 0.82-1.22, p=0.983). However, adjusted odds ratios for significant coronary artery stenosis (1.71, 95% CI 1.34-2.19, pprediabetic individuals were not associated with an increased risk of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of coronary heart disease risk reduction interventions. Methods: The effects of lipid lowering interventions as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and 53 female patients [aged 33 to 61 years; mean age 47.20 ...

  2. Resistance training and predicted risk of coronary heart disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training, designed to prevent the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on the Framingham Risk Assessment (FRA) score. Twenty-five healthy sedentary men with low CHD risk were assigned to participate in a 16-week (three days per week) ...

  3. Myocardial flow reserve is influenced by both coronary artery stenosis severity and coronary risk factors in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Naya, Masanao; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurement has an important role in assessing the functional severity of coronary artery stenosis. However, a discrepancy between the anatomical severity of coronary artery stenosis and MFR is often observed. Such a discrepancy may be explained by coronary risk factors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of coronary artery stenosis severity and risk factors on MFR. Seventy-four patients suspected to have coronary artery disease and seven age-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and MFR were measured using 15 O-labelled water PET. Regional MFR was calculated in regions with significant coronary artery stenosis (stenotic regions) and in regions without significant stenosis (remote regions). The contributions of coronary artery stenosis severity and coronary risk factors were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. In stenotic regions, MFR correlated inversely with coronary artery stenosis severity (r=-0.50, p<0.01). Univariate analysis did not show any significant difference in MFR between the patients with and the patients without each risk factor. In remote regions, however, MFR was significantly decreased in the diabetes and smoking groups (each p<0.05). By multivariate analysis, diabetes and smoking were independent predictors of MFR (each p<0.05). In the group with more than one risk factor, MFR was significantly lower (2.78±0.79) than in the other group (3.40±1.22, p<0.05). MFR is influenced not only by coronary stenosis severity but also by coronary risk factors. In particular, the influence of risk factors should be considered in regions without severe coronary stenosis. (orig.)

  4. [Hyperlipidemias as a coronary risk factor in the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A; De Tejada, A L; Espinoza, M; Karchmer, S

    1976-01-01

    This article reviews the risk factors of the coronariopathy in the newborn. The authors state that the early diagnosis of the risk factors is an important step in the prevention of ateromatous plaques. Some people are now in the investigation of the normal levels of cholesterol and triglicerides in the blood of the umbilical cord. This values seems similar in different places all over the world and have served to establish the possible interrelation between the newborn hiperlipidemia and the coronary risk.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of premature coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography in Kurdistan, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ameen Mosa; Jehangeer, Hekmat Izzat; Shaikhow, Sabri Khalif

    2015-11-18

    Premature coronary artery disease (PCAD) seems to increase, particularly in developing countries. Given the lack of such studies in the country, this study examines the prevalence, associated cardiovascular risk factors, and coronary angiographic profile of the disease in Iraq. Data was collected from a total of 445 adult patients undergoing coronary angiography at Duhok Heart Center, Kurdistan in a period between March and September 2014. Patients were divided into PCAD (male 70 % compared to lesser obstruction. Premature coronary artery disease is alarming  in the country. Cardiovascular risk factors are clustered among them. But the angiographic profile and therapeutic options of PCAD are close to those reported from previous studies.

  6. 77 FR 9842 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... (formerly 2006P-0316)] Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug... concerning the use of the health claim for phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner... risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) for phytosterol-containing conventional food and dietary...

  7. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  8. Value of multiple risk factors in predicting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhengbin; Zhang Ruiyan; Zhang Qi; Yang Zhenkun; Hu Jian; Zhang Jiansheng; Shen Weifeng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to assess the relationship between correlative comprehension risk factors and coronary arterial disease and to build up a simple mathematical model to evaluate the extension of coronary artery lesion in patients with stable angina. Methods: A total of 1024 patients with chest pain who underwent coronary angiography were divided into CAD group(n=625)and control group(n=399) based on at least one significant coronary artery narrowing more than 50% in diameter. Independent risk factors for CAD were evaluated and multivariate logistic regression model and receiver-operating characteristic(ROC) curves were used to estimate the independent influence factor for CAD and built up a simple formula for clinical use. Results: Multivariate regression analysis revealed that UACR > 7.25 μg/mg(OR=3.6; 95% CI 2.6-4.9; P 20 mmol/L(OR=3.2; 95% CI 2.3-4.4; P 2 (OR=2.3; 95% CI 1.4-3.8; P 2.6 mmol/L (OR 2.141; 95% CI 1.586-2.890; P 7.25 μg/mg + 1.158 x hsCRP > 20 mmol/L + 0.891 GFR 2 + 0.831 x LVEF 2.6 mmol/L + 0.676 x smoking history + 0.594 x male + 0.459 x diabetes + 0.425 x hypertension). Area under the curve was 0.811 (P < 0.01), and the optimal probability value for predicting severe stage of CAD was 0.977 (sensitivity 49.0%, specificity 92.7% ). Conclusions: Risk factors including renal insufficiency were the main predictors for CAD. The logistic regression model is the non-invasive method of choice for predicting the extension of coronary artery lesion in patients with stable agiana. (authors)

  9. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Kim, Y.; Chung, I.-M.; Ryu, J.; Park, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  10. Long working hours may increase risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Cho, Soo-Hun; Yoo, Min-Sang; Kim, Taeshik; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the association between long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS) in Korean adults. This study evaluated adult participants in Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV (2007-2009). After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, the final sample size for this study model was 8,350. Subjects were asked about working hours and health status. Participants also completed physical examinations and biochemical measurement necessary for estimation of FRS. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to investigate the association between working hours and 10-year risk for CHD estimated by FRS. Compared to those who work 31-40 hr, significantly higher 10-year risk was estimated among subjects working longer hours. As working hours increased, odds ratio (OR) for upper 10 percent of estimated 10-year risk for CHD was increased up to 1.94. Long working hours are significantly related to risk of coronary heart disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Drug and alcohol crash risk : traffic safety facts : research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    While the extent of use of alcohol by drivers and the risks posed by alcohol use have been well known for many decades, relatively little has been known about the use of other drugs by drivers and the associated risks. However, drug-impaired driving ...

  12. Fact Sheet: Risk Management Plan (RMP) Audit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk management programs, which consist of a hazard assessment, a prevention program, and an emergency response program; must be periodically audited to assess whether the plans are adequate or need to be revised to comply with the regulation.

  13. Prospective Coronary Heart Disease Screening in Asymptomatic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Using Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Results and Risk Factor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girinsky, Theodore, E-mail: girinsky.theodore@orange.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); M’Kacher, Radhia [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire/Direction des Sciences Vivantes/Commissariat Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Lessard, Nathalie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Koscielny, Serge [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Elfassy, Eric; Raoux, François [Department of Radiology, Marie Lannelongue, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Carde, Patrice [Department of Hematology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Santos, Marcos Dos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Margainaud, Jean-Pierre [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Sabatier, Laure [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire/Direction des Sciences Vivantes/Commissariat Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paul, Jean-François [Department of Radiology, Marie Lannelongue, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the coronary artery status using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with combined modalities and mediastinal irradiation. Methods and Materials: All consecutive asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin lymphoma entered the study during follow-up, from August 2007 to May 2012. Coronary CT angiography was performed, and risk factors were recorded along with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measurements. Results: One hundred seventy-nine patients entered the 5-year study. The median follow-up was 11.6 years (range, 2.1-40.2 years), and the median interval between treatment and the CCTA was 9.5 years (range, 0.5-40 years). Coronary artery abnormalities were demonstrated in 46 patients (26%). Coronary CT angiography abnormalities were detected in nearly 15% of the patients within the first 5 years after treatment. A significant increase (34%) occurred 10 years after treatment (P=.05). Stenoses were mostly nonostial. Severe stenoses were observed in 12 (6.7%) of the patients, entailing surgery with either angioplasty with stent placement or bypass grafting in 10 of them (5.5%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that age at treatment, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as radiation dose to the coronary artery origins, were prognostic factors. In the group of patients with LTL measurements, hypertension and LTL were the only independent risk factors. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CCTA can identify asymptomatic individuals at risk of acute coronary artery disease who might require either preventive or curative measures. Conventional risk factors and the radiation dose to coronary artery origins were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic value of LTL needs further investigation.

  14. [Risk management of coronary artery disease--pharmacological therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of coronary artery disease primarily aims at reducing the severity and frequency of cardiac symptoms and improving prognosis. Both goals can be achieved by the administration of beta-receptor blockers, which are now used as first-line therapy in these patients. Calcium channel blockers or nitrates should be given in the event of contraindications or severe intolerance to beta-receptor blocking therapy. Only long-acting calcium channel blockers should be used in this setting. Another indication for additional treatment with calcium channel blockers and nitrates is given when the efficacy of beta-blocker therapy is not sufficient to relieve symptoms. Nitroglycerin and nitrates are the drugs of choice for the treatment of the acute angina pectoris attack. Calcium channel blockers are used as first-line treatment in patients with vasospastic angina. In patients with syndrome X, nitrates as well as calcium channel blockers or beta-receptor blockers can be administered. In the absence of contraindications, every patient with coronary artery disease should be given aspirin. A daily dosage of 75 to 150 mg is sufficient to reduce the rate of future cardiac events. Clopidogrel should be given in every patient with intolerance or contraindications for aspirin. Increased plasma homocystein levels seem to be a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Homocystein levels can be reduced by dietary means as well as supplementation of folic acid or vitamin B complex. There is no evidence from controlled randomised studies that a decrease of homocystein is beneficial for the prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease.

  15. The risk of acute coronary syndrome in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriha Belguith, Asma; Baccouche, Houda; Grissa, Mohamed Habib; Boubaker, Hamdi; Bouida, Wahid; Beltaief, Kaouthar; Sekma, Adel; Fredj, Nizar; Bzeouiche, Nasri; Zina, Zied; Boukef, Riadh; Soltani, Mohamed; Nouira, Semir

    2016-10-01

    Data on the effect of fasting on coronary disease are rare and controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of Ramadan on the prevalence of acute coronary syndrome among chest pain patients in the emergency department of Monastir. It was a prospective study, performed in the emergency department of Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital of Monastir, during the 3 months before, during and after Ramadan from 2012 to 2014. We included all patients with non-traumatic chest pain during the study period. Data were collected using a standardized form. The uniformity chi 2 test, ANOVA test, Kruskal-Wallis test were performed at the 5% level. Binary logistic regression model was used for multivariate analysis. The SCA prevalence was 17% a month before Ramadan, 22% during Ramadan and 28% one month after Ramadan (p = 0.007). According to the results of the multivariate analysis, the period of Ramadan is not associated with increase of risk of SCA whereas the risk doubles after Ramadan in all group (p = 0.001). In subgroups analysis, the period of R was associated with an amplification of risk in men aged more than 55 years and women older than 65 years (OR: 2.1; p = 0.020) and among subjects with hypertension (OR: 2.4, p = 0.007). Ramadan and Shawwal were not associated with an increase of risk among subjects without CVX risk factor. We have demonstrated that the risk of SCA has increased in Ramadan only among the elderly and patient with hypertension. The increased risk in Shawwal can be explained by the lifting of dietary restriction.

  16. Computed tomography imaging of early coronary artery lesions in stable individuals with multiple cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence, extent, severity, and features of coronary artery lesions in stable patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: Seventy-seven patients with more than 3 cardiovascular risk factors were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Patients with high-risk factors and 39 controls with no risk factors were enrolled in the study. The related risk factors included hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, smoking history, and overweight. The characteristics of coronary lesions were identified and evaluated by 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography. RESULTS: The incidence of coronary atherosclerosis was higher in the high-risk group than in the no-risk group. The involved branches of the coronary artery, the diffusivity of the lesion, the degree of stenosis, and the nature of the plaques were significantly more severe in the high-risk group compared with the no-risk group (all p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Among stable individuals with high-risk factors, early coronary artery lesions are common and severe. Computed tomography has promising value for the early screening of coronary lesions.

  17. Gender differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yen Y; Gast, Gerrie-Cor M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2010-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), traditionally considered a male disease, is also a major threat to women. This review article addresses independent risk factors for CHD that are specific for women as well as non-gender-specific risk factors and how their effects differ between men and women. Although polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women is associated with an adverse metabolic risk profile, current evidence regarding future risk of CHD is conflicting. Preeclampsia is consistently associated with higher risk of CHD later in life. Menopause is associated with an increased risk of CHD, and the earlier the onset of menopause, the larger the risk. Existing data on postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) was inconclusive with regard to possible protection when HT is initiated close to menopause in young peri- or postmenopausal women. Evidence on use of low-dose oral contraceptives strongly suggests no increased risk of CHD. Although levels of physical inactivity are similar for men and women, the higher prevalences of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity in older women portends a greater risk in women than in men. Additionally, risk factors like smoking, hypertriglyceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels have greater impact in women than in men. This review indicates that acknowledgement of non-gender-specific risk factors in addition to those that are unique to women would help optimize diagnosis, treatment and earlier prevention of CHD in women. Further research is needed to ascertain if incorporating these gender-specific risks into a clinically used risk stratification model would change outcome in women. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk assessment after coronary angioplasty with SPECT myocardial perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilletti, Jorge A.; Erriest, Juan; Mele, Anibal A.

    2007-01-01

    The chest pain can be use for stratifying the risk of the patients after coronary angioplasty. Nevertheless this strategy has shown to have a low accuracy in the detection of restenosis and myocardial ischemia. Aims: To establish the usefulness of the SPECT studies in the risk stratification after the coronary angioplasty. Evaluate the incidence of silent ischemia or symptomatic, and its impact on the prognosis. Method: There were included 107 patients (p) submitted to a gated SPECT between the year of the coronary angioplasty. The analysis of the images was performed according to different scores (SSS, SRS, SDS). These data was correlated with the symptoms of the patients. We define group 1 (G1) as the asymptomatic without ischemia (n 59p), group 2 (G2) as silent ischemia (n = 28p) and group 3 (G3) as symptomatic with ischemia (n = 20p). A clinical follow-up was done in search of events (target vessel revascularization, unstable angina, AMI and death). Results: Significant differences were not observed in the clinical variables between the different groups. The SSS was lower in the G1 compare with G2 and G3 (p 0.0001) and was similar between the last two, p = NS (SSS: G1: 2.2 ± 4.9; G2: 7.6 ± 5.9; G3: 9.5 ± 6.8). The SDS was greater in G3 vs. G1 and G2, p = 0.0001, and greater in G2 vs. G1, p = 0.0001 (SDS: G1: 0; G2: 4.8 ± 3.5; G3: 7.2 ± 6.5). No differences where observed in the SRS between the three groups. In the follow-up the total percentage of events was lesser when compare the G1 with the G2 and G3 (G1: 3.3%; G2 and G3: 18.7%; p 0.02). The percentage of annual events of the G3 symptomatic with ischemia (11.03%) and G2 silent ischemia (4.04%) did not present differences (p 0.7). When the events of the G2 (4.04%) were compared with the G1 (1.24%) we observed a trend to major frequency of events in the G2 (p = 0.6). Conclusions: The presence of myocardial ischemia after coronary angioplasty is a determinant of the prognosis. Nevertheless, the extension

  19. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on ...

  20. Profile of coronary heart disease risk factors in first-year university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is substantial evidence that coronary heart disease risk factors are present in people of all ages. The extent to which the problem exists in university students in South Africa has not been confirmed in the literature and needs further investigation. The aim of the study was to profile the coronary heart disease risk factors ...

  1. First Nations people's challenge in managing coronary artery disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kathryn M; Sanguins, Julianne; McGregor, Lisa; LeBlanc, Pamela

    2007-10-01

    First Nations peoples bring a particular history and cultural perspective to healing and well-being that significantly influences their health behaviors. The authors used grounded theory methods to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that 22 First Nations people underwent when making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The transcribed interviews revealed a core variable, meeting the challenge. Meeting the challenge of CAD risk management was influenced by intrapersonal, interpersonal (relationships with others), extrapersonal (i.e., the community and government), sociodemographic, and gendered factors. Salient elements for the participants included their beliefs about origins of illness, the role of family, challenges to accessing information, financial and resource management, and the gendered element of body image. Health care providers need to understand the historical, social, and culturally embedded factors that influence First Nations people's appraisal of their CAD.

  2. Circulating tocopherols and risk of coronary artery disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangxiao; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Sun, Hao; Hou, Xiaowen; Shi, Jingpu

    2016-05-01

    Circulating level of tocopherols was supposed to be associated with risk of coronary artery disease. However, the results from previous studies remain controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis based on observational studies to evaluate the association between circulating tocopherols and coronary artery disease risk for the first time. Meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched to retrieve articles published during January 1995 and May 2015. Articles were included if they provided sufficient information to calculate the weighted mean difference and its corresponding 95% confidence interval. Circulating level of total tocopherols was significantly lower in coronary artery disease patients than that in controls (weighted mean difference -4.33 μmol/l, 95% confidence interval -6.74 to -1.91, P tocopherol alone was not significantly associated with coronary artery disease risk. Results from subgroup analyses showed that a lower level of circulating total tocopherols was merely associated with higher coronary artery disease risk in studies with higher sex ratio in cases (tocopherols was associated with early onset coronary artery disease rather than late onset coronary artery disease (tocopherols when the studies were stratified by matching status and assay methods. Our findings suggest that a deficiency in circulating total tocopherols might be associated with higher coronary artery disease risk. Whereas circulating α-tocopherol alone could not protect us from developing coronary artery disease. Further prospective studies were warranted to confirm our findings. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  3. Increased bleeding risk during percutaneous coronary interventions by arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndrepepa, Gjin; Groha, Philipp; Lahmann, Anna L; Lohaus, Raphaela; Cassese, Salvatore; Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie; Kufner, Sebastian; Mayer, Katharina; Bernlochner, Isabell; Byrne, Robert A; Fusaro, Massimiliano; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Schunkert, Heribert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess the association between arterial hypertension and bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of arterial hypertension on bleeding risk of patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI is unknown. This study included 14,180 patients who underwent PCI. Bleeding was defined using the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) criteria. Arterial hypertension was defined as treatment with antihypertensive drugs or a systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure value >90 mm Hg documented on at least 2 occasions. The primary outcome was bleeding rate within 30 days of PCI. Overall, 11,066 patients (78.0%) had arterial hypertension. Bleeding events occurred in 1,232 patients with arterial hypertension and 278 patients without arterial hypertension (11.1% vs 8.9%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.46, P arterial hypertension and 175 patients without arterial hypertension (6.6% vs 5.6%: OR = 1.19 [1.01-1.41], P = 0.049). Non-access-site bleeding occurred in 502 patients with and 103 patients without arterial hypertension (4.5% vs 3.3%; OR = 1.39 [1.12-1.72], P = 0.003). After adjustment, arterial hypertension was significantly associated with any bleeding (adjusted OR = 1.41 [1.19-1.67], P arterial hypertension increased the risk of non-access-site bleeding (P = 0.002), whereas systolic blood pressure at the time of PCI increased the risk of access site bleeding (P = 0.018). Arterial hypertension is associated with increased risk of bleeding during PCI procedures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Risk score for contrast induced nephropathy following percutaneous coronary intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, Amal Abdel; Tohamy, Khalid Y.

    2009-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is an important cause of acute renal failure. Identification of risk factors of CIN and creating a simple risk scoring for CIN after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is important. A prospective single center study was conducted in Kuwait chest disease hospital. All patients admitted to chest disease hospital for PCI from March to May 2005 were included in the study. Total of 247 patients were randomly assigned for the development dataset and 100 for the validation set using the simple random method. The overall occurrence of CIN in the development set was 5.52%. Using multivariate analysis; basal Serum creatinine, shock, female gender, multivessel PCI, and diabetes mellitus were identified as risk factors. Scores assigned to different variables yielded basal creatinine > 115 micron mol/L with the highest score(7), followed by shock (3), female gender, multivessel PCI and diabetes mellitus had the same score (2). Patients were further risk stratified into low risk score ( 1 2). The developed CIN model demonstrated good discriminative power in the validation population. In conclusion, use of a simple risk score for CIN can predict the probability of CIN after PCI; this however needs further validation in larger multicenter trials. (author)

  5. The Framingham Risk Function Underestimated Absolute Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Czech Men

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Zvárová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2007), s. 43-49 ISSN 0026-1270 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : external validation * Framingham risk function * coronary heart disease Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.451, year: 2007

  6. Prognostic Value of Coronary Computed Tomography Imaging in Patients at High Risk Without Symptoms of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Admir; Ten Kate, Gert-Jan R; Roos, Cornelis J; Neefjes, Lisan A; de Graaf, Michiel A; Spronk, Angela; Delgado, Victoria; van Lennep, Jeanine E Roeters; Moelker, Adriaan; Ouhlous, Mohamed; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Boersma, Eric; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Nieman, Koen; Bax, Jeroen J; de Feijter, Pim J

    2016-03-01

    At present, traditional risk factors are used to guide cardiovascular management of asymptomatic subjects. Intensified surveillance may be warranted in those identified as high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aims to determine the prognostic value of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography (CCTA) next to the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in patients at high CVD risk without symptoms suspect for coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 665 patients at high risk (mean age 56 ± 9 years, 417 men), having at least one important CVD risk factor (diabetes mellitus, familial hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease, or severe hypertension) or a calculated European systematic coronary risk evaluation of >10% were included from outpatient clinics at 2 academic centers. Follow-up was performed for the occurrence of adverse events including all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. During a median follow-up of 3.0 (interquartile range 1.3 to 4.1) years, adverse events occurred in 40 subjects (6.0%). By multivariate analysis, adjusted for age, gender, and CACS, obstructive CAD on CCTA (≥50% luminal stenosis) was a significant predictor of adverse events (hazard ratio 5.9 [CI 1.3 to 26.1]). Addition of CCTA to age, gender, plus CACS, increased the C statistic from 0.81 to 0.84 and resulted in a total net reclassification index of 0.19 (p value and risk reclassification benefit beyond CACS in patients without CAD symptoms but with high risk of developing CVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Paraoxonase 1 (Q192R) gene polymorphism, coronary heart disease and the risk of a new acute coronary event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna; Medina-Gil, José María; Garay-Sánchez, Paloma; Tugores, Antonio

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) plays a major role in the oxidation of low density lipoprotein and in the prevention of coronary atherogenesis. In this context, coding region polymorphisms of PON1 gene, responsible for the enzyme activity, has become of interest as a marker for atherogenesis. A study and follow-up was conducted on 529 patients with an acute coronary event in order to assess the association between the PON1 Q192R (rs662;A/G) polymorphism, the type of acute coronary syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and smoking), the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis, and the medium-term clinical follow-up. The QQ genotype was found in 245 (46.3%) patients, with 218 (41.2%) patients showing the QR genotype, and 66 (14.5%) patients had the RR genotype. No significant differences were found between the QQ and QR/RR genotypes as regards the clinical characteristics, the analytical data, and the angiographic variables. Similarly, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant differences in presenting with a new acute coronary event (p=0.598), cardiac mortality (p=0.701), stent thrombosis (p=0.508), or stent re-stenosis (p=0.598) between QQ and QR/RR genotypes during the follow-up period (3.3±2.2 years). In patients with an acute coronary syndrome, the PON1 Q192R genotypes did not influence the risk of suffering a new acute coronary event during the medium-term follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Overview of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Initiatives in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Bhatt, Deepak L; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Suri, Kunal; Mishra, Sundeep; Iqbal, Romaina; Virani, Salim S

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Industrialization and economic growth have led to an unprecedented increment in the burden of CVD and their risk factors in less industrialized regions of the world. While there are abundant data on CVD and their risk factors from longitudinal cohort studies done in the West, good-quality data from South Asia are lacking. Several multi-institutional, observational, prospective registries, and epidemiologic cohorts in South Asia have been established to systematically evaluate the burden of CVD and their risk factors. The PINNACLE (Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP), the Kerala Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), and Trivandrum Heart Failure registries have focused on secondary prevention of CVD and performance measurement in both outpatient and inpatient settings, respectively. The Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology (PURE), Centre for Cardiometabolic Risk Reduction in South Asia (CARRS), and other epidemiologic and genetic studies have focused on primary prevention of CVD and evaluated variables such as environment, smoking, physical activity, health systems, food and nutrition policy, dietary consumption patterns, socioeconomic factors, and healthy neighborhoods. The international cardiovascular community has been responsive to a burgeoning cardiovascular disease burden in South Asia. Several collaborations have formed between the West (North America in particular) and South Asia to catalyze evidence-based and data-driven changes in the federal health policy in this part of the world to promote cardiovascular health and mitigate cardiovascular risk.

  9. 76 FR 49707 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... reconsider its proposed amendments to the phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease health [[Page 49708... December 8, 2010, proposing to amend regulations on plant sterol/ stanol esters and risk of coronary heart...

  10. Lipid Biomarkers for Risk Assessment in Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Donato, Leslie J; Jaffe, Allan S

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize evidence gathered for the prognostic value of routine and novel blood lipids and lipoproteins measured in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Data supports clear association with risk and actionable value for non-high-density lipoprotein (Non-HDL) cholesterol and plasma ceramides in a setting of ACS. The prognostic value and clinical actionability of apolipoprotein B (apoB) and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in ACS have not been thoroughly tested, while the data for omega-3 fatty acids and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) are either untested or more varied. Measuring basic lipids, which should include Non-HDL cholesterol, at the time of presentation for ACS is guideline mandated. Plasma ceramides also provide useful information to guide both treatment decisions and follow-up. Additional studies targeting ACS patients are necessary for apoB, Lp(a), omega-3 fatty acids, and Ox-LDL.

  11. Dietary intake and coronary risk factors in Peruvian Quechua Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, E W; Picon-Reategui, E; Gahagan, H E; Buskirk, E R

    1976-06-01

    Some of the "risk" factors implicated in the etiology of coronary atherosclerotic heart disease were investigated in sixty Quechua men living in two areas of Peru. Highland Quechua had higher serum triglycerides (mean, 122 vs. 90 mg. per deciliter) than downward migrants. There were no significant differences between the two groups in serum cholesterol (mean 150 vs. 157 mg. per deciliter), body fat (mean, 15 vs. 17%), or blood pressure (mean, 113/72 vs. 114/72 mm Hg). Both groups consumed about 2,500 kcal per man per day, while the highland Quechua consumed more carbohydrate (mean, 66 vs. 51%) and less fat (mean 19 vs. 33%). By American standards, both groups had low serum cholesterol values, as well as low blood pressure.

  12. Computed tomography coronary angiography accuracy in women and men at low to intermediate risk of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharampal, Anoeshka S.; Papadopoulou, Stella L.; Rossi, Alexia; Weustink, Annick C.; Mollet, Nico R.A.; Meijboom, W. Bob; Neefjes, Lisan A.; Nieman, Koen; Feijter, Pim J. de; Boersma, Eric; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in women at low to intermediate pre-test probability of coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with men. In this retrospective study we included symptomatic patients with low to intermediate risk who underwent both invasive coronary angiography and CTCA. Exclusion criteria were previous revascularisation or myocardial infarction. The pre-test probability of CAD was estimated using the Duke risk score. Thresholds of less than 30 % and 30-90 % were used for determining low and intermediate risk, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of CTCA in detecting obstructive CAD (≥50 % lumen diameter narrowing) was calculated on patient level. P < 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 570 patients (46 % women [262/570]) were included and stratified as low (women 73 % [80/109]) and intermediate risk (women 39 % [182/461]). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were not significantly different in and between women and men at low and intermediate risk. For women vs. men at low risk they were 97 % vs. 100 %, 79 % vs. 90 %, 80 % vs. 80 % and 97 % vs. 100 %, respectively. For intermediate risk they were 99 % vs. 99 %, 72 % vs. 83 %, 88 % vs. 93 % and 98 % vs. 99 %, respectively. CTCA has similar diagnostic accuracy in women and men at low and intermediate risk. (orig.)

  13. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute coronary syndrome in a young patient without risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Chevli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction that is more common in younger patients (under age 50 and in women. Although the etiology is not known, some predisposing conditions to SCAD are well known and include Marfan syndrome, pregnancy and peripartum state, drug abuse, and some anatomical abnormalities of the coronary arteries such as aneurysms and severe kinking. We describe a case of SCAD in a young woman who presented with sudden onset of chest pain and was admitted for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The coronary angiography showed dissection of the left anterior descending artery. The patient underwent successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement.

  14. Androgenetic alopecia and risk of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA or male pattern baldness (MPB has been found to be associated with the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD. The well-known risk factors are family history of CAD, hypertension, increased body mass index (BMI, central obesity, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. The newer risk factors are serum lipoprotein-a (SL-a, serum homocysteine (SH, and serum adiponectin (SA. Aim : Identifying individuals at risk of CAD at an early age might help in preventing CAD and save life. Hence, a comparative study of CAD risk factors was planned in 100 males of AGA between the age of 25 and 40 years with equal number of age- and sex-matched controls. Materials and Methods : Patients of AGA grade II or more of Hamilton and Norwood (HN Scale and controls were examined clinically and advised blood test. The reports were available for fasting blood sugar (FBS, serum total serum cholesterol (SC in 64 cases, 64 controls; lipoproteins (high, low, very low density, HDL, LDL, VLDL, serum triglycerides (ST in 63 cases, 63 controls; SL-a in 63 cases, 74 controls; SH in 56 cases, 74 controls; and SA in 62 cases, 74 controls. Results : In these cases family history (FH of AGA and CAD was significantly high. The blood pressure (BP was also found to be significantly high in the cases. The difference of mean serum HDL, LDL, VLDL, ST, SH, and SL-a in cases and controls were statistically significant and with increasing grade of AGA, the risk factors also increased. Conclusion : Patients with AGA appear to be at an increased risk of developing CAD, therefore, clinical evaluation of cases with AGA of grade II and above may be of help in preventing CAD in future.

  15. Importance of high triglycerides levels between novel coronary risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmore Bermúdez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The analysis of new cardiovascular risk factors is under an extensive debate in the cardiology and metabolic research fields. Objective: To determine the main factors that contribute to the classification of individuals with higher coronary risk in the adult population from Maracaibo, Venezuela. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study with multistage random sampling in 1379 individuals belonging to the Maracaibo City Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence Study (MMSPS was performed. They were classified according to the coronary risk by Framingham-Wilson equation adapted to our population. The association between various risk factors was evaluated by ordinal logistic regression models. Results: 1,379 subjects (females 55.9%; n = 771 were evaluated, 66.2% (n = 913 were classified with low coronary risk. In univariate (χ2 = 112.35; p < 0.00001 and multivariate analysis [OR: 3.98 (2.39-6.63; p < 0.01], the main factors associated to be classified as the highest risk category were hypertriglyceridemia. Conclusion: There are several factors that should be included in predictive models use worldwide. The most important in our population were dyslipidemia such as hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipoproteinemia (a and insulin resistance. Resumen: Introducción: El análisis de nuevos factores de riesgo cardiovascular constituye un tema de amplio debate en la investigación cardio-metabólica. Objetivo: Determinar los principales factores que contribuyen a la clasificación de sujetos en las categorías de mayor riesgo coronario en individuos adultos de la ciudad de Maracaibo, Venezuela. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo, trasversal con muestreo aleatorio multietapas en 1.379 individuos pertenecientes al Estudio de Prevalencia de Síndrome Metabólico de la Ciudad de Maracaibo (EPSMM. Estos fueron clasificaron de acuerdo con el riesgo coronario mediante la fórmula Framingham-Wilson adaptada para

  16. Prevalence of conventional risk factors and lipid profiles in patients with acute coronary syndrome and significant coronary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Pacheco H

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Héctor González-Pacheco,1 Jesús Vargas-Barrón,2 Maite Vallejo,2 Yigal Piña-Reyna,3 Alfredo Altamirano-Castillo,1 Pedro Sánchez-Tapia,1 Carlos Martínez-Sánchez1 1Coronary Care Unit, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Department of Clinical Research, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Catheterization Laboratory, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico Background: Among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, 80%–90% present at least one conventional risk factor. On the other hand, lipid profile modification after a cardiovascular event related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS has been recognized. The prevalence of conventional risk factors and the lipid profile at the time of admission in patients with ACS and significant CAD (stenosis ≥50% determined through coronary angiography is not well described. Methods: We studied 3,447 patients with a diagnosis of ACS and significant CAD with stenosis ≥50%, as shown on angiography. We recorded the presence of conventional risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In addition, we analyzed the lipid profiles within the first 24 hours of admission. We analyzed the studied population and compared findings according to sex.Results: Most patients (81.7% were male. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was present in 51.3% of patients, and non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome was present in 48.7%. The most frequent risk factor was smoking, which was present in 68% of patients, followed by hypertension (57.8%, dyslipidemia (47.5%, and diabetes (37.7%. In women, the most frequent risk factors were hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, whereas in men, smoking was the most frequent. We identified at least one risk factor in 95.7% of all patients, two or three risk factors in 62%, and four risk factors in 8.6% of patients. The lipid profile analysis revealed that

  17. 76 FR 9525 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14, 2003, letter of.... FDA-2000-P-0102, FDA-2000-P-0133, and FDA-2006-P-0033] Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Extension of enforcement discretion...

  18. Macrophage cholesterol efflux correlates with lipoprotein subclass distribution and risk of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremer Werner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in patients with low HDL have suggested that impaired cellular cholesterol efflux is a heritable phenotype increasing atherosclerosis risk. Less is known about the association of macrophage cholesterol efflux with lipid profiles and CAD risk in normolipidemic subjects. We have therefore measured macrophage cholesterol efflux in142 normolipidemic subjects undergoing coronary angiography. Methods Monocytes isolated from blood samples of patients scheduled for cardiac catheterization were differentiated into macrophages over seven days. Isotopic cholesterol efflux to exogenously added apolipoprotein A-I and HDL2 was measured. Quantitative cholesterol efflux from macrophages was correlated with lipoprotein subclass distribution in plasma from the same individuals measured by NMR-spectroscopy of lipids and with the extent of coronary artery disease seen on coronary angiography. Results Macrophage cholesterol efflux was positively correlated with particle concentration of smaller HDL and LDL particles but not with total plasma concentrations of HDL or LDL-cholesterol. We observed an inverse relationship between macrophage cholesterol efflux and the concntration of larger and triglyceride rich particles (VLDL, chylomicrons. Subjects with significant stenosis on coronary angiography had lower cholesterol efflux from macrophages compared to individuals without significant stenosis (adjusted p = 0.02. Conclusion Macrophage cholesterol efflux is inversely correlated with lipoprotein particle size and risk of CAD.

  19. Risk of coronary artery disease in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    OpenAIRE

    Vilela, Felippe Dantas; Lorenzo, Andrea Rocha de; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Ferraiuoli, Giovanna Ianini; Hadlich, Marcelo; Barros, Marcelo Viana de Lima; Lima, Ana Beatriz Ribeiro; Meirelles, Vanderson

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has improved survival and allowed infected patients to develop atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). Specific strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in the infected population have not been developed. It is necessary to know the magnitude of cardiovascular risk in this population. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess cardiovascular risk using a well-known clinical score and to investigate coronary artery calcium s...

  20. Changes in some coronary disease risk factors under influence of treatment with Swieradow radon waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczeklik, E; Halawa, B; Kwiatkowski, J

    1977-01-01

    In 66 patients subbivided into group of patients with coronary disease and group of control subjects the effect of radioactive waterbath and climatotherapy in Swieradow upon coronary disease risk factors was studied. The following risk factors were taken into account: cholesterol level, triglicerides, LDL, uric acid, the serum glucose level, arterial tension and weight. The results obtained indicate that the therapy with radon waters of Swieradow complexed with climatotherapy decreases the content of some coronary disease risk factors. The decrease of the urin acid in the serum, the lowering of arterial tension and decrease of body weight was noted. The lipid level in the serum did not change under effect of radioactive waters.

  1. Novel Risk Stratification Assays for Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Haitham M; Hazen, Stanley L

    2017-08-01

    Since identification of aspartate aminotransferase as the first cardiac biomarker in the 1950s, there have been a number of new markers used for myocardial damage detection over the decades. There have also been several generations of troponin assays, each with progressively increasing sensitivity for troponin detection. Accordingly, the "standard of care" for myocardial damage detection continues to change. The purpose of this paper is to review the clinical utility, biological mechanisms, and predictive value of these various biomarkers in contemporary clinical studies. As of this writing, a fifth "next" generation troponin assay has now been cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use in the USA for subjects presenting with suspected acute coronary syndromes. Use of these high-sensitivity assays has allowed for earlier detection of myocardial damage as well as greater negative predictive value for infarction after only one or two serial measurements. Recent algorithms utilizing these assays have allowed for more rapid rule-out of myocardial infarction in emergency department settings. In this review, we discuss novel assays available for the risk assessment of subjects presenting with chest pain, including both the "next generation" cardiac troponin assays as well as other novel biomarkers. We review the biological mechanisms for these markers, and explore the positive and negative predictive value of the assays in clinical studies, where reported. We also discuss the potential use of these new markers within the context of future clinical care in the modern era of higher sensitivity troponin testing. Finally, we discuss advances in new platforms (e.g., mass spectrometry) that historically have not been considered for rapid in vitro diagnostic capabilities, but that are taking a larger role in clinical diagnostics, and whose prognostic value and power promise to usher in new markers with potential for future clinical utility in acute coronary

  2. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be

  3. Coronary artery calcification detected by a mobile helical CT unit in a mass screening. The frequency and relationship to coronary risk factors and coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itani, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Hanamura, Kazuhisa; Asakura, Kazuhiro; Sone, Shusuke; Sunami, Yuko; Shimura, Akimitsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    2001-06-01

    A strong relationship is known to exist between coronary artery disease (CAD) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by CT. In this study, we investigated the frequency of CAC and the relationship between coronary risk factors, CAD and CAC in a mass screening using a mobile helical CT unit. The total number of participants was 10008 people undergoing a medical examination for lung cancer and tuberculosis using a mobile helical CT unit. We measured the CT density of the coronary artery to detect CAC. The CT density threshold for determining CAC was above +110HU. The frequency of CAC was 16.0% in the overall patient population and significantly higher in males than in females (20.6% vs 10.7%). Frequency increased with age in both genders. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were significantly related to CAC. Smoking showed a correlation with CAC only in males. A significant relationship was observed between CAD and CAC in males. In particular, the relationship between them was strongest in males under 60 years of age. Furthermore, the odds ratio of CAC in predicting CAD increased with increasing risk factors in both genders. (author)

  4. Depression risk in patients with coronary heart disease in Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcel Konrad; Louis Jacob; Michael A Rapp; Karel Kostev

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of depression and its risk factors among patients with coronary heart disease(CHD) treated in German primary care practices.METHODS Longitudinal data from nationwide general practices in Germany(n = 1072) were analyzed.Individuals initially diagnosed with CHD(2009-2013) were identified,and 59992 patients were included and matched(1:1) to 59992 controls.The primary outcome measure was an initial diagnosis of depression within five years after the index date among patients with and without CHD.Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for confounders.RESULTS Mean age was equal to 68.0 years(SD = 11.3).A total of 55.9% of patients were men.After a five-year follow-up,21.8% of the CHD group and 14.2% of the control group were diagnosed with depression(P < 0.001).In the multivariate regression model,CHD was a strong risk factor for developing depression(HR =1.54,95%CI:1.49-1.59,P < 0.001).Prior depressive episodes,dementia,and eight other chronic conditions were associated with a higher risk of developing depression.Interestingly,older patients and women were also more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared with younger patients and men,respectively.CONCLUSION The risk of depression is significantly increased among patients with CHD compared with patients without CHD treated in primary care practices in Germany.CHD patients should be routinely screened for depression to ensure improved treatment and management.

  5. Cognitive outcomes in elderly high-risk patients after off-pump versus conventional coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birte Ostergaard; Hughes, Pia; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that the risk of cerebral dysfunction is less with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) than with conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB). However, evidence for this statement is preliminary, and additional insight is needed.......It has been suggested that the risk of cerebral dysfunction is less with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) than with conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB). However, evidence for this statement is preliminary, and additional insight is needed....

  6. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, R.; Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common...

  7. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S. F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J. P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V. M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common

  8. Job stress and behavioral characteristics in relation to coronary heart disease risk among Japanese police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Maki; Miyai, Nobuyuki; Morioka, Ikuharu; Utsumi, Miyoko; Hattori, Sonomi; Koike, Hiroaki; Arita, Mikio; Miyashita, Kazuhisa

    2017-08-08

    This study examined the association between job-related behavioral characteristics and the risk of coronary heart diseases (CHD) in Japanese male police officers. Compared to office clerks, police officers exhibited greater age-related increases of the prevalence of CHD risk factors, and a clustering number of CHD risk factors was significantly higher in the group of those over 45 yr of age. Among the police officers, coronary-prone behavior was more frequent than that seen in office clerks. The police officers with coronary-prone behavior tended to engage in shift work and to work overtime more; yet they were less likely to perceive job stress and to express the relevant physical and psychological symptoms than those without coronary-prone behavior. The subjects with such behavioral characteristics had a significantly greater number of CHD risk factors. In a multiple regression analysis, coronary-prone behavior together with age, social support, walking hours per day, and amount of alcohol consumption were selected as significant determinants of a cluster of CHD risk factors. These results suggest that coronary-prone behavior may contribute to the higher prevalence of CHD risk factors in police officers via leading the long working hours and the work-related unfavorable lifestyles, such as alcohol drinking and physical inactivity.

  9. The Incidence and the Risk Factors of Silent Embolic Cerebral Infarction After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Onur Sinan; Celik, Aziz Inan; Ikikardes, Firat; Ozmen, Caglar; Caglıyan, Caglar Emre; Deniz, Ali; Bicakci, Kenan; Bicakci, Sebnem; Evlice, Ahmet; Demir, Turgay; Kanadasi, Mehmet; Demir, Mesut; Demirtas, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Silent embolic cerebral infarction (SECI) is a major complication of coronary angiography (CAG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent CAG with or without PCI were recruited. Cerebral diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed for SECI within 24 hours. Clinical and angiographic characteristics were compared between patients with and without SECI. Silent embolic cerebral infarction occurred in 12 (12%) of the 101 patients. Age, total cholesterol, SYNTAX score (SS), and coronary artery bypass history were greater in the SECI(+) group (65 ± 10 vs 58 ± 11 years,P= .037; 223 ± 85 vs 173 ± 80 mg/dL,P= .048; 30.1 ± 2 vs 15 ± 3,PSECI was more common in the PCI group (8/24 vs 4/77,P= .01). On subanalysis, the SS was significantly higher in the SECI(+) patients in both the CAG and the PCI groups (29.3 ± 1.9 vs 15 ± 3,PSECI after CAG and PCI increases with the complexity of CAD (represented by the SS). The SS is a predictor of the risk of SECI, a complication that should be considered more often after CAG. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Selective estrogen receptor modulators and risk for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, A; Hermenegildo, C; Oviedo, P; Tarín, J J

    2007-04-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women in most countries. Atherosclerosis is the main biological process determining CHD. Clinical data support the notion that CHD is sensitive to estrogens, but debate exists concerning the effects of the hormone on atherosclerosis and its complications. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are compounds capable of binding the estrogen receptor to induce a functional profile distinct from estrogens. The possibility that SERMs may shift the estrogenic balance on cardiovascular risk towards a more beneficial profile has generated interest in recent years. There is considerable information on the effects of SERMs on distinct areas that are crucial in atherogenesis. The complexity derived from the diversity of variables affecting their mechanism of action plus the differences between compounds make it difficult to delineate one uniform trend for SERMs. The present picture, nonetheless, is one where SERMs seem less powerful than estrogens in atherosclerosis protection, but more gentle with advanced forms of the disease. The recent publication of the Raloxifene Use for The Heart (RUTH) study has confirmed a neutral effect for raloxifene. Prothrombotic states may favor occlusive thrombi at sites occupied by atheromatous plaques. Platelet activation has received attention as an important determinant of arterial thrombogenesis. Although still sparse, available evidence globally suggests neutral or beneficial effects for SERMs.

  11. Risk stratification in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: Risk scores, biomarkers and clinical judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corcoran

    2015-09-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy in higher risk NSTE-ACS. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score is a validated risk stratification tool which has incremental prognostic value for risk stratification compared with clinical assessment or troponin testing alone. In emergency medicine, there has been a limited adoption of the GRACE score in some countries (e.g. United Kingdom, in part related to a delay in obtaining timely blood biochemistry results. Age makes an exponential contribution to the GRACE score, and on an individual patient basis, the risk of younger patients with a flow-limiting culprit coronary artery lesion may be underestimated. The future incorporation of novel cardiac biomarkers into this diagnostic pathway may allow for earlier treatment stratification. The cost-effectiveness of the new diagnostic pathways based on high-sensitivity troponin and copeptin must also be established. Finally, diagnostic tests and risk scores may optimize patient care but they cannot replace patient-focused good clinical judgment.

  12. Perceptions of risk of coronary heart disease among people living with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammouri, Ali Ahmad; Abu Raddaha, Ahmad H; Natarajan, Jansi; D'Souza, Melba Sheila

    2018-02-01

    Our aim is to assess perception of risk of developing coronary heart disease and to examine its associations with individuals' characteristics and health behaviours among Omani people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Evaluating perceptions of being at risk of developing a disease may give insight into health promotion behaviours. People with diabetes are at high risk of coronary heart disease. The management of diabetes mellitus should include prevention and control of coronary heart disease. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted. A convenience sample of 160 adults with T2DM was invited to participate in this study between November 2014 and March 2015. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed to examine associations between study variables. Perception of risk of developing coronary heart disease was significantly associated with low educational level (β = 0.191, P diabetes mellitus (β = 0.200, P healthy diet more frequently. Teaching people with T2DM about the risk of developing coronary heart disease is essential as it could motivate them to perform health promotion behaviours, which may assist in controlling and reducing coronary heart disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Cannon, Christopher P; Braunwald, Eugene; Goodrich, Erica L; Im, KyungAh; Lukas, Mary Ann; O'Donoghue, Michelle L

    2018-05-01

    Background The incremental prognostic value of assessing the metabolic syndrome has been disputed. Little is known regarding its prognostic value in patients after an acute coronary syndrome. Design and methods The presence of metabolic syndrome (2005 International Diabetes Federation) was assessed at baseline in SOLID-TIMI 52, a trial of patients within 30 days of acute coronary syndrome (median follow-up 2.5 years). The primary endpoint was major coronary events (coronary heart disease death, myocardial infarction or urgent coronary revascularization). Results At baseline, 61.6% ( n = 7537) of patients met the definition of metabolic syndrome, 34.7% (n = 4247) had diabetes and 29.3% had both ( n = 3584). The presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of major coronary events (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) 1.29, p metabolic syndrome was numerically but not significantly associated with the risk of major coronary events (adjHR 1.13, p = 0.06). Conversely, diabetes was a strong independent predictor of major coronary events in the absence of metabolic syndrome (adjHR 1.57, p metabolic syndrome identified patients at highest risk of adverse outcomes but the incremental value of metabolic syndrome was not significant relative to diabetes alone (adjHR 1.07, p = 0.54). Conclusions After acute coronary syndrome, diabetes is a strong and independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Assessment of the metabolic syndrome provides only marginal incremental value once the presence or absence of diabetes is established.

  14. What does my patient's coronary artery calcium score mean? Combining information from the coronary artery calcium score with information from conventional risk factors to estimate coronary heart disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletcher Mark J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coronary artery calcium (CAC score is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease. We sought to combine information from the CAC score with information from conventional cardiac risk factors to produce post-test risk estimates, and to determine whether the score may add clinically useful information. Methods We measured the independent cross-sectional associations between conventional cardiac risk factors and the CAC score among asymptomatic persons referred for non-contrast electron beam computed tomography. Using the resulting multivariable models and published CAC score-specific relative risk estimates, we estimated post-test coronary heart disease risk in a number of different scenarios. Results Among 9341 asymptomatic study participants (age 35–88 years, 40% female, we found that conventional coronary heart disease risk factors including age, male sex, self-reported hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol were independent predictors of the CAC score, and we used the resulting multivariable models for predicting post-test risk in a variety of scenarios. Our models predicted, for example, that a 60-year-old non-smoking non-diabetic women with hypertension and high cholesterol would have a 47% chance of having a CAC score of zero, reducing her 10-year risk estimate from 15% (per Framingham to 6–9%; if her score were over 100, however (a 17% chance, her risk estimate would be markedly higher (25–51% in 10 years. In low risk scenarios, the CAC score is very likely to be zero or low, and unlikely to change management. Conclusion Combining information from the CAC score with information from conventional risk factors can change assessment of coronary heart disease risk to an extent that may be clinically important, especially when the pre-test 10-year risk estimate is intermediate. The attached spreadsheet makes these calculations easy.

  15. Coronary collateral circulation in patients with chronic coronary total occlusion; its relationship with cardiac risk markers and SYNTAX score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börekçi, A; Gür, M; Şeker, T; Baykan, A O; Özaltun, B; Karakoyun, S; Karakurt, A; Türkoğlu, C; Makça, I; Çaylı, M

    2015-09-01

    Compared to patients without a collateral supply, long-term cardiac mortality is reduced in patients with well-developed coronary collateral circulation (CCC). Cardiovascular risk markers, such as N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and high-sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) are independent predictors for cardiovascular mortality. The main goal of this study was to examine the relationship between CCC and cardiovascular risk markers. We prospectively enrolled 427 stable coronary artery disease patients with chronic total occlusion (mean age: 57.5±11.1 years). The patients were divided into two groups, according to their Rentrop scores: (a) poorly developed CCC group (Rentrop 0 and 1) and (b) well-developed CCC group (Rentrop 2 and 3). NT-proBNP, hs-CRP, hs-cTnT, uric acid and other biochemical markers were also measured. The SYNTAX score was calculated for all patients. The patients in the poorly developed CCC group had higher frequencies of diabetes and hypertension (prisk markers, such as NT-proBNP, hs-cTnT and hs-CRP are independently associated with CCC in stable coronary artery disease with chronic total occlusion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Knowledge of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors among a Community Sample in Oman; Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Ammouri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of Omani adults regarding conventional coronary heart disease (CHD risk factors and to identify demographic variables associated with these knowledge levels. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional pilot study was carried out among a convenience sample of 130 adults attending a health awareness fair held in a local shopping mall in Muscat, Oman, in November 2012. A modified version of the Heart Disease Facts Questionnaire in both English and Arabic was used to assess knowledge of CHD risk factors. Scores were calculated by summing the correct answers for each item (range: 0–21. Inadequate knowledge was indicated by a mean score of <70%. Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to establish the participants’ knowledge levels and identify associated demographic variables. Results: A total of 114 subjects participated in the study (response rate: 87.7%. Of these, 69 participants (60.5% had inadequate mean CHD knowledge scores. Knowledge of CHD risk factors was significantly associated with body mass index (odds ratio [OR] = 0.739; P = 0.023, marital status (OR = 0.057; P = 0.036 and education level (OR = 9.243; P = 0.006. Conclusion: Low knowledge levels of CHD risk factors were observed among the studied community sample in Oman; this is likely to limit the participants’ ability to engage in preventative practices. These findings support the need for education programmes to enhance awareness of risk factors and prevention of CHD in Oman.

  17. Alcohol Intake and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Younger, Middle-Aged, and Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A; Tolstrup, Janne S; Jakobsen, Marianne U

    2010-01-01

    prospective studies from North America and Europe including 192 067 women and 74 919 men free of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancers at baseline, average daily alcohol intake was assessed at baseline with a food frequency or diet history questionnaire. An inverse association between alcohol......BACKGROUND: -Light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. This protective effect of alcohol, however, may be confined to middle-aged or older individuals. Coronary heart disease incidence is low in men ... of age; for this reason, study cohorts rarely have the power to investigate the effects of alcohol on coronary heart disease risk in younger adults. This study examined whether the beneficial effect of alcohol on coronary heart disease depends on age. Methods and Results-In this pooled analysis of 8...

  18. Risk indicators in coronary cardiac disease and occlusive disease of the peripheral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, H.

    1982-01-01

    In 160 patients with clinically confirmed coronary heart diseases, angiograms of the coronary vessels, the left ventricle, the abdominal aorta, the pelvic and femoral arteries and the supra-aortic vessels were taken. At the same time the incidence of the risk indicators overweight, hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, hyperuricaemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cigarette smoking was established and compared with the angiograms. Hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, diabetes mellitus and hypertension are found to be in a clearly positive correlation with the frequency and severity of coronary and peripheral vascular diseases. For hyperuricaemia and overweight a relation to the frequency and severity of peripheral but not coronary vascular stenoses is outlined. Cigarette smoking, again, proves to be a clear risk indicator. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Betel nut usage is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Bawany, Faizan Imran; Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Asadullah; Lashari, Muhammad Nawaz

    2013-12-27

    The objective of our study was to assess betel nut usage as one of the major risk factors associated with coronary artery disease. This case control study consisted of 300 controls and 300 cases. A structured questionnaire was administered to the participants to assess consumption of betel nut and confounding variables. A respondent was considered a regular consumer of betel nut if he/she consumed one or more pieces of betel nut every day for a period of greater than 6 months. About 8 in 10 betel nut chewers developed coronary artery disease. After adjusting for diabetes and hypertension, the odds ratio analysis depicted 7.72 times greater likelihood for coronary artery disease in patients who chewed betel nut for more than 10 years. Our study concludes that betel nut chewing is a significant risk factor leading to the development of coronary artery disease.

  20. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS.THE RISK OF NEW CORONARY EVENT IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka Savic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and several markers of inflammation have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Physical activity may lower the risk of coronary heart disease(CHD by mitigating inflammation. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on systemic inflammatory response in patients with stabile coronary artery disease participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise program. Male (n=29 and female (n=23 patients with stable coronary heart disease were recruited for this study. All patients were divided into two groups: group with regular aerobic physical training during cardiovascular rehabilitation program phase II along 3 weeks in rehabilitation center and 3 weeks after that in home of patients and sedentary lifestyle group. There were no significant differences in gender distribution among analyzed groups. Student’s t test showed no significant difference in mean age, waist circumference (OS and waist/hip ratio (WHR. Degree of obesity was measured by BMI, and there was a significant improvement in BMI in patients who underwent the six-week physical training compared to control group (p<0.05.Physical training during 6 weeks did not show any effects on leukocyte count and ICAM-1 levels compared to control group. The exercise training induced reduction in plasma CRP levels by 23.72%, p<0.001, and reduction in plasma VCAM-1 levels by Moderate aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of inflammatory state by decreasing CRP and VCAM-1 levels without significant body mass and visceral obesity reduction. The obtained results indicate that regular physical activity is clinically attractive in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart diseases.

  1. Coronary fluorine-18-sodium fluoride uptake is increased in healthy adults with an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn A; Thomassen, Anders; de Jong, Pim A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coronary artery fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) uptake reflects coronary artery calcification metabolism and is considered to be an early prognostic marker of coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the relationship between coronary artery F-NaF uptake and cardiovascular risk ...... adults at low cardiovascular risk and that an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile is associated with a marked increase in coronary artery F-NaF uptake.......OBJECTIVE: Coronary artery fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) uptake reflects coronary artery calcification metabolism and is considered to be an early prognostic marker of coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the relationship between coronary artery F-NaF uptake and cardiovascular risk...... in healthy adults at low cardiovascular risk. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Study participants underwent blood pressure measurements, blood analyses, and coronary artery F-NaF PET/CT imaging. In addition, the 10-year risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, on the basis of the Framingham Risk Score...

  2. Seasonal variation in AF-related admissions to a coronary care unit in a "hot" climate: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiu, Andrew; Horowitz, John D; Stewart, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal variations in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related morbidity and mortality have been demonstrated in "cold" northern European climates, but there are few data describing such a phenomenon in a "hot" climate. To examine the pattern of AF-related admissions to a coronary care unit (CCU) in South Australia operating within a Mediterranean climate, and to determine potential differences according to mean daily temperatures. PATIENT COHORT AND METHODS: A total of 144 admissions to the CCU during the 30 hottest and coldest days (60 days in total) during the calendar year 2001 were analyzed in respect to the absolute number of admissions and the profile of those admitted during "hot" and "cold" days. Overall, there were significantly more admissions to the CCU on "cold" as opposed to "hot" days (90 vs 54 patients in 30 days, P < or = .001). Of the 24 patients found to be in AF on presentation to hospital, 18 (75%) were admitted on cold days (P < .05). Alternatively, during "hot" days, patients were more likely to be diagnosed with unstable angina rather than acute myocardial infarction (46% vs 30%, P = .07) with proportionately fewer patients in AF at the time (11% vs 20%, P = NS). These preliminary data suggest that the phenomenon of seasonal variations in AF-related morbidity extend beyond colder climates to hotter climates with sufficiently large relative (as opposed to absolute) changes in ambient temperatures during the year.

  3. Ranking of psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Marott, Jacob L; Kristensen, Tage S.

    2015-01-01

    .001] and systolic blood pressure (≥160 mmHg or blood pressure medication vs. never smoker; HR 1.74; 95% CI, 1.43-2.11; P ...-statistics and net reclassification improvement. During the follow-up, 1731 non-fatal and fatal coronary events were registered. In men, the highest ranking risk factors for coronary heart disease were vital exhaustion [high vs. low; hazard ratio (HR) 2.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.70-3.26; P

  4. High-Risk Coronary Plaques Complicated with Acute Coronary Syndrome in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opincariu Diana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA has evolved notably over the last decade, gaining an increased amount of temporo-spatial resolution in combination with decreased radiation exposure. The importance of CCTA is emerging especially in vulnerable and young patients who might not have developed a viable collateral vascular network to sustain the circulation to an infarction area during a major adverse coronary event. There are a few well-known markers by which a vulnerable plaque can be assessed and that can predict the subsequent events of sudden myocardial ischemia, such as an increased positive remodeling index (cut-off >1.4, low-attenuation plaque (cut-off 0.7, and napkin-ring sign (NRS. This manuscript presents a series of 3 clinical cases of young patients experiencing symptoms and signs of myocardial ischemia who underwent CCTA in order to assess the composition and functional characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques and their repercussion in developing an acute coronary syndrome.

  5. Usefulness of routine periodic fasting to lower risk of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Benjamin D; May, Heidi T; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Bailey, Beau M; McClure, Brian S; Renlund, Dale G; Lappé, Donald L; Carlquist, John F; Fisher, Patrick W; Pearson, Robert R; Bair, Tami L; Adams, Ted D; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2008-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is common and multifactorial. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS, or Mormons) in Utah may have lower cardiac mortality than other Utahns and the US population. Although the LDS proscription of smoking likely contributes to lower cardiac risk, it is unknown whether other shared behaviors also contribute. This study evaluated potential CAD-associated effects of fasting. Patients (n(1) = 4,629) enrolled in the Intermountain Heart Collaborative Study registry (1994 to 2002) were evaluated for the association of religious preference with CAD diagnosis (> or = 70% coronary stenosis using angiography) or no CAD (normal coronaries, <10% stenosis). Consequently, another set of patients (n(2) = 448) were surveyed (2004 to 2006) for the association of behavioral factors with CAD, with routine fasting (i.e., abstinence from food and drink) as the primary variable. Secondary survey measures included proscription of alcohol, tea, and coffee; social support; and religious worship patterns. In population 1 (initial), 61% of LDS and 66% of all others had CAD (adjusted [including for smoking] odds ratio [OR] 0.81, p = 0.009). In population 2 (survey), fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD (64% vs 76% CAD; OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.35 to 0.87, p = 0.010), and this remained after adjustment for traditional risk factors (OR 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.27 to 0.81, p = 0.007). Fasting was also associated with lower diabetes prevalence (p = 0.048). In regression models entering other secondary behavioral measures, fasting remained significant with a similar effect size. In conclusion, not only proscription of tobacco, but also routine periodic fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD.

  6. Usefulness of Routine Periodic Fasting to Lower Risk of Coronary Artery Disease among Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Benjamin D.; May, Heidi T.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Bailey, Beau M.; McClure, Brian S.; Renlund, Dale G.; Lappé, Donald L.; Carlquist, John F.; Fisher, Patrick W.; Pearson, Robert R.; Bair, Tami L.; Adams, Ted D.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is common and multi-factorial. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS, or Mormons) in Utah may have lower cardiac mortality than other Utahns and the US population. While the LDS proscription of smoking likely contributes to lower cardiac risk, it is unknown whether other shared behaviors also contribute. This study evaluated potential CAD-associated effects of fasting. Patients (N1=4,629) enrolled in the Intermountain Heart Collaborative Study registry (1994-2002) were evaluated for association of religious preference with CAD diagnosis (≥70% coronary stenosis on angiography) or no CAD (normal coronaries, <10% stenosis). Consequently, another set of patients (N2=448) were surveyed (2004-2006) for association of behavioral factors with CAD, with the primary variable being routine fasting (i.e., abstinence from food and drink). Secondary survey measures included proscription of alcohol, tea, and coffee, social support, and religious worship patterns. In population 1 (initial), 61% of LDS and 66% of all others had CAD (adjusted [including for smoking]: odds ratio [OR]=0.81; p=0.009). In population 2 (survey), fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD (64% vs. 76% CAD; OR=0.55, CI=0.35, 0.87; p=0.010) and this remained after adjustment for traditional risk factors (OR=0.46, CI=0.27, 0.81; p=0.007). Fasting was also associated with lower diabetes prevalence (p=0.048). In regression models entering other secondary behavioral measures, fasting remained significant with similar effect size. In conclusion, not only proscription of tobacco, but also routine periodic fasting was associated with lower risk of CAD. PMID:18805103

  7. Blood pressure reactivity to psychological stress and coronary calcification in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A; Zhu, Sha; Tucker, Diane C; Whooley, Mary A

    2006-03-01

    A longstanding hypothesis is that individuals who exhibit large increases in blood pressure during psychological stress are at risk for atherosclerosis. We tested whether blood pressure changes during psychological stress predict subsequent coronary calcification (CaC) in young healthy adults. We evaluated 2816 healthy black and white women, 20 to 35 years of age, from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study, who were not using medication for hypertension or diabetes in 1987-1988. Participants completed video game and star tracing tasks while their blood pressure was recorded. Thirteen years later (2000-2001), they completed computed tomography measures of CaC. Overall 9.3% (261 of 2816) had CaC present at follow-up. Each 10 mm Hg change in systolic blood pressure during the video game was associated with a 24% increased odds of having CaC at follow-up (unadjusted odds ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.46; P=0.008). This association persisted after adjustment for age, race, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, family history of myocardial infarction, smoking, daily alcohol consumption, body mass index, and resting or baseline blood pressure (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.58; P=0.006). Blood pressure changes during the star tracing task were not associated with subsequent CaC. Blood pressure changes during a video game predicted the presence of CaC 13 years later. To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports blood pressure reactivity to a stressor being related to calcification in the coronary arteries. Blood pressure reactivity may provide useful prognostic information about future risk beyond standard risk factors.

  8. Accurate determination of high-risk coronary lesion type by multidetector cardiac computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasnag, Mirvat; Umakanthan, Branavan; Foster, Gary P

    2008-07-01

    Coronary arteriography (CA) is the standard method to image coronary lesions. Multidetector cardiac computerized tomography (MDCT) provides high-resolution images of coronary arteries, allowing a noninvasive alternative to determine lesion type. To date, no studies have assessed the ability of MDCT to categorize coronary lesion types. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of lesion type categorization by MDCT using CA as a reference standard. Patients who underwent both MDCT and CA within 2 months of each other were enrolled. MDCT and CA images were reviewed in a blinded fashion. Lesions were categorized according to the SCAI classification system (Types I-IV). The origin, proximal and middle segments of the major arteries were analyzed. Each segment comprised a data point for comparison. Analysis was performed using the Spearman Correlation Test. Four hundred eleven segments were studied, of which 110 had lesions. The lesion distribution was as follows: 35 left anterior descending (LAD), 29 circumflex (Cx), 31 right coronary artery (RCA), 2 ramus intermedius, 8 diagonal, 4 obtuse marginal and 2 left internal mammary arteries. Correlations between MDCT and CA were significant in all major vessels (LAD, Cx, RCA) (p < 0.001). The overall correlation coefficient was 0.67. Concordance was strong for lesion Types II-IV (97%) and poor for Type I (30%). High-risk coronary lesion types can be accurately categorized by MDCT. This ability may allow MDCT to play an important noninvasive role in the planning of coronary interventions.

  9. Blood Transfusion and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrowni, Wassef; Vora, Amit Navin; Dai, David; Wojdyla, Daniel; Dakik, Habib; Rao, Sunil V

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicating percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. To date, no studies have evaluated the association of blood transfusion with AKI in patients undergoing PCI. We used a retrospective cohort study of all patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI from CathPCI Registry (n=1 756 864). The primary outcome was AKI defined as the rise in serum creatinine post procedure ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% above baseline values. AKI developed in 9.0% of study sample. Patients with AKI were older, more often women, and had high prevalence of comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and advanced stages of chronic kidney disease at baseline. Blood transfusion was utilized in 2.2% of patients. In the overall sample, AKI developed in 35.1% of patients who received transfusion versus 8.4% of patients without transfusion (adjusted odds ratio, 4.87 [4.71-5.04]). In the subgroup of patients who sustained bleeding event and received transfusion, the rate of AKI was significantly increased across all preprocedure hemoglobin levels versus no blood transfusion. Similar findings were seen in the subgroup of patients with no bleeding event. Blood transfusion is strongly associated with AKI in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI. Further investigation is needed to determine whether a restrictive blood transfusion strategy might improve PCI outcomes by reducing the risk of AKI. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Cardiovascular risk factors in Middle Eastern patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: Results from the first Jordanian percutaneous coronary intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Ayman J; Alhaddad, Imad A; Khader, Yousef; Tabbalat, Ramzi; Al-Mousa, Eyas; Saleh, Akram; Jarrah, Mohamad; Nammas, Assem; Izraiq, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    Background and aims: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the Middle East. We sought to study the prevalence and coexistence of 6 cardiovascular risk factors (RFs) among patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and to evaluate the impact of age and gender on the presence of multiple RFs. In this prospective, multicenter study, 2426 consecutive patients were enrolled. Mean age was 59.0 ± 10.1 years and 500 (20.6%) were women. Acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary disease were the indications for PCI in 77.1% and 22.9%, respectively. Hypertension was present in 62.3%, diabetes in 53.8%, hypercholesterolemia in 48.8%, smoking in 43.5%, family history of premature CVD 39.4% and obesity in 28.8%. Only 3.8% did not have any of these RFs. Presence of ⩾3 and ⩾4 RFS was observed in 57.4% and 29.5% of patients, respectively. Presence of ⩾3 RFs was more common in women than men (69.0% vs. 54.5%, p  Eastern population undergoing PCI. More than half and more than one-fourth of the patients had at least 3 or 4 RFs; respectively. More women than men and more middle aged patients than older or younger patients had significantly higher rates of presence of multiple RFs.

  11. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future.

  12. Coronary Artery Calcium Screening: Does it Perform Better than Other Cardiovascular Risk Stratification Tools?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Zeb

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery calcium (CAC has been advocated as one of the strongest cardiovascular risk prediction markers. It performs better across a wide range of Framingham risk categories (6%–10% and 10%–20% 10-year risk categories and also helps in reclassifying the risk of these subjects into either higher or lower risk categories based on CAC scores. It also performs better among population subgroups where Framingham risk score does not perform well, especially young subjects, women, family history of premature coronary artery disease and ethnic differences in coronary risk. The absence of CAC is also associated with excellent prognosis, with 10-year event rate of 1%. Studies have also compared with other commonly used markers of cardiovascular disease risk such as Carotid intima-media thickness and highly sensitive C-reactive protein. CAC also performs better compared with carotid intima-media thickness and highly sensitive C-reactive protein in prediction of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events. CAC scans are associated with relatively low radiation exposure (0.9–1.1 mSv and provide information that can be used not only for risk stratification but also can be used to track the progression of atherosclerosis and the effects of statins.

  13. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  14. Overweight Status, Obesity, and Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, C. Michael; Robinson, Laura M.; Davidson, Philip W.; Haveman, Meindert; Janicki, Matthew P.; Albertini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of overweight status/obesity (OSO). OSO is associated with several important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study focused on assessing whether such risk factors are being identified in adults with ID who are receiving their healthcare in…

  15. Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease - An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Bysted, Anette; Andersen, Niels Lyhne

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a strong direct (positive) association between the intake of trans fatty acids (TRA) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), primarily accounted for by industrially produced TFA (IP-TFA). However, comparisons, between ruminant TEA (R-TFA) and IP-TFA and risk...

  16. Validating diagnoses from hospital discharge registers change risk estimates for acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Albert Marni; Schmidt, E.B.; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2007-01-01

    of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) diagnoses identified in a hospital discharge register changed the relative risk estimates of well-established risk factors for ACS. Methods All first-time ACS diagnoses (n=1138) in the Danish National Patient Registry were identified among male participants in the Danish...

  17. Trends in risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, C.; Vaartjes, I.; Blokstra, A.; Verschuren, W. M M; Visser, M.; Deeg, D. J H; Bots, M. L.; Van Dis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Favourable trends in risk factor levels in the general population may partly explain the decline in coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to present long-term national trends in established risk factors for CHD.  Methods: Data were obtained from five data

  18. Trends in risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, C; Vaartjes, I; Blokstra, A; Verschuren, W M M; Visser, M; Deeg, D J H; Bots, M L; van Dis, I

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Favourable trends in risk factor levels in the general population may partly explain the decline in coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to present long-term national trends in established risk factors for CHD. METHODS: Data were obtained from five data

  19. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...

  20. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  1. Dietary fatty acids and risk factors for coronary heart disease : controlled studies in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of LDL cholesterol, blood pressure and Lp(a), and low levels of HDL cholesterol increase the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). This thesis describes the effects of dietary fatty acids on these risk factors. In each of three trials we fed diets with tailored fatty acid

  2. Serum homocysteine as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naureen, A.; Fatima, F.; Munazza, B.; Shaheen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Homocysteine (Hcy) is an intermediate formed during the catabolism of sulphur containing essential amino acid, methionine and Less than one percent of tHcy is found as the free form. Development of atherosclerotic changes and thrombo-embolism are common features in patients with homocysteinuria. This study was conducted to assess the relationship of Hcy and coronary heart disease (CHD) in our population. Methods: The cross-sectional analytical study was carried out at the Department of Biochemistry, Hazara University Mansehra and Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad. A total of 80 subjects were included in this study and were divided into 2 groups. Cases Group consisted of 40 patients who had confirmed Myocardial Infarction (MI) coming for routine follow-up (first re-visit) after the acute attack. Control Group consisted of 40 matching healthy individuals. Demographic data including age, gender, dietary habits, height and weight as documented in preformed proforma. Blood pressure was taken in sitting posture. Serum total Hcy were measured. Data was entered into computer using SPSS 16.0 for analysis. Results: The mean age of the cases was 59.68+-8.06 (30-70) years and that of the controls was 58.93+-6.93 (48-76) years. The average BMI of cases was 27.70+-3.61 Kg/m2 and of the controls was 25.66+-2.98 Kg/m2. This increase of BMI from controls to cases was statistically significant (p<0.050). The mean systolic BP of the cases was 153.88+-11.90 mmHg in comparison with 142.62+-11.65 mmHg for the controls. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Mean tHcy level of the cases was 17.15+-4.45 micro mol/l while that of controls was 12.20+-2.53 micro mol/l. There is a statistically significant difference between cases and controls with respect to Hcy levels (p<0.001). Conclusion: Plasma tHcy level has a powerful predictor value of CHD and routine screening for elevated Hcy concentrations is advisable especially for individuals who manifest

  3. Left atrial enlargement increases the risk of major adverse cardiac events independent of coronary vasodilator capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Angela S. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Murthy, Venkatesh L.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gayed, Peter; Bruyere, John; Di Carli, Marcelo F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wu, Justina [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, and the Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dorbala, Sharmila [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and the Division of Cardiology, Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Longstanding uncontrolled atherogenic risk factors may contribute to left atrial (LA) hypertension, LA enlargement (LAE) and coronary vascular dysfunction. Together they may better identify risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic LA hypertension as assessed by LAE modifies the relationship between coronary vascular function and MACE. In 508 unselected subjects with a normal clinical {sup 82}Rb PET/CT, ejection fraction ≥40 %, no prior coronary artery disease, valve disease or atrial fibrillation, LAE was determined based on LA volumes estimated from the hybrid perfusion and CT transmission scan images and indexed to body surface area. Absolute myocardial blood flow and global coronary flow reserve (CFR) were calculated. Subjects were systematically followed-up for the primary end-point - MACE - a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease progression or revascularization. During a median follow-up of 862 days, 65 of the subjects experienced a composite event. Compared with subjects with normal LA size, subjects with LAE showed significantly lower CFR (2.25 ± 0.83 vs. 1.95 ± 0.80, p = 0.01). LAE independently and incrementally predicted MACE even after accounting for clinical risk factors, medication use, stress left ventricular ejection fraction, stress left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and CFR (chi-squared statistic increased from 30.9 to 48.3; p = 0.001). Among subjects with normal CFR, those with LAE had significantly worse event-free survival (risk adjusted HR 5.4, 95 % CI 2.3 - 12.8, p < 0.0001). LAE and reduced CFR are related but distinct cardiovascular adaptations to atherogenic risk factors. LAE is a risk marker for MACE independent of clinical factors and left ventricular volumes; individuals with LAE may be at risk of MACE despite normal coronary vascular function. (orig.)

  4. Improved predictive value of GRACE risk score combined with platelet reactivity for 1-year cardiovascular risk in patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent coronary stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Haijun

    2016-11-01

    Both high platelet reactivity (HPR) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score have moderate predictive value for major adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), whereas the prognostic significance of GRACE risk score combined with platelet function testing remains unclear. A total of 596 patients with non-ST elevation ACS who underwent PCI were enrolled. The P2Y 12 reaction unit (PRU) value was measured by VerifyNow P2Y 12 assay and GRACE score was calculated by GRACE risk 2.0 calculator. Patients were stratified by a pre-specified cutoff value of PRU 230 and GRACE score 140 to assess 1-year risk of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), and stent thrombosis. Seventy-two (12.1%) patients developed CVD events during 1-year follow-up. Patients with CVD events had a higher PRU value (244.6 ± 50.9 vs. 203.7 ± 52.0, p risk independently. Compared to patients with normal platelet reactivity (NPR) and GRACE score risk (HR: 5.048; 95% CI: 2.268-11.237; p risk score yielded superior risk predictive capacity beyond GRACE score alone, which is shown by improved c-statistic value (0.871, p = 0.002) as well as net reclassification improvement (NRI 0.263, p risk of adverse CVD events. The combination of platelet function testing and GRACE score predicted 1-year CVD risk better.

  5. [Childhood body mass index and the risk of coronary heart disease in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Olsen, L.W.; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The severity of the long term consequences of the current childhood obesity epidemic on coronary heart disease is unknown. Therefore we investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) at ages 7-13 years and heart disease in adulthood among 276,835 Danish schoolchildren. We found...... that higher BMI during this period of childhood is associated with an increased risk of any, non-fatal and fatal heart disease in adulthood. Worldwide, as children are becoming heavier, our findings suggest that greater numbers of children are at risk of having coronary heart disease in adulthood...

  6. Quantitative coronary plaque analysis predicts high-risk plaque morphology on coronary computed tomography angiography: results from the ROMICAT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Puchner, Stefan B; Lu, Michael T; Ghemigian, Khristine; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Pursnani, Amit; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2018-02-01

    Semi-automated software can provide quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaques on coronary CT angiography (CTA). The relationship between established qualitative high-risk plaque features and quantitative plaque measurements has not been studied. We analyzed the association between quantitative plaque measurements and qualitative high-risk plaque features on coronary CTA. We included 260 patients with plaque who underwent coronary CTA in the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) II trial. Quantitative plaque assessment and qualitative plaque characterization were performed on a per coronary segment basis. Quantitative coronary plaque measurements included plaque volume, plaque burden, remodeling index, and diameter stenosis. In qualitative analysis, high-risk plaque was present if positive remodeling, low CT attenuation plaque, napkin-ring sign or spotty calcium were detected. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between quantitative and qualitative high-risk plaque assessment. Among 888 segments with coronary plaque, high-risk plaque was present in 391 (44.0%) segments by qualitative analysis. In quantitative analysis, segments with high-risk plaque had higher total plaque volume, low CT attenuation plaque volume, plaque burden and remodeling index. Quantitatively assessed low CT attenuation plaque volume (odds ratio 1.12 per 1 mm 3 , 95% CI 1.04-1.21), positive remodeling (odds ratio 1.25 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.10-1.41) and plaque burden (odds ratio 1.53 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.08-2.16) were associated with high-risk plaque. Quantitative coronary plaque characteristics (low CT attenuation plaque volume, positive remodeling and plaque burden) measured by semi-automated software correlated with qualitative assessment of high-risk plaque features.

  7. Frequency of conventional risk factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in males and females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, Z.; Shahbaz, U.; Hashmi, A.T.; Naseem, T.; Khan, M.M.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The frequency of conventional risk factors for acute coronary syndrome differs in women compared to men, both in the general population and in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Objective: To find out the frequency of conventional risk factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in males and females that exists in Pakistani patient population. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Material and Methods: A total of one hundred patients with acute coronary syndrome who presented in the Cardiology Department, Mayo Hospital Lahore were interviewed between May, 2008 and March 2009. Patients were enquired about the presence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Information was also obtained regarding smoking and history of ischemic heart disease in their first degree relatives. Lipid profile was recorded from the investigation chart of every patient. Results: 91% of subjects had at least one risk factor out of four conventional factors. When comparing men and women, more women were hypertensive and diabetic (p = 0.003 and 0.009 respectively). None of the females had ever smoked as compared to 34% of males (P = <0.001). Conclusion: Women with acute coronary syndrome, when compared to men, have more prevalence of diabetes and hyper-tension, and less prevalence of smoking. Further research is needed to better understand the gender differences in various aspects of ischemic heart disease that exist in our population. (author)

  8. Anomalous origin of the coronary artery from the wrong coronary sinus evaluated with computed tomography: ''High-risk'' anatomy and its clinical relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupinski, Maciej; Urbanczyk-Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Irzyk, Malgorzata; Banys, Robert; Klimeczek, Piotr; Gruszczynska, Katarzyna; Baron, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess coronary arteries arising from the wrong coronary sinus, including CT-evaluated high-risk anatomic features, clinical symptoms and cardiac events during follow-up. A total of 7,115 patients scheduled for 64-slice or dual-source cardiac CT were screened for the presence of isolated anomalous origin of the coronary artery from the wrong coronary sinus. Anomalous origin of the coronary artery was found in 54 (0.76 %) patients (29 men, 25 women, mean age 60.9 ± 11.6 years). Sixteen (30 %) patients with abnormal right coronary origin (ARCA) more commonly had a slit-like orifice (15 vs. 3; p < 0.001), intramural course (15 vs. 3; p < 0.001) and interarterial course (11 vs. 0; p < 0.001) than 22 (41 %) and 13 (24 %) individuals with abnormal circumflex artery (ALCx) and left coronary artery (ALCA) origin, respectively. Patients with ALCA presented less frequently with chest pain than subjects with ARCA and ALCx (25 vs. 3; p = 0.03). Patients with ARCA tended to show higher occurrence of cardiac events in the follow-up than individuals with ALCA and ALCx (5 vs. 4; p = NS). High-risk anatomy features are most common in patients with ARCA and these patients also have higher prevalence of chest pain and cardiac events in the follow-up than individuals with ALCA and ALCx. (orig.)

  9. Coronary artery disease risk assessment from unstructured electronic health records using text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) often leads to myocardial infarction, which may be fatal. Risk factors can be used to predict CAD, which may subsequently lead to prevention or early intervention. Patient data such as co-morbidities, medication history, social history and family history are required to determine the risk factors for a disease. However, risk factor data are usually embedded in unstructured clinical narratives if the data is not collected specifically for risk assessment purposes. Clinical text mining can be used to extract data related to risk factors from unstructured clinical notes. This study presents methods to extract Framingham risk factors from unstructured electronic health records using clinical text mining and to calculate 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores in a cohort of diabetic patients. We developed a rule-based system to extract risk factors: age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes history and smoking history. The results showed that the output from the text mining system was reliable, but there was a significant amount of missing data to calculate the Framingham risk score. A systematic approach for understanding missing data was followed by implementation of imputation strategies. An analysis of the 10-year Framingham risk scores for coronary artery disease in this cohort has shown that the majority of the diabetic patients are at moderate risk of CAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The joint impact of family history of myocardial infarction and other risk factors on 12-year coronary heart disease mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J M; Feskens, E.J.; Verschuren, W M Monique; Seidell, J C; Kromhout, D.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the impact of family history of myocardial infarction on 12-year coronary heart disease mortality. Men and women with a family history had an increased risk for coronary heart disease death, irrespective of other risk factors (RR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.17-2.13 and RR = 2.12; 95% CI =

  11. Value of Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification for Risk Prediction of Coronary and Cardiovascular Events: Result of the HNR Study (Heinz Nixdorf Recall).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Nils; Erbel, Raimund; Mahabadi, Amir A; Rauwolf, Michael; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Moebus, Susanne; Kälsch, Hagen; Budde, Thomas; Schmermund, Axel; Stang, Andreas; Führer-Sakel, Dagmar; Weimar, Christian; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Dragano, Nico; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2018-02-13

    Computed tomography (CT) allows estimation of coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression. We evaluated several progression algorithms in our unselected, population-based cohort for risk prediction of coronary and cardiovascular events. In 3281 participants (45-74 years of age), free from cardiovascular disease until the second visit, risk factors, and CTs at baseline (b) and after a mean of 5.1 years (5y) were measured. Hard coronary and cardiovascular events, and total cardiovascular events including revascularization, as well, were recorded during a follow-up time of 7.8±2.2 years after the second CT. The added predictive value of 10 CAC progression algorithms on top of risk factors including baseline CAC was evaluated by using survival analysis, C-statistics, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination index. A subgroup analysis of risk in CAC categories was performed. We observed 85 (2.6%) hard coronary, 161 (4.9%) hard cardiovascular, and 241 (7.3%) total cardiovascular events. Absolute CAC progression was higher with versus without subsequent coronary events (median, 115 [Q1-Q3, 23-360] versus 8 [0-83], P value of baseline CT and risk assessment in terms of C-statistic or integrated discrimination index, especially for total cardiovascular events. However, CAC progression did not improve models including CAC 5y and 5-year risk factors. An excellent prognosis was found for 921 participants with double-zero CAC b =CAC 5y =0 (10-year coronary and hard/total cardiovascular risk: 1.4%, 2.0%, and 2.8%), which was for participants with incident CAC 1.8%, 3.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. When CAC b progressed from 1 to 399 to CAC 5y ≥400, coronary and total cardiovascular risk were nearly 2-fold in comparison with subjects who remained below CAC 5y =400. Participants with CAC b ≥400 had high rates of hard coronary and hard/total cardiovascular events (10-year risk: 12.0%, 13.5%, and 30.9%, respectively). CAC progression is associated with

  12. Concept analysis of risk in relation to coronary heart disease among Filipino-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalusung-Angosta, Alona

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the concept of risk in relation to coronary heart disease (CHD) among Filipino-Americans (FAs) and provide a new definition of risk. Published literature. This concept analysis provided a new meaning of risk in relation to CHD among FAs and shed light on further understanding of risk. Risk has been laced with negativity in health care, but based on the current literature, risk can be conceptualized in a positive perspective, especially in the area of chronic health disease such as CHD. However, further research is needed in the conceptualization of risk related to CHD for consistency, adequacy, and meaning. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Alopecia and its association with coronary heart disease and cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Nelson; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-10-20

    Alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease as well as the following risk factors for cardiovascular disease: hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively determine the level of risk of coronary heart disease and risk factors in individuals with alopecia. A systematic literature search was conducted using several databases. We calculated pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using a random effects model. In total, 31 studies comprising 29,254 participants with alopecia were eligible for the meta-analysis and showed that alopecia is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (OR 1.22, 95% CI: 1.07-1.39), hyperinsulinaemia (OR 1.97, 95% CI: 1.20-3.21), insulin resistance (OR 4.88, 95% CI: 2.05-11.64), and metabolic syndrome (OR 4.49, 95% CI: 2.36-8.53). Individuals with alopecia were also shown to be more likely compared to those without alopecia to have higher serum cholesterol levels (OR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.17-2.21), higher serum triglyceride levels (OR 2.07, 95% CI: 1.32-3.25), higher systolic blood pressures (OR 1.73, 95% CI: 1.29-2.33), and higher diastolic blood pressures (OR 1.59, 95% CI: 1.16-2.18). Alopecia is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, and there appears to be a dose-response relationship with degree of baldness whereby the greater the severity of alopecia, the greater the risk of coronary heart disease. Alopecia is also associated with an increased risk of hypertension, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and having elevated serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antipsychotic Medications and Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Cheng Liu

    Full Text Available This study assessed the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization in association with the use of certain antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia patients.A nationwide cohort of 31,177 inpatients with schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years whose records were enrolled in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from 2000 to 2008 and were studied after encrypting the identifications. Cases (n = 147 were patients with subsequent acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization after their first psychiatric admission. Based on a nested case-control design, each case was matched with 20 controls for age, sex and the year of first psychiatric admission using risk-set sampling. The effects of antipsychotic agents on the development of acute coronary syndrome were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression and sensitivity analyses to confirm any association.We found that current use of aripiprazole (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.27-10.64, p<0.05 and chlorpromazine (adjusted RR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.40-6.24, p<0.001 were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome. Although haloperidol was associated with an increased risk (adjusted RR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.20-3.44, p<0.01, there was no clear dose-dependent relationship. These three antipsychotic agents were also associated with an increased risk in the first 30 days of use, and the risk decreased as the duration of therapy increased. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-adjusted modeling showed that the results were similar to those of multiple regression analysis.Patients with schizophrenia who received aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, or haloperidol could have a potentially elevated risk of developing acute coronary syndrome, particularly at the start of therapy.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of high-definition CT coronary angiography in high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, S.S.; Morgan-Hughes, G.; Ukoumunne, O.; Clayton, B.; Davies, E.J.; Nikolaou, V.; Hyde, C.J.; Shore, A.C.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) using a combination of high-definition CT (HD-CTCA) and high level of reader experience, with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as the reference standard, in high-risk patients for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). Materials and methods: Three hundred high-risk patients underwent HD-CTCA and ICA. Independent experts evaluated the images for the presence of significant CAD, defined primarily as the presence of moderate (≥50%) stenosis and secondarily as the presence of severe (≥70%) stenosis in at least one coronary segment, in a blinded fashion. HD-CTCA was compared to ICA as the reference standard. Results: No patients were excluded. Two hundred and six patients (69%) had moderate and 178 (59%) had severe stenosis in at least one vessel at ICA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 97.1%, 97.9%, 99% and 93.9% for moderate stenosis, and 98.9%, 93.4%, 95.7% and 98.3%, for severe stenosis, on a per-patient basis. Conclusion: The combination of HD-CTCA and experienced readers applied to a high-risk population, results in high diagnostic accuracy comparable to ICA. Modern generation CT systems in experienced hands might be considered for an expanded role. - Highlights: • Diagnostic accuracy of High-Definition CT Angiography (HD-CTCA) has been assessed. • Invasive Coronary angiography (ICA) is the reference standard. • Diagnostic accuracy of HD-CTCA is comparable to ICA. • Diagnostic accuracy is not affected by coronary calcium or stents. • HD-CTCA provides a non-invasive alternative in high-risk patients.

  16. Obesity phenotype and coronary heart disease risk as estimated by the Framingham risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Soon; Kim, Jun-Su

    2012-03-01

    There are conflicting data as to whether general or abdominal obesity is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk. This cross-sectional study involved 4,573 subjects aged 30 to 74 yr who participated in the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2008. Obesity phenotype was classified by means of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and participants were categorized into 4 groups. Individuals' 10-yr risk of coronary heart diseases (CHD) was determined from the Framingham risk score. Subjects with obese WC had a higher proportion of high risk for CHD compared to the normal WC group, irrespective of BMI level. Relative to subjects with normal BMI/normal WC, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of normal BMI/obese WC group (OR 2.93 [1.70, 5.04] and OR 3.10 [1.49, 6.46]) for CHD risk in male were higher than obese BMI/obese WC group (OR 1.91 [1.40, 2.61] and OR 1.70 [1.16, 2.47]), whereas the adjusted ORs of obese BMI/obese WC group (OR 1.94 [1.24, 3.04] and OR 3.92 [1.75, 8.78]) were higher than the others in female. Subjects with obese BMI/normal WC were not significantly associated with 10-yr CHD risk in men (P = 0.449 and P = 0.067) and women (P = 0.702 and P = 0.658). WC is associated with increased CHD risk regardless of the level of BMI. Men with normal BMI and obese WC tend to be associated with CHD risk than those with obese BMI and obese WC.

  17. Beyond Framingham risk factors and coronary calcification: does aortic valve calcification improve risk prediction? The Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälsch, Hagen; Lehmann, Nils; Mahabadi, Amir A; Bauer, Marcus; Kara, Kaffer; Hüppe, Patricia; Moebus, Susanne; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Dragano, Nico; Schmermund, Axel; Stang, Andreas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-06-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is considered a manifestation of atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated whether AVC adds to cardiovascular risk prediction beyond Framingham risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC). A total of 3944 subjects from the population based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study (59.3±7.7 years; 53% females) were evaluated for coronary events, stroke, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (including all plus CV death) over 9.1±1.9 years. CT scans were performed to quantify AVC. Cox proportional hazards regressions and Harrell's C were used to examine AVC as event predictor in addition to risk factors and CAC. During follow-up, 138 (3.5%) subjects experienced coronary events, 101 (2.6%) had a stroke, and 257 (6.5%) experienced CVD events. In subjects with AVC>0 versus AVC=0 the incidence of coronary events was 8.0% versus 3.0% (pAVC scores (pAVC scores (3rd tertile) remained independently associated with coronary events (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.81) and CVD events (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.58). After further adjustment for CAC score, HRs were attenuated (coronary events 1.55, 95% CI 0.89 to 2.69; CVD events 1.29, 95% CI 0.83 to 2.00). When adding AVC to the model containing traditional risk factors and CAC, Harrell's C indices did not increase for coronary events (from 0.744 to 0.744) or CVD events (from 0.759 to 0.759). AVC is associated with incident coronary and CVD events independent of Framingham risk factors. However, AVC fails to improve cardiovascular event prediction over Framingham risk factors and CAC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  19. Comparison of the TIMI and the GRACE risk scores with the extent of coronary artery disease in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, M.; Achakzai, A.S.; Akhtar, P.; Zaman, K.S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score and the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction risk score in predicting the extent of coronary artery disease in patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Methods: The cross-sectional study comprising 406 consecutive patients was conducted at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi, from August 2010 to March 2011. For all patients, the GRACE and TIMI RS's relevant scores on the two indices were calculated on admission using specified variables. The patients underwent coronary angiography to determine the extent of the disease. A significant level was defined as >70% stenosis in any major epicardial artery or >50% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Both the indices showed good predictive value in identifying the extent of the disease. A Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction score >4 and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score >133 was significantly associated with 3vessel disease and left main disease, while for the former score <4 and latter score <133 was associated with normal or non-obstructive coronary disease (p<0.01). On comparison of the two risk scores, the discriminatory accuracy of the latter was significantly superior to the former in predicting 2vessel, 3vessel and left main diseases (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although both the indices were helpful in predicting the extent of the disease, the Global Registry showed better performance and was more strongly associated with multi-vessel and left main coronary artery disease. (author)

  20. Genetic Variants of Homocysteine Metabolizing Enzymes and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janošíková, B.; Pavlíková, Markéta; Kocmanová, Dora; Vítová, D.; Veselá, K.; Krupková, L.; Kahleová, R.; Krijt, J.; Kraml, P.; Hyánek, J.; Zvárová, Jana; Anděl, M.; Kožich, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 79, - (2003), s. 167-175 ISSN 1096-7192 R&D Projects: GA MZd NM26; GA MZd NM6548 Keywords : coronary disease * risk factors * genes * homocysteine * metabolism Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2003

  1. Coding Variation in ANGPTL4, LPL, and SVEP1 and the Risk of Coronary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stitziel, Nathan O; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Masca, Nicholas G D; Erdmann, Jeanette; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Weeke, Peter E; Webb, Thomas R; Auer, Paul L; Schick, Ursula M; Lu, Yingchang; Zhang, He; Dube, Marie-Pierre; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Peloso, Gina M; Won, Hong-Hee; Do, Ron; van Iperen, Erik; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kruppa, Jochen; Mahajan, Anubha; Scott, Robert A; Willenberg, Christina; Braund, Peter S; van Capelleveen, Julian C; Doney, Alex S F; Donnelly, Louise A; Asselta, Rosanna; Merlini, Piera A; Duga, Stefano; Marziliano, Nicola; Denny, Josh C; Shaffer, Christian M; El-Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Franke, Andre; Gottesman, Omri; Heilmann, Stefanie; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hoffman, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hveem, Kristian; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kessler, Thorsten; Kriebel, Jennifer; Laugwitz, Karl L; Marouli, Eirini; Martinelli, Nicola; McCarthy, Mark I; Van Zuydam, Natalie R; Meisinger, Christa; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Escher, Stefan A; Alvar, Maris; Moebus, Susanne; Morris, Andrew D; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikpay, Majid; Olivieri, Oliviero; Lemieux Perreault, Louis-Philippe; AlQarawi, Alaa; Robertson, Neil R; Akinsanya, Karen O; Reilly, Dermot F; Vogt, Thomas F; Yin, Wu; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D; Stahl, Eli; Strauch, Konstantin; Varga, Tibor V; Waldenberger, Melanie; Zeng, Lingyao; Kraja, Aldi T; Liu, Chunyu; Ehret, George B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Chasman, Daniel I; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Ferrario, Marco; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kee, Frank; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Perola, Markus; Saleheen, Danish; Sattar, Naveed; Surendran, Praveen; Tregouet, David; Young, Robin; Howson, Joanna M M; Butterworth, Adam S; Danesh, John; Ardissino, Diego; Bottinger, Erwin P; Erbel, Raimund; Franks, Paul W; Girelli, Domenico; Hall, Alistair S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastrati, Adnan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Meitinger, Thomas; Kraus, William E; Shah, Svati H; McPherson, Ruth; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin N A; Peters, Annette; Rader, Daniel; Reilly, Muredach P; Loos, Ruth J F; Reiner, Alex P; Roden, Dan M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thompson, John R; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Willer, Cristen J; Kathiresan, Sekkar; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert

    BACKGROUND: The discovery of low-frequency coding variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease has facilitated the identification of therapeutic targets. METHODS: Through DNA genotyping, we tested 54,003 coding-sequence variants covering 13,715 human genes in up to 72,868 patients with

  2. Differential Association of Anthropometric Parameters with Coronary Risk in Women - Data of the CORA Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Schoeffauer, Mark; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Boeing, Heiner; Windler, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The predictive value of weight gain, BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as to cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD) is still controversial. Methods: 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident CHD (cases) were compared with

  3. A metabolic profile is associated with the risk of incident coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, A.; Verhoeven, A.; Weller, C.M.; Bohringer, S.; Brandt, van den P.A.; Greevenbroek, M.M.; Merry, A.H.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Heijmans, B.T.; Slagboom, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolomics, defined as the comprehensive identification and quantification of low-molecular-weight metabolites to be found in a biological sample, has been put forward as a potential tool for classifying individuals according to their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Here, we

  4. Homocysteine determinants and the evidence to what extent homocysteine determines the risk of coronary heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, A. de; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Kromhout, D.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Blom, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), especially coronary heart disease (CHD), are the most important causes of death in industrialized countries. Increased concentrations of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) have been associated with an increased risk of CHD. Assuming that this relation is causal, a lower

  5. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, J.B.J. van; Pare, G.; Schwartz, S.M.; Hazra, A.; Tanaka, T.; Vermeulen, S.; Cotlarciuc, I.; Yuan, X.; Malarstig, A.; Bandinelli, S.; Bis, J.C.; Blom, H.; Brown, M.J.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y.D.; Clarke, R.J.; Dehghan, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ferrucci, L.; Hamsten, A.; Hofman, A.; Hunter, D.J.; Goel, A.; Johnson, A.D.; Kathiresan, S.; Kampman, E.; Kiel, D.P.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Chambers, J.C.; Kraft, P.; Lindemans, J.; McKnight, B.; Nelson, C.P.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Psaty, B.M.; Ridker, P.M.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rose, L.M.; Seedorf, U.; Siscovick, D.S.; Schunkert, H.; Selhub, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Vollenweider, P.; Waeber, G.; Waterworth, D.M.; Watkins, H.; Witteman, J.C.; Heijer, M. den; Jacques, P.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Kooner, J.S.; Rader, D.J.; Reilly, M.P.; Mooser, V.; Chasman, D.I.; Samani, N.J.; Ahmadi, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations

  6. Peripheral arterial tonometry cannot detect patients at low risk of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van den Heuvel (Mieke); O. Sorop (Oana); P. Musters (Paul); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); T.W. Galema (Tjebbe); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim); K. Nieman (Koen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Endothelial dysfunction precedes coronary artery disease (CAD) and can be measured by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). We examined the applicability of PAT to detect a low risk of CAD in a chest pain clinic. Methods In 93 patients, PAT was performed resulting in reactive

  7. Physical activity, metabolic syndrome, and coronary risk: the EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Lysette N.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between physical activity, metabolic syndrome (MS), and the risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD) and mortality due to CHD in middle-aged men and women. Design: Prospective cohort study. Subjects: A total of 10,134 men and women aged 45-79 years at

  8. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related

  9. A metabolomic profile is associated with the risk of incident coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, A.A.M.; Verhoeven, A.; Weller, C.M.; Böhringer, S.; Göraler, S.; Meissner, A.; Deelder, A.M.; Henneman, P.; Gorgels, A.P.M.; van den Brandt, P.A.; Schouten, L.J.; van Greevenbroek, M.M.; Merry, A.H.H.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.; Willems van Dijk, K.; Isaacs, A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Oostra, B.A.; van Duijn, C.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.; Heijmans, B.T.; Slagboom, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolomics, defined as the comprehensive identification and quantification of low-molecular-weight metabolites to be found in a biological sample, has been put forward as a potential tool for classifying individuals according to their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Here, we

  10. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  11. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  12. Coronary Heart Disease Knowledge and Risk Factors among Tri-Ethnic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.; Ciccazzo, Michele W.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and Europe. This study identified and compared nutritional knowledge associated with CHD risk factors among tri-ethnic college students. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study using questionnaires. Setting: University laboratory.…

  13. Risk factors for coronary heart disease in middle-aged men in Crete in 1982.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aravanis, C.; Mensink, R.P.; Corcondilas, A.; Ioanidis, P.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Katan, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Risk factors for coronary heart disease were studied in healthy middle- aged Cretan men in order to compare them with the middle-aged men of a previous generation studied in 1960 as the Cretan cohort of the Seven Countries Study (1960). In the present cohort mean values for total cholesterol were

  14. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C l...

  15. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-...

  16. Serum cholesterol as a risk factor for coronary heart disease revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biology of lipoproteins and lipoprotein particles as mediators of atherosclerosis has been documented extensively. Numerous prospective epidemiological studies have shown a robust relationship between low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, or particles bearing apolipoprotein B, and increased risk of coronary ...

  17. State of the Art Coronary Heart Disease Risk Estimation based on the Framingham Heart Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Tomečková, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2005), s. 180-186 ISSN 0022-1732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Framingham heart study * coronary heart disease * risk validation study * calibration * discrimination Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Prevalence of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors in an Iranian population with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefizadeh Abbas

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries and most patients with diabetes die from complications of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of diabetes mellitus and other conventional coronary heart disease risk factors (cigarette smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidemia in patients with acute coronary events in an Iranian population. Methods The study included 514 patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction (MI out of 720 patients admitted to CCU ward of a general hospital from March 2003 to March 2005. History of diabetes, hypertension and cigarette smoking, demographic indices, coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus treatment, myocardial enzymes, serum triglycerides (TG and cholesterol and fasting and non fasting blood glucose levels and HbA1C of diabetics were recorded of admission sheets. The data were structured to appropriate one way ANOVA, T tests, and chi square test with SPSS 13 product for windows. Results Out of all patients 35.8% were female, 30% were diabetics (Duration 13.4 ± 8.7 years, 42% were smoker and 91% were hypertensive. Twenty four percent had MI and 76% had unstable angina. MI was significantly higher in diabetic patients (36.4% vs. 19.2%, P Conclusion In this study 19 out of 20 patients with acute coronary event have at least one of conventional cardiac risk factors. Diabetes and hypertension are leading risk factors, which may directly or indirectly interfere and predict more serious complications of coronary heart disease.

  19. CYP2C19 activity and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna; Medina-Gil, José María; Garay-Sánchez, Paloma; Tugores, Antonio

    2017-09-20

    CYP2C19 is a major isoform of cytochrome P450 that metabolizes a number of drugs and is involved in the glucocorticoids synthesis. CYP2C19 polymorphisms have been associated with the genetic risk for type 2 diabetes. Five hundred and three patients with an acute coronary event were studied to assess the association between the CYP2C19 activity (CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3 and CYP2C19*17 variants) and the type of acute coronary syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors (arterial systemic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and smoking), analytical parameters and the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Genotype distribution in our series was similar to that expected in the Caucasian population. Among the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, very poor metabolizer patients (*2/*2, *3/*3 or *2/*3) had a greater tendency to present diabetes mellitus needing insuline (P=.067). Conversely, when we compared very poor, poor and normal metabolizers vs. rapid and ultrarapid metabolizers we found significant differences in those diabetic patients under insulin treatment (64 patients [18%] vs. 17 patients [11%]; P=.032). On the contrary, analytical parameters, systemic arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking or the personal/family history of coronary artery disease did not reach statistical significance regardless of CYP2C19 activity. Similarly, the number and the type of coronary disease (thrombotic, fibrotic or both) did not differ between patients with different CYP2C19 enzyme activity. Patients with an acute coronary event and a very poor, poor and normal CYP2C19 metabolizer genotype have a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus needing insuline than patients with the rapid and ultrarapid metabolizers CPY2C19 genotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Masters Endurance Athletes With a Low Atherosclerotic Risk Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghani, Ahmed; Maestrini, Viviana; Rosmini, Stefania; Cox, Andrew T; Dhutia, Harshil; Bastiaenan, Rachel; David, Sarojini; Yeo, Tee Joo; Narain, Rajay; Malhotra, Aneil; Papadakis, Michael; Wilson, Mathew G; Tome, Maite; AlFakih, Khaled; Moon, James C; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-07-11

    Studies in middle-age and older (masters) athletes with atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease report higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores compared with sedentary individuals. Few studies have assessed the prevalence of coronary artery disease in masters athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile. We assessed 152 masters athletes 54.4±8.5 years of age (70% male) and 92 controls of similar age, sex, and low Framingham 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores with an echocardiogram, exercise stress test, computerized tomographic coronary angiogram, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and a 24-hour Holter. Athletes had participated in endurance exercise for an average of 31±12.6 years. The majority (77%) were runners, with a median of 13 marathon runs per athlete. Most athletes (60%) and controls (63%) had a normal CAC score. Male athletes had a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques of any luminal irregularity (44.3% versus 22.2%; P =0.009) compared with sedentary males, and only male athletes showed a CAC ≥300 Agatston units (11.3%) and a luminal stenosis ≥50% (7.5%). Male athletes demonstrated predominantly calcific plaques (72.7%), whereas sedentary males showed predominantly mixed morphology plaques (61.5%). The number of years of training was the only independent variable associated with increased risk of CAC >70th percentile for age or luminal stenosis ≥50% in male athletes (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15; P =0.016); 15 (14%) male athletes but none of the controls revealed late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Of these athletes, 7 had a pattern consistent with previous myocardial infarction, including 3(42%) with a luminal stenosis ≥50% in the corresponding artery. Most lifelong masters endurance athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile have normal CAC scores. Male athletes are more likely to have a CAC

  1. Coronary angiographic findings in diagnostically manifested myocardial infarctions: Their relationship to psychlosocial and somatic risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waschk, O.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation was meant as an attempt to illustrate coronary arteriosclerosis as the cause of myocardial infarction and the mechanisms of its development as well as the conditions influencing it. The paper consists of two parts: 1) Literature part: In this part, risk factors of coronary arteriosclerosis and the mechanism of its effects (as far as known) are introduced. The results obtained by other authors are also summarized. 2) Empiric part: The following empiric part covers the author's own results which are discussed and compared to the results obtained by other authors. (orig./MG) [de

  2. No more broken hearts: weight loss after bariatric surgery returns patients' postoperative risk to baseline following coronary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Hennings, Dietric L; Al-Qurayshi, Zaid; Emad Kandil; DuCoin, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    The obesity epidemic is associated with a rise in coronary surgeries because obesity is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Bariatric surgery is linked to improvement in cardiovascular co-morbidities and left ventricular function. No studies have investigated survival advantage in postoperative bariatric patients after coronary surgery. To determine if there is a benefit after coronary surgery in patients who have previously undergone bariatric surgery. National Inpatient Sample. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database from 2003 to 2010. We selected bariatric surgical patients who later underwent coronary surgery (n = 257). A comparison of postoperative complications and mortality after coronary surgery were compared with controls (n = 1442) using χ 2 tests, linear regression analysis, and multivariate logistical regression models. A subset population was identified as having undergone coronary surgery (n = 1699); of this population, 257 patients had previously undergone bariatric surgery. They were compared with 1442 controls. The majority was male (67.2%), white (82.6%), and treated in an urban environment (96.8%). Patients with bariatric surgery assumed the risk of postoperative complications after coronary surgery that was associated with their new body mass index (BMI) (BMI999.9, 95% CI .18 to>999.9, P = .07). Length of stay was significantly longer in postbariatric patients (BMIbariatric patients have a return to baseline risk of morbidity and mortality after coronary surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Weinman, John; French, David P

    2007-01-01

    This study examines sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction (MI) risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease (CHD) (N = 3130). Two variables for comparative risk perceptions were computed: (1) own risk compared to that of an average person; and (2) own risk compared...... to that of an average person with CHD. Comparative optimism in MI risk perceptions was common, particularly among men and those with higher education. CHD severity and psychosocial resources mediated these sociodemographic differences. These results suggest challenges for secondary prevention in CHD, particularly...

  4. Myocardial revascularization with coronary endarterectomy. Stratification of risk factors for early mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Fernando Antibas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk factors for mortality related to myocardial revascularization when performed in association with coronary endarterectomy. METHODS: We assessed retrospectively 353 patients who underwent 373 coronary endarterectomies between January '89 and November '98, representing 3.73% of the myocardial revascularizations in this period of time. The arteries involved were as follows: right coronary artery in 218 patients (58.45%; left anterior descending in 102 patients (27.35%; circumflex artery in 39 patients (10.46%; and diagonal artery in 14 patients (3.74%. We used 320 (85.79% venous grafts and 53 (14.21% arterial grafts. RESULTS: In-hospital mortality among our patients was 9.3% as compared with 5.7% in patients with myocardial revascularizations without endarterectomy (p=0.003. Cause of death was related to acute myocardial infarction in 18 (54.55% patients. The most significant risk factors for mortality identified were as follows: diabetes mellitus (p=0.001; odds ratio =7.168, left main disease (<0.001; 9.283, female sex (0.01; 3.111, acute myocardial infarction (0.02; 3.546, ejection fraction <35% (<0.001; 5.89, and previous myocardial revascularization (<0.001; 4.295. CONCLUSION: Coronary endarterectomy is related to higher mortality, and the risk factors involved are important elements of a poor outcome.

  5. Coronary artery disease risk in young women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Tsai, I-Ju; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2018-02-02

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are characterized by obesity, menstruation irregularity, hirsutism and infertility, and prevalent with cardiometabolic comorbidities, but population-based studies on the risk of developing coronary artery disease are limited. From claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance, we identified 8048 women with polycystic ovary syndrome aged 15-49 years newly diagnosed in 1998-2013, and 32192 women without the syndrome and CAD as controls, frequency matched by age and diagnosis date. By the end of 2013, after a mean follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall incidence of coronary artery disease was 63% higher in women with polycystic ovary syndrome than in controls (2.25 vs. 1.38 per 1000 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] of coronary artery disease was 1.44 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.81) for women with polycystic ovary syndrome, compared with controls. Hazards of coronary artery disease were significant during follow-up periods of 3-4 years (aHR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.00-2.30) and of 5-9 years (aHR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.07-2.32). The incidence of coronary artery disease increased further in those with cardiometabolic comorbidities. Among women with polycystic ovary syndrome, those with comorbid diabetes had an incidence of 35.2 per 1000 person-years, 20-fold greater than those without cardiometabolic comorbidities. In conclusion, women with polycystic ovary syndrome are at an elevated risk of coronary artery disease. Preventive interventions should be provided to them, particularly for those with the comorbidity of metabolism symptom.

  6. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

  7. Unrealistic pessimism about risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimakopoulou, Koula G.; Skinner, T. Chas; Spimpolo, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    and rated their mood about these risks using a self-report measure. Using an objective risk calculator, they were then told their actual risk of CHD and stroke and their mood was re-assessed. Results: Patients' estimates of their risk of CHD/stroke were grossly inflated. A negative relationship between...... disease risk and mood was also seen where higher risk of actual and perceived CHD/stroke was related to worse mood. A positive relationship between mood and extent of perceptual error was further observed; the more inaccurate patients' perceptions of CHD/stroke risk were, the better their mood. Mood......Objective: We examined the accuracy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients' risk estimates of developing coronary heart disease (CHD)/having a stroke as a consequence of diabetes and their mood about these risks. Methods: Patients reported their perceived risks of developing CHD/having a stroke...

  8. Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken K.; Chiuve, Stephanie; Rimm, Eric B.

    as current smoking, Mediterranean diet score, and 25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) were significantly associated......Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the influence of other lifestyle and clinical risk factors on the association between body-mass index (BMI: weight in kg/height in m2) and CHD remains uncertain. Methods and Results: In the Danish Diet...

  9. Premature Coronary Heart Disease and Traditional Risk Factors-Can We Do Better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Sadeghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are strong predictors of an increased likelihood for premature CHD. Considering the benefits of risk factors᾿ management, it is imperative to find and treat them before looking for more unknown and weak risk factors. Objectives: Limited information is available about the demographic and historical characteristics of the patients with premature Coronary Heart Disease (CHD in IR Iran. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the traditional risk factors in these patients. Also, the researchers hypothesized that there are insufficient risk assessment and preventive intervention methods for the asymptomatic adult population. Methods: This study was conducted on 125 patients with premature CHD (age<50 years who were admitted in two academic hospitals with acute coronary syndromes. The patients were accepted since they had a definite CHD on the basis of acute myocardial infarction (elevated cardiac enzymes or documented CAD in coronary angiography. Results: The mean age of the study population was 42.50±5.65 (26 to 49 years. Among the patients,92 (73.6% were male, 113 (90.4% were married, 58 (46.4% were smokers,19 (15.2% were opium users, 97 (77.6% had dyslipidemia, 44 (35.2% had hypertension, and 33 (26.4% had diabetes mellitus. In addition, family history was presented in 54 patients (43.2%. Conclusions: Premature Coronary Heart Disease is a public health problem. However, there is lack of effective and intensive treatments of well-defined traditional risk factors and prevention methods for the majority of the patients experiencing premature CHD. In sum, there is still plenty of room for improvement of risk management in IR Iran.

  10. Risk score for predicting long-term mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuntao; Camacho, Fabian T; Wechsler, Andrew S; Lahey, Stephen; Culliford, Alfred T; Jordan, Desmond; Gold, Jeffrey P; Higgins, Robert S D; Smith, Craig R; Hannan, Edward L

    2012-05-22

    No simplified bedside risk scores have been created to predict long-term mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The New York State Cardiac Surgery Reporting System was used to identify 8597 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery in July through December 2000. The National Death Index was used to ascertain patients' vital statuses through December 31, 2007. A Cox proportional hazards model was fit to predict death after CABG surgery using preprocedural risk factors. Then, points were assigned to significant predictors of death on the basis of the values of their regression coefficients. For each possible point total, the predicted risks of death at years 1, 3, 5, and 7 were calculated. It was found that the 7-year mortality rate was 24.2 in the study population. Significant predictors of death included age, body mass index, ejection fraction, unstable hemodynamic state or shock, left main coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure, malignant ventricular arrhythmia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and history of open heart surgery. The points assigned to these risk factors ranged from 1 to 7; possible point totals for each patient ranged from 0 to 28. The observed and predicted risks of death at years 1, 3, 5, and 7 across patient groups stratified by point totals were highly correlated. The simplified risk score accurately predicted the risk of mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery and can be used for informed consent and as an aid in determining treatment choice.

  11. Left atrial enlargement increases the risk of major adverse cardiac events independent of coronary vasodilator capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Angela S; Murthy, Venkatesh L; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gayed, Peter; Bruyere, John; Wu, Justina; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2015-09-01

    Longstanding uncontrolled atherogenic risk factors may contribute to left atrial (LA) hypertension, LA enlargement (LAE) and coronary vascular dysfunction. Together they may better identify risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic LA hypertension as assessed by LAE modifies the relationship between coronary vascular function and MACE. In 508 unselected subjects with a normal clinical (82)Rb PET/CT, ejection fraction ≥40 %, no prior coronary artery disease, valve disease or atrial fibrillation, LAE was determined based on LA volumes estimated from the hybrid perfusion and CT transmission scan images and indexed to body surface area. Absolute myocardial blood flow and global coronary flow reserve (CFR) were calculated. Subjects were systematically followed-up for the primary end-point - MACE - a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease progression or revascularization. During a median follow-up of 862 days, 65 of the subjects experienced a composite event. Compared with subjects with normal LA size, subjects with LAE showed significantly lower CFR (2.25 ± 0.83 vs. 1.95 ± 0.80, p = 0.01). LAE independently and incrementally predicted MACE even after accounting for clinical risk factors, medication use, stress left ventricular ejection fraction, stress left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and CFR (chi-squared statistic increased from 30.9 to 48.3; p = 0.001). Among subjects with normal CFR, those with LAE had significantly worse event-free survival (risk adjusted HR 5.4, 95 % CI 2.3 - 12.8, p < 0.0001). LAE and reduced CFR are related but distinct cardiovascular adaptations to atherogenic risk factors. LAE is a risk marker for MACE independent of clinical factors and left ventricular volumes; individuals with LAE may be at risk of MACE despite normal coronary vascular function.

  12. Direct comparison of risk-adjusted and non-risk-adjusted CUSUM analyses of coronary artery bypass surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Richard J; Fox, Stephanie A; Stitt, Larry W; Forbes, Thomas L; Steiner, Stefan

    2006-08-01

    We previously applied non-risk-adjusted cumulative sum methods to analyze coronary bypass outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the incremental advantage of risk-adjusted cumulative sum methods in this setting. Prospective data were collected in 793 consecutive patients who underwent coronary bypass grafting performed by a single surgeon during a period of 5 years. The composite occurrence of an "adverse outcome" included mortality or any of 10 major complications. An institutional logistic regression model for adverse outcome was developed by using 2608 contemporaneous patients undergoing coronary bypass. The predicted risk of adverse outcome in each of the surgeon's 793 patients was then calculated. A risk-adjusted cumulative sum curve was then generated after specifying control limits and odds ratio. This risk-adjusted curve was compared with the non-risk-adjusted cumulative sum curve, and the clinical significance of this difference was assessed. The surgeon's adverse outcome rate was 96 of 793 (12.1%) versus 270 of 1815 (14.9%) for all the other institution's surgeons combined (P = .06). The non-risk-adjusted curve reached below the lower control limit, signifying excellent outcomes between cases 164 and 313, 323 and 407, and 667 and 793, but transgressed the upper limit between cases 461 and 478. The risk-adjusted cumulative sum curve never transgressed the upper control limit, signifying that cases preceding and including 461 to 478 were at an increased predicted risk. Furthermore, if the risk-adjusted cumulative sum curve was reset to zero whenever a control limit was reached, it still signaled a decrease in adverse outcome at 166, 653, and 782 cases. Risk-adjusted cumulative sum techniques provide incremental advantages over non-risk-adjusted methods by not signaling a decrement in performance when preoperative patient risk is high.

  13. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease. DESIGN: A meta-analysis combining individual level data from a collaborative consortium and published studies identified by a systematic review. DATA SOURCES: We obtained individual....... REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...... versus low job insecurity was 1.32 (95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.59). The relative risk of job insecurity adjusted for sociodemographic and risk factors was 1.19 (1.00 to 1.42). There was no evidence of significant differences in this association by sex, age (

  14. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    , Economic and Social Research Council, European Union New and Emerging Risks in Occupational Safety and Health research programme, Finnish Work Environment Fund, Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Research, German Social Accident Insurance, Danish National Research Centre for the Working......BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We...... identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative...

  15. How do patients at risk portray candidates for coronary heart disease? A qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, J.C.; Malterud, K.; Fugelli, P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how patients at risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) portray candidates for CHD. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study. SETTING: Norway. SUBJECTS: A total of 20 men and 20 women diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) recruited through a lipid clinic. MAIN...... considered their notions to be valid for assessing people's risk of CHD, others questioned how valid their notions were. CONCLUSION: Doctors should recognize that distancing is a way patients cope with risk and that such a strategy may have psychological and moral reasons. When communicating about risk...

  16. [Prevalence and risk factors of extra-coronary artery disease in patients with diabetes which confirmed atherosclerosis of coronary arteries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracheva, S A; Biragova, M S; Glazunova, A M; Klefortova, I I; Melkozerov, K V; Shamkhalova, M Sh; Dzhavelidze, M I; Soldatova, T V; Il'in, A V; Deev, A D; Shestakova, M V; Tugeeva, E F; Buziashvili, Iu I

    2014-01-01

    To assess prevalence and risk factors of extra-coronary artery disease (peripheral artery (PA) disease (D) of lower extremities (LE), brachiocephalic arterial (BCA) stenosis (S), renal arterial (RA) S in type 1 and 2 (T1 and T2) diabetes (D) patients (P) with confirmed atherosclerosis of coronary arteries (CA). 100 P (48 with T2D, 18 with T1D, 34 without diabetes - PWD), with hemodynamically significant atherosclerosis of CA confirmed by coronary angiography. All patients underwent duplex ultrasonography of PA LE, BCA, RA. Other studies included assessment of clinical characteristics and measurement of the following parameters: profibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF] beta1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 [MMP9], monocyte chemotactic protein-1 [MCP-1], regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted [RANTES), markers of endothelial dysfunction (von Willebrand factor [VWF], homocystein [HCYST], plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1], vascular cell adhesion molecule [VCAM], soluble intercellular adhesion molecules-1 [sICAM], vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMAD, N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP), fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), and fibrinogen. Portions of P with multivessel CA disease were similar in all three groups (T1D - 88.9, T2D - 85.5, WD - 82.3%). Coexistence of atherosclerosis in 2 or more vascular beds was identified in 85.3% of T2D and in 50% of WD P (p = 0.005). In T1D group 61.1 and 11.1% of P had atherosclerosis in 2 and 3 vascular beds, respectively. Levels of profibrogenic cytokines and factors of endothelial activation (RANTES, MMP-9, PAI-I, VCAM, sICAM, ADMA) were significantly higher in P with diabetes vs P WD. P with diabetes and multifocal atherosclerosis demonstrated significant increases of CRP, fibrinogen, NT-proBNP, VWF, PAI-1, ADMA, sICAM, and decrease of GFR compared with P with atherosclerosis in 1 vascular bed. Logistic regression

  17. Prevalence of Coronary Risk Factors among Population Aged 35 Years and Above From Rural Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is predicted that cardiovascular diseases will be the most important cause of mortality in India by the year 2015. Since the key to combating the increased incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is the control of known risk factors by a population based strategy aimed at comprehensive risk reduction, it is pertinent to study the magnitude of the risk. Aim: The present study was therefore conducted to assess the prevalence of certain coronary risk factors among rural population aged 35 years and above in Maharashtra. Methods: The present community based cross sectional survey was carried out in the rural area of Pune district on 272 subjects using a structured questionnaire, clinical examination followed by lab investigations. SPSS version 17.0 was used for analysis. Results: Tobacco consumption was found to be prevalent in 51.83% of the study subjects followed by physical inactivity which was prevalent among 31.61% whereas high diastolic blood pressure was found to be prevalent in 29.41% of the study subjects. Obesity and alcohol consumption were found to be prevalent among 13.97% of the study subjects. Among the biochemical parameters studied, hypertriglyceridemia was found to be prevalent in 22.05% followed by raised fasting blood sugar in 15.44% of the study subjects. Conclusion: Behaviour change communication strategies targeting these modifiable known high risk factors need to be emphasized to lower coronary heart disease (CHD related morbidity burden in the community.

  18. Comparison of traditional cardiovascular risk models and coronary atherosclerotic plaque as detected by computed tomography for prediction of acute coronary syndrome in patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencik, Maros; Schlett, Christopher L; Bamberg, Fabian; Truong, Quynh A; Nichols, John H; Pena, Antonio J; Shapiro, Michael D; Rogers, Ian S; Seneviratne, Sujith; Parry, Blair Alden; Cury, Ricardo C; Brady, Thomas J; Brown, David F; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to determine the association of four clinical risk scores and coronary plaque burden as detected by computed tomography (CT) with the outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with acute chest pain. The hypothesis was that the combination of risk scores and plaque burden improved the discriminatory capacity for the diagnosis of ACS. The study was a subanalysis of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction Using Computer-Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) trial-a prospective observational cohort study. The authors enrolled patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a chief complaint of acute chest pain, inconclusive initial evaluation (negative biomarkers, nondiagnostic electrocardiogram [ECG]), and no history of coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients underwent contrast-enhanced 64-multidetector-row cardiac CT and received standard clinical care (serial ECG, cardiac biomarkers, and subsequent diagnostic testing, such as exercise treadmill testing, nuclear stress perfusion imaging, and/or invasive coronary angiography), as deemed clinically appropriate. The clinical providers were blinded to CT results. The chest pain score was calculated and the results were dichotomized to ≥10 (high-risk) and modeling was performed to examine the association of risk scores and coronary plaque burden to the outcome of ACS. Unadjusted models were individually fitted for the coronary plaque burden and for Goldman, Sanchis, TIMI, and chest pain scores. In adjusted analyses, the authors tested whether the association between risk scores and ACS persisted after controlling for the coronary plaque burden. The prognostic discriminatory capacity of the risk scores and plaque burden for ACS was assessed using c-statistics. The differences in area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and c-statistics were tested by performing the -2 log likelihood ratio test of nested models. A p value capacity for the diagnosis of ACS. Plaque burden was

  19. A case - control study of risk factors for coronary artery disease in Pakistani females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazeer, M.; Naveed, T.; Ullah, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the strength of association of conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease in native Pakistani females. Methods: We conducted a case - control hospital based study on 198 females (age 30 - 80 years) scheduled for their first coronary angiography at Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore. Patients were divided into pre-menopausal group (age: 45.1 +- 6.3) and post-menopausal group (62.1 +- 9.1). For each risk factor, patients with significant CAD (= 50% luminal diameter stenosis) were regarded as cases an those without significant CAD were taken as controls. Odds Ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by univariate analysis. Results: In total study cohort, Diabetes mellitus (OR 3.65 95% CI 2.0 - 6.5), Family history of premature coronary artery disease (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2 - 4.4), and increased waist circumference (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.2 - 3.8) were strongly associated with significant CAD. In post menopausal age group, diabetes mellitus (OR 2.66 CI 1.3 - 5.1), hyperlipidaemia (OR 2.25 CI 1.2 - 2.3) and increased waist circumference (OR 2.16 CI 1.1 - 4.2) reached statistical significance. In pre-menopausal females only diabetes was strongly associated with significant coronary artery disease (OR 10 CI 2.6 - 37.4). Association of hypertension was not significant in any of subgroups studied. Very few cases of smoking (6 / 198) were found in our study to merit any further statistical analysis. Conclusions: Diabetes mellitus was the only risk factor in pre-menopausal females associated with coronary artery disease While diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and increased waist circumference were significantly associated with CAD in post menopausal females. (author)

  20. Disclosing Genetic Risk for Coronary Heart Disease: Attitudes Toward Personal Information in Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sherry-Ann; Jouni, Hayan; Marroush, Tariq S; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2017-04-01

    Incorporating genetic risk information in electronic health records (EHRs) will facilitate implementation of genomic medicine in clinical practice. However, little is known about patients' attitudes toward incorporation of genetic risk information as a component of personal health information in EHRs. This study investigated whether disclosure of a genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease influences attitudes toward incorporation of personal health information including genetic risk in EHRs. Participants aged 45-65 years with intermediate 10-year coronary heart disease risk were randomized to receive a conventional risk score (CRS) alone or with a GRS from a genetic counselor, followed by shared decision making with a physician using the same standard presentation and information templates for all study participants. The CRS and GRS were then incorporated into the EHR and made accessible to both patients and physicians. Baseline and post-disclosure surveys were completed to assess whether attitudes differed by GRS disclosure. Data were collected from 2013 to 2015 and analyzed in 2015-2016. GRS and CRS participants reported similar positive attitudes toward incorporation of genetic risk information in the EHR. Compared with CRS participants, participants with high GRS were more concerned about the confidentiality of genetic risk information (OR=3.67, 95% CI=1.29, 12.32, p=0.01). Post-disclosure, frequency of patient portal access was associated with positive attitudes. Participants in this study of coronary heart disease risk disclosure overall had positive attitudes toward incorporation of genetic risk information in EHRs, although those who received genetic risk information had concerns about confidentiality. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The risk of coronary heart disease of seafarers on vessels sailing under a German flag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Jensen, Hans-Joachim; Latza, Ute; Baur, Xaver

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to predict the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among seafarers on German-flagged vessels and to assess the association of shipboard job duration at sea with the risk of CHD. During the legally required medical fitness test for nautical service, 161 seafarers in Hamburg participated in a cross-sectional study which included an interview, blood sampling, and blood pressure measurements (response 84.9%). The predicted 10-year risk of an acute coronary event of the examined German seafarers aged 35 to 64 years (n = 46) was assessed in comparison with a sample of male German employees of the same age working ashore (PROCAM study). The number of independent CHD risk factors (according to the PROCAM study) was compared in the groups with 'shorter' and 'longer' median shipboard job duration at sea (15.0 years). The examined German seafarers had a similar age-standardized predicted 10-year CHD risk as the German reference population. Nearly all independent CHD risk factors were significantly more frequent in seamen with job duration at sea of ≥ 15 years than in those with 〈 15 years. After adjusting for age, the number of CHD risk factors was associated with job duration (OR 1.08 [95% CI 1.02-1.14] per year). Seafarers on German-flagged ships have to attend a medical fitness test for nautical service every 2 years. Thus, it can be assumed that seafarers present a healthier population than employees ashore. In this study, however, CHD risk of seafarers was similar to that of the reference population. This may indicate that working onboard implies a high coronary risk. Furthermore, the study results suggest a tendency of increased risk of CHD among seafarers with longer job duration at sea.

  2. Risk factors and incidence of contrast induced nephropathy following coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN is one of important complication of contrast media administration. Its incidence and risk factors among Indonesian patients undergoing coronary intervention has not been reported yet. CIN was defined as increasing of serum creatinine by 0.5 mg/dl or more in the third day following contrast media exposure. Of 312 patients undergoing coronary intervention, 25% developed CIN. Patient-related risk factors comprised of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, NYHA class, proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dl and ejection fraction ≤ 35%. Contrast-related risk factors comprised of contrast media volume > 300 ml, contrast media type. However, our final model demonstrated that only hypertension [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.89, 95% confidence intrval (CI = 1.78 to 4.71, P = 0.000], diabetes mellitus (HR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.89 to 5.06, P = 0.000, ejection fraction (EF ≤ 35% (HR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.72 to 4.96; P = 0.000, total contrast volume > 300 ml (HR = 7.73; 95% CI = 3.09 to 19.37; P = 0.000 and proteinuria (HR = 14.96; 95% CI = 3.45 to 64.86; P = 0.000 were independent risk factors of CIN. In conclusion, CIN developed in 25% of patients undergoing coronary intervention. The independent risk factors of CIN included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, EF ≤ 35%, contrast volume > 300 ml and proteinuria. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 131-7Keywords: contrast induced nephropathy, coronary intervention

  3. Data on coronary artery calcium score performance and cardiovascular risk reclassification across gender and ethnicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Fudim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current guidelines recommend the new risk score, Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease score (ASCVD, to assess an individual׳s risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD events. No data exist on the predictive utility of ASCVD score with the incremental value of coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS across ethnicities and gender. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA is a population based study (n=6814 of White (38%, Black (28%, Chinese (22% and Hispanic (12% subjects, aged 45–84 years, free from clinical cardiovascular disease. We performed a post-hoc analysis of 6742 participants (mean age 62, 53% female from the MESA cohort. We evaluated the predictive accuracy for the ASCVD score for each participant in accord with the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines using pooled cohort equations. Similar to the publication by Fudim et al. “The Metabolic Syndrome, Coronary Artery Calcium Score and Cardiovascular Risk Reclassification” [1] the analytic properties of models incorporating the ASCVD score with and without CACS were compared for cardiovascular disease CVD prediction. Here the analysis focused on ASCVD score (with and without CACS performance across gender and ethnicities. Keywords: Risk stratification, Coronary calcium scoring, Gender, Ethnicity, MESA, {C}{C}

  4. Premature graying of hair: An independent risk marker for coronary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of premature graying of hair was associated with 3.24 times the risk of CAD on multiple logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The presence of premature graying of hair was associated with an increased risk of CAD in young smokers. Premature graying of hair can be used as preliminary evidence by ...

  5. Quantifying the contributions of behavioral and biological risk factors to socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease incidence: the MORGEN study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Droomers, Mariël; Robinson, Whitney R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the impact of different modifiable behavioral and biological risk factors on socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease (CHD) may help inform targeted, population-specific strategies to reduce the unequal distribution of the disease. Previous studies have used analytic

  6. Alcohol drinking habits, alcohol dehydrogenase genotypes and risk of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Hansen, J.L.; Gronbaek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The risk of myocardial infarction is lower among light-to-moderate drinkers compared with abstainers. Results from some previous studies, but not all, suggest that this association is modified by variations in genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We aimed to test this hypothesis......, including alcohol as both the amount of alcohol and the frequency of drinking. Methods: we conducted a nested case-cohort study within the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, including 1,645 men (770 incident cases of acute coronary syndrome from 1993-1997 through 2004 and 875 randomly selected controls......). Results: Higher alcohol intake (measured as amount or drinking frequency) was associated with lower risk of acute coronary syndrome; however, there was no evidence that these finding were modified by ADH1B or ADH1C genotypes. Conclusions: The importance of functional variation in alcohol dehydrogenase...

  7. Impaired blood rheology is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hideki; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Nara, Makoto; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood rheology and endothelial function in patients with coronary risk factors, brachial arterial flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), an index of endothelial function and blood passage time (BPT), an index of blood rheology, and fasting blood cell count, glucose metabolism, and plasma fibrinogen, lipid, C-reactive protein, and whole blood viscosity levels were measured in 95 patients with coronary risk factors and 37 healthy controls. Brachial arterial FMD after reactive hyperemia was assessed by ultrasonography. BPT was assessed using the microchannel method. In healthy controls, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = - 0.325, p index (BMI; r = 0.530, p measurement of blood rheology using the microchannel method may be useful in evaluating brachial arterial endothelial function as a marker of atherosclerosis in these patients.

  8. Diagnostic performance of an acoustic-based system for coronary artery disease risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Simon; Nissen, Louise; Schmidt, Samuel Emil

    2017-01-01

    CAD-score value ≤20. At this cut-off, sensitivity was 81% (95% CI 73% to 87%), specificity 53% (95% CI 50% to 56%), positive predictive value 16% (95% CI 13% to 18%) and negative predictive value 96% (95% CI 95% to 98%) for diagnosing haemodynamically significant CAD. CONCLUSION: Sound-based detection......OBJECTIVE: Diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) continues to require substantial healthcare resources. Acoustic analysis of transcutaneous heart sounds of cardiac movement and intracoronary turbulence due to obstructive coronary disease could potentially change this. The aim of this study...... features and clinical risk factors. Low risk is indicated by a CAD-score value ≤20. RESULTS: Haemodynamically significant CAD assessed from FFR was present in 145 (10.0%) patients. In the entire cohort, the predefined CAD-score had a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 44%. In total, 50% had an updated...

  9. Anti-inflammatory treatment and risk of depression in 91,842 patients with acute coronary syndrome and 91,860 individuals without acute coronary syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2017-01-01

    Background We examined if treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), or statins after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are associated with decreased risk of depression. Method This register-based cohort study included all individuals with a first...

  10. Loci influencing lipid levels and coronary heart disease risk in 16 European population cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ripatti, Samuli; Lindqvist, Ida

    2008-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lipids have been conducted in samples ascertained for other phenotypes, particularly diabetes. Here we report the first GWA analysis of loci affecting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) .......8% of variation in lipids and were also associated with increased intima media thickness (P = 0.001) and coronary heart disease incidence (P = 0.04). The genetic risk score improves the screening of high-risk groups of dyslipidemia over classical risk factors....

  11. Association of Type D personality with unhealthy lifestyle, and estimated risk of coronary events in the general Icelandic population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svansdóttir, E.; Denollet, J.; Thorsson, B.; Gudnason, T.; Halldorsdottir, S.; Gudnason, V.; van den Broek, K.C.; Karlsson, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type D personality is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality risk in cardiovascular disease patients, but the mechanisms explaining this risk are unclear. We examined whether Type D was associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, estimated risk of developing

  12. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CAD) in Southern Punjab, Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted for the prevalence of risk factors for CAD among 200 patients admitted at the different hospitals of Southern Punjab, Pakistan from December 2012 to April ...

  13. [Coronary bypass in treatment of high-risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdagić, Harun; Mujanović, Emir; Mesanović, Nihad; Sijereić-Avdagić, Selma; Pirić, Melika

    2009-01-01

    Although it is possible to find a number of comparative studies in the world literature discussing the results of coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with and without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), until now such analysis has not been made in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The main aim of this scientific work was to compare morbidity and mortality, need for blood transfusions, length of stay in the intensive care unit, total length of hospitalisation and number of complication in two groups of patients operated with these methods. Patients with EuroScore > or =5 with CABG operated in Cardiovascular Clinic Tuzla, from May 2000 to May 2005 divided in two groups, were included in this study. There were 100 patients in the first group operated with CPB and 100 patients in the second group operated without CPB. The average time spent on respirators was shorter in patients operated without CPB (3.7 vs.9.74 hours, p = 0.023) and the time spent in Intensive care shorter too (19 vs. 23 days, p = 0.008). Volume of postoperative bleeding was less in patients operated without CPB (574.9 vs. 988.9 ml, p = 0.038), as volume after blood transfusion (168.8 vs. 350.3 mi, p = 0.001). Intraoperative inotrope support was less in patients operated without CPB (8.0 vs. 19.0%, p = 0.038) as postoperative inotrope support (6.0 vs. 17.0%, p = 0.027). The most usual postoperative complication was atrial fibrillation and there was no difference between patients operated with CPB and without CPB (24% vs. 17%, p = 0.293). Mortality was not different in patients operated with or without CPB (2.0% vs. 6.0%, p = 0.140). The average time of total hospitalisation was also shorter in patients operated without CPB (8.0 vs. 9.5 days, p = 0.039. In conclusion CABG without CPB has many advantages compared to the conventional method. Mortality and morbidity are reduced and there is less need for transfusion. The time spent on mechanical ventilation is reduced and less time is spent in intensive care. The total

  14. Relationship between framingham risk score and coronary artery calcium score in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Seong, Su Ok

    2016-01-01

    We explored the association between Framingham risk score (FRS) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in asymptomatic Korean individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 2216 participants who underwent routine health screening and CACS using the 64-slice multidetector computed tomography between January 2010 and June 2014. Relationship between CACS and FRS, and factors associated with discrepancy between CACS and FRS were analyzed. CACS and FRS were positively correlated (p < 0.0001). However, in 3.7% of participants with low coronary event risk and high CACS, age, male gender, smoker, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI; ≥ 35) were associated with the discrepancy. In the diagnostic prediction model for discrepancy, the receiver operating characteristic curve including factors associated with FRS, diastolic blood pressure (≥ 75 mm Hg), diabetes mellitus, and BMI (≥ 35) showed that the area under the curve was 0.854 (95% confidence interval, 0.819–0.890), indicating good sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus or obesity (BMI ≥ 35) compensate for the weakness of FRS and may be potential indicators for application of CACS in asymptomatic Koreans with low coronary event risk

  15. Relationship between framingham risk score and coronary artery calcium score in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Seong, Su Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We explored the association between Framingham risk score (FRS) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in asymptomatic Korean individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 2216 participants who underwent routine health screening and CACS using the 64-slice multidetector computed tomography between January 2010 and June 2014. Relationship between CACS and FRS, and factors associated with discrepancy between CACS and FRS were analyzed. CACS and FRS were positively correlated (p < 0.0001). However, in 3.7% of participants with low coronary event risk and high CACS, age, male gender, smoker, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI; ≥ 35) were associated with the discrepancy. In the diagnostic prediction model for discrepancy, the receiver operating characteristic curve including factors associated with FRS, diastolic blood pressure (≥ 75 mm Hg), diabetes mellitus, and BMI (≥ 35) showed that the area under the curve was 0.854 (95% confidence interval, 0.819–0.890), indicating good sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus or obesity (BMI ≥ 35) compensate for the weakness of FRS and may be potential indicators for application of CACS in asymptomatic Koreans with low coronary event risk.

  16. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Carvalho Marmelo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods: The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results: The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%, and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%. The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1% and AVS (36.7%. There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001, myocardial infarction (p = 0.007, diabetes (p = 0.006 and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors.

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  18. Determinants of risk factor control in subjects with coronary heart disease : a report from the EUROASPIRE III investigators.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2012-04-18

    The EUROASPIRE audits of risk factor control have indicated that, even in those with established coronary heart disease, risk factor control remains poor. We therefore analysed the EUROASPRE III data set to establish the factors associated with success or failure in risk factor control in order to inform future risk factor management strategies. University education, attendance at a specialist cardiology clinic, and participation in a cardiac rehabilitation programme were associated with improved risk factor control. Risk factor control was poorer in women, those with diabetes, and those undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery as opposed to medical therapy or percutaneous coronary intervention. Increasing age, depression, and anxiety were not associated with poorer risk factor control.

  19. PCA-based polling strategy in machine learning framework for coronary artery disease risk assessment in intravascular ultrasound: A link between carotid and coronary grayscale plaque morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Shukla, Devarshi; Jain, Pankaj K; Londhe, Narendra D; Shrivastava, Vimal K; Banchhor, Sumit K; Saba, Luca; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-05-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventional procedures need advance planning prior to stenting or an endarterectomy. Cardiologists use intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for screening, risk assessment and stratification of coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesize that plaque components are vulnerable to rupture due to plaque progression. Currently, there are no standard grayscale IVUS tools for risk assessment of plaque rupture. This paper presents a novel strategy for risk stratification based on plaque morphology embedded with principal component analysis (PCA) for plaque feature dimensionality reduction and dominant feature selection technique. The risk assessment utilizes 56 grayscale coronary features in a machine learning framework while linking information from carotid and coronary plaque burdens due to their common genetic makeup. This system consists of a machine learning paradigm which uses a support vector machine (SVM) combined with PCA for optimal and dominant coronary artery morphological feature extraction. Carotid artery proven intima-media thickness (cIMT) biomarker is adapted as a gold standard during the training phase of the machine learning system. For the performance evaluation, K-fold cross validation protocol is adapted with 20 trials per fold. For choosing the dominant features out of the 56 grayscale features, a polling strategy of PCA is adapted where the original value of the features is unaltered. Different protocols are designed for establishing the stability and reliability criteria of the coronary risk assessment system (cRAS). Using the PCA-based machine learning paradigm and cross-validation protocol, a classification accuracy of 98.43% (AUC 0.98) with K=10 folds using an SVM radial basis function (RBF) kernel was achieved. A reliability index of 97.32% and machine learning stability criteria of 5% were met for the cRAS. This is the first Computer aided design (CADx) system of its kind that is able to demonstrate the ability of coronary

  20. Increased genetic risk for obesity in premature coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Stewart, Alexandre F R; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether obesity confers risk for CAD independently of associated risk factors including diabetes mellitus. We have carried out a Mendelian randomization study using a genetic risk score (GRS) for body mass index (BMI) based on 35 risk alleles to investigate this question in a population of 5831 early onset CAD cases without diabetes mellitus and 3832 elderly healthy control subjects, all of strictly European ancestry, with adjustment for traditional risk factors (TRFs). We then estimated the genetic correlation between these BMI and CAD (rg) by relating the pairwise genetic similarity matrix to a phenotypic covariance matrix between these two traits. GRSBMI significantly (P=2.12 × 10(-12)) associated with CAD status in a multivariate model adjusted for TRFs, with a per allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.06 (95% CI 1.042-1.076). The addition of GRSBMI to TRFs explained 0.75% of CAD variance and yielded a continuous net recombination index of 16.54% (95% CI=11.82-21.26%, P<0.0001). To test whether GRSBMI explained CAD status when adjusted for measured BMI, separate models were constructed in which the score and BMI were either included as covariates or not. The addition of BMI explained ~1.9% of CAD variance and GRSBMI plus BMI explained 2.65% of CAD variance. Finally, using bivariate restricted maximum likelihood analysis, we provide strong evidence of genome-wide pleiotropy between obesity and CAD. This analysis supports the hypothesis that obesity is a causal risk factor for CAD.

  1. Analysis of risk factors in obese patients with coronary artery disease, with and without diabetes mellitus type two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Danjela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 2 is one of the leading chronic diseases in the world and in our country, which is an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective. The aim of this research was making the estimation of risk factors in the etiology of coronary heart disease in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. The study included 82 obese patients, of which 52 with diabetes mellitus and 30 without diabetes mellitus, in all of them coronary artery disease proven by coronary angiography. All were examined by clinical examination, laboratory tests and echocardiography. Based on the test results we found that the distribution of risk factors such as hypertension, family burden coronary artery disease, smoking, alcohol intake was the same in the obese patients with diabetes mellitus, and of those without diabetes mellitus. Echocardiography showed significantly larger left ventricle, lower ejection fraction, larger left atrium and significant mitral regurgitation. Also, in a group of patients with diabetes mellitus, there was significantly higher number of patients with multiple vessel coronary disease. Despite the small sample, we can conclude that the present of diabetes mellitus in obese patients is crucial for severe forms of coronary artery disease. Severity is expressed through significant structural and functional changes in the left ventricle and the number of diseased coronary arteries.

  2. [The absence of risk factors for coronary disease in Yanomami Indians and the influence of acculturation on arterial pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilha-Carvalho, J J; Carvalho, J V; Lima, J A; Sousa e Silva, N A

    1992-10-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that hypertension and coronary heart disease are "civilization diseases", analyzing the distribution of their antecedents in an Indian population and observing the influence of acculturation on blood pressure. Seven hundred and twenty-five Yanomami Indians of both sexes, ages above 14 years, inhabitants of eight villages in Roraima and Amazonas states were examined. Measures related to all classical coronary risk factors were carried out and urine samples were collected to measure electrolytes. None of the known coronary risk factors were found. The blood pressure levels were low and did not increase with increasing age. There was influence of acculturation on blood pressure and it was in part mediated by increase in body weight and sodium intake. The absence of hypertension and other coronary risk factors and the increase of blood pressure with acculturation, among an isolated population, strongly suggest that these diseases are "civilization diseases".

  3. Frequency of risk factors in male patients with acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalli, M.A.; Kayani, A.M.; Samore, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the frequency of risk factors in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008. Methodology: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome were included in this study. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery, chronic liver and kidney diseases were excluded. Presence of diabetes, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, physical activity, stress, a family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and medication was documented. Blood pressure, ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile and echocardiography were done within 24 hours of admission. Body mass index and waist circumference were measured. Data was analysed using SPSS-15. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied having mean age of 54.26+-11.60 years. Maximum number of patients aged between 51 to 60 years, (n = 41, 31.9%). STEMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction) was diagnosed in 96 (71.1%) patients, non-STEMI in 12 (8.9%) while 27 (20%) patients were having unstable angina. Smoking was documented in 60 (44%) patients, hypertension in 50 (37%), diabetes in 34 (25.2%) and a family history of premature CAD was recorded in 24 (17.8%) patients. Fifty one (37.8%) patients were overweight (BMI = 25-29.9) while 22 (16.3%) were obese (BMI greater or equal to 30). Waist circumference > 90 cm was found in 86 (63.6%) subjects. Sixty four (47.4%) patients were active physically. Psychosocial stress was documented in 33 (23.75). Hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were the most frequent combinations, observed in 24 (17.9%) subjects. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia, smoking, hypertension and diabetes were most frequent risk factors. Public awareness to control risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD. (author)

  4. Frequency of risk factors in male patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalli, M A [Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Cardiology; Kayani, A M [Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology, Rawalpindi (Pakistan). Dept. of Cardiology; Samore, N A [Combined Military Hospital, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Cardiology

    2011-05-15

    To determine the frequency of risk factors in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008. Methodology: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome were included in this study. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery, chronic liver and kidney diseases were excluded. Presence of diabetes, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, physical activity, stress, a family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and medication was documented. Blood pressure, ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile and echocardiography were done within 24 hours of admission. Body mass index and waist circumference were measured. Data was analysed using SPSS-15. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied having mean age of 54.26+-11.60 years. Maximum number of patients aged between 51 to 60 years, (n = 41, 31.9%). STEMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction) was diagnosed in 96 (71.1%) patients, non-STEMI in 12 (8.9%) while 27 (20%) patients were having unstable angina. Smoking was documented in 60 (44%) patients, hypertension in 50 (37%), diabetes in 34 (25.2%) and a family history of premature CAD was recorded in 24 (17.8%) patients. Fifty one (37.8%) patients were overweight (BMI = 25-29.9) while 22 (16.3%) were obese (BMI greater or equal to 30). Waist circumference > 90 cm was found in 86 (63.6%) subjects. Sixty four (47.4%) patients were active physically. Psychosocial stress was documented in 33 (23.75). Hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were the most frequent combinations, observed in 24 (17.9%) subjects. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia, smoking, hypertension and diabetes were most frequent risk factors. Public awareness to control risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD. (author)

  5. The metabolic syndrome: targeting dyslipidaemia to reduce coronary risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginsberg, H.N.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2003-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a complex constellation of disorders, each one a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The increasing prevalence of this condition is a major concern for healthcare providers both in Europe and North America. The concern surrounding

  6. Plasma lipid profile, atherogenic and coronary risk indices in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of chronic degenerative diseases like stroke and myocardial infarction in African subpopulations is reported to be increasing. In view of the association between dyslipidemia and these chronic degenerative diseases, we investigated some well-established cardiovascular risk factors (plasma cholesterol and ...

  7. Association between fatness and coronary heart disease risk factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body fat was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose) by the fasting blood test. Weak correlations were obtained between fatness and the CHD risk factors for both genders. Positive correlations were reported for fatness against all the CHD variables except ...

  8. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Dani...... and cardiovascular mortality vs. those with incident MI. PAD should be considered a CHD risk equivalent, warranting aggressive secondary prevention........62-1.80, respectively), and composite of death, MI, and ischaemic stroke, 95% CI HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.36-1.42; and HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.61-1.75, respectively). The greater long-term risks of PAD were seen for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Both women and men with incident PAD have greater long-term risks of total...

  9. Prognostic Usefulness of Low Ischemic Risk SPECT in non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo Costa, Yanina; Mauro, Victor; Perez, Roberto; Charask, Adrian; Fairman, Enrique; Gomez Santamaria, Hector; Goral, Jorge; Barrero, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Background: Myocardial perfusion imaging tests are used for the clinical assessment of patients hospitalized with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTACS) who have favorable in-hospital outcomes with medical therapy. However, the prognostic relevance of a .low ischemic risk. (LR) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with NSTACS managed with a conservative approach is uncertain, as most of the information derives from patients with chronic coronary artery disease. Objectives: 1) To analyze the outcomes of patients with NSTACS and LR SPECT at discharge, 2) to compare the results of a normal SPECT with transient perfusion defects (TPDs), permanent perfusion defects (PPDs) or combined defects (CDs), and 3) to determine the additional value of SPECT to classic risk variables. Material and Methods: Patients admitted to the CCU with a NSTACS were included. Follow-up was continued during 12 months. Definitions: Clinical risk based on TIMI risk score. LR SPECT (under exercise or pharmacological stress): TPDs ≤ 3/17 segments, PPDs ≤ 3/17 segments, CPDs: TPDs + PPDs and normal: absence of defects. Clinical events (CEs): death/infarction or rehospitalization due to angina. Results: A total of 137 patients were included (median age 59 years, 60% were men). A low TIMI risk score was present in 54% of patients and 46% presented a moderate risk. CE: 5.8%. The incidence of clinical events related to perfusion defects was as follows: normal: 2.1%, TPD: 4.5%, PPD: 5.9% and CPD: 25% (p [es

  10. Associations of job strain and lifestyle risk factors with risk of coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina; Alfredsson, Lars; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Ferrie, Jane E; Goldberg, Marcel; Hamer, Mark; Jokela, Markus; Karasek, Robert; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Siegrist, Johannes; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Steptoe, Andrew; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G David

    2013-06-11

    It is unclear whether a healthy lifestyle mitigates the adverse effects of job strain on coronary artery disease. We examined the associations of job strain and lifestyle risk factors with the risk of coronary artery disease. We pooled individual-level data from 7 cohort studies comprising 102 128 men and women who were free of existing coronary artery disease at baseline (1985-2000). Questionnaires were used to measure job strain (yes v. no) and 4 lifestyle risk factors: current smoking, physical inactivity, heavy drinking and obesity. We grouped participants into 3 lifestyle categories: healthy (no lifestyle risk factors), moderately unhealthy (1 risk factor) and unhealthy (2-4 risk factors). The primary outcome was incident coronary artery disease (defined as first nonfatal myocardial infarction or cardiac-related death). There were 1086 incident events in 743,948 person-years at risk during a mean follow-up of 7.3 years. The risk of coronary artery disease among people who had an unhealthy lifestyle compared with those who had a healthy lifestyle (hazard ratio [HR] 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.18-2.98; population attributable risk 26.4%) was higher than the risk among participants who had job strain compared with those who had no job strain (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.06-1.47; population attributable risk 3.8%). The 10-year incidence of coronary artery disease among participants with job strain and a healthy lifestyle (14.7 per 1000) was 53% lower than the incidence among those with job strain and an unhealthy lifestyle (31.2 per 1000). The risk of coronary artery disease was highest among participants who reported job strain and an unhealthy lifestyle; those with job strain and a healthy lifestyle had half the rate of disease. A healthy lifestyle may substantially reduce disease risk among people with job strain.

  11. Anomalous aortic origin of coronary arteries from the opposite sinus: A critical appraisal of risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peñalver Josiah M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anomalous aortic origin of the coronary artery (AAOCA from the opposite sinus of Valsalva with an interarterial course has received much attention due to its association with sudden death in otherwise healthy individuals. AAOCA is relatively common and may have significant public health implications. While our knowledge of its pathophysiology and natural history remains incomplete, an emphasis has been placed on surgical correction. Discussion In 2005 we published a review examining the rates of sudden death with AAOCA, as well as complications of surgical management. Evidence now points even more strongly to lower rates of sudden death, while surgical outcomes data now better documents associated risks. Summary Armed with this updated information, we agree with the need for a national registry to better track patients with AAOCA. We submit that the risks of surgical management outweigh any benefits in the asymptomatic patient with anomalous right coronary artery, and expectant management should also be strongly considered even in asymptomatic patients with anomalous left coronary artery.

  12. The Tromsø Heart Study: coronary risk factors in Seventh-Day Adventists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fønnebø, V

    1985-11-01

    Seventh-Day Adventists in Tromsø showed a coronary risk factor pattern similar to Seventh-Day Adventists in other parts of the world. Compared with non-Seventh-Day Adventists, serum cholesterol was 1.35 mmol/liter (1974) and 0.83 mmol/liter (1979-1980) lower in males and 0.64 mmol/liter (1979-1980) lower in females. Blood pressure was lower in Seventh-Day Adventist women. The religiously inactive Seventh-Day Adventists had risk factor patterns more similar to non-Seventh-Day Adventists.

  13. Smoking and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Younger, Middle-Aged, and Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne S; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated associations of smoking and coronary heart disease (CHD) by age. Methods. Data came from the Pooling Project on Diet and Coronary Heart Disease (8 prospective studies, 1974-1996; n = 192 067 women and 74 720 men, aged 40-89 years). Results. During follow-up, 4326 cases...... years or older. The largest absolute risk differences between current smokers and never smokers were observed among the oldest participants. Finally, the majority of CHD cases among smokers were attributable to smoking. For example, attributable proportions of CHD by age group were 88% (40-49 years), 81......% (50-59 years), 71% for (60-69 years), and 68% (70+ years) among women who smoked. Conclusions. Among smokers, the majority of CHD cases are attributable to smoking in all age groups. Smoking prevention is important, irrespective of age. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print June 13...

  14. Obesity is associated with fatal coronary heart disease independently of traditional risk factors and deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Jennifer; Murray, Heather M; Welsh, Paul; Shepherd, James; Packard, Chris; Macfarlane, Peter; Cobbe, Stuart; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed

    2011-04-01

    The effect of body mass index (BMI) on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is attenuated when mediators of this risk (such as diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia) are accounted for. However, there is now evidence of a differential effect of risk factors on fatal and non-fatal CHD events, with markers of inflammation more strongly associated with fatal than non-fatal events. To describe the association with BMI separately for both fatal and non-fatal CHD risk after accounting for classical risk factors and to assess any independent effects of obesity on CHD risk. In the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study BMI in 6082 men (mean age 55 years) with hypercholesterolaemia, but no history of diabetes or CVD, was related to the risk of fatal and non-fatal CHD events. After excluding participants with any event in the first 2 years, 1027 non-fatal and 214 fatal CHD events occurred during 14.7 years of follow-up. A minimally adjusted model (age, sex, statin treatment) and a maximally adjusted model (including known CVD risk factors and deprivation) were compared, with BMI 25-27.4 kg/m² as referent. The risk of non-fatal events was similar across all BMI categories in both models. The risk of fatal CHD events was increased in men with BMI 30.0-39.9 kg/m² in both the minimally adjusted model (HR = 1.75 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.74)) and the maximally adjusted model (HR = 1.60 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.53)). These hypothesis generating data suggest that obesity is associated with fatal, but not non-fatal, CHD after accounting for known cardiovascular risk factors and deprivation. Clinical trial registration WOSCOPS was carried out and completed before the requirement for clinical trial registration.

  15. Profile of conventional risk factors in patients presenting for coronary angiography in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    The conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia and cigarette smoking(1). There is a large body of evidence, which implicates these factors in the causation of coronary artery disease. Objective: To study the attern of the above-mentioned as well as additional risk factors including age, gender, family history, obesity and hepatitis B and C seropositivity in the population of patients undergoing coronary angiography at our tertiary care hospital.Methodology:In this cross-sectional survey, 465 patients undergoing coronary angiography were studied using a questionnaire as well as clinical and laboratory data. The information obtained included age, sex, clinical presentation, past medical history, family history, the presence or absence of previous ischemic heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and a history of smoking. A history of duration of diabetes and hypertension, their treatment and the presence or absence of complications was also noted. A proportion of patients had their fasting blood lipid levels measured. Height, weight and waist circumference as well as HepBsAg and anti-HCV levels were also determined.Results: The 465 patients studied included 383 males and 82 females. The mean age of all patients was 49.68 +- 0.464 years and the difference between genders was not significant. A past history of ischaemic heart disease was present in 31% of patients. Diabetes mellitus was present in 23% of males and 45% of females. A history of hypertension was present in 30.8% males and 70.7% of the females. Of the patients who could be studied, the mean LDL was 110.29 +- 1.706 mg/dL, the mean HDL was 41.01 +- 0.319 mg/dL and the mean TG was 189.67 +- 4.21 mg/dL. The difference in lipid profile values between male and female patients was not significant (p-value >0.05). Waist circumference was increased in 69.7% males and 93.9% females and here the difference between genders was significant, Hep

  16. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery calcification in adults with polymyositis and dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise C. Pyndt Raun; Diederichsen, Axel C P; Simonsen, Jane A

    2015-01-01

    : Traditional CV risk factors were assessed in a cross-sectional, observational study of 76 patients with PM/DM and in 48 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. CAC was quantified by means of cardiac computed tomography scan and expressed in Agatston units. The associations between CV risk factors, PM......OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence of traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) compared to healthy controls and to assess the association between CV risk factors, PM/DM, and CAC score. METHODS...... of triglycerides (P = 0.0009). High CAC score occurred more frequently in patients (20% versus 4%; P = 0.04). In multivariate analysis of patient factors associated with CAC were age (P = 0.02) and smoking (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: In this study, traditional CV risk factors and severe CAC were commonly found...

  17. A qualitative descriptive study of risk reduction for coronary disease among the Hong Kong Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Choi Wan; Lopez, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Achieving optimal control and reduction in coronary heart disease (CHD) risks in Hong Kong (HK) remains significant and requires exploring. This article addresses the ability to reduce CHD risks among the HK Chinese. Through secondary analysis, a qualitative descriptive design using focus group interviews and content analysis were adopted. Older and younger adults were invited for the study. An interview schedule was used to guide discussions during focus group interviews. Four categories emerged from the data: planning of health actions, control of risk-reducing behavior, perceived opportunities for understanding CHD, and chest pain appraisal. Local culture and population needs play a central role in disease perception and prevention. The findings are essential to target strategies for initiating health acts for younger adults and establish public education resources that underscore understanding of CHD risk, symptom recognition, and disease management, particularly among those middle-aged and older people at high risk and with the diseased populations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Coronary artery calcium score using electron beam tomography in the patients with acute obstructive coronary arterial disease : comparative study within asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive coronary arterial disease group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seok Jong; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To compare, through analysis of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the risk factors for atherosclerosis, the characteristics of acute coronary syndrome between an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients and a chronic coronary arterial obstructive disease(CAOD) group. The CAC scores of an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients (group I, n=284), a chronic CAOD croup (group II, n=39) and an acute coronary syndrome group (group III, n=21) were measured by electron beam tomography. Forty-seven patients with CAOD from groups II and III underwent coronary angiography, and we scrutinized age, sex and risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and low high-density lipoproteinemia. The numbers of stenotic coronary arterial branches and degree of stenosis revealed by coronary angiography were also recorded. We determined the differences between the three groups in terms of CAC score and the risk factors, the relationship between CAC score and risk factors, and the characteristic features of each type of CAOD group. The mean CA score of group III (135.1) was not statistically different from that of group I (135.7) or group II (365.8). Among patients aged below 50, the mean CAC score of group III (127.4) was significantly higher than that of group I (6.2), (p=0.0006). The mean CAC score at the sixth decade was also significantly different between group I(81.5) and group II (266.9). The mean age of group III (54.2 years) was significantly lower than that of group I (58.1 years) (p=0.047) and of group II (60.1) (p=0.022). There was significant correlation between the number of stenotic coronary arterial branches and log(CAC +1) (p<.01). The square root of the CAC score and the maximal degree of stenosis was also well correlated (p<.01). There was no difference in the mean number of risk factors among the three groups, though the incidence of smoking in group III was significantly

  19. Coronary artery calcium score using electron beam tomography in the patients with acute obstructive coronary arterial disease : comparative study within asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive coronary arterial disease group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Seok Jong; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok

    2001-01-01

    To compare, through analysis of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the risk factors for atherosclerosis, the characteristics of acute coronary syndrome between an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients and a chronic coronary arterial obstructive disease(CAOD) group. The CAC scores of an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients (group I, n=284), a chronic CAOD croup (group II, n=39) and an acute coronary syndrome group (group III, n=21) were measured by electron beam tomography. Forty-seven patients with CAOD from groups II and III underwent coronary angiography, and we scrutinized age, sex and risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and low high-density lipoproteinemia. The numbers of stenotic coronary arterial branches and degree of stenosis revealed by coronary angiography were also recorded. We determined the differences between the three groups in terms of CAC score and the risk factors, the relationship between CAC score and risk factors, and the characteristic features of each type of CAOD group. The mean CA score of group III (135.1) was not statistically different from that of group I (135.7) or group II (365.8). Among patients aged below 50, the mean CAC score of group III (127.4) was significantly higher than that of group I (6.2), (p=0.0006). The mean CAC score at the sixth decade was also significantly different between group I(81.5) and group II (266.9). The mean age of group III (54.2 years) was significantly lower than that of group I (58.1 years) (p=0.047) and of group II (60.1) (p=0.022). There was significant correlation between the number of stenotic coronary arterial branches and log(CAC +1) (p<.01). The square root of the CAC score and the maximal degree of stenosis was also well correlated (p<.01). There was no difference in the mean number of risk factors among the three groups, though the incidence of smoking in group III was significantly

  20. Migraine and risk of stroke and acute coronary syndrome in two case-control studies in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Migraine has consistently been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, while the evidence for a relation with other types of stroke or coronary outcomes is limited. We examined the association between migraine and stroke and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subtypes and the ......INTRODUCTION: Migraine has consistently been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, while the evidence for a relation with other types of stroke or coronary outcomes is limited. We examined the association between migraine and stroke and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subtypes...... medication had increased ORs of all stroke subtypes (ischemic, hemorrhagic stroke and transient ischemic attacks). The diagnosis of migraine was also associated with both angina and myocardial infarction (ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction [STEMI], non-STEMI and unspecified) with the highest OR for angina...

  1. An ischemia-guided approach for risk stratification in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepine, C J

    2000-12-28

    The optimal management approach for patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes continues to be an issue of debate. An ischemia-guided strategy appears to be effective as an alternative to either a very conservative "wait-and-see" approach or a very aggressive routine revascularization approach. The need for another approach is supported by the lack of conclusive evidence-based results favoring an early routine invasive treatment strategy. In the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) IIIB trial, there were no differences in the incidence of death or myocardial infarction (MI) between patients treated with an early invasive approach and those treated with a conservative approach to treatment. Significantly worse outcomes were shown in patients assigned to an early invasive strategy in the Veterans Affairs Non-Q-Wave Infarction Strategies in Hospital (VANQWISH) trial at 1-year follow-up (111 clinical events in the invasive group vs 85 in the conservative group; p = 0.05). Registry information, including that from the Organization to Assess Strategies for Ischemic Syndromes (OASIS), which included approximately 8,000 patients with unstable angina or suspected MI, has even suggested an excess hazard with a routine invasive approach. Patients with non-ST-segment elevation MI observed in the Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries in Acute Coronary Syndromes (GUSTO)-IIB and Platelet IIb/IIIa in Unstable Angina: Receptor Suppression Using Integrilin Therapy (PURSUIT) trials also fared better with an ischemia-guided strategy. Even the recent FRagmin and Fast Revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC II) trial investigators had to be very selective relative to eliminating high-risk patients in the first week and treating with intense anti-ischemic therapy and 5-7 days of low-molecular-weight heparin therapy to show an advantage for assigned revascularization. A careful clinical evaluation with

  2. RISK FACTORS AFFECTING THE INCIDENCE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AT THE DR. WAHIDIN SUDIROHUSODO GENERAL HOSPITAL IN MAKASSAR IN 2010

    OpenAIRE

    arsin, A. Arsunan

    2011-01-01

    Dipresentasikan pada kegiatan " The 43rd APACPH Conference" di Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, Korea. pada tanggal 20-22 Oktober 2011 RISK FACTORS AFFECTING THE INCIDENCE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AT THE DR. WAHIDIN SUDIROHUSODO GENERAL HOSPITAL IN MAKASSAR IN 2010 A. Arsunan Arsin, Wiwik, Ridwan Amiruddin Hasanuddin University, Indonesia Coronary heart disease is the first cause of death in the world and the fifth cause of death in all hospitals in Indonesi...

  3. Drug Facts

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  4. Drug Facts

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  6. Drug Facts

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  7. Drug Facts

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  12. Elevated Serum Neopterin is Associated with Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Santoso

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neopterin is a soluble biomarker of monocyte activation and its increased concentration might be expressed in atherosclerosis. Until recently, there has been lacking of information on the prognostic role of neopterin in acute coronary syndromes (ACS. The study was aimed at measuring the associations between elevated serum neopterin and increased risk of cardiovascular (CV events in ACS. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study, recruited 71 ACS patients from January 31 through August 31, 2007 in Sanglah Hospital of Udayana School of Medicine, Denpasar, Bali. Cardiovascular events, such as: CV death, recurrent myocardial infarction, stroke and recurrent myocardial ischemia were previously defined. Relative risk and survival rate were measured successively by Cox proportional model and Kaplan-Meier curve. RESULTS: Of 71 ACS patients aged 56.8±9.5 years, 21 (29.5% subjects underwent CV events. Overall mean followup was 151.6 (95% CI: 129.7-173.5 days. Baseline characteristic were similarly distributed between groups with the highest quartile neopterin level (≥14.7 nmol/L than those with lowest quartile (≤6.2 nmol/L. Patients with the highest quartile had the worst survival curve than those with the lowest quartile (log-rank test; p=0.047. On Cox proportional model, relative risk of highest quartile group was 5.84 (95% CI: 1.19-28.47; p=0.029 compared to lowest quartile, after being adjusted with other predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated serum neopterin is associated with increased risk of CV events in acute coronary syndromes. KEYWORDS: neopterin, cardiovascular events, acute coronary syndromes.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis and risk of Clostridium difficile infection after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeran, Jashvant; Mazumdar, Madhu; Rasul, Rehana; Meyer, Joanne; Sacks, Henry S; Koll, Brian S; Wallach, Frances R; Moskowitz, Alan; Gelijns, Annetine C

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic use, particularly type and duration, is a crucial modifiable risk factor for Clostridium difficile. Cardiac surgery is of particular interest because prophylactic antibiotics are recommended for 48 hours or less (vs ≤24 hours for noncardiac surgery), with increasing vancomycin use. We aimed to study associations between antibiotic prophylaxis (duration/vancomycin use) and C difficile among patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. We extracted data on coronary artery bypass grafting procedures from the national Premier Perspective claims database (2006-2013, n = 154,200, 233 hospitals). Multilevel multivariable logistic regressions measured associations between (1) duration (difficile as outcome. Overall C difficile prevalence was 0.21% (n = 329). Most patients (59.7%) received a cephalosporin only; in 33.1% vancomycin was added, whereas 7.2% received vancomycin only. Extended prophylaxis was used in 20.9%. In adjusted analyses, extended prophylaxis (vs standard) was associated with significantly increased C difficile risk (odds ratio, 1.43; confidence interval, 1.07-1.92), whereas no significant associations existed for vancomycin use as adjuvant or primary prophylactic compared with the use of cephalosporins (odds ratio, 1.21; confidence interval, 0.92-1.60, and odds ratio, 1.39; confidence interval, 0.94-2.05, respectively). Substantial inter-hospital variation exists in the percentage of extended antibiotic prophylaxis (interquartile range, 2.5-35.7), use of adjuvant vancomycin (interquartile range, 4.2-61.1), and vancomycin alone (interquartile range, 2.3-10.4). Although extended use of antibiotic prophylaxis was associated with increased C difficile risk after coronary artery bypass grafting, vancomycin use was not. The observed hospital variation in antibiotic prophylaxis practices suggests great potential for efforts aimed at standardizing practices that subsequently could reduce C difficile risk. Copyright © 2016 The

  14. Diagnostic performance of an acoustic-based system for coronary artery disease risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Simon; Nissen, Louise; Schmidt, Samuel Emil; Westra, Jelmer Sybren; Rasmussen, Laust Dupont; Knudsen, Lars Lyhne; Madsen, Lene Helleskov; Kirk Johansen, Jane; Larsen, Bjarke Skogstad; Struijk, Johannes Jan; Frost, Lars; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Botker, Hans Erik; Bøttcher, Morten

    2017-11-09

    Diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) continues to require substantial healthcare resources. Acoustic analysis of transcutaneous heart sounds of cardiac movement and intracoronary turbulence due to obstructive coronary disease could potentially change this. The aim of this study was thus to test the diagnostic accuracy of a new portable acoustic device for detection of CAD. We included 1675 patients consecutively with low to intermediate likelihood of CAD who had been referred for cardiac CT angiography. If significant obstruction was suspected in any coronary segment, patients were referred to invasive angiography and fractional flow reserve (FFR) assessment. Heart sound analysis was performed in all patients. A predefined acoustic CAD-score algorithm was evaluated; subsequently, we developed and validated an updated CAD-score algorithm that included both acoustic features and clinical risk factors. Low risk is indicated by a CAD-score value ≤20. Haemodynamically significant CAD assessed from FFR was present in 145 (10.0%) patients. In the entire cohort, the predefined CAD-score had a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 44%. In total, 50% had an updated CAD-score value ≤20. At this cut-off, sensitivity was 81% (95% CI 73% to 87%), specificity 53% (95% CI 50% to 56%), positive predictive value 16% (95% CI 13% to 18%) and negative predictive value 96% (95% CI 95% to 98%) for diagnosing haemodynamically significant CAD. Sound-based detection of CAD enables risk stratification superior to clinical risk scores. With a negative predictive value of 96%, this new acoustic rule-out system could potentially supplement clinical assessment to guide decisions on the need for further diagnostic investigation. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02264717; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and actual diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović-Perišić Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is increasing in the world. Chronic hyperglycemia in DM is associated with a long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially retina, kidney, nerves and, in addition, with an increased risk of cardiovasclar disease. For a long time the illness has been unknown. Early diagnosis of diabetes could suspend the development of diabetic complications. The aim of the study was to establish risk for the development of coronary disease in the patients evaluated by the use of new diagnostic criteria for DM. Methods. The study included 930 participants without diagnosis of DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, nor coronary heart disease two years before the study. The patients went through measuring of fasting plasma glycemia, erythrocytes, hematocrit, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. In the group with hyperglycemia the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was performed. We analyzed ECG and made blood pressure monitoring, and also measured body mass, height, waist and hip circumference. We analyzed life style, especially smoking, and exercise and family history. Results. Diabetes prevalence was 2.68%, and prevalences of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and DM were 12.15%. Average age of males and females was 38 and 45 years, respectively. In the healthy population there was higher frequency of smokers (55% vs 42%, but in the population with hyperglycemia there were more obesity (23% vs 10.5%, hypertension (39% vs 9%, hypercholesterolemia (76% vs 44.1%, lower HDL-C (52.2% vs 25.7%. Cummulative risk factor in healthy subjects, and those with hyperglycemia were 5.6% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion. Subjects with hyperglicemia without diagnosis of DM have higher risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  16. Quantitation of the critically ischemic zone at risk during acute coronary occlusion using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merhige, M.; Garza, D.; Sease, D.; Rowe, R.W.; Tewson, T.; Emran, A.; Bolomey, L.; Gould, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Critical myocardial ischemia has been defined experimentally during acute coronary occlusion as flow reduction of 50% or more since cellular ATP depletion begins to occur beyond this flow reduction threshold, placing tissue at risk of cellular injury. To test the hypothesis that critically ischemic fractional left ventricular mass can be measured noninvasively with PET, nine dogs were imaged in a multi-slice positron camera using the perfusion tracer 13N-ammonia, while radiolabeled microspheres were injected into the left atrium during acute coronary occlusion. Images were processed using a 50% threshold and the size of the resulting perfusion defect was expressed as a fraction of total left ventricular image volume. The critically ischemic left ventricular fraction determined in vitro from the microsphere perfusion data, ranged from 5% to 30% of the total left ventricular weight and correlated closely with that determined noninvasively by PET with r = 0.94 (y = 1.05X - 2.0%). The authors conclude that the fraction of left ventricular myocardium rendered critically ischemic during acute coronary occlusion can be measured accurately and noninvasively in vivo using perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography

  17. Risk factors of coronary heart disease among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wang Jixian; Zhao Yongcheng; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Zhao Zhigang; Lin Zhidong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD) in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China, especially the relationship of CHD with occupational irradiation. Methods: A 1:2 matched case-control study was carried out. The study subjects consisted of 112 pair-matched cases and controls coming from different hospitals in China. Information about occupational and non-occupational risk factors obtained by interviewing every subjects personally. Individual doses were estimated by normalized work load method. SAS 6.12 software conditional Logistic regression method was applied to data analysis. Results: Variables such as family history of CHD (OR=17.298, P = 0.0001), history of hypertension (OR = 6.172, P = 0.0003), overweight (OR = 2.679, P = 0.0150), physical exercises (OR = 0.421, P0.0333), diabetes (OR = 7.823, P = 0.0200), radiation protection condition (OR = 3.992, P 0.0027), and accumulated radiation dose (OR = 1.612, P 0.0454) were included in the last model. Conclusions: For the medical diagnostic X-ray workers, family history of coronary heart disease, history of hypertension, diabetes, etc. are the main risk factors of CHD, and occupational exposure may be a potential risk factor. As for the mechanism, further studies are needed

  18. Mortality after percutaneous coronary revascularization: Prior cardiovascular risk factor control and improved outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Awsan; Balasubramaniam, Karthik; Alhous, M Hafez A; Lee, Kelvin; Jesudason, Peter; Rashid, Muhammad; Mamas, Mamas A; Zaman, Azfar G

    2017-06-01

    To assess the mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) according to their insulin requirement and PCI setting (elective, urgent, and emergency). DM is a major risk factor to develop coronary artery disease (CAD). It is unclear if meticulous glycemic control and aggressive risk factor management in patients with DM has improved outcomes following PCI. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 9,224 patients treated with PCI at a regional tertiary center between 2008 and 2011. About 7,652 patients were nondiabetics (non-DM), 1,116 had non-insulin treated diabetes mellitus (NITDM) and 456 had ITDM. Multi-vessel coronary artery disease, renal impairment and non-coronary vascular disease were more prevalent in DM patients. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.4%. In a logistic regression model, the adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for 30-day mortality were 1.28 (0.81-2.03, P = 0.34) in NITDM and 2.82 (1.61-4.94, P diabetes, this study reveals higher mortality only in insulin-treated diabetic patients following PCI for stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome. Importantly, diabetic patients with good risk factor control and managed on diet or oral hypoglycemics have similar outcomes to the non-diabetic population. © 2016 The Authors Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Thyroid Function Within the Normal Range and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åsvold, Bjørn O; Vatten, Lars J; Bjøro, Trine

    2015-01-01

    documented, but conflicting evidence suggests that thyrotropin levels in the upper part of the reference range may be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between differences in thyroid function within the reference range and CHD risk. DESIGN...... known thyroid or cardiovascular disease at baseline. EXPOSURES: Thyroid function as expressed by serum thyrotropin levels at baseline. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Hazard ratios (HRs) of CHD mortality and CHD events according to thyrotropin levels after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status....... This finding suggests that differences in thyroid function within the population reference range do not influence the risk of CHD. Increased CHD risk does not appear to be a reason for lowering the upper thyrotropin reference limit....

  20. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis

  1. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

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    Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Walter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.walter@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); Saur, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.saur@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim, E-mail: tim.sueselbeck@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Traunwieser, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.traunwieser@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Takx, Richard, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis.

  2. Facts about Type 2

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    Full Text Available ... Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts ... Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes ...

  3. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  4. Relation of thoracic aortic and aortic valve calcium to coronary artery calcium and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Sciammarella, Maria; Arad, Yadon; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Polk, Donna; Hachamovich, Rory; Friedman, John; Hayes, Sean; Daniell, Anthony; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-10-15

    Aortic calcium, aortic valve calcium (AVC), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have been associated with cardiovascular event risk. We examined the prevalence of thoracic aortic calcium (TAC) and AVC in relation to the presence and extent of CAC, cardiovascular risk factors, and estimated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). In 2,740 persons without known CHD aged 20 to 79 years, CAC was assessed by electron beam- or multidetector-computed tomography. We determined the prevalence of TAC and AVC in relation to CAC, CHD risk factors, and predicted 10-year risk of CHD. A close correspondence of TAC and AVC was observed with CAC. TAC and AVC increased with age; by the eighth decade of life, the prevalence of TAC was similar to that of CAC (>80%), and 36% of men and 24% of women had AVC. Age, male gender, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were directly related to the likelihood of CAC, TAC, and AVC; higher diastolic blood pressure and cigarette smoking additionally predicted CAC. Body mass index and higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressures were also related to TAC, and higher body mass index and lower diastolic blood pressure were related to AVC. Calculated risk of CHD increased with the presence of AVC and TAC across levels of CAC. TAC and AVC provided incremental value over CAC in association with the 10-year calculated risk of CHD. If longitudinal studies show an incremental value of aortic and aortic valve calcium over that of CAC for prediction of cardiovascular events, future guidelines for risk assessment incorporating CAC assessment may additionally incorporate the measurement of aortic and/or aortic valve calcium.

  5. Social and Behavioral Risk Marker Clustering Associated with Biological Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease: NHANES 2001–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Everage

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Social and behavioral risk markers (e.g., physical activity, diet, smoking, and socioeconomic position cluster; however, little is known whether clustering is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD risk. Objectives were to determine if sociobehavioral clustering is associated with biological CHD risk factors (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and diabetes and whether associations are independent of individual clustering components. Methods. Participants included 4,305 males and 4,673 females aged ≥20 years from NHANES 2001–2004. Sociobehavioral Risk Marker Index (SRI included a summary score of physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, smoking, and educational attainment. Regression analyses evaluated associations of SRI with aforementioned biological CHD risk factors. Receiver operator curve analyses assessed independent predictive ability of SRI. Results. Healthful clustering (SRI = 0 was associated with improved biological CHD risk factor levels in 5 of 6 risk factors in females and 2 of 6 risk factors in males. Adding SRI to models containing age, race, and individual SRI components did not improve C-statistics. Conclusions. Findings suggest that healthful sociobehavioral risk marker clustering is associated with favorable CHD risk factor levels, particularly in females. These findings should inform social ecological interventions that consider health impacts of addressing social and behavioral risk factors.

  6. Contrast nephropathy in high-risk patients undergoing coronary angiography and intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M.A.; Rabbani, M.A.; Jafary, F.H.; Bhatti, M.A.; Islam, M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of contrast nephropathy in high-risk patients undergoing coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and to define the characteristics of this cohort. Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi from January to December 2002. Patients and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients with serum creatinine greater than 1.4mg/dl who underwent coronary angiography or PCI were included. All patients received non-ionic contrast dye. Acute contrast nephropathy was defined as rise in serum creatinine of >0.5mg/dl within 48 hours following the index procedure. Means and standard deviations were calculated for continuous variables and frequencies for categorical variables. Results: Mean age of patients was 62.3 year + 8.83. Mean pre-contrast creatinine was 1.9+0.9mg/dl. Eleven (9.65%) patients developed contrast nephropathy. 4.4% of patients with serum creatinine 4.0(p-value 0.001). 11.9% diabetic patients developed nephropathy compared to 6.3% of non-diabetics (p-value 0.355). 11.4% of hypertensive and 3.7% of non-hypertensive patients developed contrast-nephropathy (p-value 0.454). 12.9% of low dose group ( 100ml) developed nephropathy (p-value 0.188). Mean serum creatinine in low dose group was higher (3.0mg/dl vs. 1.7 mg/dl). Conclusion: The incidence of contrast nephropathy in this study was similar to that reported in literature. Risk of CIN was found to be significantly proportional to the severity of baseline renal disease. Trends towards higher risk of CIN were seen in patients with diabetes and hypertension. Higher incidence of CIN in patients receiving low-dose contrast was confounded by higher baseline serum creatinine in that group. (author)

  7. Women, Work and Health Hazards: A Fact Sheet and Cosmetologists: Health Risks at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Commission on Working Women, Washington, DC.

    The first part of this document is a fact sheet that provides information on health hazards faced by employed women. It covers the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), job-related diseases suffered by workers in female-dominated occupations, employer responsibilities under OSHA, and the lack of statistical reporting on job-related disease.…

  8. Depression and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Death: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Kling, Juliana M

    2016-02-01

    Findings regarding the association between depression and risk of coronary heart disease are inconsistent. We aimed to assess the association between depression and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary death through a meta-analysis.We performed an electronic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, and Scopus databases through August 1, 2015, and manual search of the references of the eligible papers and related review articles. Two investigators independently conducted study selection and data abstraction. Disagreement was resolved by consensus. Confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Cochran Q statistic and Higgins index. Publication bias was assessed by funnel plot and Egger test. Study quality was appraised with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.Among 19 eligible cohort studies including 323,709 participants, 8447 cases of MI and coronary death were reported during follow-up ranging from 4 to 37 years. The pooled adjusted HRs for patients with depression (vs those without) were 1.22 (95% CI, 1.13-1.32) for combined MI and coronary death, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.09-1.57) for MI alone (9 studies), and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.14-1.63) for coronary death alone (8 studies). The increased risk of MI and coronary death associated with depression was consistent using modified inclusion criteria, across most subgroups, and after adjusting for possible publication bias.Depression is associated with a significantly increased risk of MI and coronary death. Effective prevention and treatment of depression may decrease such risk.

  9. Coronary risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Engstrøm, Thomas; Pries-Heje, Mia; Heitmann, Merete; Pedersen, Frants; Schou, Morten; Mickley, Hans; Elming, Hanne; Steffensen, Rolf; Køber, Lars; Iversen, Kasper

    2017-01-15

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive, less expensive, low-radiation alternative to coronary angiography (CAG) prior to valvular heart surgery. MSCT has a high negative predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD) but previous studies of patients with valvular disease have shown that MSCT, as the primary evaluation technique, lead to re-evaluation with CAG in about a third of cases and it is therefore not recommended. If a subgroup of patients with low- to intermediate risk of CAD could be identified and examined with MSCT, it could be cost-effective, reduce radiation and the risk of complications associated with CAG. The study cohort was derived from a national registry of patients undergoing CAG prior to valvular heart surgery. Using logistic regression, we identified significant risk factors for CAD and developed a risk score (CT-valve score). The score was validated on a similar cohort of patients from another registry. The study cohort consisted of 2221 patients, 521 (23.5%) had CAD. The validation cohort consisted of 2575 patients, 771 (29.9%) had CAD. The identified risk factors were male sex, age, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, aortic valve disease, extracardiac arteriopathy, ejection fraction <30% and diabetes mellitus. CT-valve score could identify a third of the population with a risk about 10%. A score based on risk factors of CAD can identify patients that might benefit from using MSCT as a gatekeeper to CAG prior to heart valve surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Circulating CD34+ progenitor cells and risk of mortality in a population with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Riyaz S; Li, Qunna; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Eapen, Danny J; Moss, Lauren D; Janjua, A Umair; Manocha, Pankaj; Kassem, Hatem Al; Veledar, Emir; Samady, Habib; Taylor, W Robert; Zafari, A Maziar; Sperling, Laurence; Vaccarino, Viola; Waller, Edmund K; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-01-16

    Low circulating progenitor cell numbers and activity may reflect impaired intrinsic regenerative/reparative potential, but it remains uncertain whether this translates into a worse prognosis. To investigate whether low numbers of progenitor cells associate with a greater risk of mortality in a population at high cardiovascular risk. Patients undergoing coronary angiography were recruited into 2 cohorts (1, n=502 and 2, n=403) over separate time periods. Progenitor cells were enumerated by flow cytometry as CD45(med+) blood mononuclear cells expressing CD34, with additional quantification of subsets coexpressing CD133, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4. Coefficient of variation for CD34 cells was 2.9% and 4.8%, 21.6% and 6.5% for the respective subsets. Each cohort was followed for a mean of 2.7 and 1.2 years, respectively, for the primary end point of all-cause death. There was an inverse association between CD34(+) and CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell counts and risk of death in cohort 1 (β=-0.92, P=0.043 and β=-1.64, P=0.019, respectively) that was confirmed in cohort 2 (β=-1.25, P=0.020 and β=-1.81, P=0.015, respectively). Covariate-adjusted hazard ratios in the pooled cohort (n=905) were 3.54 (1.67-7.50) and 2.46 (1.18-5.13), respectively. CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell counts improved risk prediction metrics beyond standard risk factors. Reduced circulating progenitor cell counts, identified primarily as CD34(+) mononuclear cells or its subset expressing CD133, are associated with risk of death in individuals with coronary artery disease, suggesting that impaired endogenous regenerative capacity is associated with increased mortality. These findings have implications for biological understanding, risk prediction, and cell selection for cell-based therapies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Risk stratification of periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention: Analysis based on the SCAI definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Yiping; Yin, Dong; He, Yuan; Chen, Changzhe; Song, Chenxi; Yan, Ruohua; Zhu, Chen'gang; Xu, Bo; Dou, Kefei

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the predictors of and generate a risk prediction method for periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using the new PMI definition proposed by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI). The SCAI-defined PMI was found to be associated with worse prognosis than the PMI diagnosed by other definitions. However, few large-sample studies have attempted to predict the risk of SCAI-defined PMI. A total of 3,371 patients (3,516 selective PCIs) were included in this single-center retrospective analysis. The diagnostic criteria for PMI were set according to the SCAI definition. All clinical characteristics, coronary angiography findings and PCI procedural factors were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of PMI. To evaluate the risk of PMI, a multivariable risk score (PMI score) was constructed with incremental weights attributed to each component variable according to their estimated coefficients. PMI occurred in 108 (3.1%) of all patients. Age, multivessel treatment, at least one bifurcation treatment and total treated lesion length were independent predictors of SCAI-defined PMI. PMI scores ranged from 0 to 20. The C-statistic of PMI score was 0.71 (95% confidence interval: 0.66-0.76). PMI rates increased significantly from 1.96% in the non-high-risk group (PMI score < 10) to 6.26% in the high-risk group (PMI score ≥ 10) (P < 0.001). Age, multivessel treatment, at least one bifurcation treatment, and total treated lesion length are predictive of PMI. The PMI score could help identify patients at high risk of PMI after PCI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 20. Prediction of 10-year risk of hard coronary events among Saudi adults based on prevalence of heart disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adil Soofi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our study is the first to estimate the 10-year risk of HCE among adults in an emerging country and discovered a significant proportion of younger aged population are at risk for development of hard coronary events. Public awareness programs to control risk factors are warranted.

  13. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  14. Obesity and Hypertension, Heart Failure, and Coronary Heart Disease—Risk Factor, Paradox, and Recommendations for Weight Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Artham, Surya M.; Lavie, Carl J.; Milani, Richard V.; Ventura, Hector O.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity prevalence has reached epidemic proportions and is independently associated with numerous cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cancers, sleep apnea, and other major CVDs. Obesity has significant negative impact on CVD, including hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias via its maladaptive effects on individual CVD risk factors and cardiac structure and function. Despite this negative association...

  15. Usefulness of Genetic Polymorphisms and Conventional Risk Factors to Predict Coronary Heart Disease in Patients With Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Net, Jeroen B.; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Defesche, Joep C.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2009-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disorder with an associated high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The considerable variation in age of onset of CHD in patients with FH is believed to arise from conventional risk factors, as well as genetic variation other than in the

  16. Impact of lipoprotein(a) levels and apolipoprotein(a) isoform size on risk of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopewell, J. C.; Seedorf, U.; Farrall, M.; Parish, S.; Kyriakou, T.; Goel, A.; Hamsten, A.; Collins, R.; Watkins, H.; Clarke, R.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.

    Objectives. Observational and genetic studies have shown that lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and apolipoprotein( a) [apo(a)] isoform size are both associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but the relative independence of these risk factors remains unclear. Clarification of this uncertainty

  17. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  18. Identification of High-Risk Plaques Destined to Cause Acute Coronary Syndrome Using Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography and Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Myung; Choi, Gilwoo; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Hwang, Doyeon; Park, Jonghanne; Zhang, Jinlong; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Tong, Yaliang; Kim, Hyun Jin; Grady, Leo; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Nam, Chang-Wook; Shin, Eun-Seok; Cho, Young-Seok; Choi, Su-Yeon; Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Jin-Ho; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Christiansen, Evald H; Niemen, Koen; Otake, Hiromasa; Penicka, Martin; de Bruyne, Bernard; Kubo, Takashi; Akasaka, Takashi; Narula, Jagat; Douglas, Pamela S; Taylor, Charles A; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2018-03-14

    We investigated the utility of noninvasive hemodynamic assessment in the identification of high-risk plaques that caused subsequent acute coronary syndrome (ACS). ACS is a critical event that impacts the prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease. However, the role of hemodynamic factors in the development of ACS is not well-known. Seventy-two patients with clearly documented ACS and available coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) acquired between 1 month and 2 years before the development of ACS were included. In 66 culprit and 150 nonculprit lesions as a case-control design, the presence of adverse plaque characteristics (APC) was assessed and hemodynamic parameters (fractional flow reserve derived by coronary computed tomographic angiography [FFR CT ], change in FFR CT across the lesion [△FFR CT ], wall shear stress [WSS], and axial plaque stress) were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The best cut-off values for FFR CT , △FFR CT , WSS, and axial plaque stress were used to define the presence of adverse hemodynamic characteristics (AHC). The incremental discriminant and reclassification abilities for ACS prediction were compared among 3 models (model 1: percent diameter stenosis [%DS] and lesion length, model 2: model 1 + APC, and model 3: model 2 + AHC). The culprit lesions showed higher %DS (55.5 ± 15.4% vs. 43.1 ± 15.0%; p stress than nonculprit lesions (all p values statistic [c-index] 0.789 vs. 0.747; p = 0.014) and reclassification abilities (category-free net reclassification index 0.287; p = 0.047; relative integrated discrimination improvement 0.368; p < 0.001) than model 2. Lesions with both APC and AHC showed significantly higher risk of the culprit for subsequent ACS than those with no APC/AHC (hazard ratio: 11.75; 95% confidence interval: 2.85 to 48.51; p = 0.001) and with either APC or AHC (hazard ratio: 3.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.86 to 5.55; p < 0.001). Noninvasive hemodynamic assessment enhanced

  19. Associations between COX-2 polymorphisms, blood cholesterol and risk of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Segel, Stine; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    the enzyme levels of COX-2, were associated with risk of ACS and if alcohol intake, smoking, and use of NSAID would modify the associations. We also wanted to investigate associations with blood lipid levels. Methods: A case–cohort study including 1031 ACS cases and a sub-cohort of 1703 persons was nested......), such that variant allele carriers with low alcohol intake had the lowest lipid levels. No statistically significant associations were observed in females. Conclusion: This study suggests that genetically determined COX-2 levels are associated with risk of ACS and blood lipid levels among males. No consistent......Background: The use of specific COX-2 inhibitors in cancer prevention has been associated with higher risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to investigate if the polymorphisms COX2 T8473C (rs5275), and COX2 A-1195G (rs689466), which modify...

  20. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Mi, Lan; Liu, Xiaojun; Pan, Shuo; Xu, Jiaojiao; Xia, Dongyu; Liu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Yong; Xiang, Yu; Yuan, Zuyi; Guan, Gongchang; Wang, Junkui

    2015-01-01

    Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58%) patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30-12.90, 13.00-13.50, 13.60-16.40). GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.055; p risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone.

  1. Coronary Plaque Characterization in Psoriasis Reveals High-Risk Features That Improve After Treatment in a Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Joseph B; Joshi, Aditya A; Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Aberra, Tsion M; Dey, Amit K; Rodante, Justin A; Salahuddin, Taufiq; Chung, Jonathan H; Rana, Anshuma; Teague, Heather L; Wu, Jashin J; Playford, Martin P; Lockshin, Benjamin A; Chen, Marcus Y; Sandfort, Veit; Bluemke, David A; Mehta, Nehal N

    2017-07-18

    Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an accelerated risk of myocardial infarction, provides an ideal human model to study inflammatory atherogenesis in vivo. We hypothesized that the increased cardiovascular risk observed in psoriasis would be partially attributable to an elevated subclinical coronary artery disease burden composed of noncalcified plaques with high-risk features. However, inadequate efforts have been made to directly measure coronary artery disease in this vulnerable population. As such, we sought to compare total coronary plaque burden and noncalcified coronary plaque burden (NCB) and high-risk plaque (HRP) prevalence between patients with psoriasis (n=105), patients with hyperlipidemia eligible for statin therapy under National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (n=100) who were ≈10 years older, and healthy volunteers without psoriasis (n=25). Patients underwent coronary computed-tomography angiography for total coronary plaque burden and NCB quantification and HRP identification, defined as low attenuation (1.10), and spotty calcification. A consecutive sample of the first 50 patients with psoriasis was scanned again 1 year after therapy. Despite being younger and at lower traditional risk than patients with hyperlipidemia, patients with psoriasis had increased NCB (mean±SD: 1.18±0.33 versus 1.11±0.32, P =0.02) and similar HRP prevalence ( P =0.58). Furthermore, compared to healthy volunteers, patients with psoriasis had increased total coronary plaque burden (1.22±0.31 versus 1.04±0.22, P =0.001), NCB (1.18±0.33 versus 1.03±0.21, P =0.004), and HRP prevalence beyond traditional risk (odds ratio, 6.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-31.7; P =0.03). Last, among patients with psoriasis followed for 1 year, improvement in psoriasis severity was associated with improvement in total coronary plaque burden (β=0.45, 0.23-0.67; P psoriasis had greater NCB and increased HRP prevalence than

  2. Gender differences in risk profile and outcome of Middle Eastern patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrah, Mohamad I; Hammoudeh, Ayman J; Al-Natour, Dalal B; Khader, Yousef S; Tabbalat, Ramzi A; Alhaddad, Imad A; Kullab, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    To determine the gender differences in cardiovascular risk profile and outcomes among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: In a prospective multicenter study of consecutive Middle Eastern patients managed with PCI from January 2013 to February 2014 in 12 tertiary care centers in Amman and Irbid, Jordan. Clinical and coronary angiographic features, and major cardiovascular events were assessed for both genders from hospital stay to 1 year. Results: Women comprised 20.6% of 2426 enrolled patients, were older (mean age 62.9 years versus 57.2 years), had higher prevalence of hypertension (81% versus 57%), diabetes (66% versus 44%), dyslipidemia (58% versus 46%), and obesity (44% versus 25%) compared with men, p less than 0.001. The PCI for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was indicated for fewer women than men (23% versus 33%; p=0.001). Prevalence of single or multi-vessel coronary artery disease was similar in women and men. More women than men had major bleeding during hospitalization (2.2% versus 0.6%; p=0.003) and at one year (2.5% versus 0.9%; p=0.007). There were no significant differences between women and men in mortality (3.1% versus 1.7%) or stent thrombosis (2.1% versus 1.8%) at 1 year. Conclusion: Middle Eastern women undergoing PCI had worse baseline risk profile compared with men.Except for major bleeding, no gender differences in the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events were demonstrated.

  3. Frequency of coronary artery disease (cad) risk factors in armed forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, S.M.; Iftikhar, R.; Abbasi, K.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of risk factors of coronary artery disease (CAD) in apparently healthy soldiers of Pakistan Armed Forces. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of medicine, CMH Okara from July 2012 to Dec 2012. Patients and Methods: The study included 2215 male currently serving soldiers in age range of 18 to 52 years by consecutive sampling. Relevant history, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) of each subject were recorded. BMI > 25 kg/m/sup 2/ and WC > 90 cm was considered obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. BP > 140/90 mmHg was defined as hypertension. All the participants of study underwent blood glucose fasting, blood glucose random, ECG recording, personality assessment and lipid profile. Risk estimation was done using Eric Brittain scoring system. Results: In our study group 95.5% patients were having at least 1 risk factor of CAD, 54 % were having 2 to 4 risk factors while 3.93% had > 4 risk factors. Risk estimation of CAD using Eric Brittain scoring system showed that a large proportion of study group had high probability of developing ischemic heart disease in next 6 years. Conclusion: A large proportion of our soldiers are harboring risk of CAD due to increase in frequency of 8 conventional CAD risk factors especially obesity. (author)

  4. Integrated systems approach identifies risk regulatory pathways and key regulators in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Dianming; Wang, Lihong; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Dai, Enyu; Liu, Xinyi; Luo, Shanshun; Jiang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. However, the molecular mechanisms of CAD remain elusive. Regulatory pathways are known to play crucial roles in many pathogenic processes. Thus, inferring risk regulatory pathways is an important step toward elucidating the mechanisms underlying CAD. With advances in high-throughput data, we developed an integrated systems approach to identify CAD risk regulatory pathways and key regulators. Firstly, a CAD-related core subnetwork was identified from a curated transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA) regulatory network based on a random walk algorithm. Secondly, candidate risk regulatory pathways were extracted from the subnetwork by applying a breadth-first search (BFS) algorithm. Then, risk regulatory pathways were prioritized based on multiple CAD-associated data sources. Finally, we also proposed a new measure to prioritize upstream regulators. We inferred that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) may be a key regulator in the dysregulation of risk regulatory pathways. This study takes a closer step than the identification of disease subnetworks or modules. From the risk regulatory pathways, we could understand the flow of regulatory information in the initiation and progression of the disease. Our approach helps to uncover its potential etiology. We developed an integrated systems approach to identify risk regulatory pathways. We proposed a new measure to prioritize the key regulators in CAD. PTEN may be a key regulator in dysregulation of the risk regulatory pathways.

  5. Hemodynamic Based Coronary Artery Aneurysm Thrombosis Risk Stratification in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande Gutierrez, Noelia; Mathew, M.; McCrindle, B.; Kahn, A.; Burns, J.; Marsden, A.

    2017-11-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) as a result of Kawasaki Disease (KD) put patients at risk for thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Current AHA guidelines recommend CAA diameter >8 mm or Z-score >10 as the criterion for initiating systemic anticoagulation. Our hypothesis is that hemodynamic data derived from computational blood flow simulations is a better predictor of thrombosis than aneurysm diameter alone. Patient-specific coronary models were constructed from CMRI for a cohort of 10 KD patients (5 confirmed thrombosis cases) and simulations with fluid structure interaction were performed using the stabilized finite element Navier-Stokes solver available in SimVascular. We used a closed-loop lumped parameter network (LPN) to model the heart and vascular boundary conditions coupled numerically to the flow solver. An automated parameter estimation method was used to match LPN values to clinical data for each patient. Hemodynamic data analysis resulted in low correlation between Wall Shear Stress (WSS)/ Particle Residence Time (PRT) and CAA diameter but demonstrates the positive correlation between hemodynamics and adverse patient outcomes. Our results suggest that quantifying WSS and PRT should enable identification of regions at higher risk of thrombosis. We propose a quantitative method to non-invasively assess the abnormal flow in CAA following KD that could potentially improve clinical decision-making regarding anticoagulation therapy.

  6. Risk of iron overload is decreased in beating heart coronary artery surgery compared to conventional bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumby, S; Koh, T W; Pepper, J R; Gutteridge, J M

    2001-11-29

    Conventional cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CCPB) increases the iron loading of plasma transferrin often to a state of plasma iron overload, with the presence of low molecular mass iron. Such iron is a potential risk factor for oxidative stress and microbial virulence. Here we assess 'off-pump' coronary artery surgery on the beating heart for changes in plasma iron chemistry. Seventeen patients undergoing cardiac surgery using the 'Octopus' myocardial wall stabilisation device were monitored at five time points for changes in plasma iron chemistry. This group was further divided into those (n=9) who had one- or two- (n=8) vessel grafts, and compared with eight patients undergoing conventional coronary artery surgery. Patients undergoing beating heart surgery had significantly lower levels of total plasma non-haem iron, and a decreased percentage saturation of their transferrin at all time points compared to conventional bypass patients. Plasma iron overload occurred in only one patient undergoing CCPB. Beating heart surgery appears to decrease red blood cell haemolysis, and tissue damage during the operative procedures and thereby significantly decreases the risk of plasma iron overload associated with conventional bypass.

  7. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, ... Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice ( ...

  10. Association Between Rotating Night Shift Work and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Among Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Céline; Devore, Elizabeth E; Wegrzyn, Lani R; Massa, Jennifer; Speizer, Frank E; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rosner, Bernard; Stampfer, Meir J; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2016-04-26

    Prospective studies linking shift work to coronary heart disease (CHD) have been inconsistent and limited by short follow-up. To determine whether rotating night shift work is associated with CHD risk. Prospective cohort study of 189,158 initially healthy women followed up over 24 years in the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS [1988-2012]: N = 73,623 and NHS2 [1989-2013]: N = 115,535). Lifetime history of rotating night shift work (≥3 night shifts per month in addition to day and evening shifts) at baseline (updated every 2 to 4 years in the NHS2). Incident CHD; ie, nonfatal myocardial infarction, CHD death, angiogram-confirmed angina pectoris, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, stents, and angioplasty. During follow-up, 7303 incident CHD cases occurred in the NHS (mean age at baseline, 54.5 years) and 3519 in the NHS2 (mean age, 34.8 years). In multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, increasing years of baseline rotating night shift work was associated with significantly higher CHD risk in both cohorts. In the NHS, the association between duration of shift work and CHD was stronger in the first half of follow-up than in the second half (P=.02 for interaction), suggesting waning risk after cessation of shift work. Longer time since quitting shift work was associated with decreased CHD risk among ever shift workers in the NHS2 (Pwomen who worked as registered nurses, longer duration of rotating night shift work was associated with a statistically significant but small absolute increase in CHD risk. Further research is needed to explore whether the association is related to specific work hours and individual characteristics.

  11. The value of exercise radionuclide ventriculography in risk stratification after coronary arterial bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Goel, I.P.; Mundth, E.D.; Kane, S.; Schenk, C.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac events after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) may be related to left ventricular (LV) function, residual coronary artery diseases (CAD), graft occlusion, and progression of CAD. This study examined the value of rest and exercise (EX) radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) done 3-6 mos after CABG in risk stratification in 212 pts. There were 185 men and 27 women, aged 57 +- 8 years (mean +- SD). During a followup period of up to 4 years, (15 +- 10 months), there were 23 cardiac events; 13 pts died of cardiac causes and 20 had non-fatal acute myocardial infarctions. The pts with and without events did not differ in: clinical presentation after CABG (most were asymptomatic), medications and ECG findings at rest and EX. The pts with events had lower EX systolic blood pressure (p < 0.01); resting LV ejection fraction (EF) (p = 0.002), and EX EF (40 +- 18% vs 54 +- 16%, p = 0.002). The change in EF (rest to EX) was not significantly different (l.6 +- 8.2%, vs 2.1 +- 9.2%). Survival analysis (Cox model) identified the EX EF as the best predictor of death and total events (X/sup 2/ = 4.3 and 2.4, p = 0.04 and 0.07 respectively). Actuarial life table analysis showed that the risk increased as the EX EF decreased when pts were grouped into EX EF ≥ 50, 30-49, and <30%, (p < 0.001, Mantel-Cox). Thus, EX RNA is useful in risk stratification after CABG. The EX LVEF is an important descriptor that categorizes pts into different risks groups. The pts at high risk probably require more aggressive followup and continued medical therapy

  12. How can we identify low- and high-risk patients among unselected patients with possible acute coronary syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Færgeman, Ole; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2007-01-01

    Objective Prognosis among patients admitted with possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may differ from that of patients with definite ACS. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for mortality among unselected patients and to use the statistical model to identify patients at low or high...... mortality risk. Methods From April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002, we identified all consecutive patients aged 30 to 69 years admitted to the 2 coronary care units covering the municipality of Aarhus, Denmark (population, 138 290). ACS was considered a possible diagnosis if the physician at admission (1) had...

  13. Risk model for suspected acute coronary syndrome is of limited value in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Jess Bjerre

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Among patients with acute chest pain, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is seen only in a minority of the patients, which raises the question, whether it is possible to separate a group with a high risk of ACS for admission to a cardiac care unit (CCU) from those with a low risk who would...... be treated at an emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to describe a risk stratification model for a Danish context. METHODS: This was a historic prospective cohort study of patients with suspicion of ACS. The patient was defined as a low-risk patient and admitted to the ED if: 1....... RESULTS: We included a total of 488 patients with suspicion of ACS, 50% of whom were low-risk patients. 17% had a verified ACS; 10% of those in the low-risk group and 24% of those in the high-risk group (p = 0.0001). Among the verified ACS cases, 71% went primarily to the CCU. The odds ratio for an ACS...

  14. Neural Network-Based Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Using Feature Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Kwon Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Of the machine learning techniques used in predicting coronary heart disease (CHD, neural network (NN is popularly used to improve performance accuracy. Objective. Even though NN-based systems provide meaningful results based on clinical experiments, medical experts are not satisfied with their predictive performances because NN is trained in a “black-box” style. Method. We sought to devise an NN-based prediction of CHD risk using feature correlation analysis (NN-FCA using two stages. First, the feature selection stage, which makes features acceding to the importance in predicting CHD risk, is ranked, and second, the feature correlation analysis stage, during which one learns about the existence of correlations between feature relations and the data of each NN predictor output, is determined. Result. Of the 4146 individuals in the Korean dataset evaluated, 3031 had low CHD risk and 1115 had CHD high risk. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve of the proposed model (0.749 ± 0.010 was larger than the Framingham risk score (FRS (0.393 ± 0.010. Conclusions. The proposed NN-FCA, which utilizes feature correlation analysis, was found to be better than FRS in terms of CHD risk prediction. Furthermore, the proposed model resulted in a larger ROC curve and more accurate predictions of CHD risk in the Korean population than the FRS.

  15. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  16. The Prevalence and Awareness of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Southern Chinese Population with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinrui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiometabolic risk factors significantly accelerate the progression of coronary artery disease (CAD; however, whether CAD patients in South China are aware of the prevalence of these risk factors is not clear yet. Methods. The study consisted of 2312 in-admission CAD patients from 2008 to 2011 in South China. Disease history including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes was relied on patients' self-reported records. Physical and clinical examinations were tested to assess the real prevalence of the cardiometabolic risk factors. Results. 57.9% of CAD patients had more than 3 cardiometabolic risk factors in terms of the metabolic syndrome. The self-known and real prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were 56.6%, 28.3%, and 25.1% and 91.3%, 40.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. The awareness rates were 64.4%, 66.3%, and 28.5% for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. The prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors was significantly different among gender and among disease status. Conclusions. Most CAD patients in South China had more than three cardiometabolic risk factors. However, the awareness rate of cardiometabolic diseases was low, especially for dyslipidemia. Strategies of routine physical examination programs are needed for the early detection and treatment of cardiometabolic risk factors in order to prevent CAD progression and prognosis.

  17. Risk factors of coronary heart disease among medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Mahnashi, Morooj; Al-Dhaheri, Amal; Al-Zahrani, Borooj; Al-Wadie, Ebtihal; Aljabri, Mydaa; Al-Shanketi, Rajaa; Al-Shehri, Rawiah; Al-Sayes, Fatin M; Bashawri, Jamil

    2014-04-28

    Nowadays, Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) represents an escalating worldwide public health problem. Providing consistent data on the magnitude and risk factors of CVDs among young population will help in controlling the risks and avoiding their consequences. The objective was to estimate the prevalence of risk factors of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) among medical students during their clinical clerkship (4th - 6th years). A cross-sectional study was done during the educational year 2012-2013 at King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah. Ethical standards were followed and a multistage stratified random sample method was used for selection of 214 medical students. Data was collected through an interviewing questionnaire, measurements and laboratory investigations. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were done by SPSS version 21. CHD risk percent in thirty years was calculated using Framingham algorithm for each student, then the risk among all students was determined. The commonest risk factors of CHDs were daily intake of high fat diet (73.4%), physical inactivity (57.9%), overweight/or obesity (31.2%) and daily consumption of fast food (13.1%). Hyper-cholesterolemia (17.2%) and hypertension (9.3%) were also prevalent risk factors. Smoking prevalence was low (2.8%). Males had significantly higher mean scores for most of CHD risk factors compared to females (p Students't test = 4.74, p students was 10.7%, 2.3% and 0.5% for mild, moderate and severe risk, respectively. An alarmingly high prevalence of CHD risk factors was prevailed among medical students, especially among males. However, a low prevalence of smoking may indicate the success of "Smoke-free Campus" program. Screening risk factors of CHD among medical students and implementation of intervention programs are recommended. Programs to raise awareness about CHD risk factors, encourage young adult students to adopt a healthy dietary behavior and promote physical exercise should be initiated.

  18. Current status of coronary risk factors among rural Malays in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawawi, Hapizah M; Nor, Idris M; Noor, Ismail M; Karim, Norimah A; Arshad, Fatimah; Khan, Rahmattullah; Yusoff, Khalid

    2002-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in Malaysia, despite its status as a developing country. The rural population is thought to be at low risk. To investigate the prevalence of risk factors and global risk profile among rural Malays in Malaysia. We studied 609 rural Malay subjects (346 females, 263 males; age range 30-65 years). Blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), smoking habits and family history of premature CHD were documented. Fasting blood samples were analysed for serum lipids, lipoprotein (a), plasma glucose and fibrinogen. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed using 75 g anhydrous glucose. The prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia for total cholesterol concentrations of > or = 5.2, > or =6.5 and > or =7.8 mmol/l were 67.3, 30.5 and 11.8% respectively. There was a high prevalence of low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (13.1%), hypertension (30.3%), smokers (24.4%), diabetes (6.4%), impaired fasting glucose or glucose tolerance (13.9%), overweight or obesity (44.7%) and increased WHR (48.5%). Global risk assessment showed that 67.3% of the study population were at risk, with 15.9, 18.9 and 32.5% in the mild, moderate and high risk categories respectively. Prevalence of risk factors was high in the rural population. Global risk assessment showed a high-risk profile with two-thirds being at risk, and one-third being categorized into the high-risk group. Although rural communities were considered at low risk of developing CHD, this is changing fast, possibly due to the rapid socio-economic development, in addition to underlying genetic predisposition.

  19. Fact Sheet for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities Residual Risk and Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    proposed amendments to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities to address the results of the residual risk and technology review

  20. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S.T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; Bacquer, D. de; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G.A.; Hamer, M.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.; Jöckel, K.H.; Kittel, F.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Lunau, T.; Madsen, I.E.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pejtersen, J.H.; Pentti, J.; Rugulies, R.; Salo, P.; Shipley, M.J.; Siegrist, J.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.B.; Theorell, T.; Vahtera, J.; Westerholm, P.J.M.; O'Reilly, D.; Kumari, M.; Batty, G.D.; Ferrie, J.E.; Virtanen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods: We identified

  1. Risk of coronary artery disease in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Felippe Dantas; Lorenzo, Andrea Rocha de; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Ferraiuoli, Giovanna Ianini; Hadlich, Marcelo; Barros, Marcelo Viana de Lima; Lima, Ana Beatriz Ribeiro; Meirelles, Vanderson

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has improved survival and allowed infected patients to develop atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). Specific strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in the infected population have not been developed. It is necessary to know the magnitude of cardiovascular risk in this population. This study aimed to assess cardiovascular risk using a well-known clinical score and to investigate coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) in this population. This was a cross-sectional study. Adults with HIV infection were studied. Demographic, clinical and anthropometric data, serum glucose and lipids were obtained. Cardiovascular risk was calculated through Framingham risk score (FRS) and CACS. Categorical variables were compared by Chi-square or Fisher's exact test, and continuous variables were analyzed by Student t test or Mann-Whitney test. An analysis of concordance between FRS and CACS was performed using kappa statistic. Forty patients, aged 45.9 ± 8.1 years, were studied. Age of risk for CAD were found in 30.0%, hypertension in 55.0%, diabetes in 10.0%, smoking in 35.0%, dyslipidemia in 67.5% and family history of CAD in 57.5%. Altered levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were found in 30.0%, 25.0% and 82.5%, respectively. HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were altered more frequently among protease inhibitors users. The FRS classified the risk as low for 72.5%, moderate for 25.0%, and high for 2.5%. CACS > 0 was found in 32.5% of the patients, in 67.5% the score was low, in 17.5% moderate, and in 15.0% high. Concordance between FRS and CACS showed a kappa = 0.435. There is a high prevalence of risk factors for CAD in the studied population, with dyslipidemia being the most frequent. HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were the most frequently altered factors and were associated with the use of protease inhibitors. Risk assessed by the FRS was low in most

  2. Risk of coronary artery disease in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felippe Dantas Vilela

    Full Text Available Current treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection has improved survival and allowed infected patients to develop atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD. Specific strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in the infected population have not been developed. It is necessary to know the magnitude of cardiovascular risk in this population. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess cardiovascular risk using a well-known clinical score and to investigate coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS in this population. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. Adults with HIV infection were studied. Demographic, clinical and anthropometric data, serum glucose and lipids were obtained. Cardiovascular risk was calculated through Framingham risk score (FRS and CACS. Categorical variables were compared by Chi-square or Fisher's exact test, and continuous variables were analyzed by Student t test or Mann-Whitney test. An analysis of concordance between FRS and CACS was performed using kappa statistic. RESULTS: Forty patients, aged 45.9 ± 8.1 years, were studied. Age of risk for CAD were found in 30.0%, hypertension in 55.0%, diabetes in 10.0%, smoking in 35.0%, dyslipidemia in 67.5% and family history of CAD in 57.5%. Altered levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were found in 30.0%, 25.0% and 82.5%, respectively. HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were altered more frequently among protease inhibitors users. The FRS classified the risk as low for 72.5%, moderate for 25.0%, and high for 2.5%. CACS > 0 was found in 32.5% of the patients, in 67.5% the score was low, in 17.5% moderate, and in 15.0% high. Concordance between FRS and CACS showed a kappa = 0.435. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of risk factors for CAD in the studied population, with dyslipidemia being the most frequent. HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were the most frequently altered factors and were associated with the use of

  3. Polymer-free Drug-Coated Coronary Stents in Patients at High Bleeding Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Philip; Meredith, Ian T; Abizaid, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients at high risk for bleeding who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) often receive bare-metal stents followed by 1 month of dual antiplatelet therapy. We studied a polymer-free and carrier-free drug-coated stent that transfers umirolimus (also known as biolimus A9......), a highly lipophilic sirolimus analogue, into the vessel wall over a period of 1 month. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind trial, we compared the drug-coated stent with a very similar bare-metal stent in patients with a high risk of bleeding who underwent PCI. All patients received 1 month of dual...... ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.69; Pbleeding who underwent PCI, a polymer-free umirolimus-coated stent was superior to a bare-metal stent with respect to the primary safety and efficacy end points when used with a 1-month course of dual antiplatelet...

  4. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Erqou, Sebhat; Kaptoge, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta.......02-1.18) for ischemic stroke, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.98-1.05) for the aggregate of nonvascular mortality, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97-1.04) for cancer deaths, and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.95-1.06) for nonvascular deaths other than cancer. CONCLUSION: Under a wide range of circumstances, there are continuous, independent, and modest......CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...

  5. Trends in Modifiable Risk Factors Are Associated With Declining Incidence of Hospitalized and Nonhospitalized Acute Coronary Heart Disease in a Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannsverk, Jan; Wilsgaard, Tom; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Rasmussen, Knut; Thelle, Dag S; Njølstad, Inger; Hopstock, Laila Arnesdatter; Bønaa, Kaare Harald

    2016-01-05

    Few studies have used individual person data to study whether contemporary trends in the incidence of coronary heart disease are associated with changes in modifiable coronary risk factors. We identified 29 582 healthy men and women ≥25 years of age who participated in 3 population surveys conducted between 1994 and 2008 in Tromsø, Norway. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates were calculated for coronary heart disease overall, out-of-hospital sudden death, and hospitalized ST-segment-elevation and non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. We measured coronary risk factors at each survey and estimated the relationship between changes in risk factors and changes in incidence trends. A total of 1845 participants had an incident acute coronary heart disease event during 375 064 person-years of follow-up from 1994 to 2010. The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of total coronary heart disease decreased by 3% (95% confidence interval, 2.0-4.0; Pcoronary risk factors accounted for 66% (95% confidence interval, 48-97; Pcoronary heart disease. Favorable changes in cholesterol contributed 32% to the decline, whereas blood pressure, smoking, and physical activity each contributed 14%, 13%, and 9%, respectively. We observed a substantial decline in the incidence of coronary heart disease that was driven by reductions in out-of-hospital sudden death and hospitalized ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Changes in modifiable coronary risk factors accounted for 66% of the decline in coronary heart disease events. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Detection of Altered Risk Factors in Hospitalized Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avany Fernandes Pereira

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary variables considered risk factors for coronary artery disease. METHODS: Using anthropometrics, dietary allowance, and blood biochemistry, we assessed 84 patients [54 males (mean age of 55± 8 years and 30 females (mean age of 57±7 years], who had severe ( > or = 70% coronary artery obstruction and nonsevere forms of coronary artery disease determined by cardiac catheterization. The severe form of the disease prevailed in 70% of the males and 64% of the females, and a high frequency of familial antecedents (92% ' 88% and history of acute myocardial infarction (80% ' 70% were observed. Smoking predominated among males (65% and diabetes mellitus among females (43%. RESULTS: Males and females had body mass index and body fat above the normal values. Females with nonsevere lesions had HDL > 35 mg/dL, and this constituted a discriminating intergroup indicator. Regardless of the severity of the disease, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia were found among females, and cholesterolemia > 200 mg/dL in both sexes, but only males had LDL fraction > 160 mg/dL and homocysteine > 11.7 mmol/L. The male dietary allowance was inadequate in nutrients for homocysteine metabolism and in nutrients with an antioxidant action, such as the vitamins B6, C, and folate. Individuals of both sexes had a higher lipid and cholesterol intake and an inadequate consumption of fiber. The diet was classified as high-protein, high-fat, and low-carbohydrate. CONCLUSION: The alterations found had no association with the severity of lesions, indicating the need for more effective nutritional intervention.

  7. Bimodal fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (BFAHP) for coronary heart disease risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabahi, Farnaz

    2018-04-04

    Rooted deeply in medical multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM), risk assessment is very important especially when applied to the risk of being affected by deadly diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD risk assessment is a stochastic, uncertain, and highly dynamic process influenced by various known and unknown variables. In recent years, there has been a great interest in fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP), a popular methodology for dealing with uncertainty in MCDM. This paper proposes a new FAHP, bimodal fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (BFAHP) that augments two aspects of knowledge, probability and validity, to fuzzy numbers to better deal with uncertainty. In BFAHP, fuzzy validity is computed by aggregating the validities of relevant risk factors based on expert knowledge and collective intelligence. By considering both soft and statistical data, we compute the fuzzy probability of risk factors using the Bayesian formulation. In BFAHP approach, these fuzzy validities and fuzzy probabilities are used to construct a reciprocal comparison matrix. We then aggregate fuzzy probabilities and fuzzy validities in a pairwise manner for each risk factor and each alternative. BFAHP decides about being affected and not being affected by ranking of high and low risks. For evaluation, the proposed approach is applied to the risk of being affected by CHD using a real dataset of 152 patients of Iranian hospitals. Simulation results confirm that adding validity in a fuzzy manner can accrue more confidence of results and clinically useful especially in the face of incomplete information when compared with actual results. Applying the proposed BFAHP on CHD risk assessment of the dataset, it yields high accuracy rate above 85% for correct prediction. In addition, this paper recognizes that the risk factors of diastolic blood pressure in men and high-density lipoprotein in women are more important in CHD than other risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Lifetime risk of developing coronary heart disease in Aboriginal Australians: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Hoy, Wendy E

    2013-01-30

    Lifetime risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is an important yardstick by which policy makers, clinicians and the general public can assess and promote the awareness and prevention of CHD. The lifetime risk in Aboriginal people is not known. Using a cohort with up to 20 years of follow-up, we estimated the lifetime risk of CHD in Aboriginal people. A cohort study. A remote Aboriginal region. 1115 Aboriginal people from one remote tribal group who were free from CHD at baseline were followed for up to 20 years. During the follow-up period, new CHD incident cases were identified through hospital and death records. We estimated the lifetime risks of CHD with and without adjusting for the presence of competing risk of death from non-CHD causes. Participants were followed up for 17 126 person-years, during which 185 developed CHD and 144 died from non-CHD causes. The average age at which the first CHD event occurred was 48 years for men and 49 years for women. The risk of developing CHD increased with age until 60 years and then decreased with age. Lifetime cumulative risk without adjusting for competing risk was 70.7% for men and 63.8% for women. Adjusting for the presence of competing risk of death from non-CHD causes, the lifetime risk of CHD was 52.6% for men and 49.2% for women. Lifetime risk of CHD is as high as one in two in both Aboriginal men and women. The average age of having first CHD events was under 50 years, much younger than that reported in non-Aboriginal populations. Our data provide useful knowledge for health education, screening and prevention of CHD in Aboriginal people.

  9. Risk model for suspected acute coronary syndrome is of limited value in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Jess Bjerre; Staehr, Peter Bisgaard

    2015-10-01

    Among patients with acute chest pain, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is seen only in a minority of the patients, which raises the question, whether it is possible to separate a group with a high risk of ACS for admission to a cardiac care unit (CCU) from those with a low risk who would be treated at an emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to describe a risk stratification model for a Danish context. This was a historic prospective cohort study of patients with suspicion of ACS. The patient was defined as a low-risk patient and admitted to the ED if: 1) electrocardiogram (ECG) was normal, 2) the patient did not have persisting chest pain and 3) there was no history of ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or cardioverter defibrillator. Otherwise, patients were admitted to the CCU. The primary outcome was whether the ACS diagnosis was confirmed or rejected. We included a total of 488 patients with suspicion of ACS, 50% of whom were low-risk patients. 17% had a verified ACS; 10% of those in the low-risk group and 24% of those in the high-risk group (p = 0.0001). Among the verified ACS cases, 71% went primarily to the CCU. The odds ratio for an ACS if assigned to the high-risk group was 3.0. Allocation to the high-risk group, male gender and age above 60 years was associated with a higher risk of ACS. For patients fulfilling the high-risk definition, sensitivity was 71%, specificity 55%, negative predictive value 90% and positive predictive value 24% for an ACS. The model for stratification separated patients into two equal groups, allocated 71% of all ACS directly to the CCU and could not be improved by any of the additional factors examined. Further development of referral strategies for chest pain patients is required. none. not relevant.

  10. Cancerogenesis Risks between 64 and 320 Row Detector CT for Coronary CTA Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif N Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study compares cancerogenesis risks posed by the 64 row detector and the 320 row detector computed tomography scanners used during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA following decennial screening guidelines. Material and Methods: Data of the radiation absorbed after CCTA by lung, thyroid, and female breast in patients between 50 and 70 years of age obtained from prior published literature for the 64 row CT scanner were compared with data from our study using 320 row detector CT scanner. Data from the 64 row and the 320 row detector CT scanners was used to determine lifetime attributable risks (LAR of cancer based on the biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR VII report. Results: The relative reduction of LAR (% for 50-, 60-, and 70-year-old patients undergoing scanning with the 320 row detector CT scanner was 30% lower for lung, and more than 50% lower for female breast when compared with results from 64 row detector CT scanner. The use of 320 row detector CT would result in a combined cumulative cancer incidence of less than 1/500 for breast in women and less than 1/1000 for lung in men; By comparison, this is much lower than other more common risk factors: 16-fold for lung cancer in persistent smokers, 2-fold for breast cancer with a first degree family member history of breast cancer, and 10-fold for thyroid cancer with a family member with thyroid cancer. Decennial screening would benefit at least 355,000 patients from sudden cardiac death each year, 94% of whom have significant coronary artery disease, with at least one stenosis >75%. LAR for thyroid cancer was negligible for both scanners. Conclusion: Lung and female breast LAR reductions with 320 row detector compared with 64 row detector CT are substantial, and the benefits would outweigh increased cancer risks with decennial screening in the age group of 50-70 years.

  11. Childhood abuse, parental warmth, and adult multisystem biological risk in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E; Gruenewald, Tara L; Taylor, Shelley E; Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Matthews, Karen A; Seeman, Teresa E

    2013-10-15

    Childhood abuse increases adult risk for morbidity and mortality. Less clear is how this "toxic" stress becomes embedded to influence health decades later, and whether protective factors guard against these effects. Early biological embedding is hypothesized to occur through programming of the neural circuitry that influences physiological response patterns to subsequent stress, causing wear and tear across multiple regulatory systems. To examine this hypothesis, we related reports of childhood abuse to a comprehensive 18-biomarker measure of multisystem risk and also examined whether presence of a loving parental figure buffers against the impact of childhood abuse on adult risk. A total of 756 subjects (45.8% white, 42.7% male) participated in this ancillary substudy of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. Childhood stress was determined by using the Risky Families Questionnaire, a well-validated retrospective self-report scale. Linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, race, parental education, and oral contraceptive use found a significant positive relationship between reports of childhood abuse and multisystem health risks [B (SE) = 0.68 (0.16); P childhood was associated with lower multisystem health risks [B (SE) = -0.40 (0.14); P childhood had the highest multisystem risk in adulthood.

  12. Facts and values: on the acceptability of risks in children's sport using the example of rugby - a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, Kenneth Lincoln; Brooks, John H M; Burger, Nicholas; Hume, Patria A; Jackson, Steve

    2017-08-01

    A clash of values has been identified between those who assert that:1. all childhood injuries, regardless of origin, are inherently undesirable and should be prevented and;2. those who believe that some measure of injury to children is an acceptable compromise for the physical benefits associated with physical activity and the development of abilities to appraise and deal with risks.A debate regarding whether the tackles and collisions permitted in schools' rugby represent acceptable risks, and what steps should be taken if they do not, exemplifies the issue.Questions regarding the magnitude of injury risks in sport are issues of fact and can be quantified via the results of injury surveillance studies. Risks are neither high nor low in isolation; they are relatively high or low with reference to other activities or across groups participating in an activity. Issues of the acceptability of a given degree of risk are value dependent. Research regarding perceptions of risk reveals wide variations in the degree of risk people view as acceptable. Factors impacting on risk perception include whether the risks are well known and understood, whether they are 'dread' risks and the degree to which people undertake the risks voluntarily and feel they have control over them.Based on the evidence currently available, the risks to children playing rugby do not appear to be inordinately high compared with those in a range of other childhood sports and activities, but better comparative information is urgently needed. Further evidence, however, should not necessarily be expected to result in the resolution of acceptable risk debates-pre-existing values shape our perspectives on whether new evidence is relevant, valid and reliable. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Sex differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease: a study in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Helena CF

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Brazil coronary heart disease (CHD constitutes the most important cause of death in both sexes in all the regions of the country and interestingly, the difference between the sexes in the CHD mortality rates is one of the smallest in the world because of high rates among women. Since a question has been raised about whether or how the incidence of several CHD risk factors differs between the sexes in Brazil the prevalence of various risk factors for CHD such as high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, sedentary lifestyle and cigarette smoking was compared between the sexes in a Brazilian population; also the relationships between blood cholesterol and the other risk factors were evaluated. Results The population presented high frequencies of all the risk factors evaluated. High blood cholesterol (CHOL and hypertension were more prevalent among women as compared to men. Hypertension, diabetes and smoking showed equal or higher prevalence in women in pre-menopausal ages as compared to men. Obesity and physical inactivity were equally prevalent in both sexes respectively in the postmenopausal age group and at all ages. CHOL was associated with BMI, sex, age, hypertension and physical inactivity. Conclusions In this population the high prevalence of the CHD risk factors indicated that there is an urgent need for its control; the higher or equal prevalences of several risk factors in women could in part explain the high rates of mortality from CHD in females as compared to males.

  14. Attribution of risk for coronary heart disease in a vulnerable immigrant population: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ritin; Davidson, Patricia M; Miranda, Charmaine; Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a common and costly condition and is increasing at a higher rate among Asian Indians than among other ethnic groups. An understanding of how Asian Indians perceive their risk is important for health providers to develop culturally appropriate programs to raise awareness of the risk of CHD. The aim of this survey was to investigate the attribution of risk factors for CHD among the Asian Indian community in Australia. Asian Indian community leaders were recruited to provide their views of how their community perceived the risk of CHD. An online survey collected demographic data and information from the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, which measures 6 domains of illness perception: timeline acute/chronic, consequences, emotional impact, personal control, treatment efficacy, and illness comprehension. An 84% response rate (n = 49) was achieved from Asian Indian community leaders. Heart disease and cancer were considered to be the illnesses of major concern. Participants indicated that people in their community perceived hereditary factors (90%), hypertension, stress or worry (84%), and aging (86%) as the major cause of their illnesses. Smoking, high blood pressure, and cholesterol were identified as being major risk factors for CHD. These data suggest that as well as strategies to address risk factors such as diet and exercise, stress management is an important issue to consider in developing community-based programs.

  15. Coronary risk assessment by point-based vs. equation-based Framingham models: significant implications for clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, William J; Polansky, Jesse M; Boscardin, W John; Fung, Kathy Z; Steinman, Michael A

    2010-11-01

    US cholesterol guidelines use original and simplified versions of the Framingham model to estimate future coronary risk and thereby classify patients into risk groups with different treatment strategies. We sought to compare risk estimates and risk group classification generated by the original, complex Framingham model and the simplified, point-based version. We assessed 2,543 subjects age 20-79 from the 2001-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) for whom Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) guidelines recommend formal risk stratification. For each subject, we calculated the 10-year risk of major coronary events using the original and point-based Framingham models, and then compared differences in these risk estimates and whether these differences would place subjects into different ATP-III risk groups (20% risk). Using standard procedures, all analyses were adjusted for survey weights, clustering, and stratification to make our results nationally representative. Among 39 million eligible adults, the original Framingham model categorized 71% of subjects as having "moderate" risk (20%) risk. Estimates of coronary risk by the original and point-based models often differed substantially. The point-based system classified 15% of adults (5.7 million) into different risk groups than the original model, with 10% (3.9 million) misclassified into higher risk groups and 5% (1.8 million) into lower risk groups, for a net impact of classifying 2.1 million adults into higher risk groups. These risk group misclassifications would impact guideline-recommended drug treatment strategies for 25-46% of affected subjects. Patterns of misclassifications varied significantly by gender, age, and underlying CHD risk. Compared to the original Framingham model, the point-based version misclassifies millions of Americans into risk groups for which guidelines recommend different treatment strategies.

  16. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  17. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Rothhaar, Baerbel, E-mail: baerbel.rothhaar@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Metzger, Franz, E-mail: franz.metzger@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin, E-mail: martin.borggrefe@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  18. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzler, Thomas; Gruettner, Joachim; Meyer, Mathias; Rothhaar, Baerbel; Apfaltrer, Paul; Metzger, Franz; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  19. Physical activity, the Framingham risk score and risk of coronary heart disease in men and women of the EPIC-Norfolk study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, Benoit J.; Rana, Jamal S.; Lemieux, Isabelle; Després, Jean-Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Test the hypothesis that considering leisure-time and work-related physical activity habits in addition to the Framingham risk score (FRS) would result into better classification of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk than FRS alone. Methods: Prospective, population-based study of 9564 men

  20. Fact Sheet: Clean Air Act Section 112(r): Accidental Release Prevention / Risk Management Plan Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is required to publish regulations and guidance for chemical accident prevention at facilities that pose the greatest risk of harm from accidental releases of regulated flammable and toxic substances above threshold quantities.

  1. CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE RISK FACTORS IN DRIVERS VERSUS PEOPLE IN OTHER OCCUPATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Nasri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract INTRODUCTION: The link between occupational factors and coronary artery diseases (CAD has been studied and confirmed in many countries. Conditions associated with driving such as stress, and factors such as long working hours and the environment can increase the risk of CAD. In this study, we measured potential CAD risk factors in bus and taxi drivers and compared them with a control group. methods: 135 taxi drivers, 194 bus drivers and 121 non-drivers (control group were evaluated for CAD risk factors, i.e. age, body mass index (BMI>24, cigarette smoking, hypertension, high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, LDL, triglyceride >200, blood sugar >126 and familial history of CAD. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used to distinguish major risk factors. results: Taxi drivers have an increased risk of hypertension compared with the control group (odds ratio: crude=5.94, adjusted=9.09; P<0001. Cigarette smoking in taxi and bus drivers was 1.4 (P<0.3 and 3.24 (P<0001 times as high as the control group, respectively. The risk of increased LDL and decreased HDL in bus drivers was 4.38 and 5.28 (P<0001 times as high as the control group, respectively. The risk of obesity, high blood sugar and high triglyceride was not significantly different between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Driving is an independent risk factor for hypertension. Known CAD risk factors are also more frequent in drivers.     Keywords: Driving, cardiovascular disease, risk factor.

  2. The influence of aortic valve calcification on the risk of periprocedural myocardial injury after elective coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang-Wei; Yang, Hong-Bo; Chen, Ying-Hua; Qian, Ju-Ying; Shu, Xian-Hong; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common progressive condition that involves several inflammatory and atherosclerotic mediators. However, it is unclear whether the occurrence of periprocedural myocardial injury (PMI) after elective coronary intervention is associated with AVC in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. A total of 530 stable CAD patients who underwent elective coronary intervention were enrolled in this clinical study. High sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) was detected before and after the procedure. PMI was defined as hs-cTnT after coronary intervention higher than 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL). All patients underwent echocardiography to detect the occurrence of AVC. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to analyze risk factors of PMI. A total of 210 patients (39.6 %) were diagnosed with PMI after elective coronary intervention. Compared with non-AVC patients (n = 386), AVC patients (n = 144) had higher rate of PMI (64.6 vs. 30.3 %, P AVC had higher Gensini score (39.9 ± 26.6 vs. 34.2 ± 22.1, P AVC patients had increased risk of PMI compared with non-AVC patients. Importantly, even after being adjusted by multivariate analysis, AVC still independently increased the risk of PMI (OR = 3.329, 95 % CI = 2.087-5.308, P AVC significantly increased the risk of PMI after elective coronary intervention. It could be one of the independent predictors for PMI in stable CAD patients.

  3. Analysis of Plasma Albumin, Vitamin D, and Apolipoproteins A and B as Predictive Coronary Risk Biomarkers in the REGICOR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Oliva, Gabriel; Zamora, Alberto; Ramos, Rafel; Subirana, Isaac; Grau, María; Dégano, Irene R; Muñoz, Daniel; Fitó, Montserrat; Elosua, Roberto; Marrugat, Jaume

    2018-05-12

    New biomarkers could improve the predictive capacity of classic risk functions. The aims of this study were to determine the association between circulating levels of apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apolipoprotein B (apoB), albumin, and 25-OH-vitamin D and coronary events and to analyze whether these biomarkers improve the predictive capacity of the Framingham-REGICOR risk function. A case-cohort study was designed. From an initial cohort of 5404 individuals aged 35 to 74 years with a 5-year follow-up, all the participants who had a coronary event (n = 117) and a random group of the cohort (subcohort; n = 667) were selected. Finally, 105 cases and 651 individuals representative of the cohort with an available biological sample were included. The events of interest were angina, fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and coronary deaths. Case participants were older, had a higher proportion of men and cardiovascular risk factors, and showed higher levels of apoB and lower levels of apoA1, apoA1/apoB ratio, 25-OH-vitamin D and albumin than the subcohort. In multivariate analyses, plasma albumin concentration was the only biomarker independently associated with coronary events (HR, 0.73; P = .002). The inclusion of albumin in the risk function properly reclassified a significant proportion of individuals, especially in the intermediate risk group (net reclassification improvement, 32.3; P = .048). Plasma albumin levels are inversely associated with coronary risk and improve the predictive capacity of classic risk functions. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Resting heart rate associates with one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Li; Wang, Cheng-Long; Wang, Pei-Li; Xu, Hao; Du, Jian-Peng; Zhang, Da-Wu; Gao, Zhu-Ye; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Chang-Geng; Chen, Ke-Ji; Shi, Da-Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    The study was to access the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with ACS after PCI (n = 808) were prospectively followed-up for MACE. RHR was obtained from electrocardiogram. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction, ischemic-driven revascularization, and ischemic stroke. The association between RHR and one-year risk of MACE was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Compared with patients with RHR >76 bpm, the adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) was 0.51 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.23-1.14; P = 0.100) for patients with RHR 76 bpm were at higher risk of MACE during one-year follow-up compared with patients with RHR 61-76 bpm. An elevated RHR ≥ 61 bpm was associated with increased risk of one-year MACE in ACS patients. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  5. Coronary Calcification and the Risk of Heart Failure in the Elderly The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leening, Maarten J. G.; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Kavousi, Maryam; Felix, Janine F.; Deckers, Jaap W.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to determine the association of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with incident heart failure in the elderly and examine its independence of overt coronary heart disease (CHD). BACKGROUND Heart failure is often observed as a first manifestation of coronary

  6. The Association between Androgenic Hormone Levels and the Risk of Developing Coronary Artery Disease (CAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allameh, Farzad; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Bozorgi, Ali; Nekuie, Sepideh; Namdari, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the serum levels of androgens and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) in an Iranian population. Male individuals admitted to Tehran Heart Center and Sina Hospital, Tehran, Iran from 2011-2012 were categorized into CAD and control groups based on selective coronary angiography. Baseline demographic data, including age, BMI, diabetes, and a history of hypertension were recorded. Patients were also assessed for their serum levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepi and rosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG). Data analysis was carried out chi-square and ANOVA tests as well as logistic regression analysis. Two hundred patients were in the CAD group and 135 individuals in control group. In the CAD group, 69 had single-vessel disease, 49 had two-vessel diseases, and 82 had three-vessel diseases. Statistically significant differences were observed between the individuals in the two groups with respect to age (PCAD group; however, the serum level of SHBG was higher in the CAD group than in the control group (P=0.007). Results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that only age (P=0.042) and diabetes (P=0.003) had significant relationships with CAD. Although the serum levels of some of the androgens were significantly different between the two groups, no association was found between androgenic hormone levels and the risk of CAD, due mainly to the effect of age and diabetes.

  7. Risk factors for prolonged hospital stay after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elayne Kelen de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Characteristics of the patient and the coronary artery bypass grafting may predispose individuals to prolonged hospitalization, increasing costs and morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate individual and perioperative risk factors of prolonged hospitalization in intensive care units and wards. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 104 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients hospitalized >3 days in the intensive care unit or >7 days in the ward were considered for the study. The association between variables was estimated by the chi-square test, odds ratio and logistic regression; P 3 days in the intensive care unit occurred for 22.1% of patients and >7 days in the ward for 27.9%. Among preoperative factors, diabetes (OR=3.17 and smoking (OR=4.07 were predictors of prolonged intensive care unit stay. Combining the pre-, intra-and postoperative variables, only mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours (OR=6.10 was predictive of intensive care unit outcome. For the ward outcome, the preoperative predictor was left ventricular ejection fraction 24 hours for the intensive care unit and presence of infection for the ward.

  8. Risk of brain injury during diagnostic coronary angiography: comparison between right and left radial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchioni, Andrea; Versaci, Francesco; Mugnolo, Antonio; Penzo, Carlo; Nikas, Dimitrios; Saccà, Salvatore; Favero, Luca; Agostoni, Pier Francesco; Garami, Zsolt; Prati, Francesco; Reimers, Bernhard

    2013-09-10

    To assess the incidence of silent cerebral embolization when using the transradial approach for diagnostic coronary angiography (DCA). Compared to other vascular access sites, the right transradial approach (RTA) could reduce the amount of brain emboli by avoiding mechanical trauma to the aortic wall caused by catheters and wire, whereas it increases manipulation of catheters in the ascending aorta and has a higher risk of direct embolization into the right common carotid artery. A recent study showed an increased incidence of microembolic signals (MES) in RTA compared to femoral. However, left transradial approach (LTA) has never been assessed. 40 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomized to DCA via RTA (n=20) or LTA (n=20) with contemporaneous bilateral transcranial Doppler monitoring. MES were detected in all patients, with a significantly higher rate in the RTA group (median 61, interquartile range (IQR) 47-105, vs 48, IQR 31-60, p=0.035). MES generated during procedures needing >2 catheters (n=8), are higher than those detected during procedures performed with 2 catheters (n=32, 102, IQR 70-108, vs 48, IQR 33-60, p=0.001). At multivariate analysis increasing number of catheters was the only independent predictor of high incidence of MES (OR 16.4, 95% CI 1.23-219.9, p=0.034, -2LL=26.7). LTA has a lower risk of brain embolization because of the lower number of catheter exchange maneuvers. Since the degree of brain embolism depends on the magnitude of mechanical manipulation, catheter changes should be minimized to reduce the risk of cerebral embolization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, Maria; Cornelis, Marilyn; Walter, Stefan; Rimm, Eric B; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2017-06-09

    Higher social integration is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality; however, whether it is associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women, and whether associations differ by case fatality are unclear. This study sought to examine the associations between social integration and risk of incident CHD in a large female prospective cohort. Seventy-six thousand three hundred and sixty-two women in the Nurses' Health Study, free of CHD and stroke at baseline (1992), were followed until 2014. Social integration was assessed by a simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index every 4 years. End points included nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD. Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two incident CHD events occurred throughout follow-up. Adjusting for demographic, health/medical risk factors, and depressive symptoms, being socially integrated was significantly associated with lower CHD risk, particularly fatal CHD. The most socially integrated women had a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.73) of developing fatal CHD compared with those least socially integrated ( P for trend social integration and nonfatal myocardial infarction risk were largely explained by health-promoting behaviors, particularly through differences in cigarette smoking; however, the association with fatal CHD risk remained after accounting for these behaviors and, thus, may involve more direct biological mechanisms. Social integration is inversely associated with CHD incidence in women, but is largely explained by lifestyle/behavioral pathways. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-11-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphism's effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.

  11. Quantifying the dose-response of walking in reducing coronary heart disease risk: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Henry; Orsini, Nicola; Amin, Janaki; Wolk, Alicja; Nguyen, Van Thi Thuy; Ehrlich, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of walking in reducing the risk of and preventing coronary heart disease (CHD) is not completely understood. This meta-analysis aimed to quantify the dose-response relationship between walking and CHD risk reduction for both men and women in the general population. Studies on walking and CHD primary prevention between 1954 and 2007 were identified through Medline, SportDiscus and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Random-effect meta-regression models were used to pool the relative risks from individual studies. A total of 11 prospective cohort studies and one randomized control trial study met the inclusion criteria, with 295,177 participants free of CHD at baseline and 7,094 cases at follow-up. The meta-analysis indicated that an increment of approximately 30 min of normal walking a day for 5 days a week was associated with 19% CHD risk reduction (95% CI = 14-23%; P-heterogeneity = 0.56; I (2) = 0%). We found no evidence of heterogeneity between subgroups of studies defined by gender (P = 0.67); age of the study population (P = 0.52); or follow-up duration (P = 0.77). The meta-analysis showed that the risk for developing CHD decreases as walking dose increases. Walking should be prescribed as an evidence-based effective exercise modality for CHD prevention in the general population.

  12. Patterns of Physical Activity and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Al-Zoughool

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the current study, we investigated the effect of physical activity (PA on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods: In total, 146 cases of CHD and 157 matched controls were included in the study. Data on sociodemographics, lifestyle, and medical history factors were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. A standard World Health Organization (WHO-based lifestyle questionnaire was used to assess PA. The risk of CHD was analyzed in relation to PA patterns using logistic regression. Results: Vigorous-intensity leisure PA was not associated with a lower risk of CHD. Subjects in the highest tertile of moderate occupational PA had a significantly lower risk of CHD compared to the lowest tertile (adjusted odds ratio (OR 0.31, 95% confidence intervals (CI 0.17–0.56. Subjects in the highest tertile of walking hasd an adjusted OR of 0.37 (95% CI 0.20–0.70. Subjects in the medium and highest tertiles of sedentary behavior had adjusted ORs of 2.01 (95% CI 1.06–3.79 and 3.88 (95% CI 2.14–7.02, respectively (p-value for trend < 0.001. Conclusion: The current results showed that both moderate occupational PA and walking protected against CHD. Sedentary behavior increased the risk of CHD.

  13. Prevalence of risk factors for coronary artery disease in an urban Indian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, T; Kanwar, R S; Wilfred, R; Chugh, P; Chhillar, M; Aggarwal, R; Sharma, Y K; Sethi, J; Sundriyal, J; Bhadra, K; Singh, S; Rautela, N; Chand, Tek; Singh, M; Singh, S K

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in government employees across India. Methods The study population consisted of government employees in different parts of India ({n=10 642 men and n=1966 women; age 20–60 years}) and comprised various ethnic groups living in different environmental conditions. Recruitment was carried out in 20 cities across 14 states, and in one union territory. All selected individuals were subjected to a detailed questionnaire, medical examinations and anthropometric measurements. Blood samples were collected for blood glucose and serum lipid profile estimation, and resting ECG was recorded. Results were analysed using appropriate statistical tools. Results The study revealed that 4.6% of the study population had a family history of premature CAD. The overall prevalence of diabetes was 16% (5.6% diagnosed during the study and the remaining 10.4% already on medication). Hypertension was present in 21% of subjects. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was significantly high, with 45.6% of study subjects having a high total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein ratio. Overall, 78.6% subjects had two or more risk factors for CAD. Conclusions The present study demonstrates a high prevalence of CAD risk factors in the Indian urban population. Therefore, there is an immediate need to initiate measures to raise awareness of these risk factors so that individuals at high risk for future CAD can be managed. PMID:25488095

  14. Posttraumatic stress and myocardial infarction risk perceptions in hospitalized acute coronary syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald eEdmondson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS; i.e., myocardial infarction or unstable angina recurrence and poor post-ACS adherence to medical advice. Since risk perceptions are a primary motivator of adherence behaviors, we assessed the relationship of probable PTSD to ACS risk perceptions in hospitalized ACS patients (n= 420. Participants completed a brief PTSD screen 3-7 days post-ACS, and rated their 1-year ACS recurrence risk relative to other men or women their age. Most participants exhibited optimistic bias (mean recurrence risk estimate between average and below average. Further, participants who screened positive for current PTSD (n=15 showed significantly greater optimistic bias than those who screened negative (p< .05, after adjustment for demographics, ACS severity, medical comorbidities, depression, and self-confidence in their ability to control their heart disease. Clinicians should be aware that psychosocial factors, and PTSD in particular, may be associated with poor adherence to medical advice due to exaggerated optimistic bias in recurrence risk perceptions.

  15. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  16. LINE-1 Hypomethylation is Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Chinese Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Li [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Liu, Shuchuan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Su, Zhendong; Cheng, Rongchao; Bai, Xiuping; Li, Xueqi, E-mail: xueqi-li@163.com [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)

    2014-05-15

    Global methylation level in blood leukocyte DNA has been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with inconsistent results in various populations. Similar data are lacking in Chinese population where different genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors may affect DNA methylation and its risk relationship with CHD. To examine whether global methylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. A total of 334 cases with CHD and 788 healthy controls were included. Global methylation in blood leukocyte DNA was estimated by analyzing LINE-1 repeats using bisulfite pyrosequencing. In an initial analysis restricted to control subjects, LINE-1 level reduced significantly with aging, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes. In the case-control analysis, reduced LINE-1 methylation was associated with increased risk of CHD; analysis by quartile revealed odds ratios (95%CI) of 0.9 (0.6-1.4), 1.9 (1.3-2.9) and 2.3 (1.6-3.5) for the third, second and first (lowest) quartile (P{sub trend} < 0.001), respectively, compared to the fourth (highest) quartile. Lower (risk of CHD. The lower LINE-1-related CHD risk estimates tended to be stronger among subjects with the highest tertile of homocysteine (P{sub interaction} = 0.042) and those with diagnosis of hypertension (P{sub interaction} = 0.012). LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. Potential CHD risk factors such as older age, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes may have impact on global DNA methylation, whereby exerting their effect on CHD risk.

  17. LINE-1 Hypomethylation is Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Chinese Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Li; Liu, Shuchuan; Su, Zhendong; Cheng, Rongchao; Bai, Xiuping; Li, Xueqi

    2014-01-01

    Global methylation level in blood leukocyte DNA has been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with inconsistent results in various populations. Similar data are lacking in Chinese population where different genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors may affect DNA methylation and its risk relationship with CHD. To examine whether global methylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. A total of 334 cases with CHD and 788 healthy controls were included. Global methylation in blood leukocyte DNA was estimated by analyzing LINE-1 repeats using bisulfite pyrosequencing. In an initial analysis restricted to control subjects, LINE-1 level reduced significantly with aging, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes. In the case-control analysis, reduced LINE-1 methylation was associated with increased risk of CHD; analysis by quartile revealed odds ratios (95%CI) of 0.9 (0.6-1.4), 1.9 (1.3-2.9) and 2.3 (1.6-3.5) for the third, second and first (lowest) quartile (P trend < 0.001), respectively, compared to the fourth (highest) quartile. Lower (risk of CHD. The lower LINE-1-related CHD risk estimates tended to be stronger among subjects with the highest tertile of homocysteine (P interaction = 0.042) and those with diagnosis of hypertension (P interaction = 0.012). LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. Potential CHD risk factors such as older age, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes may have impact on global DNA methylation, whereby exerting their effect on CHD risk

  18. Coronary fluorine-18-sodium fluoride uptake is increased in healthy adults with an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile: results from the CAMONA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Björn A; Thomassen, Anders; de Jong, Pim A; Lam, Marnix G E; Diederichsen, Axel C P; Olsen, Michael H; Mickley, Hans; Mali, Willem P T M; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F

    2017-11-01

    Coronary artery fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) uptake reflects coronary artery calcification metabolism and is considered to be an early prognostic marker of coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the relationship between coronary artery F-NaF uptake and cardiovascular risk in healthy adults at low cardiovascular risk. Study participants underwent blood pressure measurements, blood analyses, and coronary artery F-NaF PET/CT imaging. In addition, the 10-year risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, on the basis of the Framingham Risk Score, was estimated. Multivariable linear regression evaluated the dependence of coronary artery F-NaF uptake on cardiovascular risk factors. We recruited 89 (47 men, 42 women) healthy adults aged 21-75 years. Female sex (0.34 kBq/ml; P=0.009), age (0.16 kBq/ml per SD; P=0.002), and BMI (0.42 kBq/ml per SD; Prisk factors present (Prisk for the development of cardiovascular disease was on average 2.4 times higher in adults with coronary artery F-NaF uptake in the highest quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile of the distribution (8.0 vs. 3.3%, Prisk and that an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile is associated with a marked increase in coronary artery F-NaF uptake.

  19. Association between month of birth and melanoma risk: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiessler, Cornelia; Pfahlberg, Annette B; Keller, Andrea K; Radespiel-Tröger, Martin; Uter, Wolfgang; Gefeller, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Evidence on the effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in infancy on melanoma risk in later life is scarce. Three recent studies suggest that people born in spring carry a higher melanoma risk. Our study aimed at verifying whether such a seasonal pattern of melanoma risk actually exists. Data from the population-based Cancer Registry Bavaria (CRB) on the birth months of 28 374 incident melanoma cases between 2002 and 2012 were analysed and compared with data from the Bavarian State Office for Statistics and Data Processing on the birth month distribution in the Bavarian population. Crude and adjusted analyses using negative binomial regression models were performed in the total study group and supplemented by several subgroup analyses. In the crude analysis, the birth months March-May were over-represented among melanoma cases. Negative binomial regression models adjusted only for sex and birth year revealed a seasonal association between melanoma risk and birth month with 13-21% higher relative incidence rates for March, April and May compared with the reference December. However, after additionally adjusting for the birth month distribution of the Bavarian population, these risk estimates decreased markedly and no association with the birth month was observed any more. Similar results emerged in all subgroup analyses. Our large registry-based study provides no evidence that people born in spring carry a higher risk for developing melanoma in later life and thus lends no support to the hypothesis of higher UVR susceptibility during the first months of life. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  20. Subclinical Hyperthyroidism and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Tinh-Hai; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Bauer, Douglas C.; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Cappola, Anne R.; Balmer, Philippe; Iervasi, Giorgio; Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Sgarbi, José A.; Völzke, Henry; Gencer, Bariş; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Molinaro, Sabrina; Bremner, Alexandra; Luben, Robert N.; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Cornuz, Jacques; Newman, Anne B.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Walsh, John P.; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background Data from prospective cohort studies regarding the association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and cardiovascular outcomes are conflicting. We aimed to assess the risks of total and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, CHD events, and atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism among all available large prospective cohorts. Methods Individual data on 52 674 participants were pooled from 10 cohorts. Coronary heart disease events were analyzed in 22 437 participants from 6 cohorts with available data, and incident AF was analyzed in 8711 participants from 5 cohorts. Euthyroidism was defined as thyrotropin level between 0.45 and 4.49 mIU/L and endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism as thyrotropin level lower than 0.45 mIU/L with normal free thyroxine levels, after excluding those receiving thyroid-altering medications. Results Of 52 674 participants, 2188 (4.2%) had subclinical hyperthyroidism. During follow-up, 8527 participants died (including 1896 from CHD), 3653 of 22 437 had CHD events, and 785 of 8711 developed AF. In age-and sex-adjusted analyses, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with increased total mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24, 95% CI, 1.06–1.46), CHD mortality (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02–1.62), CHD events (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.99–1.46), and AF (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.16–2.43). Risks did not differ significantly by age, sex, or preexisting cardiovascular disease and were similar after further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, with attributable risk of 14.5% for total mortality to 41.5% for AF in those with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Risks for CHD mortality and AF (but not other outcomes) were higher for thyrotropin level lower than 0.10 mIU/L compared with thyrotropin level between 0.10 and 0.44 mIU/L (for both, P value for trend, ≤.03). Conclusion Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased risks of total, CHD mortality, and incident AF, with highest

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary disease: COPDCoRi, a simple and effective algorithm for predicting the risk of coronary artery disease in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Calzetta, Luigino; Matera, Maria Gabriella; Muscoli, Saverio; Rogliani, Paola; Romeo, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with cardiovascular artery disease (CAD), representing a potential and independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify an algorithm for predicting the risk of CAD in COPD patients. We analyzed data of patients afferent to the Cardiology ward and the Respiratory Diseases outpatient clinic of Tor Vergata University (2010-2012, 1596 records). The study population was clustered as training population (COPD patients undergoing coronary arteriography), control population (non-COPD patients undergoing coronary arteriography), test population (COPD patients whose records reported information on the coronary status). The predicting model was built via causal relationship between variables, stepwise binary logistic regression and Hosmer-Lemeshow analysis. The algorithm was validated via split-sample validation method and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The diagnostic accuracy was assessed. In training population the variables gender (men/women OR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.237-2.5, P COPD patients, whereas in control population also age and diabetes were correlated. The stepwise binary logistic regressions permitted to build a well fitting predictive model for training population but not for control population. The predictive algorithm shown a diagnostic accuracy of 81.5% (95%CI: 77.78-84.71) and an AUC of 0.81 (95%CI: 0.78-0.85) for the validation set. The proposed algorithm is effective for predicting the risk of CAD in COPD patients via a rapid, inexpensive and non-invasive approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examinati...

  3. Coronary risk factors and metabolic disorders in first-degree relatives of normocholesterolaemic patients with premature atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, Christiane Anneliese; Halkes, C.J.M.; de Jaegere, P.P.T.; Plokker, H.W.M.; Cabezas, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Aims. Despite agreement on the need for screening for the presence of cardiovascular risk factors in first-degree family members of patients with pre-mature coronary artery disease (CAD), this is not routinely carried out in relatives of normocholesterolaemic patients. We evaluated cardiovascular

  4. Co-occurrence of metabolic factors and the risk of coronary heart disease: A prospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, A.H.; Erkens, P.M.G.; Boer, J.M.A.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background -Prevalence of metabolic factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, HDL and total cholesterol that are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is increasing worldwide. However, less is known about combinations of these factors that are associated with the

  5. Use of fluorquinolones is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Klungel, OH; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate whether use of specific antibiotic drugs decreases the risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising pharmacy records and

  6. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LDL-cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, being overweight, cigarette smoking, lack of exercise... acids containing one or more double bonds). (2) The scientific evidence establishes that diets high in..., thus, with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol are...

  7. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease : Contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (< 15th percentile) and

  8. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease: contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (<15th percentile)

  9. Can Stress Echocardiography Compete with Perfusion Scintigraphy in the Detection of Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiac Risk Assessment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Geleijnse (Marcel); A. Elhendy (Abdou)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAims: The aim of this review was to define the place of stress echocardiography in the context of perfusion scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the assessment of cardiac risk. Stress echocardiography has the benefits of widespread availability, relatively

  10. Regular physical activity in old age : effect on coronary heart disease risk factors and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, A.J.

    1997-01-01


    Background. Regular physical activity is considered an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle. It may improve fitness, physical competence and may lower the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, until now, data on the

  11. A Common LPA Null Allele Associates With Lower Lipoprotein(a) Levels and Coronary Artery Disease Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyriakou, Theodosios; Seedorf, Udo; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; van der Hout, A.H.

    Objective-Increased levels of lipoprotein(a) are a highly heritable risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). The genetic determinants of lipoprotein(a) levels are mainly because of genetic variation in the apolipoprotein(a) gene (LPA). We have tested the association of a relatively common null

  12. Fundamental facts on dosimetry in the assessment of radioexposure and risk of such exposure in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchers, H.D.; Wallbaum, F.; Keck, E.W.; Lassrich, M.A.; Loehr, H.; Vogel, H.; Hamburg Univ.; Hamburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Various methods for determining exposure to radiation are critically reviewed on the basis of 358 X-ray examinations of children. It is shown that the surface dose is an inssuficient parameter for the actual exposure of the child to radiation. Estimates of the radiation risk based thereon are misleading. Even the determination of the area dose product and the integral dose alone will not allow any valid comparison of the exposure in different age groups. The important factor for an accurate determination of the somatic radiation risk is the ratio of integral dose to the body mass (mean body dose), since this is the only factor which is independent of body variables, i.e. only this figure will yield the relation of radiation risks in different age groups. Independent of the examination methods, a higher radiation risk must be assumed in infants than in older children or adults. These relationships are demonstrated on the basis of the authors' own measurements and calculations. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Impact of a Genetic Risk Score for Coronary Artery Disease on Reducing Cardiovascular Risk: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W. Knowles

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWe tested whether providing a genetic risk score (GRS for coronary artery disease (CAD would serve as a motivator to improve adherence to risk-reducing strategies.MethodsWe randomized 94 participants with at least moderate risk of CAD to receive standard-of-care with (N = 49 or without (N = 45 their GRS at a subsequent 3-month follow-up visit. Our primary outcome was change in low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C between the 3- and 6-month follow-up visits (ΔLDL-C. Secondary outcomes included other CAD risk factors, weight loss, diet, physical activity, risk perceptions, and psychological outcomes. In pre-specified analyses, we examined whether there was a greater motivational effect in participants with a higher GRS.ResultsSixty-five participants completed the protocol including 30 participants in the GRS arm. We found no change in the primary outcome between participants receiving their GRS and standard-of-care participants (ΔLDL-C: −13 vs. −9 mg/dl. Among participants with a higher GRS, we observed modest effects on weight loss and physical activity. All other secondary outcomes were not significantly different, including anxiety and worry.ConclusionAdding GRS to standard-of-care did not change lipids, adherence, or psychological outcomes. Potential modest benefits in weight loss and physical activity for participants with high GRS need to be validated in larger trials.

  14. Evaluation of risk scores for risk stratification of acute coronary syndromes in the Myocardial Infarction National Audit Project (MINAP) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, C P; Manda, S O M; Weston, C F; Birkhead, J S; Batin, P D; Hall, A S

    2009-03-01

    To compare the discriminative performance of the PURSUIT, GUSTO-1, GRACE, SRI and EMMACE risk models, assess their performance among risk supergroups and evaluate the EMMACE risk model over the wider spectrum of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Observational study of a national registry. All acute hospitals in England and Wales. 100 686 cases of ACS between 2003 and 2005. Model performance (C-index) in predicting the likelihood of death over the time period for which they were designed. The C-index, or area under the receiver-operating curve, range 0-1, is a measure of the discriminative performance of a model. The C-indexes were: PURSUIT C-index 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 0.80); GUSTO-1 0.80 (0.79 to 0.81); GRACE in-hospital 0.80 (0.80 to 0.81); GRACE 6-month 0.80 (0.79 to 0.80); SRI 0.79 (0.78 to 0.80); and EMMACE 0.78 (0.77 to 0.78). EMMACE maintained its ability to discriminate 30-day mortality throughout different ACS diagnoses. Recalibration of the model offered no notable improvement in performance over the original risk equation. For all models the discriminative performance was reduced in patients with diabetes, chronic renal failure or angina. The five ACS risk models maintained their discriminative performance in a large unselected English and Welsh ACS population, but performed less well in higher-risk supergroups. Simpler risk models had comparable performance to more complex risk models. The EMMACE risk score performed well across the wider spectrum of ACS diagnoses.

  15. Risk prediction models for major adverse cardiac event (MACE) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, Norhafizah A.; Abidin, Basir

    2015-02-01

    Five percent of patients who went through Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) experienced Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) after PCI procedure. Risk prediction of MACE following a PCI procedure therefore is helpful. This work describes a review of such prediction models currently in use. Literature search was done on PubMed and SCOPUS database. Thirty literatures were found but only 4 studies were chosen based on the data used, design, and outcome of the study. Particular emphasis was given and commented on the study design, population, sample size, modeling method, predictors, outcomes, discrimination and calibration of the model. All the models had acceptable discrimination ability (C-statistics >0.7) and good calibration (Hosmer-Lameshow P-value >0.05). Most common model used was multivariate logistic regression and most popular predictor was age.

  16. Variant ASGR1 Associated with a Reduced Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nioi, P.; Sigurdsson, A. S.; Thorleifsson, G.

    2016-01-01

    codon that renders a truncated protein prone to degradation. Heterozygous carriers of the mutation (1 in 120 persons in our study population) had a lower level of non-HDL cholesterol than noncarriers, a difference of 15.3 mg per deciliter (0.40 mmol per liter) (P = 1.0×10-16), and a lower risk...... of coronary artery disease (by 34%; 95% confidence interval, 21 to 45; P = 4.0×10-6). In a larger set of sequenced samples from Icelanders, we found another loss-of-function ASGR1 variant (p.W158X, carried by 1 in 1850 persons) that was also associated with lower levels of non-HDL cholesterol (P = 1...

  17. Relation of body mass index to risk of stent thrombosis after percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2012-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is a devastating complication after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but the influence of obesity on risk of stent thrombosis is unclear, and it is unknown if this relation is dependent on stent type. The objective of this study was to examine the relation between body...... mass index (BMI) and stent thrombosis after PCI with bare-metal stent (BMS) or drug-eluting stent (DES). We followed 5,515 patients who underwent PCI with implantation of ≥1 BMS or DES at a high-volume tertiary invasive cardiology center from 2000 through 2006. Only patients with a single type of stent...... (BMS or DES) implanted at the index PCI were included. Median follow-up period was 26 months (interquartile range 12 to 44) and definite stent thrombosis occurred in 78 patients. Hazard ratio of definite stent thrombosis adjusted for number of stents at the index PCI was 0.92 (95% confidence interval...

  18. PPAR gamma Pro(12)Ala polymorphism and risk of acute coronary syndrome in a prospective study of Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Segel, Stine; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) plays a key role in the regulation of the energy balance, adipocyte differentiation and lipid biosynthesis. The aim...... was to investigate if the polymorphism PPAR gamma 2 Pro(12)Ala, which encodes a less efficient transcription factor, was associated with risk of acute coronary disease and if there were interactions between this polymorphism and factors that modify PPAR gamma activity, such as alcohol intake, smoking, and use of non...

  19. Off-pump coronary surgery: surgical strategy for the high-risk patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belleghem, Y; Caes, F; Maene, L; Van Overbeke, H; Moerman, A; Van Nooten, G

    2003-02-01

    In a retrospective study, we compared two groups of consecutive patients operated by the same team during the year 2000 for coronary artery disease with the use of extracorporeal circulation (group 1, n=230) or on the beating heart using the Octopus II plus stabiliser (group 2, n=228). High-risk patients were identified by a EuroSCORE plus 6. EuroSCORE definitions and predicted risk models were utilized to compare the variables of the groups. There were no significant differences between the preoperative variables of the groups in age, gender, left ventricular function, diabetes and peripheral vascular and renal disease as is indicated by the Euroscore (resp. 4.7/5.1 p=0.107). Calcification of the ascending aorta and chronic obstructive lung disease were statistically significant more prevalent in the beating heart group. No differences in preoperative variables in the high-risk patients group (Euroscore 8.5/8.1 p=0.356) except for calcification of the ascending aorta. All patients underwent a full revascularisation through a midline sternotomy. Significant more distal anastomoses were performed in group 1 (3.7 per patient (1-6)) with regard to group 2 (2.9 per patient (1-6)). Anesthesia, postoperative treatment and follow up were equal for both groups. A significant lower incidence of atrial fibrillation (p=0.010), shorter ICU stay (p=0.031) and renal insufficiency (p=0.033) was reported in group 2. In the low risk group, we could not diagnose any difference between the two groups, except for atrial fibrillation. The benefits of the beating heart surgery however were more pronounced in the high-risk patient as is indicated by a significant reduction of the ICU stay by 1 day (3.5d/2.5d (p=0.028)), better preservation of the renal function (p=0.017) and a significant reduction of the length of hospital stay by more than two days (p=0.040). A lower incidence of atrial fibrillation, however not significant. In our experience, beating heart surgery is a safe

  20. Facts and Misconceptions about 2D:4D, Social and Risk Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Judit; Di Paolo, Roberto; Ponti, Giovanni; Sartarelli, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    We study how the ratio between the length of the second and fourth digit (2D:4D) correlates with choices in social and risk preferences elicitation tasks by building a large dataset from five experimental projects with more than 800 subjects. Our results confirm the recent literature that downplays the link between 2D:4D and many domains of economic interest, such as social and risk preferences. As for the former, we find that social preferences are significantly lower when 2D:4D is above the median value only for subjects with low cognitive ability. As for the latter, we find that a high 2D:4D is not correlated with the frequency of subjects' risky choices. PMID:29487510

  1. Prevalence of coronary artery disease risk factors in Iran: a population based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafarzadeh Motlag A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability with high health care cost in Iran. It accounts for nearly 50 percent of all deaths per year. Yet little is known about CAD and CAD risk factors in the Iranian population. We aimed to assess the prevalence of different CAD risk factors in an Iranian population. Methods A descriptive cross sectional survey was conducted involving 3000 healthy adults at 18 years of age or above who were recruited with cluster random sampling. Demographic data and risk factors were determined by taking history, physical examination and laboratory tests. Results The average age was 36.23 ± 15.26. There was 1381 female (46% and 1619 male (54% out of which 6.3% were diabetic, 21.6% were smoker, and 15% had positive familial heart disease history. 61% had total cholesterol level > 200 mg/dL, 32% triglyceride > 200 mg/dl, 47.5% LDL-c > 130 mg/dl, 5.4% HDL-c 140 mmHg, 9.1% diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg and 87% of them were physically inactive. Conclusion Clinical and Para-clinical data indicated that Iranian adult population are of a high level of CAD risk factors, which may require urgent decision making to address national control measures regarding CAD.

  2. Consumption of industrial and ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Christensen, R.; Bartels, Else Marie

    2011-01-01

    or industrial-TFA, respectively. The pooled relative risk estimates for comparison of extreme quintiles of total-TFA intake (corresponding to intake increments ranging from 2.8 to ∼10 g/day) were 1.22 (95% confidence interval: 1.08-1.38; P=0.002) for CHD events and 1.24 (1.07-1.43; P=0.003) for fatal CHD....... Ruminant-TFA intake (increments ranging from 0.5 to 1.9 g/day) was not significantly associated with risk of CHD (risk ratio (RR)=0.92 (0.76-1.11); P=0.36), and neither was industrial-TFA intake, although there was a trend towards a positive association (RR=1.21 (0.97-1.50); P=0.09). In conclusion, our......The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize the evidence from observational studies assessing the association between intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with a specific emphasis on distinguishing between TFA of industrial...

  3. Relative risk of hypertension and coronary artery disease in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, G.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    During the year 1996-1997, 3275 diabetic patients, registered in Diabetic Clinic of Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, were studied to note the effect of various variables of diabetes mellitus (DM) on hypertension (HTN) and coronary artery diseases (CAD). Out of these 1402 (42.8%) were hypertensive patients. HTN was observed more frequently in obese, older age, longer duration of DM, poor glycemic control and dyslipidemia with p<0.0001. The relative risk (RR) of HTN was significantly increased (p<0.001) in obese (M2.53, F7.77 times), older age (M 3.69,F 9.64 times), longer duration of Dm (2.3 times for both sexes), poor glycemic control (M 2.89, F 4.75 times) and dyslipedemia (M 1.62-5.27, F2.56-9.53 times). While the RR of CAD due to HTN was 4.6 times (M5.4, F4.2 times) (p<0.0001) as compared to normotensive diabetic patients. The risk of developing HTN is more in female diabetics and of CAD in male hypertensive diabetic patients. It is concluded that obesity, older age, poor glycemic control, longer duration of DM and dyslipidemia increases the risk of HTN 2-9.5 times and HTN increases the risk of CAD by 4-5 times, hence requiring aggressive and comprehensive treatment of the diabetes mellitus syndrome. (author)

  4. Relative risk of hypertension and coronary artery disease in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, G M.D. [Nishter Medical Coll., Multan (Pakistan). Dept. of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    During the year 1996-1997, 3275 diabetic patients, registered in Diabetic Clinic of Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, were studied to note the effect of various variables of diabetes mellitus (DM) on hypertension (HTN) and coronary artery diseases (CAD). Out of these 1402 (42.8%) were hypertensive patients. HTN was observed more frequently in obese, older age, longer duration of DM, poor glycemic control and dyslipidemia with p<0.0001. The relative risk (RR) of HTN was significantly increased (p<0.001) in obese (M2.53, F7.77 times), older age (M 3.69,F 9.64 times), longer duration of Dm (2.3 times for both sexes), poor glycemic control (M 2.89, F 4.75 times) and dyslipedemia (M 1.62-5.27, F2.56-9.53 times). While the RR of CAD due to HTN was 4.6 times (M5.4, F4.2 times) (p<0.0001) as compared to normotensive diabetic patients. The risk of developing HTN is more in female diabetics and of CAD in male hypertensive diabetic patients. It is concluded that obesity, older age, poor glycemic control, longer duration of DM and dyslipidemia increases the risk of HTN 2-9.5 times and HTN increases the risk of CAD by 4-5 times, hence requiring aggressive and comprehensive treatment of the diabetes mellitus syndrome. (author)

  5. Is maternal transmission of coronary heart disease risk stronger than paternal transmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinra, S; Davey Smith, G; Okasha, M; McCarron, P; McEwen, J

    2003-08-01

    To test whether intergenerational transmission of coronary heart disease (CHD) to offspring is greater from the mother than from the father, the association between parental history of CHD and coronary mortality in male offspring was examined. Prospective cohort study with 43 years of follow up. University of Glasgow. Male students (n = 8402) aged 16-30 years when examined in 1948 to 1968. Fatal CHD. Of the 8402 men studied, 615 (7.3%) reported a history of CHD in at least one of the parents: 479 (5.8%) for fathers only, 124 (1.6%) for mothers only, and a further 12 (0.2%) for both their parents. During follow up, 373 (4.4%) men died of CHD. Parental history of disease was associated with fatal CHD and controlling for personal risk factors such as cigarette smoking, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and father's social class did not attenuate this relation. The fully adjusted hazard ratios were 1.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08 to 2.18), 1.19 (95% CI 0.61 to 2.32), and 8.65 (95% CI 2.65 to 28.31) for father only, mother only, and both parents with CHD, respectively, compared with men whose parents did not have CHD. There was some evidence for interaction between parental histories (p = 0.049), with particularly high risk if both parents reported a history of CHD. This study found no differential transmission of CHD. Paternal history of CHD was at least as important as maternal history. Data from other comparable cohorts provide no consistent evidence of differential transmission. Intergenerational transmission of CHD does not appear to have differential effects between mothers and fathers.

  6. Association of chest pain and risk of cardiovascular disease with coronary atherosclerosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eRollefstad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The relation between chest pain and coronary atherosclerosis (CA in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD has not been explored previously. Our aim was to evaluate the associations of the presence of chest pain and the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD by use of several CVD risk algorithms, with multi-detector computer tomography (MDCT coronary angiography verified CA. Methods: Detailed information concerning chest pain and CVD risk factors was obtained in 335 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS. In addition, 119 of these patients underwent MDCT coronary angiography.Results: Thirty-one percent of the patients (104/335 reported chest pain. Only 6 patients (1.8% had atypical angina pectoris (pricking pain at rest. In 69 patients without chest pain, two thirds had CA, while in those who reported chest pain (n=50, CA was present in 48.0%. In a logistic regression analysis, chest pain was not associated with CA (dependent variable (p=0.43. About 30% (Nagelkerke R2 of CA was explained by any of the CVD risk calculators: SCORE, Framingham Risk Score or Reynolds Risk Score.Conclusion: The presence of chest pain was surprisingly infrequently reported in patients with IJD who were referred for a CVD risk evaluation. However, when present, chest pain was weakly associated with CA, in contrast to the predicted CVD risk by several risk calculators which was highly associated with the presence of CA. These findings suggest that clinicians treating patients with IJD should be alert of coronary atherosclerotic disease also in absence of chest pain symptoms.

  7. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhao

    Full Text Available Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58% patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30-12.90, 13.00-13.50, 13.60-16.40. GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.055; p < 0.001; 1.699; 1.294-2.232; p < 0.001; respectively. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p < 0.001. For GRACE score alone, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve for MACEs was 0.749 (95% CI: 0.707-0.787. The area under the ROC curve for MACEs increased to 0.805 (0.766-0.839, p = 0.034 after adding RDW content. The incremental predictive value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI = 0.023, p = 0.002. Combining the predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone.

  8. Plasma cystathionine and risk of acute myocardial infarction among patients with coronary heart disease: Results from two independent cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Indu; Svingen, Gard F T; Pedersen, Eva R; DeRatt, Barbara; Ulvik, Arve; Strand, Elin; Ueland, Per M; Bønaa, Kaare H; Gregory, Jesse F; Nygård, Ottar K

    2018-04-21

    Cystathionine is a thio-ether and a metabolite formed from homocysteine during transsulfuration. Elevated plasma cystathionine levels are reported in patients with cardiovascular disease; however prospective relationships with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are unknown. We investigated associations between plasma cystathionine and AMI among patients with suspected and/or verified coronary heart disease (CHD). Subjects from two independent cohort studies, the Western Norway Coronary Angiography Cohort (WECAC) (3033 patients with stable angina pectoris; 263 events within 4.8 years of median follow-up) and the Norwegian Vitamin Trial (NORVIT) (3670 patients with AMI; 683 events within 3.2 years of median follow-up) were included. In both cohorts, plasma cystathionine was associated with several traditional CHD risk factors (P coronary heart disease, and is possibly related to altered redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediagnostic plasma antibody levels to periodontopathic bacteria and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Izumi, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Yoko; Ikeda, Ai; Iso, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have indicated that periodontitis is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined whether plasma antibody levels to 3 major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia predicted the risk of CHD events. A nested case-control research design (case: n = 191, control: n = 382), by matching gender, age, study area, date of blood collection, and time since last meal at blood collection, was employed in a large cohort of Japanese community residents.Antibody levels of periodontopathic bacteria were associated with risk of CHD after adjusting for BMI, smoking status, alcohol intake, history of hypertension, history of diabetes mellitus, exercise during leisure time, and perceived mental stress. The association was different by age subgroup. For subjects aged 40-55 years, the medium (31.7-184.9 U/mL) or high tertile plasma antibody level (> 184.9 U/mL) of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed higher risk of CHD (medium: OR = 3.72; 95% CI = 1.20-11.56, high: OR = 4.64; 95% CI = 1.52-14.18) than the low tertile level ( 414.1 U/mL) of P. intermedia was associated with higher risk of CHD (OR = 2.65; 95% CI = 1.18-5.94) in a dose-response fashion (P for trend = 0.007). The possible role of periodontopathic bacteria as a risk factor for CHD incidence was suggested by the results of this study by the elevated antibody level to these bacteria with the increased risk of CHD.

  10. Effectiveness of 2-hour Troponin in High-risk Patients With Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Joseph; Hochman, Steven; Miller, Jacob; Artim, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Research has shown the safety and effectiveness of drawing a standard troponin level at presentation and again at 2 hours in only low-risk patients. Because high-sensitivity troponins are not currently approved in the United States, we studied the utility of a standard troponin that is presently in use. Our goal was to determine if 2-hour standard troponin would be safe and effective in the evaluation of a high-risk cohort of patients never studied previously. We conducted a single-center prospective observational study of adult patients presenting to the emergency department with signs and symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome. Patients were defined as high risk if the attending physician planned to admit or transfer the patient to the observation unit. History, Electrocardiography, Age, Risk factors, Troponin scores were calculated on all patients to provide verification that the individuals were high risk. The primary outcome was a composite of 30-day myocardial infarction, death, cardiac arrest with return of spontaneous circulation, or dysrhythmia. The secondary outcome was 30-day revascularization. We included a total of 122 patients with an average follow-up of 112 days (minimum 30 days). A total of 86% of cases had History, Electrocardiography, Age, Risk factors, Troponin scores ≥4. The primary outcome was met in 22 (18%) patients, and the secondary outcome occurred in 7 (5.7%) patients. The negative predictive value of negative 2-hour troponins along with no significant delta troponin rise was 98.7%. Discharging patients thought to be high risk who have negative troponins at 0 and 2 hours and no delta troponin rise appears safe. No deaths occurred in follow-up. Larger studies are warranted.

  11. National trends in statin use by coronary heart disease risk category.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Only limited research tracks United States trends in the use of statins recorded during outpatient visits, particularly use by patients at moderate to high cardiovascular risk.Data collected between 1992 and 2002 in two federally administered surveys provided national estimates of statin use among ambulatory patients, stratified by coronary heart disease risk based on risk factor counting and clinical diagnoses. Statin use grew from 47% of all lipid-lowering medications in 1992 to 87% in 2002, with atorvastatin being the leading medication in 2002. Statin use by patients with hyperlipidemia, as recorded by the number of patient visits, increased significantly from 9% of patient visits in 1992 to 49% in 2000 but then declined to 36% in 2002. Absolute increases in the rate of statin use were greatest for high-risk patients, from 4% of patient visits in 1992 to 19% in 2002. Use among moderate-risk patients increased from 2% of patient visits in 1992 to 14% in 1999 but showed no continued growth subsequently. In 2002, 1 y after the release of the Adult Treatment Panel III recommendations, treatment gaps in statin use were detected for more than 50% of outpatient visits by moderate- and high-risk patients with reported hyperlipidemia. Lower statin use was independently associated with younger patient age, female gender, African American race (versus non-Hispanic white, and non-cardiologist care.Despite notable improvements in the past decade, clinical practice fails to institute recommended statin therapy during many ambulatory visits of patients at moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk. Innovative approaches are needed to promote appropriate, more aggressive statin use for eligible patients.

  12. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and coronary collateral circulation: Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhenhua; Pei, Junyu; Tang, Liang; Hu, Xinqun

    2018-04-01

    Well-developed coronary collateral circulation usually results in fewer infarct size, improved cardiac function, and fewer mortality. Traditional coronary risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, and smoking) have some effects on coronary collateral circulation. However, the association between these risk factors and coronary collateral circulation are controversial. Given the confusing evidences regarding traditional cardiovascular risk factors on coronary collateral circulation, we performed this meta-analysis protocol to investigate the relationship between traditional risk factors of coronary artery disease and coronary collateral circulation. MEDINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index will be searched to identify relevant studies. The primary outcomes of this meta-analysis are well-developed coronary collateral circulation. Meta-analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of traditional coronary risk factors (diabetes, smoking, hypertriton). Pooled ORs were computed as the Mantel-Haenszel-weighted average of the ORs for all included studies. Sensitivity analysis, quality assessment, publication bias analysis, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach (GRADE) will be performed to ensure the reliability of our results. This study will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence of traditional risk factors on collateral circulation. This conclusion of our systematic review and meta-analysis will provide evidence to judge whether traditional risk factors affects coronary collateral circulation.Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval is not required because our systematic review and meta-analysis will be based on published data without interventions on patients. The findings of this study will be published in a peer-reviewed journal.

  13. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics and Facts A- A A+ Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts An estimated 6 million people in ... Understanding the Brain Warning Signs/ Symptoms Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Risk Factors Aneurysm ...

  14. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and 10-year Risk for Coronary Heart Disease in Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunjoo Boo, RN, PhD

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent in Korean women, and the combination of risk factors is common. Development and implementation of multifaceted nursing interventions are required to confront the current epidemic rise of CHD in Korean women.

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? ... Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  17. Behavioral problems in people with intellectual disability: Basic facts, incidence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buha Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In people with intellectual disabilities, behavioral problems result from the interaction of multiple risk factors of different origin, which undoubtedly indicates the importance of knowing their individual characteristics and life circumstances. Incidence, specific forms and topography of behavioral problems depend on different factors, both socio-demographic and inherent ones. Behavioral problems significantly impede acquiring new adaptive skills and have a negative influence on the interaction with the environment. Emotional and behavioral problems are a significant source of stress in children with intellectual disability, as well as their parents and professional staff. These difficulties, especially aggression and disruptiveness, have a big influence on the selection of education model, i.e. on how much the child will be involved in the educational process and the decision whether or not a person will be institutionalized. Better understanding of behavioral problems in people with intellectual disability is the basis of eliminating or reducing risk factors, as well as creating a comprehensive treatment model.

  18. Ethnicity Modifies Associations between Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Disease Severity in Parallel Dutch and Singapore Coronary Cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystel M Gijsberts

    Full Text Available In 2020 the largest number of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD will be found in Asia. Published epidemiological and clinical reports are overwhelmingly derived from western (White cohorts and data from Asia are scant. We compared CAD severity and all-cause mortality among 4 of the world's most populous ethnicities: Whites, Chinese, Indians and Malays.The UNIted CORoNary cohort (UNICORN simultaneously enrolled parallel populations of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography or intervention for suspected CAD in the Netherlands and Singapore. Using multivariable ordinal regression, we investigated the independent association of ethnicity with CAD severity and interactions between risk factors and ethnicity on CAD severity. Also, we compared all-cause mortality among the ethnic groups using multivariable Cox regression analysis.We included 1,759 White, 685 Chinese, 201 Indian and 224 Malay patients undergoing coronary angiography. We found distinct inter-ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, the associations of gender and diabetes with severity of CAD were significantly stronger in Chinese than Whites. Chinese (OR 1.3 [1.1-1.7], p = 0.008 and Malay (OR 1.9 [1.4-2.6], p<0.001 ethnicity were independently associated with more severe CAD as compared to White ethnicity. Strikingly, when stratified for diabetes status, we found a significant association of all three Asian ethnic groups as compared to White ethnicity with more severe CAD among diabetics, but not in non-diabetics. Crude all-cause mortality did not differ, but when adjusted for covariates mortality was higher in Malays than the other ethnic groups.In this population of individuals undergoing coronary angiography, ethnicity is independently associated with the severity of CAD and modifies the strength of association between certain risk factors and CAD severity. Furthermore, mortality differs among ethnic groups. Our data provide insight in

  19. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3

  20. Targeted deletion of the 9p21 noncoding coronary artery disease risk interval in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Zhu, Yiwen; May, Dalit; Afzal, Veena; Gong, Elaine; Attanasio, Catia; Blow, Matthew J.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence polymorphisms in a 58kb interval on chromosome 9p21 confer a markedly increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), the leading cause of death worldwide 1,2. The variants have a substantial impact on the epidemiology of CAD and other life?threatening vascular conditions since nearly a quarter of Caucasians are homozygous for risk alleles. However, the risk interval is devoid of protein?coding genes and the mechanism linking the region to CAD risk has remained enigmatic. Here we show that deletion of the orthologous 70kb noncoding interval on mouse chromosome 4 affects cardiac expression of neighboring genes, as well as proliferation properties of vascular cells. Chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice are viable, but show increased mortality both during development and as adults. Cardiac expression of two genes near the noncoding interval, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, is severely reduced in chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice, indicating that distant-acting gene regulatory functions are located in the noncoding CAD risk interval. Allelespecific expression of Cdkn2b transcripts in heterozygous mice revealed that the deletion affects expression through a cis-acting mechanism. Primary cultures of chr4delta70kb/delta70kb aortic smooth muscle cells exhibited excessive proliferation and diminished senescence, a cellular phenotype consistent with accelerated CAD pathogenesis. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence that the CAD risk interval plays a pivotal role in regulation of cardiac Cdkn2a/b expression and suggest that this region affects CAD progression by altering the dynamics of vascular cell proliferation.

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids and the genetic risk of early onset acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Yinko, S S L; Thanassoulis, G; Stark, K D; Avgil Tsadok, M; Engert, J C; Pilote, L

    2014-11-01

    Recent gene-environment interaction studies suggest that diet may influence an individual's genetic predisposition to cardiovascular risk. We evaluated whether omega-3 fatty acid intake may influence the risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) conferred by genetic polymorphisms among patients with early onset ACS. Our population consisted of 705 patients of white European descent enrolled in GENESIS-PRAXY, a multicenter cohort study of patients aged 18-55 years and hospitalized with ACS. We used a case-only design to investigate interactions between the omega-3 index (a validated biomarker of omega-3 fatty acid intake) and 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with ACS. We used logistic regression to assess the interaction between each SNP and the omega-3 index. Interaction was also assessed between the omega-3 index and a genetic risk score generated from the 30 SNPs. All models were adjusted for age and sex. An interaction for increased ACS risk was found between carriers of the chromosome 9p21 variant rs4977574 and low omega-3 index (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.07-2.32, p = 0.02), but this was not significant after correction for multiple testing. Similar results were obtained in the adjusted model (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.05-2.29, p = 0.03). We did not observe any interaction between the genetic risk score or any of the other SNPs and the omega-3 index. Our results suggest that omega-3 fatty acid intake may modify the genetic risk conferred by chromosome 9p21 variation in the development of early onset ACS and requires independent replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. THE FREQUENCY AND ASSOCIATION OF RISK FACTORS IN DEVELOPMENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Sokolović

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The coronary heart disease (CHD is a leading cause of lethality in both sexes. The risk for development of CHD is 2-4 times higher in non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM than in nondiabetics, and annual rate of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases in NIDDM is 2-5%. The etiology of CHD is still unknown until the risk factors connected to the development of CHD are well known.The purpose of this research was to establish the frequency and importance of the risk factors in development of CHD in NIDDM.The research included 60 patients with NIDDM who were by presence of CHD classified into two groups. We determined body mass index and waist hip ratio, total and HDL cholesterol, triglicerides, LDL cholesterols, uric acid and fibrinogen.Values of BMI were statistically higher in patients with CHD than in diabetics without CHD 29.67+3.31 vs. 27.87±3.17 kg/m2 (p<0.05. Raised risk levels of cholesterol had90% with CHD and 76% without CHD (Hi2=6.12, p<0.05. Larger percentage of patients in group with CHD had raised lipid risk levels of triglicerides 70% than in patients without CHD 56.5% (Hi2=4.36, p<0.05. The obesity was relatively rare in patients without CHD than in diabetics with CHD (13.6% vs. 76%, p<0.01.The frequency of risk factors was very high in NIDDM patients, which clearly points at their cumulative effect in development of CHD in diabetics.

  3. Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and Coronary Artery Calcification in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Aroda, Vanita R; Goldberg, Ronald B; Younes, Naji; Edelstein, Sharon L; Carrion-Petersen, MaryLou; Ehrmann, David A

    2018-02-01

    It is unclear whether relative elevations in androgens or irregular menses (IM) are associated with greater cardiometabolic risk among women who are already overweight and glucose intolerant. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). Participants included women with sex hormone measurements who did not use exogenous estrogen (n = 1422). We examined whether free androgen index (FAI) or IM was associated with diabetes risk during the DPP/DPPOS or with coronary artery calcification (CAC) at DPPOS year 10. Models were adjusted for menopausal status, age, race or ethnicity, randomization arm, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin A1c. Women had an average age of 48.2 ± 9.9 years. Elevations in FAI and IM were associated with greater BMI, waist circumference, and blood pressure and lower adiponectin. FAI was not associated with diabetes risk during the DPP/DPPOS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93 to 1.02] or increased odds of CAC [odds ratio (OR) 1.06; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.23]. IM was also not associated with diabetes risk during the DPP/DPPOS (HR 1.07; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.31) or increased odds of CAC (OR 0.89; 95% CI, 0.53 to 1.49). Women who had both relative elevations in FAI and IM had similar diabetes risk and odds of CAC as women without these conditions. Differences by treatment arm and menopausal status were not observed. Among midlife women who were already glucose intolerant and overweight, androgen concentrations and IM did not additionally contribute to increased risk for diabetes or CAC. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  4. The risk of arrhythmias following coronary artery bypass surgery: do smokers have a paradox effect?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Sarraf, Nael

    2010-11-01

    Smoking is reported to increase the risk of arrhythmias. However, there are limited data on its effects on arrhythmias following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This is a retrospective review of a prospective database of all CABG patients over an eight-year period. Our cohort (n=2813) was subdivided into: current (n=1169), former (n=837), and non-smokers (n=807). Predictors of arrhythmias following CABG in relation to smoking status were analysed. Atrial arrhythmias occurred in 942 patients (33%). Ventricular arrhythmias occurred in 48 patients (2%) and high-grade atrioventricular block occurred in five patients (0.2%). Arrhythmias were lower in current smokers than former and non-smokers (29% vs. 40% vs. 39%, respectively P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed 30% arrhythmia risk reduction in smokers compared to non-smokers [odds ratio (OR) 0.7, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.5-0.8] and this effect persisted after accounting for potential confounders while former smokers had the same risk as non-smokers (OR 1.04, CI 0.9-1.3). There were no significant differences in mortality. Smokers are less prone to develop arrhythmias following CABG. This paradox effect is lost in former smokers. This effect is possibly due to a lower state of hyper adrenergic stimulation observed in smokers than non-smokers following the stress of surgery.

  5. Harvest surgical site infection following coronary artery bypass grafting: risk factors, microbiology, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Fakih, Mohamad G; Berriel-Cass, Dorine; Meisner, Susan; Saravolatz, Louis; Khatib, Riad

    2009-10-01

    Our goals were to evaluate the risk factors predisposing to saphenous vein harvest surgical site infection (HSSI), the microbiology implicated, associated outcomes including 30-day mortality, and identify opportunities for prevention of infection. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures from January 2000 through September 2004 were included. Data were collected on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, in addition to microbiology and outcomes. Eighty-six of 3578 (2.4%) patients developed HSSI; 28 (32.6%) of them were classified as deep. The median time to detection was 17 (range, 4-51) days. An organism was identified in 64 (74.4%) cases; of them, a single pathogen was implicated in 50 (78%) cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen: 19 (38% [methicillin-susceptible S aureus (MSSA) = 12, methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) = 7]). Gram-negative organisms were recovered in 50% of cases, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa predominating in 11 (22%) because of a single pathogen. Multiple pathogens were identified in 14 (22%) cases. The 30-day mortality was not significantly different in patients with or without HSSI. Multivariate analysis showed age, diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery to be associated with increased risk. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery were associated with increased risk for HSSI. S aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen.

  6. Systematic review of zinc biochemical indicators and risk of coronary heart ‎disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hashemian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor zinc nutritional status is suspected as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD. Since zinc absorption may be influenced by some nutritional and physiologic factors, it would be better to investigate zinc status through biochemical measurements. The objective of the present study was to review recent studies investigating the association of zinc biomarkers with CHD, systematically. METHODS: The MEDLINE database was used for relevant studies published from January 2009 to December 2013 with appropriate keywords. Articles were included in this study if they were human studies, original articles, and published in English. RESULTS: Six case-control studies and two prospective cohort studies that measured zinc biomarkers were included in the study. Almost all case-control studies suggest that decreased plasma zinc was associated with increased CHD risk. Cohort studies did not support this relationship. CONCLUSION: The majority of the evidence for this theory is extracted from case-control studies, which might have bias. Prospective studies and randomized clinical trials are needed to investigate whether poor zinc status is associated with increased CHD risk. Consequently, a protective role of zinc in CHD could not be still established. 

  7. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD): a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luqian; Zhu, Zhigang; Lou, Huiling; Zhu, Guodong; Huang, Weimin; Zhang, Shaogang; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-07

    Some studies reported a significant association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the results are controversial. A systematic search was conducted in the PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases. Five case-control studies and 5 cohort studies were selected, involving a total of 104392 subjects in this meta-analysis. PCOS was significantly associated with the increased risk of CVD (OR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.09 - 1.56; P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis of study design, both case-control studies and prospective cohort studies showed significant results (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 - 2.77; P = 0.009; OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.06 - 1.37; P = 0.005), while retrospective cohort studies did not show positive result (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.60 - 1.40; P = 0.68). In a further stratified analysis by type of CVD, a significant association was found between PCOS and coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.13 - 1.84; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was observed between PCOS and myocardial infarction (MI) (OR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.68 - 1.51; P = 0.95). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PCOS is significantly associated with increased CHD risk.

  8. The Prevalence of Risk Factors of Coronary Artery Disease in the Patients who Underwent Coronary Artery Bypass Graft, Shiraz, Iran: Suggesting a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ostovan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of 40% of deaths in Iran annually. Many patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery have previous cardiovascular risk factors which could be prevented. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in the patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional (descriptive – analytical study, a data collecting form was used. A total of 246 patients were selected from six hospitals of Shiraz using random stratification. Descriptive statistics were presented through figures and tables and t-test was used to analyze the continuous variables. All the statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software (version 15.0. Besides, P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Among the study patients, only 11.67% had no risk factors and 88.33% had one or more risk factors. The most common risk factors observed in the patients were hypertension, obesity and overweight, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. The results showed a significant difference between males and females regarding the prevalence of hypertension (P = 0.001, diabetes (P = 0.028, hypercholesterolemia (P = 0.020, and cigarette smoking (P = 0.001. In addition, the patients' mean levels of cholesterol, LDL, triglyceride, and fasting blood sugar were higher than the acceptable level, while that of HDL was lower than the accepted level. Conclusions:: These patients are recommended to be trained regarding lifestyle changes. Also, prevention strategies can play an important role in reducing patient morbidity and mortality.

  9. Comparing an Unstructured Risk Stratification to Published Guidelines in Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ann-Jean C C; Hagemeijer, Anouk; Tortolani, Bess; Byrd, Bethany A; Parekh, Amisha; Datillo, Paris; Birkhahn, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Guidelines are designed to encompass the needs of the majority of patients with a particular condition. The American Heart Association (AHA) in conjunction with the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) developed risk stratification guidelines to aid physicians with accurate and efficient diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). While useful in a primary care setting, in the unique environment of an emergency department (ED), the feasibility of incorporating guidelines into clinical workflow remains in question. We aim to compare emergency physicians' (EP) clinical risk stratification ability to AHA/ACC/ACEP guidelines for ACS, and assessed each for accuracy in predicting ACS. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study in an urban teaching hospital ED. All patients presenting to the ED with chest pain who were evaluated for ACS had two risk stratification scores assigned: one by the treating physician based on clinical evaluation and the other by the AHA/ACC/ACEP guideline aforementioned. The patient's ACS risk stratification classified by the EP was compared to AHA/ACC/ACEP guidelines. Patients were contacted at 30 days following the index ED visit to determine all cause mortality, unscheduled hospital/ED revisits, and objective cardiac testing performed. We enrolled 641 patients presenting for evaluation by 21 different EPs. There was a difference between the physician's clinical assessment used in the ED, and the AHA/ACC/ACEP task force guidelines. EPs were more likely to assess patients as low risk (40%), while AHA/ACC/ACEP guidelines were more likely to classify patients as intermediate (45%) or high (45%) risk. Of the 119 (19%) patients deemed high risk by EP evaluation, 38 (32%) were diagnosed with ACS. AHA/ACC/ACEP guidelines classified only 57 (9%) patients low risk with 56 (98%) of those patients diagnosed with no ACS. In the ED, physicians are more efficient

  10. A multi-region assessment of population rates of cardiac catheterization and yield of high-risk coronary artery disease

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    Clement Fiona M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is variation in cardiac catheterization utilization across jurisdictions. Previous work from Alberta, Canada, showed no evidence of a plateau in the yield of high-risk disease at cardiac catheterization rates as high as 600 per 100,000 population suggesting that the optimal rate is higher. This work aims 1 To determine if a previously demonstrated linear relationship between the yield of high-risk coronary disease and cardiac catheterization rates persists with contemporary data and 2 to explore whether the linear relationship exists in other jurisdictions. Methods Detailed clinical information on all patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in 3 Canadian provinces was available through the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart (APPROACH disease and partner initiatives in British Columbia and Nova Scotia. Population rates of catheterization and high-risk coronary disease detection for each health region in these three provinces, and age-adjusted rates produced using direct standardization. A mixed effects regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between catheterization rate and high-risk coronary disease detection. Results In the contemporary Alberta data, we found a linear relationship between the population catheterization rate and the high-risk yield. Although the yield was slightly less in time period 2 (2002-2006 than in time period 1(1995-2001, there was no statistical evidence of a plateau. The linear relationship between catheterization rate and high-risk yield was similarly demonstrated in British Columbia and Nova Scotia and appears to extend, without a plateau in yield, to rates over 800 procedures per 100,000 population. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a consistent finding, over time and across jurisdictions, of linearly increasing detection of high-risk CAD as population rates of cardiac catheterization increase. This internationally-relevant finding

  11. Hypoglycaemic and coronary risk index lowering effects of Bauhinia thoningii in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojezele, M O; Abatan, O M

    2011-03-01

    Disease, one of humanity's greatest adversaries, has in recent times showed an intimidating increase in numerical and pathological strength. This stretched the available medications to the limit thereby necessitating the need for the discovery of new and alternative medications to combat the menace of disease. Diabetic mellitus is one disease condition for which ideal synthetic drugs are yet to be discovered. To this end, pharmaceuticals are looking in the direction of medicinal plants. This work aimed at screening Bauhinia thoningii (leaves) for its hypoglycaemic effect. The effect of the extract on lipid profile as a Coronary Risk Index (CRI) was also evaluated. Aqueous crude extract of the plant was administered orally to alloxan induced diabetic rats and fasting blood glucose monitored over a period of 7 days. Blood samples collected from the rats were assayed for full lipid profile and the CRI calculated. Bauhinia thoningii caused 81.37% reduction in blood glucose of the experimental animals over a period of 7 days from an initial 365 mg/dl to 68 mg/dl. The plant extract was also observed to have the capacity to ameliorate diabetic complications like cardiovascular disorders. The extract reduced the Low Density lipoprotein (LDL) and reduced the CRI. Results from this study confirmed the hypoglycaemic efficacy of the extract and ability to ameliorate coronary diabetic complications. Further study is required to purify the plant extract to identify the fraction(s) that are responsible for the hypoglycaemic effects observed. This will also help to isolate the active components and elucidate the likely mechanism of action of the plant extract.

  12. Coronary Allograft Vasculopathy after Cardiac Transplantation: Prevalence, Prognostic and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, André; Prieto, David; Pinto, Carlos; Branco, Carlos; Correia, Pedro; Batista, Manuel; Antunes, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Coronary allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is still a serious long-term complication after cardiac transplantation. To evaluate the prevalence of CAV in a single institution, its impact on survival and to explore associated risk factors. From November-2003 through June-2016, 316 patients were submitted to cardiac transplantation. After excluding those with paediatric age (n=8), those with previous renal or hepatic transplantation (n=2) and those who didn't survive the first year after cardiac transplantation (n=40), the study population resulted in 266 patients. Forty two patients (15.8%) with CAV, diagnosed by a new >50% coronary artery stenosis in any vessel during follow-up, were compared with a non-CAV group. Both groups share de same median age (54+10years). Recipient male sex predominated in the CAV group (93% vs. 74%), as did ischemic etiology (52% vs. 37%). Although not reaching statistical significance, CAV patients also had more dyslipidemia (60% vs. 50%), history of smoking (52% vs. 44%) and peripheral vascular disease (45% vs. 29%). The incidence of celular acute rejection 1R is more frequent in CAV group (69% vs. 60%) such as 2R or 3R (29% vs. 27%). Prolonged use of inotropic support and mechanical assistance after cardiac transplantation were comparable between both groups. The survival of this patients, who were submitted to cardiac transplantation and had lived at least 1 year, between CAV and non-CAV group was comparable at 5-year (91% vs. 85%), but tended to be lower for CAV patients in 10-year interval (52% vs. 73%). This data confirms CAV as a common long-term complication following cardiac transplantation. Although short to mid-term survival seems not to be affected by CAV, long-term survival appears lower, hence a longer follow-up is needed.

  13. Development of a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Model for Type 1 Diabetes: The Pittsburgh CHD in Type 1 Diabetes Risk Mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zgibor, J.C.; Ruppert, K.; Orchard, T.J.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Fuller, J.H.; Chaturvedi, N.; Roberts, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim - To create a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction model specific to type 1 diabetes. Methods - Development of the model used data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (EDC). EDC subjects had type 1 diabetes diagnosed between 1950 and 1980, received their

  14. Coronary artery calcification and ECG pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy or strain identify different healthy individuals at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Zöga; Gerke, Oke; Olsen, Michael Hecht

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE:: To improve risk stratification for development of ischaemic heart disease, several markers have been proposed. Both the presence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and ECG pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy/strain have been shown to provide independent prognostic information....... In this study, we investigated the association between established risk factors, ECG measurements and the presence of coronary artery calcification. METHOD:: A random sample of healthy men and women aged 50 or 60 years were invited to the screening study. Established risk factors were measured. A noncontrast...... computed tomographic (CT) scan was performed to assess the CAC score. ECG analysis included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) using the Sokolow-Lyon criteria and the Cornell voltage × QRS duration product, and strain pattern based on ST segment depression and T-wave abnormalities. The association between...

  15. Supported high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention with the Impella 2.5 device the Europella registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjauw, Krischan D; Konorza, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This retrospective multicenter registry evaluated the safety and feasibility of left ventricular (LV) support with the Impella 2.5 (Abiomed Europe GmbH, Aachen, Germany) during high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). BACKGROUND: Patients with complex or high-risk coronary...... with poor LV function. The Impella 2.5, a percutaneous implantable LV assist device, might be a superior alternative to the traditionally used intra-aortic balloon pump. METHODS: The Europella registry included 144 consecutive patients who underwent a high-risk PCI. Safety and feasibility end points.......5%. Rates of myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding requiring transfusion/surgery, and vascular complications at 30 days were 0%, 0.7%, 6.2%, and 4.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This large multicenter registry supports the safety, feasibility, and potential usefulness of hemodynamic support with Impella 2...

  16. Development of a questionnaire to measure heart disease risk knowledge in people with diabetes: the Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Lacey, Kimberly; Chyun, Deborah; Abbott, Gina

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes a paper and pencil questionnaire that measures heart disease risk knowledge in people with diabetes. The Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire (HDFQ) is a 25-item questionnaire that was developed to tap into respondents' knowledge of major risk factors for the development of CHD. Approximately half of these items specifically address diabetes-related CHD risk factors. Based on extensive pilot data, the current study analyzed responses from 524 people with diabetes to assess the psychometric properties. The HDFQ is readable to an average 13-year old and imposes little burden. It shows good content and face validity. It demonstrates adequate internal consistency, with Kuder-Richardson-20 formula = 0.77 and good item-total correlations. Item analysis showed a desirable range in P-values. In discriminant function analyses, HDFQ scores differentiated respondents by knowledge of their own cardiovascular health, use of lipid lowering medications, health insurance status, and educational attainment, thus indicating good criterion related validity. This measure of heart disease risk knowledge is brief, understandable to respondents, and easy to administer and score. Its potential for use in research and practice is discussed. Future research should establish norms as well as investigate its test-retest reliability and predictive validity.

  17. FTO genotype, physical activity, and coronary heart disease risk in Swedish men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Jaana; Mehlig, Kirsten; Leander, Karin; Lissner, Lauren; Björck, Lena; Rosengren, Annika; Nyberg, Fredrik

    2014-04-01

    Variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO) predisposing to obesity and diabetes mellitus have also been associated with cardiovascular disease. Physical activity has been suggested to attenuate the FTO effect on obesity, but it is unknown whether this is also true for cardiovascular disease. Therefore, we explored whether physical activity modifies the FTO association with coronary heart disease (CHD). FTO rs9939609 (T>A) polymorphism was genotyped in 2 Swedish population-based case-control studies with 1743 CHD cases and 4402 population controls (25-74 years of age; 41% women). Leisure time physical activity was assessed by questionnaires, and 3 levels were defined: low, medium, and high. Overall, carriers of the FTO A allele had an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.37) adjusted for age, sex, study, and body mass index. Although A-allele carriers with low physical activity had the highest CHD risk (odds ratio, 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 2.44-4.46) compared with those with TT genotype and high activity, the effects of FTO genotype and physical activity on CHD risk were approximately additive, indicating the absence of additive interaction. The stratum-specific relative risks of CHD from the A allele in subjects with low, medium, and high physical activity were odds ratio 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.60), 1.22 (1.04-1.44), and 1.38 (1.06-1.80), respectively, but the suggested multiplicative interaction was not significant. FTO rs9939609 A-allele carriers have an increased CHD risk, and the association is not counteracted by increased physical activity.

  18. Nut consumption, serum fatty acid profile and estimated coronary heart disease risk in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, S K; Kendall, C W C; Bazinet, R P; Bashyam, B; Ireland, C A; Augustin, L S A; Blanco Mejia, S; Sievenpiper, J L; Jenkins, D J A

    2014-08-01

    Nut consumption has been associated with decreased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes which has been largely attributed to their healthy fatty acid profile, yet this has not been ascertained. Therefore, we investigated the effect of nut consumption on serum fatty acid concentrations and how these relate to changes in markers of glycemic control and calculated CHD risk score in type 2 diabetes. 117 subjects with type 2 diabetes consumed one of three iso-energetic (mean 475 kcal/d) supplements for 12 weeks: 1. full-dose nuts (50-100 g/d); 2. half-dose nuts with half-dose muffins; and 3. full-dose muffins. In this secondary analysis, fatty acid concentrations in the phospholipid, triacylglycerol, free fatty acid, and cholesteryl ester fractions from fasting blood samples obtained at baseline and week 12 were analyzed using thin layer and gas chromatography. Full-dose nut supplementation significantly increased serum oleic acid (OA) and MUFAs compared to the control in the phospholipid fraction (OA: P = 0.036; MUFAs: P = 0.024). Inverse associations were found with changes in CHD risk versus changes in OA and MUFAs in the triacylglycerol (r = -0.256, P = 0.011; r = -0.228, P = 0.024, respectively) and phospholipid (r = -0.278, P = 0.006; r = -0.260, P = 0.010, respectively) fractions. In the cholesteryl ester fraction, change in MUFAs was inversely associated with markers of glycemic control (HbA1c: r = -0.250, P = 0.013; fasting blood glucose: r = -0.395, P consumption increased OA and MUFA content of the serum phospholipid fraction, which was inversely associated with CHD risk factors and 10-year CHD risk. NCT00410722, clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Additional prognostic value of physical examination, exercise testing, and arterial ultrasonography for coronary risk assessment in primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournot, Maxime; Taraszkiewicz, Dorota; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Galinier, Michel; Boccalon, Henri; Hanaire-Broutin, Hélène; Chamontin, Bernard; Carrié, Didier; Ferrières, Jean

    2009-11-01

    The choice of noninvasive tests used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases must be based on medical evidence. The aim of this study was to assess the additional prognostic value, over conventional risk factors, of physical examination, exercise testing, and arterial ultrasonography, in predicting a first coronary event. A prospective cohort study was conducted between 1996 and 2004 (n = 2,709), with follow-up in 2006 (response rate 96.6%). Participants had no history or symptoms of cardiovascular disease and had a standardized physical examination, a cardiac exercise testing, and carotid and femoral ultrasonography at baseline. Incident cases of definite coronary events were recorded during follow-up. Over the Framingham risk score, femoral bruit, positive exercise test, intima-media thickness >0.63 mm, and a femoral plaque provided significant additional information to the prediction model. The addition of the exercise test to the traditional risk factors, then the intima-media thickness and lastly the presence of femoral plaques, produces incremental increases in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.73-0.78, P = .02) and about a 50% increase in the positive predictive value (15.8%-31.4%), with no effect on the negative predictive value (96.4%-96.9%). Physical examination, exercise testing, and arterial ultrasonography provide incremental information on the risk of coronary event in asymptomatic adults. Exercise testing and femoral ultrasonography also improve the accuracy of the risk stratification.

  20. Impact of abciximab in elderly patients with high-risk acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: an observational registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Allan Z; Galatius, Soeren; Haahr-Pedersen, Sune Ammentorp

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing proportion of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) requiring percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are classified as elderly (aged =70 years). The glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor abciximab is known to reduce adverse outcomes in patients aged

  1. Comparison of RISK-PCI, GRACE, TIMI risk scores for prediction of major adverse cardiac events in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimov, Tamara; Mrdović, Igor; Filipović, Branka; Zdravković, Marija; Djoković, Aleksandra; Hinić, Saša; Milić, Nataša; Filipović, Branislav

    2017-12-31

    To compare the prognostic performance of three major risk scoring systems including global registry for acute coronary events (GRACE), thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI), and prediction of 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (RISK-PCI). This single-center retrospective study involved 200 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who underwent invasive diagnostic approach, ie, coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization if appropriate, in the period from January 2014 to July 2014. The GRACE, TIMI, and RISK-PCI risk scores were compared for their predictive ability. The primary endpoint was a composite 30-day major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE), which included death, urgent target-vessel revascularization (TVR), stroke, and non-fatal recurrent myocardial infarction (REMI). The c-statistics of the tested scores for 30-day MACE or area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) with confidence intervals (CI) were as follows: RISK-PCI (AUC=0.94; 95% CI 1.790-4.353), the GRACE score on admission (AUC=0.73; 95% CI 1.013-1.045), the GRACE score on discharge (AUC=0.65; 95% CI 0.999-1.033). The RISK-PCI score was the only score that could predict TVR (AUC=0.91; 95% CI 1.392-2.882). The RISK-PCI scoring system showed an excellent discriminative potential for 30-day death (AUC=0.96; 95% CI 1.339-3.548) in comparison with the GRACE scores on admission (AUC=0.88; 95% CI 1.018-1.072) and on discharge (AUC=0.78; 95% CI 1.000-1.058). In comparison with the GRACE and TIMI scores, RISK-PCI score showed a non-inferior ability to predict 30-day MACE and death in ACS patients. Moreover, RISK-PCI was the only scoring system that could predict recurrent ischemia requiring TVR.

  2. Associations between interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms and coronary heart disease risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A great number of studies regarding the associations between IL-1B-511, IL-1B+3954 and IL-1RN VNTR polymorphisms within the IL-1gene cluster and coronary heart disease (CHD have been published. However, results have been inconsistent. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate the associations. METHODS: Published literature from PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible publications. Pooled odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using random- or fixed- effect model. RESULTS: Thirteen studies (3,219 cases/2,445 controls for IL-1B-511 polymorphism, nine studies (1,828 cases/1,818 controls for IL-1B+3954 polymorphism and twelve studies (2,987 cases/ 2,208 controls for IL-1RN VNTR polymorphism were included in this meta analysis. The results indicated that both IL-1B-511 and IL-1B+3954 polymorphisms were not associated with CHD risk (IL-1B-511 T vs. C: OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.87-1.09; IL-1B+3954 T vs. C: OR = 1.06, 95%CI 0.95-1.19. Similarly, there was no association between IL-1RN VNTR polymorphism and CHD risk (*2 vs. L: OR = 1.00, 95%CI 0.85-1.17. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggested that there were no associations between IL-1 gene cluster polymorphisms and CHD.

  3. Espresso coffee consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in a large Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grioni, Sara; Agnoli, Claudia; Sieri, Sabina; Pala, Valeria; Ricceri, Fulvio; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Panico, Salvatore; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Iacoviello, Licia; de Curtis, Amalia; Vineis, Paolo; Krogh, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between coffee consumption and coronary heart disease (CHD) has been investigated in several studies with discrepant results. We examined the association between Italian-style (espresso and mocha) coffee consumption and CHD risk. We investigated 12,800 men and 30,449 women without history of cardiovascular disease recruited to the EPICOR prospective cohort study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline. In a random sub-cohort of 1472 subjects, plasma triglycerides, and total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were determined to investigate the effect of coffee consumption on plasma lipids. After a mean follow up of 10.9 years, 804 cases of CHD (500 acute events, 56 fatal events and 248 revascularizations, all first events) were identified. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for CHD were: 1.18 (95% CI 0.87-1.60) for drinking 1-2 cups/day, 1.37 (95% CI 1.03-1.82) for >2-4 cups/day and 1.52 (95% CI 1.11-2.07) for over 4 cups/day (P trend coffee consumption. Consumption of over 2 cups/day of Italian-style coffee is associated with increased CHD risk, but coffee consumption was not associated with plasma lipid changes, so the adverse effect of consumption appears unrelated to lipid profile.

  4. An Online Tool for Nurse Triage to Evaluate Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome at Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwares Sittichanbuncha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To differentiate acute coronary syndrome (ACS from other causes in patients presenting with chest pain at the emergency department (ED is crucial and can be performed by the nurse triage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS of the tertiary care hospital. Methods. We retrospectively enrolled consecutive patients who were identified as ACS at risk patients by the ED nurse triage. Patients were categorized as ACS and non-ACS group by the final diagnosis. Multivariate logistic analysis was used to predict factors associated with ACS. An online model predictive of ACS for the ED nurse triage was constructed. Results. There were 175 patients who met the study criteria. Of those, 28 patients (16.0% were diagnosed with ACS. Patients with diabetes, patients with previous history of CAD, and those who had at least one character of ACS chest pain were independently associated with having ACS by multivariate logistic regression. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval were 4.220 (1.445, 12.327, 3.333 (1.040, 10.684, and 12.539 (3.876, 40.567, respectively. Conclusions. The effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS was 16%. The online tool is available for the ED triage nurse to evaluate risk of ACS in individuals.

  5. Deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery: management and risk factor analysis for mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumun, Gunduz; Erdolu, Burak; Toktas, Faruk; Eris, Cuneyt; Ay, Derih; Turk, Tamer; As, Ahmet Kagan

    2014-08-01

    Deep sternal wound infection is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors leading to mortality, and to explore wound management techniques on deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery. Between 2008 and 2013, 58 patients with deep sternal wound infection were analyzed. Risk factors for mortality and morbidity including age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, chronic renal failure, hypertension, diabetes, and treatment choice were investigated. In this study, 19 patients (32.7%) were treated by primary surgical closure (PSC), and 39 patients (67.3%) were treated by delayed surgical closure following a vacuum-assisted closure system (VAC). Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the groups. Fourteen patients (24.1%) died in the postoperative first month. The mortality rate and mean duration of hospitalization in the PSC group was higher than in the VAC group (P = .026, P = .034). Significant risk factors for mortality were additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE. Delayed surgical closure following VAC therapy may be associated with shorter hospitalization and lower mortality in patients with deep sternal wound infection. Additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE were associated with mortality.

  6. The New York risk score for in-hospital and 30-day mortality for coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Edward L; Farrell, Louise Szypulski; Wechsler, Andrew; Jordan, Desmond; Lahey, Stephen J; Culliford, Alfred T; Gold, Jeffrey P; Higgins, Robert S D; Smith, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    Simplified risk scores for coronary artery bypass graft surgery are frequently in lieu of more complicated statistical models and are valuable for informed consent and choice of intervention. Previous risk scores have been based on in-hospital mortality, but a substantial number of patients die within 30 days of the procedure. These deaths should also be accounted for, so we have developed a risk score based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality. New York's Cardiac Surgery Reporting System was used to develop an in-hospital and 30-day logistic regression model for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery in 2009, and this model was converted into a simple linear risk score that provides estimated in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates for different values of the score. The accuracy of the risk score in predicting mortality was tested. This score was also validated by applying it to 2008 New York coronary artery bypass graft data. Subsequent analyses evaluated the ability of the risk score to predict complications and length of stay. The overall in-hospital and 30-day mortality rate for the 10,148 patients in the study was 1.79%. There are seven risk factors comprising the score, with risk factor scores ranging from 1 to 5, and the highest possible total score is 23. The score accurately predicted mortality in 2009 as well as in 2008, and was strongly correlated with complications and length of stay. The risk score is a simple way of estimating short-term mortality that accurately predicts mortality in the year the model was developed as well as in the previous year. Perioperative complications and length of stay are also well predicted by the risk score. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum Adiponectin and Cardiometabolic Risk in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Gustavo Bernardes de Figueiredo; França, João Ítalo Dias; Piegas, Leopoldo Soares

    2013-01-01

    The adipose tissue is considered not only a storable energy source, but mainly an endocrine organ that secretes several cytokines. Adiponectin, a novel protein similar to collagen, has been found to be an adipocyte-specific cytokine and a promising cardiovascular risk marker. To evaluate the association between serum adiponectin levels and the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), as well as the correlations between adiponectin and metabolic, inflammatory, and myocardial biomarkers. We recruited 114 patients with ACS and a mean 1.13-year follow-up to measure clinical outcomes. Clinical characteristics and biomarkers were compared according to adiponectin quartiles. Cox proportional hazard regression models with Firth's penalization were applied to assess the independent association between adiponectin and the subsequent risk for both primary (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI)/non-fatal stroke) and co-primary outcomes (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal AMI/non-fatal stroke/ rehospitalization requiring revascularization). There were significant direct correlations between adiponectin and age, HDL-cholesterol, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and significant inverse correlations between adiponectin and waist circumference, body weight, body mass index, Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, triglycerides, and insulin. Adiponectin was associated with higher risk for primary and co-primary outcomes (adjusted HR 1.08 and 1.07/increment of 1000; p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). In ACS patients, serum adiponectin was an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. In addition to the anthropometric and metabolic correlations, there was a significant direct correlation between adiponectin and BNP

  8. Serum Adiponectin and Cardiometabolic Risk in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Gustavo Bernardes de Figueiredo, E-mail: goliveira@cardiol.br; França, João Ítalo Dias; Piegas, Leopoldo Soares [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    The adipose tissue is considered not only a storable energy source, but mainly an endocrine organ that secretes several cytokines. Adiponectin, a novel protein similar to collagen, has been found to be an adipocyte-specific cytokine and a promising cardiovascular risk marker. To evaluate the association between serum adiponectin levels and the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), as well as the correlations between adiponectin and metabolic, inflammatory, and myocardial biomarkers. We recruited 114 patients with ACS and a mean 1.13-year follow-up to measure clinical outcomes. Clinical characteristics and biomarkers were compared according to adiponectin quartiles. Cox proportional hazard regression models with Firth's penalization were applied to assess the independent association between adiponectin and the subsequent risk for both primary (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI)/non-fatal stroke) and co-primary outcomes (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal AMI/non-fatal stroke/ rehospitalization requiring revascularization). There were significant direct correlations between adiponectin and age, HDL-cholesterol, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and significant inverse correlations between adiponectin and waist circumference, body weight, body mass index, Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, triglycerides, and insulin. Adiponectin was associated with higher risk for primary and co-primary outcomes (adjusted HR 1.08 and 1.07/increment of 1000; p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). In ACS patients, serum adiponectin was an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. In addition to the anthropometric and metabolic correlations, there was a significant direct correlation between adiponectin and BNP.

  9. Recalibration of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score in a multiethnic Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark Y; Shah, Bimal R; Gao, Fei; Sim, Ling Ling; Chua, Terrance; Tan, Huay Cheem; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Ong, Hean Yee; Foo, David; Goh, Ping Ping; Surrun, Soondal K; Pieper, Karen S; Granger, Christopher B; Koh, Tian Hai; Salim, Agus; Tai, E Shyong

    2011-08-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a leading cause of mortality in Asia. However, quantitative risk scores to predict mortality after AMI were developed without the participation of Asian countries. We evaluated the performance of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) in-hospital mortality risk score, directly and after recalibration, in a large Singaporean cohort representing 3 major Asian ethnicities. The GRACE cohort included 11,389 patients, predominantly of European descent, hospitalized for AMI or unstable angina from 2002 to 2003. The Singapore cohort included 10,100 Chinese, 3,005 Malay, and 2,046 Indian patients hospitalized for AMI from 2002 to 2005.Using the original GRACE score, predicted in-hospital mortality was 2.4% (Chinese), 2.0% (Malay), and 1.6% (Indian). However, observed in-hospital mortality was much greater at 9.8% (Chinese), 7.6% (Malay), and 6.4% (Indian). The c statistic for Chinese, Malays, and Indians was 0.86, 0.86, and 0.84, respectively, and the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic was 250, 56, and 41, respectively. Recalibration of the GRACE score, using the mean-centered constants derived from the Singapore cohort, did not change the c statistic but substantially improved the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic to 90, 24, and 18, respectively. The recalibrated GRACE score predicted in-hospital mortality as follows: 7.7% (Chinese), 6.0% (Malay), and 5.2% (Indian). In this large cohort of 3 major Asian ethnicities, the original GRACE score, derived from populations outside Asia, underestimated in-hospital mortality after AMI. Recalibration improved risk estimation substantially and may help adapt externally developed risk scores for local practice. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleep Quality, Sleep Duration, and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study With 60,586 Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xiang Qian; Liu, Xudong; Deng, Han-Bing; Chan, Ta-Chien; Ho, Kin Fai; Wang, Feng; Vermeulen, Roel; Tam, Tony; Wong, Martin C S; Tse, L A; Chang, Ly-Yun; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong

    2018-01-15

    There is limited information on the relationship between risk of cardiovascular disease and the joint effects of sleep quality and sleep duration, especially from large, prospective, cohort studies. This study is to prospectively investigate the joint effects of sleep quality and sleep duration on the development of coronary heart disease. This study examined 60,586 adults aged 40 years or older. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on sleep quality and sleep duration as well as a wide range of potential confounders. Events of coronary heart disease were self-reported in subsequent medical examinations. Two types of Sleep Score (multiplicative and additive) were constructed to reflect the participants' sleep profiles, considering both sleep quality and sleep duration. The Cox regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 2,740 participants (4.5%) reported new events of coronary heart disease at follow-up. For sleep duration, participants in the group of 8 h/d) did not reach statistical significance (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.98-1.26). For sleep quality, both dreamy sleep (HR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10-1.32) and difficult to fall asleep/use of sleeping pills or drugs (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.25-1.56) were associated with an increased risk of the disease. Participants in the lowest quartile of multiplicative Sleep Score (HR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.16-1.47) and of additive sleep score (HR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.16-1.47) were associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease compared with those in the highest quartile. Both short sleep duration and poor sleep quality are associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The association for long sleep duration does not reach statistical significance. Lower Sleep Score (poorer sleep profile) increases the risk of coronary heart disease, suggesting the importance of considering sleep duration and sleep quality together when developing strategies to

  11. Postprandial triglyceride response in young adult men and familial risk for coronary atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uiterwaal, C.S.P.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Stiphout, W.A.H.J. van; Krauss, X.H.; Havekes, L.M.; Bruijn, A.M. de; Tol, A. van; Hofman, A.

    1994-01-01

    Setting: Coronary angiography departments of four central general hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients: 80 sons (mean age, 24.8 years) of men with severe coronary artery disease and 55 sons (mean age, 23.2 years) of controls. Measurements: Postprandial levels of serum triglycerides, retinyl

  12. Coronary risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Engstrøm, Thomas; Pries-Heje, Mia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive, less expensive, low-radiation alternative to coronary angiography (CAG) prior to valvular heart surgery. MSCT has a high negative predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD) but previous studies of patients with valvular ...

  13. The next generation: poor compliance with risk factor guidelines in the children of parents with premature coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, N R; Rowe, P C; Davies, R

    1994-01-01

    The offspring of individuals with premature coronary heart disease are themselves at increased risk for myocardial infarction before the age of 55. Consensus panels have recommended that all such offspring undergo an evaluation of cardiovascular risk, including cholesterol testing. To examine self-reported rates of cardiovascular risk factor assessment in this population, we conducted a telephone survey of 318 Canadian adults with premature coronary heart disease and of one offspring from 298 (94%) of the 318 families. The median age of the offspring was 20 years (range 2 to 39 y). Among the 219 late adolescent and young adult offspring, only 97 (44%) reported having had a blood cholesterol measurement during the preceding 3 years. Thirty-seven percent reported being current smokers, 31% were overweight, and 30% exercised fewer than three times per week. Men were less likely than women to report having had their blood pressure measured in the preceding year (57% vs 80%). These low rates of cardiac risk factor assessment families of patients with premature coronary heart disease represent missed opportunities for primary prevention. More effective strategies to prevent atherosclerosis in this population are needed.

  14. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis: toward coronary arterial visualization of biologically high-risk plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfon, Marcella A.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2010-01-01

    New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.

  15. Prospective association of polycystic ovary syndrome with coronary artery calcification and carotid-intima-media thickness: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Women's study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Margalit, Ronit; Siscovick, David; Merkin, Sharon S; Wang, Erica; Daviglus, Martha L; Schreiner, Pamela J; Sternfeld, Barbara; Williams, O Dale; Lewis, Cora E; Azziz, Ricardo; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wellons, Melissa F

    2014-12-01

    To study the independent associations of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and its 2 components, hyperandrogenism and anovulation, with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). At the year 20 of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a population-based multicenter cohort of young adults, women (mean age, 45 years) with information on menses and hirsutism in their twenties were assessed for CAC (n=982) and IMT (n=988). We defined PCOS as women who had both irregular menses and hyperandrogenism (n=55); isolated oligomenorrhea (n=103) as women who only had irregular menses; and isolated hyperandrogenism (n=156) as women who had either hirsutism or increased testosterone levels. Logistic regressions and general linear models were used to estimate the associations between components of PCOS and subclinical CVD. The prevalence of CAC was 10.3% overall. Women with PCOS had a multivariable adjusted odds ratio of 2.70 (95% confidence interval, 1.31-5.60) for CAC. Women with either isolated oligomenorrhea or isolated hyperandrogenism had no increased risk of CAC when compared with unexposed women. Women with PCOS had significantly increased bulb and internal carotid-IMT measurements; however, no significant differences were noted in bulb or internal carotid artery IMT among women with either isolated oligomenorrhea or isolated hyperandrogenism when compared with unexposed women. There were no differences in common carotid-IMT among the 4 study groups. In this study, women with PCOS, manifested as both anovulation and hyperandrogenism, but not women with one of these manifestations alone, were at increased risk for the development of subclinical CVD. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts ... Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page ...

  17. Changes in triglyceride levels and risk for coronary heart disease in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amir; Rudich, Assaf; Shochat, Tzippora; Tekes-Manova, Dorit; Israeli, Eran; Henkin, Yaakov; Kochba, Ilan; Shai, Iris

    2007-09-18

    Current triglyceride levels might be only a weak predictor of risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). To assess the association between changes over time in fasting triglyceride levels and CHD risk in young adults. Follow-up study over 5.5 years after 2 measurements of fasting triglycerides 5 years apart. The Staff Periodic Examination Center of the Israel Defense Forces, Zrifin, Israel. 13,953 apparently healthy, untreated, young men (age 26 to 45 years) with triglyceride levels less than 3.39 mmol/L (<300 mg/dL). Two triglyceride measurements (at enrollment [time 1] and 5 years later [time 2]), lifestyle variables, and incident cases of angiography-proven CHD. Within 5.5 years, 158 new cases of CHD were identified. The multivariate model was adjusted for age; family history; fasting glucose; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; blood pressure; body mass index; and changes between time 1 and time 2 in body mass index, physical activity, smoking status, and habit of eating breakfast. Investigators categorized triglyceride levels according to low, intermediate, and high tertiles (as measured at time 1 and time 2 [expressed as tertile at time 1/tertile at time 2]). The risk for CHD in men with high-tertile triglyceride levels at time 1 changed depending on the tertile at time 2 (hazard ratios, 8.23 [95% CI, 2.50 to 27.13] for high/high, 6.84 [CI, 1.95 to 23.98] for high/intermediate, and 4.90 [CI, 1.01 to 24.55] for high/low, compared with the stable low/low group). The risk for CHD in men with low-tertile levels at time 1 also changed depending on the tertile at time 2 (hazard ratios, 3.81 [CI, 0.96 to 15.31] for low/intermediate and 6.76 [CI, 1.34 to 33.92] for low/high, compared with the stable low/low group). Participants were healthy and had a low incidence rate of CHD. The study was observational. Two triglyceride measurements obtained 5 years apart may assist in assessing CHD risk in young men. A decrease in initially elevated triglyceride levels is associated

  18. Renal Dysfunction after Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery- Risk Factors and Preventive Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab Maitra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative renal dysfunction is a relatively common and one of the serious complications of cardiac surgery. Though off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery technique avoids cardiopulmonary bypass circuit induced adverse effects on renal function, multiple other factors cause postoperative renal dysfunction in these groups of patients. Acute kidney injury is generally defined as an abrupt and sustained decrease in kidney function. There is no consen-sus on the amount of dysfunction that defines acute kidney injury, with more than 30 definitions in use in the literature today. Although serum creatinine is widely used as a marker for changes in glomerular filtration rate, the criteria used to define renal dysfunction and acute renal failure is highly variable. The variety of definitions used in clinical studies may be partly responsible for the large variations in the reported incidence. Indeed, the lack of a uniform definition for acute kidney injury is believed to be a major impediment to research in the field. To establish a uniform definition for acute kidney injury, the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative formulated the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage Kidney (RIFLE classification. RIFLE , defines three grades of increasing severity of acute kidney injury -risk (class R, injury (class I and failure (class F - and two outcome classes (loss and end-stage kidney disease. Various perioperative risk factors for postoperative renal dysfunction and failure have been identified. Among the important preoperative factors are advanced age, reduced left ventricular function, emergency surgery, preoperative use of intraaortic balloon pump, elevated preoperative serum glucose and creatinine. Most important intraoperative risk factor is the intraoperative haemodynamic instability and all the causes of postoperative low output syndrome com-prise the postoperative risk factors. The most important preventive strategies are the identification of the

  19. Gender and age effects on risk factor-based prediction of coronary artery calcium in symptomatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoll, R; Wiklund, U; Zhao, Y

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The influence of gender and age on risk factor prediction of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in symptomatic patients is unclear. METHODS: From the European Calcific Coronary Artery Disease (EURO-CCAD) cohort, we retrospectively investigated 6309 symptomatic patients, 62......, diabetes and smoking were independently predictive of CAC presence in both genders. In addition to a progressive increase in CAC with age, the most important predictors of CAC presence were dyslipidaemia and diabetes (β = 0.64 and 0.63, respectively) in males and diabetes (β = 1.08) followed by smoking (β...... = 0.68) in females; these same risk factors were also important in predicting increasing CAC scores. There was no difference in the predictive ability of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia in either gender for CAC presence in patients aged 70, only...

  20. Identifying emergency department patients with chest pain who are at low risk for acute coronary syndromes [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, David; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-07-21

    Though a minority of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain have acute coronary syndromes,identifying the patients who may be safely discharged and determining whether further testing is needed remains challenging. From the prehospital care setting to disposition and follow-up, this systematic review addresses the fundamentals of the emergency department evaluation of patients determined to be at low risk for acute coronary syndromes or adverse outcomes. Clinical risk scores are discussed, as well as the evidence and indications for confirmatory testing. The emerging role of new technologies, such as high-sensitivity troponin assays and advanced imaging techniques, are also presented. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  1. Genetic risk analysis of coronary artery disease in Pakistani subjects using a genetic risk score of 21 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Saleem Ullah; Shabana; Cooper, Jackie A; Beaney, Katherine E; Li, Kawah; Rehman, Abdul; Humphries, Steve E

    2017-03-01

    Conventional coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors like age, gender, blood lipids, hypertension and smoking have been the basis of CAD risk prediction algorithms, but provide only modest discrimination. Genetic risk score (GRS) may provide improved discrimination over and above conventional risk factors. Here we analyzed the genetic risk of CAD in subjects from Pakistan, using a GRS of 21 variants in 18 genes and examined whether the GRS is associated with blood lipid levels. 625 (405 cases and 220 controls) subjects were genotyped for variants, NOS3 rs1799983, SMAD3 rs17228212, APOB rs1042031, LPA rs3798220, LPA rs10455872, SORT1 rs646776, APOE rs429358, GLUL rs10911021, FTO rs9939609, MIA3 rs17465637, CDKN2Ars10757274, DAB2IP rs7025486, CXCL12 rs1746048, ACE rs4341, APOA5 rs662799, CETP rs708272, MRAS rs9818870, LPL rs328, LPL rs1801177, PCSK9 rs11591147 and APOE rs7412 by TaqMan and KASPar allele discrimination techniques. Individually, the single SNPs were not associated with CAD except APOB rs1042031 and FTO rs993969 (p = 0.01 and 0.009 respectively). However, the combined GRS of 21 SNPs was significantly higher in cases than controls (19.37 ± 2.56 vs. 18.47 ± 2.45, p = 2.9 × 10 -5 ), and compared to the bottom quintile, CAD risk in the top quintile of the GRS was 2.96 (95% CI 1.71-5.13). Atherogenic blood lipids showed significant positive association with GRS. The GRS was quantitatively associated with CAD risk and showed association with blood lipid levels, suggesting that the mechanism of these variants is likely to be, in part at least, through creating an atherogenic lipid profile in subjects carrying high numbers of risk alleles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and coronary artery disease risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongshu; Jiang, Weihong; Ouyang, Mao; Yang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have investigated the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene 4G/5G polymorphism and this association with coronary artery disease (CAD). But definite conclusions can not be drawn. Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) till 10 August 2014. Pooled ORs and 95% CIs were used to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 53 studies including 20921 CAD cases and 18434 controls were included. Significantly elevated CAD risk was found in overall analysis (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.05-1.21, P = 0.0009). In the subgroup analysis by races, significantly increased risk was found in Caucasians (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.03-1.20, P = 0.005) and Asians (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.01-1.42, P = 0.04). In the subgroup analysis by gender, significant association was found in males (OR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.06-1.25, P = 0.0008), but was not found in females (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92-1.20, P = 0.47). In the subgroup analysis by age, young populations showed increased CAD risk (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.37, P = 0.02), but old populations did not show this association (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.82-1.24, P = 0.93). This meta-analysis provides the evidence that PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism may contribute to the CAD development.

  3. Profile of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease, Normal and Impaired Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І.V. Cherniavska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to conduct the comparative analysis of the profile of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and normal either impaired carbohydrate metabolism. Materials and methods. One hundred and forty two patients were observed. In order to estimate the rate of different forms of CHD depending on the state of carbohydrate metabolism such groups were formed: the first group consisted of 83 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, the second group involved 34 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, the third group consisted of 25 patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. The ischemic changes of myocardium were detected by ambulatory ECG monitoring with the obligatory achievement of submaximal heart rate during the research. Results. Silent myocardial ischemia was educed in 19 (22.9 % patients with type 2 DM, in 3 (8.8 % persons with IGT and in 2 (8.0 % patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. Smoking, burdened heredity, violation in the haemostatic system more often occurred in the group of patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia in comparison with the patients with type 2 DM without CHD. The profile of general population cardiovascular risk factors in patients with CHD and type 2 DM belongs to the most unfavorable. At the same time for patients with early violations of carbohydrate metabolism and normal carbohydrate metabolism such profile statistically does not differentiate meaningfully. Conclusions. Patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia as compared to patients with type 2 DM without CHD have more expressed violations of indexes of general population cardiovascular risk factors for certain.

  4. PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and coronary artery disease risk: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongshu; Jiang, Weihong; Ouyang, Mao; Yang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have investigated the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene 4G/5G polymorphism and this association with coronary artery disease (CAD). But definite conclusions can not be drawn. Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) till 10 August 2014. Pooled ORs and 95% CIs were used to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 53 studies including 20921 CAD cases and 18434 controls were included. Significantly elevated CAD risk was found in overall analysis (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.05-1.21, P = 0.0009). In the subgroup analysis by races, significantly increased risk was found in Caucasians (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.03-1.20, P = 0.005) and Asians (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.01-1.42, P = 0.04). In the subgroup analysis by gender, significant association was found in males (OR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.06-1.25, P = 0.0008), but was not found in females (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92-1.20, P = 0.47). In the subgroup analysis by age, young populations showed increased CAD risk (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.37, P = 0.02), but old populations did not show this association (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.82-1.24, P = 0.93). This meta-analysis provides the evidence that PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism may contribute to the CAD development. PMID:25932140

  5. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Short-Term Outcomes after High Risk Coronary Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, Mohammed J; Mouline, Omar; Hsu, Chijen; Grieve, Stuart M; Wilson, Michael K; Bannon, Paul G; Vallely, Michael P; Puranik, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    The euroSCORE II is a widely used pre-coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CAGS) risk score, but its predictive power lacks the specificity to predict outcomes in high-risk patients (surgery case mix, revascularisation techniques and related outcomes in recent years. We investigated the utility of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) in predicting immediate and six-week outcomes after CAGS. Fifty-two consecutive patients with high euroSCORE II (>16) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (magnetic resonance imaging parameters were assessed in patients who either had complications immediately post-surgery (n=35), six weeks post-surgery (n=20) or were uncomplicated. The average age of patients recruited was 69±5 years with high euroSCORE II (22±4) and low 2D-echocardiography LV ejection fraction (38%±2%). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results demonstrated that those with immediate complications had higher LV scar/infarct burden as a proportion of LV mass (17±3% vs 10±3%; p=0.04) with lower circumferential relaxation index (2.5±0.46 vs 2.8±0.56; p=0.05) compared to those with no complications. Early mortality from surgery was 17% (n=9) and was associated with lower RV stroke volume (55±12 vs 68±18; p=0.03) and higher LV infarct scar/burden (18±2% vs 10±2%, p=0.04). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed patients with complications at six weeks post-surgery had higher LV scar/infarct burden (14.5±2% vs 6.8±2%, p=0.03) compared to those without complications. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging preoperative LV and RV parameters are valuable in assessing the likelihood of successful outcomes from CAGS in high-risk patients with LV dysfunction. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke : a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimaki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Fransson, Eleonor I.; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-anal...

  7. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S.T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; Bacquer, D. de; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods: We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-anal...

  8. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S. T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E. I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J. B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; De Bacquer, D.; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. / Methods: We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Met...

  9. PR interval prolongation in coronary patients or risk equivalent: excess risk of ischemic stroke and vascular pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yap-Hang; Hai, Jo Jo; Lau, Kui-Kai; Li, Sheung-Wai; Lau, Chu-Pak; Siu, Chung-Wah; Yiu, Kai-Hang; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2017-08-24

    Whether PR prolongation independently predicts new-onset ischemic events of myocardial infarction and stroke was unclear. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of PR prolongation leading to adverse cardiovascular events were poorly understood. We investigated the role of PR prolongation in pathophysiologically-related adverse cardiovascular events and underlying mechanisms. We prospectively investigated 597 high-risk cardiovascular outpatients (mean age 66 ± 11 yrs.; male 67%; coronary disease 55%, stroke 22%, diabetes 52%) for new-onset ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and cardiovascular death. Vascular phenotype was determined by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). PR prolongation >200 ms was present in 79 patients (13%) at baseline. PR prolongation >200 ms was associated with significantly higher mean carotid IMT (1.05 ± 0.37 mm vs 0.94 ± 0.28 mm, P = 0.010). After mean study period of 63 ± 11 months, increased PR interval significantly predicted new-onset ischemic stroke (P = 0.006), CHF (P = 0.040), cardiovascular death (P 200 ms. Using multivariable Cox regression, PR prolongation >200 ms independently predicted new-onset ischemic stroke (HR 8.6, 95% CI: 1.9-37.8, P = 0.005), cardiovascular death (HR 14.1, 95% CI: 3.8-51.4, P PR interval predicts new-onset MI at the exploratory cut-off >162 ms (C-statistic 0.70, P = 0.001; HR: 8.0, 95% CI: 1.65-38.85, P = 0.010). PR prolongation strongly predicts new-onset ischemic stroke, MI, cardiovascular death, and combined cardiovascular endpoint including CHF in coronary patients or risk equivalent. Adverse vascular function may implicate an intermediate pathophysiological phenotype or mediating mechanism.

  10. Radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: long-term risk of mortality and coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongcharoen, Wanwarang; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chung, Fa-Po; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Pei-Chun; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2017-06-10

    The long-term outcomes of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) remain unclear. We investigated the impact of RFCA on the long-term risk of coronary events and mortality in WPW patients. We conducted a prospective cohort study utilizing the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Between 2000 and 2003, WPW patients with no prior coronary artery disease (CAD) history, aged over 18 years, who underwent RFCA were identified. WPW patients without RFCA were matched with propensity-score 1:4 matching for confounding coronary risk factors. The study outcomes were total mortality and coronary events. A total of 1524 matched non-ablated WPW patients (Group 1) and 381 ablated WPW patients (Group 2) were included. After a mean follow-up of 9.6 ± 2.9 and 10.3 ± 1.9 years, respectively, ablation group demonstrated a lower incidence of mortality compared with non-ablation group (17 vs. 26/1000 person-years, P < 0.001; adjusted HR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.44-0.7). However, ablation group had a higher incidence of coronary events compared with non-ablation group (47 vs. 82/1000 person-years, P < 0.001; adjusted HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.4-2.04). The ablation-treated WPW patients had lower risk of total mortality but higher risk of coronary events than non-ablated WPW patients during the long-term follow-up. Coronary artery injury produced by RFCA may account for the increased risk of coronary events. Therefore, the ablation strategies to avoid coronary artery injury should be implemented. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Hypertension, risk factors and coronary artery stenosis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Zahra; Zibaeenejad, Mohammadjavad; Fararouei, Mohammad

    2018-04-25

    Although hypertension is introduced as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), our knowledge about the nature of the association is hindered. The aim of this study was to assess the concurrent associations of several factors including serologic, anthropometric and coronary artery stenosis (CAS) with blood pressure. This is a case-control study on 163 hypertensive patients (SBP > 140 mmHg or DBP > 80 mmHg) and 227 healthy participants. All participants underwent angiography due to classic symptoms of CVDs. Controlling for other study variables, significant associations between CAS (OR yes/no = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.18-3.34 P = 0.006), BMI (kg/m 2 ) (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.03-1.14, P = 0.002) and age (year) (OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 1.005-1.05, p = 0.01) with hypertension were found. However, according to the results of the stratified analysis, no such associations were found among those with significant CAS. BMI and age were the only significant predictors of hypertension among participants with no CAS. Abdominal obesity was not remained in the final model regardless of the presence or absence of stenosis. As expected, stenosis itself was significantly associated with hypertension. This study suggested that BMI and age are the most powerful predictors of hypertension among those without CAS. As the result, it can be concluded that CAS alters the association between several factors and hypertension.

  12. Exploring causal associations between alcohol and coronary heart disease risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    association with triglycerides [-14.9% (-25.6, -4.3)] in IV analyses; P = 0.006 and 0.01, respectively, for difference between the two. Alcohol was not associated with non-HDLc or glucose.ConclusionOur results show adverse effects of long-term alcohol consumption on BP and BMI. We also found novel evidence......AimsTo explore the causal effect of long-term alcohol consumption on coronary heart disease risk factors.Methods and resultsWe used variants in ADH1B and ADH1C genes as instrumental variables (IV) to estimate the causal effect of long-term alcohol consumption on body mass index (BMI), blood...... pressure (BP), lipids, fibrinogen, and glucose. Analyses were undertaken in 54 604 Danes (mean age 56 years). Both confounder-adjusted multivariable and IV analyses suggested that a greater alcohol consumption among those who drank any alcohol resulted in a higher BP [mean difference in SBP per doubling...

  13. Body Mass Index and Subjective Social Status: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurandhar, Emily J; Pavela, Gregory; Kaiser, Kathryn A; Dutton, Gareth R; Fontaine, Kevin R; Kim, Daniel; Shikany, James M; Allison, David B; Lewis, Cora E

    2018-02-01

    Subjective social status (SSS), or perceived social status, may explain, in part, the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and obesity. The objective of this study was to test whether SSS mediates the relationship between two indicators of SES (income and education) and body mass index (BMI). A cross-sectional, structural equation path analysis was applied to the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study (n = 2,624). The analysis tested whether SSS (MacArthur scale), education, and income were associated with BMI at the year 20 examination (adjusting for sex, age, and race), and it was hypothesized that the associations of education and income with BMI would be at least partly mediated by SSS. SSS had a significant direct effect on BMI (-0.21, P = 0.018). Education had a significant direct relationship with SSS (0.11, P SSS (-0.02, P = 0.022). Although income did not have a significant direct relationship with BMI, it did have a significant indirect relationship through SSS (b = -0.05, P = 0.019). Results are consistent with the hypothesized model in which SSS partially mediates the relationship between SES indicators and BMI. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  14. Coronary Collateral Circulation and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Is There a Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Hemal; Kochar, Suzi; Htun, Wah Wah; Julliard, Kell; Fernaine, George

    2015-07-01

    We sought to determine the association of major cardiovascular risk factors and other comorbidities with the presence or absence of coronary collateral (CC) circulation. All electronic medical records from 2010 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 563 patients were divided into 2 groups: CC present (180) and CC absent (383). Smoking (P = .012, odds ratio [OR] 1.58), hypercholesterolemia (P = .001, OR 2.21), and hypertension (P = .034, OR 1.75) were associated with the presence of CC. Increasing body mass index (BMI, P = .001) and decreasing estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = .042) were associated with the absence of CC. On multivariable linear regression analysis, hypercholesterolemia (P = .001, OR 2.28), BMI (P = .012, OR 0.77), and eGFR (P = .001, OR 0.70) were found to be independently associated with CC. Our findings will help predict patient populations more likely to have presence or absence of CC circulation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Predictors of incident heart failure in patients after an acute coronary syndrome: The LIPID heart failure risk-prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Blankenberg, Stefan; Colquhoun, David M; Hunt, David; Nestel, Paul J; Stewart, Ralph A; West, Malcolm J; White, Harvey D; Simes, John; Tonkin, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of heart failure. Availability of risk-prediction models that include both clinical parameters and biomarkers is limited. We aimed to develop such a model for prediction of incident heart failure. A multivariable risk-factor model was developed for prediction of first occurrence of heart failure death or hospitalization. A simplified risk score was derived that enabled subjects to be grouped into categories of 5-year risk varying from 20%. Among 7101 patients from the LIPID study (84% male), with median age 61years (interquartile range 55-67years), 558 (8%) died or were hospitalized because of heart failure. Older age, history of claudication or diabetes mellitus, body mass index>30kg/m 2 , LDL-cholesterol >2.5mmol/L, heart rate>70 beats/min, white blood cell count, and the nature of the qualifying acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction or unstable angina) were associated with an increase in heart failure events. Coronary revascularization was associated with a lower event rate. Incident heart failure increased with higher concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide >50ng/L, cystatin C>0.93nmol/L, D-dimer >273nmol/L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >4.8nmol/L, and sensitive troponin I>0.018μg/L. Addition of biomarkers to the clinical risk model improved the model's C statistic from 0.73 to 0.77. The net reclassification improvement incorporating biomarkers into the clinical model using categories of 5-year risk was 23%. Adding a multibiomarker panel to conventional parameters markedly improved discrimination and risk classification for future heart failure events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction of the estimated radiation dose and associated patient risk with prospective ECG-gated 256-slice CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathopoulos, E P; Kelekis, N L; Pantos, I; Brountzos, E; Argentos, S; Grebac, J; Ziaka, D; Seimenis, I; Katritsis, D G

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but high radiation doses have been reported. Prospective ECG-gating using a 'step-and-shoot' axial scanning protocol has been shown to reduce radiation exposure effectively while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. 256-slice scanners with 80 mm detector coverage have been currently introduced into practice, but their impact on radiation exposure has not been adequately studied. The aim of this study was to assess radiation doses associated with CT coronary angiography using a 256-slice CT scanner. Radiation doses were estimated for 25 patients scanned with either prospective or retrospective ECG-gating. Image quality was assessed objectively in terms of mean CT attenuation at selected regions of interest on axial coronary images and subjectively by coronary segment quality scoring. It was found that radiation doses associated with prospective ECG-gating were significantly lower than retrospective ECG-gating (3.2 ± 0.6 mSv versus 13.4 ± 2.7 mSv). Consequently, the radiogenic fatal cancer risk for the patient is much lower with prospective gating (0.0176% versus 0.0737%). No statistically significant differences in image quality were observed between the two scanning protocols for both objective and subjective quality assessments. Therefore, prospective ECG-gating using a 'step-and-shoot' protocol that covers the cardiac anatomy in two axial acquisitions effectively reduces radiation doses in 256-slice CT coronary angiography without compromising image quality.

  17. Quantification of the myocardial area at risk using coronary CT angiography and Voronoi algorithm-based myocardial segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Akira; Kono, Atsushi; Coenen, Adriaan; Saru-Chelu, Raluca G.; Krestin, Gabriel P. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi [AZE inc, Development Division, Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Toon, Ehime (Japan); Higashino, Hiroshi [Yotsuba Circulation Clinic, Department of Radiology, Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Abe, Mitsunori [Yotsuba Circulation Clinic, Department of Cardiology, Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Feyter, Pim J. de; Nieman, Koen [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the myocardial area at risk (MAAR) using coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and Voronoi algorithm-based myocardial segmentation in comparison with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Thirty-four patients with coronary artery disease underwent 128-slice coronary CTA, stress/rest thallium-201 SPECT, and coronary angiography (CAG). CTA-based MAAR was defined as the sum of all CAG stenosis (>50 %) related territories (the ratio of the left ventricular volume). Using automated quantification software (17-segment model, 5-point scale), SPECT-based MAAR was defined as the number of segments with a score above zero as compared to the total 17 segments by summed stress score (SSS), difference (SDS) score map, and comprehensive SPECT interpretation with either SSS or SDS best correlating CAG findings (SSS/SDS). Results were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Forty-nine stenoses were observed in 102 major coronary territories. Mean value of CTA-based MAAR was 28.3 ± 14.0 %. SSS-based, SDS-based, and SSS/SDS-based MAAR was 30.1 ± 6.1 %, 20.1 ± 15.8 %, and 26.8 ± 15.7 %, respectively. CTA-based MAAR was significantly related to SPECT-based MAAR (r = 0.531 for SSS; r = 0.494 for SDS; r = 0.814 for SSS/SDS; P < 0.05 in each). CTA-based Voronoi algorithm myocardial segmentation reliably quantifies SPECT-based MAAR. (orig.)

  18. Quantification of the myocardial area at risk using coronary CT angiography and Voronoi algorithm-based myocardial segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Akira; Kono, Atsushi; Coenen, Adriaan; Saru-Chelu, Raluca G.; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kido, Teruhito; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Higashino, Hiroshi; Abe, Mitsunori; Feyter, Pim J. de; Nieman, Koen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the myocardial area at risk (MAAR) using coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and Voronoi algorithm-based myocardial segmentation in comparison with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Thirty-four patients with coronary artery disease underwent 128-slice coronary CTA, stress/rest thallium-201 SPECT, and coronary angiography (CAG). CTA-based MAAR was defined as the sum of all CAG stenosis (>50 %) related territories (the ratio of the left ventricular volume). Using automated quantification software (17-segment model, 5-point scale), SPECT-based MAAR was defined as the number of segments with a score above zero as compared to the total 17 segments by summed stress score (SSS), difference (SDS) score map, and comprehensive SPECT interpretation with either SSS or SDS best correlating CAG findings (SSS/SDS). Results were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Forty-nine stenoses were observed in 102 major coronary territories. Mean value of CTA-based MAAR was 28.3 ± 14.0 %. SSS-based, SDS-based, and SSS/SDS-based MAAR was 30.1 ± 6.1 %, 20.1 ± 15.8 %, and 26.8 ± 15.7 %, respectively. CTA-based MAAR was significantly related to SPECT-based MAAR (r = 0.531 for SSS; r = 0.494 for SDS; r = 0.814 for SSS/SDS; P < 0.05 in each). CTA-based Voronoi algorithm myocardial segmentation reliably quantifies SPECT-based MAAR. (orig.)

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted ...

  20. Markers of endogenous desaturase activity and risk of coronary heart disease in the CAREMA cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchang Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intakes of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, especially EPA (C20:5n-3 and DHA (C22:6n-3, are known to prevent fatal coronary heart disease (CHD. The effects of n-6 PUFAs including arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6, however, remain unclear. δ-5 and δ-6 desaturases are rate-limiting enzymes for synthesizing long-chain n-3 and n-6 PUFAs. C20:4n-6 to C20:3n-6 and C18:3n-6 to C18:2n-6 ratios are markers of endogenous δ-5 and δ-6 desaturase activities, but have never been studied in relation to incident CHD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relation between these ratios as well as genotypes of FADS1 rs174547 and CHD incidence. METHODS: We applied a case-cohort design within the CAREMA cohort, a large prospective study among the general Dutch population followed up for a median of 12.1 years. Fatty acid profile in plasma cholesteryl esters and FADS1 genotype at baseline were measured in a random subcohort (n = 1323 and incident CHD cases (n = 537. Main outcome measures were hazard ratios (HRs of incident CHD adjusted for major CHD risk factors. RESULTS: The AA genotype of rs174547 was associated with increased plasma levels of C204n-6, C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3 and increased δ-5 and δ-6 desaturase activities, but not with CHD risk. In multivariable adjusted models, high baseline δ-5 desaturase activity was associated with reduced CHD risk (P for trend = 0.02, especially among those carrying the high desaturase activity genotype (AA: HR (95% CI = 0.35 (0.15-0.81 for comparing the extreme quintiles. High plasma DHA levels were also associated with reduced CHD risk. CONCLUSION: In this prospective cohort study, we observed a reduced CHD risk with an increased C20:4n-6 to C20:3n-6 ratio, suggesting that δ-5 desaturase activity plays a role in CHD etiology. This should be investigated further in other independent studies.

  1. Coronary artery disease in a rural population of Bangladesh: is dyslipidemia or adiposity a significant risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajal Krishna Banerjee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD are on the increase worldwide and more in the developing countries. Coronary artery disease (CAD constitutes the major brunt of CVD. Despite the increasing morbidity and mortality, Bangladesh has a few published data on CAD in rural population. This study addressed the prevalence of CAD and its risk factors in rural population of Bangladesh. Study methods: Sixteen villages were purposively selected in a rural area. A population census was conducted in the selected area. The census yielded eligible participants, who reached at least eighteen years of age. Those who willingly consented to participate were enlisted. Each participant was interviewed regarding CAD risk (age, sex, social class, occupation, illness, family history. Anthropometry (height, weight, waist- and hip-girth was recorded. Resting blood pressure (BP was measured. Blood sample was collected for fasting blood glucose (FBG, total cholesterol (Chol, triglycerides (Tg, low density lipoproteins (LDL, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL and high density (HDL. All participants having FBG>5.5mmol/l or systolic (SBP ³135 or diastolic BP (DBP ³85mmHg underwent electrocardiography (ECG. A team of cardiologists selected and accomplished exercise tolerance test (ETT and echocardiography (Echo. Results: The prevalence of CAD was 4.5% (95% CI: 3.85 – 5.15. Compared with the female (3.5%, CI, 2.76 – 4.24 the male participants had significantly higher prevalence of CAD (6.0%, CI, 4.83 – 7.13. Comparison of characteristics between participants with and without CAD showed that age, SBP, DBP and FBG were significantly higher in CAD group. Bivariate analysis showed that age, sex, social class, glycemic status, metabolic syndrome (MetS and smoking were significantly related to CAD. Stepwise logistic regression proved only male sex, rich social class, hypertension and diabetes had independent risk of CAD; whereas, age, obesity

  2. Hyperglycemia, Young Age, Altered Sleep Habits: The Three Shifting Paradigms of Coronary Artery Disease Risk Stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irtiza Hasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to estimate the risk factors age, gender, race, obesity (BMI, glycemic status (prediabetes, diabetes, exercise and psychosocial factors (sleep, sadness related to coronary artery disease (CAD. The data set for this study is the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS, which is a large scale, cross sectional, voluntary, household interview survey maintaining data on health status, health care access and progress towards achieving the national health objectives in the USA. A total of 26,965 (male/female =55.8/ 44.2% subjects were included in the study. Of them, 79.9% were less than 65 years of age. Regarding obesity, overweight, obese and morbid obese were 34.8, 17.3 and 11.0%, respectively. Sadness of any degree was reported in 28%. Sleep duration was found 9h/d in 9.7%. Heart disease was reported in 4.9%. About 10% were reported to have diabetes and 4.1% prediabetes. 40% of the respondents’ maintained exercise once per week and only 12.8% maintained 10 or more times per week. Logistic regression estimated that compared with the non-diabetics, the subjects with prediabetes (OR 3.27, 95% CI, 2.32-4.59 and diabetes (OR 6.44 95% CI, 5.21-7.96 had excess risk of CAD, more significant in the younger subjects (65y. The risk of CAD was found significant in both prediabetes (OR 2.47, 95% CI, 1.44-4.23 and diabetes (OR 3.03, 95% CI, 2.16-4.24 as compared with non-diabetic group who slept >9h a day. The subjects with prediabetes or diabetes had excess risk for CAD compared with the non-diabetic subjects, which was more marked in the younger people. Again, compared with the non-diabetic people, the subjects with prediabetes or diabetes, having less sleep or excess sleep, had excess risk for CAD. Further study may confirm our findings. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2012; 6(2: 39-45

  3. Prevalence of Coronary Artery Disease Risk factors in Teachers Residing in Shiraz-Iran 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Tahmasebi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: coronary artery diseases (CAD are the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and disability with high health care cost in any countries including Iran. The prevalence of all CAD risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, lipid profile abnormalities and obesity is rising in the population of Iran. Knowing the population at risk would lead to proper education to decrease these risk factors and ultimately would reduce CAD.Methods: This descriptive cross- sectional study was conducted in February to December 2009 and comprised a total of 3115 Shiraz educational staff, aged 21- 73 years.Questionnaires were applied to collect information including; demographic data, physical activity, history of CAD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking. In addition, waist circumference, height, weight, body mass index (BMI, and hip circumference (HC were measured and serum biochemistry profiles were determined on venous blood samples. Such data helped identify the prevalence of diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, overweight and obesity, central obesity, and smoking. Results: The mean age of 3115 participant was 42.7 and 41.5 years for men and women respectively. The prevalence of pre-diabetes, diabetes hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia were %10.2, %4, %18.2, %38.30 and %33.2 respectively. Diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia were more prevalent among males and older subjects. The prevalence of central obesity was %75.05 (IDF criteria and %40.64 (ATP- III criteria. The frequency of obesity, current smoking, ex-smoking and passive smoking were %12.1, %5.85 , %1.52 ,%7.9 respectively which were below the reported prevalence in Iran in previous studies, but physical inactivity was %73.3 which is very high in this study group.Conclusion: Although CAD risk factors seem to be very common in the study population, clinical and paraclinical data indicated that teachers residing in Shiraz have a

  4. Characteristics and risk factors of cerebrovascular accidents after percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with history of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Feng, Li-qun; Bi, Qi; Wang, Yu-ping

    2010-06-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a well-established method for managing coronary diseases. However, the increasing use of PCI has led to an increased incidence of acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) related to PCI. In this study, we investigated the characteristics and risk factors of CVA after PCI in patients with known stroke history. Between January 1, 2005 and March 1, 2009, 621 patients with a history of stroke underwent a total of 665 PCI procedures and were included in this retrospective study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, previous medications, procedures, neurologic deficits, location of lesion and in-hospital clinical outcomes of patients who developed a CVA after the cardiac catheterization laboratory visit and before discharge were reviewed. Acute CVA was diagnosed in 53 (8.5%) patients during the operation or the perioperative period. Seventeen patients suffered from transient ischemic attack, thirty-four patients suffered from cerebral infarction and two patients suffered from cerebral hemorrhage. The risk factors for CVA after PCI in stroke patients were: admission with an acute coronary syndrome, use of an intra-aortic balloon pump, urgent or emergency procedures, diabetes mellitus, and poor left ventricular systolic function, arterial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and no/irregular use of anti-platelet medications. The incidence of CVA during and after PCI in patients with history of stroke is much higher than that in patients without history of stroke. Patients with atrial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and no or irregular use of anti-platelet medications were at higher risk for recurrent stroke. This study showed a strong association between acute coronary syndromes and in-hospital stroke after PCI.

  5. The effects of cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise capacity and coronary risk factors in CABG Patients aged 45-65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rahim Mirnasuri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the most common cause of mortalily and inability. In Iran, one third of mortality causes are coronary heart diseases. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a Cardiac Rehabilitation program (CR on exercise capacity (VO2max and coronary risk factors in CABG patients aged 45-65 . Materials and Methods: Of 36 CABG patients randomly selected from Hamadan Shahid Beheshti hospital, 18 subjects as experimental group (with mean age 54.57±6.26 years and weight 72.14±10.83 kg participated in CR program, and 18 subjects as control group (with mean age 57.64±4.75 years and weight 76.5±12 kg without participation in any exercise and CR program participated in this study based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. CR program was an eight-week involving warm-up, aerobic exercises and cool-down. Variables including: anthropometrics measurements and exercise capacity (VO2max, and also coronary risk factors such as body mass index (BMI, waist-hip ratio (WHR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, fasting blood sugar (FBS, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL-HDL ratio (LHR, body fat percent (BFP were determined at the first and the last week of CR program in both groups. Results: Statistical analysis by independent t-test indicated that after program, there was a significant difference between 2 groups in VO2max, BMI, WHR, SBP, DBP, TC, TG, LDL, LHR (P<0.05, but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in FBS, HDL, BFP. Conclusion: The CR program of the present study indicated a significant effect on exercise capacity and some coronary risk factors profile in CABG patients of 45-65 and can it be considered as a suitable program for CABG patients.

  6. Genetic risk, coronary heart disease events, and the clinical benefit of statin therapy: an analysis of primary and secondary prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, J L; Stitziel, N O; Smith, J G; Chasman, D I; Caulfield, M; Devlin, J J; Nordio, F; Hyde, C; Cannon, C P; Sacks, F; Poulter, N; Sever, P; Ridker, P M; Braunwald, E; Melander, O; Kathiresan, S; Sabatine, M S

    2015-06-06

    Genetic variants have been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. In this study, we tested whether or not a composite of these variants could ascertain the risk of both incident and recurrent coronary heart disease events and identify those individuals who derive greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. A community-based cohort study (the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study) and four randomised controlled trials of both primary prevention (JUPITER and ASCOT) and secondary prevention (CARE and PROVE IT-TIMI 22) with statin therapy, comprising a total of 48,421 individuals and 3477 events, were included in these analyses. We studied the association of a genetic risk score based on 27 genetic variants with incident or recurrent coronary heart disease, adjusting for traditional clinical risk factors. We then investigated the relative and absolute risk reductions in coronary heart disease events with statin therapy stratified by genetic risk. We combined data from the different studies using a meta-analysis. When individuals were divided into low (quintile 1), intermediate (quintiles 2-4), and high (quintile 5) genetic risk categories, a significant gradient in risk for incident or recurrent coronary heart disease was shown. Compared with the low genetic risk category, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for coronary heart disease for the intermediate genetic risk category was 1·34 (95% CI 1·22-1·47, pgenetic risk category was 1·72 (1·55-1·92, pgenetic risk categories. Similarly, we noted greater absolute risk reductions in those individuals in higher genetic risk categories (p=0·0101), resulting in a roughly threefold decrease in the number needed to treat to prevent one coronary heart disease event in the primary prevention trials. Specifically, in the primary prevention trials, the number needed to treat to prevent one such event in 10 years was 66 in people at low genetic risk, 42 in those at intermediate genetic risk, and 25 in those at high

  7. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Beaney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601 lies within a “gene desert.” The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s and gene(s involved. Methods. A phenome scan was performed with UCLEB Consortium data. Allele-specific protein binding was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Dual-reporter luciferase assays were used to assess the impact of genetic variation on expression. Expression quantitative trait analysis was performed with Advanced Study of Aortic Pathology (ASAP and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx consortium data. Results. A suggestive association between QT interval and the locus was observed (rs9982601  p=0.04. One variant at the locus, rs28451064, showed allele-specific protein binding and its minor allele showed 12% higher luciferase expression (p = 4.82 × 10−3 compared to the common allele. The minor allele of rs9982601 was associated with higher expression of the closest upstream genes (SLC5A3 1.30-fold increase p = 3.98 × 10−5; MRPS6 1.15-fold increase p = 9.60 × 10−4 in aortic intima media in ASAP. Both rs9982601 and rs28451064 showed a suggestive association with MRPS6 expression in relevant tissues in the GTEx data. Conclusions. A candidate functional variant, rs28451064, was identified. Future work should focus on identifying the pathway(s involved.

  8. Coronary artery calcification scores improve contrast-induced nephropathy risk assessment in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osugi, Naohiro; Suzuki, Susumu; Shibata, Yohei; Tatami, Yosuke; Harata, Shingo; Ota, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Ishii, Hideki; Shimizu, Atsuya; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-06-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictive value of CAC scores for the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after cardiac catheterization in non-dialyzed CKD patients. The present study evaluated a total of 140 CKD patients who underwent cardiac catheterization. Patients were stratified into two groups based on the optimal cut-off value of the CAC score, which was graded by a non-triggered, routine diagnostic chest computed tomography scan: CAC score ≥8 (high CAC group); and CAC score 10 % in the baseline serum cystatin C level at 24 h after contrast administration. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate levels were 41.1 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , and the mean contrast dose administered was 37.5 mL. Patients with high CAC scores exhibited a higher incidence of CIN than patients with low CAC scores (25.5 vs. 3.2 %, p < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment for confounders, the CAC score predicted CIN (odds ratio 1.68, 95 % confidence interval 1.28-2.21, p < 0.001). Moreover, the C-index for CIN prediction significantly increased when the CAC scores were added to the Mehran risk score (0.855 vs. 0.760, p = 0.023). CAC scores, as evaluated using semi-quantitative methods, are a simple and powerful predictor of CIN. Incorporating the CAC score in the Mehran risk score significantly improved the predictive ability to predict CIN incidence.

  9. Variant in GALNT3 Gene Linked with Reduced Coronary Artery Disease Risk in Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liwei; Li, Duan; Li, Mengting; Li, Lin; Huang, Yanmei

    2017-07-01

    Our previous study found expression of GALNT3 gene was reduced in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, and it contributed to endothelial injury by regulating apoptosis and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. GALNT3 gene may be a potential target for future therapeutic intervention of CAD. However, none reports linking the GALNT3 gene to susceptibility of CAD. This study investigated the variant associations of GALNT3 gene and CAD. Thirteen single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in and around the GALNT3 gene were tagged and analyzed in CAD patients (n = 1515) and control individuals (n = 5019), and the SNPs with CAD were tested with multiple logistic regression analysis in an additive genetic model (with one degree of freedom) after adjusting for age and sex. Expression of GALNT3 gene was detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. Luciferase reporter assays were used to detect the allele-specific effect of rs4621175 on transcriptional activity. Two GALNT3 markers, rs13427924 and rs4621175, were significantly associated with CAD (odds ratio [OR] = 0.87, p = 1.01 × 10 -3 and OR = 0.75, p = 2.51 × 10 -4 , respectively), and the risk A allele of rs4621175 was associated with lower GALNT3 expression in both mRNA and protein level; also, A allele showed decreased reporter activity. In addition, we found the level of GALNT3 negatively correlated with MMP-2 gene expression. This study identified GALNT3 as a novel gene that rendered patients susceptible to CAD, and the A allele of a disease-associated variant rs4621175 linked reduced CAD risk through decreased GALNT3 expression. These results confirmed the role of GALNT3 gene in CAD and provided new insights into the genetic regulation of the GALNT3 gene with respect to the pathogenesis of CAD.

  10. US State-level income inequality and risks of heart attack and coronary risk behaviors: longitudinal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Kawachi, Ichiro; Gilman, Stephen E

    2015-07-01

    To examine prospectively the association between US state income inequality and incidence of heart attack. We used data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,445). Respondents completed interviews at baseline (2001-2002) and follow-up (2004-2005). Weighted multilevel modeling was used to determine if US state-level income inequality (measured by the Gini coefficient) at baseline was a predictor of heart attack during follow-up, controlling for individual-level and state-level covariates. In comparison to residents of US states in the lowest quartile of income inequality, those living in the second [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 1.71, 95 % CI 1.16-2.53)], third (AOR = 1.81, 95 % CI 1.28-2.57), and fourth (AOR = 2.04, 95 % CI 1.26-3.29) quartiles were more likely to have a heart attack. Similar findings were obtained when we excluded those who had a heart attack prior to baseline. This study is one of the first to empirically show the longitudinal relationship between income inequality and coronary heart disease. Living in a state with higher income inequality increases the risk for heart attack among US adults.

  11. High prevalence of ulcer bleeding risk factors in dual antiplatelet-treated patients after percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Berit Elin S; Hansen, Jane M; Junker, Anders B

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dual antiplatelet therapy is standard treatment following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and stenting. However, such therapy increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The risk factors of UGIB are well-documented and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment...... reduces the risk. The aim was to describe the prevalence of risk factors of UGIB in dual antiplatelet-treated patients. METHODS: A questionnaire was used to assess the prevalence of risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among dual antiplatelet-treated first-time PCI patients in Western Denmark......: A total of 1,358 patients with a mean age of 64.1 years (range: 33-92 years) were included. The distribution of risk factors was as follows: dyspepsia: 681 patients (50.1%); previous ulcer: 110 (8.1%; 2.3% with bleeding); use of NSAIDs: 214 (15.8%); corticosteroids (2.9%), SSRIs (5.8%) and anticoagulants...

  12. Invasive or non-invasive imaging for detecting high-risk coronary lesions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Patel (Kush); J. Tarkin (Jason); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); E. Tenekecioglu (Erhan); N. Foin (Nicolas); Y. Zhang (Yaojun); T. Crake (Tom); J. Moon (James); A. Mathur (Anthony); C.V. Bourantas (Christos)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract_Introduction:_ Advances in our understanding about atherosclerotic evolution have enabled us to identify specific plaque characteristics that are associated with coronary plaque vulnerability and cardiovascular events. With constant improvements in signal and image processing an

  13. When the facts are just not enough: credibly communicating about risk is riskier when emotions run high and time is short.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Barbara J

    2011-07-15

    When discussing risk with people, commonly subject matter experts believe that conveying the facts will be enough to allow people to assess a risk and respond rationally to that risk. Because of this expectation, experts often become exasperated by the seemingly illogical way people assess personal risk and choose to manage that risk. In crisis situations when the risk information is less defined and choices must be made within impossible time constraints, the thought processes may be even more susceptible to faulty heuristics. Understanding the perception of risk is essential to understanding why the public becomes more or less upset by events. This article explores the psychological underpinnings of risk assessment within emotionally laden events and the risk communication practices that may facilitate subject matter experts to provide the facts in a manner so they can be more certain those facts are being heard. Source credibility is foundational to risk communication practices. The public meeting is one example in which these best practices can be exercised. Risks are risky because risk perceptions differ and the psychosocial environment in which risk is discussed complicates making risk decisions. Experts who want to influence the actions of the public related to a threat or risk should understand that decisions often involve emotional as well as logical components. The media and other social entities will also influence the risk context. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's crisis and emergency-risk communication (CERC) principles are intended to increase credibility and recognize emotional components of an event. During a risk event, CERC works to calm emotions and increase trust which can help people apply the expertise being offered by response officials. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. When the facts are just not enough: Credibly communicating about risk is riskier when emotions run high and time is short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    When discussing risk with people, commonly subject matter experts believe that conveying the facts will be enough to allow people to assess a risk and respond rationally to that risk. Because of this expectation, experts often become exasperated by the seemingly illogical way people assess personal risk and choose to manage that risk. In crisis situations when the risk information is less defined and choices must be made within impossible time constraints, the thought processes may be even more susceptible to faulty heuristics. Understanding the perception of risk is essential to understanding why the public becomes more or less upset by events. This article explores the psychological underpinnings of risk assessment within emotionally laden events and the risk communication practices that may facilitate subject matter experts to provide the facts in a manner so they can be more certain those facts are being heard. Source credibility is foundational to risk communication practices. The public meeting is one example in which these best practices can be exercised. Risks are risky because risk perceptions differ and the psychosocial environment in which risk is discussed complicates making risk decisions. Experts who want to influence the actions of the public related to a threat or risk should understand that decisions often involve emotional as well as logical components. The media and other social entities will also influence the risk context. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's crisis and emergency-risk communication (CERC) principles are intended to increase credibility and recognize emotional components of an event. During a risk event, CERC works to calm emotions and increase trust which can help people apply the expertise being offered by response officials.

  15. Clinical pharmacy cardiac risk service for managing patients with coronary artery disease in a health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhoff, Brian G; Nies, Leslie K; Olson, Kari L; Nash, James D; Rasmussen, Jon R; Merenich, John A

    2007-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy service for managing the treatment of coronary artery disease in a health maintenance organization is described. Despite the proven benefits of aggressive risk factor modification for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), there remains a treatment gap between consensus- and evidence-based recommendations and their application in patient care. In 1998, Kaiser Permanente of Colorado developed the Clinical Pharmacy Cardiac Risk Service (CPCRS) to focus on the long-term management of patients with CAD to improve clinical outcomes. The primary goals of the CPCRS are to increase the number of CAD patients on lipid-lowering therapy, manage medications shown to decrease the risk of future CAD-related events, assist in the monitoring and control of other diseases that increase cardiovascular risk, provide patient education and recommendations for nonpharmacologic therapy, and act as a CAD information resource for physicians and other health care providers. Using an electronic medical record and tracking database, the service works in close collaboration with primary care physicians, cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation nurses, and other health care providers to reduce cardiac risk in the CAD population. Particular attention is given to dyslipidemia, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco cessation. Treatment with evidence-based regimens is initiated and adjusted as necessary. Over 11,000 patients are currently being followed by the CPCRS. A clinical pharmacy service in a large health maintenance organization provides cardiac risk reduction for patients with CAD and helps close treatment gaps that may exist for these patients.

  16. Stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides effective cardiac risk reclassification in patients with known or suspected stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi; Heydari, Bobak; Coelho-Filho, Otavio; Murthy, Venkatesh L; Abbasi, Siddique; Feng, Jiazhuo H; Pencina, Michael; Neilan, Tomas G; Meadows, Judith L; Francis, Sanjeev; Blankstein, Ron; Steigner, Michael; di Carli, Marcelo; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2013-08-06

    A recent large-scale clinical trial found that an initial invasive strategy does not improve cardiac outcomes beyond optimized medical therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Novel methods to stratify at-risk patients may refine therapeutic decisions to improve outcomes. In a cohort of 815 consecutive patients referred for evaluation of myocardial ischemia, we determined the net reclassification improvement of the risk of cardiac death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (major adverse cardiac events) incremental to clinical risk models, using guideline-based low (3%) annual risk categories. In the whole cohort, inducible ischemia demonstrated a strong association with major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio=14.66; Pstatistic, 0.81-0.86; P=0.04; adjusted hazard ratio=7.37; PStress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging effectively reclassifies patient risk beyond standard clinical variables, specifically in patients at moderate to high pretest clinical risk and in patients with previous coronary artery disease. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01821924.

  17. A new risk scoring model for prediction of poor coronary collateral circulation in acute non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İleri, Mehmet; Güray, Ümit; Yetkin, Ertan; Gürsoy, Havva Tuğba; Bayır, Pınar Türker; Şahin, Deniz; Elalmış, Özgül Uçar; Büyükaşık, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the clinical features associated with development of coronary collateral circulation (CCC) in patients with acute non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and to develop a scoring model for predicting poor collateralization at hospital admission. The study enrolled 224 consecutive patients with NSTEMI admitted to our coronary care unit. Patients were divided into poor (grade 0 and 1) and good (grade 2 and 3) CCC groups. In logistic regression analysis, presence of diabetes mellitus, total white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil counts and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were found as independent positive predictors of poor CCC, whereas older age (≥ 70 years) emerged as a negative indicator. The final scoring model was based on 5 variables which were significant at p risk score ≤ 1, 29 had good CCC (with a 97% negative predictive value). On the other hand, 139 patients had risk score ≥ 4; out of whom, 130 (with a 93.5% positive predictive value) had poor collateralization. Sensitivity and specificity of the model in predicting poor collateralization in patients with scores ≤ 1 and ≥ 4 were 99.2% (130/131) and +76.3 (29/38), respectively. This study represents the first prediction model for degree of coronary collateralization in patients with acute NSTEMI.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of coronary heart disease in a rural population of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abu Sayeed

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major global health problem with the majority of burden observed increasingly in the developing countries. There has been no estimate of CHD in Bangladesh. This study addresses the prevalence of CHD in a Bangladeshi rural population which also aimed to determine the risk factors related to CHD. Ten villages of Nandail sub-district under Mymensingh were selected purposively. All subjects of age ³20y were considered eligible and were interviewed about family income, family history of T2DM, CHD and HTN. The investigations included height, weight, waist-girth, hip-girth, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP & DBP, fasting blood glucose (FBG, triglycerides (TG, cholesterol (Chol and high density lipoprotein (HDL. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c and albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR were also estimated. Finally, electrocardiography (ECG was undertaken in all participants who had family history of diabetes or hypertension or CHD. Diagnosis of CHD was based on history of angina or changes in ECG or diagnosed by a cardiologist. A total of 6235 subjects were enlisted as eligible (age ³20y participants. Of them, 4141 (m / f: 1749 / 2392 subjects volunteered for the study. The age-adjusted (20-69y prevalence of CHD was 1.85 with 95% CI, 1.42 – 2.28. There was no significant difference between men and women. The mean (SD values of age (p<0.001, SBP (p<0.01, DBP (p<0.05, HbA1c (p<0.05 and ACR (p<0.01 were significantly higher among subjects with CHD than those without; whereas, there were no significant differences in BMI and WHR, TG, Chol and HDL. Logistic regression analysis showed that adjusted for age, sex, social class and obesity, the subjects with higher age (³45y, higher 2hBG (³7.0mmol/l, higher ACR (³17.2 and family history of CHD had significant risk for CHD. The prevalence of CHD is comparable with other Asian population. Family history of CHD and age over 45 years, and who had hyperglycemia and higher ACR were

  19. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome: absence of premature atherosclerosis in patients without traditional coronary artery disease risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, D; Bortolotto, L; Bonfá, E; Borba, E

    2016-04-01

    To investigate if patients with Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome (PAPS) with venous and/or arterial thrombosis without traditional coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors develop early atherosclerotic vascular damage. 27 female patients with PAPS (Sidney criteria) and 27 age, body mass index (BMI), and sex matched controls were consecutively selected. Exclusion criteria were: black race, age ≥55 years, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, other thrombophilias or connective tissue diseases, corticosteroids use and pregnancy. All subjects underwent Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and Echo-Tracking (ET), both in carotidal bed, to analyse vascular functional properties. Age (p = 0.92) and BMI (p = 0.91) were comparable in both groups. PAPS patients and controls had similar PWV (9.07 ± 1.08 m/s vs 9.42 ± 1.47 m/s, p = 0.34) as well as echo tracking parameters such as intima-media thickness (683 ± 171 µm vs 636 ± 140 µm, p = 0.52), carotideal diameter (p = 0.26), distensibility (p = 0.92), compliance coefficients (p = 0.36) and elastic modulus (p = 0.78). Patients with exclusively venous thrombosis showed lower PWV than patients with arterial thrombosis (8.55 ± 0.70 m/s vs 9.56 ± 0.94 m/s, p = 0.01), but no difference regarding intima-media thickness (683 ± 171 µm vs 636 ± 140 µm, p = 0.52) was observed. Patients with PAPS do not seem to be at higher risk of developing premature atherosclerosis. Patients who suffered exclusively venous thrombosis seem to be at lower risk than those with exclusively arterial events. Other studies need to confirm our findings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Fatty liver is associated with insulin resistance, risk of coronary heart disease, and early atherosclerosis in a large European population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastaldelli, Amalia; Kozakova, Michaela; Højlund, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Patients with fatty liver (FL) disease have a high risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The aim was to evaluate the association between FL, insulin resistance (IR), coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, and early atherosclerosis in a large European population (RISC Study). In 1...... cholesterol (r = 0.33), alanine aminotransferase (r = 0.48), aspartate aminotransferase (r = 0.25), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.39) and IMT (r = 0.30), and reduced insulin sensitivity (r = -0.43), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.50), adiponectin (r = -0.42), and physical activity (r = -0...

  1. Magnesium and trace metals: risk factors for coronary heart disease - associations between blood levels and angiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthey, J.; Stoeppler, M.; Morgenstern, W.; Nussel, E.; Opherk, D.; Weintraut, A.; Wesch, H.; Kubler, W.

    1981-01-01

    A deficiency or an excessive intake of metals with cardiovascular effects is suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and sudden death. Therefore, in 106 patients undergoing coronary arteriography, serum levels of six essential metals (magnesium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc) and whole blood concentrations of two elements without known essential function (cadmium and lead) were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, including the flameless technique, or neutron activation analysis. Our results suggest that a deficiency of magnesium but not of the other metals studied may be present in patients with severe CHD; elevated serum copper and manganese levels do not play a role in the development of CHD in the sample of patients studied; and cigarette smoking may be associated with increased serum cadmium levels, which may explain in part the contribution of smoking to the risk of sudden death in patients with CHD

  2. The risk and prognostic impact of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Data are limited on the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with coronary stents. We examined the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results......: All patients who underwent stent implantation from 2002 to 2005 were identified in the Western Denmark Heart Registry. The hazard ratio (HR) for death associated with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis was estimated with a Cox regression analysis with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis...... as time-dependent variables. A total of 12,277 patients were treated with stent implantation. Stent thrombosis was observed in 111 (0.9%) patients and in-stent restenosis in 503 (4.1%) patients within 12 months after the index PCI. Occurrence of stent thrombosis was associated with an increased risk...

  3. The relation between ankle-brachial index (ABI and coronary artery disease severity and risk factors: an angiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current study aims to determine the relation between ankle–brachialindex (ABI and angiographic findings and major cardiovascular risk factors in patients withsuspected coronary artery diseases (CAD in Isfahan.METHODS: In this cross-sectional descriptive-analytic research, patients with suspected CADwere studied. Characteristics of studied subjects including demographics, familial history, pastmedical history and atherosclerotic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension,hyperlipidemia and smoking were obtained using a standard questionnaire. ABI was measuredin all studied patients. ABI ≤ 0.9 (ABI+ was considered as peripheral vessel disease and ABI >0.9 (ABI- was considered as normal. Then, all studied patients underwent coronary arteryangiography. The results of the questionnaire and angiographic findings were compared in ABI+and ABI- groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 using ANOVA, t-test, Spearman's rankcorrelation coefficient, and discriminant analysis.RESULTS: In this study, 125 patients were investigated. ABI ≤ 0.9 was seen in 25 patients (20%.The prevalence of ABI+ among men and women was 25.9% and 7.5%, respectively (P = 0.01. Theprevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors was significantly higher in ABI+ patients than in ABIones(P < 0.05. ABI+ patients had more significant stenosis than ABI- ones. The mean ofocclusion was significantly higher in ABI+ patients with left main artery (LMA, right coronaryartery (RCA, left anterior descending artery (LAD, diagonal artery 1 (D1 and left circumflexartery (LCX involvements (P < 0.05.CONCLUSION: The findings of this research indicated that ABI could be a useful method inassessing both the atherosclerotic risk factors and the degree of coronary involvements insuspected patients. However, in order to make more accurate decisions for using this method indiagnosing and preventing CAD, we should plan further studies in large sample sizes of generalpopulation

  4. Alcohol intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome and mortality in men and women with and without hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindschou Hansen, Jane; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Jensen, Majken Karoline

    2011-01-01

    Although a light to moderate alcohol intake is associated with a lower risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), alcohol is also associated with risk of hypertension, which in turn is a strong risk factor of ACS. We examined whether middle-aged men and women with hypertension also benefit from a light...... to moderate alcohol intake in relation to risk of ACS and overall mortality. We used data from 57,053 men and women, aged 50-64, who participated in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study. Information on alcohol intake (amount and frequency) was reported by the participants. Hypertension status was assessed...... at baseline by combining blood pressure measurements and self-reports. During follow-up, 860 and 271 ACS events occurred among men and women. Irrespective of alcohol intake, participants with hypertension had a higher risk than participants with normal blood pressure. Alcohol intake was associated...

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of clopidogrel non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham I. Sakr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of clopidogrel non-response and identify its risk factors among Saudi patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January and June 2013, to assess the degree of platelet inhibition using the VerifyNow assay (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA after receiving clopidogrel standard loading dose. Clopidogrel resistance was defined as ≤15% platelet inhibition or greater than 213 P2Y12 reaction units (PRU. Results: Three hundred and four patients were included in the study. The mean age was 60.3 ± 11.4 years, and 73% were males. Clopidogrel doses were 300 mg (57%, 600 mg (27%, and 75 mg (16%. All patients used aspirin (81 mg in 94%. Approximately 66% (200/304 showed in vitro clopidogrel non-response, 54% had low platelet inhibitions, and 61% had high post-loading PRU. Using multivariate regression analysis that included all significant characteristics; only diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-4.27, p=0.005 and higher preloading PRU (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.40-4.11, p=0.002 remained significantly associated with higher clopidogrel non-response while myocardial infarction (OR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.15-0.81, p=0.014 remained significantly associated with lower clopidogrel non-response. The associations of morbid obesity and diuretics use with higher clopidogrel non-response were slightly attenuated. Conclusion: Our findings indicate a high rate of clopidogrel in-vitro non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography.

  6. Circulating Cellular Adhesion Molecules and Cognitive Function: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Yursun Yoon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveHigher circulating concentrations of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs can be used as markers of endothelial dysfunction. Given that the brain is highly vascularized, we assessed whether endothelial function is associated with cognitive performance.MethodWithin the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA Study, excluding N = 54 with stroke before year 25, we studied CAMs among N = 2,690 black and white men and women in CARDIA year 7 (1992–1993, ages 25–37 and N = 2,848 in CARDIA year 15 (2000–2001, ages 33–45. We included subjects with levels of circulating soluble CAMs measured in year 7 or 15 and cognitive function testing in year 25 (2010–2011, ages 43–55. Using multiple regression analysis, we evaluated the association between CAMs and year 25 cognitive test scores: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT, memory, Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST, speed of processing, and the Stroop Test (executive function.ResultAll CAM concentrations were greater in year 15 vs. year 7. Adjusting for age, race, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, diet, physical activity, participants in the fourth vs. the first quartile of CARDIA year 7 of circulating intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 scored worse on RAVLT, DSST, and Stroop Test (p ≤ 0.05 in CARDIA year 25. Other CAMs showed little association with cognitive test scores. Findings were similar for ICAM-1 assessed at year 15. Adjustment for possibly mediating physical factors attenuated the findings.ConclusionHigher circulating ICAM-1 at average ages 32 and 40 was associated with lower cognitive skills at average age 50. The study is consistent with the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction is associated with worse short-term memory, speed of processing, and executive function.

  7. Coronary artery bypass graft readmission rates and risk factors - A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, T Robert; White, Robert S; Gaber-Baylis, Licia K; Turnbull, Zachary A; Rong, Lisa Q

    2018-04-17

    Hospital readmissions contribute substantially to the overall healthcare cost. Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is of particular interest due to its relatively high short-term readmission rates and mean hospital charges. A retrospective review was performed on 2007-2011 data from California, Florida, and New York from the State Inpatient Databases, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. All patients ≥18 years of age who underwent isolated CABG and met inclusion/exclusion criteria were included. Insurance status was categorized by Medicaid, Medicare, Private Insurance, Uninsured, and Other. Primary outcomes were unadjusted rates and adjusted odds of readmission at 30- and 90-days. Secondary outcomes included diagnosis at readmission. A total of 177,229 were included in the analyses after assessing for exclusion criteria. Overall 30-day readmission rate was 16.1%; rates were highest within Medicare (18.4%) and Medicaid (20.2%) groups and lowest in the private insurance group (11.7%; p readmission diagnoses were atrial fibrillation (26.7%), pleural effusion (22.5%), and wound infection (17.7%). Medicare patients had the highest proportion of readmissions with atrial fibrillation (31.7%) and pleural effusions (23.3%), while Medicaid patients had the highest proportion of readmissions with wound infections (21.8%). Similar results were found at 90 days. Risk factors for readmission included non-private insurance, age, female sex, non-white race, low median household income, non-routine discharge, length of stay, and certain comorbidities and complications. CABG readmission rates remain high and are associated with insurance status and racial and socioeconomic markers. Further investigation is necessary to better delineate the underlying factors that relate racial and socioeconomic disparities to CABG readmissions. Understanding these factors will be key to improving healthcare outcomes and expenditure. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by

  8. Circulating Cellular Adhesion Molecules and Cognitive Function: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Cynthia Yursun; Steffen, Lyn M; Gross, Myron D; Launer, Lenore J; Odegaard, Andrew; Reiner, Alexander; Sanchez, Otto; Yaffe, Kristine; Sidney, Stephen; Jacobs, David R

    2017-01-01

    Higher circulating concentrations of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) can be used as markers of endothelial dysfunction. Given that the brain is highly vascularized, we assessed whether endothelial function is associated with cognitive performance. Within the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study, excluding N  = 54 with stroke before year 25, we studied CAMs among N  = 2,690 black and white men and women in CARDIA year 7 (1992-1993, ages 25-37) and N  = 2,848 in CARDIA year 15 (2000-2001, ages 33-45). We included subjects with levels of circulating soluble CAMs measured in year 7 or 15 and cognitive function testing in year 25 (2010-2011, ages 43-55). Using multiple regression analysis, we evaluated the association between CAMs and year 25 cognitive test scores: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT, memory), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST, speed of processing), and the Stroop Test (executive function). All CAM concentrations were greater in year 15 vs. year 7. Adjusting for age, race, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, diet, physical activity, participants in the fourth vs. the first quartile of CARDIA year 7 of circulating intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) scored worse on RAVLT, DSST, and Stroop Test ( p  ≤ 0.05) in CARDIA year 25. Other CAMs showed little association with cognitive test scores. Findings were similar for ICAM-1 assessed at year 15. Adjustment for possibly mediating physical factors attenuated the findings. Higher circulating ICAM-1 at average ages 32 and 40 was associated with lower cognitive skills at average age 50. The study is consistent with the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction is associated with worse short-term memory, speed of processing, and executive function.

  9. Is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a risk factor for epistaxis after coronary artery bypass graft surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingoz, Faruk; Oz, Bilgehan Savas; Arslan, Gokhan; Guler, Adem; Sahin, Mehmet Ali; Gunay, Celalettin; Arslan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has customarily been associated with increased surgical morbidity and mortality rates after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between epistaxis and COPD after CABG surgery. There were 3 443 patients who consecutively underwent isolated CABG from January 2002 to March 2012. We retrospectively analysed the data of 27 patients (0.8%) with newly developed and serious spontaneous epistaxis, which required consultation with the Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) Department. The patients were divided into three groups according to severity of nasal bleeding. Twenty-one (77.7%) patients in the three groups had COPD. There were 19 males (70%) and eight females (30%). Their ages ranged between 52 and 72 years (mean 61 ± 5). Fifty-five per cent of the patients had hypertension and 78% had COPD. The overall duration of hospital stay was six to 11 days (mean 7.9 ± 1.1). Epistaxis was seen particularly on the fourth and seventh days postoperatively and 17 patients (63%) were treated with anterior, posterior, or anterior and posterior nasal packing (group 1). Nasal bleeding was controlled with electrocautery in six patients (22%) (group 2), and four (15%) were treated with surgical excision and blood transfusions (group 3). All patients (100%) had a good recovery with no mortality. The high coincidence between epistaxis and COPD made us wonder whether COPD may be a risk factor for epistaxis after CABG surgery. However, we could not find any direct causative link between COPD and epistaxis in patients who had undergone CABG. Epistaxis was more common in patients with COPD and it was more serious clinically in patients who had both COPD and hypertension.

  10. No major differences in 30-day outcomes in high-risk patients randomized to off-pump versus on-pump coronary bypass surgery: the best bypass surgery trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Perko, Mario J; Lund, Jens T

    2010-01-01

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting compared with coronary revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass seems safe and results in about the same outcome in low-risk patients. Observational studies indicate that off-pump surgery may provide more benefit in high-risk patients. Our objective...... was to compare 30-day outcomes in high-risk patients randomized to coronary artery bypass grafting without or with cardiopulmonary bypass....

  11. Reptile Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Describes an award-winning bulletin board for introducing a unit on reptiles. This interactive bulletin board contains fun facts and counters common misconceptions about reptiles. Twelve true-false statements are hidden behind pull-up flaps. Four pictures ask students to identify the difference between often-confused animals. (PR)

  12. Standard deviation of carotid young's modulus and presence or absence of plaque improves prediction of coronary heart disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lili; Zhang, Yanling; Qian, Ming; Xiao, Yang; Meng, Long; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Hairong

    2017-11-01

    The stiffness of large arteries and the presence or absence of plaque are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Because arterial walls are biologically heterogeneous, the standard deviation of Young's modulus (YM-std) of the large arteries may better predict coronary atherosclerosis. However, the role of YM-std in the occurrence of coronary events has not been addressed so far. Therefore, this study investigated whether the carotid YM-std and the presence or absence of plaque improved CHD risk prediction. One hundred and three patients with CHD (age 66 ± 11 years) and 107 patients at high risk of atherosclerosis (age 61 ± 7 years) were recruited. Carotid YM was measured by the vessel texture matching method, and YM-std was calculated. Carotid intima-media thickness was measured by the MyLab 90 ultrasound Platform employed dedicated software RF-tracking technology. In logistic regression analysis, YM-std (OR = 1·010; 95% CI = 1·003-1·016), carotid plaque (OR = 16·759; 95% CI = 3·719-75·533) and YM-std plus plaque (OR = 0·989; 95% CI = 0·981-0·997) were independent predictors of CHD. The traditional risk factors (TRF) plus YM-std plus plaque model showed a significant improvement in area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC), which increased from 0·717 (TRF only) to 0·777 (95% CI for the difference in adjusted AUC: 0·010-0·110). Carotid YM-std is a powerful independent predictor of CHD. Adding plaque and YM-std to TRF improves CHD risk prediction. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Prevalence of coronary artery disease and coronary risk factors in Kerala, South India: A population survey – Design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geevar Zachariah

    2013-05-01

    Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional population survey. We estimated the sample size based on an anticipated prevalence of 7.4% of CAD for rural and 11% for urban Kerala. The derived sample sizes for rural and urban areas were 3000 and 2400, respectively. The urban areas for sampling constituted one ward each from three municipal corporations at different parts of the state. The rural sample was drawn from two panchayats each in the same districts as the urban sample. One adult from each household in the age group of 20–59 years was selected using Kish method. All subjects between 60 and 79 years were included from each household. A detailed questionnaire was administered to assess the risk factors, history of CAD, family history, educational status, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, physical activity and treatment for CAD; anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, electrocardiogram and fasting blood levels of glucose and lipids were recorded.

  14. Is metabolic syndrome predictive of prevalence, extent, and risk of coronary artery disease beyond its components? results from the multinational coronary ct angiography evaluation for clinical outcome: An international multicenter registry (confirm) : An international multicenter registry (confirm)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ahmadi (Amir); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); H. Gransar (Heidi); Kalra, D. (Dan); R. Heo (Ran); S. Achenbach (Stephan); D. Andreini (Daniele); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel S.); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); M. Gomez (Millie); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); N. Hindoyan (Niree); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G. Pontone (Gianluca); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); A.M. Dunning (Allison M.); J.K. Min (James)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAlthough metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and events, its added prognostic value beyond its components remains unknown. This study compared the prevalence, severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), and prognosis of patients with metabolic

  15. Association of Plasma Myeloperoxidase Level with Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study aimed to investigate whether the change of plasma myeloperoxidase (MPO level would be associated with the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD among diabetic patients. Methods. 339 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM underwent coronary angiography. Of them, 204 cases had CAD and were assigned to CAD group and 135 cases without CAD were assigned to non-CAD group. Results. Compared to non-CAD group, CAD group had higher level of plasma MPO (p<0.01. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that plasma MPO level was correlated with Gensini score. Multiple logistic analysis showed that the odds ratios for CAD across increasing tertiles of MPO level were 1.191 (0.971–1.547 and 1.488 (1.115–2.228 (p=0.048, p=0.009 versus 1st tertile of MPO level, resp. by adjusting for age, sex, and other conventional risk factors for CAD. The subjects were stratified into nine groups according to tertiles of MPO and HbA1c. The odds ratio for CAD was significantly higher in group with highest levels of MPO and HbA1c (OR = 4.08, p<0.01. Conclusion. Plasma MPO level was positively correlated with the degree of coronary artery stenosis in type 2 diabetic patients, and increasing blood glucose might amplify the association between MPO and CAD.

  16. Psycho-emotional disorders as incoming risk factors for myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Javier López; Izquierdo Coronel, Bárbara; Galán Gil, David; Espinosa Pascual, María Jesús; Martinez Peredo, Carlos Gustavo; Awamleh García, Paula; Górriz Magaña, Juan; Mata Caballero, Rebeca; Fraile Sanz, Alfonso; Muñiz, Javier; Martín, Joaquín J Alonso

    2018-01-01

    There is an emerging field underlying the myocardial infarction (MI) with non-obstruc-tive coronary arteries (MINOCA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of psycho-emotional disorders and social habits in MINOCA patients. The study included 95 consecutive patients diagnosed of MINOCA and 178 patients with MI and obstructive lesions. MINOCA patients were included when they fulfilled the three main criteria: accomplishment of the Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction, absence of obstructive coronary arteries and no clinically overt specific cause for the acute presentation. MINOCA patients had a higher frequency of previous psychiatric illnesses than the obstructive coronary arteries group (29.7% vs. 12.9%, p = 0.001). MINOCA patients recognized emotional stress in 75.7% of the cases, while only 32.1% of the obstructive related group did (p Psycho-emotional disorders are related to MINOCA and they could act as risk fac-tor. This relationship is maintained after excluding takotsubo from the analysis. (Cardiol J 2018; 25, 1: 24-31).

  17. Contesting lifestyle risk and gendering coronary candidacy: lay epidemiology of heart disease in Finland in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauho, Mikko

    2017-09-01

    This study addresses two issues currently under critical discussion in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the relative neglect of women and the individualised nature of key risk factors. It focuses on the North Karelia project (NKP), a community programme aimed at coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention in a predominantly rural Finnish region in the early 1970s, that is, during a period when the epidemiological understanding of CVD still was relatively new and actively promoted. Adopting the notions of lay epidemiology and coronary candidacy, culturally mediated explanatory models lay people use to assess who is likely to develop heart disease and why, the study shows that locals targeted by the project critically engaged with both of these bias. Based on the rich materials resulting from project activities the study shows, first, how many locals subsumed the individualised and lifestyle-based approach to CHD prevention promoted by NKP under a more general framework emphasising the health effects of ongoing structural changes in the area, and second, how women constructed themselves as viable coronary candidates. The case supports the position in the current discussions on lay expertise that wants to integrate lay experiences more firmly into epidemiological studies and public health. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  18. Perioperative risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy in women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra S Faritous

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged mechanical ventilation is an important recognized complication occurring during cardiovascular surgery procedures. This study was done to assess the perioperative risk factors related to postoperative pulmonary complications and tracheostomy in women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods: It was a retrospective study on 5,497 patients, including 31 patients with prolonged ventilatory support and 5,466 patients without it; from the latter group, 350 patients with normal condition (extubated in 6-8 hours without any complication were selected randomly. Possible perioperative risk factors were compared between the two groups using a binary logistic regression model. Results: Among the 5,497 women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, 31 women needed prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV, and 15 underwent tracheostomy. After logistic regression, 7 factors were determined as being independent perioperative risk factors for PMV. Discussion: Age ≥70 years old, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤30%, preexisting respiratory or renal disease, emergency or re-do operation and use of preoperative inotropic agents are the main risk factors determined in this study on women undergoing CABG.

  19. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with coronary artery disease risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huifeng; Dong, Pingshuan; Yang, Xuming; Liu, Zhenghao

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk using a meta-analysis. All eligible studies were identified through a search of PubMed, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Database of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals, and China Biology Medical literature database (CBM) before June 2014. The association between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and CAD risk was estimated by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 72 studies including 23557 cases and 21526 controls were eventually collected. The PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was significant associated with CAD risk in overall population (OR=1.19, 95% CI 1.10-1.28, P 5G polymorphism was a risk factor for CAD.

  20. Healthy lifestyle through young adulthood and the presence of low cardiovascular disease risk profile in middle age: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in (Young) Adults (CARDIA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L; Loria, Catherine M; Colangelo, Laura A; Spring, Bonnie; Moller, Arlen C; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2012-02-28

    A low cardiovascular disease risk profile (untreated cholesterol risk profile. We examined whether adopting a healthy lifestyle throughout young adulthood is associated with the presence of the low cardiovascular disease risk profile in middle age. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in (Young) Adults (CARDIA) study sample consisted of 3154 black and white participants 18 to 30 years of age at year 0 (1985-1986) who attended the year 0, 7, and 20 examinations. Healthy lifestyle factors defined at years 0, 7, and 20 included average body mass index risk profile at year 20 were 3.0%, 14.6%, 29.5%, 39.2%, and 60.7% for people with 0 or 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 healthy lifestyle factors, respectively (P for trend risk profile in middle age. Public health and individual efforts are needed to improve the adoption and maintenance of healthy lifestyles in young adults.

  1. Genetic regulation of serum phytosterol levels and risk of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teupser, Daniel; Baber, Ronny; Ceglarek, Uta; Scholz, Markus; Illig, Thomas; Gieger, Christian; Holdt, Lesca M; Leichtle, Alexander; Greiser, Karin H; Huster, Dominik; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Schäfer, Arne; Braund, Peter S; Tiret, Laurence; Stark, Klaus; Raaz-Schrauder, Dorette; Fiedler, Georg M; Wilfert, Wolfgang; Beutner, Frank; Gielen, Stephan; Grosshennig, Anika; König, Inke R; Lichtner, Peter; Heid, Iris M; Kluttig, Alexander; El Mokhtari, Nour E; Rubin, Diana; Ekici, Arif B; Reis, André; Garlichs, Christoph D; Hall, Alistair S; Matthes, Gert; Wittekind, Christian; Hengstenberg, Christian; Cambien, Francois; Schreiber, Stefan; Werdan, Karl; Meitinger, Thomas; Loeffler, Markus; Samani, Nilesh J; Erdmann, Jeanette; Wichmann, H-Erich; Schunkert, Heribert; Thiery, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are taken up from food and can serve as biomarkers of cholesterol uptake. Serum levels are under tight genetic control. We used a genomic approach to study the molecular regulation of serum phytosterol levels and potential links to coronary artery disease (CAD). A genome-wide association study for serum phytosterols (campesterol, sitosterol, brassicasterol) was conducted in a population-based sample from KORA (Cooperative Research in the Region of Augsburg) (n=1495) with subsequent replication in 2 additional samples (n=1157 and n=1760). Replicated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with premature CAD in a metaanalysis of 11 different samples comprising 13 764 CAD cases and 13 630 healthy controls. Genetic variants in the ATP-binding hemitransporter ABCG8 and at the blood group ABO locus were significantly associated with serum phytosterols. Effects in ABCG8 were independently related to SNPs rs4245791 and rs41360247 (combined P=1.6 x 10(-50) and 6.2 x 10(-25), respectively; n=4412). Serum campesterol was elevated 12% for each rs4245791 T-allele. The same allele was associated with 40% decreased hepatic ABCG8 mRNA expression (P=0.009). Effects at the ABO locus were related to SNP rs657152 (combined P=9.4x10(-13)). Alleles of ABCG8 and ABO associated with elevated phytosterol levels displayed significant associations with increased CAD risk (rs4245791 odds ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.14; P=2.2 x 10(-6); rs657152 odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.19; P=9.4 x 10(-6)), whereas alleles at ABCG8 associated with reduced phytosterol levels were associated with reduced CAD risk (rs41360247 odds ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.78 to 0.91; P=1.3 x 10(-5)). Common variants in ABCG8 and ABO are strongly associated with serum phytosterol levels and show concordant and previously unknown associations with CAD.

  2. The profile of physical activity and coronary risk factors in Monica Jakarta survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Kusmana

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A population study was done to know the profile of daily physical activity including sports, and its influence on major coronary risk factors in three districts of Jakarta using questionnaire, physicaL and laboratory examination, and 12 leads ECC. The questionnaire gave the data about physical activity (work load and sport, and smoking habit. Work load was divided into light, moderate and heavy. Sport activity was divided into regular (≥ twice a week, 20 minutes or more, irregular (≤ once or occasional, and no sport activity. In addition, blood pressure  (hypertension was grouped according to WHO criteria, total cholesterol (regarded as hypercholesterolemia when > 200 mg%, and ECG were measured. ECG interpretation was done using Minnesota Code. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS. Out of 2400 people there were  2073(86.4%  respondents that consist of 1086 females and 987 males. The profile of physical activity as a whole showed 33.4% light, 50.7% moderate and 15.8% heavy activity. OnLy 22.5% of respondents had sport regularly, while 30.3% had sport irregularly, and 47.2% had no sport activity. The type of sport was walking (45.0%, callisthenic (22.0% jogging/running (15.6%, badminton (6.5%, volley ball/soccer (4.1%, tennis (3.8%, and golf (0.1%. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of hypertension between people with heavy (12.0%, moderate (44.8% and light work load (43.2% (P<0.003, in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (13.2%: 50.8%: 36% (P<0.0003, and smoking (19.7%; 44.1%: 36.2% (P<0.00001, respectively. The difference also occurred in the prevalence of abnormal ECG (Q/QS, ST and T  abnormalities between people having regular sport (19.0%, irregular (22.7%, and no sport activity (58.3% (P<0.05. The number of respondents having enough physical activity (including regular sport was relatively low. Therefore, promotion should be done as a preventive method to overcome cardiovascular risk factors. (Med J Indones

  3. [Myocardial bridge as the only cause of acute coronary syndrome among the young patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miakinkova, Liudmila O; Teslenko, Yurii V; Tsyhanenko, Irina V

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Myocardial bridge is an inborn anomaly of coronary artery development, when a part of it is submerged in a myocard, which is pressing the coronary artery to a systola and restrains coronary blood circulation. Generally this feature of coronary blood circulation does not cause any clinical symptoms because the 85% of coronary blood stream of the left ventricle is provided by diastolic filling. Hemodynamic changes in atherosclerosis, tahicardie, hypertrophie of myocard are leading to the manifestation of clinical symptoms of ischemia. The aim: The purpose of the investigation was to discover the features of clinical development of acute coronary syndrome caused by myocardial bridge of young patients without the features of atherosclerotical harm of coronary arteries. Materials and methods: Eight causes of acute coronary syndrome among patients of 28±8,5 years with myocardial bridge which was revealed during coronary angiography, were investigated. Standardized examination and conservative treatment of patients was held, except for three who have got interventional therapy. Results: According to our investigation, myocardial bridge of all investigated patients was located in the middle of the third front interventricular branch of the left coronary artery. Causes of acute coronary syndrome manifestation were tahicardia, spasms of coronary artery, inducted by iatrogenic factors hypertrophie of myocard, hypertrophic cardiomyopatie. Connection between the manifestation of clinical symptoms and length of tunneled segment which did not depend on the level of systolic compres was discovered. The results of conservative and interventional treatment were analyzed. Conclusions: Myocardial bridge can be the cause of myocardial ischemia among patients without signs of coronary atherosclerosis with additional hemodynamic risk facts such as tahicardia, spasms of coronary artery, hypertrophie of myocard. Clinical symptomatology of the acute coronary syndrome is more

  4. The New York State risk score for predicting in-hospital/30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Edward L; Farrell, Louise Szypulski; Walford, Gary; Jacobs, Alice K; Berger, Peter B; Holmes, David R; Stamato, Nicholas J; Sharma, Samin; King, Spencer B

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to develop a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) risk score for in-hospital/30-day mortality. Risk scores are simplified linear scores that provide clinicians with quick estimates of patients' short-term mortality rates for informed consent and to determine the appropriate intervention. Earlier PCI risk scores were based on in-hospital mortality. However, for PCI, a substantial percentage of patients die within 30 days of the procedure after discharge. New York's Percutaneous Coronary Interventions Reporting System was used to develop an in-hospital/30-day logistic regression model for patients undergoing PCI in 2010, and this model was converted into a simple linear risk score that estimates mortality rates. The score was validated by applying it to 2009 New York PCI data. Subsequent analyses evaluated the ability of the score to predict complications and length of stay. A total of 54,223 patients were used to develop the risk score. There are 11 risk factors that make up the score, with risk factor scores ranging from 1 to 9, and the highest total score is 34. The score was validated based on patients undergoing PCI in the previous year, and accurately predicted mortality for all patients as well as patients who recently suffered a myocardial infarction (MI). The PCI risk score developed here enables clinicians to estimate in-hospital/30-day mortality very quickly and quite accurately. It accurately predicts mortality for patients undergoing PCI in the previous year and for MI patients, and is also moderately related to perioperative complications and length of stay. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Low Birth Weight as The Risk factor of Coronary Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Wahyu Wibowo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Low birth weight, a nutritional deficiency is related to the increased in the coronary heart disease insidence. Low birth weight is correlated with the hipotalamus-pituitary-adrenal responsible for the the concentration of cortisol in sirculation, increased in homosistein, insuline resistence and increased C reactive protein playing role on the aterosclerosis process predispose the corronary disease. This paper will discuss the relationship between the low birth weight and the ateroclesoris process leading to coronary heart disesase (Sains Medika, 3(2:185-200.

  6. A Study of Correlation of Neck Circumference with Framingham Risk Score as a Predictor of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppad, Anand K; Kaulgud, Ram S; Arun, B S

    2017-09-01

    It has been observed that metabolic syndrome is risk factor for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and exerts its effects through fat deposition and vascular aging. CAD has been acknowledged as a leading cause of death. In earlier studies, the metabolic risk has been estimated by Framingham risk score. Recent studies have shown that Neck Circumference (NC) has a good correlation with other traditional anthropometric measurements and can be used as marker of obesity. It also correlates with Framingham risk score, which is slightly more sophisticated measure of CAD risk. To assess the risk of CAD in a subject based on NC and to correlate the NC to Framingham risk score. The present cross-sectional study, done at Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Hubli, Karnataka, India, includes 100 subjects. The study duration was of one year from 1 st January 2015 to 31 st December 2015. Anthropometric indices Body Mass Index (BMI) and NC were correlated with 10 year CAD risk as calculated by Framingham risk score. The correlation between BMI, NC, vascular age and Framingham risk score was calculated using Karl Pearson's correlation method. NC has a strong correlation with 10 year CAD risk (p≤0.001). NC was significantly greater in males as compared to females (p≤0.001). Males had greater risk of cardiovascular disease as reflected by higher 10 year Framingham risk score (p≤0.0035). NC gives simple and easy prediction of CAD risk and is more reliable than traditional risk markers like BMI. NC correlates positively with 10 year Framingham risk score.

  7. The impact of obesity on risk factors and prevalence and prognosis of coronary heart disease-the obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schutter, Alban; Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a host of cardiovascular risk factors and its prevalence is rising rapidly. Despite strong evidence that obesity predisposes to the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD), numerous studies have shown an inverse relationship between various measures of obesity (most commonly body mass index) and outcomes in established CHD. In this article we review the evidence surrounding the ≪obesity paradox≫ in the secondary care of CHD patients and the CHD presentations where a paradox has been found. Finally we discuss the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness and a number of mechanisms which may offer potential explanations for this puzzling phenomenon. © 2014.

  8. The relation between coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic subjects and both traditional risk factors and living in the city centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambrechtsen, J; Gerke, Oke; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    atherosclerosis. The relationship between CAC and several demographic and clinical parameters were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. Results:  A total of 1225 individuals participated in the study, of whom 250 (20%) were living in the centres of major Danish cities. Gender and age showed......Objective:  To evaluate the association between the risk factor of living in the city centre as a surrogate for air pollution and the presence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in a population of asymptomatic Danish subjects. Design and subjects:  A random sample of 1825 men and women...

  9. Nutritional related cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary artery disease in IRAN: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzali Naser

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims There are limited findings available on coronary artery disease (CAD risk factors and nutritional pattern of CAD patients in Iran. The purpose of this study was to compare nutritional-related risk factors of CAD patients with that of matched controls. Methods In a case-control design, dietary patterns and CAD risk factors of 108 documented patients (determined by cardiac catheterization showing greater than 70% stenosis or established myocardial infarction whom were admitted to coronary care units (CCU of Ahvaz teaching hospitals were compared with that of 108 gender- and age-matched subjects of normal cardiac catheterization (lesser than 40% stenosis. Measured variables consisted of blood lipid profile, smoking habits, dietary patterns, anthropometric indices and blood pressure levels. Results Almost all patients had hypertriglyceridemia and high LDL-C levels. Odds ratios (CI 95% for consuming fish, tea, vegetable oils were 0.55(0.31-0.91, 0.3(0.15-0.65, 0.23(0.13-0.42, respectively. However, consumption of hydrogenated fats, and full-fat yoghurt was associated with higher CAD risk (OR = 2.12(1.23-3.64 and 2.35(1.32-4.18, respectively. Patients' serum lipid profiles, sugar concentrations, and blood pressure levels were significantly higher than defined cut-off points of the known risk factors. Considerable numbers of the control group also showed high levels of the known risk factors. Conclusions Consumption of fish, tea and vegetable oils shown to have protective effect on CAD while full fat yoghurt and hydrogenated fats increase the risk of CAD. Moreover, CAD patients obviously have higher blood lipids and sugar concentrations, blood pressure, body fat percent and BMI levels compared with their matched counterparts. We need to define specific local cut-off points with more practical criteria to detect CAD patients.

  10. Lower Plasma Fetuin-A Levels Are Associated With a Higher Mortality Risk in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuechen; Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Qian; Li, Qing; Li, Yanping; Ling, Wenhua

    2017-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the association of circulating fetuin-A with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. We measured plasma fetuin-A in 1620 patients using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The patients were members of the Guangdong coronary artery disease cohort and were recruited between October 2008 and December 2011. Cox regression models were used to estimate the association between plasma fetuin-A and the risk of mortality. A total of 206 deaths were recorded during a median follow-up of 5.9 years, 146 of whom died from CVD. The hazard ratios for the second and third tertiles of the fetuin-A levels (using the first tertile as a reference) were 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.96) and 0.51 (95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.78) for CVD mortality ( P =0.005) and 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.91) and 0.48 (95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.70) for all-cause mortality ( P <0.001), respectively. Lower plasma fetuin-A levels were associated with an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality in patients with coronary artery disease independently of traditional CVD risk factors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Abdominal fat and risk of coronary heart disease in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Beate G.; Visseren, Frank L. J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    Objective: We investigated whether the presence of concomitant coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be explained by intra-abdominal fat accumulation and compared different measures of adiposity as predictors of CHD in patients with PAD. Research Methods

  12. Physical inactivity, abdominal obesity and risk of coronary heart disease in apparently healthy men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, B. J.; Rana, J. S.; Lemieux, I.; Després, J.-P.; Kastelein, J. J. P.; Boekholdt, S. M.; Wareham, N. J.; Khaw, K.-T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that for any given body mass index (BMI) category, active individuals would have a smaller waist circumference than inactive individuals. Our second objective was to examine the respective contribution of waist circumference and physical inactivity on coronary heart

  13. Off-pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft in a High Risk Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) entails the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The procedure is safe but it's not without complications like neurocognitive deficits, cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial ischemic injury and activation of inflammatory pathways that contribute to pulmonary, renal, hematologic ...

  14. Risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Indians of Durban

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major problem in migrant ... Indians in the metropolitan area of Durban to determine the prevalence and ... and judging by the high MRs for all three cardiovascular diseases ... circumstances than the indigent rural populations in Iridia, had very ..... Left ventricular hypertrophy.

  15. Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deloukas, Panos; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Farrall, Martin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Thompson, John R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Saleheen, Danish; Erdmann, Jeanette; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Stirrups, Kathleen; König, Inke R.; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Asa; Hall, Alistair S.; Lee, Jong-Young; Willer, Cristen J.; Chambers, John C.; Esko, Tõnu; Folkersen, Lasse; Goel, Anuj; Grundberg, Elin; Havulinna, Aki S.; Ho, Weang K.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Eriksson, Niclas; Kleber, Marcus E.; Kristiansson, Kati; Lundmark, Per; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Rafelt, Suzanne; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Zuydam, Natalie; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Altshuler, David; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barroso, Inês; Braund, Peter S.; Burgdorf, Christof; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cox, David; Dimitriou, Maria; Do, Ron; Doney, Alex S. F.; El Mokhtari, NourEddine; Eriksson, Per; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gigante, Bruna; Groop, Leif; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hager, Jörg; Hallmans, Göran; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hunt, Sarah E.; Kang, Hyun M.; Illig, Thomas; Kessler, Thorsten; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lundmark, Anders; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Mihailov, Evelin; Maouche, Seraya; Morris, Andrew D.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikus, Kjell; Peden, John F.; Rayner, N. William; Rasheed, Asif; Rosinger, Silke; Rubin, Diana; Rumpf, Moritz P.; Schäfer, Arne; Sivananthan, Mohan; Song, Ci; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Wagner, Peter J.; Wells, George A.; Wild, Philipp S.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Basart, Hanneke; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brambilla, Paolo; Cambien, Francois; Cupples, Adrienne L.; de Faire, Ulf; Dehghan, Abbas; Diemert, Patrick; Epstein, Stephen E.; Evans, Alun; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Gauguier, Dominique; Go, Alan S.; Goodall, Alison H.; Gudnason, Villi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Holm, Hilma; Iribarren, Carlos; Jang, Yangsoo; Kähönen, Mika; Kee, Frank; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Klopp, Norman; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lee, Ji-Young; Lind, Lars; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Parish, Sarah; Park, Jeong E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peters, Annette; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric; Shah, Svati H.; Sinisalo, Juha; Stark, Klaus; Stefansson, Kari; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas; Zimmermann, Martina E.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hovingh, G. Kees; Dedoussis, George; Franks, Paul W.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Schreiber, Stefan; Ripatti, Samuli; Blankenberg, Stefan S.; Perola, Markus; Clarke, Robert; Boehm, Bernhard O.; O'Donnell, Christopher; Reilly, Muredach P.; März, Winfried; Collins, Rory; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hamsten, Anders; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Danesh, John; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Roberts, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2)

  16. Particulate air pollution, coronary heart disease and individual risk assessment: a general overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassing, Carlijne; Twickler, Marcel; Brunekreef, Bert; Cassee, Flemming; Doevendans, Pieter; Kastelein, John; Cramer, Maarten Jan

    2009-01-01

    Both long-term and short-term exposure to air pollution is associated with a marked increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality because of the coronary syndrome and its complications. The exact molecular mechanism that is responsible for these acute and chronic effects is not elucidated yet.

  17. Depression as a non-causal variable risk marker in coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Zuidersma, Marij; de Jonge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: After decades of investigations, explanations for the prospective association between depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) are still incomplete. Discussion: Depression is often suggested to be causally related to CHD. Based on the available literature, we would rather argue that

  18. Particulate air pollution, coronary heart disease and individual risk assessment: a general overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassing, C.; Twickler, M.; Brunekreef, B.; Cassee, F.R.; Doevendans, P.A.; Kastelein, J.; Cramer, M.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Both long-term and short-term exposure to air pollution is associated with a marked increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality because of the coronary syndrome and its complications. The exact molecular mechanism that is responsible for these acute and chronic effects is not elucidated yet.

  19. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial-wall-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M. M.; Zhao, Wei; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy ...

  20. Association of type D personality with unhealthy lifestyle, and estimated risk of coronary events in the general Icelandic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svansdottir, Erla; Denollet, Johan; Thorsson, Bolli; Gudnason, Thorarinn; Halldorsdottir, Sigrun; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van den Broek, Krista C; Karlsson, Hrobjartur D

    2013-04-01

    Type D personality is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality risk in cardiovascular disease patients, but the mechanisms explaining this risk are unclear. We examined whether Type D was associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, estimated risk of developing CAD, and previous cardiac events. Cross-sectional study in the general Icelandic population. A random sample of 4753 individuals (mean age 49.1 ± 12.0 years; 49% men) from the REFINE-Reykjavik study completed assessments for Type D personality and conventional CAD risk factors. Ten-year risk of developing CAD was estimated with the Icelandic risk calculator. Type D personality (22% of sample) was associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension (35 vs. 31%, p = 0.009), but less use of hypertension medication (58 vs. 65%, p = 0.013) in hypertensives, more diabetes (6 vs. 4%, p = 0.023), wider waist circumference (p = 0.007), and elevated body mass index (p = 0.025) and blood lipids (p lifestyle-related CAD risk factors, a higher estimated risk of developing CAD, and higher incidence of previous cardiac events. Unhealthy lifestyles may partly explain the adverse cardiovascular effect of Type D personality.

  1. The estimated risk for coronary heart disease and prevalence of dyslipidemia among workers of information technology industries in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Chi; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Tsai, Wei-I; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2011-03-18

    Individuals working in information technology (IT) industries suffer from high work stress, possibly causing adverse impacts on their health. However, studies of cardiovascular risk factors among these workers are lacking. The aims of this study were to evaluate the estimated risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and prevalence of dyslipidemia among IT workers. A total of 941 employees from 11 IT companies were enrolled and the anthropometrics and serum lipid profiles were measured. The 10-year risk for CHD was calculated based on the Framingham risk score. Compared with lipid profiles in a representative sample (n=6589), IT workers had a significantly higher prevalence of obesity, hypercholesterolemia, low level of HDL-C, and high level of LDL-C in each age group. Their overall estimated 10-year risk for CHD was higher than the average risk of an age- and gender-matched population (2.91% vs. 2.79%, p=0.027). Working for more than 10h/day was associated with a higher estimated CHD risk (3.62% vs. 2.54%, p<0.01). A higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia was noted among IT workers. Their estimated 10-year CHD risk was also higher than average. More aggressive interventions to reduce the risk of CHD in this population are needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiologic studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California: prevalence of coronary and hypertensive heart disease and associated risk factors. [Coronary and hypertensive heart disease in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmot, M G; Syme, S L; Kagan, A; Kato, H; Cohen, J B; Belsky, J L

    1974-01-01

    A study of coronary heart disease (CHD) among Japanese migrants compared with Japanese living in Japan provided the opportunity to study factors possibly responsible for the high rates of CHD in America as compared with Japan. Comparable methods were employed in examining 11,900 men of Japanese ancestry aged 45-69 living in Japan, Hawaii, and California. The age-adjusted prevalence rates/1000 for definite CHD as determined by electrocardiogram were: Japan 5.3, Hawaii 5.2, and California 10.8. For definite plus possible CHD the rates were 25.4, 34.7, and 44.6. The prevalence of angina pectoris and pain of possible myocardial infarction, determined by questionnaire, showed a similar gradient. Elevated serum cholesterol showed a Japan < Hawaii < California gradient, but the prevalence of hypertension in Japan was intermediate between the prevalence in Hawaii and the higher prevalence in California. The three geographical locations were compared as to prevalence of CHD at comparable levels of blood pressure and cholesterol. At each blood pressure level and at each cholesterol level, the greater prevalence of CHD in California persisted. These facts, plus the near universality of smoking in Japan, suggest that conventional risk factors only partly explain the observed gradient in CHD. (auth)

  3. Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease and Management of Coronary Risk in Daily Clinical Practice: Results from a Mediterranean Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Echeverría

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are conflicting data on the prevalence of coronary events and the quality of the management of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF in HIV-infected patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective descriptive study to determine the prevalence of coronary events and to evaluate the management of CVRF in a Mediterranean cohort of 3760 HIV-1-infected patients from April 1983 through June 2011. Results. We identified 81 patients with a history of a coronary event (prevalence 2.15%; 83% of them suffered an acute myocardial infarction. At the time of the coronary event, CVRF were highly prevalent (60.5% hypertension, 48% dyslipidemia, and 16% diabetes mellitus. Other CVRF, such as smoking, hypertension, lack of exercise, and body mass index, were not routinely assessed. After the coronary event, a significant decrease in total cholesterol P=0.025 and LDL-cholesterol P=0.004 was observed. However, the percentage of patients who maintained LDL-cholesterol > 100 mg/dL remained stable (from 46% to 41%, P=0.103. Patients using protease inhibitors associated with a favorable lipid profile increased over time P=0.028. Conclusions. The prevalence of coronary events in our cohort is low. CVRF prevalence is high and their management is far from optimal. More aggressive interventions should be implemented to diminish cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients.

  4. Relation of coronary vasoreactivity and coronary calcification in asymptomatic subjects with a family history of premature coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirich, Christian; Leber, Alexander; Knez, Andreas; Bengel, Frank M.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Haberl, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) allows non-invasive imaging of coronary calcification and has been promoted as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) in asymptomatic high-risk subjects. This study assessed the relation of coronary calcifications to alterations in coronary vascular reactivity by means of positron emission tomography (PET) in asymptomatic subjects with a familial history of premature CAD. Twenty-one subjects (mean age 51±10 years) underwent EBCT imaging for coronary calcifications expressed as the coronary calcium score (CCS according to Agatston) and rest/adenosine-stress nitrogen-13 ammonia PET with quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). The mean CCS was 237±256 (median 146, range 0-915). The CCS was 100 units in 13. As defined by age-related thresholds, 15 subjects had an increased CCS (>75th percentile). Overall mean resting and stress MBF and CFR were 71±16 ml 100 g -1 min -1 , 218±54 ml 100 g -1 min -1 and 3.20±0.77, respectively. Three subjects with CCS ranging from 114 to 451 units had an abnormal CFR (<2.5). There was no relation between CCS and resting or stress MBF or CFR (r=0.17, 0.18 and 0.10, respectively). In asymptomatic subjects a pathological CCS was five times more prevalent than an abnormal CFR. The absence of any close relationship between CCS and CFR reflects the fact that quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with PET characterises the dynamic process of vascular reactivity while EBCT is a measure of more stable calcified lesions in the arterial wall whose presence is closely related to age. (orig.)

  5. Accuracy of non-fasting lipid profile for the assessment of lipoprotein coronary risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, S.; Ijaz, A.; Sharif, T.; Khan, D.A.; Siddique, A.

    2016-01-01

    .004) for the assessment of lipoprotein coronary risk on the basis of non-HDL-C, which seemed to be significant test for ruling out hyperlipidemia. (author)

  6. Investigation of risk factors to coronary heart disease in two countryside villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisleine Elisa Cavalcante da Silva

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate risk factors to coronary heart disease in two countryside villages in the State of Paraná, southern Brazil, typical in terms of the poverty and lack of access to public health care. All population was invited to participate in the study. The 462 volunteers (61.3% female, mean age = 42 years showed high prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (7.0%, hypertriglyceridemia (19.0%, hyperglycemia (11.0%, hypertension (30.0% and obesity (16.0%. The majority of the individuals, during the interview did not report the diseases detected by the testes. The results revealed that the high prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, hypertension and diabetes mellitus could be consequence of the delayed detection of these diseases or inadequate treatment after diagnostic.O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar os fatores de risco para doenças coronarianas em uma região pobre do Noroeste do Estado do Paraná - Brasil, onde o acesso a cuidados de saúde pública é deficiente.Toda a população foi convidada a participar do estudo, sendo que a população efetivamente estudada foi de 462 indivíduos, onde a maioria era mulheres (61,3% com idade média de 42 anos. Os voluntários mostraram alta prevalência de hipercolesterolemia (7%, hipertrigliceridemia (19%, hiperglicemia (11%, hipertensão (30% e obesidade (16%. Foi realizada uma entrevista com cada participante do estudo, onde a maioria declarou não ter conhecimento sobre as doenças detectadas. Os resultados obtidos através dos exames laboratoriais e entrevistas mostraram que a alta prevalência de hiperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, hipertensão e obesidade resultam da detecção tardia dessas doenças ou de tratamento inadequado após o diagnóstico.

  7. Coronary risk factors and myocardial blood flow in patients evaluated for coronary artery disease: a quantitative [15O]H2O PET/CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danad, Ibrahim; Appelman, Yolande E.; Haan, Stefan de; Allaart, Cornelis P.; Rossum, Albert C. van; Knaapen, Paul; Raijmakers, Pieter G.; Harms, Hendrik J.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Lubberink, Mark; Oever, Mijntje L.P. van den; Kuijk, Cornelis van

    2012-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) imaging over the last years and it is expected to become a routinely used technique in clinical practice. Positron emission tomography (PET) using [ 15 O]H 2 O is the established gold standard for quantification of MBF in vivo. A fundamental issue when performing quantitative MBF imaging is to define the limits of MBF in a clinically suitable population. The aims of the present study were to determine the limits of MBF and to determine the relationship among coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, gender and MBF in a predominantly symptomatic patient cohort without significant CAD. A total of 128 patients (mean age 54 ± 10 years, 50 men) with a low to intermediate pretest likelihood of CAD were referred for noninvasive evaluation of CAD using a hybrid PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner. MBF was quantified with [ 15 O]H 2 O at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia. Obstructive CAD was excluded in these patients by means of invasive or CT-based coronary angiography. Global average baseline MBF values were 0.91 ± 0.34 and 1.09 ± 0.30 ml.min -1 .g -1 (range 0.54-2.35 and 0.59-2.75 ml.min -1 .g -1 ) in men and women, respectively (p -1 .g -1 in men and women, respectively; p = 0.08). Global average hyperaemic MBF values were 3.44 ± 1.20 ml.min -1 .g -1 in the whole study population, and 2.90 ± 0.85 and 3.78 ± 1.27 ml.min -1 .g -1 (range 1.52-5.22 and 1.72-8.15 ml.min -1 .g -1 ) in men and women, respectively (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified male gender, age and body mass index as having an independently negative impact on hyperaemic MBF. Gender, age and body mass index substantially influence reference values and should be corrected for when interpreting hyperaemic MBF values. (orig.)

  8. Indications for coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenbach, M.; Vallbracht, C.

    1985-01-01

    Today selective coronary angiography, introduced by Sones in 1957, is used as clinical routine for diagnosing morphological changes in the coronary arteries. Hitherto, more recent techniques such as digital subtraction angiography cannot provide comparable information. Strict criteria for its indication depending on possible therapeutic consequences, have to be applied, although the risk is low with a letality of 0.01 to 0.05 percent. Radionuclear investigations can be used as additional tool in selected cases. The careful indication for coronary angiography usually implies the possible need for coronary bypass graft surgery of balloon angioplasty. (orig./MG) [de

  9. The cardiovascular event reduction tool (CERT)--a simplified cardiac risk prediction model developed from the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Italien, G; Ford, I; Norrie, J; LaPuerta, P; Ehreth, J; Jackson, J; Shepherd, J

    2000-03-15

    The clinical decision to treat hypercholesterolemia is premised on an awareness of patient risk, and cardiac risk prediction models offer a practical means of determining such risk. However, these models are based on observational cohorts where estimates of the treatment benefit are largely inferred. The West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS) provides an opportunity to develop a risk-benefit prediction model from the actual observed primary event reduction seen in the trial. Five-year Cox model risk estimates were derived from all WOSCOPS subjects (n = 6,595 men, aged 45 to 64 years old at baseline) using factors previously shown to be predictive of definite fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction. Model risk factors included age, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol/ high-density lipoprotein ratio (TC/HDL), current smoking, diabetes, family history of fatal coronary heart disease, nitrate use or angina, and treatment (placebo/ 40-mg pravastatin). All risk factors were expressed as categorical variables to facilitate risk assessment. Risk estimates were incorporated into a simple, hand-held slide rule or risk tool. Risk estimates were identified for 5-year age bands (45 to 65 years), 4 categories of TC/HDL ratio ( or = 7.5), 2 levels of diastolic blood pressure ( or = 90 mm Hg), from 0 to 3 additional risk factors (current smoking, diabetes, family history of premature fatal coronary heart disease, nitrate use or angina), and pravastatin treatment. Five-year risk estimates ranged from 2% in very low-risk subjects to 61% in the very high-risk subjects. Risk reduction due to pravastatin treatment averaged 31%. Thus, the Cardiovascular Event Reduction Tool (CERT) is a risk prediction model derived from the WOSCOPS trial. Its use will help physicians identify patients who will benefit from cholesterol reduction.

  10. A Comparison of the Updated Diamond-Forrester, CAD Consortium, and CONFIRM History-Based Risk Scores for Predicting Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Stable Chest Pain: The SCOT-HEART Coronary CTA Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Lohendran; Danad, Ibrahim; Gransar, Heidi; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Lin, Fay Y; Peña, Jessica M; Hunter, Amanda; Newby, David E; Adamson, Philip D; Min, James K

    2018-04-13

    This study sought to compare the performance of history-based risk scores in predicting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients with stable chest pain from the SCOT-HEART study. Risk scores for estimating pre-test probability of CAD are derived from referral-based populations with a high prevalence of disease. The generalizability of these scores to lower prevalence populations in the initial patient encounter for chest pain is uncertain. We compared 3 scores among patients with suspected CAD in the coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) randomized arm of the SCOT-HEART study for the outcome of obstructive CAD by coronary CTA: the updated Diamond-Forrester score (UDF), CAD Consortium clinical score (CAD2), and CONFIRM risk score (CRS). We tested calibration with goodness-of-fit, discrimination with area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC), and reclassification with net reclassification improvement (NRI) to identify low-risk patients. In 1,738 patients (58 ± 10 years and 44.0% women), overall calibration was best for UDF, with underestimation by CRS and CAD2. Discrimination by AUC was highest for CAD2 at 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77 to 0.81) than for UDF (0.77 [95% CI: 0.74 to 0.79]) or CRS (0.75 [95% CI: 0.73 to 0.77]) (p CAD2 (NRI 0.31, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.35) followed by CRS (NRI 0.21, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.25) compared with UDF (p CAD and uniform CAD evaluation by coronary CTA, CAD2 provided the best discrimination and classification, despite overestimation of obstructive CAD as evaluated by coronary CTA. CRS exhibited intermediate performance followed by UDF for discrimination and reclassification. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years......), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early- onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart...... Registry and risk factor control was evaluated. The study revealed that risk factors are common in early-onset CAD and that a large room for risk factor improvement remains. In study II, we used coronary computed tomography angiography to compare the coronary plaque burden and characteristics between 88...

  12. Coronary Artery Calcium as an Independent Surrogate Marker in the Risk Assessment of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and an Intermediate Pretest Likelihood for Coronary Artery Disease Admitted to a German Chest Pain Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuckmann, Frank; Olligs, Jan; Hinrichs, Liane; Koopmann, Matthias; Lichtenberg, Michael; Böse, Dirk; Fischer, Dieter; Eckardt, Lars; Waltenberger, Johannes; Garvey, J Lee

    2016-03-01

    About 10% of patients admitted to a chest pain unit (CPU) exhibit atrial fibrillation (AF). To determine whether calcium scores (CS) are superior over common risk scores for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients presenting with atypical chest pain, newly diagnosed AF, and intermediate pretest probability for CAD within the CPU. In 73 subjects, CS was related to the following risk scores: Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score, including a new model of a frequency-normalized approach; Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction score; European Society of Cardiology Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE); Framingham risk score; and Prospective Cardiovascular Münster Study score. Revascularization rates during index stay were assessed. Median CS was 77 (interquartile range, 1-270), with higher values in men and the left anterior descending artery. Only the modified GRACE (ρ = 0.27; P = 0.02) and the SCORE (ρ = 0.39; P risk scores and calcium burden, as well as revascularization rates during index stay, were low. By contrast, the determination of CS may be used as an additional surrogate marker in risk stratification in AF patients with intermediate pretest likelihood for CAD admitted to a CPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Non-invasive assessment of coronary calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliegenth