WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronary risk facts

  1. The risk of bleeding of triple therapy with vitamin K-antagonists, aspirin and clopidogrel after coronary stent implantation: Facts and questions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Rubboli

    2011-01-01

    Background Triple therapy (TT) with vitamin K-antagonists (VKA),aspirin and clopidogrel is the recommended antithrombotic treatment following percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation (PCI-S) in patients with an indication for oral anticoagulation.TT is associated with an increased risk of bleeding,but available evidence is flawed by important limitations,including the limited size and the retrospective design of most of the studies,as well as the rare reporting of the incidence of in-hospital bleeding and the treatment which was actually ongoing at the time of bleeding.Since the perceived high bleeding risk of TT may deny patients effective strategies,the determination of the true safety profile of TT is of paramount importance.Methods All the 27 published studies where the incidence of bleeding at various time points during follow-up has been reported separately for patients on TT were reviewed,and the weakness of the data was analyzed.Results The absolute incidence of major bleeding upon discharge at in-hospital,< 1 month,6 months,12 months and ≥ 12months was: 3.3% ± 1.9%,5.1% ± 6.7%,8.0% ± 5.2%,9.0% ± 8.0,and 6.2% ± 7.8%,respectively,and not substantially different from that observed in previous studies with prolonged dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel.Conclusions While waiting for the ongoing,large-scale,registries and clinical trials to clarify the few facts and to answer the many questions regarding the risk of bleeding of TT,this treatment should not be denied to patients with an indication for VKA undergoing PCI-S provided that the proper measures and cautions are implemented.

  2. Cardiovascular risk scores for coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Murat; Kardesoglu, Ejder; Aparci, Mustafa; Isilak, Zafer; Uz, Omer; Yiginer, Omer; Ozmen, Namik; Cingozbay, Bekir Yilmaz; Uzun, Mehmet; Cebeci, Bekir Sitki

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare frequently used cardiovascular risk scores in predicting the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3-vessel disease. In 350 consecutive patients (218 men and 132 women) who underwent coronary angiography, the cardiovascular risk level was determined using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the Modified Framingham Risk Score (MFRS), the Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) score, and the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The area under the curve for receiver operating characteristic curves showed that FRS had more predictive value than the other scores for CAD (area under curve, 0.76, P MFRS, PROCAM, and SCORE) may predict the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis.The FRS had better predictive value than the other scores.

  3. Coronary risk factors in patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Nasser; Alikhah, Hossein; Abadan, Younes

    2011-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk increases with increasing number of risk factors. This study was aimed to assess different coronary risk factors among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) surgery patients. A total of 700 patients younger than 45 or older than 65 years and underwent CABG in Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center since 2003 to 2007 were enrolled. We examined the probable differences of CAD risk factors between male and female groups and age groups. We also assessed the change of risk factors presentation in last 5 years. There was not significant difference between risk factor numbers in 65 years groups, but smoking and dyslipidemia was more prevalent in patients 65 years old. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus was more prevalent in patients > 65 old than < 45 years old; also differences were found between males and females patients, so that dyslipidemia, diabetes and hypertension were more prevalent in women than men. Some risk factors were recognized as acting more on one gender than the other. Also, the majority of patients have one or more risk factors, but different age and gender groups may have different risk factors that suggest the need for exact programming for appropriate prophylactic and therapeutic interventions in all groups.

  4. Coronary calcification improves cardiovascular risk prediction in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, R; Oudkerk, M; Hofman, A; Oei, HHS; van Dijck, W; van Rooij, FJA; Witteman, JCM

    2005-01-01

    Background - Coronary calcification detected by electron beam tomography may improve cardiovascular risk prediction. The technique is particularly promising in the elderly because the predictive power of cardiovascular risk factors weakens with age. We investigated the prognostic value of coronary c

  5. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  6. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    of coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed the original data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States and Europe to estimate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Over 6 to 10 years of follow-up, 5249 incident total coronary cases......BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... associated with risk of coronary heart disease....

  7. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  8. Paradigm of pretest risk stratification before coronary computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Øvrehus, Kristian; Nielsen, Lene H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal method of determining the pretest risk of coronary artery disease as a patient selection tool before coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the ability of 3 different clinical risk scores to predict the outcome of coronary...... by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The distribution of low-, intermediate-, and high-risk persons, respectively, was established and compared for each of the 3 risk models. RESULTS: Overall, all risk prediction models performed equally well. However, the Duke risk model classified the low......-risk patients more correctly than did the other models (P value of the Duke risk model was superior to the other risk models (P

  9. Coronary risk in a cohort of Paralympic athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, J A O; Salvetti, X M; de Mello, M T; da Silva, A C; Filho, B L

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of coronary risk factors in Paralympic athletes and evaluate their risk of coronary events. Method An observational prospective cross sectional study of 79 consecutive Brazilian Paralympic athletes (mean (SD) age 27.8 (6.7) years (median 26 years)). There were 56 men and 23 women, 67 with physical and 12 with visual disabilities. The occurrence of systemic hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, familial antecedents, obesity, and hypertriglyceridaemia was investigated. The risk of coronary events was calculated using the American Heart Association Coronary risk handbook, and also the 10 year probability of a coronary event using the Framingham risk score. Results The prevalence of risk factors was: systemic hypertension, 11%; familial antecedents, 10%; smoking, 9%; hypertriglyceridaemia, 6%; hypercholesterolaemia, 1.3%; obesity, 4%; diabetes, 0%. They occurred in 51% of the Paralympic athletes: one factor (41%), two factors (4%), and three factors (6%). The risk of coronary events was absent in 80%, slight in 17%, and moderate in 3%. This could only be evaluated in 81% of the athletes, as 8% had amputations, 9% were young, and 2% had unknown familial antecedents. The Framingham risk score ranged from −14 to +6, predicting a 10 year probability of a coronary event of 3.3 (3.8)%. Conclusion This study shows a reasonably high prevalence of coronary risk factors (51%), despite a low probability of coronary events in Paralympic athletes. The lipid and blood pressure profiles were similar in ambulatory and wheelchair athletes. PMID:16950883

  10. Coronary angiography of pregnancy-associated coronary artery dissection: a high-risk procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Raphaël Pedro; Leurent, Guillaume; Corbineau, Hervé; Fouquet, Olivier; Seconda, Sébastien; Baruteau, Alban E; Moreau, Olivier; Le Breton, Hervé; Bedossa, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome occurring predominantly in young women without any cardiovascular risk factors, especially during the peripartum and early postpartum period. Here, we report a case of a 28-year-old pregnant woman who was found to have an isolated distal SCAD of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Coronary angiography was complicated by extensive LAD and circumflex arteries dissection, requiring an emergency coronary artery bypass grafting associated with ventricular assist device implantation and underlying the extreme fragility of coronary arteries in pregnant women.

  11. Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk. ... modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and ... within a short period of time in all patients, irrespective of their initial risk status.

  12. [Passive smoking and the risk of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 10 years it has become clear that passive smoking is correlated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. The relative risk of 25-30% is comparable to that of lung cancer due to passive smoking. Since coronary heart disease is the most common cause of death, it is likely that p

  13. Change in abdominal obesity and risk of coronary calcification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabour, S.; Grobbee, D.E.; Prokop, M.; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Bots, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A prospective follow-up study was conducted to examine the relationship between 9 year change in abdominal obesity and risk of coronary artery calcification (CAC). METHODS: Data on coronary risk factors for 573 postmenopausal women were collected at baseline (1993-1997) and follow

  14. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke B;

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  15. Education and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2013-01-01

    Educational-related gradients in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mediation by behavioral risk factors are plausible given previous research; however this has not been comprehensively addressed in absolute measures. Questionnaire data on health behavior of 69,513 participants, 52 % women, from...... seven Danish cohort studies were linked to registry data on education and incidence of CHD. Mediation by smoking, low physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) on the association between education and CHD were estimated by applying newly proposed methods for mediation based on the additive hazards...... model, and compared with results from the Cox proportional hazards model. Short (vs. long) education was associated with 277 (95 % CI: 219, 336) additional cases of CHD per 100,000 person-years at risk among women, and 461 (95 % CI: 368, 555) additional cases among men. Of these additional cases 17 (95...

  16. Arginine methylation dysfunction increased risk of acute coronary syndrome in coronary artery disease population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengyu; Zhang, Shuyang; Wang, Hongyun; Wu, Wei; Ye, Yicong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) had been proved to be an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Few studies involved the entire arginine methylation dysfunction. This study was designed to investigate whether arginine methylation dysfunction is associated with acute coronary syndrome risk in coronary artery disease population. In total 298 patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain with the diagnosis of stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndrome from February 2013 to June 2014 were included. Plasma levels of free arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and the methylated form of arginine, ADMA, and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. We examined the relationship between arginine metabolism-related amino acids or arginine methylation index (AMI, defined as ratio of [arginine + citrulline + ornithine]/[ADMA + SDMA]) and acute coronary events. We found that plasma ADMA levels were similar in the stable angina pectoris group and the acute coronary syndrome group (P = 0.88); the AMI differed significantly between 2 groups (P angina and acute coronary syndrome patients; AMI might be an independent risk factor of acute coronary events in coronary artery disease population. PMID:28207514

  17. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  18. Coronary Microvascular Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women With Angina Pectoris and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Naja Dam; Michelsen, Marie Mide; Peña, Adam

    2016-01-01

    artery stenosis (coronary flow velocity reserve......BACKGROUND: The majority of women with angina-like chest pain have no obstructive coronary artery disease when evaluated with coronary angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a possible explanation and associated with a poor prognosis. This study evaluated the prevalence of coronary...... microvascular dysfunction and the association with symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, psychosocial factors, and results from diagnostic stress testing. METHODS AND RESULTS: After screening 3568 women, 963 women with angina-like chest pain and a diagnostic coronary angiogram without significant coronary...

  19. Presence of anomalous coronary seen on angiogram is not associated with increased risk of significant coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, Prakash; Kollampare, Shubha; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Lee, Justin; Husnain, Muhammad; Luni, Faraz Khan; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is unclear if anomalous coronary arteries are at higher risk for atherosclerosis. The link between anomalous coronary artery and early coronary artery disease has been suggested. The aim of this study is to determine whether the coronary artery anomaly predisposes to development of significant coronary disease. Using retrospective chart review, patients with documented anomalous coronary arteries recognized during coronary angiography between years 2000 to 2007 were analyzed. Prevalence of significant atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (defined as more than 50% luminal narrowing) was compared between normal and anomalous coronaries. A total of 147 patients with anomalous coronary arteries were found. Right coronary artery was the most common anomalous artery 128 of 148 (86.5%) in our dataset. There was no difference in the occurrence of atherosclerosis between anomalous and nonanomalous coronaries. Significant atherosclerosis was present in 59 of the 148 anomalous coronary arteries (37.8%), and 112 of the 293 nonanomalous coronary arteries (38.2%, p = 0.9). On the basis of our study, there is no evidence that anomalous coronary arteries predispose to significant coronary artery disease in comparison to normal coronary arteries.

  20. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...

  1. Coronary CT angiography in clinical triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, J Tobias; Hove, Jens D; Kristensen, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    in patients with high likelihood of coronary artery disease and could, in theory, be used to triage high risk patients. As many obstacles remain, including logistical and safety issues, our study does not support the use of CCTA as an additional diagnostic test before ICA in an all-comer NSTEMI population.......%) coronary artery diameter stenosis with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 99%, 81%, 96% and 95%, respectively. CCTA was used to triage patients into guideline defined treatment groups of "no or medical treatment", "referral to percutaneous coronary intervention...

  2. Coronary risk stratification : from PREVEND to the prevention of coronary events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, Christiane Anneliese

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to evaluate some of the unresolved issues on the pathway from risk association to risk stratification with regard to C-reactive protein, urinary albumin excretion and coronary calcium. This thesis shows that C-reactive protein is associated to angiographic evidence of

  3. Risk of coronary artery involvement in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Martínez-Del Val, Elena; Negreira Cepeda, Sagrario; González-Tomé, María I; Cedena Romero, Pilar; Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Albert de la Torre, Leticia; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Kawasaki disease refers to systemic vasculitis with risk of coronary artery disease. Our objective is to identify risk factors associated with coronary artery disease in patients with complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Descriptive, retrospective study conducted in patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease in a tertiary-care hospital between 2008 and 2014. The American Heart Association diagnostic criteria were used to define complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Thirty-one children were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease; 24 met the criteria for the complete form, and 7, for the incomplete form of this condition. Five had coronary artery disease. One of them had incomplete Kawasaki disease (1/7= 14.3%), and the remaining four had the complete form (4/24= 16.7%). No significant differences were found between both groups (p= 1.0). Patients with coronary artery involvement had a higher C-reactive protein level (median: 16.2 mg/dL versus 8.4 mg/dL, p= 0.047) and lower albuminemia (median: 3.2 mg/dL versus 3.99 mg/dL, p= 0.002). The risk of coronary artery involvement in incomplete Kawasaki disease is similar to that in complete Kawasaki disease; therefore, in patients with the incomplete form, immunoglobulin therapy should not be delayed. In our population, C-reactive protein and albumin levels were related to a higher risk of coronary artery involvement. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  4. On-Pump Beating Coronary Artery Bypass in High Risk Coronary Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Afrasiabirad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are some conflicting results with Conventional Coronary Artery Bypass Grafts (CCABG with arrested heart in coronary high-risk patients. Moreover, performing off-pump CABG in these cases may be associated with serious complications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the on-pump beating CABG (OPBCABG in coronary high-risk patients in comparison with the conventional methods. Methods: In a prospective research study, 3000 off-pump CABG patients were considered during June 2003 to December 2011. Among these, 157 patients with one or more of the following risk factors were included for OPBCABG; severe left main stenosis, early post-acute myocardial infarction with ongoing chest pain, unstable angina, intractable ventricular arrhythmia, post complicated coronary intervention and severe left ventricular dysfunction. These patients were compared with 157 similar patients undergone CCABG with aortic cross clamp before 2003. Results: Preoperative patient characteristics revealed no significant differences between the two groups. The patients’ mean age and number of grafts were 57 years and 3 per patient respectively. Hospital mortality was 3.2% and 9% in OPBCABG and CCABG groups, respectively (P<0.001. Preoperative myocardial infarction, requirement of inotropic agents and intraaortic balloon pump, renal dysfunction and prolonged ventilation time were significantly higher in CCABG group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that OPBCABG is effective in coronary high-risk patients and significantly reduces mortality and the incidence of perioperative MI and other major complications.

  5. Coronary Microvascular Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women With Angina Pectoris and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Naja Dam; Michelsen, Marie Mide; Pena, Adam;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of women with angina-like chest pain have no obstructive coronary artery disease when evaluated with coronary angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a possible explanation and associated with a poor prognosis. This study evaluated the prevalence of coronary.......01), hypertension (P=0.02), current smoking (Pheart rate (P.... CONCLUSION: Impaired CFVR was detected in a substantial proportion, which suggests that coronary microvascular dysfunction plays a role in the development of angina pectoris. CFVR was associated with few cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting that CFVR is an independent parameter in the risk evaluation...

  6. The Relationship of Epicardial Fat Volume to Coronary Plaque, Severe Coronary Stenosis, and High-Risk Coronary Plaque Features Assessed by Coronary CT Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, Ronak; Shmilovich, Haim; Nakazato, Ryo; Nakanishi, Rine; Otaki, Yuka; Cheng, Victor Y.; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Min, James K.; Berman, Daniel S.; Dey, Damini

    2013-01-01

    Background Associations of epicardial fat volume (EFV) measured on non-contrast cardiac computed tomography (NCT) include coronary plaque, myocardial ischemia and adverse cardiac events. Objectives This study aimed to define the relationship of EFV to coronary plaque type, severe coronary stenosis, and to the presence of high-risk plaque features (HRPFs). Methods We retrospectively evaluated 402 consecutive patients, with no prior history of coronary artery disease, who underwent same day non-contrast cardiac computed tomography (NCT) and coronary CT angiography (CTA). EFV was measured on NCT using validated, semi-automated, software. The coronary arteries were evaluated for coronary plaque type [calcified (CP), non-calcified (NCP) or partially-calcified (MP)] and coronary stenosis severity ≥70% using coronary CTA. For patients with NCP and PCP, 2 high risk plaque features were evaluated: Low-attenuation plaque and positive remodeling. Results There were 402 patients with a median age of 66 years (range 23–92) of whom 226 (56%) were male. The EFV was larger in patients with CP (112 ± 55 cm3 vs. 89 ± 39 cm3), PCP (110 ± 57 cm3 vs. 98 ± 45 cm3) and NCP (115 ± 44 cm3 vs. EFV 100 ± 52 cm3. In the 192 patients with PCP or NCP, on multivariable analysis, after adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, EFV was an independent predictor of ≥70% coronary artery stenosis (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.3–6.6, p=0.008), any high risk plaque features (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.9–3.4, p=0.04) and low attention plaque (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.1, p=0.02), but not of positive remodeling. Conclusions Epicardial fat volume is larger in patients with CP, PCP and NCP. In patients with NCP and PCP, EFV is significantly associated with severe coronary stenosis, high risk plaque features and low attenuation plaque. PMID:23622507

  7. Genetic and metabolomic approaches for coronary heart disease risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, Anika Antoinette Maria

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is currently based on traditional risk factors (TRFs) like age, sex, lipid levels, blood pressure. Here we investigated, using the CAREMA cohort, whether this prediction can potentially be improved by applying a metabolomics approach and by includi

  8. Knowledge of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and coronary intervention among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Aysha; Hameed, Aamir; Sultan, Fateh Ali Tipoo

    2008-10-01

    To elucidate knowledge of coronary artery disease (CAD) risks factors and coronary intervention in adult students of Karachi East. To calculate the mean knowledge score about CAD risk factors among them. A multi center crossectional study was conducted in Universities and colleges of Karachi East from April-September 2005. Questionnaires were distributed to 200 adult students of different non-medical universities and colleges. The questionnaire contained assessment of knowledge of risk factors on CAD and awareness about coronary angiography. Those belonging to medical colleges and universities were excluded from the study. Knowledge was assessed as a continuous variable. Risk factors for CAD were taken as categorical variables The mean age of students was 20 yrs +/- 2.2 years and 62% were females. The mean score of knowledge about risk factors of CAD was 11.47 +/- 2.37. Sixty percent students thought that heart diseases are the number one cause of death in our population. Twenty five percent students graded smoking as the top most risk factor for CAD. Twenty five percent students refused to quit smoking for CAD prevention. Forty eight percent students correctly defined coronary angiography. Eighty five percent students thought that cost is the major hindrance in getting timely treatment. Knowledge of fifty percent students was based on personal and family experience of heart disease. Students graded smoking as the topmost risk factor for CAD and cost as the major hindrance in getting timely treatment for heart disease. Only half of the students were aware about coronary angiography. The mean knowledge score among them was above the median score but not up to the mark.

  9. An Update on the Utility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring for Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianoush, Sina; Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Umapathi, Priya; Graham, Garth; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Estimating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is necessary for determining the potential net benefit of primary prevention pharmacotherapy. Risk estimation relying exclusively on traditional CVD risk factors may misclassify risk, resulting in both undertreatment and overtreatment. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring personalizes risk prediction through direct visualization of calcified coronary atherosclerotic plaques and provides improved accuracy for coronary heart disease (CHD) or CVD risk estimation. In this review, we discuss the most recent studies on CAC, which unlike historical studies, focus sharply on clinical application. We describe the MESA CHD risk calculator, a recently developed CAC-based 10-year CHD risk estimator, which can help guide preventive therapy allocation by better identifying both high- and low-risk individuals. In closing, we discuss calcium density, regional distribution of CAC, and extra-coronary calcification, which represent the future of CAC and CVD risk assessment research and may lead to further improvements in risk prediction.

  10. Hostility, Anger and Risk of Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Masoudnia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The previous researches about the etiology of coronary artery atherosclerosis have accentuated on clinical and medical risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, positive family background, myocardial ischemia history in family, atherogenic diet, increase of A lipoprotein, inflammatory factors such as increase of cross-reactive protein and so on. Although factors in behavioral medicine are recognized as an independent risk factor in coronary artery atherosclerosis, few researches have been done on hostility and anger. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between normal people(Control group and people with coronary artery atherosclerosis(Case group with regards to hostility and anger. Methods: This study was performed as a case-control design. Data was collected from seventy-seven patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis who had referred to Afshar Hospital Professional Heart Clinic in Yazd city and seventy-eight normal people were used as control. Two groups completed the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire(BPAQ to measure their hostility and anger. Results: The results of the analysis showed that there was a statistically significant difference regarding hostility(p<.05 and anger(p<.001 between the two groups. Hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the sociodemographic and clinical variables(step 1 explained 35.5 % to 47.4%, while hostility and anger(step 2 explained 6.7% to 9% of the variance in incidence of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are strong risk factors for coronary artery atherosclerosis or CAD in Iran. Therefore, in order to decrease the incidence rate of coronary artery atherosclerosis in Iran, alongside medical interventions, attention should also be paid towards behavioral interventions in order to modify hostile and angrily behavior.

  11. [Hyperlipidemias as a coronary risk factor in the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A; De Tejada, A L; Espinoza, M; Karchmer, S

    1976-01-01

    This article reviews the risk factors of the coronariopathy in the newborn. The authors state that the early diagnosis of the risk factors is an important step in the prevention of ateromatous plaques. Some people are now in the investigation of the normal levels of cholesterol and triglicerides in the blood of the umbilical cord. This values seems similar in different places all over the world and have served to establish the possible interrelation between the newborn hiperlipidemia and the coronary risk.

  12. 77 FR 9842 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ...; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification... phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14... use of a health claim regarding reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) for phytosterol...

  13. [Adipokines: adiponectin, leptin, resistin and coronary heart disease risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Barbara; Jegier, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Visceral obesity is among the known risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. As long as adipose tissue was considered only an inert store of excess energy, accumulated in triglycerides, explanation of the mechanisms causing increased cardiovascular risk in obesity was difficult. Finding that the adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ and that the adipokines secreted in it influence several metabolic processes, allowed better understanding of this correlation. Several disturbances in secretion, function and balance of adipokines occur in the course of obesity. Changes of adiponectin, leptin and resistin concentrations are among the reasons of accelerated atherosclerosis occurring in the visceral adiposity. Adiponectin concentrations are decreased in visceral adiposity. Adiponectin is adipokine possessing antiatherogenic properties. It's effects exerted though the specific receptors in skeletal muscles and liver include decreased insulin resistance and improved plasma lipid profile. Acting directly in the vessel wall adiponectin prevents development of atheromatic lesions by inhibiting production of adhesive molecules and formation of foam cells. It has been found that decreased adiponectin concentrations are connected not only with increased coronary risk but also with progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels. Moreover it was found that adiponectin plasma concentration is significantly decreased in acute coronary incidences. Leptin regulates energy metabolism and balance. The concentrations of this adipokine are increased in obesity and correlate with insulin resistance. Hiperleptinemia has been also recognized as cardiovascular diseases risk factor. Resistin is considered to be a substance increasing insulin resistance, however the exact mechanisms are not known. Resistin plasma concentrations are increased in obese subjects and correlate with the inflammatory state that underlies the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic

  14. Serum bilirubin levels, polymorphisms and risk for coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lingenhel, Arno; Kollerits, Barbara; Johannes P. Schwaiger; Hunt, Steven C.; Gress, Richard; Hopkins, Paul N.; Schoenborn, Veit; Heid, Iris M; Kronenberg, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels, UGT1A1 polymorphisms and risk for coronary artery disease correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +43 512 9003 70560; fax: +43 512 9003 73560. (Kronenberg, Florian) (Kronenberg, Florian) Division of Genetic Epidemiology; Department of Medical Genetics, Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology; Innsbruck Medical University - AUSTRIA (Lingenhel, Arno) Division of Genetic Epidemiology; Depa...

  15. status, risk factors disease Socio-economic and coronary heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... UK, males in social classes 1 and 2 had higher CHD death rates than those of ... smoking appear to be more prevalent in lower SES groups,Z-S,8-l1 whereas the ... survey of the Coronary Risk Factor Study (CORIS), which.

  16. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  17. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Sanne Ae; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Wood, Angela M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among...

  18. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  19. Persistence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary artery diseases after percutaneous coronary interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Heidari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary artery disease (CAD is as a leading cause of death and disability all around the world. Multiple risk factors have a role in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD. It is necessary to control risk factors, to achieve optimal results of treatment. The aim of present study was to evaluate the persistence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with CADs after percutaneous cardiac interventions. Methods: In an analytical-descriptive study, 150 patient with CAD and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI were performed for them, and referred to Cardiology Clinic of Shahid Madani Hospital of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, from September 2013 to September 2015, were studied. The persistence of coronary risk factors, 12-24 months after performing PCI, was evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients at time of PCI performing was 57.90 ± 12.26 years. 72.7% of patients were male and 27.3% were female and male to female ratio was 1 to 0.37. Dyslipidemia in 52.0% of patients, hypertension in 51.3% patients, and diabetes mellitus (DM in 41.3% patients were the most common underlying comorbidities. In both before and after doing PCI, 26.7% were a smoker, and smoking rates after doing PCI also showed no significant change (P = 0.055, and also there were no significant changes in the physical activity of patients compared before and after performing PCI. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and DM, was the most frequent underlying diseases in patients with CAD respectively. Risk factors such as smoking, and lack of exercise, had no significant changes after performing PCI.

  20. Low risk of coronary artery disease in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Silva, Cintia Marques; Lima, G A B; Volschan, I C M; Gottlieb, I; Kasuki, L; Neto, L Vieira; Gadelha, M R

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in acromegalic patients and to investigate the relationship between the coronary artery calcium score (CS) and acromegaly status and clinical parameters [Framingham risk score (FRS)]. Fifty-six acromegalic patients and paired non-acromegalic volunteers were stratified according to the FRS into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. CS was assessed using multidetector computed tomography. The patients were considered to have controlled or active acromegaly at the time they were submitted to evaluation. Sixty-six percent of acromegalic patients exhibited arterial hypertension, 36 % had diabetes mellitus, and 34 % had hypercholesterolemia. The median FRS and the median risk for cardiovascular event within the next 10 years were similar in the acromegalics and the controls. The median total CS and CS >75th percentile didn't differ significantly between these groups. In patients with controlled acromegaly, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was observed in 86, 14, and 0 %, respectively. In patients with active disease, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was verified in 94, 3, and 3 %, respectively, and differences between the controlled and active groups were not significant. Seventy-two percent of the patients had total CS = 0, and there were no differences between the controlled and active groups. The risk of coronary artery disease in acromegalic patients, determined according to FRS and CS, is low despite the high prevalence of metabolic abnormalities.

  1. Improvement in prediction of coronary heart disease risk over conventional risk factors using SNPs identified in genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We examined whether a panel of SNPs, systematically selected from genome-wide association studies (GWAS, could improve risk prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD, over-and-above conventional risk factors. These SNPs have already demonstrated reproducible associations with CHD; here we examined their use in long-term risk prediction. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: SNPs identified from meta-analyses of GWAS of CHD were tested in 840 men and women aged 55-75 from the Edinburgh Artery Study, a prospective, population-based study with 15 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the addition of SNPs to conventional risk factors in prediction of CHD risk. CHD was classified as myocardial infarction (MI, coronary intervention (angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass surgery, angina and/or unspecified ischaemic heart disease as a cause of death; additional analyses were limited to MI or coronary intervention. Model performance was assessed by changes in discrimination and net reclassification improvement (NRI. RESULTS: There were significant improvements with addition of 27 SNPs to conventional risk factors for prediction of CHD (NRI of 54%, P<0.001; C-index 0.671 to 0.740, P = 0.001, as well as MI or coronary intervention, (NRI of 44%, P<0.001; C-index 0.717 to 0.750, P = 0.256. ROC curves showed that addition of SNPs better improved discrimination when the sensitivity of conventional risk factors was low for prediction of MI or coronary intervention. CONCLUSION: There was significant improvement in risk prediction of CHD over 15 years when SNPs identified from GWAS were added to conventional risk factors. This effect may be particularly useful for identifying individuals with a low prognostic index who are in fact at increased risk of disease than indicated by conventional risk factors alone.

  2. Medical History for Prognostic Risk Assessment and Diagnosis of Stable Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Min (James); A. Dunning (Allison); H. Gransar (Heidi); S. Achenbach (Stephan); F.Y. Lin (Fay); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); M.J. Budoff (Matthew J.); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); E. Maffei (Erica); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); R.B. D'Agostino (Ralph); A. Delago (Augustin); J. Friedman (John); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); S.W. Hayes (Sean W.); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp A.); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee J.); L.E.J. Thomson (Louise); T.C. Villines (Todd); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); H. Marques (Hugo); D.S. Berman (Daniel S.); M. Pencina (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To develop a clinical cardiac risk algorithm for stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease based upon angina typicality and coronary artery disease risk factors. Methods Between 2004 and 2011, 14,004 adults with suspected coronary artery disease referred for cardia

  3. Medical History for Prognostic Risk Assessment and Diagnosis of Stable Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Min (James); A. Dunning (Allison); H. Gransar (Heidi); S. Achenbach (Stephan); F.Y. Lin (Fay); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); M.J. Budoff (Matthew J.); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); E. Maffei (Erica); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); R.B. D'Agostino (Ralph); A. Delago (Augustin); J. Friedman (John); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); S.W. Hayes (Sean W.); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp A.); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee J.); L.E.J. Thomson (Louise); T.C. Villines (Todd); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); H. Marques (Hugo); D.S. Berman (Daniel S.); M. Pencina (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To develop a clinical cardiac risk algorithm for stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease based upon angina typicality and coronary artery disease risk factors. Methods Between 2004 and 2011, 14,004 adults with suspected coronary artery disease referred for cardia

  4. Bleeding risk stratification in an era of aggressive management of acute coronary syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad; Abu-Assi; Sergio; Raposeiras-Roubín; José; María; García-Acu?a; José; Ramón; González-Juanatey

    2014-01-01

    Major bleeding is currently one of the most common non-cardiac complications observed in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS). Hemorrhagic complications occur with a frequency of 1% to 10% during treatment for ACS. In fact, bleeding events are the most common extrinsic complication associated with ACS therapy. The identification of clinical characteristics and particularities of the antithrombin therapy associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications would make it possible to adopt prevention strategies, especially among those exposed to greater risk. The international societies of cardiology renewed emphasis on bleeding risk stratification in order to decide strategy and therapy for patients with ACS. With this review, we performed an update about the ACS bleeding risk scores most frequently used in daily clinical practice.

  5. Incremental prognostic value of coronary computed tomographic angiography over coronary artery calcium score for risk prediction of major adverse cardiac events in asymptomatic diabetic individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Min (James); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); M. Gomez (Millie); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A.M. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); D.S. Berman (Daniel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is useful for identification of symptomatic diabetic individuals at heightened risk for death. Whether CCTA-detected CAD enables improved risk assessment of asymptomatic diabetic indiv

  6. Incremental prognostic value of coronary computed tomographic angiography over coronary artery calcium score for risk prediction of major adverse cardiac events in asymptomatic diabetic individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Min (James); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); M. Gomez (Millie); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A.M. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); D.S. Berman (Daniel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is useful for identification of symptomatic diabetic individuals at heightened risk for death. Whether CCTA-detected CAD enables improved risk assessment of asymptomatic diabetic indiv

  7. Correlation between the FINish diabetes risk score and the severity of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The FINish Diabetes RIsk SCore (FINDRISC which includes age, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, physical (in activity, diet, arterial hypertension, history of high glucose levels, and family history of diabetes, is of a great significance in identifying patients with impaired glucose tolerance and a 10-year risk assessment of developing type 2 diabetes in adults. Due to the fact that the FINDRISC score includes parameters which are risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD, our aim was to determine a correlation between this score, and some of its parameters respectively, with the severity of angiographically verified CAD in patients with stable angina in two ways: according to the Synergy between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX score and the number of diseased coronary arteries. Methods. The study included 70 patients with stable angina consecutively admitted to the Clinic of Cardiology, Military Medical Academy, Belgrade. The FINDRISC score was calculated in all the patients immediately prior to angiography. Venous blood samples were collected and inflammatory markers [erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, leucocytes, C-reactive protein (CRP, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose] determined. Coronary angiography was performed in order to determine the severity of coronary artery disease according to the SYNTAX score and the number of affected coronary vessels: 1-vessel, 2-vessel or 3-vessel disease (hemodynamically significant stenoses: more than 70% of the blood vessel lumen. The patients were divided into three groups regarding the FINDRISC score: group I: 5-11 points; group II: 12-16 points; group III: 17-22 points. Results. Out of 70 patients (52 men and 18 women enrolled in this study, 14 had normal coronary angiogram. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the FINDRISC score and its parameters respectively

  8. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes in relation to risk of coronary events and coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardys, Isabella; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; de Maat, Moniek P M

    2007-02-01

    Fibrin network structure has been correlated with coronary disease. Fibrinogen gamma and alpha (FGG and FGA) gene haplotypes (chromosome 4q28) may be associated with fibrin network structure, and thereby with rigidity of the fibrin clot and sensitivity of the fibrin clot to the fibrinolytic system. Through these mechanisms they may influence risk of cardiovascular disease. We set out to investigate the relation between combined fibrinogen FGG and FGA gene haplotypes, representing the common variation of the fibrinogen FGG and FGA genes, coronary events and measures of coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis. The study was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based study among men and women aged >or=55 years. Common haplotypes were studied using seven tagging SNPs across a 30-kb region with the FGG and FGA genes. Incident coronary events were registered, and carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaques, ankle-arm index, aortic calcification and coronary calcification were assessed. Seven haplotypes with frequencies >1% covered 97.5% of the genetic variation. In 5,667 participants without history of coronary heart disease (CHD), 733 CHD cases occurred during a median follow-up time of 11.9 years. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes were not associated with coronary events. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes did not show a consistent association with measures of coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis. In conclusion, fibrinogen FGG and FGA gene haplotypes are not associated with coronary events, coronary atherosclerosis or extracoronary atherosclerosis. Confirmation of these findings by future population-based studies is warranted.

  9. Relation of anthropometric variables to coronary artery disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra C Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Anthropometric variables and their relation to conventional coronary artery disease (CAD risk factors in railway employees have been inadequately studied in India. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Solapur division of the Central railway in the year 2004, to assess the anthropometric variables in railway employees and their relation to conventional CAD risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 995 railway employees, with 872 males and 123 females participated in this cross-sectional study. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, fasting lipid profile, and blood sugar level. Various anthropometric indices were calculated for body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, and abdominal volume index (AVI. Statistical analysis was done by EPI Info 6 statistical software. Results: Compared to all other obesity indices, WHtR was most prevalent in both genders. High WHtR was present in 699 (80.16% males and 103 (83.73% females. Age ≥45 years, high systolic BP, high diastolic BP, low HDL, high triglyceride, and diabetes mellitus were positively correlated with high BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI. High BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI were negatively associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions: Over all, anthropometric variables in both genders were significantly deranged in subjects with coronary risk factors. Compared to all other anthropometric variables, WHtR was statistically significantly associated with a majority of coronary artery risk factors. Hence we recommend inclusion of WHtR as a parameter of obesity to predict coronary artery disease risk factor along with WC, WHR, and BMI in epidemiologic studies.

  10. Smoking and hyperlipidemia are important risk factors for coronary artery spasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of coronary artery spasm in the etiology of chest pain lacking significant coronary stenosis and to identify the clinical risk factors related to coronary artery spasm. Methods Two hundred and seventy five patients with chest pain, but without significant coronary artery stenosis underwent the intracoronary acetylcholine test. Coronary artery spasm was diagnosed while coronary artery stenosis increased to 90% and was accompanied by the usual chest pain with or without ischemic changes on electrocardiogram. Logistic regression was employed to investigate the relationships between coronary artery spasm and sex, age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia and results of electrocardiographic treadmill stress test. Left ventricular ejection fraction and end diastolic pressure were compared between spasm group and non-spasm group. Results Coronary artery spasm was detected in 103 out of 271 patients, a rate of 38%. Logistic regression analysis showed that smoking and hyperlipidemia increased the relative risk of coronary artery spasm 4.2 times and 2.3 times, respectively. There was a significantly negative relationship between diabetes mellitus and coronary artery spasm. Furthermore, there was no coronary artery spasm detected in left ventricular ejection fraction and end diastolic pressure. Conclusions Coronary artery spasm was one of the important etiological factors for patients with chest pain but no coronary artery stenosis. Smoking and hyperlipidemia were the main clinical risk factors for coronary artery spasm.

  11. Fact Sheet: Risk Management Plan (RMP) Audit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk management programs, which consist of a hazard assessment, a prevention program, and an emergency response program; must be periodically audited to assess whether the plans are adequate or need to be revised to comply with the regulation.

  12. USAWC Coronary Risk and Fitness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-04

    Dr. Wood and associates of the Stanford Heart Disease Prevention Program compared the lipopro- tein patterns of sedentary and active men 35-39 years... insulates the body and increases the risk of heat exhaus- tion and heat stroke; it lowers the body’s efficient use of oxy- gen and reduces an...around the heart and throughout the body, and at the same time keep undiseased blood vessels ,,24 soft and pliable . It has also been established that

  13. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Y. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y., E-mail: yookkim@ewha.ac.k [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, I.-M. [Division of Cardiology in Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, J.; Park, H. [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  14. [Main coronary disease risk factors in metallurgy workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiak, J; Giec, L; Zajac, T; Olwiński, M

    1984-01-01

    The authors investigated the extension of major coronary risk factors among metal-flatten workers. In the whole population the percentage of these factors was as follows: hypertension 14,4%, hypercholesterolemia, 17.7%, hyperglycemia 6,5%, overweight 35% and cigarette smoking 61,3%. The extension of the risk factors is dependent on age and increases with age. No significant correlation was found between these factors and working conditions. In comparison to other investigations carried out in Poland the examined population exhibited considerable tobacco smoking, overweight, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia.

  15. Noninvasive assessment of coronary vasodilation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Phillip

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired coronary vasodilation to both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent stimuli have been associated with atherosclerosis. Direct measurement of coronary vasodilation using x-ray angiography or intravascular ultrasound is invasive and, thus, not appropriate for asymptomatic patients or for serial follow-up. In this study, high-resolution coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR was used to investigate the vasodilatory response to nitroglycerine (NTG of asymptomatic patients at high risk for CAD. Methods A total of 46 asymptomatic subjects were studied: 13 high-risk patients [8 with diabetes mellitus (DM, 5 with end stage renal disease (ESRD] and 33 age-matched controls. Long-axis and cross-sectional coronary artery images were acquired pre- and 5 minutes post-sublingual NTG using a sub-mm-resolution multi-slice spiral coronary CMR sequence. Coronary cross sectional area (CSA was measured on pre- and post-NTG images and % coronary vasodilation was calculated. Results Patients with DM and ESRD had impaired coronary vasodilation to NTG compared to age-matched controls (17.8 ± 7.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%, p = 0.002. This remained significant for ESRD patients alone (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.003 and for DM patients alone (19.8 ± 6.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.049, with a non-significant trend toward greater impairment in the ESRD vs. DM patients (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 19.8 ± 6.3%; p = 0.23. Conclusion Noninvasive coronary CMR demonstrates impairment of coronary vasodilation to NTG in high-risk patients with DM and ESRD. This may provide a functional indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis and warrants clinical follow up to determine prognostic significance.

  16. Coronary heart disease risk factors in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Jennifer; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Lofgren, Ingrid E

    2014-03-01

    More than one-half of young adults aged 18-24 y have at least 1 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and nearly one-quarter have advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The extent of atherosclerosis is directly correlated with the number of risk factors. Unhealthy dietary choices made by this age group contribute to weight gain and dyslipidemia. Risk factor profiles in young adulthood strongly predict long-term CHD risk. Early detection is critical to identify individuals at risk and to promote lifestyle changes before disease progression occurs. Despite the presence of risk factors and pathological changes, risk assessment and disease prevention efforts are lacking in this age group. Most young adults are not screened and are unaware of their risk. This review provides pathological evidence along with current risk factor prevalence data to demonstrate the need for early detection. Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable through diet and lifestyle, and young adults are ideal targets for prevention efforts because they are in the process of establishing lifestyle habits, which track forward into adulthood. This review aims to establish the need for increased screening, risk assessment, education, and management in young adults. These essential screening efforts should include the assessment of all CHD risk factors and lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, and smoking), blood pressure, glucose, and body mass index in addition to the traditional lipid panel for effective long-term risk reduction.

  17. THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS OF GENETIC RISK VARIANTS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar Srivastava

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This review covers therapeutic implication of genetic risk variant responsible for coronary artery disease by utilising the highdensity single-nucleotide microarrays to screen the entire human genome. The sequence of the human genome provides the blueprint for life. Approximately, 99.5% of the human genome Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA sequence is identical among humans with 0.5% of the genome sequence (15 million bps accounting for all individual differences. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new technology of the computerised chip array of millions of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs as Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA markers makes it possible to study and detect genetic predisposition to common polygenic disorders such as Coronary Artery Disease (CAD. The sample sizes required for these studies are massive and large; worldwide consortiums such as Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM study have been formed to accommodate this requirement. After the identification of 9p21 progress to detect genetic predisposition has been remarkable. RESULTS There are currently a total of 50 genetic risk variants predisposing to CAD of genome-wide significance with confirmation in independent populations. Rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency, MAF <5% will require direct sequencing to detect genetic predisposition. CONCLUSION We can develop new biomarkers for detecting early CAD as well as unique targets for novel therapy. The challenge for the future will be to identify the molecular mechanisms mediating the risk of those genetic risk variants that act through nonconventional risk factors. The ultimate objective for the future is the sequencing and functional analysis of the causative polymorphisms for its therapeutic implications.

  18. Clinical Profile & Risk Factors in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Yadav, D Joseph, P Joshi, P Sakhi, RK Jha, J Gupta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is becoming a major cause of morbidity & mortality burden in the developing world. Indians have been associated with a more severe form of CAD that has its onset at a younger age group with a male predominance. A prospective study was carried out to identify the risk factors and to know the emerging clinical profile in acute coronary syndrome (ACS including S T elevation & Non S T elevation myocardial infarction. We enrolled 200 consecutive patients with typical ECG changes & clinical history, admitted in emergency department from January 2009 to December 2009. A predefined Performa was completed in every patient with a detailed clinical history, physical examinations, and investigation studies. The clinical history revealed information about age, gender, risk factors, and modes of presentation and duration of symptoms. The details of physical examination including anthropometric data, vital signs and complete systemic evaluation were recorded. The regions of infarction and rhythm disturbances were also documented. Our study showed a significant male predominance with mean age being 56 years. Tobacco was identified as major risk factors (65% & obesity (BMI more than 25 is least common risk factor (13%.Patients had typical chest pain (94% and ECG showed anterior wall changes in54%. Forty percent patients developed complications, majority being arrhythmias (60% and least common is mechanical complication (2.5% Thus we conclude that ACS is more common in adult male with tobacco being major risk factors in our population.

  19. Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia as a coronary risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borén, Jan; Matikainen, Niina; Adiels, Martin; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2014-04-20

    Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia is now established as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This metabolic abnormality is principally initiated by overproduction and/or decreased catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and is a consequence of predisposing genetic variations and medical conditions such as obesity and insulin resistance. Accumulation of TRLs in the postprandial state promotes the retention of remnant particles in the artery wall. Because of their size, most remnant particles cannot cross the endothelium as efficiently as smaller low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. However, since each remnant particle contains approximately 40 times more cholesterol compared with LDL, elevated levels of remnants may lead to accelerated atherosclerosis and CVD. The recognition of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in the clinical setting has been severely hampered by technical difficulties and the lack of established clinical protocols for investigating postprandial lipemia. In addition, there are currently no internationally agreed management guidelines for this type of dyslipidemia. Here we review the mechanism for and consequences of excessive postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, epidemiological evidence in support of high triglycerides and remnant particles as risk factors for CVD, the definition of hypertriglyceridemia, methods to measure postprandial hypertriglyceridemia and apolipoproteins and, finally, current and future treatment opportunities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on ...

  1. Prediction of coronary risk by SYNTAX and derived scores: synergy between percutaneous coronary intervention with taxus and cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Mayank; Palmerini, Tullio; Caixeta, Adriano; Madhavan, Mahesh V; Sanidas, Elias; Kirtane, Ajay J; Stone, Gregg W; Généreux, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    The introduction of the SYNTAX (Synergy Between PCI With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery) score has prompted a renewed interest for angiographic risk stratification in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Syntax score is based on qualitative and quantitative characterization of coronary artery disease by including 11 angiographic variables that take into consideration lesion location and characteristics. Thus far, this score has been shown to be an effective tool to risk-stratify patients with complex coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the landmark SYNTAX trial, as well as in other clinical settings. This review provides an overview of its current applications, including its integration with other nonangiographic clinical scores, and explores future applications of the SYNTAX and derived scores.

  2. Pharmacological undertreatment of coronary risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Skov, Lone; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    with psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: To examine the pharmacological treatment of coronary risk factors in patients with severe psoriasis treated with biologic agents in a real-world setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Medical history of patients with severe psoriasis treated with biologic agents in the time period 2007......-09 was retrieved from a Danish nationwide registry (DERMBIO). Individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative registries of hospitalizations, concomitant medications, and socioeconomic status was performed to gain insights into the use of pharmacological treatment. A total of 693 patients (mean age 46.1 ± 12...

  3. Prospective Coronary Heart Disease Screening in Asymptomatic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Using Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Results and Risk Factor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girinsky, Theodore, E-mail: girinsky.theodore@orange.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); M’Kacher, Radhia [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire/Direction des Sciences Vivantes/Commissariat Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Lessard, Nathalie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Koscielny, Serge [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Elfassy, Eric; Raoux, François [Department of Radiology, Marie Lannelongue, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Carde, Patrice [Department of Hematology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Santos, Marcos Dos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Margainaud, Jean-Pierre [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Sabatier, Laure [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire/Direction des Sciences Vivantes/Commissariat Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paul, Jean-François [Department of Radiology, Marie Lannelongue, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the coronary artery status using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with combined modalities and mediastinal irradiation. Methods and Materials: All consecutive asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin lymphoma entered the study during follow-up, from August 2007 to May 2012. Coronary CT angiography was performed, and risk factors were recorded along with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measurements. Results: One hundred seventy-nine patients entered the 5-year study. The median follow-up was 11.6 years (range, 2.1-40.2 years), and the median interval between treatment and the CCTA was 9.5 years (range, 0.5-40 years). Coronary artery abnormalities were demonstrated in 46 patients (26%). Coronary CT angiography abnormalities were detected in nearly 15% of the patients within the first 5 years after treatment. A significant increase (34%) occurred 10 years after treatment (P=.05). Stenoses were mostly nonostial. Severe stenoses were observed in 12 (6.7%) of the patients, entailing surgery with either angioplasty with stent placement or bypass grafting in 10 of them (5.5%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that age at treatment, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as radiation dose to the coronary artery origins, were prognostic factors. In the group of patients with LTL measurements, hypertension and LTL were the only independent risk factors. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CCTA can identify asymptomatic individuals at risk of acute coronary artery disease who might require either preventive or curative measures. Conventional risk factors and the radiation dose to coronary artery origins were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic value of LTL needs further investigation.

  4. Computed tomography imaging of early coronary artery lesions in stable individuals with multiple cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence, extent, severity, and features of coronary artery lesions in stable patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: Seventy-seven patients with more than 3 cardiovascular risk factors were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Patients with high-risk factors and 39 controls with no risk factors were enrolled in the study. The related risk factors included hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, smoking history, and overweight. The characteristics of coronary lesions were identified and evaluated by 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography. RESULTS: The incidence of coronary atherosclerosis was higher in the high-risk group than in the no-risk group. The involved branches of the coronary artery, the diffusivity of the lesion, the degree of stenosis, and the nature of the plaques were significantly more severe in the high-risk group compared with the no-risk group (all p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Among stable individuals with high-risk factors, early coronary artery lesions are common and severe. Computed tomography has promising value for the early screening of coronary lesions.

  5. Common clinical practice versus new PRIM score in predicting coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.......To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk....

  6. Traditional risk factors are predictive on segmental localization of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacoy, Gulten; Balcioglu, Akif Serhat; Akinci, Sinan; Erdem, Güliz; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Timurkaynak, Timur; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between established risk factors and segmental localization of coronary artery disease. A total of 2760 patients who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled into the study. Coronary angiographic segmental evaluation was performed according to the scheme of American Heart Association. Patients were classified into 2 groups (group 1: normal coronary artery segments, group 2: coronary artery segments with coronary artery disease). Smoking was highly related with left main coronary artery disease (odds ratio = 7.5; P = .005). Diabetes mellitus and male sex increased the risk of atherosclerosis in all coronary vasculature (odds ratio = 2.7-2.2; P < .001-P < .001). Hypertension was correlated with distal coronary artery (odds ratio = 1.4; P < .001) and family history with distal circumflex lesions (odds ratio = 4.5; P = .005) High triglyceride levels were associated with right coronary artery lesions (odds ratio = 1.00; P =.03). The effect of advanced age was small (odds ratio = 1.08; P < .001). Risk factors may be predictive for segmental localization.

  7. Coronary heart disease risk factors in a rural and urban Orange Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dietary habits, risk factor prevalence, morbidity and mortality ... measure of regional fat distribution and as an independent. IHO risk factor.9 ... An overview ofthe coronary heart ..... cholesterol levels are due mainly to a diet high in saturated fat ...

  8. Coronary fluorine-18-sodium fluoride uptake is increased in healthy adults with an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn A; Thomassen, Anders; de Jong, Pim A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coronary artery fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) uptake reflects coronary artery calcification metabolism and is considered to be an early prognostic marker of coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the relationship between coronary artery F-NaF uptake and cardiovascular risk...

  9. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory...

  10. 76 FR 49707 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... reconsider its proposed amendments to the phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease health ] claim. The... December 8, 2010, proposing to amend regulations on plant sterol/ stanol esters and risk of coronary heart...

  11. A new method for IVUS-based coronary artery disease risk stratification: A link between coronary & carotid ultrasound plaque burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Shukla, Devarshi; Londhe, Narendra D; Shrivastava, Vimal K; Banchhor, Sumit K; Saba, Luca; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-02-01

    Interventional cardiologists have a deep interest in risk stratification prior to stenting and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is most commonly adapted for screening, but current tools lack the ability for risk stratification based on grayscale plaque morphology. Our hypothesis is based on the genetic makeup of the atherosclerosis disease, that there is evidence of a link between coronary atherosclerosis disease and carotid plaque built up. This novel idea is explored in this study for coronary risk assessment and its classification of patients between high risk and low risk. This paper presents a strategy for coronary risk assessment by combining the IVUS grayscale plaque morphology and carotid B-mode ultrasound carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) - a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Support vector machine (SVM) learning paradigm is adapted for risk stratification, where both the learning and testing phases use tissue characteristics derived from six feature combinational spaces, which are then used by the SVM classifier with five different kernels sets. These six feature combinational spaces are designed using 56 novel feature sets. K-fold cross validation protocol with 10 trials per fold is used for optimization of best SVM-kernel and best feature combination set. IRB approved coronary IVUS and carotid B-mode ultrasound were jointly collected on 15 patients (2 days apart) via: (a) 40MHz catheter utilizing iMap (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) with 2865 frames per patient (42,975 frames) and (b) linear probe B-mode carotid ultrasound (Toshiba scanner, Japan). Using the above protocol, the system shows the classification accuracy of 94.95% and AUC of 0.95 using optimized feature combination. This is the first system of its kind for risk stratification as a screening tool to prevent excessive cost burden and better patients' cardiovascular disease management, while validating our two hypotheses.

  12. Impact of individual and cumulative coronary risk factors on coronary flow reserve assessed by dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmari, Saeed A L; Bunch, T Jared; Modesto, Karen; Stussy, Vicky; Dichak, Amy; Seward, James B; Pellikka, Patricia A; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy

    2008-06-15

    Traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been shown to cause microvascular dysfunction. Most studies that have evaluated microcirculation rely on invasive measurement tools. We used dobutamine stress echocardiography, a validated method to measure coronary flow velocity (CFV) and coronary flow reserve (CFR), in a previously unstudied population without known significant coronary artery disease to determine the impact of traditional risk factors on CFR. Consecutive patients who had no evidence of regional wall motion abnormalities at rest or during dobutamine stress echocardiography were studied. Left anterior descending artery CFV was measured at baseline and at peak dobutamine stress and CFR was calculated as the ratio of peak stress CFV to baseline CFV. Fifty-nine consecutive patients (28 men) with mean age of 66.8+/-14.5 years were studied. CFR was lower in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those without (1.7+/-0.74 vs 2.48+/-0.98, p50 mm Hg), and obesity with a wide pulse pressure. In a multivariate model, DM, obesity, and wide pulse pressure were significantly associated with variation in CFR (p<0.0008). In conclusion, CFR was abnormal in patients with DM, hypertension, and obesity. CFR impairment is exaggerated as the number of risk factors increases. Despite a negative dobutamine stress echocardiographic result, aggressive risk factor assessment and control should be implemented in patients with coronary risk factors due to an underlying abnormal CFR.

  13. Coronary heart disease in women: why the disproportionate risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhoun, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Women with diabetes experience much greater relative risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared with the nondiabetic population than do men with diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, much of the greater elevation in risk in women is explained by a more adverse pattern of known CHD risk factors. In type 1 diabetes the picture is less clear, but current evidence suggests that a cardioprotective lipid profile is found in type 1 diabetic men, thus reducing the effect of diabetes on CHD, but that in women this is not the case. Also, in type 1 diabetic women there is some evidence of altered body fat distribution and a greater elevation in blood pressure. Whether these reflect a greater degree of insulin resistance in type 1 women, and what the origin of this might be, remains controversial. The practical consequence is that clinicians need to be aware that the usual cardioprotective effect of sex does not apply in diabetic women and that risk factor intervention is needed at an early age.

  14. Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Josh; Farmer, John

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor, and clinical trials have demonstrated that successful reduction of elevated blood pressure to target levels translates into decreased risk for the development of coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. The arterial system had previously been regarded as a passive conduit for the transportation of arterial blood to peripheral tissues. The physiologic role the arterial system was greatly expanded by the recognition of the central role of the endothelial function in a variety of physiologic processes. The role of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology was expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes, and have been classified as an emerging risk factor that provides prognostic information beyond standard stratification strategies involving hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and smoking. Multiple epidemiologic studies have correlated markers of arterial stiffness such as pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index and pulse pressure with risk for the development of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Additionally, measurements of arterial stiffness had clarified the results of clinical trials that demonstrated differing impacts on clinical outcomes, despite similar reductions in blood pressure, as measured by brachial and sphygmomanometry.

  15. Androgenetic alopecia and risk of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA or male pattern baldness (MPB has been found to be associated with the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD. The well-known risk factors are family history of CAD, hypertension, increased body mass index (BMI, central obesity, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. The newer risk factors are serum lipoprotein-a (SL-a, serum homocysteine (SH, and serum adiponectin (SA. Aim : Identifying individuals at risk of CAD at an early age might help in preventing CAD and save life. Hence, a comparative study of CAD risk factors was planned in 100 males of AGA between the age of 25 and 40 years with equal number of age- and sex-matched controls. Materials and Methods : Patients of AGA grade II or more of Hamilton and Norwood (HN Scale and controls were examined clinically and advised blood test. The reports were available for fasting blood sugar (FBS, serum total serum cholesterol (SC in 64 cases, 64 controls; lipoproteins (high, low, very low density, HDL, LDL, VLDL, serum triglycerides (ST in 63 cases, 63 controls; SL-a in 63 cases, 74 controls; SH in 56 cases, 74 controls; and SA in 62 cases, 74 controls. Results : In these cases family history (FH of AGA and CAD was significantly high. The blood pressure (BP was also found to be significantly high in the cases. The difference of mean serum HDL, LDL, VLDL, ST, SH, and SL-a in cases and controls were statistically significant and with increasing grade of AGA, the risk factors also increased. Conclusion : Patients with AGA appear to be at an increased risk of developing CAD, therefore, clinical evaluation of cases with AGA of grade II and above may be of help in preventing CAD in future.

  16. Computed tomography coronary angiography accuracy in women and men at low to intermediate risk of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharampal, Anoeshka S.; Papadopoulou, Stella L.; Rossi, Alexia; Weustink, Annick C.; Mollet, Nico R.A.; Meijboom, W. Bob; Neefjes, Lisan A.; Nieman, Koen; Feijter, Pim J. de [Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boersma, Eric [Erasmus MC, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Krestin, Gabriel P. [Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in women at low to intermediate pre-test probability of coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with men. In this retrospective study we included symptomatic patients with low to intermediate risk who underwent both invasive coronary angiography and CTCA. Exclusion criteria were previous revascularisation or myocardial infarction. The pre-test probability of CAD was estimated using the Duke risk score. Thresholds of less than 30 % and 30-90 % were used for determining low and intermediate risk, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of CTCA in detecting obstructive CAD ({>=}50 % lumen diameter narrowing) was calculated on patient level. P < 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 570 patients (46 % women [262/570]) were included and stratified as low (women 73 % [80/109]) and intermediate risk (women 39 % [182/461]). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were not significantly different in and between women and men at low and intermediate risk. For women vs. men at low risk they were 97 % vs. 100 %, 79 % vs. 90 %, 80 % vs. 80 % and 97 % vs. 100 %, respectively. For intermediate risk they were 99 % vs. 99 %, 72 % vs. 83 %, 88 % vs. 93 % and 98 % vs. 99 %, respectively. CTCA has similar diagnostic accuracy in women and men at low and intermediate risk. (orig.)

  17. Coronary heart disease multiple risk factor reduction. Providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosal, Milagros C; Ockene, Judith K; Luckmann, Roger; Zapka, Jane; Goins, Karin Valentine; Saperia, Gordon; Mason, Theresa; Donnelly, Gary

    2004-08-01

    Although primary care physicians understand the importance of preventive services for patients with multiple risk factors (MRF) for coronary heart disease, physician intervention is limited. This study investigated (1) physicians' views of challenges faced in managing patients with MRF; (2) the counseling and management methods they utilize; and (3) possible strategies to enhance MRF intervention in the primary care setting. Two focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians from varying settings to gain insight into these issues noted above. Each group was co-facilitated by a physician and a behavioral scientist using a previously developed semistructured interview guide. The group discussions were tape recorded and subsequently transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative method for analysis. Physicians are challenged by knowledge limitations (contribution of individual risk factors to overall risk); limited support (guidelines, materials, and staff); and logistic difficulties (organizational issues, time limitations). Their approach to MRF management tends to be highly individualized with an initial preference for lifestyle change interventions rather than prescription of medications with some qualifying circumstances. Physicians favored a serial rather than a parallel approach to MRF intervention, starting with behaviors that the patient perceives as a priority. Proposed solutions to current challenges emphasize physician education and the development of innovative approaches that include physician assistance and a team approach. Physicians are aware of and sensitive to the complexity of MRF management for their patients and themselves. However, future MRF interventions will require nonphysician staff involvement and increased systems support.

  18. Effects of whole grains on coronary heart disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kristina A; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing which types of carbohydrates, including whole grains, reduce the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) is challenging. Whole grains are characterized as being high in resistant carbohydrates as compared with refined grains, meaning they typically are high in fiber, nutrients, and bound antioxidants. Whole grain intake consistently has been associated with improved cardiovascular disease outcomes, but also with healthy lifestyles, in large observational studies. Intervention studies that assess the effects of whole grains on biomarkers for CHD have mixed results. Due to the varying nutrient compositions of different whole grains, each could potentially affect CHD risk via different mechanisms. Whole grains high in viscous fiber (oats, barley) decrease serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure and improve glucose and insulin responses. Grains high in insoluble fiber (wheat) moderately lower glucose and blood pressure but also have a prebiotic effect. Obesity is inversely related to whole grain intake, but intervention studies with whole grains have not produced weight loss. Visceral fat, however, may be affected favorably. Grain processing improves palatability and can have varying effects on nutrition (e.g., the process of milling and grinding flour increases glucose availability and decreases phytochemical content whereas thermal processing increases available antioxidants). Understanding how individual grains, in both natural and processed states, affect CHD risk can inform nutrition recommendations and policies and ultimately benefit public health.

  19. Prevalence of coronary heart disease risk factors in physical education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Costa Moreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To establish the prevalence of coronary risk in physical education students, and compare risk between the genders and the years of course. We evaluated 246 physical education students using RISKO questionnaire to determine eight risk factors: age, heredity, body weight, smoking, physical inactivity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and sex. Students had mean coronary risk score of 16.03 ± 3.52 points, rated "below-average risk." Men had significantly greater risk compared to women. No difference was found between the years of course. The prevalence of risk factors were heritability (58.37%, physical inactivity (32.65%, hypercholesterolemia (32.24%, overweight (27.35%, smoking (3.67% and hypertension (2.45%. The coronary risk of physical education students was rated as below average, being higher among men than women, and no difference in risk between years of course. The most prevalent risk factors were heredity, physical inactivity, overweight and hypercholesterolemia.

  20. Prevalence of conventional risk factors and lipid profiles in patients with acute coronary syndrome and significant coronary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pacheco, Héctor; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Vallejo, Maite; Piña-Reyna, Yigal; Altamirano-Castillo, Alfredo; Sánchez-Tapia, Pedro; Martínez-Sánchez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 80%–90% present at least one conventional risk factor. On the other hand, lipid profile modification after a cardiovascular event related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has been recognized. The prevalence of conventional risk factors and the lipid profile at the time of admission in patients with ACS and significant CAD (stenosis ≥50%) determined through coronary angiography is not well described. Methods We studied 3,447 patients with a diagnosis of ACS and significant CAD with stenosis ≥50%, as shown o n angiography. We recorded the presence of conventional risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In addition, we analyzed the lipid profiles within the first 24 hours of admission. We analyzed the studied population and compared findings according to sex. Results Most patients (81.7%) were male. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was present in 51.3% of patients, and non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome was present in 48.7%. The most frequent risk factor was smoking, which was present in 68% of patients, followed by hypertension (57.8%), dyslipidemia (47.5%), and diabetes (37.7%). In women, the most frequent risk factors were hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, whereas in men, smoking was the most frequent. We identified at least one risk factor in 95.7% of all patients, two or three risk factors in 62%, and four risk factors in 8.6% of patients. The lipid profile analysis revealed that 85.1% of patients had some type of dyslipidemia, and the most frequent was low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (68.6% of cases). Conclusion We found at least one conventional risk factor in 95.7% of patients with ACS and significant CAD. The lipid profile analysis revealed that two thirds of cases had low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. PMID:25328397

  1. Prevalence of conventional risk factors and lipid profiles in patients with acute coronary syndrome and significant coronary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Pacheco H

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Héctor González-Pacheco,1 Jesús Vargas-Barrón,2 Maite Vallejo,2 Yigal Piña-Reyna,3 Alfredo Altamirano-Castillo,1 Pedro Sánchez-Tapia,1 Carlos Martínez-Sánchez1 1Coronary Care Unit, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Department of Clinical Research, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Catheterization Laboratory, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico Background: Among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, 80%–90% present at least one conventional risk factor. On the other hand, lipid profile modification after a cardiovascular event related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS has been recognized. The prevalence of conventional risk factors and the lipid profile at the time of admission in patients with ACS and significant CAD (stenosis ≥50% determined through coronary angiography is not well described. Methods: We studied 3,447 patients with a diagnosis of ACS and significant CAD with stenosis ≥50%, as shown on angiography. We recorded the presence of conventional risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In addition, we analyzed the lipid profiles within the first 24 hours of admission. We analyzed the studied population and compared findings according to sex.Results: Most patients (81.7% were male. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was present in 51.3% of patients, and non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome was present in 48.7%. The most frequent risk factor was smoking, which was present in 68% of patients, followed by hypertension (57.8%, dyslipidemia (47.5%, and diabetes (37.7%. In women, the most frequent risk factors were hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, whereas in men, smoking was the most frequent. We identified at least one risk factor in 95.7% of all patients, two or three risk factors in 62%, and four risk factors in 8.6% of patients. The lipid profile analysis revealed that

  2. Effect of serum lipid level change on 10-year coronary heart risk distribution estimated by means of seven different coronary risk scores during one-year treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojić, Nevena Eremić; Derić, Mirjana; Dejanović, Jadranka

    2014-01-01

    This study was done in order to evaluate the effect of serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol on 10-year coronary heart disease risk distribution change. This study included 110 subjects of both genders (71 female and 39 male), aged 29 to 73, treated at the Outpatient Department of Atherosclerosis Prevention, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Centre Vojvodina. The 10-year coronary heart disease risk was estimated on first examination and after one-year treatment by means of Framingham, PROCAM and SCORE coronary risk scores and their modifications (Framingham Adult Treatment Panel III, Framingham Weibul, PROCAM NS and PROCAM Cox Hazards). Age, gender, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking, positive family history and left ventricular hypertrophy are risk factors involved in the estimation of coronary heart disease besides lipid parameters. There were no significant differences in nutritional status, smoking habits, systolic and diastolic pressure, and no development of diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular incidents during one-year follow. However, a significant reduction in cholesterol level (p risk (Framingham- p Framingham ATP III- p Framingham Weibul- p SCORE- p risk category (Framingham- p Framingham ATP III- p Framingham Weibul- p SCORE- p risk at the beginning of the study. Our results show that the correction of lipid level after one-year treatment leads to a significant redistribution of 10-year coronary heart disease risk estimated by means of seven different coronary risk scores. This should stimulate patients and doctors to persist in prevention measures.

  3. Study on the screening program and risk factors of carotid artery stenosis with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆祥

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the relationship and risk factors between coronary artery disease and carotid artery stenosis (CAS) ,screened by duplex ultra-sonography.Methods 1339 patients with coronary artery disease were enrolled into this

  4. Risk assessment by myocardial perfusion imaging for coronary revascularization, medical therapy, and noncardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Georgios I; Heller, Gary V

    2003-01-01

    Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has become an important tool in risk stratification of patients with known coronary artery disease. A normal myocardial perfusion scan has a high negative predictive value and is associated with low annual mortality rate ( 20% of the left ventricle), defects in more than 1 coronary vascular territory, transient or persistent left ventricular cavity dilation, and ejection fraction less than 45% have a high annual mortality rate (> 3%). Those patients should undergo coronary revascularization whenever feasible, as the cardiac event rate increases in proportion to the magnitude of the jeopardized myocardium. Stress MPI can be used to demonstrate ischemia in patients with symptoms early after coronary artery bypass surgery (/= 5 years) after coronary artery bypass surgery. With respect to patients who underwent percutaneous interventions, stress MPI can help detect in-stent restenosis early after the intervention (3-6 months) or assess the progression of native coronary disease afterward. Since preliminary data suggest that a reduction in the perfusion defect size may translate to a reduction of coronary events, stress MPI can help assess the efficacy of medical management of coronary disease. Finally, stress MPI is indicated for perioperative cardiac risk stratification for noncardiac surgery in patients with intermediate risk predictors (mild angina, prior myocardial infarction or heart failure symptoms, diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency) and poor functional capacity or in those who undergo high-risk surgery with significant implications in further preoperative management.

  5. Pregnancy risks in women with pre-existing coronary artery disease, or following acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burchill, Luke J.; Lameijer, Heleen; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Grewal, Jasmine; Ruys, Titia P. E.; Kulikowski, Julia D.; Burchill, Laura A.; Oudijk, M. A.; Wald, Rachel M.; Colman, Jack M.; Siu, Samuel C.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Silversides, Candice K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine outcomes in pregnant women with pre-existing coronary artery disease (CAD) or following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) including myocardial infarction (MI). Background The physiological changes of pregnancy can contribute to myocardial ischaem

  6. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute coronary syndrome in a young patient without risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Chevli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction that is more common in younger patients (under age 50 and in women. Although the etiology is not known, some predisposing conditions to SCAD are well known and include Marfan syndrome, pregnancy and peripartum state, drug abuse, and some anatomical abnormalities of the coronary arteries such as aneurysms and severe kinking. We describe a case of SCAD in a young woman who presented with sudden onset of chest pain and was admitted for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The coronary angiography showed dissection of the left anterior descending artery. The patient underwent successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement.

  7. IS IMPAIRED FASTING GLUCOSE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED RISK OF CORONARY ATEROSCLEROSIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hashemi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Impaired fasting glucose identifies individuals at high risk of progression to diabetes but the role of IFG as a coronary artery disease risk factor, independent of its progression to diabetes and its association with other coronary artery disease risk factors ,is unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that impaired fasting glucose increased the likelihood of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Blood chemistry data as well as traditional coronary artery disease risk factors from 812 patients referred for coronary angiography to heart centers in Shahid- Chamran and Sina hospital, Isfahan, Iran were recorded. The population were stratified into three groups according to American Diabetes Association criteria: normal fasting glucose (n=608, impaired fasting glucose(n=92 and diabetes mellitus(n=112.We use extent, Vessel and stenosis scores to indicate the coronary artery involvement. KrusKal-Wallis test showed that the means of extent, Vessel and stenosis scores are not significantly different between three groups(P> 0.05. Multivariate linear regression analysis, using extent score of coronary artery disease as dependent variable and traditional risk factors and impaired fasting glucose as independent variables did not show any significant difference either. Our data suggested that impaired fasting glucose is not associated with increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis.

  8. Risk factor profiling and study of atherosclerotic coronary plaque burden and morphology with coronary computed tomography angiography in coronary artery disease among young Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R; Chauhan, A; Singhal, M; Bagga, S

    2017-08-01

    With a decade earlier manifestation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and paucity of data characterizing coronary plaque with coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) among CAD patients in India, the study aimed to analyze patient characteristics and coronary plaque burden and morphology in young Indian patients with CAD. Serial coronary CTA was performed in 96 CAD patients. Among 60 patients ≤40years, risk factor and coronary plaque analysis done using a 256- slice CT in 33 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was compared with 27 patients with chronic stable angina (CSA). Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, for factors predicting ACS as an outcome among young CAD patients. In addition, quantitative and morphologic plaque characteristics were compared among those ≤40years and >40years. Among 60 subjects ≤40years of age, 77% had dyslipidemia, 70% high lipoprotein(a), 53.33% elevated hs-CRP and 73.33% raised homocysteine. hs-CRP (9.33 vs. 3.33, p value=0.01) and serum triglycerides (178.67 vs. 141.42, p value=0.03) were markedly raised in patients with ACS. Statistically significant number of patients in the ACS group had positive remodelling (ACS, 69.7% vs. CSA, 14.8%; p value30mg/dL and composite vulnerability score maintained a predictive value for ACS in patients ≤40years. Statistically significant number of patients in the younger age group had higher mean total plaque volume (66.17±41.31mm(3) vs. 44.94±49.07mm(3); p=0.03), remodelling index (1.5±0.27 vs. 1.08±0.38; p=0.0001). Comparing culprit lesion characteristics of ACS patients in the two age groups, positive remodelling (95.8% vs. 70.5%, p=0.02), spotty calcification (50% vs. 11.7%, p=0.01) and non-calcified plaque (95.8% vs. 70.5%, p=0.02) were significantly more frequent in patients ≤40years. ACS in young Indians is characterized by a higher prevalence of both conventional and newer risk factors. In addition, culprit lesions in young ACS patients are more

  9. Macrophage cholesterol efflux correlates with lipoprotein subclass distribution and risk of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremer Werner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in patients with low HDL have suggested that impaired cellular cholesterol efflux is a heritable phenotype increasing atherosclerosis risk. Less is known about the association of macrophage cholesterol efflux with lipid profiles and CAD risk in normolipidemic subjects. We have therefore measured macrophage cholesterol efflux in142 normolipidemic subjects undergoing coronary angiography. Methods Monocytes isolated from blood samples of patients scheduled for cardiac catheterization were differentiated into macrophages over seven days. Isotopic cholesterol efflux to exogenously added apolipoprotein A-I and HDL2 was measured. Quantitative cholesterol efflux from macrophages was correlated with lipoprotein subclass distribution in plasma from the same individuals measured by NMR-spectroscopy of lipids and with the extent of coronary artery disease seen on coronary angiography. Results Macrophage cholesterol efflux was positively correlated with particle concentration of smaller HDL and LDL particles but not with total plasma concentrations of HDL or LDL-cholesterol. We observed an inverse relationship between macrophage cholesterol efflux and the concntration of larger and triglyceride rich particles (VLDL, chylomicrons. Subjects with significant stenosis on coronary angiography had lower cholesterol efflux from macrophages compared to individuals without significant stenosis (adjusted p = 0.02. Conclusion Macrophage cholesterol efflux is inversely correlated with lipoprotein particle size and risk of CAD.

  10. Prognostic Value of Risk Factors, Calcium Score, Coronary CTA, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and Invasive Coronary Angiography in Kidney Transplantation Candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Simon; Svensson, My; Jørgensen, Hanne Skou

    2017-01-01

    , but only CACS predicted MACE. Combining risk factors with CACS identified a very-low-risk cohort with a MACE event rate of 2.1%, and a 1.0% mortality rate per year. Of the diagnostic modalities, coronary CTA and ICA significantly predicted MACE, but only coronary CTA predicted death. In contrast, SPECT...

  11. CT measurement of coronary calcium mass: impact on global cardiac risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Christoph R.; Majeed, Amal; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Crispin, Alexander [University Hospital Munich, Department of Medical Data Processing, Biometry, and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Knez, Andreas; Boekstegers, Peter; Steinbeck, Gerhard [University Hospital Munich, Department of Cardiology, Munich (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Coronary calcium mass percentiles can be derived from electron beam CT as well as from multidetector-row CT of all manufacturers. Coronary calcium mass may serve as a more individualized substitute for age for cardiac risk stratification. The aim was to investigate the potential impact of CT coronary calcium mass quantification on cardiac risk stratification using an adjusted Framingham score. Standardized coronary calcium mass was determined by multidetector-row CT in a total of 1,473 patients (1,038 male, 435 female). The impact on risk stratification of replacing the traditional Framingham age point score by a point score based on calcium mass relative to age was tested. Any coronary calcium found in males in the age group of 20-34 years and females in the age group of 20-59 years results in an increase of the Framingham score by 9 and 4-7 points, respectively. Only in males 65 years of age and older, none or minimal amounts of coronary calcium decrease the Framingham score by three points. The coronary calcium mass and age-related scoring system may have impact on the reassignment of patients with an intermediate Framingham risk to a lower or higher risk group. (orig.)

  12. The coronary calcium score is a more accurate predictor of significant coronary stenosis than conventional risk factors in symptomatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoll, R; Wiklund, U; Zhao, Y;

    2016-01-01

    risk factor assessment, computed tomographic coronary angiogram (CTCA) or conventional angiography and a CT scan for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring. 1539 (27.9%) patients had significant stenosis, 5.5% of whom had zero CAC. In 5074 patients, multiple binary regression showed the most important...... predictor of significant stenosis to be male gender (B=1.07) followed by diabetes mellitus (B=0.70) smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, family history of CAD and age but not obesity. When the log transformed CAC score was included, it became the most powerful predictor (B=1.25), followed by male...... gender (B=0.48), diabetes, smoking, family history and age but hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension lost significance. The CAC score is a more accurate predictor of >50% stenosis than risk factors regardless of the means of assessment of stenosis. The sensitivity of risk factors, CAC score...

  13. Sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Weinman, John; French, David P

    2007-01-01

    This study examines sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction (MI) risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease (CHD) (N = 3130). Two variables for comparative risk perceptions were computed: (1) own risk compared to that of an average person; and (2) own risk compared...

  14. Risk stratification in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: Risk scores, biomarkers and clinical judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corcoran

    2015-09-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy in higher risk NSTE-ACS. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score is a validated risk stratification tool which has incremental prognostic value for risk stratification compared with clinical assessment or troponin testing alone. In emergency medicine, there has been a limited adoption of the GRACE score in some countries (e.g. United Kingdom, in part related to a delay in obtaining timely blood biochemistry results. Age makes an exponential contribution to the GRACE score, and on an individual patient basis, the risk of younger patients with a flow-limiting culprit coronary artery lesion may be underestimated. The future incorporation of novel cardiac biomarkers into this diagnostic pathway may allow for earlier treatment stratification. The cost-effectiveness of the new diagnostic pathways based on high-sensitivity troponin and copeptin must also be established. Finally, diagnostic tests and risk scores may optimize patient care but they cannot replace patient-focused good clinical judgment.

  15. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, van J.B.J.; Pare, G.; Schwartz, S.M.; Hazra, A.; Tanaka, T.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Cotlarciuc, I.; Yuan, X.; Malarstig, A.; Bandinelli, S.; Bis, J.C.; Morn, H.; Brown, M.J.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y.D.; Clarke, R.J.; Dehghan, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ferrucci, L.; Hamsten, A.; Hofman, A.; Hunten, D.J.; Goel, A.; Johnson, A.D.; Kathiresan, S.; Kampman, E.; Kiel, D.P.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Chambers, J.C.; Kraft, P.; Lindemans, J.; McKnight, B.; Nelson, C.P.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Psaty, B.M.; Ridken, P.M.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rose, L.M.; Seedoif, U.; Siscovick, D.S.; Schunkert, H.; Selhub, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Vollenweiden, P.; Waeben, G.; Waterworth, D.M.; Watkins, H.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Heijen, den M.; Jacques, P.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Koonet, J.S.; Rader, D.J.; Reilly, M.P.; Moose, V.; Chasman, D.I.; Samani, N.J.; Ahmadi, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteinelowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and

  16. Depressive Symptoms, Health Behaviors, and Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whooley, Mary A.; de Jonge, Peter; Vittinghoff, Eric; Otte, Christian; Moos, Rudolf; Carney, Robert M.; Ali, Sadia; Dowray, Sunaina; Na, Beeya; Feldman, Mitchell D.; Schiller, Nelson B.; Browner, Warren S.

    2008-01-01

    Context Depressive symptoms predict adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease, but the mechanisms responsible for this association are unknown. Objective To determine why depressive symptoms are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Design and Part

  17. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common

  18. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, R.; Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common...

  19. Lp-PLA₂- a novel risk factor for high-risk coronary and carotid artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, K C; Wilensky, R L

    2011-01-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA₂) is at the crossroads of lipid metabolism and the inflammatory response. It is produced by inflammatory cells, bound to LDL and other lipoproteins, and once in the arterial wall facilitates hydrolysis of phospholipids. Elevated serum levels of Lp-PLA₂ have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk in healthy populations and in patients with known vascular disease. Here, we review the role of Lp-PLA₂ in the development of atherosclerosis and progression to unstable disease, the utility of Lp-PLA₂ as a risk predictor for coronary and carotid events and the potential clinical benefit of pharmacologic inhibition of Lp-PLA₂.

  20. Coronary artery calcification detected by a mobile helical CT unit in a mass screening. The frequency and relationship to coronary risk factors and coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itani, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Hanamura, Kazuhisa; Asakura, Kazuhiro; Sone, Shusuke; Sunami, Yuko; Shimura, Akimitsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    2001-06-01

    A strong relationship is known to exist between coronary artery disease (CAD) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by CT. In this study, we investigated the frequency of CAC and the relationship between coronary risk factors, CAD and CAC in a mass screening using a mobile helical CT unit. The total number of participants was 10008 people undergoing a medical examination for lung cancer and tuberculosis using a mobile helical CT unit. We measured the CT density of the coronary artery to detect CAC. The CT density threshold for determining CAC was above +110HU. The frequency of CAC was 16.0% in the overall patient population and significantly higher in males than in females (20.6% vs 10.7%). Frequency increased with age in both genders. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were significantly related to CAC. Smoking showed a correlation with CAC only in males. A significant relationship was observed between CAD and CAC in males. In particular, the relationship between them was strongest in males under 60 years of age. Furthermore, the odds ratio of CAC in predicting CAD increased with increasing risk factors in both genders. (author)

  1. Contemporary invasive imaging modalities that identify and risk-stratify coronary plaques at risk of rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam J; Costopoulos, Charis; West, Nick Ej; Bennett, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is responsible for the majority of myocardial infarctions, with ruptured plaques exhibiting specific morphological features, including large lipid cores, thinner overlying fibrous caps and micro-calcifications. Contemporary imaging modalities are increasingly able to characterize plaques, potentially leading to the identification of precursor lesions that are at high risk of rupture. Observational studies using invasive imaging consistently find that plaques responsible for an acute coronary event display these high-risk morphological features, and recent prospective imaging studies have now established links between baseline plaque characteristics and future cardiovascular events. Despite these promising advances, subsequent overall event rates remain too low for clinical utility. Novel technologies are now required to refine and improve our ability to identify and risk-stratify lesions at risk of rupture, if plaque-based risk evaluation is ever to become reality.

  2. Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: possible effect modification by gender and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30–71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models used...... not significantly. In conclusion, the present study suggests that coronary heart disease risk relates to both the quantity and the quality of dietary fats....

  3. Association of Low Serum Concentration of Bilirubin with Increased Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    bilirubin with increased risk of coronary artery dises . Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada Cliii Chem 1994,40:18-23. Fax 416-481-2899 10 CLINICAL...performed for abnor- according to the maximum coronary stenosis at angiog- mal repolarization, decreased thallium uptake, cardiac raphy: < 10% (no...g AD-A276 272... 08/17/93 Association of Low Serum Concentration of Bilirubin IN-House with Increased Risk of Coronary Artery Disease PE 62202F

  4. Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Thomas M.; Stanislawski, Maggie A.; Grunwald, Gary K.; Bradley, Steven M.; Ho, P. Michael; Tsai, Thomas T.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sandhu, Amneet; Valle, Javier; Magid, David J.; Leon, Benjamin; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fihn, Stephan D.; Rumsfeld, John S.

    2016-01-01

    nonobstructive HR, 4.6 (95% CI, 2.0–10.5); 3-vessel nonobstructive HR, 4.5 (95% CI, 1.6–12.5); 1-vessel obstructive HR, 9.0 (95% CI, 4.2–19.0); 2-vessel obstructive HR, 16.5 (95% CI, 8.1–33.7); and 3-vessel or LM obstructive HR, 19.5 (95% CI, 9.9–38.2). One-year mortality rates were associated with increasing CAD extent, ranging from 1.38% among patients without apparent CAD to 4.30% with 3-vessel or LM obstructive CAD. After risk adjustment, there was no significant association between 1- or 2-vessel nonobstructive CAD and mortality, but there were significant associations with mortality for 3-vessel nonobstructive CAD (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1–2.5), 1-vessel obstructive CAD (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4–2.6), 2-vessel obstructive CAD (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.1–3.7), and 3-vessel or LM obstructive CAD (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.6–4.4). Similar associations were noted with the combined outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this cohort of patients undergoing elective coronary angiography, nonobstructive CAD, compared with no apparent CAD, was associated with a significantly greater 1-year risk of MI and all-cause mortality. These findings suggest clinical importance of nonobstructive CAD and warrant further investigation of interventions to improve outcomes among these patients. PMID:25369489

  5. Periodontitis as a Risk Factor in Non-Diabetic Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Nesar Hoseini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is responsible for much mortality across the w orld, especially in our country .The conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis are well understood, but they can account for only about 50 to 70% of atherosclerotic events in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between prevalent Coronary Artery Disease (CAD and clinical periodontal disease in patients with angiographic ally proven coronary artery disease. 152 consecutive patients w ith angiographically proven coronary artery disease will be included in this study, who received a complete periodontal examination during visit. Patients with normal coronary, average plaque index (1.6±1.02 Index of bleeding (1.51±0.92, mean adhesion level (3.57±1.18. But patients with coronary artery disease, the mean plaque index (2.46±0.62 Index of bleeding (1.86±0.92, mean adhesion level (4.13±1.45. These differences are statistically significant. (p<0.05 In this study, average depth of probe entrance on the surface of teeth has had little relation w ith cardiovascular disease (p = 0.051. According to the results of this study, in peoples over 40 years, who had coronary artery disease proved by coronary angiography, gingival inflammation (periodentitis has a significant relation as a risk factor.

  6. Evaluation of coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on risk categories: the Dallas Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mahesh J; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K; See, Raphael; Lindsey, Jason B; Murphy, Sabina A; Grundy, Scott M; Khera, Amit

    2009-06-01

    A strategy using coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening to refine coronary heart disease risk assessment in moderately high risk (MHR) subjects (10-year risk 10%-20%) has been suggested. The potential impact of this strategy is unknown. Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects were modeled in 2,610 subjects aged 30 to 65 years undergoing Framingham risk scoring and CAC assessment in the Dallas Heart Study. The proportions of subjects eligible for imaging and reclassified from MHR to high risk (HR) (10-year risk >20%) based upon CAC scores were determined. Only 1.0% of women and 15.4% of men were at MHR by Framingham risk scoring and thus eligible for imaging, and MHR to HR using a CAC threshold > or = 400. Coronary artery calcium imaging targeting MHR subjects was also relatively inefficient (>100 women, 14.3 men scanned per subject reclassified). Restricting to an older age range (45-65 years) or expanding the MHR group to 6% to 20% risk had virtually no impact on risk assessment in women. In a secondary analysis, a proposed imaging strategy targeting promotion of subjects from lower risk to MHR was more efficient and had greater yield than current recommendations targeting promotion from MHR to HR. Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects will have a negligible impact on risk assessment in women and a modest impact in men. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of CAC screening as an adjunct to coronary heart disease risk assessment, especially for women and those at seemingly lower risk.

  7. Coronary risk reduction through intensive community-based lifestyle intervention: the Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, H A

    1998-11-26

    Vigorous cholesterol lowering with diet, drugs, or a combination has been shown to slow, arrest, or even reverse atherosclerosis. Residential lifestyle intervention programs have successfully lowered serum cholesterol levels and other coronary risk factors, but they have the disadvantages of high cost and difficulty with long-term adherence. Community-based risk-reduction programs have the potential to effect change at low cost and improve long-term adherence. To assess the effectiveness of, and to develop a model for, such programs, the community-based Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) was developed in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In the intensive (30-day, 40-hour), hospital-based educational program, participants are encouraged to exercise 30 minutes a day and to embrace a largely unrefined plant-food-centered diet that is high in complex carbohydrates and fiber; very low in fat, animal protein, sugar, and salt; and virtually free of cholesterol. A total of 304 enrollees in the first program were at elevated risk of coronary artery and related diseases: 70% were > or =10% above their ideal weight, 14% had diabetes, 47% had hypertension, and 32% had a history of coronary artery disease. Of the enrollees, 288 "graduated" from the program (123 men, 165 women; mean age was 55+/-11 years). Various markers of disease risk, including serum blood lipids and fasting blood glucose concentrations, were measured before and after the program. At 4 weeks, overall improvements in the participants' laboratory test results, blood pressures, weights, and body mass indexes were highly significant (p 200 mg/dL in men, 200-299 mg/dL in women).

  8. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We......·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose...... long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. FUNDING: Medical Research Council...

  9. Risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in a general Japanese population: the Hisayama study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yutaka; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Doi, Yasufumi; Kubo, Michiaki; Iida, Mitsuo; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2009-01-01

    To investigate risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in men and women in the recent general Japanese population, we examined coronary arteries obtained from subjects autopsied in the Hisayama cohort study (autopsy rate: 78.7%). The subjects were over 40 years of age and consisted of 125 men and 108 women. They underwent an antemortem medical examination in 1988 and were subject to autopsy at death during an 8-year follow-up period. Atherosclerosis was globally assessed by examining 14 specimens taken from wide areas of epicardial coronary arteries and classified into 6 grades. The frequency of more severe grades of coronary atherosclerosis increased with age in both genders and was greater in men than in women of the same age. Multiple regression analysis revealed that age, systolic blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, and hemoglobin A(1C) were significant risk factors for men. Age, systolic blood pressure, and waist to hip ratio were risk factors for women. Smoking was not significantly correlated with the grade of coronary atherosclerosis in either gender. Thus, aging, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and glucose intolerance are risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in recent Japanese populations, and the significance of the metabolic risk factors is different between men and women.

  10. Relationship among coronary plaque compliance, coronary risk factors and tissue characteristics evaluated by integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihara Yoshiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of coronary plaques and plaque behavior, and to elucidate the relationship among tissue characteristics of coronary plaques, mechanical properties and coronary risk factors using integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound (IB-IVUS. Methods Non-targeted plaques with moderate stenosis (plaque burden at the minimal lumen site: 50-70% located proximal to the site of the percutaneous coronary intervention target lesions were evaluated by IB-IVUS. Thirty-six plaques (less calcified group: an arc of calcification ≤10° in 36 patients and 22 plaques (moderately calcified group: 10°  Results In the less calcified group, there was a significant correlation between EEMV compliance and the relative lipid volume (r = 0.456, p = 0.005. There was a significant inverse correlation between EEM area stiffness index and the relative lipid volume (p = 0.032, r = −0.358. The LV compliance and EEM area stiffness index were significantly different in the diabetes mellitus (DM group than in the non-DM group (1.32 ± 1.49 vs. 2.47 ± 1.79%/10 mmHg, p =0.014 and 28.3 ± 26.0 vs. 15.7 ± 17.2, p =0.020. The EEMV compliance and EEM area stiffness index were significantly different in the hypertension (HTN group than in the non-HTN group (0.77 ± 0.68 vs. 1.57 ± 0.95%/10 mmHg, p =0.012 and 26.5 ± 24.3 vs. 13.0 ± 16.7, p =0.020. These relationships were not seen in the moderately calcified group. Conclusion The present study provided new findings that there was a significant correlation between mechanical properties and tissue characteristics of coronary arteries. In addition, our results suggested that the EEMV compliance and the LV compliance were independent and the compliance was significantly impaired in the patients with DM and/or HTN. Assessment of coronary mechanical properties during PCI may provide us with

  11. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION.... (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease... lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of developing coronary heart disease...

  12. 21 CFR 101.81 - Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.81 Section 101.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a) Relationship between diets that are low in saturated fat and... means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the most...

  13. What does my patient's coronary artery calcium score mean? Combining information from the coronary artery calcium score with information from conventional risk factors to estimate coronary heart disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletcher Mark J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coronary artery calcium (CAC score is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease. We sought to combine information from the CAC score with information from conventional cardiac risk factors to produce post-test risk estimates, and to determine whether the score may add clinically useful information. Methods We measured the independent cross-sectional associations between conventional cardiac risk factors and the CAC score among asymptomatic persons referred for non-contrast electron beam computed tomography. Using the resulting multivariable models and published CAC score-specific relative risk estimates, we estimated post-test coronary heart disease risk in a number of different scenarios. Results Among 9341 asymptomatic study participants (age 35–88 years, 40% female, we found that conventional coronary heart disease risk factors including age, male sex, self-reported hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol were independent predictors of the CAC score, and we used the resulting multivariable models for predicting post-test risk in a variety of scenarios. Our models predicted, for example, that a 60-year-old non-smoking non-diabetic women with hypertension and high cholesterol would have a 47% chance of having a CAC score of zero, reducing her 10-year risk estimate from 15% (per Framingham to 6–9%; if her score were over 100, however (a 17% chance, her risk estimate would be markedly higher (25–51% in 10 years. In low risk scenarios, the CAC score is very likely to be zero or low, and unlikely to change management. Conclusion Combining information from the CAC score with information from conventional risk factors can change assessment of coronary heart disease risk to an extent that may be clinically important, especially when the pre-test 10-year risk estimate is intermediate. The attached spreadsheet makes these calculations easy.

  14. Risk stratification for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; A; Brogan; Christopher; J; Malkin; Philip; D; Batin; Alexander; D; Simms; James; M; McLenachan; Christopher; P; Gale

    2014-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes presenting with ST elevation are usually treated with emergency reperfusion/revascularisation therapy. In contrast current evidence and national guidelines recommend risk stratification for non ST segment elevation myocardial infarction(NSTEMI) with the decision on revascularisation dependent on perceived clinical risk. Risk stratification for STEMI has no recommendation. Statistical risk scoring techniques in NSTEMI have been demonstrated to improve outcomes however their uptake has been poor perhaps due to questions over their discrimination and concern for application to individuals who may not have been adequately represented in clinical trials. STEMI is perceived to carry sufficient risk to warrant emergency coronary intervention [by primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PPCI)] even if this results in a delay to reperfusion with immediate thrombolysis. Immediate thrombolysis may be as effective in patients presenting early, or at low risk, but physicians are poor at assessing clinical and procedural risks and currently are not required to consider this. Inadequate data on risk stratification in STEMI inhibits the option of immediate fibrinolysis, which may be cost-effective. Currently the mode of reperfusion for STEMI defaults to emergency angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention ignoring alternative strategies. This review article examines the current risk scores and evidence base for risk stratification for STEMI patients. The requirements for an ideal STEMI risk score are discussed.

  15. The relationship between proteinuria and coronary risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlado Perkovic

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Markers of kidney dysfunction such as proteinuria or albuminuria have been reported to be associated with coronary heart disease, but the consistency and strength of any such relationship has not been clearly defined. This lack of clarity has led to great uncertainty as to how proteinuria should be treated in the assessment and management of cardiovascular risk. We therefore undertook a systematic review of published cohort studies aiming to provide a reliable estimate of the strength of association between proteinuria and coronary heart disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A meta-analysis of cohort studies was conducted to obtain a summary estimate of the association between measures of proteinuria and coronary risk. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for studies reporting an age- or multivariate-adjusted estimate and standard error of the association between proteinuria and coronary heart disease. Studies were excluded if the majority of the study population had known glomerular disease or were the recipients of renal transplants. Two independent researchers extracted the estimates of association between proteinuria (total urinary protein >300 mg/d, microalbuminuria (urinary albumin 30-300 mg/d, macroalbuminuria (urinary albumin >300 mg/d, and risk of coronary disease from individual studies. These estimates were combined using a random-effects model. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine possible sources of heterogeneity in effect size. A total of 26 cohort studies were identified involving 169,949 individuals and 7,117 coronary events (27% fatal. The presence of proteinuria was associated with an approximate 50% increase in coronary risk (risk ratio 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-1.74 after adjustment for known risk factors. For albuminuria, there was evidence of a dose-response relationship: individuals with microalbuminuria were at 50% greater risk of coronary heart disease (risk ratio 1.47, 95% CI 1.30-1.66 than

  16. Computed tomography for the measurement of coronary calcification in asymptomatic risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichlbauer, Ernest

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2003 nearly 20% of deaths in Germany were caused by coronary heart disease (CHD. Risk models are used to estimate the ten-year-risk of a coronary event. Coronary calcification may be seen as an additional risk factor. The amount of calcium is correlated with atherosclerotic lesions, but there is no direct correlation with the probability of a plaque rupture. Coronary calcification may be measured either by electron beam computed tomography (EBCT or multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT. Objectives: The aim of this HTA report is to investigate the diagnostic validity and cost effectiveness of computed tomography techniques in measuring coronary calcification of asymptomatic risk patients. Ethical aspects are discussed. Methods: A systematic literature research was performed in 35 international databases which yielded 1080 articles. Overall 43 publications were included for assessment, according to predefined selection criteria. Results: Measuring coronary calcification offers additional information compared with traditional risk factors. Yet at present it cannot be said - according to published literature - which population groups gain most. For determining adequate calcium score thresholds standardisation for age and sex is important. When comparing the reference standard EBCT with MDCT results are inconsistent and depend on the calcium-score value as well as on the scoring method. EBCT as a triage instrument in diagnosing CHD appears to be cost-effective. Yet it is rather not cost-effective as a refinement tool for risk stratification. Discussion: Most of the literature was published in the United States and discusses the use of EBCT as well as (traditional risk stratification by the Framingham Score. Regarding coronary calcification measured by MDCT (which is more widespread in Germany than EBCT and a risk model applicable for European populations clear recommendations based on published literature cannot be made at present

  17. CT coronary angiography: new risks for low-risk chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Ryan Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Widespread conservative management of low-risk chest pain has motivated the development of a rapid triage strategy based on CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in the Emergency Department (ED). Recently, three prominent trials using this technology in the ED setting have presented results in support of its routine use. However, these studies fail to show the incremental prognostic value of CTCA over clinical and biomarker-based risk-stratification strategies, demonstrate additional downstream costs and interventions, and result in multiple harms associated with radio-contrast and radiation exposure. Observing the widespread overdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism following availability of CT pulmonary angiogram as a practice pattern parallel, CTCA use for low-risk chest pain in the ED should be advanced only with caution.

  18. Risk stratification of non-contrast CT beyond the coronary calcium scan

    OpenAIRE

    Madaj, Paul; Budoff, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a well-known marker for coronary artery disease and has important prognostic implications. CAC is able to provide clinicians with a reliable source of information related to cardiovascular atherosclerosis, which carries incremental information beyond Framingham risk. However, non-contrast scans of the heart provide additional information beyond the Agatston score. These studies are also able to measure various sources of fat, including intrathoracic (eg,...

  19. On-pump beating heart coronary surgery for high risk patients requiring emergency multiple coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Segesser Ludwig K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with aortic cross-clamping and cardioplegic arrest remains the method of choice for patients requiring standard myocardial revascularization. Therefore, very high-risk patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, unstable angina, onset of cardiac decompensation and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, can have a poor outcome. The on-pump beating heart technique can reduce the mortality and the morbidity in such a selected group of patients and this report describes our clinical experience. Methods Out of 290 patients operated for CABG from January 2005 to January 2006, 25 (8.6% selected high-risk patients suffering from life threatening coronary syndrome (mean age 69 ± 7 years and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, underwent on-pump beating heart surgery. The mean pre-operative left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF was 27 ± 8%. The majority of them (88% suffered of tri-vessel coronary disease and 6 (24% had a left main stump disease. Nine patients (35% were on severe cardiac failure and seven among them (28% received a pre-operative intra-aortic balloon pump. The pre-operative EuroScore rate was equal or above 8 in 18 patients (73%. Results All patients underwent on-pump-beating heart coronary revascularization. The mean number of graft/patient was 2.9 ± 0.6 and the internal mammary artery was used in 23 patients (92%. The mean CPB time was 84 ± 19 minutes. Two patients died during the recovery stay in the intensive care unit, and there were no postoperative myocardial infarctions between the survivors. Eight patients suffered of transitorily renal failure and 1 patient developed a sternal wound infection. The mean hospital stay was 12 ± 7 days. The follow-up was complete for all 23 patients survived at surgery and the mean follow-up time was 14 ± 5 months. One patient died during the follow-up for cardiac arrest and 2 patients required an

  20. On-pump beating heart coronary surgery for high risk patients requiring emergency multiple coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Enrico; Stalder, Nicolas; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2008-07-02

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with aortic cross-clamping and cardioplegic arrest remains the method of choice for patients requiring standard myocardial revascularization. Therefore, very high-risk patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, unstable angina, onset of cardiac decompensation and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, can have a poor outcome. The on-pump beating heart technique can reduce the mortality and the morbidity in such a selected group of patients and this report describes our clinical experience. Out of 290 patients operated for CABG from January 2005 to January 2006, 25 (8.6%) selected high-risk patients suffering from life threatening coronary syndrome (mean age 69 +/- 7 years) and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, underwent on-pump beating heart surgery. The mean pre-operative left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was 27 +/- 8%. The majority of them (88%) suffered of tri-vessel coronary disease and 6 (24%) had a left main stump disease. Nine patients (35%) were on severe cardiac failure and seven among them (28%) received a pre-operative intra-aortic balloon pump. The pre-operative EuroScore rate was equal or above 8 in 18 patients (73%). All patients underwent on-pump-beating heart coronary revascularization. The mean number of graft/patient was 2.9 +/- 0.6 and the internal mammary artery was used in 23 patients (92%). The mean CPB time was 84 +/- 19 minutes. Two patients died during the recovery stay in the intensive care unit, and there were no postoperative myocardial infarctions between the survivors. Eight patients suffered of transitorily renal failure and 1 patient developed a sternal wound infection. The mean hospital stay was 12 +/- 7 days. The follow-up was complete for all 23 patients survived at surgery and the mean follow-up time was 14 +/- 5 months. One patient died during the follow-up for cardiac arrest and 2 patients required an implantable cardiac defibrillator. One

  1. Prevalence Pattern of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease among Patients Presenting for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeeva Rivikath Pieris

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the pattern of prevalence of risk factors in patients presenting for coronary artery bypass grafting at a single center in Oman. Methods: All patients who had coronary artery bypass grafting between March 2008 to March 2010 were included and data were obtained from history and laboratory investigations. The prevalence rates of eight conventional risk factors are presented as a retrospective single center observational study. Results: Out of 146 total patients, 107 (73.29% were male. The age ranged from 31 to 87 years old. The mean age was 58.18 ± 10.08 years (males = 56.81 ± 10.42, females = 61.95 ± 7.97. Hypertension was present in 119 patients (81.51%, 115 patients (78.77% had dyslipidemia, 107 patients (73.29% were male, 79 patients (54.11% had diabetes mellitus, 70 patients (47.95% were over the age of 60 years, 41 patients (28.08% gave a history of smoking, 31 patients (21.23% were obese, and 19 patients (13.01% gave a positive family history. Conclusions: The most common risk factor was hypertension, followed by dyslipidemia, male gender, diabetes mellitus, old age, smoking, obesity and positive family history; 87.7% had three or more risk factors. The females in this study were older than the males and had more risk factors at presentation. The most common combination of factors seen together was diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and male gender.

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? Do You or a Loved One Have a Drug Use Problem? Signs of Drug Use and Addiction How Does Drug Use Become Addiction? Addiction Risk ...

  3. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS.THE RISK OF NEW CORONARY EVENT IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka Savic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and several markers of inflammation have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Physical activity may lower the risk of coronary heart disease(CHD by mitigating inflammation. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on systemic inflammatory response in patients with stabile coronary artery disease participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise program. Male (n=29 and female (n=23 patients with stable coronary heart disease were recruited for this study. All patients were divided into two groups: group with regular aerobic physical training during cardiovascular rehabilitation program phase II along 3 weeks in rehabilitation center and 3 weeks after that in home of patients and sedentary lifestyle group. There were no significant differences in gender distribution among analyzed groups. Student’s t test showed no significant difference in mean age, waist circumference (OS and waist/hip ratio (WHR. Degree of obesity was measured by BMI, and there was a significant improvement in BMI in patients who underwent the six-week physical training compared to control group (p<0.05.Physical training during 6 weeks did not show any effects on leukocyte count and ICAM-1 levels compared to control group. The exercise training induced reduction in plasma CRP levels by 23.72%, p<0.001, and reduction in plasma VCAM-1 levels by Moderate aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of inflammatory state by decreasing CRP and VCAM-1 levels without significant body mass and visceral obesity reduction. The obtained results indicate that regular physical activity is clinically attractive in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart diseases.

  4. Dietary magnesium intake and coronary heart disease risk: A study from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Stevanović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To assess the relationship between dietary magnesium intakeand the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods A conducted case-control study included 290 randomly selected cases (mean age 59.98 +/- 10.03 years with first event of an acute coronary syndrome and 290 selected controls paired by sex, age and region (mean age 59.43 +/- 10.10 years admitted to the same hospitals without any suspicion of coronary disease. A diet was assessed by an interviewer-administered semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, and magnesium intake was derived from the nutrient database. Results Subjects with coronary heart disease had significantly lower intake of foods containing high levels of magnesium like whole grain (p<0.0001, legumes (p<0.05 and nuts (p<0.05. Lower dietary magnesium intake was found to be positively associated with risk of coronary heart disease (0.027. Conclusion Our findings suggest that dietary intake of magnesium was associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease among Serbian population.

  5. Comprehensive coronary risk determination in primary prevention: an imaging and clinical based definition combining computed tomographic coronary artery calcium score and national cholesterol education program risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Khurram; Vasamreddy, Chandra; Blumenthal, Roger S; Rumberger, John A

    2006-06-16

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and a major cause of morbidity. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for nearly half of all CVD deaths. Currently estimation of risk in primary prevention is based on the Framingham risk equations, which inputs traditional risk factors and is helpful in predicting the development of CHD in asymptomatic individuals. However many individuals suffer events in the absence of established risk factors for atherosclerosis and broad based population risk estimations may have little precision when applied to a given individual. To meet the challenge of CHD risk assessment, several tools have been developed to identify atherosclerotic disease in its preclinical stages. This paper aims to incorporate information from coronary artery calcification (CAC) scoring from a computed tomographic "heartscan" (using Electron Beam Tomography (EBT) as the validated prototype) along with current Framingham risk profiling in order to refine risk on an absolute scale by combining imaging and clinical data to affect a more comprehensive calculation of absolute risk in a given individual. For CAC scores above the 75th percentile but or =55 years, women> or =65 years) a CAC = 0 will result in an age point score corresponding to the age-group whose median CAC score is zero i.e., 40-44 years for men and 55-59 years for women. The utilization of CAC scores allows the inclusion of sub-clinical disease definition into the context of modifiable risk factors as well as identifies high-risk individuals requiring aggressive treatment.

  6. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future.

  7. Risk of Coronary Heart Disease among HIV-Infected Patients: A Multicenter Study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C. Fuchs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease has emerged as a crescent problem among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to determine the 10-year risk of coronary heart disease using the Framingham risk score among HIV-infected patients from three regions of Brazil. This is a pooled analysis of three cohort studies, which enrolled 3,829 individuals, 59% were men, 66% had white skin color, and mean age 39.0 ± 9.9 years. Comparisons among regions showed that there were marked differences in demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and HIV-related characteristics. Prevalence of Framingham score ≥10 was 4.5% in the Southern, 4.2% in the Midwest, and 3.9% in the Northeast of Brazil. The Framingham score ≥10 was similar between regions for males, patients aged ≥60 years, with obesity, central obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Women were three times more likely to have coronary heart disease in 10 years than men. Hypertension and diabetes increased more than four times the risk of coronary heart disease, followed by central obesity, obesity, and prehypertension. The use of antiretroviral agents and time since HIV diagnosis were not risk factors for coronary artery disease in 10 years. In conclusion, hypertension and diabetes are the strongest independent predictors of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease among HIV-infected population.

  8. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults With Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise P; Diederichsen, Axel C P; Simonsen, Jane A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence of traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) compared to healthy controls and to assess the association between CV risk factors, PM/DM, and CAC score. METHODS...

  9. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  10. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is one...

  11. Regular physical activity in old age. Effect on coronary heart disease risk factors and well- being.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Regular physical activity is considered an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle. It may improve fitness, physical competence and may lower the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, until now, data on the effects of regular exercise on CHD risk factors in elde

  12. Risk of stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting: effect of age and comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mérie, Charlotte; Køber, Lars; Olsen, Peter Skov;

    2012-01-01

    The risk of stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is known to increase dramatically with age. During recent years, the age of patients operated on has increased and concomitant therapy has changed. Therefore, we have re-evaluated the risk of stroke after CABG....

  13. Contribution of the risk factor concept to patient care in coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    This article deals with the question of whether or not the risk factor concept, a principal aspect of preventive cardiology, has contributed to patient care in coronary heart disease. The risk factors considered are plasma cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes and marked obesity. With

  14. Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease - An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Bysted, Anette; Andersen, Niels Lyhne;

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a strong direct (positive) association between the intake of trans fatty acids (TRA) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), primarily accounted for by industrially produced TFA (IP-TFA). However, comparisons, between ruminant TEA (R-TFA) and IP-TFA and risk...

  15. Overweight Status, Obesity, and Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, C. Michael; Robinson, Laura M.; Davidson, Philip W.; Haveman, Meindert; Janicki, Matthew P.; Albertini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of overweight status/obesity (OSO). OSO is associated with several important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study focused on assessing whether such risk factors are being identified in adults with ID who are receiving their healthcare in…

  16. Growth in height in childhood and risk of coronary heart disease in adult men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Baker, Jennifer L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2012-01-01

    Adult height is inversely associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but it is still unknown which phase of the human growth period is critical for the formation of this association. We investigated the association between growth in height from 7 to 13 years of age and the risk...

  17. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  18. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular ...

  19. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  20. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Erqou, Sebhat; Kaptoge, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...

  1. Dietary fatty acids and risk factors for coronary heart disease: controlled studies in healthy volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of LDL cholesterol, blood pressure and Lp(a), and low levels of HDL cholesterol increase the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). This thesis describes the effects of dietary fatty acids on these risk factors. In each of three trials we fed diets with tailored fatty acid composition to

  2. Radiation risk and exposure of radiologists and patients during coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karppinen, J.; Parviainen, T.; Servomaa, A.; Komppa, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    The exposure of radiologists and patient to radiation during coronary angiography and PTCA in Finland was studied using phantom measurements. The effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP 60 recommendations and patients` radiation risk according to the BEIR V report. An adult patient`s mean surface dose was 660 mGy, corresponding to an effective dose of about 11 mSv. The average effective dose to the radiologist performing coronary angiography is about 0.05 mSv per examination. The eye dose to the radiologist who injects contrast medium manually is about 0.5 mSv per procedure, which would suggest a limit of seven procedures per week on the basis of occupational dose limits. The average risk of exposure-induced death (REID) for male patients is about 0.24% and for female patients 0.1%. The average loss of life expectancy (LLE/REID) among patients with an exposure-induced fatal cancer is about ten years. The radiation risk for male patients is underestimated by about 66% if the risk is assessed on the basis of the effective dose instead of organ doses. (Author).

  3. Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2009-01-01

    Description: New recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on the use of nontraditional, or novel, risk factors in assessing the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk of asymptomatic persons. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted of literature since 1996 on 9 proposed non

  4. Left atrial enlargement increases the risk of major adverse cardiac events independent of coronary vasodilator capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Angela S. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Murthy, Venkatesh L.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gayed, Peter; Bruyere, John; Di Carli, Marcelo F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wu, Justina [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, and the Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dorbala, Sharmila [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and the Division of Cardiology, Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Longstanding uncontrolled atherogenic risk factors may contribute to left atrial (LA) hypertension, LA enlargement (LAE) and coronary vascular dysfunction. Together they may better identify risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic LA hypertension as assessed by LAE modifies the relationship between coronary vascular function and MACE. In 508 unselected subjects with a normal clinical {sup 82}Rb PET/CT, ejection fraction ≥40 %, no prior coronary artery disease, valve disease or atrial fibrillation, LAE was determined based on LA volumes estimated from the hybrid perfusion and CT transmission scan images and indexed to body surface area. Absolute myocardial blood flow and global coronary flow reserve (CFR) were calculated. Subjects were systematically followed-up for the primary end-point - MACE - a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease progression or revascularization. During a median follow-up of 862 days, 65 of the subjects experienced a composite event. Compared with subjects with normal LA size, subjects with LAE showed significantly lower CFR (2.25 ± 0.83 vs. 1.95 ± 0.80, p = 0.01). LAE independently and incrementally predicted MACE even after accounting for clinical risk factors, medication use, stress left ventricular ejection fraction, stress left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and CFR (chi-squared statistic increased from 30.9 to 48.3; p = 0.001). Among subjects with normal CFR, those with LAE had significantly worse event-free survival (risk adjusted HR 5.4, 95 % CI 2.3 - 12.8, p < 0.0001). LAE and reduced CFR are related but distinct cardiovascular adaptations to atherogenic risk factors. LAE is a risk marker for MACE independent of clinical factors and left ventricular volumes; individuals with LAE may be at risk of MACE despite normal coronary vascular function. (orig.)

  5. Coronary calcification and risk of cardiovascular disease : an epidemiologic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Vliegenthart (Rozemarijn)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAlready in the eighteenth century, calcification of the coronary artery wall was recognized as being part of the atherosclerotic process.1 However, only after the recent development of electron-beam tomography (EBT), an ultrafast CT technique, it became possible to accurately quantify th

  6. Joint associations of obsity and other cardiovascular risk factors in relation to risk of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken K.; Chiuve, Stephanie; Rimm, Eric B.

    Background: Obesity is a well-established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the influence of other lifestyle and clinical risk factors on the association between body-mass index (BMI: weight in kg/height in m2) and CHD remains uncertain. Methods and Results: In the Danish Diet...... risk, even among individuals who have few CHD risk factors. BMI and other CHD risk factors appear to work in an additive fashion on risk of ACS......., Cancer and Health study, we followed 29,262 women and 26,088 men, 50 to 64 years of age, who were free of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and cancer at baseline in 1993-1997. During a mean follow-up of 8 years, we documented 262 female and 845 male cases of ACS. Lifestyle risk factors were categorized...

  7. Patient selection for TAVI 2015 - TAVI in low-risk patients: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussig, Stephan; Linke, Axel

    2015-09-01

    For decades, surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has been the standard treatment for severe aortic stenosis (AS). With the clinical introduction of the concept of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), a rapid development took place and, based on the results of landmark randomised controlled trials, within a few years TAVI became first-line therapy for inoperable patients with severe AS and an alternative to SAVR in operable high-risk patients. Indeed, data from a recent randomised controlled trial suggest that TAVI is superior to SAVR in higher-risk patients with AS. New TAVI devices have been developed to address current limitations, to optimise results further and to minimise complications. First results using these second-generation valves are promising. However, no data from randomised controlled trials assessing TAVI in younger, low-risk patients are yet available. While we await the results of trials addressing these issues (e.g., SURTAVI [NCT01586910] and PARTNER II [NCT01314313]), recent data from TAVI registries suggest that treatment of low-risk patients is already fact and no longer fiction.

  8. Adding multiple risk factors improves Framingham coronary heart disease risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guizhou; Root, Martin; Duncan, Ashlee W

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), numerous versions of coronary heart disease (CHD) prediction models have claimed improvement over the FRS. Tzoulaki et al challenged the validity of these claims by illustrating methodology deficiencies among the studies. However, the question remains: Is it possible to create a new CHD model that is better than FRS while overcoming the noted deficiencies? To address this, a new CHD prediction model was developed by integrating additional risk factors, using a novel modeling process. Using the National Health Nutritional Examination Survey III data set with CHD-specific mortality outcomes and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities data set with CHD incidence outcomes, two FRSs (FRSv1 from 1998 and FRSv2 from National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III), along with an additional risk score in which the high density lipoprotein (HDL) component of FRSv1 was ignored (FRSHDL), were compared with a new CHD model (NEW-CHD). This new model contains seven elements: the original Framingham equation, FRSv1, and six additional risk factors. Discrimination, calibration, and reclassification improvements all were assessed among models. Discrimination was improved for NEW-CHD in both cohorts when compared with FRSv1 and FRSv2 (Prisk assessment when compared with the FRSs, comparable to the improvement of adding HDL to the FRS.

  9. Coronary artery disease risk assessment from unstructured electronic health records using text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) often leads to myocardial infarction, which may be fatal. Risk factors can be used to predict CAD, which may subsequently lead to prevention or early intervention. Patient data such as co-morbidities, medication history, social history and family history are required to determine the risk factors for a disease. However, risk factor data are usually embedded in unstructured clinical narratives if the data is not collected specifically for risk assessment purposes. Clinical text mining can be used to extract data related to risk factors from unstructured clinical notes. This study presents methods to extract Framingham risk factors from unstructured electronic health records using clinical text mining and to calculate 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores in a cohort of diabetic patients. We developed a rule-based system to extract risk factors: age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes history and smoking history. The results showed that the output from the text mining system was reliable, but there was a significant amount of missing data to calculate the Framingham risk score. A systematic approach for understanding missing data was followed by implementation of imputation strategies. An analysis of the 10-year Framingham risk scores for coronary artery disease in this cohort has shown that the majority of the diabetic patients are at moderate risk of CAD.

  10. How do patients at risk portray candidates for coronary heart disease? A qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, J.C.; Malterud, K.; Fugelli, P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how patients at risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) portray candidates for CHD. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study. SETTING: Norway. SUBJECTS: A total of 20 men and 20 women diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) recruited through a lipid clinic. MAIN...... the coronary candidate as someone who was different from themselves. Among those who mentioned gender, all presented the candidate as a man. Some women said that they had to reconcile themselves to being at risk of CHD, since they at first had conceived CHD as a man's disease. While some participants...

  11. [Childhood body mass index and the risk of coronary heart disease in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Olsen, L.W.; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The severity of the long term consequences of the current childhood obesity epidemic on coronary heart disease is unknown. Therefore we investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) at ages 7-13 years and heart disease in adulthood among 276,835 Danish schoolchildren. We found...... that higher BMI during this period of childhood is associated with an increased risk of any, non-fatal and fatal heart disease in adulthood. Worldwide, as children are becoming heavier, our findings suggest that greater numbers of children are at risk of having coronary heart disease in adulthood...

  12. Comparison of conventional risk factors, clinical and angiographic profile between younger and older coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan D. Khadkikar

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Young patients with Coronary heart disease had different risk profile and less extensive coronary artery disease as compared to older counterparts. Emphasis should be given on diagnosis and management of major modifiable risk factors. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 567-570

  13. A Health Education Program for Parents and Children Who Exhibit High Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Joyce W.; And Others

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of joint parent-child education to change the behaviors known to be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Earlier studies have shown that parents who are at increased risk of coronary heart disease can be identified by studying certain factors in the children. Utilizing a combined risk…

  14. Risks and diagnosis of coronary artery disease in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupeli, Serhan

    2014-07-26

    Higher mortality rates are reported because of cardiovascular diseases in individuals living in industrialized areas of the World. In cancer patients, cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and/or mediastinal radiotherapy are additional risk factors for the development of coronary artery disease. An improved survival rate for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma was reported in recent decades. Determining and handling the long-term effects of cancer treatment have become more important nowadays, parallel to the good results reached in survival rates. Mediastinal radiotherapy and cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents are routinely used to treat Hodgkin lymphoma but are commonly associated with a variety of cardiovascular complications. Drugs used in cancer treatment and radiotherapy may cause deleterious effects on contractile capacity and conduction system of the heart. Approximately ten years after the completion of all therapies, the cardiovascular disease risk peaks in patients who survived from Hodgkin lymphoma. The value of coronary computed tomography angiography as a diagnostic tool in determining coronary artery disease as early as possible is underlined in this review, in patients who are in remission and carry the risk of coronary artery disease probably because of chemo/radiotherapy used in their treatment. Survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma especially treated with combined chemoradiotherapy at younger ages are candidates for coronary computed tomography angiography.

  15. Risks and diagnosis of coronary artery disease in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serhan; Kupeli

    2014-01-01

    Higher mortality rates are reported because of cardiovascular diseases in individuals living in industrialized areas of the World.In cancer patients,cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and/or mediastinal radiotherapy are additional risk factors for the development of coronary artery disease.An improved survival rate for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma was reported in recent decades.Determining and handling the long-term effects of cancer treatment have become more important nowadays,parallel to the good results reached in survival rates.Mediastinal radiotherapy and cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents are routinely used to treat Hodgkin lymphoma but are commonly associated with a variety of cardiovascular complications.Drugs used in cancer treatment and radiotherapy may cause deleterious effects on contractile capacity and conduction system of the heart.Approximately ten years after the completion of all therapies,the cardiovascular disease risk peaks in patients who survived from Hodgkin lymphoma.The value of coronary computed tomography angiography as a diagnostic tool in determining coronary artery disease as early as possible is underlined in this review,in patients who are in remission and carry the risk of coronary artery disease probably because of chemo/radiotherapy used in their treatment.Survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma especially treated with combined chemoradiotherapy at younger ages are candidates for coronary computed tomography angiography.

  16. Persistent Reactive Thrombocytosis May Increase the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Sudeep Dhoj; Hadid, Hiba; Imam, Waseem; Hassan, Ahmad; Usman, Muhammad; Jafri, Syed-Mohammed; Schairer, Jason

    2015-10-01

    IBD patients are at increased risk of coronary artery disease in the absence of traditional risk factors. However, the disease-related risk factors remain poorly understood although increased inflammation seems to increase cardiovascular disease risk in IBD. Thrombocytes are involved in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, and a subset of IBD patients have reactive thrombocytosis. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of persistent reactive thrombocytosis on the development of coronary artery disease in IBD. We evaluated a retrospective cohort of 2525 IBD patients who were evaluated at the Henry Ford hospital from 2000 to 2004. We performed a case-control study comparing patients with persistent thrombocytosis and patients without persistent thrombocytosis. Cases (n = 36) and controls (n = 72) were matched for age and gender. Coronary artery disease incidence was compared between the two groups. Cases (n = 36) and controls (n = 72) were matched for age and gender. Cases and controls were similar in age at onset of IBD (41.5 vs. 35.5, p value 0.11) and smoking status (33.3 vs. 27.8%, p value 0.66). Persistent thrombocytosis was less common among Caucasian patients (44.44 vs. 62.5%, p value 0.09) and more common in patients who had exposure to steroids during the study follow-up period. Coronary artery disease occurred in 13 (36.1%) patients with persistent thrombocytosis compared to only seven (9.7%) patients in the control group. Persistent reactive thrombocytosis among IBD patients is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease. Further studies should characterize the clinical and molecular associations of this phenomenon and determine appropriate therapeutic measures.

  17. Antipsychotic Medications and Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Nested Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Yang, Shu-Yu; Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization in association with the use of certain antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia patients. Methods A nationwide cohort of 31,177 inpatients with schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years whose records were enrolled in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from 2000 to 2008 and were studied after encrypting the identifications. Cases (n = 147) were patients with subsequent acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization after their first psychiatric admission. Based on a nested case-control design, each case was matched with 20 controls for age, sex and the year of first psychiatric admission using risk-set sampling. The effects of antipsychotic agents on the development of acute coronary syndrome were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression and sensitivity analyses to confirm any association. Results We found that current use of aripiprazole (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.27–10.64, p<0.05) and chlorpromazine (adjusted RR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.40–6.24, p<0.001) were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome. Although haloperidol was associated with an increased risk (adjusted RR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.20–3.44, p<0.01), there was no clear dose-dependent relationship. These three antipsychotic agents were also associated with an increased risk in the first 30 days of use, and the risk decreased as the duration of therapy increased. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-adjusted modeling showed that the results were similar to those of multiple regression analysis. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia who received aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, or haloperidol could have a potentially elevated risk of developing acute coronary syndrome, particularly at the start of therapy. PMID:27657540

  18. Quantitative coronary plaque analysis predicts high-risk plaque morphology on coronary computed tomography angiography: results from the ROMICAT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Puchner, Stefan B; Lu, Michael T; Ghemigian, Khristine; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Pursnani, Amit; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2017-08-12

    Semi-automated software can provide quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaques on coronary CT angiography (CTA). The relationship between established qualitative high-risk plaque features and quantitative plaque measurements has not been studied. We analyzed the association between quantitative plaque measurements and qualitative high-risk plaque features on coronary CTA. We included 260 patients with plaque who underwent coronary CTA in the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) II trial. Quantitative plaque assessment and qualitative plaque characterization were performed on a per coronary segment basis. Quantitative coronary plaque measurements included plaque volume, plaque burden, remodeling index, and diameter stenosis. In qualitative analysis, high-risk plaque was present if positive remodeling, low CT attenuation plaque, napkin-ring sign or spotty calcium were detected. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between quantitative and qualitative high-risk plaque assessment. Among 888 segments with coronary plaque, high-risk plaque was present in 391 (44.0%) segments by qualitative analysis. In quantitative analysis, segments with high-risk plaque had higher total plaque volume, low CT attenuation plaque volume, plaque burden and remodeling index. Quantitatively assessed low CT attenuation plaque volume (odds ratio 1.12 per 1 mm(3), 95% CI 1.04-1.21), positive remodeling (odds ratio 1.25 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.10-1.41) and plaque burden (odds ratio 1.53 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.08-2.16) were associated with high-risk plaque. Quantitative coronary plaque characteristics (low CT attenuation plaque volume, positive remodeling and plaque burden) measured by semi-automated software correlated with qualitative assessment of high-risk plaque features.

  19. Risk stratifying the acute coronary syndrome patient: a focus on treatable risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhubl, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    Providing the optimal treatment for patients who present to the emergency room with chest pains or suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a dilemma for many practitioners due to subjectivity, delayed diagnoses, and widely variable mechanisms with similar clinical presentations. In treating patients with chest pain but no obvious electrocardiogram changes, practitioners frequently utilize the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines. The guidelines group possible ACS patients together as unstable angina/non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and recommend that treatment be based on level of risk. The challenge for practitioners is discriminating between "risk" and "treatable risk." Evaluation of troponin levels can help identify patients with possible ACS who are at high risk of death and MI, and guide early decision making. Available data indicate that in the troponin-negative patient, routine interventions such as unfractionated heparin, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists, and invasive approaches have no benefit in terms of reducing death and MI. Although the ACC/AHA Guidelines combine patients with unstable angina and NSTEMI, it is essential to evaluate troponin status in order to optimize patient outcomes and safety in the treatment of suspected ACS.

  20. Ranking of psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Marott, Jacob L; Kristensen, Tage S.

    2015-01-01

    .001] and systolic blood pressure (≥160 mmHg or blood pressure medication vs. high vs. low; HR 2.07; 95% CI, 1......-statistics and net reclassification improvement. During the follow-up, 1731 non-fatal and fatal coronary events were registered. In men, the highest ranking risk factors for coronary heart disease were vital exhaustion [high vs. low; hazard ratio (HR) 2.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.70-3.26; P ...AIMS: To rank psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study randomly selected in 1976. The third examination was carried out from 1991 to 1994, and 8882 men...

  1. Anomalous origin of the coronary artery from the wrong coronary sinus evaluated with computed tomography: ''High-risk'' anatomy and its clinical relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupinski, Maciej; Urbanczyk-Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Irzyk, Malgorzata; Banys, Robert; Klimeczek, Piotr [John Paul II Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Krakow (Poland); Gruszczynska, Katarzyna; Baron, Jan [Medical University of Silesia, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the study was to assess coronary arteries arising from the wrong coronary sinus, including CT-evaluated high-risk anatomic features, clinical symptoms and cardiac events during follow-up. A total of 7,115 patients scheduled for 64-slice or dual-source cardiac CT were screened for the presence of isolated anomalous origin of the coronary artery from the wrong coronary sinus. Anomalous origin of the coronary artery was found in 54 (0.76 %) patients (29 men, 25 women, mean age 60.9 ± 11.6 years). Sixteen (30 %) patients with abnormal right coronary origin (ARCA) more commonly had a slit-like orifice (15 vs. 3; p < 0.001), intramural course (15 vs. 3; p < 0.001) and interarterial course (11 vs. 0; p < 0.001) than 22 (41 %) and 13 (24 %) individuals with abnormal circumflex artery (ALCx) and left coronary artery (ALCA) origin, respectively. Patients with ALCA presented less frequently with chest pain than subjects with ARCA and ALCx (25 vs. 3; p = 0.03). Patients with ARCA tended to show higher occurrence of cardiac events in the follow-up than individuals with ALCA and ALCx (5 vs. 4; p = NS). High-risk anatomy features are most common in patients with ARCA and these patients also have higher prevalence of chest pain and cardiac events in the follow-up than individuals with ALCA and ALCx. (orig.)

  2. Age-Related Differences of Risk Profile and Angiographic Findings in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Siddique

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health problem which imposes a significant burden on health caresystems because of high morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To compare the risk factors profile for coronary heartdisease in young and old subjects. Methods: Total 100 patients (50 subjects less than 40 years of age and 50 subjectsmore than 40 years of age with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina who were undergoing coronary angiogram inthe Department of Cardiology, University Cardiac Center, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Dhaka, fromJuly 2006 to June 2008 were evaluated for the presence coronary artery disease risk factors e.g. hypertension, dyslipidemiaand smoking. Results: The mean age of the study population in younger group was (33.0 ± 6.4 years and in older group(52.0±8.6. The male to female ratio in both groups was 4:1. Smokers were more in younger group (70.0% vs. 46.0% (p =0.032. Hypertension was less in the younger group (38.0% vs. 58.0% (p = 0.045. Presence of diabetes was higher in theolder age group (34.0% vs. 4.0% (p = 0.001. Higher incidence of family history of coronary heart disease was in theyounger age group. The total cholesterol was higher in older group (182.9 ± 33.1 vs. (171.1 ± 24.8 mg/dl (p = 0.047. 68%of patients of older group and 38% of younger group had stenosis in left anterior descending artery (p = 0.003. Theinvolvement of left circumflex and right coronary artery in older age group were higher (56% and 66% respectively thanthose in younger group (36% and 40% respectively (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009. Conclusion: Ischemic heart disease inyounger adults < 40 years had different risk profile characteristics than older patients.Key words: Coronary heart disease; acute coronary syndrome; stable angina; risk factors.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i1.5508BSMMU J 2010; 3(1: 13-17

  3. Coronary artery and thoracic aorta calcification is inversely related to coronary flow reserve as measured by 82Rb PET/CT in intermediate risk patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jongho; Bravo, Paco E.; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Sohn, Seil; Rafique, Ash; Travis, Arlene; Machac, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Background The strength and nature of the relationship between myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), coronary flow reserve (CFR), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) and thoracic aorta calcium (TAC) remain to be clarified. Methods Dynamic rest-pharmacological stress 82Rb positron emission tomography/computed tomography MPI with CFR, CAC, and TAC was performed in 75 patients (59 ± 13 years; F/M = 38/37) with intermediate risk of coronary artery disease. Results A total of 29 (39%) patients had isc...

  4. [Impact of both cardiac-CT and cardiac-MR on the assessment of coronary risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, S; Richartz, B M

    2005-01-01

    Today's definition of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprises two forms: obstructive and non-obstructive CAD. The 31-72% chance of a life-threatening event-like a myocardial infarction-with non-obstructive CAD is well documented in numerous studies. The objective in modern strategies of diagnosis and therapy should therefore be expedient identification of patients at high risk for coronary events, who will benefit from a customized therapy. Before initiating diagnostic procedures of CAD, a well defined strategy should be pursued. There are two possible primary objectives: ASSESSMENT OF THE INDIVIDUAL RISK FOR A CORONARY EVENT: Assessment of the individual "absolute" risk for a coronary event is not possible using single traditional risk factors. The individual risk can be estimated by integrating several of the traditional risk factors into a scoring system. These so-called risk scores (e.g. Framingham score and Procam score), however, have been associated with shortcomings: insufficient discrimination of high-risk from low-risk individuals. The calcium score has therefore become increasingly established; this Agatston score is independent of the traditional risk factors, so there is no correlation between Agatston and Procam scores. Today, the calcium score is considered the superior test for identifying individuals at high risk for a coronary event and its use is recommended by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PROOF OR EXCLUSION OF A HEMODYNAMICALLY SIGNIFICANT CORONARY STENOSIS: Another concept is the definitive proof or exclusion of a hemodynamically "significant" coronary narrowing. The probability of an obstructive CAD is traditionally assessed by the type of chest pain, age, gender and stress-ECG. In patients with a low probability of an obstructive CAD, cardiac catheterization is not indicated, whereas in patients with a high probability of a hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis, an

  5. Fragmented QRS for Risk Stratification in Patients Undergoing First Diagnostic Coronary Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyuboglu, Mehmet; Ekinci, Mehmet Akif; Karakoyun, Suleyman; kucuk, Ugur; Senarslan, Omer; Akdeniz, Bahri

    2016-01-01

    Background Only a small proportion of patients referred for coronary angiography with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) have the diagnosis of obstructive CAD confirmed by the exam. For this reason, further strategies for risk stratification are necessary. Objective To investigate the relationship of the presence of fragmented QRS (fQRS) on admission electrocardiogram with angiographically detected CAD and CAD severity in patients without known vascular diseases and myocardial fibrosis, undergoing first diagnostic coronary angiography. Methods We enrolled 336 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography for suspected CAD. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of fQRS on admission. We compared the groups regarding the presence and severity of CAD. Results Seventy-nine (23.5%) patients had fQRS on admission. There was not a statistically significant difference between patients with fQRS (41.8%) and non-fQRS (30.4%), regarding the presence of CAD (p = 0.059). However, there was a statistically significant difference between patients with fQRS and non-fQRS regarding the presence of stenotic CAD (40.5% vs. 10.5%, p22 compared to patients with SYNTAX score ≤22. Conclusions Our findings suggest that fQRS may be an indicator of early-stage myocardial damage preceding the appearance of fibrosis and scar, and may be used for risk stratification in patients undergoing first diagnostic coronary angiography PMID:27849256

  6. Sex difference in the effect of the fasting serum glucose level on the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Song Vogue; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Nam, Chung Mo; Suh, Il

    2017-09-04

    Diabetic women have a greater relative risk of coronary heart disease than diabetic men. However, the sex difference in the effect of fasting serum glucose levels below the diabetic range on the risk of coronary heart disease is unclear. We investigated whether the association between nondiabetic blood glucose levels and the incident risk of coronary heart disease is different between men and women. The fasting serum glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors at baseline were measured in 159,702 subjects (100,144 men and 59,558 women). Primary outcomes were hospital admission and death due to coronary heart disease during the 11-year follow-up. The risk for coronary heart disease in women significantly increased with impaired fasting glucose levels (≥110mg/dL) compared to normal glucose levels (coronary heart disease in men was significantly increased at a diabetic glucose range (≥126mg/dL). Women had a higher hazard ratio of coronary heart disease associated with the fasting serum glucose level than men (p for interaction with sex=0.021). The stronger effect of the fasting serum glucose levels on the risk of coronary heart disease in women than in men was significant from a prediabetic range (≥110mg/dL). Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel atherosclerotic risk factors and angiographic profile of young Gujarati patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Jain, Sharad; Virpariya, Kapil; Rawal, Jayesh; Joshi, Hasit; Sharma, Kamal; Roy, Bhavesh; Thakkar, Ashok

    2014-07-01

    In this study we aimed to analyse the frequency of atherosclerotic risk factors with focus to novel risk factors for coronary artery disease and angiographic profile in young (≤ 40 years) acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patient with healthy controls in Gujarat, India. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 109 consecutive young patients aged ≤ 40 years old, diagnosed to have ACS were included in the study. All ACS patients underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. An equivalent age and sex matched population without coronary disease with similar risk factors without tobacco considered a control group. All angiographic patients were evaluated for conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, obesity as well as novel atherogenic risk factors like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), Lipoprotein(a) [LP(a)], homocysteine, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and B (ApoB). In a study group, out of 109 young patients, 90 (82.6%) patients were presented to our hospital as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 10 (9.2%) presented as known non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 9 (8.3%) presented as unstable angina (UA). Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, LP(a) and lipid tetrad index were significantly higher in the study group whereas the HDL levels significantly lower as compared to the control group. A quite common risk factors of premature CAD are smoking, high Hs-CRP, high LP(a), hyperhomocysteinaemia and positive family history in the young ACS. Most common presentation of ACS in young was STEMI. On angiography, single vessel involvement was the most common finding.

  8. A Clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yang (Yelin); L. Chen (Li); Y. Yam (Yeung); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); R.P. Karlsberg (Ronald); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James K.); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify th

  9. Variant ASGR1 Associated with a Reduced Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nioi, P.; Sigurdsson, A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Helgason, H.; Agustsdottir, A.B.; Norddahl, G.L.; Helgadottir, A.; Magnusdottir, A.; Jonasdottir, A.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Jonsdottir, I.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Rafnar, T.; Swinkels, D.W.; Galesloot, T.E.; Grarup, N.; Jorgensen, T.; Vestergaard, H.; Hansen, T.; Lauritzen, T.; Linneberg, A.; Friedrich, N.; Krarup, N.T.; Fenger, M.; Abildgaard, U.; Hansen, P.R.; Galloe, A.M.; Braund, P.S.; Nelson, C.P.; Hall, A.S.; Williams, M.J.; Rij, A.M. van; Jones, G.T.; Patel, R.S.; Levey, A.I.; Hayek, S.; Shah, S.H.; Reilly, M.; Eyjolfsson, G.I.; Sigurdardottir, O.; Olafsson, I.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Rader, D.J.; Kraus, W.E.; Samani, N.J.; Pedersen, O.; Thorgeirsson, G.; Masson, G.; Holm, H.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Sulem, P.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several sequence variants are known to have effects on serum levels of non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol that alter the risk of coronary artery disease. METHODS: We sequenced the genomes of 2636 Icelanders and found variants that we then imputed into the genomes of

  10. Anxiety and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Annelieke M.; Martens, Elisabeth J.; de Jonge, Peter; Denollet, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the association between anxiety and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Background Less research has focused on the association of anxiety with incident CHD in contrast to other negative emotions, such as depression. Methods A meta-analysis of ref

  11. Coronary Heart Disease Knowledge and Risk Factors among Tri-Ethnic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.; Ciccazzo, Michele W.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and Europe. This study identified and compared nutritional knowledge associated with CHD risk factors among tri-ethnic college students. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study using questionnaires. Setting: University laboratory.…

  12. Polymer-free Drug-Coated Coronary Stents in Patients at High Bleeding Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Philip; Meredith, Ian T; Abizaid, Alexandre;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients at high risk for bleeding who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) often receive bare-metal stents followed by 1 month of dual antiplatelet therapy. We studied a polymer-free and carrier-free drug-coated stent that transfers umirolimus (also known as biolimus A9),...

  13. Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: possible effect modification by gender and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30–71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models used...

  14. Risk factors for coronary heart disease in the white comm.unity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods. A coronary risk factor ... to fast for 14 hours. The blood was allowed to clot at room temperature and, ... the CHaD-PAP enzymatic method; and serum uric acid and ... Institute for Nutritional Diseases of the South African. Medical ..... As shown in Table IT a personal history of CHD was obtained from 42 ...

  15. Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a positive association between trans fatty acids (TFA) intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), primarily accounted for by industrially produced TFA. Some of these studies indicate an inverse association between ruminant TFA (R-TFA) intake and CHD implying...

  16. Childhood body-mass index and the risk of coronary heart disease in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Olsen, Lina Wøhlk; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The worldwide epidemic of childhood obesity is progressing at an alarming rate. Risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) are already identifiable in overweight children. The severity of the long-term effects of excess childhood weight on CHD, however, remains unknown. METHODS: We...

  17. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  18. Saturated Fat Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nettleton, Joyce A.; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Hornstra, G.

    2017-01-01

    At a workshop to update the science linking saturated fatty acid (SAFA) consumption with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke, invited participants presented data on the consumption and bioavailability of SAFA and their functions in the body and food technology.

  19. CLINICAL STUDY OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN WOMEN WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Betdur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM To study the clinical profile of coronary artery disease in women and to identify the influence of the risk factors. METHODS We conducted a prospective observational study in Vydehi Institute of Medical Science and Research Centre (VIMS & RC, Bengaluru during the period June 2012 to Dec 2013. Patients admitted with history suggestive of coronary artery disease were evaluated clinically and investigated for risk factors. Prognosis with regards to morbidity and mortality following the standard treatment protocol was documented. RESULTS Out of 100 cases of coronary artery disease (CAD, 32 had Acute Myocardial infarction (AMI, 23 with Unstable Angina and 45 patients had Stable Angina. Nearly half of the patients had the traditional risk factors, namely hypertension (HTN, diabetes mellitus (DM, hyperlipidaemia and obesity. Chest pain was the most common symptom. Mortality was 14% which was observed predominantly in post-menopausal women who presented after 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. CONCLUSION Coronary artery disease is no longer a disease of men. Men and women share the same traditional risk factors like HTN, DM, Obesity, and Hyperlipidaemia. Increased incidence of complications and mortality occurred in those who presented after 24 hours of the symptoms. Our study highlights the importance of early recognition of CAD and initiation of thrombolytic therapy, to reduce significant morbidity and mortality.

  20. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease : A pan-European case-cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Sanne A E; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Wood, Angela M.; Sweeting, Michael J.; Moons, Karel G M; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Arriola, Larraitz; Benetou, Vassiliki; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnet, Fabrice; Butt, Salma T.; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Drake, Isabel; Gavrila, Diana; Key, Timothy J.; Klinaki, Eleni; Krogh, Vittorio; Kühn, Tilman; Lassale, Camille; Masala, Giovanna; Matullo, Giuseppe; Merritt, Melissa; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Nøst, Therese H.; Olsen, Anja; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, M. Luisa; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Turzanski-Fortner, Renée; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Wennberg, Patrik; Winkvist, Anna; Thompson, Simon G.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Danesh, John; Butterworth, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among

  1. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C l...

  2. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  3. Coronary heart disease risk : family history and gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes research into lifestyle, genetic, and biological factors that may underlie the increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) in individuals with a family history of this disorder. The second part of this thesis describes whether levels of plasma lipids and l

  4. Differential Association of Anthropometric Parameters with Coronary Risk in Women - Data of the CORA Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Schoeffauer, Mark; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Boeing, Heiner; Windler, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The predictive value of weight gain, BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as to cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD) is still controversial. Methods: 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident CHD (cases) were compared with 25

  5. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common va

  6. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); G. Paré (Guillaume); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); A. Hazra (Aditi); T. Tanaka; S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); I. Cotlarciuc (Ioana); X. Yuan (Xin); A. Mälarstig (Anders); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); J.C. Bis (Joshua); H.J. Blom (Henk); M.J. Brown (Morris); C. Chen (Christopher); R. Clarke (Robert); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); L. Ferrucci; A. Hamsten (Anders); A. Hofman (Albert); D. Hunter (David); A. Goel (Anuj); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); E. Kampman (Ellen); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J.C. Chambers (John); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Lindemans (Jan); B. McKnight (Barbara); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P.M. Ridker (Paul); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); L.M. Rose (Lynda); U. Seedorf (Udo); D.S. Siscovick (David); H. Schunkert (Heribert); J. Selhub (Jacob); P.M. Ueland (Per); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); D. Waterworth (Dawn); H. Watkins (Hugh); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M. den Heijer (Martin); P.F. Jacques (Paul); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); D.J. Rader (Daniel); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); V. Mooser (Vincent); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); K.R. Ahmadi (Kourosh)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteinelowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concen

  7. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  8. Adiponectin: an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in men in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma adiponectin levels were an independent predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 3,188 male and female participants from cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age: 57 years in both men and women; BMI:...

  9. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related

  10. A Clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yang (Yelin); L. Chen (Li); Y. Yam (Yeung); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); A. Delago (Augustin); A. Dunning (Allison); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); J. Hausleiter (Jörg); R.P. Karlsberg (Ronald); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); Y.-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); J. Leipsic (Jonathon); T.M. LaBounty (Troy); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James K.); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify th

  11. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common va...

  12. Red blood cell MUFAs and risk of coronary artery disease in the Physicians’ Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of a Mediterranean diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, these findings remain inconsistent because some experimental studies have suggested atherogenic and lipotoxicity effects of long-chain...

  13. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related t

  14. Exploring causal associations between alcohol and coronary heart disease risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo explore the causal effect of long-term alcohol consumption on coronary heart disease risk factors.Methods and resultsWe used variants in ADH1B and ADH1C genes as instrumental variables (IV) to estimate the causal effect of long-term alcohol consumption on body mass index (BMI), blood...

  15. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related t

  16. Variant ASGR1 Associated with a Reduced Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nioi, P.; Sigurdsson, A. S.; Thorleifsson, G.

    2016-01-01

    of approximately 398,000 Icelanders. We tested for association between these imputed variants and non-HDL cholesterol levels in 119,146 samples. We then performed replication testing in two populations of European descent. We assessed the effects of an implicated loss-of-function variant on the risk of coronary...

  17. Genetic variation in CYP2J2 and risk of coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    CYP2J2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which regulate endothelial function and serve as a reserve system to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). We sought to determine if genetic variation in CYP2J2 was associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events...

  18. Cardiovascular risk factors in Middle Eastern patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: Results from the first Jordanian percutaneous coronary intervention study

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    Ayman J. Hammoudeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death in the Middle East. We sought to study the prevalence and coexistence of 6 cardiovascular risk factors (RFs among patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, and to evaluate the impact of age and gender on the presence of multiple RFs. Methods and results. In this prospective, multicenter study, 2426 consecutive patients were enrolled. Mean age was 59.0 ± 10.1 years and 500 (20.6% were women. Acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary disease were the indications for PCI in 77.1% and 22.9%, respectively. Hypertension was present in 62.3%, diabetes in 53.8%, hypercholesterolemia in 48.8%, smoking in 43.5%, family history of premature CVD 39.4% and obesity in 28.8%. Only 3.8% did not have any of these RFs. Presence of ⩾3 and ⩾4 RFS was observed in 57.4% and 29.5% of patients, respectively. Presence of ⩾3 RFs was more common in women than men (69.0% vs. 54.5%, p < 0.0001, and among patients 41–65 years of age than older or younger patients (60.1% vs. 52.0% vs. 48.3%, respectively, p = 0.017. Conclusions: Cardiovascular RFs are highly prevalent in this PCI Middle Eastern population undergoing PCI. More than half and more than one-fourth of the patients had at least 3 or 4 RFs; respectively. More women than men and more middle aged patients than older or younger patients had significantly higher rates of presence of multiple RFs.

  19. Relation of routine, periodic fasting to risk of diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Benjamin D; Muhlestein, Joseph B; May, Heidi T; Carlquist, John F; Lappé, Donald L; Bair, Tami L; Anderson, Jeffrey L

    2012-06-01

    Previously we discovered that routine periodic fasting was associated with a lower prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD). Other studies have shown that fasting increases longevity in animals. A hypothesis-generating analysis suggested that fasting may also associate with diabetes. This study prospectively tested whether routine periodic fasting is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients (n = 200) undergoing coronary angiography were surveyed for routine fasting behavior before their procedure. DM diagnosis was based on physician reports of current and historical clinical and medication data. Secondary end points included CAD (physician reported for ≥ 1 lesion of ≥ 70% stenosis), glucose, and body mass index (BMI). Meta-analyses were performed by evaluation of these patients and 448 patients from a previous study. DM was present in 10.3% of patients who fasted routinely and 22.0% of those who do not fast (odds ratio [OR] 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17 to 0.99, p = 0.042). CAD was found in 63.2% of fasting and 75.0% of nonfasting patients (OR 0.42, CI 0.21 to 0.84, p = 0.014), and in nondiabetics this CAD association was similar (OR 0.38, CI 0.16 to 0.89, p = 0.025). Meta-analysis showed modest differences for fasters versus nonfasters in glucose concentrations (108 ± 36 vs 115 ± 46 mg/dl, p = 0.047) and BMI (27.9 ± 5.3 vs 29.0 ± 5.8 kg/m(2), p = 0.044). In conclusion, prospective hypothesis testing showed that routine periodic fasting was associated with a lower prevalence of DM in patients undergoing coronary angiography. A reported fasting association with a lower CAD risk was also validated and fasting associations with lower glucose and BMI were found. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EVALUATION OF CORONARY RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

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    Santosh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Cardiovascular disease is the commonest cause of death globally. Acute myocardial infarction generally occurs when coronary blood flow decreases abruptly after thrombotic occlusion of a coronary artery causing focal or massive necrosis of cardiac muscle. The risk factor concept implies that a person with one risk factor is more likely to develop clinical atherosclerotic event and is more likely to do so earlier than a person with no risk factors. The presence of multiple risk factors further accelerates th e atherosclerosis. Hence it is important to identify the major risk factors of coronary atherosclerosis in an individual with acute myocardial infarction so that further preventive measures can be taken in the form of lifestyle modification and pharmacothe rapy. MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY: T his is a hospital based study. This study comprises of 100 cases of acute myocardial infarction admitted in ICCU under the department of medicine and 100 normal healthy controls in the age group of 29 - 85 years. Patients wi th the evidence of acute MI were diagnosed according to WHO criteria. Blood samples collected in vacutainers were analyzed for different biochemical parameters in the clinical biochemistry laboratory. RESULTS: Common risk factors have been evaluated in our study and we found that maximum MI patients were recorded in the age group of 51 - 60 years, with respect to other risk factors history like sex, majority of patients were males (82%, Sedentary life style (44%, Mixed dietary habits (84%, Family history o f IHD (6%, Dyslipidemia and Smoking (46%, Hypertension (31%, Diabetes (37%, Obesity (18%. In our study we found that 81% of the patients of acute MI had multiple risk factors. CONCLUSION: Thus from the study we can conclude that risk factors play a ma jor role in the genesis of coronary heart disease. Modification of these factors by pharmacotherapy, diet, physical exercises and behavioral therapy can improve the

  1. Decreased Renal Function Is a Risk Factor for Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Korean Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Chon, Seung Joo; Cho, Si Hyun; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Byung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Decreased renal function is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Our study was planned to verify the association of decreased renal function and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 251 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center for a routine health checkup. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used to show renal function, which was estimated by calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formulas. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results Women with reduced eGFR (menopausal hormone therapy before atherosclerosis development. PMID:28119897

  2. No more broken hearts: weight loss after bariatric surgery returns patients' postoperative risk to baseline following coronary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Hennings, Dietric L; Al-Qurayshi, Zaid; Emad Kandil; DuCoin, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    The obesity epidemic is associated with a rise in coronary surgeries because obesity is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Bariatric surgery is linked to improvement in cardiovascular co-morbidities and left ventricular function. No studies have investigated survival advantage in postoperative bariatric patients after coronary surgery. To determine if there is a benefit after coronary surgery in patients who have previously undergone bariatric surgery. National Inpatient Sample. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database from 2003 to 2010. We selected bariatric surgical patients who later underwent coronary surgery (n = 257). A comparison of postoperative complications and mortality after coronary surgery were compared with controls (n = 1442) using χ(2) tests, linear regression analysis, and multivariate logistical regression models. A subset population was identified as having undergone coronary surgery (n = 1699); of this population, 257 patients had previously undergone bariatric surgery. They were compared with 1442 controls. The majority was male (67.2%), white (82.6%), and treated in an urban environment (96.8%). Patients with bariatric surgery assumed the risk of postoperative complications after coronary surgery that was associated with their new body mass index (BMI) (BMI999.9, 95% CI .18 to>999.9, P = .07). Length of stay was significantly longer in postbariatric patients (BMIbariatric patients have a return to baseline risk of morbidity and mortality after coronary surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Roma coronary heart disease patients have more medical risk factors and greater severity of coronary heart disease than non-Roma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudzinova, A.; Nagyova, I.; Studencan, M.; Rosenberger, J.; Skodova, Z.; Vargova, H.; Middel, B.; Reijneveld, S. A.; van Dijk, J. P.

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide. Evidence on ethnic differences between the Roma and non-Roma regarding medical risk factors is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess differences in medical risk factors and the severity of CHD in Roma

  4. Roma coronary heart disease patients have more medical risk factors and greater severity of coronary heart disease than non-Roma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudzinova, A.; Nagyova, I.; Studencan, M.; Rosenberger, J.; Skodova, Z.; Vargova, H.; Middel, B.; Reijneveld, S. A.; van Dijk, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide. Evidence on ethnic differences between the Roma and non-Roma regarding medical risk factors is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess differences in medical risk factors and the severity of CHD in Roma

  5. Combining Personality Traits with Traditional Risk Factors for Coronary Stenosis: An Artificial Neural Networks Solution in Patients with Computed Tomography Detected Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Compare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Coronary artery disease (CAD is a complex, multifactorial disease in which personality seems to play a role but with no definition in combination with other risk factors. Objective. To explore the nonlinear and simultaneous pathways between traditional and personality traits risk factors and coronary stenosis by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN data mining analysis. Method. Seventy-five subjects were examined for traditional cardiac risk factors and personality traits. Analyses were based on a new data mining method using a particular artificial adaptive system, the autocontractive map (AutoCM. Results. Several traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors (CRF present significant relations with coronary artery plaque (CAP presence or severity. Moreover, anger turns out to be the main factor of personality for CAP in connection with numbers of traditional risk factors. Hidden connection map showed that anger, hostility, and the Type D personality subscale social inhibition are the core factors related to the traditional cardiovascular risk factors (CRF specifically by hypertension. Discussion. This study shows a nonlinear and simultaneous pathway between traditional risk factors and personality traits associated with coronary stenosis in CAD patients without history of cardiovascular disease. In particular, anger seems to be the main personality factor for CAP in addition to traditional risk factors.

  6. High prevalence of coronary risk factors among bank employees in India

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay Rao; Prasannalakshmi Rao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bank employees are considered to have work situation bearing directly on the health status of individual. Materials and Methods: The employees were subjected to a detailed interview, examination and appropriate laboratory investigations. Data analysis was done using the SPSS 11.5. Results: About 50% of the population had presence of more than, one coronary risk factors. Conclusion: The prevalence of various risk factors for bank employees paralleled the prevalence rates in urban a...

  7. Stress resilience and physical fitness in adolescence and risk of coronary heart disease in middle age

    OpenAIRE

    Bergh, Cecilia; Udumyan, Ruzan; Fall, Katja; Almroth, Henrik; Montgomery, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective Psychosocial stress is a suggested risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship of stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent CHD risk is underinvestigated, so our objective was to assess this and investigate the possible mediating role of physical fitness. Methods In this register-based study, 237 980 men born between 1952 and 1956 were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from Swedish registers. Stress resilience was measured at a compulsory military consc...

  8. 41-month follow-up of risk factors correlated with new coronary events in 708 elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, W S; Herzig, A H; Etienne, F; D'Alba, P; Ronquillo, J

    1989-06-01

    A prospective study correlated coronary risk factors with new coronary events in 192 elderly men and 516 elderly women, mean age 82 +/- 8 years. Follow-up was 41 +/- 6 months (range 24-44). Coronary events (myocardial infarction, primary ventricular fibrillation, and sudden cardiac death) occurred in 64 of 192 men (33%) and in 149 of 516 women (29%), P not significant. Using univariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events were antecedent coronary artery disease, cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum total cholesterol (TC) greater than or equal to 200 mg/dL and greater than or equal to 250 mg/dL, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) less than 35 mg/dL, and serum TC/HDL-C greater than or equal to 6.5 in men and women, and obesity in women. Using multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events were age, antecedent coronary artery disease, cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and serum TC in men and women and serum HDL-C and serum triglycerides in women. Using univariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events in men and women with antecedent coronary artery disease were cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, serum TC greater than or equal to 250 mg/dL, and serum TC/HDL-C greater than or equal to 6.5. Using multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for coronary events in men and women with antecedent coronary artery disease were age, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, serum TC, serum HDL-C, and serum triglycerides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Risk stratification of coronary artery disease in asymptomatic diabetic subjects using multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Michio; Saito, Taro; Higa, Toru; Nakamura, Keita; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Sata, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) show a greater risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), but the risk stratification in asymptomatic CAD patients has not been established. This study investigated the prevalence and severity for asymptomatic CAD and predictors in T2DM patients. In a multiclinic group, diabetic patients (320 men, 186 women) without known symptoms suggestive of CAD were recruited for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Patients were categorized according to severity of coronary atherosclerosis: Grade 1 (normal findings), Grade 2 (mild atherosclerosis without significant stenosis), Grade 3 (moderate stenosis/atherosclerosis, 50-74% stenosis), Grade 4 (moderate stenosis/atherosclerosis, 75-89% stenosis), Grade 5 (severe stenosis/atherosclerosis, ≥90% stenosis). The trend for severity grade of CAD was slightly higher in men than women (P=0.054). For critical lesions (combined Grades 3-5), the prevalence was almost equal (men 44% vs. women 37%; P=0.113). Multivariate models showed that in men, HbA1c≥7.4%, dyslipidemia, duration of diabetes, retinopathy, and other type of cardiovascular diseases were predictors of critical lesions and in women, duration of diabetes and retinopathy were predictors. The prevalence and severity of asymptomatic CAD are comparably high in men and women with T2DM. Risk stratification by using MDCT might be useful to predict asymptomatic coronary lesions requiring coronary revascularization.

  10. Correlation between body mass index and the risk factors and severity of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing LI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the correlation between body mass index and the risk factors and severity of coronary artery disease.Methods Five thousand two hundred and ninety-four patients with suspected coronary artery disease,who underwent coronary angiography from Jan.2001 to Mar.2007 at 20 medical centers in China,were enrolled in the present study.The patients were divided into normal,overweight and obesity group,and body mass index(BMI,blood pressure(BP,blood glucose,serum total cholesterol(TC,triglyceride(TG,low-density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol(HDL-C were measured.The correlation between BMI and the risk factors and severity of coronary artery disease(CAD was analyzed.And the correlation between gender in different BMI group and CAD rick factors was also evaluated.Results The BMI was correlated with BP,TC,blood glucose,age and HDL-C(P 0.05 in male group.The BMI was correlated with BP,TC,TG,LDL-C and high blood glucose(P 0.05 in female group.Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension was a prominent predictor of overweight and obesity(OR=2.102,95%CI 1.762~2.509.Conclusion BMI is significantly correlated with blood glucose,BP,TG,TC,LDL-C and HDL-C,but it is not an independent risk factor for CAD.

  11. Effect of caffeine on the risk of coronary heart disease- A re-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, J O; Akinyinka, A O; Odewole, G A; Okwusidi, J I

    2007-03-01

    The effect of caffeine intake on the risk of coronary heart disease was studied. Twenty-one rats used were randomly divided into three experimental groups, the first group served as the control while the second and third groups were administered caffeine orally at doses of 10mg/kg body weight and 20mg/kg body weight respectively for fourteen days. Caffeine, at 10mg/kg body weight, significantly increased (P<0.05) serum LDL- cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease risk ratio while it significantly reduced (P<0.05) serum triacylglycerol concentration when compared with controls. At 20mg/kg body weight, caffeine significantly increased (P<0.05) coronary heart disease risk ratio while it significantly reduced (P<0.05) serum HDL-cholesterol concentration and serum triacylgycerol concentration when compared with controls. No dose response effect was observed possibly suggestive of a threshold effect. These results suggest that caffeine predisposes consumers of caffeine containing beverages to coronary heart disease.

  12. Coronary computer tomographic angiography for preoperative risk stratification in patients undergoing liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodocy, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.jodocy@klinikum-minden.de [Department of Internal Medicine III (Cardiology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Abbrederis, Susanne, E-mail: susanne.abbrederis@uki.at [Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Graziadei, Ivo W., E-mail: ivo.graziadei@i-med.ac.at [Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Vogel, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.vogel@uki.at [Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pachinger, Otmar, E-mail: otmar.pachinger@uki.at [Department of Internal Medicine III (Cardiology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Feuchtner, Gudrun M., E-mail: gudrun.feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.jaschke@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Friedrich, Guy, E-mail: guy.friedrich@uki.at [Department of Internal Medicine III (Cardiology), Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    The assessment of the cardiovascular risk profile in patients with end-stage liver disease is essential prior to liver transplantation (LT) as cardiovascular diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality in the posttransplant course. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a 64-slice coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scoring (CCS) to predict the postoperative cardiovascular risk of patients assessed for LT. In this single center, observational study we included 54 consecutive patients who were assessed for LT and consequently transplanted. Twenty-four patients (44%) presented with a high CCS above 300 and/or a significant stenosis (>50% percent narrowing due to stenotic plaques) and were further referred to coronary angiography. Three of these patients had a more than 70% LAD stenosis with subsequent angioplasty (n = 1) or conservative therapy (n = 2). The other patients showed only diffuse CAD without significant stenosis. The remaining 30 patients with normal CTA findings were listed for LT without further tests. None of the 54 patients developed cardiovascular events peri- and postoperatively. This study indicated that CTA combined with CCS is a useful non-invasive imaging technique for pre-LT assessment of coronary artery disease and safe tool in the risk assessment of peri- and postoperative cardiovascular events in patients undergoing LT.

  13. Adding multiple risk factors improves Framingham coronary heart disease risk scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Guizhou Hu,1 Martin Root,2 Ashlee W Duncan1 1BioSignia, Inc., Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Nutrition and Health Care Management, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA Purpose: Since the introduction of the Framingham Risk Score (FRS, numerous versions of coronary heart disease (CHD prediction models have claimed improvement over the FRS. Tzoulaki et al challenged the validity of these claims by illustrating methodology deficiencies among the studies. However, the question remains: Is it possible to create a new CHD model that is better than FRS while overcoming the noted deficiencies? To address this, a new CHD prediction model was developed by integrating additional risk factors, using a novel modeling process. Methods: Using the National Health Nutritional Examination Survey III data set with CHD-specific mortality outcomes and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities data set with CHD incidence outcomes, two FRSs (FRSv1 from 1998 and FRSv2 from National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, along with an additional risk score in which the high density lipoprotein (HDL component of FRSv1 was ignored (FRSHDL, were compared with a new CHD model (NEW-CHD. This new model contains seven elements: the original Framingham equation, FRSv1, and six additional risk factors. Discrimination, calibration, and reclassification improvements all were assessed among models. Results: Discrimination was improved for NEW-CHD in both cohorts when compared with FRSv1 and FRSv2 (P<0.05 and was similar in magnitude to the improvement of FRSv1 over FRSHDL. NEW-CHD had a similar calibration to FRSv2 and was improved over FRSv1. Net reclassification for NEW-CHD was substantially improved over both FRSv1 and FRSv2, for both cohorts, and was similar in magnitude to the improvement of FRSv1 over FRSHDL. Conclusion: While overcoming several methodology deficiencies reported by earlier authors, the NEW-CHD model improved CHD risk assessment when

  14. Association of cardiovascular risk factors with the different presentations of acute coronary syndrome

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    Evelise Helena Fadini Reis Brunori

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the relationship between different presentations of acute coronary syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors among hospitalized individuals.METHOD: cross-sectional study performed in a teaching hospital in São Paulo, in the State of São Paulo (SP. Socio-demographic, clinical and anthropometric data of 150 individuals hospitalized due to acute coronary syndrome were collected through interviews and review of clinical charts. Association between these data and the presentation of the syndrome were investigated.RESULTS: there was a predominance of ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. There was significant association of systemic hypertension with unstable angina and high values of low density lipoprotein with infarction, without influence from socio-demographic characteristics.CONCLUSION: arterial hypertension and high levels of low-density lipoprotein were associated with different presentations of coronary syndrome. The results can provide support for health professionals for secondary prevention programs aimed at behavioural changing.

  15. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

  16. Clinical risk scores predict procedural complications of primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, László; Şerban, Razvan Constantin; Scridon, Alina; Şuş, Ioana; Lakatos, Éva Katalin; Demjén, Zoltán; Dobreanu, Dan

    2017-04-01

    The predictive value of five risk score models containing clinical (PAMI-PMS, GRACE-GRS, and modified ACEF-ACEFm-scores), angiographic SYNTAX score (SXS) and combined Clinical SYNTAX score (CSS) variables were evaluated for the incidence of three procedural complications of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI): iatrogenic coronary artery dissection, angiographically visible distal embolization and angiographic no-reflow phenomenon. The mentioned scores and the incidence of procedural complications were retrospectively analyzed in 399 consecutive patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent pPCI. Coronary dissection, distal embolization and no-reflow occurred in 39 (9.77%), 71 (17.79%), and 108 (27.07%) subjects, respectively. Coronary dissections were significantly associated with higher GRS, ACEFm, and CSS values (all p<0.05). PMS, GRS, ACEFm, and CSS were significantly higher in patients with no-reflow (all p<0.05), while distal embolization was not predicted by any of the calculated scores. In multiple logistic regression models, GRS and ACEFm remained independent predictors of both coronary dissections (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.56-6.54, p<0.01 and OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.27-6.45, p=0.01, respectively) and no-reflow (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.82, p=0.03 and OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.10-3.14, p=0.01, respectively). Whereas SXS failed to predict procedural complications related to pPCI, two simple, noninvasive risk models, GRS and ACEFm, independently predicted coronary dissections and no-reflow. Pre-interventional assessment of these scores may help the interventional cardiologist to prepare for procedural complications during pPCI.

  17. Increased level of glycated hemoglobin portends high risk of coronary artery stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG FAN-fang; WANG Li-li; LONG Juan; YI Wen-ya; LUO Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the diabetics.However,the relationship between HbAlc and the risk of coronary artery stenosis in the non-diabetics is controversial.Methods A retrospective research was conducted on 338 enrolled participants who have undergone 2 times of coronary angiographic examination within the past year.Clinical and laboratory variables at the initial and the second time of admission were collected.According to the initial median HbA1c level,all participants were divided into two groups named lower and higher groups.The relationship between HbA1c level and the risk of coronary artery stenosis over time was evaluated.Results The initial values of HbA1c in lower and upper groups were 5.78 ± 0.35% and 6.21 ± 0.32% (P < 0.05).As compared to the lower group,the percentages of male and smoking participants,and the serum level of CRP were significantly higher in the higher group (P < 0.05).Other traditional risk factors were comparable between the two groups.There were 54.2% and 55.2% participants with single vessel stenosis,and 45.8% and 44.8% with multiple vessel stenoses,respectively in the two groups without significant difference.The second time of admission,were 308.5± 25.4 days (lower group) and 300.7 ± 30.1 days (higher group) from the initial admission.Although no significant changes of HbA1c level were observed when compared to initial,HbA1c level in the higher group was still significantly higher in comparison to the lower group (6.24 ± 0.39% vs.5.80 ± 0.36%,P =0.008).The percentage of new coronary artery stenosis (≥ 50% stenosis) was higher in the higher group than that in the lower group (41.7% vs.32.3%,P < 0.001).Multivariate regression analyses suggested that HbAlc remained independent factor associated with coronary artery stenoses after extensive adjustment for risk factors.Conclusion In the nondiabetics

  18. Risk-prediction model for ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (from the global registry of acute coronary events [GRACE]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kay Lee; Budaj, Andrzej; Goldberg, Robert J; Anderson, Frederick A; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Kennelly, Brian M; Gurfinkel, Enrique P; Fitzgerald, Gordon; Gore, Joel M

    2012-09-01

    The risk of stroke in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) ranges from ischemic stroke in patients with ACS to help guide clinicians in the acute management of these high-risk patients. Data were obtained from 63,118 patients enrolled from April 1999 to December 2007 in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE), a multinational registry involving 126 hospitals in 14 countries. A regression model was developed to predict the occurrence of in-hospital ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with an ACS. The main study outcome was the development of ischemic stroke during the index hospitalization for an ACS. Eight risk factors for stroke were identified: older age, atrial fibrillation on index electrocardiogram, positive initial cardiac biomarkers, presenting systolic blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg, ST-segment change on index electrocardiogram, no history of smoking, higher Killip class, and lower body weight (c-statistic 0.7). The addition of coronary artery bypass graft surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention into the model increased the prediction of stroke risk. In conclusion, the GRACE stroke risk score is a simple tool for predicting in-hospital ischemic stroke risk in patients admitted for the entire spectrum of ACS, which is widely applicable to patients in various hospital settings and will assist in the management of high-risk patients with ACS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Premature Coronary Heart Disease and Traditional Risk Factors-Can We Do Better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Sadeghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are strong predictors of an increased likelihood for premature CHD. Considering the benefits of risk factors᾿ management, it is imperative to find and treat them before looking for more unknown and weak risk factors. Objectives: Limited information is available about the demographic and historical characteristics of the patients with premature Coronary Heart Disease (CHD in IR Iran. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the traditional risk factors in these patients. Also, the researchers hypothesized that there are insufficient risk assessment and preventive intervention methods for the asymptomatic adult population. Methods: This study was conducted on 125 patients with premature CHD (age<50 years who were admitted in two academic hospitals with acute coronary syndromes. The patients were accepted since they had a definite CHD on the basis of acute myocardial infarction (elevated cardiac enzymes or documented CAD in coronary angiography. Results: The mean age of the study population was 42.50±5.65 (26 to 49 years. Among the patients,92 (73.6% were male, 113 (90.4% were married, 58 (46.4% were smokers,19 (15.2% were opium users, 97 (77.6% had dyslipidemia, 44 (35.2% had hypertension, and 33 (26.4% had diabetes mellitus. In addition, family history was presented in 54 patients (43.2%. Conclusions: Premature Coronary Heart Disease is a public health problem. However, there is lack of effective and intensive treatments of well-defined traditional risk factors and prevention methods for the majority of the patients experiencing premature CHD. In sum, there is still plenty of room for improvement of risk management in IR Iran.

  20. Inpatient and outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programmes improve cardiometabolic risk in revascularized coronary patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Avram; Adina Avram; L.aura Crăciun; Stela Iurciuc; Lucian Hoble; Alexandra Rusu; Bogdan Almăjan-Guţă; Silvia Mancaş

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate cardiometabolic risk reduction of diabetic patients following coronary revascularizationprocedures after participation in outpatients or inpatients cardiac rehabilitation programmes. Materials and methods: weperformed a retrospective analytical study which included a group of 103 revascularized coronary patients with diabetesmellitus. Depending on participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program we have defined the following subgroups of patients:Grou...

  1. Risk model for suspected acute coronary syndrome is of limited value in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Christian Backer; Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Jess Bjerre

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Among patients with acute chest pain, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is seen only in a minority of the patients, which raises the question, whether it is possible to separate a group with a high risk of ACS for admission to a cardiac care unit (CCU) from those with a low risk who would...... be treated at an emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to describe a risk stratification model for a Danish context. METHODS: This was a historic prospective cohort study of patients with suspicion of ACS. The patient was defined as a low-risk patient and admitted to the ED if: 1...

  2. Risk factors and prevention of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage after a coronary artery bypass grafting operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongguang; Zheng, Zhe; Feng, Wei; Wang, Wei; Song, Yunhu; Lin, Ye; Hu, Shengshou

    2010-10-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a serious complication of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the risk factors and prevention of upper GI bleeding after CABG. This study followed 6316 coronary patients who underwent CABG from 1998 to 2005. The perioperative parameters were recorded. Data from patients who experienced major gastrointestinal complications were analyzed retrospectively by univariate and multivariate analyses. The rate of upper GI bleeding was 0.3%. The overall mortality for patients complicated by upper GI bleeding was 47.6%. The risk factors for upper GI bleeding were age (odds ratio [OR] = 3.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.73-5.87, P upper GI bleeding group and the controls (P risk factors for upper GI bleeding after CABG, and the prophylactic use of omeprazole decreased the rate of upper GI bleeding.

  3. Helicobacter pylori:Does it add to risk of coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishal; Sharma; Amitesh; Aggarwal

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is a known pathogen implicated in genesis of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Beyond the stomach, the organism has also been implicated in the causation of immune thrombocytopenia and iron deficiency anemia. Although an area of active clinical research, the role of this gram negative organism in causation of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease(CAD) remains enigmatic. CAD is a multifactorial disease which results from the atherosclerosis involving coronaryarteries. The major risk factors include age, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The risk of coronary artery disease is believed to increase with chronic inflammation. Various organisms like Chlamydia and Helicobacter have been suspected to have a role in genesis of atherosclerosis via causation of chronic inflammation. This paper focuses on available evidence to ascertain if the role of H. pylori in CAD causation has been proven beyond doubt and if eradication may reduce the risk of CAD or improve outcomes in these patients.

  4. Prevalence of Coronary Risk Factors among Population Aged 35 Years and Above From Rural Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is predicted that cardiovascular diseases will be the most important cause of mortality in India by the year 2015. Since the key to combating the increased incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is the control of known risk factors by a population based strategy aimed at comprehensive risk reduction, it is pertinent to study the magnitude of the risk. Aim: The present study was therefore conducted to assess the prevalence of certain coronary risk factors among rural population aged 35 years and above in Maharashtra. Methods: The present community based cross sectional survey was carried out in the rural area of Pune district on 272 subjects using a structured questionnaire, clinical examination followed by lab investigations. SPSS version 17.0 was used for analysis. Results: Tobacco consumption was found to be prevalent in 51.83% of the study subjects followed by physical inactivity which was prevalent among 31.61% whereas high diastolic blood pressure was found to be prevalent in 29.41% of the study subjects. Obesity and alcohol consumption were found to be prevalent among 13.97% of the study subjects. Among the biochemical parameters studied, hypertriglyceridemia was found to be prevalent in 22.05% followed by raised fasting blood sugar in 15.44% of the study subjects. Conclusion: Behaviour change communication strategies targeting these modifiable known high risk factors need to be emphasized to lower coronary heart disease (CHD related morbidity burden in the community.

  5. CFD-based Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Coronary aneurysms occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki Disease (KD) patients and put patients at increased risk for myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend using aneurysm diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for treating with anti-coagulation therapy. This study uses patient-specific modeling to non-invasively determine hemodynamic parameters and quantify thrombotic risk. Anatomic models were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 5 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. CFD simulations were performed to obtain hemodynamic data including WSS and particle residence times (PRT). Thrombosis was clinically observed in 4/9 aneurysmal coronaries. Thrombosed vessels required twice as many cardiac cycles (mean 8.2 vs. 4.2) for particles to exit, and had lower mean WSS (1.3 compared to 2.8 dynes/cm2) compared to vessels with non-thrombosed aneurysms of similar max diameter. 1 KD patient in the cohort with acute thrombosis had diameter < 8 mm. Regions of low WSS and high PRT predicted by simulations correlated with regions of subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating both hemodynamic and geometric quantities. Current clinical guidelines to assess patient risk based only on aneurysm diameter may be misleading. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate the utility of patient-specific modeling in risk stratifying KD patients with coronary aneurysms. NIH R21.

  6. Obese sedentary patients with dyspnoea on exertion who are at low risk for coronary artery disease by clinical criteria have a very low prevalence of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckel, J T; Larsen, G; Benson, M R

    2014-06-01

    Dyspnoea, a much less specific symptom of ischaemia than chest discomfort, is common among obese patients. Patients with dyspnoea often undergo stress testing as part of their evaluation. We sought to examine the yield of stress testing in non-elderly, obese, sedentary patients with dyspnoea on exertion (DOE) as a chief complaint.We reviewed stress echocardiograms carried out on 203 patients in a stress testing laboratory at a major tertiary care centre. Of these, 81 (40%) fell into a group that was at low risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) by clinical criteria. Ischaemia was detected in two patients in the low-risk group (2.5%), and these results were likely false positives. In the higher risk group, 9.0% of functional tests showed ischaemia; after further testing, 2.5% of the higher risk patients were found to have obstructive coronary lesions. Clinical follow-up was performed for a mean of 815 days. New obstructive coronary disease was detected in 1.6% of all patients, and these patients were from the higher risk group. In obese sedentary patients with DOE but otherwise at low risk of coronary disease stress testing is of very low yield. DOE is generally not an anginal equivalent in this patient population.

  7. Factor XIII B Subunit Polymorphisms and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán A. Mezei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the case-control study was to explore the effect of coagulation factor XIII (FXIII B subunit (FXIII-B polymorphisms on the risk of coronary artery disease, and on FXIII levels. In the study, 687 patients admitted for coronary angiography to investigate suspected coronary artery disease and 994 individuals representing the Hungarian population were enrolled. The patients were classified according to the presence of significant coronary atherosclerosis (CAS and history of myocardial infarction (MI. The F13B gene was genotyped for p.His95Arg and for intron K nt29756 C>G polymorphisms; the latter results in the replacement of 10 C-terminal amino acids by 25 novel amino acids. The p.His95Arg polymorphism did not influence the risk of CAS or MI. The FXIII-B intron K nt29756 G allele provided significant protection against CAS and MI in patients with a fibrinogen level in the upper tertile. However, this effect prevailed only in the presence of the FXIII-A Leu34 allele, and a synergism between the two polymorphisms was revealed. Carriers of the intron K nt29756 G allele had significantly lower FXIII levels, and FXIII levels in the lower tertile provided significant protection against MI. It is suggested that the protective effect of the combined polymorphisms is related to decreased FXIII levels.

  8. Relevance of hemostatic risk factors on coronary morphology in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Ansgar J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The influence hemostatitc parameters on the morphological extent and severity of coronary artery disease were studied in patients with and without DM type 2. Background It is known that patients with diabetes (DM have abnormal metabolic and hemostatic parameters Methods Of 150 consecutive patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease 29 presented with DM. Additionally to parameters of lipid-metabolism fibrinogen, tissue-plasminogenactivator (t-PA, plasminogen-activator-inhibitor (PAI, plasmin-a-antiplasmin (PAP, prothrombin-fragment 1+2 (F1+2, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT, von-willebrand-factor (vWF, platelet factor 4 (PF4, glykomembranproteine 140 (GMP140 and the rheologic parameters plasma viscosity and red blood cell aggregation were evaluated. The extent and severity of CAD was evaluated according to the criteria of the American Heart Association. Results Patients with DM presented with a higher number of conventional risk factors as compared to non-diabetic patients. Additionally there were significant differences for F1+2, red blood cell aggregation and PAI. Diabetic patients showed a more severe extent of coronary arteriosclerosis, which also could be found more distally. A significant relationship between blood-glucose, thrombocyte-activation (vWF, endogenous fibrinolysis (PAI and the severity of CAD and a more distal location of stenoses could be found (r = 0.6, p Conclusion Patients with coronary artery disease and DM type 2 showed marked alterations of metabolic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic and rheologic parameters, which can produce a prothrombogenic state. A direct association of thrombogenic factors on coronary morphology could be shown. This can be the pathophysiologic mechanism of more severe and distal pronounced coronary atherosclerosis in these patients.

  9. Waterpipe smoking and risk of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedawar, Mohamad Musbah; Walsh, Jason Leo; Isma'eel, Hussain A

    2016-09-01

    Smoking tobacco using a water pipe is becoming more prevalent globally, particularly amongst younger populations. In addition to its growing popularity, more evidence is emerging regarding associated harm, and several misconceptions exist concerning the likely adverse health effects of waterpipe smoking (WPS). It is timely, therefore, to examine the body of evidence linking WPS to coronary artery disease (CAD). Here, we review the direct evidence linking WPS to CAD and examine additional, indirect evidence of associated harm. We discuss the clinical and public health implications of the current evidence and provide suggestions for further research. A multicentre case-control study in Lebanon has recently demonstrated an association between WPS and CAD. There are few prior studies making this direct link. However, a large body of evidence has emerged showing close similarities between WPS and cigarette smoking with regard to the toxicity of smoke and acute inflammatory and haemodynamic effects following exposure to it. There are consistent similarities between WPS and cigarette smoking in regard to association with CAD, the nature of the smoke produced, and the acute haemodynamic effects and inflammatory responses that follow exposure. These findings justify both public health and clinical interventions to reduce WPS. Further studies are warranted to confirm a causal association between WPS and CAD.

  10. Association between T174M polymorphism in the angiotensinogen gene and risk of coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensinogen (AGT) T174M gene polymorphism has been suggested to be linked to risk of coronary artery disease, however, results from studies of this association have been inconsistent. In this study, we assess the relationship between AGT T174M gene polymorphism and coronary artery disease. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of 18 case-control studies with 8,147 coronary artery disease cases and 5,344 controls in Google scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to identify eligible studies published by July, 2012. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from these studies. Results Overall, a significant association was found between angiotensinogen T174M polymorphism and coronary artery association of T174M polymorphism with coronary stenosis risk in Caucasians.

  11. Risk factors and incidence of contrast induced nephropathy following coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN is one of important complication of contrast media administration. Its incidence and risk factors among Indonesian patients undergoing coronary intervention has not been reported yet. CIN was defined as increasing of serum creatinine by 0.5 mg/dl or more in the third day following contrast media exposure. Of 312 patients undergoing coronary intervention, 25% developed CIN. Patient-related risk factors comprised of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, NYHA class, proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dl and ejection fraction ≤ 35%. Contrast-related risk factors comprised of contrast media volume > 300 ml, contrast media type. However, our final model demonstrated that only hypertension [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.89, 95% confidence intrval (CI = 1.78 to 4.71, P = 0.000], diabetes mellitus (HR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.89 to 5.06, P = 0.000, ejection fraction (EF ≤ 35% (HR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.72 to 4.96; P = 0.000, total contrast volume > 300 ml (HR = 7.73; 95% CI = 3.09 to 19.37; P = 0.000 and proteinuria (HR = 14.96; 95% CI = 3.45 to 64.86; P = 0.000 were independent risk factors of CIN. In conclusion, CIN developed in 25% of patients undergoing coronary intervention. The independent risk factors of CIN included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, EF ≤ 35%, contrast volume > 300 ml and proteinuria. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 131-7Keywords: contrast induced nephropathy, coronary intervention

  12. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We......-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p=0·002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (ptrendwork...... long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. FUNDING: Medical Research Council...

  13. "Risk factors in mortality after coronary artery bypass graft - Imam Hospital (1996-1999 "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Radmehr H

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause of mortality in developed countries. CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Graft is one of the therapeutic methods in ischemic heart disease. Methods and Materials: Considering the increased incidence of coronary artery disease in Iran, and with increased rate of CABG, we performed a cross sectioned study (1996-1999. In 635 patients 467 male (73.5 percent, 168 female (26.5 percent about risk factors of mortality after CABG in cardiac surgery department "Imam Khomeini hospital. 20 risk factors were included in our study: age, gender, smoking, family history, diabetes mellitus, morbid obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, palpitation, renal failure COPD, (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of myocardial infarction, CHF, angina, cerebral vascular disease, pace maker, Ejection fraction<40 percent, history of PTCA, history of CPR, and coronary endarterectomy. Results: Cigarette smoking (P=0.40, CHF in female (P=0.003. Endarterectomy in both gender (P=0.0001. Pace maker in both gender (P=0.00006, palpitation in both gender (P=0.0001. CPR in both gender (P=0.0000001, were associated with increased risk of mortality after CABG. Conclusion: We found that, endarterctomy, cigarette smoking, CHF. Pace maker, CPR, and palpitation are important risk factors for mortality after CABG.

  14. Increased risks of coronary heart disease and stroke among spousal caregivers of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianguang; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-04-10

    Spousal caregivers of cancer patients suffer psychological and physical burdens that may affect their risk of subsequently developing coronary heart disease and stroke. Cancer patients were identified in the Swedish Cancer Registry, and information on their spouses was retrieved from the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. Follow-up of caregivers was performed from the date of the first diagnosis of cancer in their spouses through 2008. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for spousal caregivers of cancer patients compared with those without an affected spouse. After the cancer diagnosis in wives, the risks of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke in husbands were 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.16), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.21-1.27), and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.18-1.32), respectively. The corresponding risks in wives with an affected husband were 1.13 (95% CI, 1.10-1.16), 1.29 (95% CI, 1.26-1.32), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.19-1.34). The increases were consistent over time and were more pronounced if the spouse was affected by a cancer with a high mortality rate, such as pancreatic and lung cancers. Spousal caregivers of cancer patients have increased risks of coronary heart disease and stroke that persist over time. Clinical attention should be paid to spousal caregivers, especially those caring for cancer patients with high mortality rates.

  15. Coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients – risk factors for sternal wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenz, Kristina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of sternal wound infections (SWI after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG as reported worldwide is low. However, it is associated with significant increase of postoperative mortality and treatment costs. The major risk factors discussed are diabetes mellitus and bilateral IMA harvesting of the internal mammary artery. This study analyses data of 590 patients receiving CABG concerning the risk factors for SWI. Sternal wound infections occur significantly more often in diabetic patients, one crucial and significant additional risk factor is obesity.

  16. Validating diagnoses from hospital discharge registers change risk estimates for acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Albert Marni; Schmidt, Erik Berg; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2007-01-01

    of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) diagnoses identified in a hospital discharge register changed the relative risk estimates of well-established risk factors for ACS. Methods All first-time ACS diagnoses (n=1138) in the Danish National Patient Registry were identified among male participants in the Danish...... cohort study "Diet, Cancer and Health" (n=26 946). Medical records were retrieved and reviewed using current European Society of Cardiology criteria for ACS. The ACS diagnosis was confirmed in a total of 781 participants. Results The relative risk estimates of ACS for a range of well...

  17. Analysis of physical fitness and coronary heart disease risk of Dallas area police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, M L; Gettman, L R; Meyer, B U

    1978-06-01

    Two hundred thirteen male police officers between 21 and 52 years of age volunteered to participate in a physical evaluation and conditioning program. Information concerning the physical fitness status and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) of police officers were shown. Younger police officers (less than 30 years of age) were average in physical fitness levels and CHD risk compared to the population of the same age. Middle-aged police officers were shown to be lower in physical fitness levels and higher in CHD risk compared to their cohorts. The results from this investigation support the need for physical fitness and preventive medicine programs for police officers.

  18. Alcohol drinking habits, alcohol dehydrogenase genotypes and risk of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Hansen, J.L.; Gronbaek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The risk of myocardial infarction is lower among light-to-moderate drinkers compared with abstainers. Results from some previous studies, but not all, suggest that this association is modified by variations in genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We aimed to test this hypothesis......). Results: Higher alcohol intake (measured as amount or drinking frequency) was associated with lower risk of acute coronary syndrome; however, there was no evidence that these finding were modified by ADH1B or ADH1C genotypes. Conclusions: The importance of functional variation in alcohol dehydrogenase......, including alcohol as both the amount of alcohol and the frequency of drinking. Methods: we conducted a nested case-cohort study within the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, including 1,645 men (770 incident cases of acute coronary syndrome from 1993-1997 through 2004 and 875 randomly selected controls...

  19. Impaired blood rheology is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hideki; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Nara, Makoto; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood rheology and endothelial function in patients with coronary risk factors, brachial arterial flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), an index of endothelial function and blood passage time (BPT), an index of blood rheology, and fasting blood cell count, glucose metabolism, and plasma fibrinogen, lipid, C-reactive protein, and whole blood viscosity levels were measured in 95 patients with coronary risk factors and 37 healthy controls. Brachial arterial FMD after reactive hyperemia was assessed by ultrasonography. BPT was assessed using the microchannel method. In healthy controls, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = - 0.325, p rheology using the microchannel method may be useful in evaluating brachial arterial endothelial function as a marker of atherosclerosis in these patients.

  20. Risk prediction with triglycerides in patients with stable coronary disease on statin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Christian; Filmer, Anja; Fritsch, Marco; Groenewold, Stephanie; Gräber, Stefan; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the prospective Homburg Cream and Sugar study was to analyze the role of fasting and postprandial serum triglycerides (TG) as risk modifiers in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). A sequential oral triglyceride and glucose tolerance test was developed to obtain standardized measurements of postprandial TG kinetics and glucose in 514 consecutive patients with stable CAD confirmed by angiography (95% were treated with a statin). Fasting and postprandial TG predicted the primary outcome measure of cardiovascular death and hospitalizations after 48 months follow-up (fasting TG >150 vs. 1120 vs. triglycerides >150 mg/dl independently predict cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease on guideline-recommended medication. Assessment of postprandial TG does not improve risk prediction compared to fasting TG in these patients.

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  2. Increased genetic risk for obesity in premature coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Stewart, Alexandre F R; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether obesity confers risk for CAD independently of associated risk factors including diabetes mellitus. We have carried out a Mendelian randomization study using a genetic risk score (GRS) for body mass index (BMI) based on 35 risk alleles to investigate this question in a population of 5831 early onset CAD cases without diabetes mellitus and 3832 elderly healthy control subjects, all of strictly European ancestry, with adjustment for traditional risk factors (TRFs). We then estimated the genetic correlation between these BMI and CAD (rg) by relating the pairwise genetic similarity matrix to a phenotypic covariance matrix between these two traits. GRSBMI significantly (P=2.12 × 10(-12)) associated with CAD status in a multivariate model adjusted for TRFs, with a per allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.06 (95% CI 1.042-1.076). The addition of GRSBMI to TRFs explained 0.75% of CAD variance and yielded a continuous net recombination index of 16.54% (95% CI=11.82-21.26%, Pobesity and CAD. This analysis supports the hypothesis that obesity is a causal risk factor for CAD.

  3. Components of the complete blood count as risk predictors for coronary heart disease: in-depth review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjid, Mohammad; Fatemi, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, and several inflammatory biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, have been used to predict the risk of coronary heart disease. High white blood cell count is a strong and independent predictor of coronary risk in patients of both sexes, with and without coronary heart disease. A high number of white blood cells and their subtypes (for example, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils) are associated with the presence of coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke. The coronary heart disease risk ratios associated with a high white blood cell count are comparable to those of other inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein. In addition, other components of the complete blood count, such as hematocrit and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, also are associated with coronary heart disease, and the combination of the complete blood count with the white blood cell count can improve our ability to predict coronary heart disease risk. These tests are inexpensive, widely available, and easy to order and interpret. They merit further research.

  4. Association between dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihua; Qian, Yufeng; Pan, Yiwen; Li, Peiwei; Yang, Jun; Ye, Xianhua; Xu, Geng

    2015-08-01

    The association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and dietary fiber intake is not consistent, especially for the subtypes of dietary fiber. The aim of our study was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing cohort published studies assessing the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of CHD, and quantitatively estimating their dose-response relationships. We searched PubMed and EMBASE before May 2013. Random-effect model was used to calculate the pool relative risk (RRs) for the incidence and mortality of CHD. Dose-response, subgroup analyses based on fiber subtypes, heterogeneity and publication bias were also carried out. Eighteen studies involving 672,408 individuals were finally included in the present study. The pooled-adjusted RRs of coronary heart disease for the highest versus lowest category of fiber intake were 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-0.96, P fiber subtypes (cereal, fruit, and vegetable fiber), indicated that RRs were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85-0.99, P = 0.032), 0.92 (95% CI, 0.86-0.98, P = 0.01), 0.95 (95% CI, 0.89-1.01, P = 0.098) respectively for all coronary event and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72-0.92, P = 0.001), 0.68 (95% CI, 0.43-1.07, P = 0.094), 0.91 (95% CI, 0.74-1.12, P = 0.383) for mortality. In addition, a significant dose-response relationship was observed between fiber intake and the incidence and mortality of CHD (P dietary fiber is inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease, especially for fiber from cereals and fruits. Besides, soluble and insoluble fibers have the similar effect. A significant dose-response relationship is also observed between fiber intake and CHD risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of caffeine on the risk of coronary heart disease— A re-evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayo, J. O.; Akinyinka, A. O.; Odewole, G. A.; Okwusidi, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of caffeine intake on the risk of coronary heart disease was studied. Twenty-one rats used were randomly divided into three experimental groups, the first group served as the control while the second and third groups were administered caffeine orally at doses of 10mg/kg body weight and 20mg/kg body weight respectively for fourteen days. Caffeine, at 10mg/kg body weight, significantly increased (P

  6. Risk Factors, Coronary Severity, Outcome and ABO Blood Group: A Large Chinese Han Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Xu, Rui-Xia; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-10-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to have ethnic difference and to be a pivotal genetic determinant of cardiovascular risk, whereas few prospective data regarding the impact on cardiovascular outcomes are available in a large cohort of patients with angiography-proven coronary artery disease, especially from the Chinese population. The objective of this study was to assess the prognostic role of blood type in future cardiovascular events (CVEs) in Chinese Han patients undergoing coronary angiography.The population of this prospective cohort study consisted of 3823 eligible patients, and followed annually to capture all CVEs. Baseline characteristics and ABO blood type were obtained. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the risk of ABO blood type on CVEs.New CVEs occurred in 348 patients [263 (10.3%) non-O and 85 (7.8%) O] during a median period of 24.6 months follow-up. Significantly, non-O blood group was related to the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis and several risk factors including inflammatory markers. The log-rank test revealed that there was a significant difference between non-O and O blood groups in event-free survival analysis (P = 0.026). In particular, the Cox proportional hazards models revealed that non-O blood type was associated with increased CVEs risk [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.320 (1.033-1.685)], even after adjusting for potential confounders [adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) non-O: 1.289 (1.003-1.656); A: 1.083 (0.797-1.472); B: 1.481 (1.122-1.955); AB: 1.249 (0.852-1.831), respectively].Non-O blood type is associated with future CVEs in Chinese Han patients undergoing coronary angiography.

  7. Individuals at Risk of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), its Prevention and Management by an Indigenous Compound

    OpenAIRE

    Dubey, G.P.; Agrawal, Aruna; S. P. Dixit; Pathak, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of rist factors have been suspected for causing the coronary heart disease. 406 cases of both sex groups with age range of 35 to 55 years were selected from three distinct localities of varanasi city. Individuals who reported single or more risk factors of CHD were isolated from the population of the particular areas. After a detailed preliminary screening of the subjects various physical, physiological, psychological and biochemical measurements were carried out. Other basis of ini...

  8. Determinants of risk factor control in subjects with coronary heart disease : a report from the EUROASPIRE III investigators.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2012-04-18

    The EUROASPIRE audits of risk factor control have indicated that, even in those with established coronary heart disease, risk factor control remains poor. We therefore analysed the EUROASPRE III data set to establish the factors associated with success or failure in risk factor control in order to inform future risk factor management strategies. University education, attendance at a specialist cardiology clinic, and participation in a cardiac rehabilitation programme were associated with improved risk factor control. Risk factor control was poorer in women, those with diabetes, and those undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery as opposed to medical therapy or percutaneous coronary intervention. Increasing age, depression, and anxiety were not associated with poorer risk factor control.

  9. Polygamy and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in Men Undergoing Angiography: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Amir; Al-Murayeh, Mushabab; Al-kaabi, Salem; Al-Faifi, Salem M.; Alama, Mohamed N.; Hersi, Ahmad S.; Dixon, Ciaran M.; Ahmed, Waleed; Al-Shehri, Mohamed; Youssef, Ali; Elimam, Ahmed Moustafa; Abougalambou, Ayman S.; Murad, Waheed; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests a link between psychosocial risk factors such as marital status and coronary artery disease (CAD). Polygamy (multiple concurrent wives) is a distinct marital status practiced in many countries in Asia and the Middle East, but its association with CAD is not well defined. We conducted a multicenter, observational study of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography during the period from April 1, 2013, to March 30, 2014. Of 1,068 enrolled patients, 687 were married men. Polygamy was reported in 32% of married men (1 wife: 68%, 2 wives: 19%, 3 wives: 10%, and 4 wives: 3%). When stratified by number of wives, significant baseline differences were observed in age, type of community (rural versus urban), prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and household income. After adjusting for baseline differences, there was a significant association between polygamy and CAD (adjusted OR 4.6 [95% CI 2.5, 8.3]), multivessel disease (MVD) (adjusted OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.8, 3.7]), and left main disease (LMD) (adjusted OR 3.5 [95% CI 2.1, 5.9]). Findings were consistent when the number of wives was analyzed as a continuous variable. In conclusion, among married men undergoing coronary angiography for clinical indications, polygamy is associated with the presence of significant CAD, MVD, and LMD. PMID:28250991

  10. Polygamy and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in Men Undergoing Angiography: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Daoulah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic evidence suggests a link between psychosocial risk factors such as marital status and coronary artery disease (CAD. Polygamy (multiple concurrent wives is a distinct marital status practiced in many countries in Asia and the Middle East, but its association with CAD is not well defined. We conducted a multicenter, observational study of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography during the period from April 1, 2013, to March 30, 2014. Of 1,068 enrolled patients, 687 were married men. Polygamy was reported in 32% of married men (1 wife: 68%, 2 wives: 19%, 3 wives: 10%, and 4 wives: 3%. When stratified by number of wives, significant baseline differences were observed in age, type of community (rural versus urban, prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, and household income. After adjusting for baseline differences, there was a significant association between polygamy and CAD (adjusted OR 4.6 [95% CI 2.5, 8.3], multivessel disease (MVD (adjusted OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.8, 3.7], and left main disease (LMD (adjusted OR 3.5 [95% CI 2.1, 5.9]. Findings were consistent when the number of wives was analyzed as a continuous variable. In conclusion, among married men undergoing coronary angiography for clinical indications, polygamy is associated with the presence of significant CAD, MVD, and LMD.

  11. Framingham risk score and alternatives for prediction of coronary heart disease in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Rodondi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guidelines for the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD recommend use of Framingham-based risk scores that were developed in white middle-aged populations. It remains unclear whether and how CHD risk prediction might be improved among older adults. We aimed to compare the prognostic performance of the Framingham risk score (FRS, directly and after recalibration, with refit functions derived from the present cohort, as well as to assess the utility of adding other routinely available risk parameters to FRS. METHODS: Among 2193 black and white older adults (mean age, 73.5 years without pre-existing cardiovascular disease from the Health ABC cohort, we examined adjudicated CHD events, defined as incident myocardial infarction, CHD death, and hospitalization for angina or coronary revascularization. RESULTS: During 8-year follow-up, 351 participants experienced CHD events. The FRS poorly discriminated between persons who experienced CHD events vs. not (C-index: 0.577 in women; 0.583 in men and underestimated absolute risk prediction by 51% in women and 8% in men. Recalibration of the FRS improved absolute risk prediction, particulary for women. For both genders, refitting these functions substantially improved absolute risk prediction, with similar discrimination to the FRS. Results did not differ between whites and blacks. The addition of lifestyle variables, waist circumference and creatinine did not improve risk prediction beyond risk factors of the FRS. CONCLUSIONS: The FRS underestimates CHD risk in older adults, particularly in women, although traditional risk factors remain the best predictors of CHD. Re-estimated risk functions using these factors improve accurate estimation of absolute risk.

  12. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayols-Baixeras S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergi Sayols-Baixeras, Carla Lluís-Ganella, Gavin Lucas, Roberto ElosuaCardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Group, Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Coronary artery disease (CAD is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility.Keywords: coronary artery disease, pathogenesis, genetic risk factors, genetic variants

  13. Relationship between framingham risk score and coronary artery calcium score in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Seong, Su Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We explored the association between Framingham risk score (FRS) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in asymptomatic Korean individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 2216 participants who underwent routine health screening and CACS using the 64-slice multidetector computed tomography between January 2010 and June 2014. Relationship between CACS and FRS, and factors associated with discrepancy between CACS and FRS were analyzed. CACS and FRS were positively correlated (p < 0.0001). However, in 3.7% of participants with low coronary event risk and high CACS, age, male gender, smoker, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI; ≥ 35) were associated with the discrepancy. In the diagnostic prediction model for discrepancy, the receiver operating characteristic curve including factors associated with FRS, diastolic blood pressure (≥ 75 mm Hg), diabetes mellitus, and BMI (≥ 35) showed that the area under the curve was 0.854 (95% confidence interval, 0.819–0.890), indicating good sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus or obesity (BMI ≥ 35) compensate for the weakness of FRS and may be potential indicators for application of CACS in asymptomatic Koreans with low coronary event risk.

  14. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Carvalho Marmelo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods: The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results: The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%, and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%. The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1% and AVS (36.7%. There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001, myocardial infarction (p = 0.007, diabetes (p = 0.006 and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors.

  15. Risk stratification of non-contrast CT beyond the coronary calcium scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaj, Paul; Budoff, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a well-known marker for coronary artery disease and has important prognostic implications. CAC is able to provide clinicians with a reliable source of information related to cardiovascular atherosclerosis, which carries incremental information beyond Framingham risk. However, non-contrast scans of the heart provide additional information beyond the Agatston score. These studies are also able to measure various sources of fat, including intrathoracic (eg, pericardial or epicardial) and hepatic, both of which are thought to be metabolically active and linked to increased incidence of subclinical atherosclerosis as well as increased prevalence of type 2  diabetes. Testing for CAC is also useful in identifying extracoronary sources of calcification. Specifically, aortic valve calcification, mitral annular calcification, and thoracic aortic calcium (TAC) provide additional risk stratification information for cardiovascular events. Finally, scanning for CAC is able to evaluate myocardial scaring due to myocardial infarcts, which may also add incremental prognostic information. To ensure the benefits outweigh the risks of a scanning for CAC for an appropriately selected asymptomatic patient, the full utility of the scan should be realized. This review describes the current state of the art interpretation of non-contrast cardiac CT, which clinically should go well beyond coronary artery Agatston scoring alone.

  16. Risk factor paradox in the occurrence of cardiac arrest in acute coronary syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Silvia Aguiar; Timóteo, Ana Teresa; Nogueira, Marta Afonso; Belo, Adriana; Ferreira, Rui Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare patients without previously diagnosed cardiovascular risk factors) and patients with one or more risk factors admitted with acute coronary syndrome. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with first episode of acute coronary syndrome without previous heart disease, who were included in a national acute coronary syndrome registry. The patients were divided according to the number of risk factors, as follows: 0 risk factor (G0), 1 or 2 risk factors (G1 - 2) and 3 or more risk factors (G ≥ 3). Comparative analysis was performed between the three groups, and independent predictors of cardiac arrest and death were studied. Results A total of 5,518 patients were studied, of which 72.2% were male and the mean age was 64 ± 14 years. G0 had a greater incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, with the left anterior descending artery being the most frequently involved vessel, and a lower prevalence of multivessel disease. Even though G0 had a lower Killip class (96% in Killip I; p < 0.001) and higher ejection fraction (G0 56 ± 10% versus G1 - 2 and G ≥ 3 53 ± 12%; p = 0.024) on admission, there was a significant higher incidence of cardiac arrest. Multivariate analysis identified the absence of risk factors as an independent predictor of cardiac arrest (OR 2.78; p = 0.019). Hospital mortality was slightly higher in G0, although this difference was not significant. By Cox regression analysis, the number of risk factors was found not to be associated with mortality. Predictors of death at 1 year follow up included age (OR 1.05; p < 0.001), ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.94; p = 0.003) and ejection fraction < 50% (OR 2.34; p < 0.001). Conclusion Even though the group without risk factors was composed of younger patients with fewer comorbidities, better left ventricular function and less extensive coronary disease, the absence of risk factors was an independent predictor of cardiac arrest. PMID

  17. Requirements of a coronary heart disease risk factor intervention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... coloured population of the Cape Peninsula to be at high risk of developing CHD. Only 5,4% of men ... promotion of health and prevention of disease. Guidelines for ... among the unskilled coloured labour force. This could be.

  18. HYBRID TREATMENT OF COMPLEX COMBINED CORONARY AND VALVE DISEASE FOR PATIENTS WITH HIGH LEVEL OF OPERATIONAL RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Aniskevich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of results of hybrid treatment of complex combined coronary and valve disease at patients with high level of operational risk between January 2005 and December 2010. The hybrid treatment of complex combined coronary and valve disease, provides performance of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI in a combinati- on valve surgery. 118 patients, with a median age 64.4 ± 8.9 years, are included in research. 2 approaches of a hy- brid method of treatment – 2-Staged (n = 86 and a method «1-stop» (n = 32 are applied. The оperative mortality has made 4.2%. On the basis of the received results were the conclusion is drawn that at high-risk patients with complex combined coronary and valve disease the hybrid method of treatment allows to lower risk of operation. 

  19. PCA-based polling strategy in machine learning framework for coronary artery disease risk assessment in intravascular ultrasound: A link between carotid and coronary grayscale plaque morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Shukla, Devarshi; Jain, Pankaj K; Londhe, Narendra D; Shrivastava, Vimal K; Banchhor, Sumit K; Saba, Luca; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-05-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventional procedures need advance planning prior to stenting or an endarterectomy. Cardiologists use intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for screening, risk assessment and stratification of coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesize that plaque components are vulnerable to rupture due to plaque progression. Currently, there are no standard grayscale IVUS tools for risk assessment of plaque rupture. This paper presents a novel strategy for risk stratification based on plaque morphology embedded with principal component analysis (PCA) for plaque feature dimensionality reduction and dominant feature selection technique. The risk assessment utilizes 56 grayscale coronary features in a machine learning framework while linking information from carotid and coronary plaque burdens due to their common genetic makeup. This system consists of a machine learning paradigm which uses a support vector machine (SVM) combined with PCA for optimal and dominant coronary artery morphological feature extraction. Carotid artery proven intima-media thickness (cIMT) biomarker is adapted as a gold standard during the training phase of the machine learning system. For the performance evaluation, K-fold cross validation protocol is adapted with 20 trials per fold. For choosing the dominant features out of the 56 grayscale features, a polling strategy of PCA is adapted where the original value of the features is unaltered. Different protocols are designed for establishing the stability and reliability criteria of the coronary risk assessment system (cRAS). Using the PCA-based machine learning paradigm and cross-validation protocol, a classification accuracy of 98.43% (AUC 0.98) with K=10 folds using an SVM radial basis function (RBF) kernel was achieved. A reliability index of 97.32% and machine learning stability criteria of 5% were met for the cRAS. This is the first Computer aided design (CADx) system of its kind that is able to demonstrate the ability of coronary

  20. NREL's Renewable Energy Development Expertise Reduces Project Risks (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    This National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) success story fact sheet highlights a June 2012 solar power purchase agreement between the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority and three corporations. The fact sheet describes how technical assistance from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory enabled the U.S. Virgin Islands to realistically assess its clean energy resources and identify the most viable and cost-effective solutions to its energy challenges--resulting in a $65 million investment in solar energy in the territory.

  1. A qualitative descriptive study of risk reduction for coronary disease among the Hong Kong Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Choi Wan; Lopez, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Achieving optimal control and reduction in coronary heart disease (CHD) risks in Hong Kong (HK) remains significant and requires exploring. This article addresses the ability to reduce CHD risks among the HK Chinese. Through secondary analysis, a qualitative descriptive design using focus group interviews and content analysis were adopted. Older and younger adults were invited for the study. An interview schedule was used to guide discussions during focus group interviews. Four categories emerged from the data: planning of health actions, control of risk-reducing behavior, perceived opportunities for understanding CHD, and chest pain appraisal. Local culture and population needs play a central role in disease perception and prevention. The findings are essential to target strategies for initiating health acts for younger adults and establish public education resources that underscore understanding of CHD risk, symptom recognition, and disease management, particularly among those middle-aged and older people at high risk and with the diseased populations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. TO STUDY THE INCIDENCE OF ANAEMIA AND IDENTIFY AS RISK FACTOR IN CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Periasamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM AND OBJECTIVE To identify the incidence of anaemia and to identity anaemia itself as a risk factors in coronary artery disease in rural population. METHODS AND MATERIALS A prospective observational study done in patients admitted with evidence of coronary artery disease in Rajah Muthiah Medical College Hospital from January 2016 to April 2016. Patients with age more than 18 years, both gender, evidence of coronary artery disease were included and secondary case for anaemia were excluded. A detailed clinical history and examination, blood count with smear study was done. RESULT In our present study, male predominance (72% with more common in age group between (51-60 years 36%. Mean haemoglobin level in our study showed 11.70 g/dL. The incidence of anaemia was 80% with varying severity 7-9 (2%, 9-11 (32%, 11-13 (46%, >13(20% and smear showed microcytic hypochromic dominated with 52%. CONCLUSION Incidence of anaemia observed in rural population with reference to significances of role as risk factor yet to be studied with detailed study. It is important also to investigate secondary cause of anaemia.

  3. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease. DESIGN: A meta-analysis combining individual level data from a collaborative consortium and published studies identified by a systematic review. DATA SOURCES: We obtained individual...... level data from 13 cohort studies participating in the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium. Four published prospective cohort studies were identified by searches of Medline (to August 2012) and Embase databases (to October 2012), supplemented by manual searches....... REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...

  4. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease. DESIGN: A meta-analysis combining individual level data from a collaborative consortium and published studies identified by a systematic review. DATA SOURCES: We obtained individual...... level data from 13 cohort studies participating in the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium. Four published prospective cohort studies were identified by searches of Medline (to August 2012) and Embase databases (to October 2012), supplemented by manual searches....... REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...

  5. Assessment of the risk factors of coronary heart events based on data mining with decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaolis, Minas A; Moutiris, Joseph A; Hadjipanayi, Demetra; Pattichis, Constantinos S

    2010-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the major causes of disability in adults as well as one of the main causes of death in the developed countries. Although significant progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of CHD, further investigation is still needed. The objective of this study was to develop a data-mining system for the assessment of heart event-related risk factors targeting in the reduction of CHD events. The risk factors investigated were: 1) before the event: a) nonmodifiable-age, sex, and family history for premature CHD, b) modifiable-smoking before the event, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes; and 2) after the event: modifiable-smoking after the event, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and glucose. The events investigated were: myocardial infarction (MI), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). A total of 528 cases were collected from the Paphos district in Cyprus, most of them with more than one event. Data-mining analysis was carried out using the C4.5 decision tree algorithm for the aforementioned three events using five different splitting criteria. The most important risk factors, as extracted from the classification rules analysis were: 1) for MI, age, smoking, and history of hypertension; 2) for PCI, family history, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes; and 3) for CABG, age, history of hypertension, and smoking. Most of these risk factors were also extracted by other investigators. The highest percentages of correct classifications achieved were 66%, 75%, and 75% for the MI, PCI, and CABG models, respectively. It is anticipated that data mining could help in the identification of high and low risk subgroups of subjects, a decisive factor for the selection of therapy, i.e., medical or surgical. However, further investigation with larger datasets is

  6. Differential association of anthropometric parameters with coronary risk in women--data of the CORA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Schoeffauer, Mark; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Boeing, Heiner; Windler, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    The predictive value of weight gain, BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as to cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD) is still controversial. 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident CHD (cases) were compared with 255 randomized age-matched population-based controls recruited from corresponding neighborhoods of Hamburg between 1997 and 2001. At the time of recruitment cases and controls did not differ in BMI, but at any BMI in WC and WHR. Both parameters of central obesity were related to coronary risk. However, after adjustment for conventional risk factors, the odds ratio of WC for CHD lost its significance while the odds ratio of WHR was still 2.20 per 0.1 unit (95% confidence interval 1.48-3.27; p = 0.0001). The pattern of weight gain differed considerably in women with WHR ≥0.85 or <0.85 and closely matched that of women with or without CHD. The dietary pattern did not distinguish women with elevated WC or WHR. In women, an elevated WHR was closely associated with the risk for CHD independent of BMI and conventional risk factors over and above an elevated WC. An increased WC predominantly seems to reflect the presence of components of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Drug Facts

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  8. Drug Facts

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  14. Hypothyroidism in coronary heart disease and its relation to selected risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Mayer Jr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Otto Mayer Jr1, Jaroslav Šimon1, Jan Filipovský1, Markéta Plášková2, Richard Pikner11Center of Preventive Cardiology, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Charles University, Medical Faculty, Plze , Czech Republic; 2Department of Preventive Cardiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech RepublicIntroduction: Hypothyroidism (HT has been found a predictor of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to ascertain the prevalence of HT in patients with manifest coronary heart disease (CHD, and to establish its association with conventional risk factors.Methods: 410 patients, 6–24 months after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome, and/or revascularization, were included into the cross-sectional study.Results: The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was found in males and females as follows: overt HT, ie, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH > 3.65 mIU/L and free thyroxine (fT4 < 9 pmol/L and/or L-thyroxine substitution, in 2.6% and 8.4%, respectively; subclinical HT (TSH >3.65, fT4 9–23 and no substitution in 4.3% and 15.0%, respectively. Higher prevalence of HT was found in females with hypercholesterolemia, and in males and females with concomitant positive thyroid peroxydase antibodies. Hypothyroid subjects had higher total homocysteine in both genders and von Willebrand factor in males only. Hypothyroid females had higher total  and LDL cholesterol, and were more often treated for diabetes.Conclusions: HT was found highly prevalent in patient with clinical coronary heart disease, mainly in females, and was associated with several cardiovascular risk factors.Keywords: hypothyroidism, coronary heart disease, cholesterol, homocysteine, diabetes

  15. The use of percutaneous left ventricular assist device in high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondi, Andre Babak; Lee, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with high-risk coronary lesions may be denied coronary artery bypass grafting due to excessive comorbidities. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may be a feasible revascularization strategy in high-risk patients who present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Historically, the use if intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in high-risk PCI and cardiogenic shock. However, recent data has shown that elective IABP insertion did not reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events following PCI. The use of a left ventricular assist device is a reasonable and safe alternative compared with IABP counterpulsation, giving greater cardiac output and hemodynamic support in patients undergoing high-risk PCI and in those with severe cardiogenic shock. This review outlines a case of severe cardiogenic shock and hemodynamic instability where high-risk PCI is a reasonable option.

  16. Impact of abciximab in elderly patients with high-risk acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: an observational registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Allan Z; Galatius, Soeren; Haahr-Pedersen, Sune Ammentorp;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing proportion of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) requiring percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are classified as elderly (aged =70 years). The glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor abciximab is known to reduce adverse outcomes in patients aged high......-risk ACS undergoing PCI, but conflicting findings relating to its effects in the elderly have been reported. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of abciximab in elderly high-risk ACS patients undergoing PCI. METHODS: From our dedicated PCI registry we identified 2068 ACS patients...... with high-risk lesions that were treated with PCI. Baseline data were collected prospectively. All-cause mortality, target vessel revascularization (TVR), myocardial infarction (MI), and the combination of these were primary study endpoints. All endpoints within 1 year after PCI were registered...

  17. Social and Behavioral Risk Marker Clustering Associated with Biological Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease: NHANES 2001–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Everage

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Social and behavioral risk markers (e.g., physical activity, diet, smoking, and socioeconomic position cluster; however, little is known whether clustering is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD risk. Objectives were to determine if sociobehavioral clustering is associated with biological CHD risk factors (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and diabetes and whether associations are independent of individual clustering components. Methods. Participants included 4,305 males and 4,673 females aged ≥20 years from NHANES 2001–2004. Sociobehavioral Risk Marker Index (SRI included a summary score of physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, smoking, and educational attainment. Regression analyses evaluated associations of SRI with aforementioned biological CHD risk factors. Receiver operator curve analyses assessed independent predictive ability of SRI. Results. Healthful clustering (SRI = 0 was associated with improved biological CHD risk factor levels in 5 of 6 risk factors in females and 2 of 6 risk factors in males. Adding SRI to models containing age, race, and individual SRI components did not improve C-statistics. Conclusions. Findings suggest that healthful sociobehavioral risk marker clustering is associated with favorable CHD risk factor levels, particularly in females. These findings should inform social ecological interventions that consider health impacts of addressing social and behavioral risk factors.

  18. Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) Polymorphism and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Li, You-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) polymorphism has been extensively investigated as a potential risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the results of these studies have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to explore the association between LPL polymorphism and CAD risk. Methods: The literature was searched from electronic databases such as Embase, China Biological Medicine Database, PubMed, Knowledge Infrastructure, and China National Web of Science by the key words “coronary artery disease”, “lipoprotein lipase” and “polymorphism”. All of the studies included in this manuscript met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. An odds ratio (OR) analysis using a 95% confidence interval (CI) was employed to assess the association of the LPL polymorphism with CAD susceptibility. Results: We performed a meta-analysis of 14 case-control studies including HindIII, Ser447X and PvuII polymorphism. A statistically significant increase in the risk of CAD was associated with LPL HindIII polymorphism. This included HindIII H+H+ genotype (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.09–1.49, p = 0.002, I2 = 43%) and H+ allele genotype (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.03–1.58, p = 0.03, I2 = 67%). Ser447X XX genotype (OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.33–4.24, p = 0.004, I2 = 53%) was also associated with CAD risk. However, PvuII polymorphism was found to have no significant association with CAD risk. Conclusions: LPL HindIII polymorphism was significantly associated with the risk of CAD. For Ser447X polymorphism, it was found that only XX genotype was significantly associated with CAD risk. Furthermore, PvuII polymorphism had no significant association with CAD risk. It was considered that LPL HindIII polymorphism might serve as a potential biomarker for CAD risk.

  19. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and actual diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović-Perišić Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is increasing in the world. Chronic hyperglycemia in DM is associated with a long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially retina, kidney, nerves and, in addition, with an increased risk of cardiovasclar disease. For a long time the illness has been unknown. Early diagnosis of diabetes could suspend the development of diabetic complications. The aim of the study was to establish risk for the development of coronary disease in the patients evaluated by the use of new diagnostic criteria for DM. Methods. The study included 930 participants without diagnosis of DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, nor coronary heart disease two years before the study. The patients went through measuring of fasting plasma glycemia, erythrocytes, hematocrit, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. In the group with hyperglycemia the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was performed. We analyzed ECG and made blood pressure monitoring, and also measured body mass, height, waist and hip circumference. We analyzed life style, especially smoking, and exercise and family history. Results. Diabetes prevalence was 2.68%, and prevalences of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and DM were 12.15%. Average age of males and females was 38 and 45 years, respectively. In the healthy population there was higher frequency of smokers (55% vs 42%, but in the population with hyperglycemia there were more obesity (23% vs 10.5%, hypertension (39% vs 9%, hypercholesterolemia (76% vs 44.1%, lower HDL-C (52.2% vs 25.7%. Cummulative risk factor in healthy subjects, and those with hyperglycemia were 5.6% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion. Subjects with hyperglicemia without diagnosis of DM have higher risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  20. Amlodipine reduces predicted risk of coronary heart disease in high-risk patients with hypertension in Spain (The CORONARIA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, J; Rodriguez Padial, L; Cosín, J; Hernandiz, A; Gutierrez-Chico, J L; Pérez de Isla, L; Arístegui, R; Masramon, X

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of amlodipine besylate alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents in high-risk hypertensive patients in Spanish primary care. In this 1-year, open-label, prospective cohort study, 7468 patients were treated with amlodipine 5 - 10 mg as a monotherapy or as an add-on therapy to attain blood pressure control (target of risk) was -8.6%, down from 24.7% at baseline (relative risk reduction, 31.6%). Change in blood pressure from baseline (162.5/95.3 mmHg) was -26.7/-14.6 mmHg, and 38.6% of patients achieved their blood pressure target. In summary, significant reductions in predicted coronary heart disease risk and blood pressure were observed with amlodipine both as a monotherapy and as an add-on therapy. Amlodipine was well tolerated and compliance with treatment was good.

  1. PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism and risk of acute coronary syndrome in a prospective study of Danes

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Majken K; Wallin Håkan; Saber Anne; Tjønneland Anne; Dethlefsen Claus; Segel Stine; Vogel Ulla; Schmidt Erik B; Andersen Paal; Overvad Kim

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a key role in the regulation of the energy balance, adipocyte differentiation and lipid biosynthesis. The aim was to investigate if the polymorphism PPARγ2 Pro12Ala, which encodes a less efficient transcription factor, was associated with risk of acute coronary disease and if there were interactions between this polymorp...

  2. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  3. Coronary artery calcium score using electron beam tomography in the patients with acute obstructive coronary arterial disease : comparative study within asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive coronary arterial disease group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seok Jong; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To compare, through analysis of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the risk factors for atherosclerosis, the characteristics of acute coronary syndrome between an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients and a chronic coronary arterial obstructive disease(CAOD) group. The CAC scores of an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients (group I, n=284), a chronic CAOD croup (group II, n=39) and an acute coronary syndrome group (group III, n=21) were measured by electron beam tomography. Forty-seven patients with CAOD from groups II and III underwent coronary angiography, and we scrutinized age, sex and risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and low high-density lipoproteinemia. The numbers of stenotic coronary arterial branches and degree of stenosis revealed by coronary angiography were also recorded. We determined the differences between the three groups in terms of CAC score and the risk factors, the relationship between CAC score and risk factors, and the characteristic features of each type of CAOD group. The mean CA score of group III (135.1) was not statistically different from that of group I (135.7) or group II (365.8). Among patients aged below 50, the mean CAC score of group III (127.4) was significantly higher than that of group I (6.2), (p=0.0006). The mean CAC score at the sixth decade was also significantly different between group I(81.5) and group II (266.9). The mean age of group III (54.2 years) was significantly lower than that of group I (58.1 years) (p=0.047) and of group II (60.1) (p=0.022). There was significant correlation between the number of stenotic coronary arterial branches and log(CAC +1) (p<.01). The square root of the CAC score and the maximal degree of stenosis was also well correlated (p<.01). There was no difference in the mean number of risk factors among the three groups, though the incidence of smoking in group III was significantly

  4. Relation of thoracic aortic and aortic valve calcium to coronary artery calcium and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Sciammarella, Maria; Arad, Yadon; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Polk, Donna; Hachamovich, Rory; Friedman, John; Hayes, Sean; Daniell, Anthony; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-10-15

    Aortic calcium, aortic valve calcium (AVC), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have been associated with cardiovascular event risk. We examined the prevalence of thoracic aortic calcium (TAC) and AVC in relation to the presence and extent of CAC, cardiovascular risk factors, and estimated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). In 2,740 persons without known CHD aged 20 to 79 years, CAC was assessed by electron beam- or multidetector-computed tomography. We determined the prevalence of TAC and AVC in relation to CAC, CHD risk factors, and predicted 10-year risk of CHD. A close correspondence of TAC and AVC was observed with CAC. TAC and AVC increased with age; by the eighth decade of life, the prevalence of TAC was similar to that of CAC (>80%), and 36% of men and 24% of women had AVC. Age, male gender, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were directly related to the likelihood of CAC, TAC, and AVC; higher diastolic blood pressure and cigarette smoking additionally predicted CAC. Body mass index and higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressures were also related to TAC, and higher body mass index and lower diastolic blood pressure were related to AVC. Calculated risk of CHD increased with the presence of AVC and TAC across levels of CAC. TAC and AVC provided incremental value over CAC in association with the 10-year calculated risk of CHD. If longitudinal studies show an incremental value of aortic and aortic valve calcium over that of CAC for prediction of cardiovascular events, future guidelines for risk assessment incorporating CAC assessment may additionally incorporate the measurement of aortic and/or aortic valve calcium.

  5. The Impact of Extreme-Risk Cases on Hospitals’ Risk-Adjusted Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Mortality Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Ho, Kalon K.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Messenger, John C.; Weaver, W. Douglas; Dai, David; Peterson, Eric D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The goal of this study was to examine the calibration of a validated risk-adjustment model in very high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) cases and assess whether sites’ case mix affects their performance ratings. BACKGROUND There are concerns that treating PCI patients with particularly high-risk features such as cardiogenic shock or prior cardiac arrest may adversely impact hospital performance ratings. However, there is little investigation on the validity of these concerns. METHODS We examined 624,286 PCI procedures from 1,168 sites that participated in the CathPCI Registry in 2010. Procedural risk was estimated using the recently published Version 4 National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) PCI risk-adjusted mortality (RAM) model. We calculated observed/expected mortality using several risk classification methods, and simulated hospital performance after combining their highest risk cases over 2 years into a single year. RESULTS In 2010, crude in-hospital PCI mortality was 1.4%. The NCDR model was generally well calibrated among high risk, however there was slight overprediction of risk in extreme cases. Hospitals treating the highest overall expected risk PCI patients or those treating the top 20% of high-risk cases had lower (better) RAM ratings than centers treating lower-risk cases (1.25% vs. 1.51%). The observed/expected ratio for top-risk quintile versus low-risk quintile was 0.91 (0.87 to 0.96) versus 1.10 (1.03 to 1.17). Combining all the high-risk patients over a 2-year period into a single year also did not negatively impact the site’s RAM ratings. CONCLUSIONS Evaluation of a contemporary sample of PCI cases across the United States showed no evidence that treating high-risk PCI cases adversely affects hospital RAM rates. PMID:25499301

  6. 20. Prediction of 10-year risk of hard coronary events among Saudi adults based on prevalence of heart disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adil Soofi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our study is the first to estimate the 10-year risk of HCE among adults in an emerging country and discovered a significant proportion of younger aged population are at risk for development of hard coronary events. Public awareness programs to control risk factors are warranted.

  7. [Risk factor management of coronary heart disease : what is evidence-based?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzer, E B; Schuler, G C

    2014-06-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease the further course of the disease can be substantially influenced by means of a targeted treatment of risk factors. A reduction of hospital referrals, an improvement in quality of life and an extension in life expectation by secondary prophylactic measures have been well documented. In addition to an optimized medicinal therapy, an often drastic change in lifestyle with a focus on a consistent abstinence from nicotine, a healthy diet and regular physical exercise is necessary. Data from healthcare research show that these targets are only insufficiently achieved. The implementation of current guidelines should therefore be rigorously applied. There is a need for research particularly with respect to the prognostic significance of beta blocker therapy for patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function, the prognostic significance of targeted weight loss for overweight or obese coronary heart disease patients, the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in the various patient groups and their implementation into routine care. Research is also necessary with respect to optimization of structured rehabilitation programs and improvement in patient compliance.

  8. Facts and values: on the acceptability of risks in children's sport using the example of rugby - a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, Kenneth Lincoln; Brooks, John H M; Burger, Nicholas; Hume, Patria A; Jackson, Steve

    2017-08-01

    A clash of values has been identified between those who assert that:1. all childhood injuries, regardless of origin, are inherently undesirable and should be prevented and;2. those who believe that some measure of injury to children is an acceptable compromise for the physical benefits associated with physical activity and the development of abilities to appraise and deal with risks.A debate regarding whether the tackles and collisions permitted in schools' rugby represent acceptable risks, and what steps should be taken if they do not, exemplifies the issue.Questions regarding the magnitude of injury risks in sport are issues of fact and can be quantified via the results of injury surveillance studies. Risks are neither high nor low in isolation; they are relatively high or low with reference to other activities or across groups participating in an activity. Issues of the acceptability of a given degree of risk are value dependent. Research regarding perceptions of risk reveals wide variations in the degree of risk people view as acceptable. Factors impacting on risk perception include whether the risks are well known and understood, whether they are 'dread' risks and the degree to which people undertake the risks voluntarily and feel they have control over them.Based on the evidence currently available, the risks to children playing rugby do not appear to be inordinately high compared with those in a range of other childhood sports and activities, but better comparative information is urgently needed. Further evidence, however, should not necessarily be expected to result in the resolution of acceptable risk debates-pre-existing values shape our perspectives on whether new evidence is relevant, valid and reliable. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Coronary artery calcification and ECG pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy or strain identify different healthy individuals at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Zöga; Gerke, Oke; Olsen, Michael Hecht

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE:: To improve risk stratification for development of ischaemic heart disease, several markers have been proposed. Both the presence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and ECG pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy/strain have been shown to provide independent prognostic information....... In this study, we investigated the association between established risk factors, ECG measurements and the presence of coronary artery calcification. METHOD:: A random sample of healthy men and women aged 50 or 60 years were invited to the screening study. Established risk factors were measured. A noncontrast...

  10. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Walter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.walter@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); Saur, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.saur@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim, E-mail: tim.sueselbeck@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Traunwieser, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.traunwieser@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Takx, Richard, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis.

  11. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: impact on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard; Kralev, Stefan; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Henzler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or "triple-rule-out" CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated d-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease: effects on perceived personal control and genetic counseling satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C L; Jouni, H; Kruisselbrink, T M; Austin, E E; Christensen, K D; Green, R C; Kullo, I J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether disclosure of coronary heart disease (CHD) genetic risk influences perceived personal control (PPC) and genetic counseling satisfaction (GCS). Participants (n = 207, age: 45-65 years) were randomized to receive estimated 10-year risk of CHD based on a conventional risk score (CRS) with or without a genetic risk score (GRS). Risk estimates were disclosed by a genetic counselor who also reviewed how GRS altered risk in those randomized to CRS+GRS. Each participant subsequently met with a physician and then completed surveys to assess PPC and GCS. Participants who received CRS+GRS had higher PPC than those who received CRS alone although the absolute difference was small (25.2 ± 2.7 vs 24.1 ± 3.8, p = 0.04). A greater proportion of CRS+GRS participants had higher GCS scores (17.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.9 ± 6.3, p = 0.06). In the CRS+GRS group, PPC and GCS scores were not correlated with GRS. Within both groups, PPC and GCS scores were similar in patients with or without family history (p = NS). In conclusion, patients who received their genetic risk of CHD had higher PPC and tended to have higher GCS. Our findings suggest that disclosure of genetic risk of CHD together with conventional risk estimates is appreciated by patients. Whether this results in improved outcomes needs additional investigation.

  13. Exercise cardiac power and the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular mortality in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurl, Sudhir; Mäkikallio, Timo; Jae, Sae Young; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of exercise cardiac power (ECP), defined as a ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake with peak systolic blood pressure during exercise, with the risk of mortality from coronary heart diseases (CHD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Population-based cohort study with an average follow-up of 25 years from eastern Finland. About 2358 men at baseline participated in exercise stress test and 182 CHD and 302 CVD deaths occurred. Men with low ECP (risk of CHD mortality as compared with men with high ECP (>16.4 mL/mmHg, highest quartile) after adjusting for age and examination year. Low ECP was associated with a 2.8-fold risk of CHD and 2.4-fold for CVD mortality after additional adjustment for conventional risk factors. After further adjustment for leisure time physical activity, the results hardly changed (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.71-3.67, p risk of CHD and CVD mortality is an elevated afterload and peripheral resistance indicated by hypertension. Key messages Index of exercise cardiac power defined as the ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) with peak systolic blood pressure gives prognostic information in coronary heart disease (CHD) and CVD mortality risk stratification. ECP provides non-invasive and easily available measure for the prediction of CHD and CVD mortality. One of the most potential explanation for the association between ECP and the risk of CHD and CVD mortality is an elevated afterload and peripheral resistance indicated by hypertension.

  14. Inactivating Variants in ANGPTL4 and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Frederick E.; Gusarova, Viktoria; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Gottesman, Omri; Trejos, Jesus; Hunt, Charleen; Van Hout, Cristopher V.; Habegger, Lukas; Buckler, David; Lai, Ka-Man V.; Leader, Joseph B.; Murray, Michael F.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Ledbetter, David H.; Penn, John; Lopez, Alexander; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Overton, John D.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Carey, David J.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Baras, Aris; Gromada, Jesper; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Higher-than-normal levels of circulating triglycerides are a risk factor for ischemic cardiovascular disease. Activation of lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme that is inhibited by angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), has been shown to reduce levels of circulating triglycerides. METHODS We sequenced the exons of ANGPTL4 in samples obtain from 42,930 participants of predominantly European ancestry in the DiscovEHR human genetics study. We performed tests of association between lipid levels and the missense E40K variant (which has been associated with reduced plasma triglyceride levels) and other inactivating mutations. We then tested for associations between coronary artery disease and the E40K variant and other inactivating mutations in 10,552 participants with coronary artery disease and 29,223 controls. We also tested the effect of a human monoclonal antibody against ANGPTL4 on lipid levels in mice and monkeys. RESULTS We identified 1661 heterozygotes and 17 homozygotes for the E40K variant and 75 participants who had 13 other monoallelic inactivating mutations in ANGPTL4. The levels of triglycerides were 13% lower and the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were 7% higher among carriers of the E40K variant than among noncarriers. Carriers of the E40K variant were also significantly less likely than noncarriers to have coronary artery disease (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 0.92; P = 0.002). K40 homozygotes had markedly lower levels of triglycerides and higher levels of HDL cholesterol than did heterozygotes. Carriers of other inactivating mutations also had lower triglyceride levels and higher HDL cholesterol levels and were less likely to have coronary artery disease than were noncarriers. Monoclonal antibody inhibition of Angptl4 in mice and monkeys reduced triglyceride levels. CONCLUSIONS Carriers of E40K and other inactivating mutations in ANGPTL4 had lower levels of triglycerides and a lower risk of coronary artery

  15. Comparison of Novel Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors between Obese and Normal Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Kouzehgaran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary artery disease is considered as the most common cause of death in all societies including Iran. This study seeks to compare the new risk factors of coronary-artery diseases in obese adolescents and control group. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, amongst the obese adolescents registered in the nutrition clinic of Ghaem Hospital, 80 individuals were selected. As the control group, additional 80 adolescent students having the same gender and age as the obese group, but with normal weight were selected. These two groups were selected randomly and their serum level of vitamin D, anti-heat shock protein27 (HSP27, balance of oxidants and antioxidants, and homocysteine were determined and compared. Results: In this study, 42 (53.2% and 37 (46.8% of the obese and normal weight groups were male, respectively. The mean value of triglyceride, cholesterol, and LDL in the obese group was higher than the normal group, but the mean value for HDL, vitamin D, homocysteine, PAB (Preoxidant and Antioxidants Balance, and anti-HSP27 was not significantly different between the groups. In the base of homocysteine >15 µmol/l, 26.6% of the obese group had hyperhomocysteinemia, therefore homocysteine may be a new risk factor for coronary artery disease in obese adolescents (χ2=4.072; P value=0.091. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that despite the presence of obesity in adolescence and adolescents, new risk factors are not present among them more than the control group. This was in contrast to what was seen in adults.

  16. Mortality risk of triglyceride levels in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Takatoshi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Yanagisawa, Naotake; Kajimoto, Kan; Kubota, Naozumi; Ogita, Manabu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Amano, Atsushi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The association between triglyceride level and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains controversial. In particular, the prognostic significance of triglyceride levels in established CAD is unclear. We aimed to assess the relationship between triglyceride levels and long-term (>10 years) prognosis in a cohort of patients after complete coronary revascularisation. Observational cohort study. Departments of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery in a university hospital. Consecutive patients who had undergone complete revascularisation between 1984 and 1992. All patients were categorised according to the quintiles of fasting triglyceride levels at baseline. The risk of fasting triglyceride levels for all-cause and cardiac mortality was assessed by multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Data from 1836 eligible patients were assessed. There were 412 (22.4%) all-cause deaths and 131 (7.2%) cardiac deaths during a median follow-up of 10.5 years. Multivariable analyses including total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other covariates revealed no significant differences in linear trends for all-cause mortality according to the quintiles of triglyceride (p for trend=0.711). However, the HR increased with the triglyceride levels in a significant and dose-dependent manner for cardiac mortality (p for trend=0.031). Multivariable analysis therefore showed a significant relationship between triglyceride levels, when treated as a natural logarithm-transformed continuous variable, and increased cardiac mortality (HR 1.51, p=0.044). Elevated fasting triglyceride level is associated with increased risk of cardiac death after complete coronary revascularisation.

  17. Risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in coronary artery disease patients receiving both aspirin and clopidogrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuang-Wei; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Chin-Chou; Hou, Ming-Chih; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Lu, Ching-Liang; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Chang, Full-Young

    2013-01-01

    Dual therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel) increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a critical ill condition, may increase the risk of UGIB due to stress-related mucosal disease and the impact of receiving dual antiplatelet agents. We identified risk factors of UGIB in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) receiving dual therapy. Patients who received dual therapy due to ACS or postpercutaneous coronary intervention (elective, primary, or urgent) were enrolled retrospectively. We assessed the occurrence of UGIB and identified the risk factors for UGIB at early stage (dual therapy ≤ 2 weeks) and late stage (> 2 weeks) by Cox regression analysis. During a mean follow-up period of 125 days, 67 (12.5 %) out of 534 patients developed UGIB (32 patients at early stage, 35 patients at late stage). Cox regression analysis showed that use of proton pump inhibitor therapy has a protective role in these patients [hazard ratio (HR): 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.01-0.71]. ACS (HR: 2.67, 95% CI: 1.33-5.34) has a high risk of developing UGIB at an early stage. Old age (>75 years of age) (HR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.02-4.47) and prior history of peptic ulcer disease (HR: 3.27, 95% CI: 1.28-8.34) each have an associated high risk for developing UGIB at a late stage. The use of mechanical ventilation (HR: 5.85, 95% CI: 2.19-15.58) also increased UGIB risk at both the early and late stages. ACS and mechanical ventilation are important risk factors of UGIB at the early stage (≤ 2 weeks). Additionally, old age (>75 years), past peptic ulcer disease history, and the use of mechanical ventilation play important roles in the occurrence of UGIB at late stage (>2 weeks). However, it was also noted that use of PPI plays a protective role in patients with CAD receiving aspirin and clopidogrel therapy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Consumption of industrial and ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Christensen, R.; Bartels, Else Marie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize the evidence from observational studies assessing the association between intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with a specific emphasis on distinguishing between TFA of industrial...... and ruminant origin. By searching five bibliographic databases, analyses from six published and two unpublished prospective cohort studies, assessing the association of intake of TFA with fatal and/or non-fatal CHD, were identified. Four and three studies reported separate associations for intake of ruminant...

  19. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient for Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande Gutierrez, Noelia; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2014-11-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in coronary aneurysms in up to 25% of patients if not treated early putting patients at risk of thrombus formation, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines for administering anti-coagulation therapy currently rely on anatomy alone. Previous studies including patient specific modeling and computer simulations in KD patients have suggested that hemodynamic data can predict regions susceptible to thrombus formation. In particular, high Particle Residence Time gradient (PRTg) regions have shown to correlate with regions of thrombus formation. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient (TAG) is determined from the change in radiological attenuation per vessel length. TAG has been used for characterizing coronary artery stenoses, however this approach has not yet been used in aneurysmal vessels. The aim of this study is to analyze the correlation between TAG and PRTg in KD patients with aneurysms and evaluate the use of TAG as an index to quantify thrombotic risk. Patient specific anatomic models for fluids simulations were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 3 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. TAG values for the aneurysm patients were markedly lower than for the non-aneurysmal patient (mean -18.38 vs. -2). In addition, TAG values were compared to PRTg obtained for each patient. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating TAG and should be evaluated in future prospective studies.

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase promoter hypomethylation is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jinyan; Chen, Xiaoying; Wu, Nan; Shen, Caijie; Cui, Hanbin; Du, Weiping; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Feng, Mingjun; Liu, Junsong; Lin, Shaoyi; Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xiaomin; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-11-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation is known to be associated with the risk of acute coronary events. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of COMT promoter methylation towards the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). COMT methylation was evaluated in 48 CHD cases and 48 well-matched non-CHD controls using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. The results demonstrated that CHD cases had a significantly lower level of methylation at COMT CpG3 sites compared with the controls (33.77±5.71 vs. 36.42±5.00%; P=0.018). Further analysis, according to gender, showed that CpG3 methylation was associated with CHD in males (P=0.038) but not in females (P=0.253), suggesting that there is a gender disparity in the association between COMT methylation and CHD. In conclusion, it was determined that COMT CpG3 hypomethylation is associated with an increased risk of CHD in males.

  1. Computed Tomography Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring Review of Evidence Base and Cost-effectiveness in Cardiovascular Risk Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Morris, Pamela B.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factor-scoring algorithms may fall short in identifying asymptomatic individuals who will subsequently suffer a coronary event. It is generally thought that evaluation of the extent of the atherosclerotic plaque and total plaque burden can improve cardiovascular risk stratificati

  2. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  3. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  4. Birth weight, childhood body mass index and risk of coronary heart disease in adults: combined historical cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lise Geisler; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Eriksson, Johan G

    2010-01-01

    Low birth weight and high childhood body mass index (BMI) is each associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adult life. We studied individual and combined associations of birth weight and childhood BMI with the risk of CHD in adulthood....

  5. Hypercholesterolaemia and risk of coronary heart disease in the elderly: impact of age: the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Allan; Jensen, Jan Skov; Scharling, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population and interventional studies have shown that high plasma-cholesterol is a risk factor of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, in most of the studies elderly people were excluded. AIM: This paper assesses whether the effect of total plasma-cholesterol on the risk of incident...

  6. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  7. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  8. A clinical model to identify patients with high-risk coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yelin; Chen, Li; Yam, Yeung; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Berman, Daniel S; Budoff, Matthew J; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor Y; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Karlsberg, Ronald P; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; LaBounty, Troy; Lin, Fay; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Min, James K; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2015-04-01

    This study sought to develop a clinical model that identifies patients with and without high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD). Although current clinical models help to estimate a patient's pre-test probability of obstructive CAD, they do not accurately identify those patients with and without high-risk coronary anatomy. Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected multinational coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) cohort was conducted. High-risk anatomy was defined as left main diameter stenosis ≥50%, 3-vessel disease with diameter stenosis ≥70%, or 2-vessel disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery. Using a cohort of 27,125, patients with a history of CAD, cardiac transplantation, and congenital heart disease were excluded. The model was derived from 24,251 consecutive patients in the derivation cohort and an additional 7,333 nonoverlapping patients in the validation cohort. The risk score consisted of 9 variables: age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, hyperlipidemia, family history of CAD, history of peripheral vascular disease, and chest pain symptoms. Patients were divided into 3 risk categories: low (≤7 points), intermediate (8 to 17 points) and high (≥18 points). The model was statistically robust with area under the curve of 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75 to 0.78) in the derivation cohort and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.69 to 0.74) in the validation cohort. Patients who scored ≤7 points had a low negative likelihood ratio (risk CAD was 1% in patients with ≤7 points and 16.7% in those with ≥18 points. We propose a scoring system, based on clinical variables, that can be used to identify patients at high and low pre-test probability of having high-risk CAD. Identification of these populations may detect those who may benefit from a trial of medical therapy and those who may benefit most from an invasive strategy. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  9. Risk stratification of periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention: Analysis based on the SCAI definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Yiping; Yin, Dong; He, Yuan; Chen, Changzhe; Song, Chenxi; Yan, Ruohua; Zhu, Chen'gang; Xu, Bo; Dou, Kefei

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the predictors of and generate a risk prediction method for periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using the new PMI definition proposed by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI). The SCAI-defined PMI was found to be associated with worse prognosis than the PMI diagnosed by other definitions. However, few large-sample studies have attempted to predict the risk of SCAI-defined PMI. A total of 3,371 patients (3,516 selective PCIs) were included in this single-center retrospective analysis. The diagnostic criteria for PMI were set according to the SCAI definition. All clinical characteristics, coronary angiography findings and PCI procedural factors were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of PMI. To evaluate the risk of PMI, a multivariable risk score (PMI score) was constructed with incremental weights attributed to each component variable according to their estimated coefficients. PMI occurred in 108 (3.1%) of all patients. Age, multivessel treatment, at least one bifurcation treatment and total treated lesion length were independent predictors of SCAI-defined PMI. PMI scores ranged from 0 to 20. The C-statistic of PMI score was 0.71 (95% confidence interval: 0.66-0.76). PMI rates increased significantly from 1.96% in the non-high-risk group (PMI score PMI score ≥ 10) (P PMI. The PMI score could help identify patients at high risk of PMI after PCI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Measurement of coronary calcium scores by electron beam computed tomography or exercise testing as initial diagnostic tool in low-risk patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geluk, Christiane A.; Perik, Patrick J.; Tio, Rene A.; Goette, Marco J.W.; Hillege, Hans L.; Zijlstra, Felix [University Medical Center Groningen, Thoraxcenter, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Dikkers, Riksta; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Houwers, Janneke B.; Willems, Tineke P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    We determined the efficiency of a screening protocol based on coronary calcium scores (CCS) compared with exercise testing in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), a normal ECG and troponin levels. Three-hundred-and-four patients were enrolled in a screening protocol including CCS by electron beam computed tomography (Agatston score), and exercise testing. Decision-making was based on CCS. When CCS{>=}400, coronary angiography (CAG) was recommended. When CCS<10, patients were discharged. Exercise tests were graded as positive, negative or nondiagnostic. The combined endpoint was defined as coronary event or obstructive CAD at CAG. During 12{+-}4 months, CCS{>=}400, 10-399 and <10 were found in 42, 103 and 159 patients and the combined endpoint occurred in 24 (57%), 14 (14%) and 0 patients (0%), respectively. In 22 patients (7%), myocardial perfusion scintigraphy was performed instead of exercise testing due to the inability to perform an exercise test. A positive, nondiagnostic and negative exercise test result was found in 37, 76 and 191 patients, and the combined endpoint occurred in 11 (30%), 15 (20%) and 12 patients (6%), respectively. Receiver-operator characteristics analysis showed that the area under the curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.93) for CCS was superior to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.61-0.78) for exercise testing (P<0.0001). In conclusion, measurement of CCS is an appropriate initial screening test in a well-defined low-risk population with suspected CAD. (orig.)

  11. Tribal-Focused Environmental Risk and Sustainability Tool (Tribal-FERST) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribal-Focused Environmental Risk and Sustainability Tool (Tribal- FERST) is a web-based geospatial decision support tool that will provide tribes with easy access to the best available human health and ecological science.

  12. AGE-Related Differences of Novel Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Angiographic Profile Among Gujarati Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Joshi, Hasit; Sahoo, Sibasis; Virpariya, Kapil; Parmar, Meena; Shah, Komal

    2015-06-01

    Although numerous risk factors have been established to predict the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the risk factor profile may be different between the younger and older individuals. To analyse the frequency and pattern of atherogenic risk factors and angiographic profiles in age-stratified Gujarati patients with ACS. ACS patients undergoing coronary angiography at U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research, Gujarat, India between January 2008 and December 2012 were classified in to two age groups with 40y as cut-off. Patients were assessed for conventional risk factors (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity), novel risk factors (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein (a), homocysteine), and angiographic profiles.The statistical difference between two age groups was determined by Student's t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. A total of 200 patients, 100 patients ≤40 y of age and 100 patients >40 y of age, were evaluated. Older patients had higher frequency of hypertension (32 vs. 16%, p=0.008), while family history of coronary artery disease was more common among younger patients (19 vs. 9%, p=0.041). The incidence of diabetes, dyslipidaemia, smoking and tobacco chewing did not vary significantly between the two groups. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the younger group (p<0.05). Lipoprotein (a), homocysteine and high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels were comparable between two age groups. Multi-vessel coronary artery disease was more common among older group. The most commonly affected coronary artery was the left anterior descending artery among younger patients (44%) and the left circumflex artery among older patients (38.1%). Young patients with ACS had different atherosclerotic risk profile and less extensive coronary artery disease as compared to older counterparts. Emphasis

  13. Facts and perceptions on the flood-risk evolution along the Po River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Carisi, Francesca; Castellarin, Attilio

    2014-05-01

    Has the flood risk increased in the Po river basin during the last half century? The increasing frequency with which floods damages are recorded, or reported by media, strengthen the common perception that the flood risk is dramatically increasing in Europe and other areas of the world, due to a combination of different causes, among which climate change is often described as the major factor. However, there is a growing awareness of how anthropogenic pressures, such as uncontrolled urban and industrial expansion on flood-prone areas, may strongly impact the evolution of flood-risk in a given area, increasing potential flood damages and losses. Starting from these considerations, our study aims at shedding some light on the impact and relative importance of different factors controlling the flood risk. Focusing in particular on the middle-lower portion of the River Po, we analyse the evolution of flood hazard in the last half century referring to long streamflow series for different gauging stations located along the study reach (~450 km), while the modification of anthropogenic pressure is evaluated by referring to land-use and demographic dynamics observed from 1950s. Our study proposes simplified flood-vulnerability indices to be used for large scale flood-risk assessments and, on the basis of these indices, (1) we assess the importance of the different elements contributing to the definition of flood risk and (2) represent the evolution of flood risk in time along the middle and lower portion of the River Po. The results of the study represent an important piece of information that can be particularly useful to decision-makers in the definition of large scale flood-risk mitigation strategies and development plans for the study area.

  14. Coronary Plaque Characterization in Psoriasis Reveals High-Risk Features That Improve After Treatment in a Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Joseph B; Joshi, Aditya A; Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Aberra, Tsion M; Dey, Amit K; Rodante, Justin A; Salahuddin, Taufiq; Chung, Jonathan H; Rana, Anshuma; Teague, Heather L; Wu, Jashin J; Playford, Martin P; Lockshin, Benjamin A; Chen, Marcus Y; Sandfort, Veit; Bluemke, David A; Mehta, Nehal N

    2017-07-18

    Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an accelerated risk of myocardial infarction, provides an ideal human model to study inflammatory atherogenesis in vivo. We hypothesized that the increased cardiovascular risk observed in psoriasis would be partially attributable to an elevated subclinical coronary artery disease burden composed of noncalcified plaques with high-risk features. However, inadequate efforts have been made to directly measure coronary artery disease in this vulnerable population. As such, we sought to compare total coronary plaque burden and noncalcified coronary plaque burden (NCB) and high-risk plaque (HRP) prevalence between patients with psoriasis (n=105), patients with hyperlipidemia eligible for statin therapy under National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (n=100) who were ≈10 years older, and healthy volunteers without psoriasis (n=25). Patients underwent coronary computed-tomography angiography for total coronary plaque burden and NCB quantification and HRP identification, defined as low attenuation (1.10), and spotty calcification. A consecutive sample of the first 50 patients with psoriasis was scanned again 1 year after therapy. Despite being younger and at lower traditional risk than patients with hyperlipidemia, patients with psoriasis had increased NCB (mean±SD: 1.18±0.33 versus 1.11±0.32, P=0.02) and similar HRP prevalence (P=0.58). Furthermore, compared to healthy volunteers, patients with psoriasis had increased total coronary plaque burden (1.22±0.31 versus 1.04±0.22, P=0.001), NCB (1.18±0.33 versus 1.03±0.21, P=0.004), and HRP prevalence beyond traditional risk (odds ratio, 6.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-31.7; P=0.03). Last, among patients with psoriasis followed for 1 year, improvement in psoriasis severity was associated with improvement in total coronary plaque burden (β=0.45, 0.23-0.67; Ppsoriasis had greater NCB and increased HRP prevalence than healthy

  15. Evaluation of clinical characteristics of Kawasaki syndrome and risk factors for coronary artery abnormalities among children in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amy; Holman, Robert C; Callinan, Laura S; Sreenivasan, Nandini; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Fischer, Thea K; Belay, Ermias D

    2013-04-01

    To examine clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of Kawasaki syndrome patients in Denmark. A retrospective chart review of hospitalization records for children Kawasaki syndrome discharge diagnosis identified through the Danish National Patient Registry during 1994 through June 2008 was conducted. A total of 284 cases Kawasaki syndrome (n = 279) and atypical Kawasaki syndrome (n = 5); 70.4% were Kawasaki syndrome patients were diagnosed with coronary artery abnormalities. Not receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment before the 10th day of illness, young age and male sex were significantly associated with the development of coronary artery abnormalities. In Denmark, more than one in 10 children with Kawasaki syndrome develop coronary artery abnormalities. Physicians should increase their index of suspicion for early diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki syndrome among patients susceptible to increased risk of coronary artery abnormalities, particularly in infants who may have a more atypical presentation of the illness. ©2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice ( ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  18. Structural Model of psychological risk and protective factors affecting on quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: A psychocardiology model

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Khayyam Nekouei; Alireza Yousefy; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Gholamreza Manshaee; Masoumeh Sadeghei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conducted researches show that psychological factors may have a very important role in the etiology, continuity and consequences of coronary heart diseases. This study has drawn the psychological risk and protective factors and their effects in patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD) in a structural model. It aims to determine the structural relations between psychological risk and protective factors with quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. Materials and M...

  19. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In manuscript named “Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus” by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study.

  20. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet; Ali; Eren; Tevfik; Sabuncu; Hüseyin; Karaaslan

    2016-01-01

    In manuscript named "Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus" by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/d L reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study.

  1. Acoustic detection of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmlow, John; Rahalkar, Ketaki

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the arteries to the heart (the coronary arteries) become blocked by deposition of plaque, depriving the heart of oxygen-bearing blood. This disease is arguably the most important fatal disease in industrialized countries, causing one-third to one-half of all deaths in persons between the ages of 35 and 64 in the United States. Despite the fact that early detection of CAD allows for successful and cost-effective treatment of the disease, only 20% of CAD cases are diagnosed prior to a heart attack. The development of a definitive, noninvasive test for detection of coronary blockages is one of the holy grails of diagnostic cardiology. One promising approach to detecting coronary blockages noninvasively is based on identifying acoustic signatures generated by turbulent blood flow through partially occluded coronary arteries. In fact, no other approach to the detection of CAD promises to be as inexpensive, simple to perform, and risk free as the acoustic-based approach. Although sounds associated with partially blocked arteries are easy to identify in more superficial vessels such as the carotids, sounds from coronary arteries are very faint and surrounded by noise such as the very loud valve sounds. To detect these very weak signals requires sophisticated signal processing techniques. This review describes the work that has been done in this area since the 1980s and discusses future directions that may fulfill the promise of the acoustic approach to detecting coronary artery disease.

  2. Association between arterial stiffness and risk of coronary artery disease in a community-based population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yun; Ye Ping; Luo Leiming; Bai Yongyi; Xu Ruyi; Xiao Wenkai; Liu Dejun

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is well known as an important risk factor for coronary artery disease.In this study,we aimed to investigate the association between carotid-ankle pulse wave velocity (caPWV) and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD),and the interaction between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and other potential risk factors of CAD.Methods A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted for subjects living in Beijing,China.We collected 213 subjects with coronary artery disease and 1 266 subjects without CAD between September 2007 and January 2009 in a community center of Beijing.A multivariate Logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess the odds ratios of factors related to CAD.Results We found CAD subjects were more likely to have a higher body massindex (BMI),fasting glucose,uric acid,low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol,high-sensitivity Creactive protein (hs-CRP),carotic-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and caPWV (P <0.05),and CAD subjects had a significantly lower HDL cholesterol levels (P <0.05).Moreover,the proportion of hypertension in CAD subjects was significantly higher than non-CAD subjects.The multiple Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension,higher uric acid,hs-CRP,cfPWV and caPWV levels significantly increased the risk of CAD,with ORs (Cl) of 1.47 (1.25-1.74),1.17 (1.01-1.26),1.35 (1.10-1.67),1.15 (1.09-1.19) and 1.07 (1.01-1.15),respectively.Higher HDL cholesterol was significantly associated with reduced risk of CAD,with ORs (CI) of 0.58 (0.40-0.83).In addition,cfPWV had significant association with age,hypertension,LDL cholesterol,with Pearson's coefficients of 0.166,0.074,and 0.030,respectively.Conclusions cfPWV and caPWV are independently associated with significant CAD,and cfPWV has significant correlation with age and hypertension.cfPWV and caPWV may be used as a practical tool for predicting the risk of CAD.

  3. Coronary heart disease: incidence, risk factors and interventions in Jiaozhou of Shandong province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hua; Li Dan; Chu Xianming; An Yi; Song Tongxun; Feng Huixin; Lin Peilin

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of heart disease and cause of heart attacks.This study investigated the epidemiological characteristics of CHD and its risk factors in Jiaozhou,Shandong province,to ultimately find a way of reducing the prevalence of cardiovascular disease,and to provide a theoretical basis for establishing a cardiovascular disease management path under the regional medical collaborative mechanism.Methods A questionnaire survey was performed including 1 952 people aged 35 years or older who were questioned by means of stratified,cluster,proportional sampling to investigate the prevalence of CHD and its risk factors.The data were inputted into SPSS11.0 statistical software for processing and analysis.We advised the local medical institutions to establish health files for the residents with CHD and risk factors.They were followed up regularly.Their risk factors and life-style were monitored,and advice was given as to proper medications.Green channels were established,and the patients were transmitted in a timely manner to superior hospitals for better treatment if the necessary treatments were not available in the local hospitals.The control of risk factors was observed after the follow-up for half a year.Results In Jiaozhou,the rates of coronary artery disease,hypertension,diabetes,hyperlipidemia and overweight were 8.15%,28.54%,11.43%,35.46%,and 18.70% respectively.The rates of hypertension,diabetes,hyperlipidemia and overweight were higher than the data published in "The report of Chinese cardiovascular disease 2012"; which are 24%,9.7%,18.6%,and 9.7%,respectively.The control of risk factors improved significantly after the guidance of the residents lifestyle and medication for six months.Conclusions The high prevalence of coronary artery disease in Jiaozhou is closely related to age,gender,diet structure,family history of cardiovascular disease

  4. Current status of coronary risk factors among rural Malays in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawawi, Hapizah M; Nor, Idris M; Noor, Ismail M; Karim, Norimah A; Arshad, Fatimah; Khan, Rahmattullah; Yusoff, Khalid

    2002-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in Malaysia, despite its status as a developing country. The rural population is thought to be at low risk. To investigate the prevalence of risk factors and global risk profile among rural Malays in Malaysia. We studied 609 rural Malay subjects (346 females, 263 males; age range 30-65 years). Blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), smoking habits and family history of premature CHD were documented. Fasting blood samples were analysed for serum lipids, lipoprotein (a), plasma glucose and fibrinogen. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed using 75 g anhydrous glucose. The prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia for total cholesterol concentrations of > or = 5.2, > or =6.5 and > or =7.8 mmol/l were 67.3, 30.5 and 11.8% respectively. There was a high prevalence of low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (13.1%), hypertension (30.3%), smokers (24.4%), diabetes (6.4%), impaired fasting glucose or glucose tolerance (13.9%), overweight or obesity (44.7%) and increased WHR (48.5%). Global risk assessment showed that 67.3% of the study population were at risk, with 15.9, 18.9 and 32.5% in the mild, moderate and high risk categories respectively. Prevalence of risk factors was high in the rural population. Global risk assessment showed a high-risk profile with two-thirds being at risk, and one-third being categorized into the high-risk group. Although rural communities were considered at low risk of developing CHD, this is changing fast, possibly due to the rapid socio-economic development, in addition to underlying genetic predisposition.

  5. GenousTM endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent vs. the Taxus Liberte stent in patients with de novo coronary lesions with a high-risk of coronary restenosis: a randomized, single-centre, pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Beijk; M. Klomp; N.J.W. Verouden; N. van Geloven; K.T. Koch; J.P.S. Henriques; J. Baan; M.M. Vis; E. Scheunhage; J.J. Piek; J.G.P. Tijssen; R.J. de Winter

    2010-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Genous(TM) endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent vs. the Taxus Liberté paclitaxel-eluting stent in patients with de novo coronary lesions with a high-risk of coronary restenosis. Methods and results We randomly assigned 193 patients with lesio

  6. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  7. [Knowledge of coronary heart disease risk factors among students of Warsaw universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Robert; Nowak, Agnieszka; Adamus, Jerzy

    2002-12-01

    Prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most effective way in fighting with epidemic of this illness in our country. Risk factors of CHD are divided into modifying and non-modifying. General knowledge of cardiac risk factors in young population is the most important point in prophylactic. Our aim was to elucidate knowledge of cardiovascular disease risk factors in students. We distributed a questionnaire to 544 students (264 women and 280 men) of 3 Universities in Warsaw in the middle age 22 +/- 0.79. The survey contained 22 answers: general risk factors (obesity--O, high cholesterol level--Ch, smoking--S. hypertension--HA, wrong diet--D, family history--F, life style--S, age--A, diabetes--DM, male--M, down limbs arteriosclerosis--DLA, myocardial infarction in family under 55 years old-MI) and wrong answers (allergic, female, mobile phone...). Data were taken under analyze. Right risk factors were mentioned by the following number of students: O--92%, Ch--89%, S--85%, HA--75.8%, D--71%, F--65.2%, DM--50.4%, M--49.3%. DLA--36.9%, MI--36.0%. General knowledge of modifying cardiac risk factors, not including diabetes, is high among polish students. However, the knowledge is poor about non-modifying factors, like gender, age, early MI in family. The results of our study let us hope that the students will correctly use their knowledge to reduce risk of CHD in their families.

  8. Family history: impact on coronary heart disease risk assessment beyond guideline-defined factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanaj, Q; Wilson, B J; Little, J; Montazeri, Z; Carroll, J C

    2013-01-01

    Family history (FH) provides insights into the effects of shared genomic susceptibilities, environments and behaviors, making it a potentially valuable risk assessment tool for chronic diseases. We assessed whether coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment is improved when FH information is added to other clinical information recommended in guidelines. We applied logistic regression analyses to cross-sectional data originally obtained from a UK study of women who delivered a live-born infant between 1951 and 1970. We developed 3 models: Model 1 included only the covariates in a guideline applicable to the population, Model 2 added FH to Model 1, and Model 3 included a fuller range of risk factors. For each model, its ability to discriminate between study subjects with and those without CHD was evaluated and its impact on risk classification examined using the net reclassification index. FH was an independent risk factor for CHD (odds ratio = 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-2.47) and improved discrimination beyond guideline-defined clinical factors (p risk factor for CHD, it added little to risk factors typically included in guidelines. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Risk profile of coronary heart disease among the staff members of Qassim University, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohair, Sultan A. L.; Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman A. L.; Sharaf, Fawzy; Naeem, Zahid; Midhet, Farid; Homaidan, Homaidan A. L.; Winter, Sandra J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the risk profile of coronary heart disease (CHD) among the staff members of Qassim University and assess their knowledge in a screening campaign in Qassim region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among male and female staff at Qassim University campus. All employees of Qassim University were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. The study sample size was 233 staff and employees. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 18. The data analysis focused on providing point estimates for the risk factors. Results: The study found that 30% of participants have one or more risk factors for CHD, namely obesity 20.6%, diabetes 10.3%, hypertension 12.4%, dyslipidemia 10.7%, and smokers (11.6%). About 54% of the participants have a family history of at least one chronic disease as a risk factor for CHD. Conclusion: The most common risk factor of CHD among the staff members is obesity by 20.6%. Risk factors for CHD are quite common among Qassim University staff. These findings need to increase the health education and disease promotion program as an important intervention to reduce the occurrence and severity of CHD risk factors and to improve the quality of the life of the staff members of Qassim University.

  10. Identification of women's coronary heart disease and risk factors prior to first myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C; Jacobsen, Steven J; Fryer, George E; Roger, Veronique L

    2004-12-01

    To understand when women's coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD risk factors are recognized prior to first myocardial infarction (MI). Medical record review of the 10 years prior to incident MI among women with a confirmed incident MI between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2001, to determine the timing of CHD diagnosis as well as assessment and treatment for risk factors. One hundred fifty women had incident MIs during the study period. They made 8732 ambulatory visits and had 457 hospitalizations during the period of review (mean 9.1 years, range 6.2-10 years). Average age at incident MI was 74.7 years (SD 12.6, range 38.9-99.8 years). A CHD diagnosis prior to first MI was present in 52% (n = 78) of the women but was less common in those <70 years (p = 0.001). All but 3 women had one or more modifiable risk factors identified prior to their first MI. Treatment of recognized risk factors varied from 81% (antihypertension medications) to only 28% (drug therapy for abnormal lipid levels). Having a diagnosis of CHD was associated with an increased likelihood of having identified risk factors and receiving drug treatment for identified risk factors. Women with undiagnosed CHD (48%) and those with unrecognized or untreated risk factors for CHD, especially younger women, represent missed opportunities for prevention of cardiac events.

  11. The Prevalence and Awareness of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Southern Chinese Population with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Xinrui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiometabolic risk factors significantly accelerate the progression of coronary artery disease (CAD; however, whether CAD patients in South China are aware of the prevalence of these risk factors is not clear yet. Methods. The study consisted of 2312 in-admission CAD patients from 2008 to 2011 in South China. Disease history including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes was relied on patients' self-reported records. Physical and clinical examinations were tested to assess the real prevalence of the cardiometabolic risk factors. Results. 57.9% of CAD patients had more than 3 cardiometabolic risk factors in terms of the metabolic syndrome. The self-known and real prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were 56.6%, 28.3%, and 25.1% and 91.3%, 40.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. The awareness rates were 64.4%, 66.3%, and 28.5% for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. The prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors was significantly different among gender and among disease status. Conclusions. Most CAD patients in South China had more than three cardiometabolic risk factors. However, the awareness rate of cardiometabolic diseases was low, especially for dyslipidemia. Strategies of routine physical examination programs are needed for the early detection and treatment of cardiometabolic risk factors in order to prevent CAD progression and prognosis.

  12. Gender Differences in Coronary Artery Disease: Correlational Study on Dietary Pattern and Known Cardiovascular Risk Factors

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    Mahdi Najafi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relationship between diet and cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD has been the subject of recent studies. We studied a group of Iranian CAD patients to analyze any relationship between diet and CAD risk factors based on gender. Methods: In this study, 461 consecutive patients were assessed before their planned isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. They were interviewed to obtain the quantity and components of nutrients and micronutrients based on a validated food frequency questionnaire. Diet scores were calculated in each dietary group and the total score was reported as the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (Med-DQI. Physical activity was assessed using International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. Functional class, EuroSCORE and the frequency of the known risk factors in the men and women were recorded as well. Results: The women were more likely than the men to present with obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension (all Ps < 0.001. Also, the women had higher functional class and mean of EuroSCORE (P < 0.001 and P = 0.03. Only six women (5.7% reported to have regular physical activity. In addition, Women’s energy intake was more likely to be supplied through fat. Cereals, fruit, and vegetable consumption in both genders was within the safe recommended range, while olive and fish consumption was low in both sexes. MedDQI score was different between men and women with hypertension (P = 0.018 and obesity (P = 0.048. Conclusions: Modifiable classical risk factors for CAD, except for smoking, were more prevalent in women and were associated with their diet. Therefore, women probably need to maintain low calorie intake while improving physical activity and dietary patterns to decrease the frequency and severity of modifiable cardiac risk factors.

  13. Bone mineral density and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alissa, Eman M; Alnahdi, Wafa A; Alama, Nabil; Ferns, Gordon A

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that osteoporosis and coronary artery disease (CAD) have overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms and related risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between several traditional cardiovascular risk factors and measures of bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with and without clinically significant CAD defined angiographically. A case-control study was undertaken of 180 postmenopausal women (aged between 48 and 88 years) who were recruited from King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Study subjects underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and coronary angiography. The presence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, smoking and physical activity was identified from clinical examination and history. Demographic, anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were measured. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to explore the relationships between cardiovascular risk factors, including BMD, and the presence of CAD. CAD patients were more likely to have a lower BMD and T-score at the femoral neck than those without CAD (P<0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups for fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose and anthropometric measures (P<0.05). Conditional logistic regression showed that 3 risk factors were significantly related with the presence of CAD: high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (odds ratio, OR: 0.226, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.062-0.826), fasting plasma glucose (OR: 1.154, 95% CI: 1.042-1.278) and femoral neck T-score (OR: 0.545, 95% CI: 0.374-0.794). This study suggests an association of low BMD and elevated CAD risk. Nevertheless, additional longitudinal studies are needed to determine the temporal sequence of this association.

  14. Association of ABO Blood Types With Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Number of Involved Coronary Arteries

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    Golmohammadi Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. The relationship between ABO blood groups and main risk factors of CVD is unknown. So this study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between ABO blood groups and cardiovascular risk factors in otherwise healthy people. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, risk factors for CVD were screened in 300 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD who were hospitalized in Madani hospital (biggest heart center in Tabriz in 2013-2014 and evaluated by a questionnaire that aimed to extract information about age, sex, smoking, blood group type, weight, height, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and family history of CVD. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17. Results: Of the total selected 300 patients, 69.3% were male, 35.3% were smoker, 61% were hypertensive, 30.3% were diabetic mellitus, 31% had hyperlipidemia, 70.97% were obese and 17.3% had family history of CVD. The mean age was 62.06 ± 11.40 years. Blood groups O (28%, A (43.3%, B (19% and AB (7.3% were the most frequent ones, respectively. According to our results, we found that the rate of CAD in individuals with the blood group A was higher than the other blood groups. Regarding the risk factors, however, no significant difference was observed between the blood groups. Conclusion: A correlation was found between blood group A and the incidence of CAD and there was no significant difference between the blood groups and cardiovascular risk factors and number of involved coronary arteries.

  15. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Choi, Hyunrim; Won, Chang Won; Kim, Byung-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m(2) and 23.3 kg/m(2) for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults.

  16. Behavioral, emotional and neurobiological determinants of coronary heart disease risk in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Viola; Bremner, J Douglas

    2017-03-01

    Women have more of the stress-related behavioral profile that has been linked to cardiovascular disease than men. For example, women double the rates of stress-related mental disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than men, and have higher rates of exposure to adversity early in life. This profile may increase women's long-term risk of cardiometabolic conditions linked to stress, especially coronary heart disease (CHD). In addition to having a higher prevalence of psychosocial stressors, women may be more vulnerable to the adverse effects of these stressors on CHD, perhaps through altered neurobiological physiology. Emerging data suggest that young women are disproportionally susceptible to the adverse effects of stress on the risk of cardiovascular disease, both in terms of initiating the disease as well as worsening the prognosis in women who have already exhibited symptoms of the disease. Women's potential vulnerability to psychosocial stress could also help explain their higher propensity toward abnormal coronary vasomotion and microvascular disease compared with men.

  17. Predicting the risk of bleeding during dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, Joakim; Neely, Benjamin; Neely, Megan L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Goodman, Shaun G; Tricoci, Pierluigi; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Cornel, Jan H; White, Harvey D; Fox, Keith Aa; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Winters, Kenneth J; Armstrong, Paul W; Ohman, E Magnus; Roe, Matthew T

    2017-08-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin + a P2Y12 inhibitor is recommended for at least 12 months for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with shorter durations considered for patients with increased bleeding risk. However, there are no decision support tools available to predict an individual patient's bleeding risk during DAPT treatment in the post-ACS setting. To develop a longitudinal bleeding risk prediction model, we analy sed 9240 patients with unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRILOGY ACS) trial, who were managed without revasculari sation and treated with DAPT for a median of 14.8 months. We identified 10 significant baseline predictors of non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO) severe/life-threatening/moderate bleeding: age, sex, weight, NSTEMI (vs unstable angina), angiography performed before randomi sation, prior peptic ulcer disease, creatinine, systolic blood pressure, haemoglobin and treatment with beta-blocker. The five significant baseline predictors of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major or minor bleeding included age, sex, angiography performed before randomi sation, creatinine and haemoglobin. The models showed good predictive accuracy with Therneau's C-indices: 0.78 (SE = 0.024) for the GUSTO model and 0.67 (SE = 0.023) for the TIMI model. Internal validation with bootstrapping gave similar C-indices of 0.77 and 0.65, respectively. External validation demonstrated an attenuated C-index for the GUSTO model (0.69) but not the TIMI model (0.68). Longitudinal bleeding risks during treatment with DAPT in patients with ACS can be reliably predicted using selected baseline characteristics. The TRILOGY ACS bleeding models can inform risk -benefit considerations regarding the duration of DAPT following

  18. Cardiovascular risk among stable individuals suspected of having coronary artery disease with no modifiable risk factors: Results from an international multicenter study of 5262 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Leipsic (Jonathon); C.W. Taylor (Carolyn); G. Grunau (Gilat); J. Heilbron (Johan); G.B.J. Mancini (John); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); A. Delago (Augustin); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To assess the prevalence, extent, severity, and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients suspected of having CAD but with no medically modifiable risk factors. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval or waiver of consent was obtained at each center. T

  19. Cardiovascular risk among stable individuals suspected of having coronary artery disease with no modifiable risk factors: Results from an international multicenter study of 5262 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Leipsic (Jonathon); C.W. Taylor (Carolyn); G. Grunau (Gilat); J. Heilbron (Johan); G.B.J. Mancini (John); S. Achenbach (Stephan); M. Al-Mallah (Mouaz); D.S. Berman (Daniel); M.J. Budoff (Matthew); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); T.Q. Callister (Tracy); H.-J. Chang (Hyuk-Jae); V.Y. Cheng (Victor); K. Chinnaiyan (Kavitha); B.J.W. Chow (Benjamin); A. Delago (Augustin); M. Hadamitzky (Martin); R.C. Cury (Ricardo); G.M. Feuchtner (Gudrun); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); P.A. Kaufmann (Philipp); F.Y. Lin (Fay); E. Maffei (Erica); G.L. Raff (Gilbert); L.J. Shaw (Leslee); T.C. Villines (Todd); J.K. Min (James)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To assess the prevalence, extent, severity, and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients suspected of having CAD but with no medically modifiable risk factors. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval or waiver of consent was obtained at each center. T

  20. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S.T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; Bacquer, D. de; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G.A.; Hamer, M.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.; Jöckel, K.H.; Kittel, F.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Lunau, T.; Madsen, I.E.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pejtersen, J.H.; Pentti, J.; Rugulies, R.; Salo, P.; Shipley, M.J.; Siegrist, J.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.B.; Theorell, T.; Vahtera, J.; Westerholm, P.J.M.; O'Reilly, D.; Kumari, M.; Batty, G.D.; Ferrie, J.E.; Virtanen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods: We identified

  1. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B;

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL......-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss......-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from...

  2. Hormone replacement therapy and risk for coronary heart disease. Data from the CORA-study--a case-control study on women with incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Eberhard; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Eidenmüller, Britta; Boeing, Heiner

    2007-07-20

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been suggested to prevent cardiovascular disease, while some intervention studies have shed doubt on this concept. Thus, uncertainty remains whether current HRT use is beneficial as to cardiovascular disease or may even be harmful. This research investigates the association of hormone replacement therapy, risk factors and lifestyle characteristics with the manifestation of coronary heart disease in current HRT users versus never users. The coronary risk factors for atherosclerosis in women study (CORA-study) provide clinical and biochemical parameters and data on lifestyle in 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident coronary heart disease compared to 255 age-matched population-based controls, of which 87.9% were postmenopausal. Significantly more controls than cases used currently HRT for a median of 9.5 years (32.9% versus 20.2%), while 50.0% of cases and 42.5% of controls had never used HRT (pCORA-study are not compatible with an adverse impact of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular disease, rather support the notion of beneficial effects of HRT on weight, central adiposity, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Yet, the data do not support the presumption of a general healthy user effect in women on HRT either. Rather, in some women adverse lifestyle habits, especially intense smoking, appear to counteract possible beneficial effects of HRT.

  3. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Danish...... the other groups. During follow up (median 1051 d, IQR 384-1938), we found that MI-alone patients had greater risk of adverse outcomes in the acute setting (first 90 d); however, the PAD-only and PAD + MI groups had higher long-term mortality at 7 years than those with MI alone (47.8 and 60.4 vs. 36.......62-1.80, respectively), and composite of death, MI, and ischaemic stroke, 95% CI HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.36-1.42; and HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.61-1.75, respectively). The greater long-term risks of PAD were seen for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Both women and men with incident PAD have greater long-term risks of total...

  4. Sex differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease: a study in a Brazilian population

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    Oliveira Helena CF

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Brazil coronary heart disease (CHD constitutes the most important cause of death in both sexes in all the regions of the country and interestingly, the difference between the sexes in the CHD mortality rates is one of the smallest in the world because of high rates among women. Since a question has been raised about whether or how the incidence of several CHD risk factors differs between the sexes in Brazil the prevalence of various risk factors for CHD such as high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, sedentary lifestyle and cigarette smoking was compared between the sexes in a Brazilian population; also the relationships between blood cholesterol and the other risk factors were evaluated. Results The population presented high frequencies of all the risk factors evaluated. High blood cholesterol (CHOL and hypertension were more prevalent among women as compared to men. Hypertension, diabetes and smoking showed equal or higher prevalence in women in pre-menopausal ages as compared to men. Obesity and physical inactivity were equally prevalent in both sexes respectively in the postmenopausal age group and at all ages. CHOL was associated with BMI, sex, age, hypertension and physical inactivity. Conclusions In this population the high prevalence of the CHD risk factors indicated that there is an urgent need for its control; the higher or equal prevalences of several risk factors in women could in part explain the high rates of mortality from CHD in females as compared to males.

  5. Cancerogenesis Risks between 64 and 320 Row Detector CT for Coronary CTA Screening

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    Atif N Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study compares cancerogenesis risks posed by the 64 row detector and the 320 row detector computed tomography scanners used during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA following decennial screening guidelines. Material and Methods: Data of the radiation absorbed after CCTA by lung, thyroid, and female breast in patients between 50 and 70 years of age obtained from prior published literature for the 64 row CT scanner were compared with data from our study using 320 row detector CT scanner. Data from the 64 row and the 320 row detector CT scanners was used to determine lifetime attributable risks (LAR of cancer based on the biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR VII report. Results: The relative reduction of LAR (% for 50-, 60-, and 70-year-old patients undergoing scanning with the 320 row detector CT scanner was 30% lower for lung, and more than 50% lower for female breast when compared with results from 64 row detector CT scanner. The use of 320 row detector CT would result in a combined cumulative cancer incidence of less than 1/500 for breast in women and less than 1/1000 for lung in men; By comparison, this is much lower than other more common risk factors: 16-fold for lung cancer in persistent smokers, 2-fold for breast cancer with a first degree family member history of breast cancer, and 10-fold for thyroid cancer with a family member with thyroid cancer. Decennial screening would benefit at least 355,000 patients from sudden cardiac death each year, 94% of whom have significant coronary artery disease, with at least one stenosis >75%. LAR for thyroid cancer was negligible for both scanners. Conclusion: Lung and female breast LAR reductions with 320 row detector compared with 64 row detector CT are substantial, and the benefits would outweigh increased cancer risks with decennial screening in the age group of 50-70 years.

  6. Increased Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis: A Nationwide Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Tse; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chung, Wei-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation may promote development of coronary heart disease. Studies on the relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and cardiovascular diseases are scant.We conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study to determine the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with CP.We randomly selected a comparison cohort of individuals without CP from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (N = 23.74 million) and frequency-matched them with patients with CP from 2000 to 2010 in a 1:4 ratio according to age, sex, and index year. The follow-up period lasted from the index date of the new CP diagnosis to the date of ACS diagnosis, censoring, or the end of 2011. We analyzed the risk of ACS by using Cox proportional-hazard models.In total, 17,405 patients with CP and 69,620 individuals without CP were followed for 84,430 and 417,426 person-years. Most patients with CP were men, and the mean age of the patients was 48.3 ± 15.0 years. The overall ACS incidence was 2.15-fold higher in the CP cohort than in the non-CP cohort (4.89 vs 2.28 per 10,000 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-1.64). Compared with individuals without CP, patients with CP aged ≤39 years exhibited the highest risk of ACS (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.13-4.02), followed by those aged 40 to 54 years (aHR 1.66, 95% CI 1.23-2.24) and those aged 55 to 69 years (aHR 1.53, 95% CI 1.15-2.03).CP may become an independent risk factor for ACS.

  7. [Aortic valve calcification prevalence and association with coronary risk factors and atherosclerosis in Mexican population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Valerio, Jorge; Rodas-Díaz, Marco A; Macias-Garrido, Enrico; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Juárez-Rojas, Juan G; Medina-Urrutia, Aida X; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo C; Joge-Galarza, Esteban; Torres-Tamayo, Margarita; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Posadas-Romero, Carlos

    The prevalence of aortic valve calcification (AVC), strongly influenced by ethnicity, is unknown in Mexican population. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of AVC and its associations with cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC), in Mexican subjects. In 1,267 subjects (53% women) without known coronary heart disease, aged 35 to 75 years, AVC and CAC were assessed by multidetector-computed tomography using the Agatston score. Cardiovascular risk factors were documented in all participants. The associations of AVC with CAC and risk factors were assessed by multivariable logistic regression analyses. The overall prevalence of AVC and CAC was 19.89% and 26.5%, respectively. AVC and CAC increased with age and were found more frequently in men (25.5% and 37.1%, respectively) than in women (14.9% and 13.0%, respectively). AVC was observed in only 8.5% of subjects without CAC, while those with CAC 1-99, 100-399, and >400 Agatston units had AVC prevalences of 36.8%, 56.8%, and 84.0%, respectively. The multivariable logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age, gender, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and high insulin levels, showed that the presence of CAC (OR [CI95%]: 3.23 [2.26-4.60]), obesity (1.94 [1.35-2.79]), male gender (1.44 [1.01-2.05]) and age (1.08 [1.03-1.10]), were significant independent predictors of AVC. Prevalence of AVC is high and significantly associated with atherosclerotic risk factors and CAC in this Mexican population. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis Is a Strong Predictor of High-Risk Coronary-Artery Plaques as Determined by Multidetector CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Osawa

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with a risk of coronary artery disease (e.g., diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome. We evaluated whether nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis is associated with high-risk plaques as assessed by multidetector computed tomography (CT.This retrospective study involved 414 participants suspected of having coronary artery disease. Nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was defined as a liver-to-spleen fat ratio of <1.0 and the presence and appropriate characteristics of coronary-artery plaques as assessed by coronary CT angiography. High-risk plaques were identified, as were low-density plaques, positive remodeling, and spotty calcification.Compared with patients who did not have nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis had more low-density plaques (21% vs. 44%, p<0.01, positive remodeling (41% vs. 58%, p = 0.01, and spotty calcification (12% vs. 36%, p<0.01. The number of high-risk plaques in patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was greater than in those without nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis (p<0.01. Patients with nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis were more likely to have high-risk plaques than were those with only an elevated level of visceral adipose tissue (≥86 cm2; 35% vs. 16%, p<0.01. Multivariate analyses that included nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, amount of visceral adipose tissue, and the presence/absence of traditional risk factors demonstrated that nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis was an independent predictor of high-risk plaques (odds ratio: 4.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.94-9.07, p<0.01.Diagnosis of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis may be of value when assessing the risk of coronary artery disease.

  9. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, risk of coronary heart disease, and L-thyroxine treatment: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yen-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a retrospective cohort analysis. The cohort study consisted of 1165 newly diagnosed HT patients and 4660 matched controls (non-HT patients) from 2000 to 2010. The median follow-up time was 5.46 years. The risk of developing CHD for HT patients was measured using the Cox proportional hazards model. The risk of developing CHD in HT patients was increased compared with the non-HT controls, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.99). The risk was significant in women but not in men, and restricted to subjects younger than 49 years. HT remained an independent risk factor after adjusting for comorbidities; however, combining with hypertension or hyperlipidemia further increased the risk of CHD (adjusted HR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.46-2.92; and adjusted HR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.31-2.55, respectively). Furthermore, HT without T4 treatment and HT with treatment for less than 1 year were associated with higher risk of CHD (adjusted HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 0.98-2.46; and adjusted HR = 2.42, 95% CI = 1.43-3.97, respectively). The risk of CHD decreased after treatment with T4 for more than 1 year and did not differ from the non-HT cohort (adjusted HR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.0.47-1.52). Patients with HT, are at higher risk of developing CHD compared with the general population. Treatment with T4 reduces the risk of CHD.

  10. Parallel comparison of risk factors between progression of organic stenosis in the coronary arteries and onset of acute coronary syndrome by covariance structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuo; Minai, Kosuke; Kawai, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Ogawa, Takayuki; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that progression of organic stenosis in the coronary arteries and onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are similar in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the extent of the association of each risk factor with the respective pathological conditions has not been fully elucidated. We investigated the differences in risk factors between these conditions using a statistical procedure. The study population consisted of 1,029 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). We divided the study population into two groups (ACS and non-ACS) and by diseased vessels (organic stenosis). Covariance structure analysis was simultaneously performed in one equation model for determination and comparison of the risk factors for organic stenosis and ACS. The analysis revealed that age (standardized regression coefficient, β: 0.206, P stenosis. HDL level (β: 0100, P = 0.002) and MDA-LDL level (β: 0.335, P stenosis than ACS, while MDA-LDL was significantly more strongly associated with ACS than organic stenosis. The current statistical analysis revealed clear differences among the risk factors between the progression of organic stenosis and the onset of ACS. Among them, the MDA-LDL level should be considered to indicate a substantial risk of ACS.

  11. [Incidence and risk factors of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yali; Ma, Zhengliang; Shi, Hongwei; Zhao, Yamei; Gu, Xiaoping; Wei, Haiyan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the incidence rate and the risk factors for postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. A total of 147 patients underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery between January to July 2013 were included in this study. POCD was diagnosed using a neuropsychological test battery. All enrolled patients were interviewed on the day before surgery, the seventh day and 3 months after surgery, respectively, by the same researcher, and were divided into two groups based on the results: the POCD group and the non-POCD group. The information, including age, sex, body mass index, educational status, comorbidities, history of smoking and drinking, ASA grade, left ventricular ejection fraction, operation method, duration of operations, regional cerebral oxygen saturation, the lowest haemoglobin concentrations and the haemoglobin concentration decline rate during the operation, tracheal catheter retention time, postoperative pain on visual analogue scales (VAS) and systemic inflammatory response syndrome score (SIRS score), were recorded based on a schedule of survey. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors for POCD. A total of 101 patients finished this study. On 7 days and 3 months after surgery, 38 and 21 cases showed POCD, with an incidence rate at 37.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in incidence of POCD between CABG and OPCABG group on both 7 days and 3 months after surgery (P>0.05). The logistic stepwise regression analysis indicated that the risk factors for POCD included advanced age (OR=1.177, 95%CI 1.071-1.292, P=0.001), the haemoglobin concentration decline rate (OR=1.334, 95%CI 1.152-1.545, PSIRS score (OR=2.815, 95%CI 1.014-7.818, P=0.047). The incidence rate of POCD was 37.6% and 20.8% on 7 days and 3 months after surgery respectively. Advanced age, the haemoglobin concentration decline rate and

  12. Detection of Altered Risk Factors in Hospitalized Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avany Fernandes Pereira

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary variables considered risk factors for coronary artery disease. METHODS: Using anthropometrics, dietary allowance, and blood biochemistry, we assessed 84 patients [54 males (mean age of 55± 8 years and 30 females (mean age of 57±7 years], who had severe ( > or = 70% coronary artery obstruction and nonsevere forms of coronary artery disease determined by cardiac catheterization. The severe form of the disease prevailed in 70% of the males and 64% of the females, and a high frequency of familial antecedents (92% ' 88% and history of acute myocardial infarction (80% ' 70% were observed. Smoking predominated among males (65% and diabetes mellitus among females (43%. RESULTS: Males and females had body mass index and body fat above the normal values. Females with nonsevere lesions had HDL > 35 mg/dL, and this constituted a discriminating intergroup indicator. Regardless of the severity of the disease, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia were found among females, and cholesterolemia > 200 mg/dL in both sexes, but only males had LDL fraction > 160 mg/dL and homocysteine > 11.7 mmol/L. The male dietary allowance was inadequate in nutrients for homocysteine metabolism and in nutrients with an antioxidant action, such as the vitamins B6, C, and folate. Individuals of both sexes had a higher lipid and cholesterol intake and an inadequate consumption of fiber. The diet was classified as high-protein, high-fat, and low-carbohydrate. CONCLUSION: The alterations found had no association with the severity of lesions, indicating the need for more effective nutritional intervention.

  13. Is Mitral Annular Calcification Associated With Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Severity and Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Hemal; Sanghani, Dharmesh; Julliard, Kell; Fernaine, George

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the association of mitral annular calcification (MAC) with atherosclerotic risk factors and severity and complexity of coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac catheterization reports and electronic medical records from 2010 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 481 patients were divided into 2 groups: MAC present (209) and MAC absent (272). All major cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, and coronary lesion characteristics were included. On linear regression analysis, age (P = .001, β 1.12) and female gender (P = .031, β 0.50) were the independent predictors of MAC. Mitral annular calcification was not independently associated with the presence of lesions with >70% stenosis (P = .283), number of obstructive vessels (P = .469), lesions with 50% to 70% stenosis (P = .458), and Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery score (P = .479). Mitral annular calcification is probably a benign marker of age-related degenerative changes in the heart independent of the severity and complexity of CAD.

  14. Stable angina pectoris with no obstructive coronary artery disease is associated with increased risks of major adverse cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lasse; Hvelplund, Anders; Abildstrøm, Steen Z

    2012-01-01

    AimsPatients with chest pain and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are considered at low risk for cardiovascular events but evidence supporting this is scarce. We investigated the prognostic implications of stable angina pectoris in relation to the presence and degree of CAD...... with no obstructive CAD in focus.Methods and resultsWe identified 11 223 patients referred for coronary angiography (CAG) in 1998-2009 with stable angina pectoris as indication and 5705 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study for comparison. Main outcome measures were major adverse cardiovascular events.......ConclusionPatients with stable angina and normal coronary arteries or diffuse non-obstructive CAD have elevated risks of MACE and all-cause mortality compared with a reference population without ischaemic heart disease....

  15. Long term gluten consumption in adults without celiac disease and risk of coronary heart disease: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Cao, Yin; Zong, Geng; Hu, Frank B; Green, Peter H R; Neugut, Alfred I; Rimm, Eric B; Sampson, Laura; Dougherty, Lauren W; Giovannucci, Edward; Willett, Walter C; Sun, Qi; Chan, Andrew T

    2017-05-02

    Objective To examine the association of long term intake of gluten with the development of incident coronary heart disease.Design Prospective cohort study.Setting and participants 64 714 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 45 303 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study without a history of coronary heart disease who completed a 131 item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire in 1986 that was updated every four years through 2010.Exposure Consumption of gluten, estimated from food frequency questionnaires.Main outcome measure Development of coronary heart disease (fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction).Results During 26 years of follow-up encompassing 2 273 931 person years, 2431 women and 4098 men developed coronary heart disease. Compared with participants in the lowest fifth of gluten intake, who had a coronary heart disease incidence rate of 352 per 100 000 person years, those in the highest fifth had a rate of 277 events per 100 000 person years, leading to an unadjusted rate difference of 75 (95% confidence interval 51 to 98) fewer cases of coronary heart disease per 100 000 person years. After adjustment for known risk factors, participants in the highest fifth of estimated gluten intake had a multivariable hazard ratio for coronary heart disease of 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.02; P for trend=0.29). After additional adjustment for intake of whole grains (leaving the remaining variance of gluten corresponding to refined grains), the multivariate hazard ratio was 1.00 (0.92 to 1.09; P for trend=0.77). In contrast, after additional adjustment for intake of refined grains (leaving the variance of gluten intake correlating with whole grain intake), estimated gluten consumption was associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (multivariate hazard ratio 0.85, 0.77 to 0.93; P for trend=0.002).Conclusion Long term dietary intake of gluten was not associated with risk of coronary heart disease. However, the

  16. Cost-effectiveness of coronary artery calcium testing for coronary heart and cardiovascular disease risk prediction to guide statin allocation: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric T; Horne, Aaron; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Blankstein, Ron; Budoff, Matthew J; Sibley, Christopher; Polak, Joseph F; Frick, Kevin D; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) showed that the addition of coronary artery calcium (CAC) to traditional risk factors improves risk classification, particularly in intermediate risk asymptomatic patients with LDL cholesterol levels statin. Treatment based on CAC was compared to (1) treatment of all intermediate-risk patients, and (2) treatment on the basis of United States guidelines. We developed a Markov model of first coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. We modeled statin treatment in intermediate risk patients with CAC≥1 and CAC≥100, with different intensities of statins based on the CAC score. We compared these CAC-based treatment strategies to a "treat all" strategy and to treatment according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines. Clinical and economic outcomes were modeled over both five- and ten-year time horizons. Outcomes consisted of CHD and CVD events and Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Sensitivity analyses considered the effect of higher event rates, different CAC and statin costs, indirect costs, and re-scanning patients with incidentalomas. We project that it is both cost-saving and more effective to scan intermediate-risk patients for CAC and to treat those with CAC≥1, compared to treatment based on established risk-assessment guidelines. Treating patients with CAC≥100 is also preferred to existing guidelines when we account for statin side effects and the disutility of statin use. Compared to the alternatives we assessed, CAC testing is both effective and cost saving as a risk-stratification tool, particularly if there are adverse effects of long-term statin use. CAC may enable providers to better tailor preventive therapy to patients' risks of CVD.

  17. LINE-1 Hypomethylation is Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Chinese Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Li [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Liu, Shuchuan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Su, Zhendong; Cheng, Rongchao; Bai, Xiuping; Li, Xueqi, E-mail: xueqi-li@163.com [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)

    2014-05-15

    Global methylation level in blood leukocyte DNA has been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with inconsistent results in various populations. Similar data are lacking in Chinese population where different genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors may affect DNA methylation and its risk relationship with CHD. To examine whether global methylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. A total of 334 cases with CHD and 788 healthy controls were included. Global methylation in blood leukocyte DNA was estimated by analyzing LINE-1 repeats using bisulfite pyrosequencing. In an initial analysis restricted to control subjects, LINE-1 level reduced significantly with aging, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes. In the case-control analysis, reduced LINE-1 methylation was associated with increased risk of CHD; analysis by quartile revealed odds ratios (95%CI) of 0.9 (0.6-1.4), 1.9 (1.3-2.9) and 2.3 (1.6-3.5) for the third, second and first (lowest) quartile (P{sub trend} < 0.001), respectively, compared to the fourth (highest) quartile. Lower (risk of CHD. The lower LINE-1-related CHD risk estimates tended to be stronger among subjects with the highest tertile of homocysteine (P{sub interaction} = 0.042) and those with diagnosis of hypertension (P{sub interaction} = 0.012). LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. Potential CHD risk factors such as older age, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes may have impact on global DNA methylation, whereby exerting their effect on CHD risk.

  18. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  19. Risk stratification scores for predicting mortality in coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretti, R; Pannek, N; Knecht, J-P; Krabatsch, T; Hübler, S; Hetzer, R

    2002-08-01

    Four risk-stratification scores (RSSs - Euro, French, CCS/Higgins, Parsonnet) were tested as predictors of mortality in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. From March to April 2000, the perioperative courses of 245 consecutive CABG patients were compared to the predictions according to the RSSs. Sensitivity and specificity were determined with receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. CCS/Higgins uses the most easily acquired patient data, and rates emergency conditions as high-risk. Euro focuses on advanced age and septal rupture. French uses the smallest number of patient parameters and rates rare critical situations as high-risk. Parsonnet is partially based on the physician's subjective assessment of a "catastrophic state," making the scoring arbitrary. All RSSs gave similar (not significant) areas under the ROC curves regarding mortality (Euro 0.826 +/- 0.080, French 0.783 +/- 0.094, CCS/Higgins 0.820 +/- 0.060, Parsonnet 0.831 +/- 0.042). Predicted risk levels for the 11 patients who died differed between the RSSs--Higgins placed these patients in 3 of 5 risk levels with ascending distribution. The other RSSs placed these patients in the highest risk level except for one and two patients, respectively, who were placed in the lowest Euro and French risk level. Euro and Parsonnet placed about half of all patients with non-lethal outcome in the highest risk level. All RSSs satisfactorily estimated the group risk for mortality. No RSS expressed sufficient validity to predict individuals with lethal outcome. In clinical use, CCS/Higgins proved the most practicable.

  20. Risk factors for decreased cardiac output after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Eduarda Ribeiro; Lopes, Camila Takao; Maria, Vera Lucia Regina; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2017-04-01

    No previous study has investigated the predictive risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study aimed to identify the predictive risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after CABG. This was a prospective cohort study performed at a cardiac university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil and 257 adult patients undergoing CABG were included. Potential risk factors for low cardiac output in the immediate post-operative period were investigated using the patients' medical records. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to identify the predictive risk factors of decreased cardiac output. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated as a measure of accuracy. The variables that could not be analysed through logistic regression were analysed through Fisher's exact test. One hundred and ninety-five patients had low cardiac output in the immediate post-operative period. The predictive risk factors included age ⩾60 years, decreased left ventricle ejection fraction, not using the radial artery graft, positive fluid balance and post-operative arrhythmia that differed from the pre-operative arrhythmia. This model predicted the outcome with a sensitivity of 62.9%, a specificity of 87.2% and an accuracy of 81.5%. The variables analysed through Fisher's exact test included heart failure, re-exploration and bleeding-related re-exploration. The predictive risk factors for the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after CABG were found. These results can be used to direct nurses in patient monitoring, staff training and nursing team staffing.

  1. Analysis of risk factors of coronary heart disease%冠心病的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付丽莉; 刘芳; 韩晓燕; 李敦彤

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析探究冠心病的危险因素。方法随机选取2011年2月至2013年2月来我院救治的冠心病患者34例,根据临床特征及冠状动脉造影检查,分析冠心病患者的危险因素。结果被选取的34例患者中13例体重指数严重超标,17例有严重吸烟史,9例合并高血压,6例合并糖尿病。结论超重及肥胖是冠心病的主要潜在危险因素,高血压是冠心病的独立因素,冠心病的危险性与血糖水平相关。了解冠心病和动脉粥样硬化危险因素,对于进行危险因素的干预治疗,尤其是进行有效的血脂异常的防治具有非常重要的意义。%Objective to analyze the risk factors of coronary heart disease. Methods 34 patients with coronary heart disease admitted in our hospital were randomly selected from february 2011 to february 2013. according to the clinical characteristics and coronary angiography in patients with coronary heart disease, risk factors were analyzed. Results of 34 cases selected, 13 patients performed with body mass index severely exceeding the standard, 17 cases with serious smoking history, 9 cases with hypertension, 6 patients with diabetes mellitus. Conclusion overweight and obesity are the main potential risk factors for coronary heart disease and hypertension is an independent factor for coronary heart disease, and coronary heart disease risk is associated with blood glucose levels. Understanding the risk factors for coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis and given therapeutic intervention for risk factors, especially has very important signiifcance for effective prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia.

  2. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts A- A A+ Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts An estimated 6 million people in the United ... Brain Warning Signs/ Symptoms Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Risk Factors Aneurysm Complications Types ...

  3. Posttraumatic stress and myocardial infarction risk perceptions in hospitalized acute coronary syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald eEdmondson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS; i.e., myocardial infarction or unstable angina recurrence and poor post-ACS adherence to medical advice. Since risk perceptions are a primary motivator of adherence behaviors, we assessed the relationship of probable PTSD to ACS risk perceptions in hospitalized ACS patients (n= 420. Participants completed a brief PTSD screen 3-7 days post-ACS, and rated their 1-year ACS recurrence risk relative to other men or women their age. Most participants exhibited optimistic bias (mean recurrence risk estimate between average and below average. Further, participants who screened positive for current PTSD (n=15 showed significantly greater optimistic bias than those who screened negative (p< .05, after adjustment for demographics, ACS severity, medical comorbidities, depression, and self-confidence in their ability to control their heart disease. Clinicians should be aware that psychosocial factors, and PTSD in particular, may be associated with poor adherence to medical advice due to exaggerated optimistic bias in recurrence risk perceptions.

  4. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-01-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiologic studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P<5×10−8 for each) to examine the role of triglycerides on risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides, and show that the direction and magnitude of both are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong magnitude of association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a polymorphism's strength of effect on triglycerides is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD. PMID:24097064

  5. Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, Maria; Cornelis, Marilyn; Walter, Stefan; Rimm, Eric B; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2017-06-09

    Higher social integration is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality; however, whether it is associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women, and whether associations differ by case fatality are unclear. This study sought to examine the associations between social integration and risk of incident CHD in a large female prospective cohort. Seventy-six thousand three hundred and sixty-two women in the Nurses' Health Study, free of CHD and stroke at baseline (1992), were followed until 2014. Social integration was assessed by a simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index every 4 years. End points included nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD. Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two incident CHD events occurred throughout follow-up. Adjusting for demographic, health/medical risk factors, and depressive symptoms, being socially integrated was significantly associated with lower CHD risk, particularly fatal CHD. The most socially integrated women had a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.73) of developing fatal CHD compared with those least socially integrated (P for trend social integration and nonfatal myocardial infarction risk were largely explained by health-promoting behaviors, particularly through differences in cigarette smoking; however, the association with fatal CHD risk remained after accounting for these behaviors and, thus, may involve more direct biological mechanisms. Social integration is inversely associated with CHD incidence in women, but is largely explained by lifestyle/behavioral pathways. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ron; Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Gao, Chi; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Altshuler, David; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2013-11-01

    Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphism's effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.

  7. Beyond the SYNTAX score--advantages and limitations of other risk assessment systems in left main percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodanno, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification is an emerging topic in the modern management of patients with left main disease referred for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Recent years have witnessed an explosive multiplication of risk models for prognostic stratification in complex PCI. Many of this models deal with modification of the angiographic SYNTAX score, or seek to overcome its known pitfalls and limitations, including lack of clinical and functional information, inter- and intra-observer variabilities, and poor calibration. Risk scoring systems beyond the SYNTAX score may be classified into angiographic (residual SYNTAX score, coronary artery bypass grafting SYNTAX score), clinical (EuroSCORE I and II, ACEF score and modified ACEF scores), combined clinical and angiographic (Global Risk Classification, Clinical SYNTAX score, logistic Clinical SYNTAX score, SYNTAX score II) and functional (Functional SYNTAX score). This article reviews current concepts in risk modeling and explores the advantages and limitations of the alternatives to the SYNTAX score in patients undergoing left main PCI. 

  8. Kale Juice Improves Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors in Hypercjlolesterolemiic Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SOO YEON KIM; SUN YOON; SOO MI KWON; KYE SOOK PARK; YANG CHA LEE-KIM

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of 3-month kale(Brassica oleracea acephala)iuice supplementation on coronary artery disease risk factors among hypercholesterolemic men.Methods Thkty-two men with hypercholesterolemia (>200 mg/dL)were recruited after annual health examinations among the faculty and staff at university.The subijects consumed 150 mL of kale iuice per day for a 12-week intervention period.Dietary and anthropomeu-ic assessments were performed and blood samples were collected to evaluate biochemical profdes before and after supplementation.Results Serum concentrations of HDL-cholesterol,and HDL-to LDL-cholesterol ratio were significantly increased by 27%(P<0.0001)and 52%(P<0.0001),respectively.The LDL-cholesterol concentration and the atherogenic index were significantly reduced by 1O%(P=0.O007)and 24.2%(P<0.0001),respectively without affecting body mass index,waist and hip circumferences,or nutrient intakes after three months of supplementation.While there was no difference in the concentration of malondialdehvde,significant increase in glutathione peroxidase activity(P=0.0005)were accompanied by a significant increase in the serom selenium level(P=0.0132).It was also foand that the responses of these risk factors to kale inice administration were dependent on smoking status.Conelusion Regular meals supplementation with kale juice can favorably influence serum lipid profiles and antioxidant systems.and hence contribute to reduce the risks of coronary artery disease in male subjects with hyperlipidemia.

  9. Significance of adiponectin in the risk of coronary lesions in patients with impaired glucose regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄珊

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of impaired glucose regulation and adiponectin(APN) with the clinical severity of coronary lesions. Methods A total of 210 cases of suspected coronary heart disease were examined

  10. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David;

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  11. Increased risk for intracranial arterial stenosis in subjects with coronary artery calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyung-Geun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is considered an important cause of stroke in Asians. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a surrogate marker for subclinical atherosclerosis. We aimed to analyze the association of ICAS assessed by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and CAC in middle-aged Korean population. This study included 10 550 participants (81.3% men, mean age 43 years) from a health screening program, in whom transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was used to detect >50% intracranial stenosis based on criteria modified from the stroke outcomes and neuroimaging of intracranial atherosclerosis trial. Multidetector computed tomography was used to assess coronary artery calcium score (CACS). CAC grade (0, 1-100, and >100) was defined by CACS. The subjects with CAC showed significantly higher proportion of subjects with ICAS compared with those without CAC (4.4% versus 2.8%; P400 compared with those with CACS=0 (odds ratio, 2.754; 95% confidence interval, 1.205-2.936). The risk for ICAS was significantly increased in middle-aged Korean subjects with CAC compared with that in those without CAC. These findings suggest the possibility of a separate undetected atherosclerotic focus in subjects with 1 atherosclerotic event. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. C-reactive protein as a risk factor for acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨胜利; 何秉贤; 何作云; 张华; 何学兰; 张伟

    2002-01-01

    Objective We assessed thelevels of C-reactive protein ( CRP ) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) [including unstable angina pectoris (UAP), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) ] compared with non-ACS [including stable angina pectoris (SAP), old myocardial infarction (OMI) and healthy volunteers] and sought to test whether CRP are associated with clinical acute coronary syndrome. Methods Ultrasensitive immunoassay (rate nephelometry with the Beckman Array multitest immunoassay system) wasused to measure CRP levels in 91 patients with ACS(20 UAP, 71 AMI including 2 SCD) and non-ACS (34SAP, 25 patients with healing phase of AMI, 41 OMI and 94 control healthy subjects) Results CRP levels were higher in ACS group (18.50 + 23.98 mg/L [ SE 2.51, n = 91 ] ) compared with non - ACS group (3.89+7.14mg/L[SE0.51, n=194]) (P <0.01).Using Logistic Regression, CRP was a potent determinant of ACS ( OR = 1.65) Conclusion These results suggest that CRP has a strong association with ACS, and CRP is a risk factor of ACS.

  13. The Association between Androgenic Hormone Levels and the Risk of Developing Coronary Artery Disease (CAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allameh, Farzad; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Bozorgi, Ali; Nekuie, Sepideh; Namdari, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the serum levels of androgens and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) in an Iranian population. Male individuals admitted to Tehran Heart Center and Sina Hospital, Tehran, Iran from 2011-2012 were categorized into CAD and control groups based on selective coronary angiography. Baseline demographic data, including age, BMI, diabetes, and a history of hypertension were recorded. Patients were also assessed for their serum levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepi and rosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG). Data analysis was carried out chi-square and ANOVA tests as well as logistic regression analysis. Two hundred patients were in the CAD group and 135 individuals in control group. In the CAD group, 69 had single-vessel disease, 49 had two-vessel diseases, and 82 had three-vessel diseases. Statistically significant differences were observed between the individuals in the two groups with respect to age (PCAD group; however, the serum level of SHBG was higher in the CAD group than in the control group (P=0.007). Results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that only age (P=0.042) and diabetes (P=0.003) had significant relationships with CAD. Although the serum levels of some of the androgens were significantly different between the two groups, no association was found between androgenic hormone levels and the risk of CAD, due mainly to the effect of age and diabetes.

  14. Intimate relationships, individual adjustment, and coronary heart disease: Implications of overlapping associations in psychosocial risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy W; Baucom, Brian R W

    2017-09-01

    Being married or involved in a similar intimate relationship is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the quality of these relationships matters, as strain and disruption are associated with increased risk. These effects are typically studied separately from well-established psychosocial factors for CHD that are aspects of personality and emotional adjustment, even though discord and disruption in intimate relationships are related to these same individual characteristics. Thus, research to date tends to parse correlated risks, often taking a piecemeal approach by focusing on intimate relationships without considering aspects of personality and emotional adjustment that contribute to risk and protection, or focusing on individual-level risks while largely ignoring closely related health-relevant relationships. As an alternative, this article describes an integrative approach, first reviewing associations of the quality of intimate relationships with personality characteristics and aspects of emotional adjustment that confer CHD risk, and then discussing conceptual models of these associations and the biobehavioral mechanisms linking them with CHD. Current approaches to couple interventions are then discussed, including those that have a combined focus on intimate relationship difficulties and emotional adjustment. An integrative agenda for future research emphasizes aggregated risks, combining concepts and methods in current relationship science with those in biobehavioral research on CHD, and including parallel disparities in relationship functioning, emotional adjustment, and CHD risk. Such efforts could ultimately inform empirically based assessments and interventions for interrelated aspects of individuals and their intimate relationships that influence the development and course of CHD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Rothhaar, Baerbel, E-mail: baerbel.rothhaar@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Metzger, Franz, E-mail: franz.metzger@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin, E-mail: martin.borggrefe@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  16. Analysis of relationship between severity of coronary artery disease and coronary artery disease risk factors%冠状动脉病变程度与冠心病危险因素的相关分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恒宾

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨冠心病患者冠状动脉病变的严重程度与冠心病危险因素的关系。方法选择冠心病患者116例为冠心病组,选择冠状动脉样硬化狭窄程度<50%的患者66例为对照组。分析冠状动脉狭窄程度与冠心病危险因素的关系。结果多因素分析结果显示,LVEF、Ccr与冠状动脉粥样硬化程度呈负相关,而hs-CRP与冠状动脉粥样硬化程度呈正相关(P<0.05或P<0.01)。结论冠状动脉狭窄程度与LVEF、Ccr呈负相关,与hs-CRP呈正相关。%Objective To analyze relationship between severity of coronary artery disease and coronary artery disease risk factors. Methods 116 cases with coronary artery disease were selected as group of coronary artery disease, and 66 cases with coronary artery sclerosis stenosis degree < 50% were selected as control group. Relationship between severity of coronary artery disease and coronary artery disease risk factors was analyzed. Results Multifactor analysis results showed LVEF and Ccr were negative correlation with severity of coronary artery disease,and hs-CRP was positive correlation with severity of coronary artery disease(P < 0.05 orP < 0.01). Conclusion LVEF and Ccr are negative correlation with severity of coronary artery disease,and hs-CRP is positive correlation with severity of coronary artery disease.

  17. Risk factors of coronary heart disease among medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Mahnashi, Morooj; Al-Dhaheri, Amal; Al-Zahrani, Borooj; Al-Wadie, Ebtihal; Aljabri, Mydaa; Al-Shanketi, Rajaa; Al-Shehri, Rawiah; Al-Sayes, Fatin M; Bashawri, Jamil

    2014-04-28

    Nowadays, Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) represents an escalating worldwide public health problem. Providing consistent data on the magnitude and risk factors of CVDs among young population will help in controlling the risks and avoiding their consequences. The objective was to estimate the prevalence of risk factors of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) among medical students during their clinical clerkship (4th - 6th years). A cross-sectional study was done during the educational year 2012-2013 at King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah. Ethical standards were followed and a multistage stratified random sample method was used for selection of 214 medical students. Data was collected through an interviewing questionnaire, measurements and laboratory investigations. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were done by SPSS version 21. CHD risk percent in thirty years was calculated using Framingham algorithm for each student, then the risk among all students was determined. The commonest risk factors of CHDs were daily intake of high fat diet (73.4%), physical inactivity (57.9%), overweight/or obesity (31.2%) and daily consumption of fast food (13.1%). Hyper-cholesterolemia (17.2%) and hypertension (9.3%) were also prevalent risk factors. Smoking prevalence was low (2.8%). Males had significantly higher mean scores for most of CHD risk factors compared to females (p < 0.05). Systolic Blood pressure was higher among males (119.47 ± 11.17) compared to females (112.26 ± 9.06). A highly statistical significant difference was present (Students't test = 4.74, p < 0.001). Framingham Risk Score revealed that CHD risk percent in thirty-years among all students was 10.7%, 2.3% and 0.5% for mild, moderate and severe risk, respectively. An alarmingly high prevalence of CHD risk factors was prevailed among medical students, especially among males. However, a low prevalence of smoking may indicate the success of "Smoke-free Campus" program. Screening risk

  18. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and 10-year Risk for Coronary Heart Disease in Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunjoo Boo, RN, PhD

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent in Korean women, and the combination of risk factors is common. Development and implementation of multifaceted nursing interventions are required to confront the current epidemic rise of CHD in Korean women.

  19. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease : Contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (< 15th percentile) and

  20. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease: contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (<15th percentile)

  1. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease : Contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (< 15th percentile) and

  2. Pre-diabetes and the risk of contrast induced nephropathy in patients undergoing coronary angiography or percutaneous intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, L.; Verdoia, M.; Schaffer, A.; Cassetti, E.; Giovine, G. Di; Marino, P.; Suryapranata, H.; Luca, G. De

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is a complication of coronary angiography/percutaneous intervention (PCI). It is known that diabetes is an independent risk factor for CIN, but we have no data regarding the association between CIN and glycemic levels in patients without diabetes. Aim

  3. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  4. Dietary Patterns Predict Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Risk In Postmenopausal Women : The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Evidence suggests that dietary patterns predispose to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship between dietary patterns and CHD risk was assessed in postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). Methods: Case-co...

  5. Association of cholesteryl ester transfer protein genotypes with CETP mass and activity, lipid levels, and coronary risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Alexander; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Sarwar, Nadeem; Erqou, Sebhat; Saleheen, Danish; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Keavney, Bernard; Ye, Zheng; Danesh, John

    2008-01-01

    Context The importance of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) pathway in coronary disease is uncertain. Study of CETP genotypes can help better understand the relevance of this pathway to lipid metabolism and disease risk. Objective To assess associations of CETP genotypes with CETP

  6. Use of fluorquinolones is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Klungel, OH; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate whether use of specific antibiotic drugs decreases the risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising pharmacy records and

  7. Regular physical activity in old age : effect on coronary heart disease risk factors and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, A.J.

    1997-01-01


    Background. Regular physical activity is considered an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle. It may improve fitness, physical competence and may lower the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, until now, data on the

  8. Family history and the risk of sudden cardiac death as a manifestation of an acute coronary event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Kari S; Kortelainen, Marja-Leena; Linna, Eeva; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2006-10-03

    Observational studies have suggested that a parental history of sudden death increases one's risk of dying suddenly. This study tested the hypothesis that a family history of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a risk factor for SCD caused by an acute coronary event. A retrospective case-control study included (1) consecutive victims of SCD (n=138) whose deaths were verified to be due to an acute coronary event without a history of prior myocardial infarction at medicolegal autopsy, (2) consecutive patients surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI; n=254), and (3) healthy control subjects (n=470). Family history of AMI and SCD among the first-degree relatives was ascertained in each study group. The incidence of SCD in the 1223 first-degree relatives of SCD victims was higher (5.2%) than that in the 2326 relatives of AMI survivors (3.3%; odds ration [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 2.2, Phistory of SCD in 2 or more first-degree relatives was also higher (10.9%) among SCD victims than among AMI survivors (3.5%; OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 7.8, Phistory of AMI did not differ between the SCD and AMI groups. Male gender and current smoking were the only coronary risk factors that were more prevalent among SCD victims than among AMI survivors (Phistory of SCD have an increased risk of dying suddenly during an acute coronary event.

  9. Co-occurrence of metabolic factors and the risk of coronary heart disease: A prospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, A.H.; Erkens, P.M.G.; Boer, J.M.A.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background -Prevalence of metabolic factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, HDL and total cholesterol that are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is increasing worldwide. However, less is known about combinations of these factors that are associated with the h

  10. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examinati...

  11. Association of cholesteryl ester transfer protein genotypes with CETP mass and activity, lipid levels, and coronary risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Alexander; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Sarwar, Nadeem; Erqou, Sebhat; Saleheen, Danish; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Keavney, Bernard; Ye, Zheng; Danesh, John

    2008-01-01

    Context The importance of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) pathway in coronary disease is uncertain. Study of CETP genotypes can help better understand the relevance of this pathway to lipid metabolism and disease risk. Objective To assess associations of CETP genotypes with CETP phenot

  12. Literature-based genetic risk scores for coronary heart disease : the Cardiovascular Registry Maastricht (CAREMA) Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaathorst, A.A.; Lu Yingchang (Kevin), Y.; Heijmans, B.T.; Dolle, M.E.; Bohringer, S.; Putter, de H.; Imholz, S.; Merry, A.H.; Greevenbroek, M.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.; Muller, M.R.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Slagboom, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background-Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD risk factors (RF). Using a case-cohort study within the prospective Cardiovascular Registry Maastricht (CAREMA) cohort, we tested if genet

  13. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  14. MODIFIED CLASSIC RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN CHINESE HAN POPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-bin Cui; Joseph B Muhlestein; Sheng-huang Wang; Dong-qi Wang; Chang-cong Cui; Xin-yi Chen; Xiao-min Chen; Zheng Zhang; Hong-kao Zhang; Feng Bai

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the levels of cardiovascular disease risk factors and their relations to clinical phenotype associated with coronary artery disease (CAD).Methods The subjects were recruited from five independent cardiovascular centers. Coronary angiography was employed to define the CAD with stenosis in each major vessel ≥70% and control with stenosis < 10% in every lesion.The classic risk factors including family history, body mass index, smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and serum lipid levels were surveyed according to established criteria. Associations between risk levels and clinical phenotypes were assessed by case control and correlation analysis.Results A total of 762 individuals were collected, including 481 men and 281 women, aged from 17 to 81 (mean 60 ± 10) years. The patients with CAD accounted for 55.5% of all participants, and controls 44. 5%, respectively. Compared with the pattern in published data, our study showed that mean serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)level was significantly lower (P <0. 001 ) and triglycerides was significantly higher (P <0. 001 ), while total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were comparative ( both P > 0. 05 ). The prevalence of low HDL-C ( <40 g/L) and hypertriglyceridemia ( > 150 g/L) were 27. 2% and 41.4%, respectively. Mean serum levels of HDL-C and apolipoprotein A1 were significantly higher in female subjects than in male ( P < 0. 001 ). Lower HDL-C functioned as an independent risk factor for CAD only in men (RR = 2. 8, 95% CI: 1.5-4. 2, P < 0. 001 ), yet increased non-HDL cholesterol combined with diabetes mellitus and obesity seemed to play a key role in the development of CAD in women. Similarity in risk association with CAD was found for hypertension and TC/HDL ratio in male and female subjects, while family history had no relationship with the presence of CAD.Conclusion It is remarkable that emphasis of intervention in future

  15. Characterising and predicting bleeding in high-risk patients with an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razi; Lopes, Renato D; Neely, Megan L; Stevens, Susanna R; Harrington, Robert A; Diaz, Rafael; Cools, Frank; Jansky, Petr; Montalescot, Gilles; Atar, Dan; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Flather, Marcus; Liaw, Danny; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H; Goodman, Shaun G

    2015-09-01

    In the Apixaban for Prevention of Acute Ischemic Events (APPRAISE-2) trial, the use of apixaban, when compared with placebo, in high-risk patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS) resulted in a significant increase in bleeding without a reduction in ischaemic events. The aim of this analysis was to provide further description of these bleeding events and to determine the baseline characteristics associated with bleeding in high-risk post-ACS patients. APPRAISE-2 was a multinational clinical trial including 7392 high-risk patients with a recent ACS randomised to apixaban (5 mg twice daily) or placebo. Bleeding including Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major or minor bleeding, International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding, and any bleeding were analysed using an on-treatment analysis. Kaplan-Meier curves were plotted to describe the timing of bleeding, and a Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify predictors of ISTH major or CRNM bleeding and any bleeding. Median follow-up was 241 days. The proportion of patients who experienced TIMI major or minor, ISTH major or CRNM, and any bleeding was 1.5%, 2.2% and 13.3%, respectively. The incidence of bleeding was highest in the immediate post-ACS period (0.11 in the first 30 days vs 0.03 after 30 days events per 1 patient-year); however, >60% of major bleeding events occurred >30 days after the end of the index hospitalisation. Gastrointestinal bleeding was the most common cause of major bleeding, accounting for 45.9% of TIMI major or minor and 39.5% of ISTH major or CRNM bleeding events. Independent predictors of ISTH major or CRNM bleeding events included older age, renal dysfunction, dual oral antiplatelet therapy, smoking history, increased white cell count and coronary revascularisation. When compared with placebo, the use of apixaban is associated with an important short-term and long-term risk of bleeding

  16. Dietary Patterns, Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Adults: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Shu, Long; Si, Cai-Juan; Yu, Xiao-Long; Liao, Dan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Zheng, Pei-Fen

    2015-08-07

    Previous studies reported the potential associations between dietary patterns and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adulthood, however a consistent perspective has not been established to date. Herein, we carried out this meta-analysis to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of CHD. MEDLINE and EBSCO were searched for relevant articles published up to April 2015. A total of 35 articles (reporting 37 original studies) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present meta-analysis. The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD.

  17. The Impact of Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease on Related Disability in Older Irish Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruise, Sharon M; Hughes, John; Bennett, Kathleen; Kouvonen, Anne; Kee, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD)-related disability (hereafter also "disability") and the impact of CHD risk factors on disability in older adults in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI). Population attributable fractions were calculated using risk factor relative risks and disability prevalence derived from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing and the Northern Ireland Health Survey. Disability was significantly lower in ROI (4.1% vs. 8.8%). Smoking and diabetes prevalence rates, and the fraction of disability that could be attributed to smoking (ROI: 6.6%; NI: 6.1%), obesity (ROI: 13.8%; NI: 11.3%), and diabetes (ROI: 6.2%; NI: 7.2%), were comparable in both countries. Physical inactivity (31.3% vs. 54.8%) and depression (10.2% vs. 17.6%) were lower in ROI. Disability attributable to depression (ROI: 16.3%; NI: 25.2%) and physical inactivity (ROI: 27.5%; NI: 39.9%) was lower in ROI. Country-specific similarities and differences in the prevalence of disability and associated risk factors will inform public health and social care policy in both countries.

  18. Prevalence of coronary artery disease risk factors in Iran: a population based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafarzadeh Motlag A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability with high health care cost in Iran. It accounts for nearly 50 percent of all deaths per year. Yet little is known about CAD and CAD risk factors in the Iranian population. We aimed to assess the prevalence of different CAD risk factors in an Iranian population. Methods A descriptive cross sectional survey was conducted involving 3000 healthy adults at 18 years of age or above who were recruited with cluster random sampling. Demographic data and risk factors were determined by taking history, physical examination and laboratory tests. Results The average age was 36.23 ± 15.26. There was 1381 female (46% and 1619 male (54% out of which 6.3% were diabetic, 21.6% were smoker, and 15% had positive familial heart disease history. 61% had total cholesterol level > 200 mg/dL, 32% triglyceride > 200 mg/dl, 47.5% LDL-c > 130 mg/dl, 5.4% HDL-c 140 mmHg, 9.1% diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg and 87% of them were physically inactive. Conclusion Clinical and Para-clinical data indicated that Iranian adult population are of a high level of CAD risk factors, which may require urgent decision making to address national control measures regarding CAD.

  19. Body mass index and myocardium at risk in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrebola-Moreno, A L; Marfil-Alvarez, R; Catena, A; García-Retamero, R; Arrebola, J P; Melgares-Moreno, R; Ramirez-Hernández, J A; Kaski, J C

    2014-04-01

    Whilst traditional studies have shown that obese individuals are at a higher risk of cardiovascular events compared to lean subjects, recent studies in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have suggested that obesity may exert protective effects (the "obesity paradox"). We sought to assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the BARI score (BARIsc), a validated tool used to assess myocardium at risk, in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Participants were 116 consecutive patients (mean age, 60.6 years; 97 men) with AMI (68 ST elevated myocardial infarction, STEMI; 48 non-ST elevated myocardial infarction, NSTEMI). Demographics, BMI, risk factors, biochemistry data, left ventricular function, angiographic data and the BARIsc were assessed in every patient. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that BMI significantly correlated with BARIsc; β=.23, p<0.02. This was found only in the overweight/obese patients, β=.27, p<0.01, but not in patients with normal BMIs, β=0.08, p=0.71. An increased body weight is associated with an increased area of myocardium at risk in patients with ACS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating the Framingham hypertension risk prediction model in young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, April P; Lewis, Cora E; Jacobs, David R; Peralta, Carmen A; Steffen, Lyn M; Bower, Julie K; Person, Sharina D; Muntner, Paul

    2013-12-01

    A prediction model was developed in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) to evaluate the short-term risk of hypertension. Our goal was to determine the predictive ability of the FHS hypertension model in a cohort of young adults advancing into middle age and compare it with the predictive ability of prehypertension and individual components of the FHS model. We studied 4388 participants, aged 18 to 30 years without hypertension at baseline, enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study, who participated in 2 consecutive examinations occurring 5 years apart between the baseline (1985-1986) and year 25 examination (2010-2011). Weibull regression was used to assess the association of the FHS model overall, individual components of the FHS model, and prehypertension with incident hypertension. During the 25-year follow-up period, 1179 participants developed incident hypertension. The FHS hypertension model (c-index=0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.85) performed well in discriminating those who did and did not develop hypertension and was better than prehypertension alone (c-index=0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.73). The predicted risk from the FHS hypertension model was systematically lower than the observed hypertension incidence initially (χ(2)=249.4; Padults with a high risk for developing hypertension.

  1. Malaria Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Malaria in ... to determine definitively which species are involved. Other Facts Five times, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or ...

  2. Organ Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Organ Facts Here you can find valuable information about organs ... Camps for kids Contacting my donor family Data Facts about living donation Financing a transplant Matching organs ...

  3. Kidney Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Kidney Facts The kidneys are a pair of reddish-brown ... Camps for kids Contacting my donor family Data Facts about living donation Financing a transplant Matching organs ...

  4. Liver Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Facts How the Liver Works The liver is one ... Camps for kids Contacting my donor family Data Facts about living donation Financing a transplant Matching organs ...

  5. Variant ASGR1 Associated with a Reduced Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nioi, Paul; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    2016-01-01

    codon that renders a truncated protein prone to degradation. Heterozygous carriers of the mutation (1 in 120 persons in our study population) had a lower level of non-HDL cholesterol than noncarriers, a difference of 15.3 mg per deciliter (0.40 mmol per liter) (P=1.0×10(-16)), and a lower risk...... of coronary artery disease (by 34%; 95% confidence interval, 21 to 45; P=4.0×10(-6)). In a larger set of sequenced samples from Icelanders, we found another loss-of-function ASGR1 variant (p.W158X, carried by 1 in 1850 persons) that was also associated with lower levels of non-HDL cholesterol (P=1...

  6. Preoperative hemostatic testing and the risk of postoperative bleeding in coronary artery bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Johansson, Pär I; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to assess predictability of excessive bleeding using thrombelastography (TEG), multiplate impedance aggregometry, and conventional coagulation tests including fibrinogen in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. METHODS: A total of 170 patients were...... enrolled in this prospective observational study. TEG, Multiplate aggregometry, and coagulation tests were sampled on the day before surgery. Excessive bleeding was defined as >1000 mL over 18 hours. RESULTS: Multiplate-adenosine diphosphate (ADP) measurements were significantly lower in patients...... impedance aggregometry identified patients at risk for excessive bleeding after CABG. Low fibrinogen levels were associated with increased bleeding. Neither routine TEG parameters nor conventional coagulation tests were correlated with bleeding....

  7. Childhood intelligence in relation to adult coronary heart disease and stroke risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G David; Mortensen, Erik L; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    is unknown. We investigated the relation of childhood intelligence with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk in a cohort of 6910 men born in 1953 in the Copenhagen area of Denmark. Events were ascertained from 1978 to 2000 using a cause-of-death register and hospital discharge records. There were 150...... CHD (19 fatal; 131 non-fatal) and 93 stroke (4 fatal; 89 non-fatal) events during follow-up into mid-life. Childhood intelligence was inversely related to CHD with the highest rate apparent in adults with low childhood test scores (HR(lowest vs. highest quartile), 2.70; 95% confidence interval: 1......While recent studies have reported an inverse relation between childhood intelligence test scores and all-cause mortality in later life, the link with disease-specific outcomes has been rarely examined. Furthermore, the potential confounding effect of birthweight and childhood social circumstances...

  8. Risk prediction models for major adverse cardiac event (MACE) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, Norhafizah A.; Abidin, Basir

    2015-02-01

    Five percent of patients who went through Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) experienced Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) after PCI procedure. Risk prediction of MACE following a PCI procedure therefore is helpful. This work describes a review of such prediction models currently in use. Literature search was done on PubMed and SCOPUS database. Thirty literatures were found but only 4 studies were chosen based on the data used, design, and outcome of the study. Particular emphasis was given and commented on the study design, population, sample size, modeling method, predictors, outcomes, discrimination and calibration of the model. All the models had acceptable discrimination ability (C-statistics >0.7) and good calibration (Hosmer-Lameshow P-value >0.05). Most common model used was multivariate logistic regression and most popular predictor was age.

  9. Coronary heart disease and associated risk factors in Qazvin: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrzadeh, H; Bandarian, F; Adibi, H; Samavat, T; Malekafzali, H; Hodjatzadeh, E; Larijani, B

    2008-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran, 846 residents (425 men and 421 women) aged > or = 25 years were assessed for coronary heart disease and its associated risk factors comparing ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of possible myocardial infarction, ischaemic ECG changes and angina pectoris were 4.2%, 36.8% and 2.2% respectively. There was no difference in the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index between ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. There was a significant association between possible myocardial infarction and hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and smoking in women. There was also a significant association between ischaemic ECG changes and waist-hip ratio in women and between ischaemic ECG changes and hypertension in men.

  10. Genetically Driven Hyperglycemia Increases Risk of Coronary Artery Disease Separately From Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Jordi; Leong, Aaron; Posner, Daniel C; Porneala, Bianca; Masana, Lluís; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C

    2017-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that genetically raised hyperglycemia increases coronary artery disease (CAD) risk separately from the risk conferred by type 2 diabetes as a whole. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis using summary-level statistics from the largest published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) (n = 133,010 participants free of diabetes) and CAD (n = 63,746 case subjects and 130,681 control subjects) of predominantly European ancestry. FG-increasing variants associated with type 2 diabetes from the largest GWAS for type 2 diabetes were excluded. Variants with pleiotropic effects on other CAD risk factors (blood lipids, blood pressure, and obesity) were excluded using summary-level data from the largest published GWAS. Data from the Framingham Heart Study were used to validate the MR instrument and to build an FG genetic risk score (GRS). In an instrumental variable analysis comprising 12 FG-raising variants, a 1 mmol/L increase in FG revealed an effect-size estimate of 1.43 CAD odds (95% CI 1.14-1.79). The association was preserved after excluding variants for heterogeneity and pleiotropic effects on other CAD risk factors (odds ratio [OR] 1.33 [95% CI 1.02-1.73]). The 12 FG-increasing variants did not significantly increase type 2 diabetes risk (OR 1.05 [95% CI 0.91-1.23]), and its prevalence was constant across FG GRS quintiles (P = 0.72). Our data support that genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia raises the odds of CAD separately from type 2 diabetes and other CAD risk factors. These findings suggest that modulating glycemia may provide cardiovascular benefit. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Benefit of standard versus low-dose tirofiban for percutaneous coronary intervention in very elderly patients with high-risk acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-ling LIN; Liang-long CHEN; Yu-kun LUO; Xing-chun ZHENG; Wei-wei LI

    2009-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety between standard and low-dose tirofiban in the treatment of elderly high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Methods: Ninety-four very elderly (≥80 years) high-risk patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to the standard myocardial infarction (TIMI) grade flow were assessed. The major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), including death, myocardial infarction, recurrent angina and urgent target-vessel revascularization (TVR), were documented at 7 d, 30 d, and 6 months, and bleeding events were recorded at 7 d.Results: Although a significantly higher inhibition of platelet aggregation was observed in the standard-dose group (P0.05). The rate of MACEs was not significantly different at 7 days (2.1% vs 4.4%, P=0.61), 30 days(6.3% vs 8.7%, P=0.71) and 6 months (14.6% vs 17.4%, P=0.71). Major bleeding events were significantly higher in the standard-dose group (10.4% vs 0.0%, P=0.03).Conclusion: In very elderly high-risk patients with NSTE-ACS undergoing PCI, low-dose tirofiban offered about the same level of protection from major ischemic events that standard doses did, with less associated bleeding.

  12. Incremental prognostic value of coronary computed tomographic angiography over coronary artery calcium score for risk prediction of major adverse cardiac events in asymptomatic diabetic individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James K.; Labounty, Troy M.; Gomez, Millie J.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M.; Chow, Benjamin; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jorg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is useful for identification of symptomatic diabetic individuals at heightened risk for death. Whether CCTA-detected CAD enables improved risk assessment of asymptomatic diabetic individuals beyond clinical risk factors and coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) remains unexplored. Methods From a prospective 12-center international registry of 27,125 individuals undergoing CCTA, we identified 400 asymptomatic diabetic individuals without known CAD. Coronary stenosis by CCTA was graded as 0%, 1–49%, 50–69%, and ≥70%. CAD was judged on a per-patient, per-vessel and per-segment basis as maximal stenosis severity, number of vessels with ≥50% stenosis, and coronary segments weighted for stenosis severity (segment stenosis score), respectively. We assessed major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) – inclusive of mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and late target vessel revascularization ≥90 days (REV) – and evaluated the incremental utility of CCTA for risk prediction, discrimination and reclassification. Results Mean age was 60.4 ± 9.9 years; 65.0% were male. At a mean follow-up 2.4 ± 1.1 years, 33 MACE occurred (13 deaths, 8 MI, 12 REV) [8.25%; annualized rate 3.4%]. By univariate analysis, per-patient maximal stenosis [hazards ratio (HR) 2.24 per stenosis grade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61–3.10, p < 0.001], increasing numbers of obstructive vessels (HR 2.30 per vessel, 95% CI 1.75–3.03, p < 0.001) and segment stenosis score (HR 1.14 per segment, 95% CI 1.09–1.19, p < 0.001) were associated with increased MACE. After adjustment for CAD risk factors and CACS, maximal stenosis (HR 1.80 per grade, 95% CI 1.18–2.75, p = 0.006), number of obstructive vessels (HR 1.85 per vessel, 95% CI 1.29–2.65, p < 0.001) and segment stenosis score (HR 1.11 per segment, 95% CI 1.05–1.18, p < 0.001) were associated with increased risk of

  13. Association between Traditional Risk Factors and CoronaryArtery Ectasia:AStudy on 10057Angiographic Procedures among Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AliReza Amirzadegan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whether coronary artery ectasia (CAE is a unique clinical finding or results from other clinical entities is still unknown. We aimed to determine the CAE prevalence, investigate the relationship between CAE and patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics, and assess the prognosis at follow-up in a sample of Iranian population.Methods: Totally, 10057 patients who underwent coronary angiography were divided into three categories: normal coronary arteries without co-existing coronary artery disease; CAE without co-existing coronary artery narrowing < 50%; and coronary artery stenosis with > 50% luminal narrowing (CAS.Results: The prevalence of CAE was 1.5%. Compared to the normal individuals, the CAE patients were older, were more frequently male, and had higher rates of myocardial infarction (MI. The CAE patients had a lower frequency of diabetes and MI than the CAS group. The CAE patients were largely focused between 40 to 60 years of age. The right coronary and left anterior descending arteries were the most involved arteries, and ectasia was located more frequently in the proximal part of these arteries. Patients with ectasia in the three main vessels had higher rates of MI. After a mean follow-up of 54.23 ±18.41 months, chest pain and dyspnea on exertion remained the main complaint in more than 97% of the patients, leading to hospital admission in more than 14%.Conclusion: There was no relationship between the presence of ectasia and conventional risk factors. According to our study, pure CAE may be deemed a benign feature of atherosclerosis; however, it can lead to frequent hospital admissions because of the persistence of cardiovascular symptoms.

  14. Aspirin resistance in patients with acute coronary events: risk factors and prevalence as determined by whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, O; Maskon, O; Darinah, Noor; Raymond, A A; Rahman, M M

    2013-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of aspirin resistance and associated risk factors based on biochemical parameters using whole blood multiple electrode aggregometry. The study was conducted at the outpatients cardiology clinic of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) from August 2011 to February 2012. Subjects on aspirin therapy were divided into two groups; first-ever coronary event and recurrent coronary event. Aspirin resistance was measured by a Multiplate(®) platelet analyser. A total of 74 patients (63 male, 11 female), with a mean age of 57.93 ± 74.1years were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups -first-ever coronary event group (n=52) and recurrent coronary event group (n=22). Aspirin resistance was observed in 12 out of 74 (16%) of the study patients, which consisted of 11 patients from the first-ever coronary event group and one patient from the recurrent coronary event group. There were significant correlations between aspirin resistance and age (r = -0.627; p = 0.029), total cholesterol (r = 0.608; p = 0.036) and LDL (r = 0.694; p = 0.012). LDL was the main predictor for area under the curve (AUC) for aspirin resistance. However, there was no association between aspirin resistance and cardiovascular events in both groups in this study. Aspirin resistance was observed in 16% of the study population. LDL was the major predictor of aspirin resistance. No association was found in the study between aspirin resistance with recurrent coronary events.

  15. Risk factors for coronary heart disease in patients below 45 years of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Mansoor; Ahmed, Syed Shahzad; Mansoor, Sarah; Farooq, Sidra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the traditional risk factors and biochemical profile of patients with established CAD (coronary artery disease), and compare the trends of these in specified age groups of different populations as depicted in various studies. Methodology: All consecutive patients below 45 years of age, having classical history of Ischemic heart disease and also having definite ECG changes consistent with coronary artery disease were enrolled. These patients were admitted to CCU/Intermediate Coronary Care Unit of Pakistan Ordinance Factories (POF) Hospital Wah Cantonment from April 2007 to December 2011. Patients who had doubtful history as regards CHD and those having ECG changes not classically consistent with CAD were excluded. Information collected through Performa included history including family history and details of risk factors. Clinical examination was carried out and relevant investigations including the serial ECG changes were recorded. Blood samples were collected after an overnight fast of 14 hours and tests were done for total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol by using Pioneer-USA, linear chemical kits by cholesterol oxidase and enzymatic calometric method. Results: A total of 109 cases were included. Cigarette smoking (46%) Family history (43%), Hypertension (37%), Dyslipidemia (33%), Diabetes mellitus (18%) and above normal BMI (63.3%) are the most common risk factors in our patients. Increased abdominal girth has appeared to be an important risk factor and at occasions is documented to be independent of obesity. Casual dietary habits and sedentary life style are the other less important risk factors. The majority of risk factors were equally prevalent in males as well as females except smoking which was less prevalent in females. Conclusions: Our study shows that Family history, Smoking, Hypertension, increased BMI, increased Abdominal girth, Dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus are the main risk factors. Considering the increasing incidence of

  16. A Clinical Decision Rule to Identify Emergency Department Patients at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome Who Do Not Need Objective Coronary Artery Disease Testing: The No Objective Testing Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Jaimi H; Parsonage, William; Than, Martin; Scott, Adam; Aldous, Sally; Pickering, John W; Hammett, Christopher J; Cullen, Louise

    2016-04-01

    We derive a clinical decision rule for ongoing investigation of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain. The rule identifies patients who are at low risk of acute coronary syndrome and could be discharged without further cardiac testing. This was a prospective observational study of 2,396 patients who presented to 2 EDs with chest pain suggestive of acute coronary syndrome and had normal troponin and ECG results 2 hours after presentation. Research nurses collected clinical data on presentation, and the primary endpoint was diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome within 30 days of presentation to the ED. Logistic regression analyses were conducted on 50 bootstrapped samples to identify predictors of acute coronary syndrome. A rule was derived and diagnostic accuracy statistics were computed. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed in 126 (5.3%) patients. Regression analyses identified the following predictors of acute coronary syndrome: cardiac risk factors, age, sex, previous myocardial infarction, or coronary artery disease and nitrate use. A rule was derived that identified 753 low-risk patients (31.4%), with sensitivity 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 93.2% to 99.5%), negative predictive value 99.6% (95% CI 98.8% to 99.9%), specificity 33.0% (95% CI 31.1% to 35.0%), and positive predictive value 7.5% (95% CI 6.3% to 8.9%) for acute coronary syndrome. This was referred to as the no objective testing rule. We have derived a clinical decision rule for chest pain patients with negative early cardiac biomarker and ECG testing results that identifies 31% at low risk and who may not require objective testing for coronary artery disease. A prospective trial is required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeted deletion of the 9p21 noncoding coronary artery disease risk interval in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Zhu, Yiwen; May, Dalit; Afzal, Veena; Gong, Elaine; Attanasio, Catia; Blow, Matthew J.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence polymorphisms in a 58kb interval on chromosome 9p21 confer a markedly increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), the leading cause of death worldwide 1,2. The variants have a substantial impact on the epidemiology of CAD and other life?threatening vascular conditions since nearly a quarter of Caucasians are homozygous for risk alleles. However, the risk interval is devoid of protein?coding genes and the mechanism linking the region to CAD risk has remained enigmatic. Here we show that deletion of the orthologous 70kb noncoding interval on mouse chromosome 4 affects cardiac expression of neighboring genes, as well as proliferation properties of vascular cells. Chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice are viable, but show increased mortality both during development and as adults. Cardiac expression of two genes near the noncoding interval, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, is severely reduced in chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice, indicating that distant-acting gene regulatory functions are located in the noncoding CAD risk interval. Allelespecific expression of Cdkn2b transcripts in heterozygous mice revealed that the deletion affects expression through a cis-acting mechanism. Primary cultures of chr4delta70kb/delta70kb aortic smooth muscle cells exhibited excessive proliferation and diminished senescence, a cellular phenotype consistent with accelerated CAD pathogenesis. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence that the CAD risk interval plays a pivotal role in regulation of cardiac Cdkn2a/b expression and suggest that this region affects CAD progression by altering the dynamics of vascular cell proliferation.

  18. Hypomethylation of Interleukin-6 Promoter is Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hong-Peng; Guo, Ying-Yu; Che, Lin; Wu, Xian-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is implicated in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and IL-6 expression has associated with reduced DNA methylation of its gene promoter. However, there are no data on IL-6 promoter methylation and the risk of CHD. Objective: To examine whether IL-6 promoter methylation measured in blood leukocyte DNA is associated with CHD risk. Methods: A total of 212 cases with CHD and 218 controls were enrolled. Methylation at two CpG sites in IL-6 promoter was measured by bisulfite pyrosequencing, and the mean IL-6 methylation was calculated by averaging the methylation measures of the two CpGs. Results: Mean methylation level in IL-6 promoter in CHD cases was significantly lower than that in controls (p = 0.023). Logistic regression analysis showed that IL-6 methylation was inversely associated with the risk of CHD. The odds ratios (ORs) of CHD for subjects in the second and first (lowest) tertile of IL-6 methylation were 1.87 (95% CI = 1.10‑3.20) and 2.01 (95% CI = 1.19-3.38) (ptrend = 0.013), respectively, compared to subjects in the third (highest) tertile. The IL-6 hypomethylation-related risk estimates tended to be stronger for acute myocardial infarction (ptrend = 0.006). CpG position-specific analysis showed that hypomethylation of position 1 conferred a more pronounced increase in CHD risk than that of position 2. Conclusion: These findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation of IL-6 promoter is associated with the increased risk for CHD, especially for acute myocardial infarction. The two distinct CpGs in IL-6 may contribute differently to the development of CHD. PMID:27627640

  19. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  20. Stress resilience and physical fitness in adolescence and risk of coronary heart disease in middle age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Cecilia; Udumyan, Ruzan; Fall, Katja; Almroth, Henrik; Montgomery, Scott

    2015-04-01

    Psychosocial stress is a suggested risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship of stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent CHD risk is underinvestigated, so our objective was to assess this and investigate the possible mediating role of physical fitness. In this register-based study, 237,980 men born between 1952 and 1956 were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from Swedish registers. Stress resilience was measured at a compulsory military conscription examination using a semistructured interview with a psychologist. Some 10,581 diagnoses of CHD were identified. Cox regression estimated the association of stress resilience with CHD, with adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors. Low-stress resilience was associated with increased CHD risk. The association remained after adjustment for physical fitness and other potential confounding and mediating factors, with adjusted HRs (and 95% CIs) of 1.17 (1.10 to 1.25), with some evidence of mediation by physical fitness. CHD incidence rates per 1000 person-years (and 95% CIs) for low-stress, medium-stress and high-stress resilience were 2.61 (2.52 to 2.70), 1.97 (1.92 to 2.03) and 1.59 (1.53 to 1.67) respectively. Higher physical fitness was inversely associated with CHD risk; however, this was attenuated by low-stress resilience, shown by interaction testing (p physical fitness. This represents new evidence of the role of stress resilience in determining risk of CHD and its interrelationship with physical fitness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Prevalence of conventional risk factors and lipid profiles in patients with acute coronary syndrome and significant coronary disease

    OpenAIRE

    González-Pacheco H; Vargas-Barrón J; Vallejo M; Piña-Reyna Y; Altamirano-Castillo A; Sánchez-Tapia P; Martínez-Sánchez C

    2014-01-01

    Héctor González-Pacheco,1 Jesús Vargas-Barrón,2 Maite Vallejo,2 Yigal Piña-Reyna,3 Alfredo Altamirano-Castillo,1 Pedro Sánchez-Tapia,1 Carlos Martínez-Sánchez1 1Coronary Care Unit, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Department of Clinical Research, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Catheterization Laboratory, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico ...

  2. Combined Value of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Risk Score for Predicting Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhao

    Full Text Available Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score and red blood cell distribution width (RDW content can both independently predict major adverse cardiac events (MACEs in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We investigated the combined predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI for the first time. We enrolled 480 ACS patients. During a median follow-up time of 37.2 months, 70 (14.58% patients experienced MACEs. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the baseline RDW content (11.30-12.90, 13.00-13.50, 13.60-16.40. GRACE score was positively correlated with RDW content. Multivariate Cox analysis showed that both GRACE score and RDW content were independent predictors of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.039; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.055; p < 0.001; 1.699; 1.294-2.232; p < 0.001; respectively. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the risk of MACEs increased with increasing RDW content (p < 0.001. For GRACE score alone, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve for MACEs was 0.749 (95% CI: 0.707-0.787. The area under the ROC curve for MACEs increased to 0.805 (0.766-0.839, p = 0.034 after adding RDW content. The incremental predictive value of combining RDW content and GRACE risk score was significantly improved, also shown by the net reclassification improvement (NRI = 0.352, p < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI = 0.023, p = 0.002. Combining the predictive value of RDW and GRACE risk score yielded a more accurate predictive value for long-term cardiovascular events in ACS patients who underwent PCI as compared to each measure alone.

  3. Clinical Risk Factors for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Myoung; Park, Seon-Young; Choi, Jung-Ho; Kim, Uh-Jin; Rew, Soo-Jung; Cho, Jae Yeong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Lim, Sung-Wook; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is often performed therapeutically, and antithrombotic treatment is required for at least 12 months after stent implantation. However, the development of post-PCI upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases morbidity and mortality. We investigated the incidence and risk factors for UGIB in Korean patients within 1 year after PCI. The medical records of 3,541 patients who had undergone PCI between January 2006 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 40 cases of UGIB. We analyzed the incidence and clinical risk factors associated with UGIB occurring within 1 year after PCI by comparing the results for each case to matched controls. The propensity score matching method using age and sex was utilized. UGIB occurred in 40 patients (1.1%). Two independent risk factors for UGIB were a history of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio [OR], 12.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.70 to 59.66; p=0.001) and the use of anticoagulants (OR, 7.76; 95% CI, 2.10 to 28.66; p=0.002). UGIB after PCI occurred at a rate of 1.1% in the study population. Clinicians must remain vigilant for the possibility of UGIB after PCI and should consider performing timely endoscopy in patients who have undergone PCI and are suspected of having an UGIB.

  4. Magnesium Levels in Drinking Water and Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; He, Pengcheng; Chen, Jiyan; Liu, Yong; Liu, Dehui; Qin, Genggeng; Tan, Ning

    2016-01-02

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated inconsistent associations between drinking water magnesium levels and risk of mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD); thus, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between them. Relevant studies were searched by the databases of Cochrane, EMBASE, PubMed and Web of Knowledge. Pooled relative risks (RR) with their 95% CI were calculated to assess this association using a random-effects model. Finally, nine articles with 10 studies involving 77,821 CHD cases were used in this study. Our results revealed an inverse association between drinking water magnesium level and CHD mortality (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79-0.99, I² = 70.6). Nine of the 10 studies came from Europe, and the association was significant between drinking water magnesium level and the risk of CHD mortality (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.69-0.98). In conclusion, drinking water magnesium level was significantly inversely associated with CHD mortality.

  5. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD): a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luqian; Zhu, Zhigang; Lou, Huiling; Zhu, Guodong; Huang, Weimin; Zhang, Shaogang; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Some studies reported a significant association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the results are controversial. A systematic search was conducted in the PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases. Five case-control studies and 5 cohort studies were selected, involving a total of 104392 subjects in this meta-analysis. PCOS was significantly associated with the increased risk of CVD (OR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.09 – 1.56; P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis of study design, both case-control studies and prospective cohort studies showed significant results (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 – 2.77; P = 0.009; OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.06 – 1.37; P = 0.005), while retrospective cohort studies did not show positive result (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.60 – 1.40; P = 0.68). In a further stratified analysis by type of CVD, a significant association was found between PCOS and coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.13 – 1.84; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was observed between PCOS and myocardial infarction (MI) (OR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.68 – 1.51; P = 0.95). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PCOS is significantly associated with increased CHD risk. PMID:27220885

  6. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD): a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luqian; Zhu, Zhigang; Lou, Huiling; Zhu, Guodong; Huang, Weimin; Zhang, Shaogang; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Some studies reported a significant association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the results are controversial. A systematic search was conducted in the PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases. Five case-control studies and 5 cohort studies were selected, involving a total of 104392 subjects in this meta-analysis. PCOS was significantly associated with the increased risk of CVD (OR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.09 - 1.56; P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis of study design, both case-control studies and prospective cohort studies showed significant results (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 - 2.77; P = 0.009; OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.06 - 1.37; P = 0.005), while retrospective cohort studies did not show positive result (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.60 - 1.40; P = 0.68). In a further stratified analysis by type of CVD, a significant association was found between PCOS and coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.13 - 1.84; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was observed between PCOS and myocardial infarction (MI) (OR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.68 - 1.51; P = 0.95). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PCOS is significantly associated with increased CHD risk.

  7. Preoperative statin is associated with decreased operative mortality in high risk coronary artery bypass patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Thomas D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins are widely prescribed to patients with atherosclerosis. A retrospective database analysis was used to examine the role of preoperative statin use in hospital mortality, for patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Methods The study population comprised 2377 patients who had isolated CABG at Allegheny General Hospital between 2000 and 2004. Mean age of the patients was 65 ± 11 years (range 27 to 92 years. 1594 (67% were male, 5% had previous open heart procedures, and 4% had emergency surgery. 1004 patients (42% were being treated with a statin at the time of admission. Univariate, bivariate (Chi2, Fisher's Exact and Student's t-tests and multivariate (stepwise linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of statin use with mortality following CABG. Results Annual prevalence of preoperative statin use was similar over the study period and averaged 40%. Preoperative clinical risk assessment demonstrated a 2% risk of mortality in both the statin and non-statin groups. Operative mortality was 2.4% for all patients, 1.7% for statin users and 2.8% for non-statin users (p Conclusions Between 2000 and 2004 less than 50% of patients at this institution were receiving statins before admission for isolated CABG. A retrospective analysis of this cohort provides evidence that preoperative statin use is associated with lower operative mortality in high-risk patients.

  8. The risk of arrhythmias following coronary artery bypass surgery: do smokers have a paradox effect?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Sarraf, Nael

    2010-11-01

    Smoking is reported to increase the risk of arrhythmias. However, there are limited data on its effects on arrhythmias following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This is a retrospective review of a prospective database of all CABG patients over an eight-year period. Our cohort (n=2813) was subdivided into: current (n=1169), former (n=837), and non-smokers (n=807). Predictors of arrhythmias following CABG in relation to smoking status were analysed. Atrial arrhythmias occurred in 942 patients (33%). Ventricular arrhythmias occurred in 48 patients (2%) and high-grade atrioventricular block occurred in five patients (0.2%). Arrhythmias were lower in current smokers than former and non-smokers (29% vs. 40% vs. 39%, respectively P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed 30% arrhythmia risk reduction in smokers compared to non-smokers [odds ratio (OR) 0.7, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.5-0.8] and this effect persisted after accounting for potential confounders while former smokers had the same risk as non-smokers (OR 1.04, CI 0.9-1.3). There were no significant differences in mortality. Smokers are less prone to develop arrhythmias following CABG. This paradox effect is lost in former smokers. This effect is possibly due to a lower state of hyper adrenergic stimulation observed in smokers than non-smokers following the stress of surgery.

  9. Associations between COX-2 polymorphisms, blood cholesterol and risk of acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Segel, Stine; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    significant interactions between genotypes and alcohol intake, smoking and NSAID use in relation to risk of ACS. Among males, there was interaction between COX-2 T8473C and alcohol in relation to total cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol and LDL levels (p for interaction: 0.003, 0.007 and 0.01, respectively......Background: The use of specific COX-2 inhibitors in cancer prevention has been associated with higher risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to investigate if the polymorphisms COX2 T8473C (rs5275), and COX2 A-1195G (rs689466), which modify...... the enzyme levels of COX-2, were associated with risk of ACS and if alcohol intake, smoking, and use of NSAID would modify the associations. We also wanted to investigate associations with blood lipid levels. Methods: A case–cohort study including 1031 ACS cases and a sub-cohort of 1703 persons was nested...

  10. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  11. [Birth cohort effect on prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in coronary artery disease. Experience in a Latin-american country].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiel, Marisol; Cepeda, Magda; Ochoa, Julián; Loaiza, John H; Velásquez, Jorge G

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of major risk factors associated to coronary artery disease has changed over time. Today, the frequency of dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes mellitus has increased, while smoking has decreased. The birth cohort effect for coronary artery disease in subjects as an approximation of the true prevalence over time has not been studied in Latin-America. To determine the trends in the prevalence of major risk factors for coronary artery disease by birth cohort effect in a high risk population. We estimate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia from a prospective institutional registry (DREST registry) of patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary event. Birth cohort effect was defined as a statistical, epidemiological and sociological methodology to identify the influence of the environment in the lifetime from birth by each decade. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed adjusted by gender. Out of 3,056 subjects who were enrolled, 72% were male, with a median age of 61 years (interquartile range=53-69). Hypertension prevalence was 62.3%, for diabetes mellitus it was 48.8%, for smoking it was 18.8% and for dyslipidemia it was 48.8%. We observed an increase in prevalence for diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia in each cohort according to birth decade, while there was a reduction in prevalence for hypertension in the same decades. The prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors has changed in time and the presence of time at birth effect is evident, possibly influenced by the environment's social conditions in each decade of life. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Cost-utility analysis of genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy in patients with moderate-to-high risk acute coronary syndrome and planned percutaneous coronary intervention

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    Patel V

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prasugrel is recommended over clopidogrel in poor/intermediate CYP2C19 metabolizers with acute coronary syndrome (ACS and planned percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, reducing the risk of ischemic events. CYP2C19 genetic testing can guide antiplatelet therapy in ACS patients. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-utility of genotype-guided treatment, compared with prasugrel or generic clopidogrel treatment without genotyping, from the US healthcare provider’s perspective. Methods: A decision model was developed to project lifetime economic and humanistic burden associated with clinical outcomes (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke and major bleeding for the three strategies in patients with ACS. Probabilities, costs and age-adjusted quality of life were identified through systematic literature review. Incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs were calculated for the treatment strategies, with quality-adjusted life years (QALYs as the primary effectiveness outcome. Relative risk of developing myocardial infarction and stroke between patients with and without variant CYP2C19 when receiving clopidogrel were estimated to be 1.34 and 3.66, respectively. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Clopidogrel cost USD19,147 and provided 10.03 QALYs versus prasugrel (USD21,425, 10.04 QALYs and genotype-guided therapy (USD19,231, 10.05 QALYs. The ICUR of genotype-guided therapy compared with clopidogrel was USD4,200. Genotype-guided therapy provided more QALYs at lower costs compared with prasugrel. Results were sensitive to the cost of clopidogrel and relative risk of myocardial infarction and stroke between CYP2C19 variant vs. non-variant. Net monetary benefit curves showed that genotype-guided therapy had at least 70% likelihood of being the most cost-effective alternative at a willingness-to-pay of USD100,000/QALY. In comparison with clopidogrel, prasugrel therapy was more cost

  13. Development of a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Model for Type 1 Diabetes: The Pittsburgh CHD in Type 1 Diabetes Risk Mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zgibor, J.C.; Ruppert, K.; Orchard, T.J.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Fuller, J.H.; Chaturvedi, N.; Roberts, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim - To create a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction model specific to type 1 diabetes. Methods - Development of the model used data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (EDC). EDC subjects had type 1 diabetes diagnosed between 1950 and 1980, received their

  14. A multi-region assessment of population rates of cardiac catheterization and yield of high-risk coronary artery disease

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    Clement Fiona M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is variation in cardiac catheterization utilization across jurisdictions. Previous work from Alberta, Canada, showed no evidence of a plateau in the yield of high-risk disease at cardiac catheterization rates as high as 600 per 100,000 population suggesting that the optimal rate is higher. This work aims 1 To determine if a previously demonstrated linear relationship between the yield of high-risk coronary disease and cardiac catheterization rates persists with contemporary data and 2 to explore whether the linear relationship exists in other jurisdictions. Methods Detailed clinical information on all patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in 3 Canadian provinces was available through the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart (APPROACH disease and partner initiatives in British Columbia and Nova Scotia. Population rates of catheterization and high-risk coronary disease detection for each health region in these three provinces, and age-adjusted rates produced using direct standardization. A mixed effects regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between catheterization rate and high-risk coronary disease detection. Results In the contemporary Alberta data, we found a linear relationship between the population catheterization rate and the high-risk yield. Although the yield was slightly less in time period 2 (2002-2006 than in time period 1(1995-2001, there was no statistical evidence of a plateau. The linear relationship between catheterization rate and high-risk yield was similarly demonstrated in British Columbia and Nova Scotia and appears to extend, without a plateau in yield, to rates over 800 procedures per 100,000 population. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a consistent finding, over time and across jurisdictions, of linearly increasing detection of high-risk CAD as population rates of cardiac catheterization increase. This internationally-relevant finding

  15. Clinical Outcomes After Drug-Eluting Stents Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in High Surgical Risk Patients With Left Main or Three-Vessel Coronary Artery Disease

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    Tonga Nfor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Previous studies comparing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG in patients with unprotected left main or three-vessel coronary artery disease (LM-3VD have excluded patients at high surgical risk. We compared clinical outcomes after PCI with drug-eluting stents to CABG in high surgical risk patients with LM-3VD. Methods: Patients with symptomatic LM-3VD who had Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS-predicted operative mortality > 5% and were undergoing either PCI with drug-eluting stents or CABG at a tertiary care center from January 2009 to December 2010 were enrolled in this nonrandomized prospective study. Results: Mean STS score was 14.5 ± 5.8% for PCI (n=83 vs. 13.6 ± 7.1% for CABG (n=187 (P=0.31. After mean follow-up of 37 months, incidence of the composite primary endpoint (death, myocardial infarction or stroke was 42.2% for PCI and 39.6% for CABG (P=0.69, hazard ratio 1.3, 95% confidence interval 0.5-2.8. There were no differences in the individual components of the primary endpoint between PCI and CABG. Repeat revascularization was 30.1% for PCI vs. 9.6% for CABG (P=0.001. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event rates were similar between PCI and CABG, 50.6% vs. 42.2%, respectively (P=0.23. Patients in the PCI group were less likely than those in the CABG group to be discharged to a nursing home (12.1% vs. 47.1%, P 5%.

  16. Drug-eluting stents in percutaneous coronary intervention: a benefit-risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Robert A; Sarafoff, Nikolaus; Kastrati, Adnan; Schömig, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Drug-eluting stent (DES) therapy has represented a very significant milestone in the evolution of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy. This review attempts to provide a balanced overview of the unprecedented wealth of data generated on this new technology, by examining the evidence bases for anti-restenotic efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness. The performance of a DES may be related to each of its three components: stent backbone; carrier polymer (to control drug-release kinetics); and active drug. In terms of anti-restenotic efficacy, the most appropriate parameters to examine are target lesion revascularization, angiographic restenosis and late luminal loss. The principal safety parameters are overall mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and stent thrombosis. Anti-restenotic superiority of DES over bare metal stents (BMS) has been demonstrated across a spectrum of disease from straightforward 'vanilla lesions' through higher disease complexity in pivotal clinical trials to phase IV studies of efficacy in 'off-label' populations. The treatment effect of DES versus BMS is consistent in terms of a reduction in the need for repeat intervention of the order of 35-70%. Regarding differential efficacy of first-generation DES, a benefit may exist in favour of the Cypher (sirolimus-eluting) stent over Taxus (paclitaxel-eluting), particularly in high-risk lesion subsets. The second-generation approved devices are the Endeavor (zotarolimus-eluting) and Xience (everolimus-eluting) DES. While all four of these stents are permanent polymer-based, the current focus of development is towards DES platforms that are devoid of durable polymer, the presence of which has been implicated in late adverse events. In terms of safety concerns raised in relation to DES therapy, it is reasonable to conclude the following at 4- to 5-year post-stent implantation: (i) that there is no increased risk of death or MI with DES (neither is there a general signal of mortality

  17. Coronary Artery Disease: A Descriptive Analysis of Risk Factors: Before and After Treatment

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    S Dinkar, Suresh Rao, M Vakamudi, R Saldanha, KR Balakrishnan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing life span of man, the number of ageing people is also increasing, and along with that the number of diseases affecting them is also increasing. Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is one of them. Coronary revascularization was started in 1960s through the pioneering efforts of David Sabiston and Kolessov. This is a retrospective descriptive study. A total number of 1050 Patients were operated on beating heart surgery from 1998 to Nov. 2002 out of which 852 patients were analysed to know the results and prognostic outcomes. Mean age was 57.8 years (range 31 - 80years with M:F ratio of 7:1. The pre-operative parameters studied were DM, HTN, hyperlipidemia, family history of CAD, smoking and past history of MI. other parameters included pulmonary disease, chronic renal failure, CVA, APD, PVD etc. 55.75% patients were diabetic, 53.99% were hypertensive and 24.4% had history of hyperlipidemia. Family history was positive in 12.9% of the patients, 25% were smokers and 44% had history of previous MI. average number of diseased vessels was 2.34 with triple vessel disease being most common. 6.6% had history of pulmonary diseases, 7.4% had pre-operative renal failure and 2% had past history of CV stroke. Overall in-hospital mortality was 1.4%. relative risk for mortality, morbidity, new onset of renal failure, CVA, arrhythmias, CCF were calculated. Mean hospital stay was 9.83days (range 6 - 41years, mean ICU stay was 74.3 hours (range 73 - 700years. Usage of blood and blood products was significantly less. Freedom from complications was 93%. LVEF<40%, age >70 years, high diastolic PA pressure> 15mm Hg were found to be significant risk factors for mortality. Females were found to be 2.6 times more at risk for mortality and development of complications as compared to males. Patients with previous history of MI were found to be more at risk of developing complications increasing their hospital and ICU stay.

  18. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3 prosp

  19. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3 prosp

  20. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3

  1. "Poor man's risk factor": correlation between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and socio-economic class in patients of acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rishi; Puri, Aniket; Makhija, Aman; Singhal, A; Ahuja, A; Mukerjee, S; Dwivedi, S K; Narain, V S; Saran, R K; Puri, V K

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed as one of the factors responsible for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) at present is the strongest marker of inflammation. We did a study to assess the correlation of hs-CRP with socio-economic status (SES) in patients of CAD presenting as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Baseline hs-CRP of 490 patients of ACS was estimated by turbidimetric immunoassay. Patients were stratified by levels of hs-CRP into low (3 mg/L) groups and in tertiles of 0-0.39 mg/L, 0.4-1.1 mg/L and >1.1 mg/L, respectively. Classification of patient into upper (21.4%), middle (45.37 percent) and lower (33.3%) SES was based on Kuppuswami Index which includes education, income and profession. Presence or absence of traditional risk factors for CAD diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking was recorded in each patient. Mean levels of hs-CRP in lower, middle and upper SES were 2.3 +/- 2.1 mg/L, 0.8 +/- 1.7 mg/L and 1.2 +/- 1.5 mg/L, respectively. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in low SES compared with both upper SES (p = 0.033) and middle SES (p = 0.001). Prevalence of more than one traditional CAD risk factors was seen in 13.5%, 37.5% and 67.67 percent; in patient of lower, middle and upper SES. It was observed that multiple risk factors had a linear correlation with increasing SES. Of the four traditional risk factors of CAD, smoking was the only factor which was significantly higher in lower SES (73%) as compared to middle (51.67 percent;) and upper (39.4%) SES. We found that 62.3%, 20.8% and 26.5% patients of low, middle and upper SES had hs-CRP values in the highest tertile. Median value of the Framingham risk score in low, middle and upper SES as 11, 14 and 18, respectively. We observed that at each category of Framingham risk, low SES had higher hs-CRP. We conclude from our study that patient of lower SES have significantly higher levels of hs-CRP despite the fact that they have

  2. Cost-effectiveness of coronary artery calcium testing for coronary heart and cardiovascular disease risk prediction to guide statin allocation: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA.

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    Eric T Roberts

    Full Text Available The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA showed that the addition of coronary artery calcium (CAC to traditional risk factors improves risk classification, particularly in intermediate risk asymptomatic patients with LDL cholesterol levels <160 mg/dL. However, the cost-effectiveness of incorporating CAC into treatment decision rules has yet to be clearly delineated.To model the cost-effectiveness of CAC for cardiovascular risk stratification in asymptomatic, intermediate risk patients not taking a statin. Treatment based on CAC was compared to (1 treatment of all intermediate-risk patients, and (2 treatment on the basis of United States guidelines.We developed a Markov model of first coronary heart disease (CHD and cardiovascular disease (CVD events. We modeled statin treatment in intermediate risk patients with CAC≥1 and CAC≥100, with different intensities of statins based on the CAC score. We compared these CAC-based treatment strategies to a "treat all" strategy and to treatment according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III guidelines. Clinical and economic outcomes were modeled over both five- and ten-year time horizons. Outcomes consisted of CHD and CVD events and Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs. Sensitivity analyses considered the effect of higher event rates, different CAC and statin costs, indirect costs, and re-scanning patients with incidentalomas.We project that it is both cost-saving and more effective to scan intermediate-risk patients for CAC and to treat those with CAC≥1, compared to treatment based on established risk-assessment guidelines. Treating patients with CAC≥100 is also preferred to existing guidelines when we account for statin side effects and the disutility of statin use.Compared to the alternatives we assessed, CAC testing is both effective and cost saving as a risk-stratification tool, particularly if there are adverse effects of long-term statin use. CAC may enable providers to better tailor

  3. The Prevalence of Risk Factors of Coronary Artery Disease in the Patients who Underwent Coronary Artery Bypass Graft, Shiraz, Iran: Suggesting a Model

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    Mohammad Ali Ostovan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of 40% of deaths in Iran annually. Many patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery have previous cardiovascular risk factors which could be prevented. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in the patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional (descriptive – analytical study, a data collecting form was used. A total of 246 patients were selected from six hospitals of Shiraz using random stratification. Descriptive statistics were presented through figures and tables and t-test was used to analyze the continuous variables. All the statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software (version 15.0. Besides, P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Among the study patients, only 11.67% had no risk factors and 88.33% had one or more risk factors. The most common risk factors observed in the patients were hypertension, obesity and overweight, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. The results showed a significant difference between males and females regarding the prevalence of hypertension (P = 0.001, diabetes (P = 0.028, hypercholesterolemia (P = 0.020, and cigarette smoking (P = 0.001. In addition, the patients' mean levels of cholesterol, LDL, triglyceride, and fasting blood sugar were higher than the acceptable level, while that of HDL was lower than the accepted level. Conclusions:: These patients are recommended to be trained regarding lifestyle changes. Also, prevention strategies can play an important role in reducing patient morbidity and mortality.

  4. Serum taurine and risk of coronary heart disease: a prospective, nested case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Oktawia P.; Koenig, Karen L.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Pearte, Camille; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a molecule obtained from diet, is involved in bile acid conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation. We performed the first prospective study of taurine and CHD risk. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested in the New York University Women’s Health Study to evaluate the association between circulating taurine levels and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Taurine was measured in two yearly pre-diagnostic serum samples of 223 CHD cases and 223 matched controls and averaged for a more reliable measurement of long-term taurine levels. Results Mean serum taurine was positively related to age and dietary intake of poultry, niacin, vitamin B1, fiber, and iron, and negatively related to dietary intake of saturated fat (all p values ≤ 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between the risk of CHD and serum taurine levels. The adjusted ORs for CHD in increasing taurine tertiles were 1.0 (reference), 0.85 (95% CI, 0.51–1.40), and 0.66 (0.39–1.13; p for trend = 0.14). There was a significant inverse association between serum taurine and CHD risk among women with high total serum cholesterol (>250 mg/dl) (adjusted OR = 0.39 (0.19–0.83) for the third vs. first tertile; p for trend = 0.02) but not among those with low total serum cholesterol (p for interaction = 0.01). The data suggest a possible inverse association of serum taurine with diabetes and hypertension risk. Conclusions The findings suggest that high levels of taurine may be protective against CHD among individuals with high serum cholesterol levels. PMID:22322924

  5. Identifying genetic risk variants for coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolemia: an extreme genetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versmissen, Jorie; Oosterveer, Daniëlla M; Yazdanpanah, Mojgan; Dehghan, Abbas; Hólm, Hilma; Erdman, Jeanette; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Schunkert, Heribert; Huijgen, Roeland; Vongpromek, Ranitha; Uitterlinden, André G; Defesche, Joep C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mulder, Monique; Dadd, Tony; Karlsson, Hróbjartur D; Ordovas, Jose; Kindt, Iris; Jarman, Amelia; Hofman, Albert; van Vark-van der Zee, Leonie; Blommesteijn-Touw, Adriana C; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Liem, Anho H; van der Ouderaa, Frans J; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano; Averna, Maurizio; Langslet, Gisle; Ose, Leiv; Ros, Emilio; Almagro, Fátima; de Leeuw, Peter W; Civeira, Fernando; Masana, Luis; Pintó, Xavier; Simoons, Maarten L; Schinkel, Arend FL; Green, Martin R; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Johnson, Keith J; Schaefer, Arne; Neil, Andrew; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Humphries, Steve E; Kastelein, John JP; Sijbrands, Eric JG

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a disorder characterized by coronary heart disease (CHD) at young age. We aimed to apply an extreme sampling method to enhance the statistical power to identify novel genetic risk variants for CHD in individuals with FH. We selected cases and controls with an extreme contrast in CHD risk from 17 000 FH patients from the Netherlands, whose functional LDLR mutation was unequivocally established. The genome-wide association (GWA) study was performed on 249 very young FH cases with CHD and 217 old FH controls without CHD (above 65 years for males and 70 years of age for females) using the Illumina HumanHap550K chip. In the next stage, two independent samples (one from the Netherlands and one from Italy, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom) of FH patients were used as replication samples. In the initial GWA analysis, we identified 29 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with suggestive associations with premature CHD (P<1 × 10−4). We examined the association of these SNPs with CHD risk in the replication samples. After Bonferroni correction, none of the SNPs either replicated or reached genome-wide significance after combining the discovery and replication samples. Therefore, we conclude that the genetics of CHD risk in FH is complex and even applying an ‘extreme genetics' approach we did not identify new genetic risk variants. Most likely, this method is not as effective in leveraging effect size as anticipated, and may, therefore, not lead to significant gains in statistical power. PMID:24916650

  6. IL-6 gene promoter polymorphisms and risk of coronary artery disease in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G Q; Wu, G D; Meng, Y; Du, B; Li, Y B

    2014-09-26

    We investigated the relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the interleukin (IL)-6 gene 174 G>C (rs1800795), 572 G>C (rs1800796), and 597 G/A (rs1800797) and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk in a Chinese population. This case-control study recruited 296 CAD patients and 327 controls between January 2009 and May 2012. Genotyping of IL-6 174 G>C (rs1800795), 572 G>C (rs1800796), and 597 G/A (rs1800797) was performed on a 384-well plate format using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. CAD patients were more likely to be older and male, with a higher body mass index, diabetes, and hypertension, and presented higher triglycerides, and lower total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. We found that the IL-6 174CC genotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of CAD compared to the wild-type GG genotype in a codominant model [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 1.94 (1.13-3.37)], whereas IL-6 174 G>C polymorphisms presented an increased risk of CAD in dominant and recessive models. However, we did not find that the IL-6 572 CC and 597 AA genotypes were correlated with an increased risk of CAD. IL-6 174 G>C rs1800795 was associated with CAD risk in a Chinese population. Further large-scale studies are required to determine whether IL-6 SNPs interact with environmental factors in the development of CAD.

  7. Normal-Weight Central Obesity and Mortality Risk in Older Adults With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Batsis, John A; Coutinho, Thais; Somers, Virend K; Hodge, David O; Carter, Rickey E; Sochor, Ondrej; Kragelund, Charlotte; Kanaya, Alka M; Zeller, Marianne; Park, Jong-Seon; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    To study the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and central obesity and mortality in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We identified 7057 patients 65 years or older from 5 cohort studies assessing mortality risk using either waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio (WHR) in patients with CAD from January 1, 1980, to December 31, 2008. Normal weight, overweight, and obesity were defined using standard BMI cutoffs. High WHR was defined as 0.85 or more for women and 0.90 or more for men. High WC was defined as 88 cm or more for women and 102 cm or more for men. Separate models examined WC or WHR in combination with BMI (6 categories each) as the primary predictor (referent = normal BMI and normal WC or WHR). Cox proportional hazards models investigated the relationship between these obesity categories and mortality. Patients' mean age was 73.0±6.0 years (3741 [53%] women). The median censor time was 7.1 years. A normal BMI with central obesity (high WHR or high WC) demonstrated highest mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.14-1.46; HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12-1.50, respectively). High WHR was also predictive of mortality in the overall (HR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.93-2.38) as well as in the sex-specific cohort. In the overall cohort, high WC was not predictive of mortality (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.12); however, it predicted higher risk in men (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01-1.24). In older adults with CAD, normal-weight central obesity defined using either WHR or WC is associated with high mortality risk, highlighting a need to combine measures in adiposity-related risk assessment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Prevalence of risk factors, coronary and systemic atherosclerosis in abdominal aortic aneurysm: Comparison with high cardiovascular risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palazzuoli

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Palazzuoli, Maddalena Gallotta, Giuseppe Guerrieri, Ilaria Quatrini, Beatrice Franci, et alDepartment of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Unit of Aortic Surgery, University of Siena, ItalyBackground: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is considered a manifestation of atherosclerosis, however there are epidemiologic, biochemical, and structural differences between occlusive atherosclerosis and AAA. The pathogenesis of AAA involves several factors, first of all destruction of collagen and elastin in the aortic wall. Classical risk factors may influence the evolution and development of AAA, though no consistent association has been found. Aims of the study were to evaluate associations between risk factors and to establish the prevalence of carotid, peripheral vascular and coronary atherosclerosis in patients with AAA.Methods: We studied 98 patients with AAA (Group 1 awaiting surgery compared with high cardiovascular risk population having two or more risk factors (n = 82 Group 2. We evaluated traditional risk factors and we studied by eco-doppler and echocardiography the presence of carotid peripheral and coronaric atherosclerosis in two groups.Results: We found a higher incidence of AAA in males (p < 0.01. The prevalence of infrarenal AAA was significantly higher than suprarenal AAA (81 vs 17 p < 0.001. No differences in total cholesterol (199 ± 20 vs. 197 ± 25 mg/dl, low-density lipoprotein (142 ± 16 vs. 140 ± 18 mg/dl, triglycerides (138 ± 45 vs. 144 ± 56 mg/dl, glycemia (119 ± 15 vs. 122 ± 20 mg/dl, and fibrinogen (388 ± 154 vs. 362 ± 92 mg/dl were found between groups. We demonstrated significant differences for cigarette smoking (p < 0.002, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (150 ± 15 vs. 143 ± 14 mmHg and 88 ± 6 vs. 85 ± 7 mmHg, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.05, respectively and high sensititivity C reactive protein (2.8 ± 1.3 vs. 1.3 ± 0.7 mg/dl, p < 0.001. High-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels were

  9. Cardiac risk of coronary patients after reintegration into occupations with heavy physical exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R; Habel, F; Heiermann, M; Jäkel, R; Sinn, R

    2005-04-01

    The job related reintegration of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is a central part of cardiac rehabilitation. However, specific occupational demands like jobs with heavy physical exertion (> 6 METs) could increase the cardiovascular risk because the relative risk for acute myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiac death is temporarily elevated after vigorous exertion ("hazard period"). Thus, in 2001 any male patient with proven CAD who performed a job with heavy exertion until the occurrence of an index event (MI/ACS, any interventional or surgical revascularization measure) received a questionnaire after an average of 20 months. Complete data were available in 108 from 119 included patients (90.8%), aged 51.8+/-7.8 years. Ejection fraction was 61.5+/-13.1% and the functional capacity at the time of hospital discharge averaged 130.1+/-31.2 W. 75% of the patients had a previous MI and 59.3% underwent bypass surgery. During follow-up the previous job with heavy exertion was performed over a cumulated time of 74 years. The aim of the study was to compare the observed and the expected incidence of MI and cardiac death with and without job performance. The expected ("basal") risk for MI and cardiac death without heavy physical exertion was determined from pooled study results and assumed to be 5.2% per year. The combined risk due to performing an occupation with strenuous exertion can be calculated from time periods with and without working hours and amounts to 11.9%. There could be expected 0.119 . 74=8.8 cardiac events related to the job. In contrast, 5 MIs (4 NSTEMI, 1 STEMI) were observed (6.8%). The relative risk for an expected event compared to the basal risk without heavy exertion was 2.3 (95% CI: 0.7-7.4). The relative risk for the observed cardiac events amounts to 1.3 (95% CI: 0.4-4.8). The lower observed risk is probably due to the high grade of physical fitness in this patient group. In spite of several limitations, our study showed no convincing

  10. Do parental coronary heart disease risk factors(non-modifiable) effect their young ones?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun; Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the differences between the lipid profiles of the subjects whose parents are having known non-modifiable risk factors such as obesity,hypertension(HTN),myocardial infarction and diabetes,and compare them with the lipid profiles of the subjects whose parents are not having those risk factors.Methods:A total of 402 subjects were recruited to this study.A detailed questionnaire which included information on the past medical history,height,weight,blood pressure,physical activity,smoke,alcohol,family history of coronary heart disease,HTN.diabetics and obesity.Basic demographic data and dietary habits were completed by all participants.Blood samples were obtained from all subjects after 14 h.Lipid profiles were analyzed using automated analyzer.The results were analyzed using SPSS software packages.Results:The mean body mass index of the population was well below the cut-off value of obesity(>24.5 kg/m") and high risk of future cardiovascular disorder(CVD) events in this age group.The mean levels of total cholesterol(TC),triglycerides(TG) and TC/high density lipoprotein(HDL) were less than the risk levels indicative of future CVD events according to the ATP Ⅲ cut-off values.However the mean HDL level in our population was slightly greater than the cut-off value while the mean low density lipoprotein level was almost similar to the risk level.Differences were observed when the subjects without history of maternal obesity were compared with subjects with history of maternal obesity.The greater percentage of subjects who are having risk levels of body mass index.TC.low density lipoprotein.TG.and TC/HDI.indicated that maternal obesity contributed to the greater susceptibility of developing CVD risk in their offspring.Conclusions:Advancing age may result in changes that could be atherogenic in the future.Such atherogenic changes have already initialed when the subjects are about 21 years old.The incidence of atherogenic changes is far greater when mothers

  11. Kidney stones may increase the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: A PRISMA-Compliant meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian-Ping; Zheng, Hang

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to quantitatively assess the potential relationship between kidney stones and coronary heart disease or stroke. A meta-analysis was conducted on eligibly studies published before 31 May 2016 in PubMed or Embase. The data were pooled, and the relationship was assessed by the random-effect model with inverse variance-weighted procedure. The results were expressed as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Eight studies of 11 cohorts (n = 11) were included in our analysis with 3,658,360 participants and 157,037 cases. We found that a history of kidney stones was associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) (RR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.14-1.36; I = 79.0%, n = 11); similar effect on myocardial infarction, a serious condition of CHD, was observed (RR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.10-1.40; I = 80.4%, n = 8). We also found that a history of kidney stones may increase the risk of stroke (RR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.06-1.38; I = 54.7%, n = 4). In subgroup analysis, the risk of coronary heart disease was higher in men (RR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.02-1.49) while the risk for stroke was higher in women (RR = 1.12; 95%CI: 1.03-1.21). No obvious publications bias was detected (Egger test: P = .47). Kidney stones are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke, and the effect may differ by sex.

  12. Polymorphisms in NOS3, MTHFR, APOB and TNF-α Genes and Risk of Coronary Atherosclerotic Lesions in Iranian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Mehri; Hadadzadeh, Mehdi; Kazemi, Mahbobeh; Mahamed, Sahar; Malekzadeh, Pegah; Mirjalili, Massomeh

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors. In the present study, we investigated the possible association between NOS3 (rs1799983), MTHFR (rs1801133), APOB (rs5742904) and TNF-α (rs361525) polymorphisms and the risk of coronary atherosclerotic lesions in Iranian patients. In the case-control study, 108 patients with coronary atherosclerosis disease and 95 control subjects with no family history of cardiovascular disease were enrolled. Genotypes for NOS3, MTHFR, APOB and TNF-α polymorphisms were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We specifically detected the NOS3 TT genotype in 12 patients (11.11%) and did not find the same genotype in any of the controls. The frequencies of T allele in patients and the controls were 24% and 17.8%, respectively. The prevalence of the MTHFR TT genotype was 16.7% in patients and 2.2% in control groups. The prevalence of the APOB-100 (R3500Q) mutation in this patient population was 0%. The frequency of the A allele in the TNF-α gene was 11.1% and 11% in patients and controls, respectively, and the AA genotype was undetected. Our results show a significant association of NOS3 and MTHFR gene polymorphisms with coronary atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, these variants might influence the risk of coronary artery disease, specifically in the Iranian population.

  13. When the facts are just not enough: credibly communicating about risk is riskier when emotions run high and time is short.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Barbara J

    2011-07-15

    When discussing risk with people, commonly subject matter experts believe that conveying the facts will be enough to allow people to assess a risk and respond rationally to that risk. Because of this expectation, experts often become exasperated by the seemingly illogical way people assess personal risk and choose to manage that risk. In crisis situations when the risk information is less defined and choices must be made within impossible time constraints, the thought processes may be even more susceptible to faulty heuristics. Understanding the perception of risk is essential to understanding why the public becomes more or less upset by events. This article explores the psychological underpinnings of risk assessment within emotionally laden events and the risk communication practices that may facilitate subject matter experts to provide the facts in a manner so they can be more certain those facts are being heard. Source credibility is foundational to risk communication practices. The public meeting is one example in which these best practices can be exercised. Risks are risky because risk perceptions differ and the psychosocial environment in which risk is discussed complicates making risk decisions. Experts who want to influence the actions of the public related to a threat or risk should understand that decisions often involve emotional as well as logical components. The media and other social entities will also influence the risk context. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's crisis and emergency-risk communication (CERC) principles are intended to increase credibility and recognize emotional components of an event. During a risk event, CERC works to calm emotions and increase trust which can help people apply the expertise being offered by response officials.

  14. Agreement between Framingham Risk Score and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Risk Engine in Identifying High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in North Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dipika; Nayakallu, Ramya S R; Gudala, Kapil; Vyamasuni, Rajavikram; Bhansali, Anil

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the concurrence between Framingham Risk score (FRS) and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine in identifying coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in newly detected diabetes mellitus patients and to explore the characteristics associated with the discrepancy between them. A cross-sectional study involving 489 subjects newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was conducted. Agreement between FRS and UKPDS in classifying patients as high risk was calculated using kappa statistic. Subjects with discrepant scores between two algorithms were identified and associated variables were determined. The FRS identified 20.9% subjects (range, 17.5 to 24.7) as high-risk while UKPDS identified 21.75% (range, 18.3 to 25.5) as high-risk. Discrepancy was observed in 17.9% (range, 14.7 to 21.7) subjects. About 9.4% had high risk by UKPDS but not FRS, and 8.6% had high risk by FRS but not UKPDS. The best agreement was observed at high-risk threshold of 20% for both (κ=0.463). Analysis showed that subjects having high risk on FRS but not UKPDS were elderly females having raised systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Patients with high risk on UKPDS but not FRS were males and have high glycosylated hemoglobin. The FRS and UKPDS (threshold 20%) identified different populations as being at high risk, though the agreement between them was fairly good. The concurrence of a number of factors (e.g., male sex, low high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking) in both algorithms should be regarded as increasing the CHD risk. However, longitudinal follow-up is required to form firm conclusions.

  15. Espresso coffee consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in a large Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grioni, Sara; Agnoli, Claudia; Sieri, Sabina; Pala, Valeria; Ricceri, Fulvio; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Panico, Salvatore; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Iacoviello, Licia; de Curtis, Amalia; Vineis, Paolo; Krogh, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between coffee consumption and coronary heart disease (CHD) has been investigated in several studies with discrepant results. We examined the association between Italian-style (espresso and mocha) coffee consumption and CHD risk. We investigated 12,800 men and 30,449 women without history of cardiovascular disease recruited to the EPICOR prospective cohort study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline. In a random sub-cohort of 1472 subjects, plasma triglycerides, and total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were determined to investigate the effect of coffee consumption on plasma lipids. After a mean follow up of 10.9 years, 804 cases of CHD (500 acute events, 56 fatal events and 248 revascularizations, all first events) were identified. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for CHD were: 1.18 (95% CI 0.87-1.60) for drinking 1-2 cups/day, 1.37 (95% CI 1.03-1.82) for >2-4 cups/day and 1.52 (95% CI 1.11-2.07) for over 4 cups/day (P trend coffee consumption. Consumption of over 2 cups/day of Italian-style coffee is associated with increased CHD risk, but coffee consumption was not associated with plasma lipid changes, so the adverse effect of consumption appears unrelated to lipid profile.

  16. Prevalence of and risk factors for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Feng Liu; Jian Cao; Li Fan; Lin Liu; Jian Li; Guo-Liang Hu; Yi-Xin Hu; Xiao-Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of and related risk factors for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Two hundred and forty-six elderly patients (75.9 ± 7.4 years) with CAD who received daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over one month were recruited. The effect of aspirin was assessed using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and thrombelastography platelet mapping assay (TEG). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation and ≥ 70% adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation in the LTA assay. An aspirin semi-responder was defined as meeting one (but not both) of the criteria described above. Based on the results of TEG, aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 50% aggregation induced by AA. Results As determined by LTA, 23 (9.3%) of the elderly CAD patients were resistant to aspirin therapy; 91 (37.0%) were semi-responders. As determined by TEG, 61 patients (24.8%) were aspirin resistant. Of the 61 patients who were aspirin resistant by TEG, 19 were aspirin resistant according to LTA results. Twenty-four of 91 semi-responders by LTA were aspirin resistant by TEG. Multivariate logistic risk factor for aspirin resistance as determined by TEG. Conclusions A significant number of elderly patients with CAD are resistant to aspirin therapy. Fasting blood glucose level is closely associated with aspirin resistance in elderly CAD patients.

  17. Quantitative assessment of the influence of paraoxonase 1 activity and coronary heart disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingsong; Lang, Xilong; Cui, Shitao; Zou, Liangjian; Cao, Jia; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Xintian

    2012-06-01

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a calcium-dependent high-density lipoprotein associated ester hydrolase that has attracted considerable attention as a candidate factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) based on its function as a key factor in lipoprotein catabolism pathways. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify the inconsistency of published studies and to establish a comprehensive picture of the relationship between PON1 activity and CHD susceptibility. A systematic search was performed from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and CNKI databases. Ratio of means (RoM) between case and control and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. The source of heterogeneity was explored by subgroup analysis and meta-regression. We identified 47 eligible studies including a total of 9853 CHD cases and 11,408 controls. The pooled analysis showed that CHD patients had a 19% lower PON1 activity than did the controls (RoM=0.81; 95% CI: 0.74-0.89, pPON1 activity associated with CHD risk was observed in almost all subgroup analysis according to ethnicity, sample size, study design, mean age of cases, source, and type of control. Decreased PON1 activity may act as a risk factor for the development of CHD. Progressive decrease in serum PON1 activity may exist for an individual with severe disease. However, larger studies using a prospective approach are needed to confirm our results.

  18. Role of six single nucleotide polymorphisms, risk factors in coronary disease, in OLR1 alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Tilgner, Hagen; Iannone, Camilla; Guigó, Roderic; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-06-01

    The OLR1 gene encodes the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1), which is responsible for the cellular uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), foam cell formation in atheroma plaques and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Alternative splicing (AS) of OLR1 exon 5 generates two protein isoforms with antagonistic functions in Ox-LDL uptake. Previous work identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium that influence the inclusion levels of OLR1 exon 5 and correlate with the risk of cardiovascular disease. Here we use minigenes to recapitulate the effects of two allelic series (Low- and High-Risk) on OLR1 AS and identify one SNP in intron 4 (rs3736234) as the main contributor to the differences in exon 5 inclusion, while the other SNPs in the allelic series attenuate the drastic effects of this key SNP. Bioinformatic, proteomic, mutational and functional high-throughput analyses allowed us to define regulatory sequence motifs and identify SR protein family members (SRSF1, SRSF2) and HMGA1 as factors involved in the regulation of OLR1 AS. Our results suggest that antagonism between SRSF1 and SRSF2/HMGA1, and differential recognition of their regulatory motifs depending on the identity of the rs3736234 polymorphism, influence OLR1 exon 5 inclusion and the efficiency of Ox-LDL uptake, with potential implications for atherosclerosis and coronary disease.

  19. Further evaluation of plasma sphingomyelin levels as a risk factor for coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lackner Karl J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingomyelin (SM is the major phospholipid in cell membranes and in lipoproteins. In human plasma, SM is mainly found in atherogenic lipoproteins; thus, high levels of SM may promote atherogenesis. Methods We investigated in a median follow up of 6.0 years the association of SM with the incidence of a combined endpoint (myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death in stable and unstable patients, and its relation to other marker of atherosclerosis in 1,102 patients with angiographically documented CAD and 444 healthy controls. Results and discussion Logistic regression analysis showed that SM categorized by median was associated with an elevated risk for CAD (HR 3.2, 95%CI 2.5–4.0, p Conclusion The results of our study reveal that 1 human plasma SM levels are a risk factor for CAD; 2 the pro-atherogenic property of plasma SM might be related to metabolism of apoB-containing or triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; and 3 plasma SM levels are a predictor for outcome of patients with acute coronary syndrome.

  20. GCK Gene-Body Hypomethylation Is Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

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    Limin Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucokinase encoded by GCK is a key enzyme that facilitates phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. Variants of GCK gene were shown to be associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D and coronary heart disease (CHD. The goal of this study was to investigate the contribution of GCK gene-body methylation to the risk of CHD. Design and Methods. 36 patients (18 males and 18 females and 36 age- and sex-matched controls were collected for the current methylation research. DNA methylation level of the CpG island (CGI region on the GCK gene-body was measured through the sodium bisulfite DNA conversion and pyrosequencing technology. Results. Our results indicated that CHD cases have a much lower methylation level (49.77 ± 6.43% compared with controls (54.47 ± 7.65%, P=0.018. In addition, GCK gene-body methylation was found to be positively associated with aging in controls (r=0.443, P=0.010. Conclusions. Our study indicated that the hypomethylation of GCK gene-body was significantly associated with the risk of CHD. Aging correlates with an elevation of GCK methylation in healthy controls.

  1. An Online Tool for Nurse Triage to Evaluate Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome at Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwares Sittichanbuncha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To differentiate acute coronary syndrome (ACS from other causes in patients presenting with chest pain at the emergency department (ED is crucial and can be performed by the nurse triage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS of the tertiary care hospital. Methods. We retrospectively enrolled consecutive patients who were identified as ACS at risk patients by the ED nurse triage. Patients were categorized as ACS and non-ACS group by the final diagnosis. Multivariate logistic analysis was used to predict factors associated with ACS. An online model predictive of ACS for the ED nurse triage was constructed. Results. There were 175 patients who met the study criteria. Of those, 28 patients (16.0% were diagnosed with ACS. Patients with diabetes, patients with previous history of CAD, and those who had at least one character of ACS chest pain were independently associated with having ACS by multivariate logistic regression. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval were 4.220 (1.445, 12.327, 3.333 (1.040, 10.684, and 12.539 (3.876, 40.567, respectively. Conclusions. The effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS was 16%. The online tool is available for the ED triage nurse to evaluate risk of ACS in individuals.

  2. An online tool for nurse triage to evaluate risk for acute coronary syndrome at emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittichanbuncha, Yuwares; Sanpha-Asa, Patchaya; Thongkrau, Theerayut; Keeratikasikorn, Chaiyapon; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    Background. To differentiate acute coronary syndrome (ACS) from other causes in patients presenting with chest pain at the emergency department (ED) is crucial and can be performed by the nurse triage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS of the tertiary care hospital. Methods. We retrospectively enrolled consecutive patients who were identified as ACS at risk patients by the ED nurse triage. Patients were categorized as ACS and non-ACS group by the final diagnosis. Multivariate logistic analysis was used to predict factors associated with ACS. An online model predictive of ACS for the ED nurse triage was constructed. Results. There were 175 patients who met the study criteria. Of those, 28 patients (16.0%) were diagnosed with ACS. Patients with diabetes, patients with previous history of CAD, and those who had at least one character of ACS chest pain were independently associated with having ACS by multivariate logistic regression. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 4.220 (1.445, 12.327), 3.333 (1.040, 10.684), and 12.539 (3.876, 40.567), respectively. Conclusions. The effectiveness of the ED nurse triage for ACS was 16%. The online tool is available for the ED triage nurse to evaluate risk of ACS in individuals.

  3. Risk of Stroke in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention versus Optimal Medical Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglieri, Nevio; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Ghetti, Gabriele; Saia, Francesco; Dall’Ara, Gianni; Gallo, Pamela; Moretti, Carolina; Palmerini, Tullio; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Marzocchi, Antonio; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke is a rare but serious adverse event associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, the relative risk of stroke between stable patients undergoing a direct PCI strategy and those undergoing an initial optimal medical therapy (OMT) strategy has not been established yet. This study sought to investigate if, in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD), an initial strategy PCI is associated with a higher risk of stroke than a strategy based on OMT alone. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 6 contemporary randomized control trials in which 5673 patients with SCAD were randomized to initial PCI or OMT. Only trials with stent utilization more than 50% were included. Study endpoint was the rate of stroke during follow up. Results Mean age of patients ranged from 60 to 65 years and stent utilization ranged from 72% to 100%. Rate of stroke was 2.0% at a weighted mean follow up of 55.3 months. On pooled analysis, the risk of stroke was similar between patients undergoing a PCI plus OMT and those receiving only OMT (2.2% vs. 1.8%, OR on fixed effect = 1.24 95%CI: 0.85–1.79). There was no heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.15). On sensitivity analysis after removing each individual study the pooled effect estimate remains unchanged. Conclusions In patients with SCAD an initial strategy based on a direct PCI is not associated with an increased risk of stroke during long-term follow up compared to an initial strategy based on OMT alone. PMID:27391212

  4. Risk of Stroke in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention versus Optimal Medical Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevio Taglieri

    Full Text Available Stroke is a rare but serious adverse event associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. However, the relative risk of stroke between stable patients undergoing a direct PCI strategy and those undergoing an initial optimal medical therapy (OMT strategy has not been established yet. This study sought to investigate if, in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD, an initial strategy PCI is associated with a higher risk of stroke than a strategy based on OMT alone.We performed a meta-analysis of 6 contemporary randomized control trials in which 5673 patients with SCAD were randomized to initial PCI or OMT. Only trials with stent utilization more than 50% were included. Study endpoint was the rate of stroke during follow up.Mean age of patients ranged from 60 to 65 years and stent utilization ranged from 72% to 100%. Rate of stroke was 2.0% at a weighted mean follow up of 55.3 months. On pooled analysis, the risk of stroke was similar between patients undergoing a PCI plus OMT and those receiving only OMT (2.2% vs. 1.8%, OR on fixed effect = 1.24 95%CI: 0.85-1.79. There was no heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.15. On sensitivity analysis after removing each individual study the pooled effect estimate remains unchanged.In patients with SCAD an initial strategy based on a direct PCI is not associated with an increased risk of stroke during long-term follow up compared to an initial strategy based on OMT alone.

  5. Loci influencing lipid levels and coronary heart disease risk in 16 European population cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ripatti, Samuli; Lindqvist, Ida; Boomsma, Dorret; Heid, Iris M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Wilson, James F; Spector, Tim; Martin, Nicholas G; Pedersen, Nancy L; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hofman, Albert; Freimer, Nelson B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Johansson, Asa; Marroni, Fabio; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Jonasson, Inger; Pattaro, Cristian; Wright, Alan; Hastie, Nick; Pichler, Irene; Hicks, Andrew A; Falchi, Mario; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Montgomery, Grant W; Whitfield, John; Magnusson, Patrik; Saharinen, Juha; Perola, Markus; Silander, Kaisa; Isaacs, Aaron; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Oostra, Ben A; Elliott, Paul; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sabatti, Chiara; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Kronenberg, Florian; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Smit, Johannes H; McCarthy, Mark I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lipids have been conducted in samples ascertained for other phenotypes, particularly diabetes. Here we report the first GWA analysis of loci affecting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides sampled randomly from 16 population-based cohorts and genotyped using mainly the Illumina HumanHap300-Duo platform. Our study included a total of 17,797-22,562 persons, aged 18-104 years and from geographic regions spanning from the Nordic countries to Southern Europe. We established 22 loci associated with serum lipid levels at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 x 10(-8)), including 16 loci that were identified by previous GWA studies. The six newly identified loci in our cohort samples are ABCG5 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-11); LDL, P = 2.6 x 10(-10)), TMEM57 (TC, P = 5.4 x 10(-10)), CTCF-PRMT8 region (HDL, P = 8.3 x 10(-16)), DNAH11 (LDL, P = 6.1 x 10(-9)), FADS3-FADS2 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-10); LDL, P = 4.4 x 10(-13)) and MADD-FOLH1 region (HDL, P = 6 x 10(-11)). For three loci, effect sizes differed significantly by sex. Genetic risk scores based on lipid loci explain up to 4.8% of variation in lipids and were also associated with increased intima media thickness (P = 0.001) and coronary heart disease incidence (P = 0.04). The genetic risk score improves the screening of high-risk groups of dyslipidemia over classical risk factors.

  6. Serum Adiponectin and Cardiometabolic Risk in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gustavo Bernardes de Figueiredo; França, João Ítalo Dias; Piegas, Leopoldo Soares

    2013-01-01

    Background The adipose tissue is considered not only a storable energy source, but mainly an endocrine organ that secretes several cytokines. Adiponectin, a novel protein similar to collagen, has been found to be an adipocyte-specific cytokine and a promising cardiovascular risk marker. Objectives To evaluate the association between serum adiponectin levels and the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), as well as the correlations between adiponectin and metabolic, inflammatory, and myocardial biomarkers. Methods We recruited 114 patients with ACS and a mean 1.13-year follow-up to measure clinical outcomes. Clinical characteristics and biomarkers were compared according to adiponectin quartiles. Cox proportional hazard regression models with Firth's penalization were applied to assess the independent association between adiponectin and the subsequent risk for both primary (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI)/non-fatal stroke) and co-primary outcomes (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal AMI/non-fatal stroke/ rehospitalization requiring revascularization). Results There were significant direct correlations between adiponectin and age, HDL-cholesterol, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and significant inverse correlations between adiponectin and waist circumference, body weight, body mass index, Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, triglycerides, and insulin. Adiponectin was associated with higher risk for primary and co-primary outcomes (adjusted HR 1.08 and 1.07/increment of 1000; p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion In ACS patients, serum adiponectin was an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. In addition to the anthropometric and metabolic correlations, there was a significant direct correlation between adiponectin and BNP. PMID:24029961

  7. Role of Adiponectin in Coronary Heart Disease Risk: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Maria Carolina; Lawlor, Debbie A; de Oliveira, Cesar; White, Jon; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Barros, Aluísio J D

    2016-07-22

    Hypoadiponectinemia correlates with several coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. However, it is unknown whether adiponectin is causally implicated in CHD pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate the causal effect of adiponectin on CHD risk. We undertook a Mendelian randomization study using data from genome-wide association studies consortia. We used the ADIPOGen consortium to identify genetic variants that could be used as instrumental variables for the effect of adiponectin. Data on the association of these genetic variants with CHD risk were obtained from CARDIoGRAM (22 233 CHD cases and 64 762 controls of European ancestry) and from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Metabochip (63 746 cases and 130 681 controls; ≈ 91% of European ancestry) consortia. Data on the association of genetic variants with adiponectin levels and with CHD were combined to estimate the influence of blood adiponectin on CHD risk. In the conservative approach (restricted to using variants within the adiponectin gene as instrumental variables), each 1 U increase in log blood adiponectin concentration was associated with an odds ratio for CHD of 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.68-1.01) in CARDIoGRAM and 0.97 (95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.12) in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Metabochip. Findings from the liberal approach (including variants in any locus across the genome) indicated a protective effect of adiponectin that was attenuated to the null after adjustment for known CHD predictors. Overall, our findings do not support a causal role of adiponectin levels in CHD pathogenesis. © 2016 The Authors.

  8. Serum Adiponectin and Cardiometabolic Risk in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Gustavo Bernardes de Figueiredo, E-mail: goliveira@cardiol.br; França, João Ítalo Dias; Piegas, Leopoldo Soares [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    The adipose tissue is considered not only a storable energy source, but mainly an endocrine organ that secretes several cytokines. Adiponectin, a novel protein similar to collagen, has been found to be an adipocyte-specific cytokine and a promising cardiovascular risk marker. To evaluate the association between serum adiponectin levels and the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), as well as the correlations between adiponectin and metabolic, inflammatory, and myocardial biomarkers. We recruited 114 patients with ACS and a mean 1.13-year follow-up to measure clinical outcomes. Clinical characteristics and biomarkers were compared according to adiponectin quartiles. Cox proportional hazard regression models with Firth's penalization were applied to assess the independent association between adiponectin and the subsequent risk for both primary (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI)/non-fatal stroke) and co-primary outcomes (composite of cardiovascular death/non-fatal AMI/non-fatal stroke/ rehospitalization requiring revascularization). There were significant direct correlations between adiponectin and age, HDL-cholesterol, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and significant inverse correlations between adiponectin and waist circumference, body weight, body mass index, Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index, triglycerides, and insulin. Adiponectin was associated with higher risk for primary and co-primary outcomes (adjusted HR 1.08 and 1.07/increment of 1000; p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). In ACS patients, serum adiponectin was an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. In addition to the anthropometric and metabolic correlations, there was a significant direct correlation between adiponectin and BNP.

  9. Association of serum antioxidants and risk of coronary heart disease in South Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekhar D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Higher prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD has been reported in south Indian population, which cannot be accounted for by the traditional risk factors like hyperlipidemia. Identification of new risk factors may help in treatment and prevention of CHD in this part of the world. In an attempt to investigate the causes of increased incidence of CHD in this part of the world, we intended to look for oxidative stress in our patients as a possible risk factor. As an initial step in this perspective, a case- control study was conducted to find out the serum antioxidant levels and their association with CHD in south Indian population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A tertiary care hospital; Case - control study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred thirty nine angiographically proven CHD patients (aged 29-75 years were studied against 59 population based healthy controls (aged 29-72 years free of CHD. Fasting serum cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, erythrocyte and plasma glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were estimated on automated clinical chemistry analyzer. LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholesterol were calculated. Vitamins A and E were estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Unpaired t test was used to compare means. Binary logistic regression was done to find out the association between dependent and independent variables. RESULTS: Significantly higher levels of Total Cholesterol/HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and lower HDL cholesterol levels were observed in patients when compared to controls. No significant difference of plasma and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity was observed between patients and controls. Significantly lower levels of vitamin E in patients than in controls was observed (PP=0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The results of present study suggest that deficiency of vitamin E may be an independent risk factor

  10. Acute Renal Failure Following Coronary Artery By-Pass Surgery: Perioperative Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Baltalarlı

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Morbidity and mortality rates due to acute renal failure (ARF developed in the postoperative period in patients undergoing coronary artery by-pass surgery (CABG, are increasing. After the determination of risk factors for the development of ARF in the perioperative period, treatment strategies to prevent the development of ARF can be implemented. Methods: Three hundred and nine patients who had undergone isolated CABG between May 2005 and December 2006 were included in the study. Patients’ data registered in the preoperative, intra-operative, and postoperative periods were collected in the electronic media. Factors possibly affecting the development of ARF in the postoperative period were determined by univariate analysis. Later, the independent risk factors affecting the development of ARF were determined by multivariate analysis.Results: Univariate analysis showed that there was a relation between old age, low ejection fraction (EF in the preoperative period, presence of COPD, high preoperative serum creatinine levels, long CPB duration, the requirement of intra-operative inotropic support, the amount of postoperative mediastinal drainage, peak creatinine levels, the amount of blood transfusions and postoperative ARF development.At the end of the evaluation of these factors with multivariate analysis; old age, high creatinine levels in the preoperative period, the requirement of inotropic support during the operation and increased amounts of postoperative mediastinal drainage were found to be independent risk factors for the development of ARF.Conclusions: ARF development is found to be higher in patients with old age, low EF, impaired preoperative renal functions. We suggest that implementing a close follow up with appropriate measures forthese patients can decrease the risk of ARF development postoperatively.

  11. Noninvasive Detection of Endothelial Function in Normal Subjects,Asymptomatic Patients at Risk of Atherosclerosis and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rajabzadeh

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The endothelial dysfunction is associated with atherosclerosis. The dilatory reaction of atherosclerotic vessels in response to occlusion is reduced. This reduction could be of value in atherosclerosis determination. This study aimed at comparing brachial artery response to occlusion and administration of nitroglycerine in three groups: coronary artery disease patients, individuals with corona ry disease risk factors but no coronary disease,and normal subjects. Patients and Methods: The participants included 23 healthy individuals, 22 subjects with cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperte nsion or hypercholesterolemia ,and 57 angiographically proven coronary pati ents. The brachial artery diameter was measured by color Doppler ultrasound at rest, 5 min utes after inflation of the cuff, and 5 minutes after sublingual administration of nitroglycerine pearl. Results: The vessel’s diameter increased the least in the coronary artery disease and coronary risk factor groups in comparison to nor mal subjects (p=0.003 and 0.048, respectively. Vessel dilatation in response to nitroglycerine did not differ in healthy individuals from the coronary patients or the risk factor group (p=0.96 and 0.77, respectively. Conclusion: Doppler ultrasound may be used as a noninvasive method to identify subjects with endothelial dysfunction at high risk of coronary artery disease who need intervention or more invasive procedures.

  12. A genetic risk score based on direct associations with coronary heart disease improves coronary heart disease risk prediction in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC), but not in the Rotterdam and Framingham Offspring, Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautbar, Ariel; Pompeii, Lisa A; Dehghan, Abbas; Ngwa, Julius S; Nambi, Vijay; Virani, Salim S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Pencina, Michael J; Folsom, Aaron R; Cupples, L Adrienne; Ballantyne, Christie M; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Multiple studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined whether SNPs selected based on predefined criteria will improve CHD risk prediction when added to traditional risk factors (TRFs). SNPs were selected from the literature based on association with CHD, lack of association with a known CHD risk factor, and successful replication. A genetic risk score (GRS) was constructed based on these SNPs. Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate CHD risk based on the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Framingham CHD risk scores with and without the GRS. The GRS was associated with risk for CHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.13). Addition of the GRS to the ARIC risk score significantly improved discrimination, reclassification, and calibration beyond that afforded by TRFs alone in non-Hispanic whites in the ARIC study. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) increased from 0.742 to 0.749 (Δ = 0.007; 95% CI, 0.004-0.013), and the net reclassification index (NRI) was 6.3%. Although the risk estimates for CHD in the Framingham Offspring (HR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.10-1.14) and Rotterdam (HR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.02-1.14) Studies were significantly improved by adding the GRS to TRFs, improvements in AUC and NRI were modest. Addition of a GRS based on direct associations with CHD to TRFs significantly improved discrimination and reclassification in white participants of the ARIC Study, with no significant improvement in the Rotterdam and Framingham Offspring Studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of upstream tirofiban versus downstream tirofiban on myocardial damage and 180-day clinical outcomes in high-risk acute coronary syndromes patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; XIE Ying; ZHOU Yu-jie; LI Yue-ping; MA Han-ying; GUO Yong-he; LIU Yu-yang; ZHAO Ying-xin; SHI Dong-mei

    2009-01-01

    Background For patients with moderate to high-risk acute coronary syndromes(ACS)who undergo early,invasive treatment strategies,current guidelines recommend the usage of glycoprotein(GP)lib/Illa inhibitors as an upstream treatment for a coronary care unit or as an downstream provisional treatment for selected patients who are undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI).The relative advantage of either strategy is unknown.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of upstream tirofiban versus the effects of downstream tirofiban on myocardial damage and 180-day major adverse cardiovascular events(MACE)after PCI in high-risk non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS)undergoing PCI.Methods From July 2006 to July 2007,160 high-risk NSTE-ACS undergoing PCI were randomized to receive upstream (within 4-6 hours before coronary angiography)tirofiban or downstream(the guidewire crossing the lesion)tirofiban,to evaluate the extent of myocardial damage after PCI by quantitatively and qualitatively analyzing the value of cardiac troponin I(cTnl)as well as MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase(CK-MB)before and after PCI.The incidences of 24-hour,3-day,7-day,30-day and 180-day MACE after PCI were followed up and the rates of bleeding complications and thrombocytopenia during tirofiban administration were recorded.Results The peak release and cumulative release of cTnl levels within 48 hours after PCI were significantly lower with upstream tirefiban than downstream tirofiban(0.45 vs 0.63 and 0.32 vs 0.43,respectively;P<0.05).Post-procedural cTnl elevation within 48 hours was significantly less frequent among patients who received the upstream tirofiban than those who received the downstream tirefiban(66.3%vs 87.5%,P<0.05).The peak and cumulative release of CK-MB levels as well as post-procedural CK-MB elevation within 48 hours after PCI were not significantly different between the two groups (16 vs 14,5 vs 3 and 26.3%vs 36.3%,respectively;P>0.05).The incidences of

  14. [Prevalence and influence of risk factors on coronary shunting operations in patients with aterosclerosis of abdominal aorta and peripheral vessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, B A; Bazylev, V V; Belov, Iu V; Kizyma, A G

    2008-01-01

    Retrospective study analysis concerning the prevalence of risk factors for unfavorable outcomes after coronary operations in patients with peripheral arterial atherosclerosis is presented. Meta-analysis of individual risk factors was carried out. Frequency of complications after coronary shunting in patients with various concomitant diseases is evaluated. The multifactorial relative risk affecting hospital lethality is defined. The study includes 131 patients with generalized atherosclerosis, which have underwent myocardial revascularization at the first stage (the main group) and at the second stage have been operated on abdominal aorta and peripheral arteries. 1128 patients without peripheral arterial atherosclerosis have made the control group. They underwent only coronary shunting. All patients were treated from December of 1994 till June of 2006. Relying on the results of the study cumulative relative risk for unfavorable outcomes after revascularization is 1.8 times higher in patients from the main group than in patients from the control group, and the risk for primary complications is 2.03 times higher. Concomitant atherosclerotic arterial involvement among cardiosurgical patients is associated with high risk for stroke in postoperative period. In case of chronic renal failure risk factors are cumulated. In the main group lethality made 5% , which was higher as compared with the control group. Correlation of such risk factors as heart failure and renal failure (creatinine level more than 1.8 mg/dl) with lethality has been revealed among patients from the main group. Lethality risk raises in 5.30 times in the presence of heart failure in medical history, and raises in 13.15 times in case of initially elevated creatinine level. Age of patient didn't have any influence on lethality in early postoperative period.

  15. Renal Dysfunction after Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery- Risk Factors and Preventive Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab Maitra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative renal dysfunction is a relatively common and one of the serious complications of cardiac surgery. Though off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery technique avoids cardiopulmonary bypass circuit induced adverse effects on renal function, multiple other factors cause postoperative renal dysfunction in these groups of patients. Acute kidney injury is generally defined as an abrupt and sustained decrease in kidney function. There is no consen-sus on the amount of dysfunction that defines acute kidney injury, with more than 30 definitions in use in the literature today. Although serum creatinine is widely used as a marker for changes in glomerular filtration rate, the criteria used to define renal dysfunction and acute renal failure is highly variable. The variety of definitions used in clinical studies may be partly responsible for the large variations in the reported incidence. Indeed, the lack of a uniform definition for acute kidney injury is believed to be a major impediment to research in the field. To establish a uniform definition for acute kidney injury, the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative formulated the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage Kidney (RIFLE classification. RIFLE , defines three grades of increasing severity of acute kidney injury -risk (class R, injury (class I and failure (class F - and two outcome classes (loss and end-stage kidney disease. Various perioperative risk factors for postoperative renal dysfunction and failure have been identified. Among the important preoperative factors are advanced age, reduced left ventricular function, emergency surgery, preoperative use of intraaortic balloon pump, elevated preoperative serum glucose and creatinine. Most important intraoperative risk factor is the intraoperative haemodynamic instability and all the causes of postoperative low output syndrome com-prise the postoperative risk factors. The most important preventive strategies are the identification of the

  16. PR interval prolongation in coronary patients or risk equivalent: excess risk of ischemic stroke and vascular pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yap-Hang; Hai, Jo Jo; Lau, Kui-Kai; Li, Sheung-Wai; Lau, Chu-Pak; Siu, Chung-Wah; Yiu, Kai-Hang; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2017-08-24

    Whether PR prolongation independently predicts new-onset ischemic events of myocardial infarction and stroke was unclear. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of PR prolongation leading to adverse cardiovascular events were poorly understood. We investigated the role of PR prolongation in pathophysiologically-related adverse cardiovascular events and underlying mechanisms. We prospectively investigated 597 high-risk cardiovascular outpatients (mean age 66 ± 11 yrs.; male 67%; coronary disease 55%, stroke 22%, diabetes 52%) for new-onset ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and cardiovascular death. Vascular phenotype was determined by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). PR prolongation >200 ms was present in 79 patients (13%) at baseline. PR prolongation >200 ms was associated with significantly higher mean carotid IMT (1.05 ± 0.37 mm vs 0.94 ± 0.28 mm, P = 0.010). After mean study period of 63 ± 11 months, increased PR interval significantly predicted new-onset ischemic stroke (P = 0.006), CHF (P = 0.040), cardiovascular death (P 200 ms. Using multivariable Cox regression, PR prolongation >200 ms independently predicted new-onset ischemic stroke (HR 8.6, 95% CI: 1.9-37.8, P = 0.005), cardiovascular death (HR 14.1, 95% CI: 3.8-51.4, P PR interval predicts new-onset MI at the exploratory cut-off >162 ms (C-statistic 0.70, P = 0.001; HR: 8.0, 95% CI: 1.65-38.85, P = 0.010). PR prolongation strongly predicts new-onset ischemic stroke, MI, cardiovascular death, and combined cardiovascular endpoint including CHF in coronary patients or risk equivalent. Adverse vascular function may implicate an intermediate pathophysiological phenotype or mediating mechanism.

  17. Roma coronary heart disease patients have more medical risk factors and greater severity of coronary heart disease than non-Roma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudzinova, A; Nagyova, I; Studencan, M; Rosenberger, J; Skodova, Z; Vargova, H; Middel, B; Reijneveld, S A; van Dijk, J P

    2013-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide. Evidence on ethnic differences between the Roma and non-Roma regarding medical risk factors is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess differences in medical risk factors and the severity of CHD in Roma compared with non-Roma CHD patients, adjusted for gender, age and education. Six hundred seventy four patients were included in this cross-sectional study (132 Roma, 542 non-Roma). Data on medical risk factors, symptoms, medication and severity of CHD were obtained from medical records. After matching Roma and non-Roma according to education, linear and logistic regression analyses with adjustments for gender and age were used. Compared with non-Roma, Roma patients had significantly more risk factors and more severe types of CHD. They were treated less frequently with statins and beta-blockers, were more frequently left on pharmacotherapy and surgically revascularised. These differences remained after controlling for education, gender and age. Roma CHD patients have a worse risk profile at entry of care and seem to be undertreated compared with non-Roma CHD patients.

  18. Coronary risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Engstrøm, Thomas; Pries-Heje, Mia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive, less expensive, low-radiation alternative to coronary angiography (CAG) prior to valvular heart surgery. MSCT has a high negative predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD) but previous studies of patients with valvular ...

  19. 76 FR 9525 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Extension of enforcement... of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14, 2003, letter... supplement products with claims regarding free phytosterols and heart disease that were marketed prior to...

  20. Smoking and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Younger, Middle-Aged, and Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne S; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated associations of smoking and coronary heart disease (CHD) by age. Methods. Data came from the Pooling Project on Diet and Coronary Heart Disease (8 prospective studies, 1974-1996; n = 192 067 women and 74 720 men, aged 40-89 years). Results. During follow-up, 4326 cases...