WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronal hole boundaries

  1. Dynamics of Coronal-Hole Boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Higginson, A K; DeVore, C R; Wyper, P F; Zurbuchen, T H

    2016-01-01

    Remote and in-situ observations suggest that the slow solar wind consists of plasma from the hot, closed-field corona that is released onto open magnetic field lines. The Separatrix-Web (S-Web) theory for the slow wind proposes that photospheric motions, at the scale of supergranules, are responsible for generating dynamics at coronal-hole boundaries, which result in the inferred necessary transfer of plasma from closed to open field lines. We use 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to determine the effect of photospheric flows on the open and closed magnetic flux of a model corona with a dipole magnetic field and an isothermal solar wind. We find that a supergranular-scale photospheric motion at the boundary between the coronal hole and helmet streamer results in prolific and efficient interchange reconnection between open and closed flux. This reconnection acts to smooth the large- and small-scale structure introduced by the photospheric flows. Magnetic flux near the coronal-hole boundary experiences m...

  2. The Dynamics of Coronal-Hole Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    The source of the slow solar wind at the Sun is the subject of intense debate in solar and heliospheric physics. Because the majority of the solar wind observed at Earth is slow wind, understanding its origin is essential for understanding and predicting Earth's space weather environment. In-situ and remote observations show that, compared to the fast wind, the slow solar wind corresponds to higher freeze-in temperatures, as indicated by charge-state ratios, and more corona-like elemental abundances. These results indicate that the most likely source for the slow wind is the hot plasma in the closed-field corona; however, the release mechanism for the wind from the closed-field regions is far from understood. Here we present the first fully dynamic, 3D MHD simulations of a coronal-hole boundary driven by photospheric convective flows. We determine in detail the opening and closing of coronal flux due to photospheric motions at the base of a helmet streamer. These changes should lead to the release of plasma from the closed magnetic field at the edge of the streamer. Our analysis demonstrates that the bulk of the release is due to interchange reconnection. We calculate the effective of numerical Lundquist number on the dynamics and discuss the implications of our results for theories of slow-wind origin, in particular the S-Web model. We also discuss the implications of our results for observations, in particular from the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions. This work was supported by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  3. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  4. Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  5. Coronal Holes and Solar f -Mode Wave Scattering Off Linear Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess Webber, Shea A.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal holes (CHs) are solar atmospheric features that have reduced emission in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum due to decreased plasma density along open magnetic field lines. CHs are the source of the fast solar wind, can influence other solar activity, and track the solar cycle. Our interest in them deals with boundary detection near the solar surface. Detecting CH boundaries is important for estimating their size and tracking their evolution through time, as well as for comparing the physical properties within and outside of the feature. In this thesis, we (1) investigate CHs using statistical properties and image processing techniques on EUV images to detect CH boundaries in the low corona and chromosphere. SOHO/EIT data is used to locate polar CH boundaries on the solar limb, which are then tracked through two solar cycles. Additionally, we develop an edge-detection algorithm that we use on SDO/AIA data of a polar hole extension with an approximately linear boundary. These locations are used later to inform part of the helioseismic investigation; (2) develop a local time-distance (TD) helioseismology technique that can be used to detect CH boundary signatures at the photospheric level. We employ a new averaging scheme that makes use of the quasi-linear topology of elongated scattering regions, and create simulated data to test the new technique and compare results of some associated assumptions. This method enhances the wave propagation signal in the direction perpendicular to the linear feature and reduces the computational time of the TD analysis. We also apply a new statistical analysis of the significance of differences between the TD results; and (3) apply the TD techniques to solar CH data from SDO/HMI. The data correspond to the AIA data used in the edge-detection algorithm on EUV images. We look for statistically significant differences between the TD results inside and outside the CH region. In investigation (1), we found that the polar CH

  6. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, V S; Linker, J A; Lionello, R; Antiochos, S K

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open flux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the field with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. It is known that such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because they allow this process to occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being confined to a small region around the...

  7. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  8. Alfvénic turbulence in solar wind originating near coronal hole boundaries: heavy-ion effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The mid-latitude phases of the Ulysses mission offer an excellent opportunity to investigate the solar wind originating near the coronal hole boundaries. Here we report on Alfvénic turbulence features, revealing a relevant presence of in-situ generated fluctuations, observed during the wind rarefaction phase that charaterizes the transition from fast to slow wind. Heavy-ion composition and magnetic field measurements indicate a strict time correspondence of the locally generated fluctuations with 1 the crossing of the interface between fast and slow wind and 2 the presence of strongly underwound magnetic field lines (with respect to the Parker spiral. Recent studies suggest that such underwound magnetic configurations correspond to fast wind magnetic lines that, due to footpoint motions at the Sun, have their inner leg transferred to slow wind and are stretched out by the velocity gradient. If this is a valid scenario, the existence of a magnetic connection across the fast-slow wind interface is a condition that, given the different state of the two kinds of wind, may favour the development of processes acting as local sources of turbulence. We suggest that heavy-ion effects could be responsible of the observed turbulence features.

  9. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheron, L E; McAteer, R T J

    2016-01-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. As the source of the fast solar wind, the detection and characterization of these regions is important for both testing theories of their formation and evolution and from a space weather perspective. Coronal holes are detected in full disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind ...

  10. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    calculate the time-dependent dynamics of coronal hole boundaries rigorously and test our conjectures. We describe below our numerical simulations of...radiation and thermal conduction are needed in order to test such a model. It is tempting to conjecture that this process of releasing the closed-field... HTP , TR&T, and SR&T Programs, and has benefited greatly from the authors’ participation in the NASA TR&T focused science team on the solar

  11. The Lower Chromosphere in a Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitskaya, R. B.; Turova, I. P.; Ozhogina, O. A.

    2007-07-01

    We study the Ca ii K, H, and λ 849.8 nm line profiles in two regions of the quiet Sun, one being located in the extensive low-latitude coronal hole observed on 3 through 5 August 2003, and the other being located outside the coronal hole. Comparison of the profiles was carried out separately for cells and cell boundaries of the chromospheric network. Our principal result is that space- and time-averaged profiles of the central self-reversal in the coronal hole sites differ from those outside of the hole: Intensities of the K3 and H3 central depressions are increased in the cells but are unchanged in the network; the height of the K2 peaks is reduced in the cells and particularly in the network; the central self-reversal asymmetry is intensified in the network. Distinctions appear at a high confidence level. Line wings as well as average characteristics of the infrared line remain practically unchanged. We discuss probable causes for this behavior of the lower chromosphere lines.

  12. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-10-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  13. Segmentation of Coronal Holes Using Active Contours Without Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron, L. E.; Valluri, M.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2016-09-01

    An application of active contours without edges is presented as an efficient and effective means of extracting and characterizing coronal holes. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the Sun with open magnetic field lines. The detection and characterization of these regions is important for testing theories of their formation and evolution, and also from a space weather perspective because they are the source of the fast solar wind. Coronal holes are detected in full-disk extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). The proposed method detects coronal boundaries without determining any fixed intensity value in the data. Instead, the active contour segmentation employs an energy-minimization in which coronal holes are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than the surrounding active regions and quiet Sun. The segmented coronal holes tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. The means to identify a coronal hole without specifying a final intensity threshold may allow this algorithm to be more robust across multiple datasets, regardless of data type, resolution, and quality.

  14. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  15. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  16. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ν. Gopalswamy; Κ. Shibasaki; Μ. Salem

    2000-09-01

    We report on the statistical properties of the microwave enhancement (brightness temperature, area, fine structure, life time and magnetic field strength) in coronal holes observed over a period of several solar rotations.

  17. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', G; Patsourakos, S; Zimbardo, G

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km/s, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km/s2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 minutes, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and eq...

  18. Using Coronal Hole Maps to Constrain MHD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Ronald M.; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2017-08-01

    In this presentation, we explore the use of coronal hole maps (CHMs) as a constraint for thermodynamic MHD models of the solar corona. Using our EUV2CHM software suite (predsci.com/chd), we construct CHMs from SDO/AIA 193Å and STEREO-A/EUVI 195Å images for multiple Carrington rotations leading up to the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse. We then contruct synoptic CHMs from synthetic EUV images generated from global thermodynamic MHD simulations of the corona for each rotation. Comparisons of apparent coronal hole boundaries and estimates of the net open flux are used to benchmark and constrain our MHD model leading up to the eclipse. Specifically, the comparisons are used to find optimal parameterizations of our wave turbulence dissipation (WTD) coronal heating model.

  19. Polar Coronal Holes During Solar Cycles 22 and 23

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhang; J. Woch; S. Solanki

    2005-01-01

    Data from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on Ulysses and synoptic maps from Kitt Peak are used to analyze the polar coronal holes of solar activity cycles 22 and 23 (from 1990 to end of 2003). In the beginning of the declining phase of solar cycles 22 and 23, the north polar coronal holes (PCHs) appear about one year earlier than the ones in the south polar region.The solar wind velocity and the solar wind ionic charge composition exhibit a characteristic dependence on the solar wind source position within a PCH. From the center toward the boundary of a young PCH, the solar wind velocity decreases,coinciding with a shift of the ionic charge composition toward higher charge states.However, for an old PCH, the ionic charge composition does not show any obvious change, although the latitude evolution of the velocity is similar to that of a young PCH.

  20. A Mechanism for Coronal Hole Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, D A N

    2008-01-01

    Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fa...

  1. Characteristics of polar coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekhar, K; Banerjee, D; Gupta, G R; Teriaca, L

    2013-01-01

    High spatial- and temporal-resolution images of coronal hole regions show a dynamical environment where mass flows and jets are frequently observed. These jets are believed to be important for the coronal heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind. We studied the dynamics of two jets seen in a polar coronal hole with a combination of imaging from EIS and XRT onboard Hinode. We observed drift motions related to the evolution and formation of these small-scale jets, which we tried to model as well. We found observational evidence that supports the idea that polar jets are very likely produced by multiple small-scale reconnections occurring at different times in different locations. These eject plasma blobs that flow up and down with a motion very similar to a simple ballistic motion. The associated drift speed of the first jet is estimated to be $\\approx$ 27 km s$^{-1}$. The average outward speed of the first jet is $\\approx 171$ km s$^{-1}$, well below the escape speed, hence if simple ballistic motio...

  2. The Evolution and Space Weather Effects of Solar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krista, Larisza; Gallagher, P.

    2011-05-01

    As solar activity is the foremost important aspect of space weather, the forecasting of flare and CME related transient geomagnetic storms has become a primary initiative. Minor magnetic storms caused by coronal holes (CHs) have also proven to be important due to their long-lasting and recurrent geomagnetic effects. In order to forecast CH related geomagnetic storms, the author developed the Coronal Hole Automated Recognition and Monitoring (CHARM) algorithm to replace the user-dependent CH detection methods commonly used. CHARM uses an intensity thresholding method to identify low intensity regions in EUV or X-ray images. Since CHs are regions of "open” magnetic field and predominant polarity, magnetograms were used to differentiate CHs from other low intensity regions. The Coronal Hole Evolution (CHEVOL) algorithm was developed and used in conjunction with CHARM to study the boundary evolution of CHs. It is widely accepted that the short-term changes in CH boundaries are due to the interchange reconnection between the CH open field lines and small loops. We determined the magnetic reconnection rate and the diffusion coefficient at CH boundaries in order to test the interchange reconnection model. The author also developed the Minor Storm (MIST) package to link CHs to high-speed solar wind (HSSW) periods detected at Earth. Using the algorithm the relationship between CHs, the corresponding HSSW properties, and geomagnetic indices were studied between 2000-2009. The results showed a strong correlation between the velocity and HSSW proton plasma temperature, which indicates that the heating and acceleration of the solar wind plasma in CHs are closely related, and perhaps caused by the same mechanism. The research presented here includes analysis of CHs on small and large spatial/temporal scales, allowing us to further our understanding of CHs as a whole.

  3. The formation of an equatorial coronal hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Zhang, Jun

    2010-02-01

    The formation of an equatorial coronal hole (CH) from 2006 January 9 to 12 was simultaneously observed by GOES-12/SXI, SOHO/EIT and SOHO/MDI instruments. The varieties of soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux in the CH were examined and compared with that of a quiet-sun (QS) region nearby. The following results are obtained. (1) A preexisting dark lane appeared on the location of the followed CH and was reinforced by three enhanced networks. (2) The CH gradually formed in about 81 hours and was predominated by positive magnetic flux. (3) During the formation, the soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux obviously decreased in the CH, but were almost no change in the QS region. The decrease of the total magnetic flux may be the result of magnetic reconnection between the open and closed magnetic lines, probably indicating the physical mechanism for the birth of the CH.

  4. Magnetic fields, plasmas, and coronal holes - The inner solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1979-01-01

    Recent results concerning streams and magnetic fields in the inner solar system are reviewed. Observations have shown that MHD streams are bounded by thin shear layers within 1 AU, probably because they originate in coronal holes which have sharp boundaries. The properties of Alfvenic fluctuations in streams cannot be fully explained on the basis of the hypothesis that they are plane, transverse Alfven waves. A more complete and accurate description might be that they represent nonplanar general Alfven waves weakly coupled to a compressive mode and moving through a medium containing tangential discontinuities and other convected inhomogeneities.

  5. Disappearance of a coronal hole induced by a filament activation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ma; Xiao-Li, Yan; Zhi-Ke, Xue

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare observation of direct magnetic interaction between an activating filament and a coronal hole (CH). The filament was a quiescent one located at the northwest of the CH. It underwent a nonradial activation, during which filament material constantly fell and intruded into the CH. As a result, the CH was clearly destroyed by the intrusion. Brightenings appeared at the boundaries and in the interior of the CH, meanwhile, its west boundaries began to retreat and the area gradually shrank. It is noted that the CH went on shrinking after the end of the intrusion and finally disappeared entirely. Following the filament activation, three coronal dimmings (D1-D3) were formed, among which D1 and D2 persisted throughout the complete disappearance of the CH. The derived coronal magnetic configuration shows that the filament was located below an extended loop system which obviously linked D1 to D2. By comparison with this result of extrapolation, our observations imply that the interaction between the fila...

  6. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hegde; K. M. Hiremath; Vijayakumar H. Doddamani; Shashanka R. Gurumath

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  7. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  8. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takashi Sakurai

    2000-09-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the quiet corona and coronal holes are reviewed. The review is based on long-term accumulation of data from eclipse observations, coronagraph observations, helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms, and X-ray observations.

  9. MHD Modeling of Differential Rotation in Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    The photosphere and the magnetic flux therein undergo differential rotation. Coronal holes appear to rotate almost rigidly. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile these phenomena. Mechanism relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind. We have used our MHD model in spherical coordinates to study the effect of differential rotation on coronal holes. We have imposed a magnetic flux distribution similar to and applied differential rotation for the equivalent of 5 solar rotations.

  10. An Estimate of Solar Wind Density and Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1996-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) during the first solar conjunction in summer 1991, two data sets were selected, one associated with a coronal hole and the other associated with coronal streamer crossings. In order to determine coronal streamer density profiles, the electron content of the tracking passes embedded in a coronal streamer were corrected for the contributions from coronal hole densities.

  11. Redefining the boundaries of interplanetary coronal mass ejections from observations at the ecliptic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Cid, C; Saiz, E; Guerrero, A

    2016-01-01

    On 2015 January 6-7, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed at L1. This event, which can be associated with a weak and slow coronal mass ejection, allows us to discuss on the differences between the boundaries of the magnetic cloud and the compositional boundaries. A fast stream from a solar coronal hole surrounding this ICME offers a unique opportunity to check the boundaries' process definition and to explain differences between them. Using Wind and ACE data, we perform a complementary analysis involving compositional, magnetic, and kinematic observations providing relevant information regarding the evolution of the ICME as travelling away from the Sun. We propose erosion, at least at the front boundary of the ICME, as the main reason for the difference between the boundaries, and compositional signatures as the most precise diagnostic tool for the boundaries of ICMEs.

  12. Areas of Polar Coronal Holes from 1996 Through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Hess S. A.; Karna, N.; Pesnell, W. D.; Kirk, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Polar coronal holes (PCHs) trace the magnetic variability of the Sun throughout the solar cycle. Their size and evolution have been studied as proxies for the global magnetic field. We present measurements of the PCH areas from 1996 through 2010, derived from an updated perimeter-tracing method and two synoptic-map methods. The perimeter tracing method detects PCH boundaries along the solar limb, using full-disk images from the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT). One synoptic-map method uses the line-of-sight magnetic field from the SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to determine the unipolarity boundaries near the poles. The other method applies thresholding techniques to synoptic maps created from EUV image data from EIT. The results from all three methods suggest that the solar maxima and minima of the two hemispheres are out of phase. The maximum PCH area, averaged over the methods in each hemisphere, is approximately 6 % during both solar minima spanned by the data (between Solar Cycles 22/23 and 23/24). The northern PCH area began a declining trend in 2010, suggesting a downturn toward the maximum of Solar Cycle 24 in that hemisphere, while the southern hole remained large throughout 2010.

  13. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  14. Characteristics of Low-latitude Coronal Holes near the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmeister, Stefan J.; Veronig, Astrid; Reiss, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    of the coronal holes is predominantly concentrated in magnetic flux tubes: 38% (81%) of the unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes arises from only 1% (10%) of the coronal hole area, clustered in magnetic flux tubes with field strengths >50 G (10 G). The average magnetic field density and the unbalanced...

  15. Evolution of an equatorial coronal hole structure and the released coronal hole wind stream: Carrington rotations 2039 to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The Sun is a highly dynamic environment that exhibits dynamic behavior on many different timescales. Variability is observed both in closed and in open field line regions in the solar corona. In particular, coronal holes exhibit temporal and spatial variability. Signatures of these coronal dynamics are inherited by the coronal hole wind streams that originate in these regions and can effect the Earth's magnetosphere. Both the cause of the observed variabilities and how these translate to fluctuations in the in situ observed solar wind is not yet fully understood. Aims: During solar activity minimum the structure of the magnetic field typically remains stable over several Carrington rotations (CRs). But how stable is the solar magnetic field? Here, we address this question by analyzing the evolution of a coronal hole structure and the corresponding coronal hole wind stream emitted from this source region over 12 consecutive CRs in 2006. Methods: To this end, we link in situ observations of Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) with synoptic maps of Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) at the photospheric level through a combination of ballistic back-mapping and a potential field source surface (PFSS) approach. Together, these track the evolution of the open field line region that is identified as the source region of a recurring coronal hole wind stream. Under the assumptions of the freeze-in scenario for charge states in the solar wind, we derive freeze-in temperatures and determine the order in which the different charge state ratios of ion pairs appear to freeze-in. We call the combination of freeze-in temperatures derived from in situ observed ion density ratios and freeze-in order a minimal electron temperature profile and investigate its variability. Results: The in situ properties and the PFSS model together probe the lateral magnetic field

  16. Measurements of outflow from the base of solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.; Orrall, F. Q.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    New evidence is presented that EUV emission lines formed at the levels of the base of the corona and the transition region are systematically shifted to shorter wavelengths within coronal holes relative to the rest of the solar disk, and that moreover this shift increases with height in the atmosphere. Measurements were made with a rocket-borne EUV spectrometer having high spectroscopic resolution and stability flown on July 15, 1980. Repeated measurements were made along a chord of the solar disk that crossed a compact coronal hole near sun center identified on gamma 10830 He I spectroheliograms. The maximum measured shift corresponded to a velocity of 12 km/sec in gamma 625 Mg X and 7 km/sec in gamma 629 O V. If these velocities correspond to a true mass flux, they provide important data on the acceleration of coronal plasma in open magnetic field regions. These observed Doppler displacements are a strong and significant signature of coronal holes, now measured on three rocket flights.

  17. Influence of coronal holes on CMEs in causing SEP events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Long Shen; Jia Yao; Yu-Ming Wang; Pin-Zhong Ye; Xue-Pu Zhao; Shui Wang

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the influence of coronal holes(CHs)on coronal mass ejections(CMEs)in causing solar energetic particle(SEP)events is revisited.It is a continuation and extension of our previous work,in which no evident effects of CHs on CMEs in generating SEPs were found by statistically investigating 56 CME events.This result is consistent with the conclusion obtained by Kahler in 2004.We extrapolate the coronal magnetic field,define CHs as the regions consisting of only open magnetic field lines and perform a similar analysis on this issue for 76 events in total by extending the study interval to the end of 2008.Three key parameters,CH proximity,CH area and CH relative position,are involved in the analysis.The new result confirms the previous conclusion that CHs did not show any evident effect on CMEs in causing SEP events.

  18. Examining the Properties of Jets in Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulle, Owen; Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examined both X-ray and Magnetic field data in order to determine if there is a correlation between emerging magnetic flux and the production of Coronal jets. It was proposed that emerging flux can be a trigger to a coronal jet. The jet is thought to be caused when local bipoles reconnect or when a region of magnetic polarity emerges through a uniform field. In total we studied 15 different jets that occurred over a two day period starting 2011-02-27 00:00:00 UTC and ending 2011-02-28 23:59:55 UTC. All of the jets were contained within a coronal hole that was centered on the disk. Of the 15 that we studied 6 were shown to have an increase of magnetic flux within one hour prior to the creation of the jet and 10 were within 3 hours before the event.

  19. Evaluation of the Minifilament-Eruption Scenario for Solar Coronal Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikie, Tomi K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David; Moore, Ronald L.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are suspected to result from magnetic reconnection low in the Sun's atmosphere. Sterling et al. (2015) looked as 20 jets in polar coronal holes, using X-ray images from the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). They suggested that each jet was driven by the eruption of twisted closed magnetic field carrying a small-scale filament, which they call a 'minifilament', and that the jet was produced by reconnection of the erupting field with surrounding open field. In this study, we carry out a more extensive examination of polar coronal jets. From 180 hours of XRT polar coronal hole observations spread over two years (2014-2016), we identified 130 clearly-identifiable X-ray jet events and thus determined an event rate of over 17 jets per day per in the Hinode/XRT field of view. From the broader set, we selected 25 of the largest and brightest events for further study in AIA 171, 193, 211, and 304 Angstrom images. We find that at least the majority of the jets follow the minifilament-eruption scenario, although for some cases the evolution of the minifilament in the onset of its eruption is more complex than presented in the simplified schematic of Sterling et al. (2015). For all cases in which we could make a clear determination, the spire of the X-ray jet drifted laterally away from the jet-base-edge bright point; this spire drift away from the bright point is consistent with expectations of the minifilament-eruption scenario for coronal-jet production. This work was supported with funding from the NASA/MSFC Hinode Project Office, and from the NASA HGI program.

  20. Statistical study of network jets observed in the solar transition region: A comparison between coronal holes and quiet sun regions

    CERN Document Server

    Narang, Nancy; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Cranmer, Steven R; DeLuca, Ed E; McKillop, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Recent IRIS observations have revealed a prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with apparent speeds of 80 - 250 km s$^{-1}$, emanating from small-scale bright regions inside network boundaries of coronal holes. We find that these network jets appear not only in coronal holes but also in quiet-sun regions. Using IRIS 1330A (C II) slit-jaw images, we extract several parameters of these network jets, e.g. apparent speed, length, lifetime and increase in foot-point brightness. Using several observations, we find that some properties of the jets are very similar but others are obviously different between the quiet sun and coronal holes. For example, our study shows that the coronal-hole jets appear to be faster and longer than those in the quiet sun. This can be directly attributed to a difference in the magnetic configuration of the two regions with open magnetic field lines rooted in coronal holes and magnetic loops often present in quiet sun. We have also detected compact bright loops, likely transition r...

  1. Solar jet-coronal hole collision and a related coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-01-01

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using the high-quality imaging data of AIA/SDO, here we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which part of the jets, with the embedding coronal loops, runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced towards the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat-shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME initially with a narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph, propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 A dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region towards the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and t...

  2. SOLAR JET–CORONAL HOLE COLLISION AND A CLOSELY RELATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209, Weihai (China)

    2016-03-10

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using high-quality imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory, we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which the part of the jet with embedding coronal loops runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced in the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME with an initially narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 Å dark material flowing from the jet–CH interaction region toward the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet–CH collision and the large-scale magnetic topology of the CH being important in defining the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet–CME eruption.

  3. An Estimate of Solar Wind Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and Coronal Streamer Area (6-40R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment during the first solar conjunction in summer 1991 (Bird et al., 1994), an estimate is presented of solar wind velocity profiles in a coronal hole and a coronal streamer area in the range between 6 and 40 solar radii.

  4. Spectral Characteristics of Large-Scale Radio Emission Areas in Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Prosovetsky, D V; Kochanov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The spectra of the coronal hole radio emission in solar cycles 23 and 24 have been studied based on RATAN-600 data in the 4-16.5 GHz range at frequencies of 5.7 and 17 GHz and 327 MHz. It has been found that bright features of coronal hole microwave emission at 17 GHz and dark features at 5.7 GHz can exist in coronal holes when the spectral index is 1.25-1.5 in the 6.5-16.5 GHz range; the radio spectrum in this range is flat when coronal holes are indiscernible against the background of a quiet Sun. The possible vertical scale of the solar atmosphere over coronal holes is discussed.

  5. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions and Coronal Holes in their Causal Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Golubeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    North-south asymmetry of sunspot activity resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields in the current cycle. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study a causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the...

  6. Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Flux over Cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Chris; Qiu, Jiong; Leamon, Robert

    2017-01-01

    As the observational signature of the footprints of solar magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, coronal holes provide a critical measure of the structure and evolution of these lines. Using a combination of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT), Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (STEREO/EUVI A/B) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations spanning 1996 - 2015 (nearly two solar cycles), coronal holes are automatically detected and characterized. Coronal hole area distributions show distinct behavior in latitude, defining the domain of polar and low-latitude coronal holes. The northern and southern polar regions show a clear asymmetry, with a lag between hemispheres in the appearance and disappearance of polar coronal holes.

  7. Fast-sausage oscillations in coronal loops with smooth boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: The effect of the transition layer (shell) in nonuniform coronal loops with a continuous radial density profile on the properties of fast-sausage modes are studied analytically and numerically. Methods: We modeled the coronal waveguide as a structured tube consisting of a cord and a transition region (shell) embedded within a magnetic uniform environment. The derived general dispersion relation was investigated analytically and numerically in the context of frequency, cut-off wave number, and the damping rate of fast-sausage oscillations for various values of loop parameters. Results: The frequency of the global fast-sausage mode in the loops with a diffuse (or smooth) boundary is determined mainly by the external Alfvén speed and longitudinal wave number. The damping rate of such a mode can be relatively low. The model of coronal loop with diffuse boundary can support a comparatively low-frequency, global fast-sausage mode of detectable quality without involving extremely low values of the density contrast. The effect of thin transition layer (corresponds to the loops with steep boundary) is negligible and produces small reductions of oscillation frequency and relative damping rate in comparison with the case of step-function density profile. Seismological application of obtained results gives the estimated Alfvén speed outside the flaring loop about 3.25 Mm/s.

  8. Coronal holes near the equatorial plane and the solar wind abundance of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Yellin, K. A.

    1996-03-01

    Composition analysis of the solar wind from two equatorial coronal holes has been carried out with the Ion Composition Instrument on the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The abundances of oxygen, neon and iron were determined as coronal hole-related material flowed past the spacecraft. The results show that the edges of the hole-related flow are sharply defined with abundances closer to the abundances in the photosphere than in the slower solar wind. These results are similar to those found in flows from the southern polar coronal hole and suggest an underlying unity between the polar and equatorial regions of the sun.

  9. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  10. Improvements on coronal hole detection in SDO/AIA images using supervised classification

    CERN Document Server

    Reiss, Martin A; De Visscher, Ruben; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M; Delouille, Véronique; Mampaey, Benjamin; Ahammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of machine learning algorithms in combination with segmentation techniques in order to distinguish coronal holes and filaments in SDO/AIA EUV images of the Sun. Based on two coronal hole detection techniques (intensity-based thresholding, SPoCA), we prepared data sets of manually labeled coronal hole and filament channel regions present on the Sun during the time range 2011 - 2013. By mapping the extracted regions from EUV observations onto HMI line-of-sight magnetograms we also include their magnetic characteristics. We computed shape measures from the segmented binary maps as well as first order and second order texture statistics from the segmented regions in the EUV images and magnetograms. These attributes were used for data mining investigations to identify the most performant rule to differentiate between coronal holes and filament channels. We applied several classifiers, namely Support Vector Machine, Linear Support Vector Machine, Decision Tree, and Random Forest and found tha...

  11. Comparing High-speed Transition Region Jets in Coronal Holes and Quiet Sun Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate Arbacher, Rebecca; Tian, Hui; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The complicated energy transfer and plasma motion in the transition region, between the photosphere and the corona, may play a significant role in the formation and acceleration of the solar wind. New observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have revealed unprecedented levels of detail in this less-studied region. Coronal holes in particular are a likely source of solar wind material, though the formation and acceleration mechanisms of the fast solar wind are still largely unknown. In our previous work, we have reported the prevalence of small-scale high-speed (~80-250 km/s) jets with transition region temperatures from the network structures of coronal holes. Here we undertake a comparative study of these short-lived episodic network jets in a coronal hole region and a quiet sun region using IRIS sit-and-stare slit-jaw imaging in the 1330 Angstrom (C II) passband. The pointing coordinates, exposure time, observing cadence, and field of view of both observations are all identical. Our preliminary study suggests that the speeds and lengths of the network jets may differ between quiet sun and coronal hole regions. The quiet sun region exhibits many compact bright regions with sizes of 5-10 arcseconds which produce very few jets. The jets that do exist tend to propagate at much slower speeds over smaller distances than their coronal hole counterparts. Comparatively, in the coronal hole, such compact regions are almost absent and all network patches are permeated by the intermittent high-reaching jets. Such a difference suggests that magnetic loops are much smaller in the coronal hole and the network jets are produced at low heights. The recurrence frequency seems to be higher in the coronal hole region, with many of the isolated quiet sun region jets demonstrating curved trajectories.This work is supported under contract 8100002705 from Lockheed-Martin to SAO and by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241.

  12. Hemispheric asymmetry in coronal hole evolution: Cause of the bashful ballerina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursula, K.; Tlatov, A.; Virtanen, I.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic hemisphere prevalent in the solar northern hemisphere has been shown to cover a larger area than in the south for about three years in the declining phase of several solar cycles. Correspondingly, the average field intensity is weaker in the northern hemisphere and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is shifted southward at these times. This phenomenon, now called the bashful ballerina, has been verified using several databases and methods, including the in situ observations of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) at 1 AU by the OMNI data base, at about 2 AU by the Ulysses probe, and at different radial distances by the Voyager 1 and 2 and Pioneer 10 and 11 probes. The Ulysses observations show that the mean southward shift of the HCS was about 2 degrees in the declining phase of both cycle 22 and cycle 23, although the polar strengths were very different between the two cycles. The HMF observations by the Voyager and Pioneer probes show a very consistent structure of HMF sectors and HCS location in the entire heliosphere, and even beyond the termination shock. Moreover, they suggest a systematic difference in the development of northern and southern polar coronal holes. While the northern coronal holes developed very systematically during all the four solar minima since mid-1970s, the evolution of southern coronal holes was less systematic and delayed with respect to the northern hemisphere. This delay in the evolution of southern coronal holes leads to a larger extent of northern coronal holes and a southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet (the bashful ballerina phenomenon) for a few years in the declining phase of the solar cycle. Here we study direct observations of solar coronal holes and verify this difference in the evolution of coronal holes between the two solar hemispheres, which explains the bashful ballerina phenomenon.

  13. Observations of Dissipation of Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves in Polar Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, G R

    2014-01-01

    We focus on polar coronal hole region to find any evidence of dissipation of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. We obtained time-distance and frequency-distance maps along plume structure in polar coronal hole. We also obtained Fourier power maps of polar coronal hole in different frequency ranges in 171 \\AA\\ and 193 \\AA\\ passbands. We performed intensity distribution statistics in time domain at several locations in polar coronal hole. We find presence of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves having temperature dependent propagation speeds. The wavelet analysis and Fourier power maps of polar coronal hole show that low-frequency waves are travelling longer distances (longer detection length) as compared to high-frequency waves. We found two distinct dissipation length scales of wave amplitude decay at two different height ranges (between 0-10 Mm and 10-70 Mm) along the observed plume structure. Dissipation length obtained at higher height range show some frequency dependence. Individual Fourier power...

  14. An estimate of solar wind velocity profiles in an coronal hole and a coronal streamer area (6-40 solar radius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment during the superior solar conjunction in summer 1991, we selected two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other one with coronal streamer crossings. By doing this data splitting, we find two entirely different density profiles varying as r(exp -2.7) and r(exp -2.3) for the coronal hole and coronal streamers, respectively. Assuming mass flux conservation from the inner corona to one AU, an estimate for the velocity profiles or acceleration in these two different regions can be determined. The more negative exponent of the coronal hole density profile indicates a more extended heating and acceleration region or more flaring, or both. Various possible explanations will be discussed.

  15. An Estimate of Solar Wind Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer Area (6-40 R(radius symbol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Total electron content data obtained from the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) in 1991 were used to select two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other with coronal streamer crossings. (This is largely equatorial data shortly after solar maximum.) The solar wind velocity profile is estimated for these areas.

  16. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, J. T.; Devore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry,gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfven wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfven waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  17. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry, gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfvén wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfvén waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  18. The study of Equatorial coronal hole during maximum phase of Solar Cycle 21, 22, 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Mahendra; Karna, Nishu

    2017-08-01

    The 11-year Solar Cycle (SC) is characterized by the periodic change in the solar activity like sunspot numbers, coronal holes, active regions, eruptions such as flares and coronal mass ejections. We study the relationship between equatorial coronal holes (ECH) and the active regions (AR) as coronal whole positions and sizes change with the solar cycle. We made a detailed study of equatorial coronal hole for four solar maximum: Solar Cycle 21 (1979,1980,1981 and 1982), Solar Cycle 22 (1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992), Solar Cycle 23 (1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002) and Solar Cycle 24 (2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015). We used publically available NOAA solar coronal hole data for cycle 21 and 22. We measured the ECH region using the EIT and AIA synoptic map for cycle 23 and 24. We noted that in two complete 22-year cycle of solar activity, the equatorial coronal hole numbers in SC 22 is greater than SC 21 and similarly, SC 24 equatorial coronal hole numbers are greater than SC 23. Moreover, we also compared the position of AR and ECH during SC 23 and 24. We used daily Solar Region Summary (SRS) data from SWPC/NOAA website. Our goal is to examine the correlation between equatorial holes, active regions, and flares.

  19. Hydrogen Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta radiances and profiles in polar coronal holes

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Curdt, Werner; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen Lyman-alpha plays a dominant role in the radiative energy transport in the lower transition region, and is important for the stud- ies of transition-region structure as well as solar wind origin. We investigate the Ly-alpha profiles obtained by SUMER in coronal holes and quiet Sun. In a subset of these observations, also the Hi Lyman-beta, Si iii, and O vi lines were (quasi-) simultaneously recorded. We find that the distances between the two peaks of Ly-alpha profiles are larger in coronal holes than in the quiet Sun, indicating a larger opacity in coronal holes. This difference might result from the different magnetic structures or the different radiation fields in the two regions. Most of the Ly-beta profiles in the coronal hole have a stronger blue peak, in contrast to those in quiet-Sun regions. Whilst in both regions the Ly-alpha profiles are stronger in the blue peak. Although the asymmetries are likely to be produced by differential flows in the solar atmosphere, their detailed formation ...

  20. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Karpen, J T; Antiochos, S K; Pariat, E

    2016-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in solar coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry, gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagat...

  1. Improvements on coronal hole detection in SDO/AIA images using supervised classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Martin A.; Hofmeister, Stefan J.; De Visscher, Ruben; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Delouille, Véronique; Mampaey, Benjamin; Ahammer, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the use of machine learning algorithms in combination with segmentation techniques in order to distinguish coronal holes and filaments in SDO/AIA EUV images of the Sun. Based on two coronal hole detection techniques (intensity-based thresholding, SPoCA), we prepared datasets of manually labeled coronal hole and filament channel regions present on the Sun during the time range 2011-2013. By mapping the extracted regions from EUV observations onto HMI line-of-sight magnetograms we also include their magnetic characteristics. We computed shape measures from the segmented binary maps as well as first order and second order texture statistics from the segmented regions in the EUV images and magnetograms. These attributes were used for data mining investigations to identify the most performant rule to differentiate between coronal holes and filament channels. We applied several classifiers, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM), Linear Support Vector Machine, Decision Tree, and Random Forest, and found that all classification rules achieve good results in general, with linear SVM providing the best performances (with a true skill statistic of ≈ 0.90). Additional information from magnetic field data systematically improves the performance across all four classifiers for the SPoCA detection. Since the calculation is inexpensive in computing time, this approach is well suited for applications on real-time data. This study demonstrates how a machine learning approach may help improve upon an unsupervised feature extraction method.

  2. Observations of high and low Fe charge states in individual solar wind streams with coronal-hole origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Context. The solar wind originating from coronal holes is comparatively well-understood and is characterized by lower densities and average charge states compared to the so-called slow solar wind. Except for wave perturbations, the average properties of the coronal-hole solar wind are passably constant. Aims: In this case study, we focus on observations of the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) of individual streams of coronal-hole solar wind that illustrate that although the O and C charge states are low in coronal-hole wind, the Fe charge distribution is more variable. In particular, we illustrate that the Fe charge states in coronal-hole solar wind are frequently as high as in slow solar wind. Methods: We selected individual coronal-hole solar wind streams based on their collisional age as well as their respective O and C charge states and analyzed their Fe charge-state distributions. Additionally, with a combination of simple ballistic back-mapping and the potential field source surface model, transitions between streams with high and low Fe charge states were mapped back to the photosphere. The relative frequency of high and low Fe charge-state streams is compared for the years 2004 and 2006. Results: We found several otherwise typical coronal-hole streams that include Fe charge states either as high as or lower than in slow solar wind. Eight such transitions in 2006 were mapped back to equatorial coronal holes that were either isolated or connected to the northern coronal-hole. Attempts to identify coronal structures associated with the transitions were so far inconclusive.

  3. Observations of dissipation of slow magneto-acoustic waves in a polar coronal hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We focus on a polar coronal hole region to find any evidence of dissipation of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. Methods: We obtained time-distance and frequency-distance maps along the plume structure in a polar coronal hole. We also obtained Fourier power maps of the polar coronal hole in different frequency ranges in 171 Å and 193 Å passbands. We performed intensity distribution statistics in time domain at several locations in the polar coronal hole. Results: We find the presence of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves having temperature dependent propagation speeds. The wavelet analysis and Fourier power maps of the polar coronal hole show that low-frequency waves are travelling longer distances (longer detection length) as compared to high-frequency waves. We found two distinct dissipation length scales of wave amplitude decay at two different height ranges (between 0-10 Mm and 10-70 Mm) along the observed plume structure. The dissipation lengths obtained at higher height range show some frequency dependence. Individual Fourier power spectrum at several locations show a power-law distribution with frequency whereas probability density function of intensity fluctuations in time show nearly Gaussian distributions. Conclusions: Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are getting heavily damped (small dissipation lengths) within the first 10 Mm distance. Beyond that waves are getting damped slowly with height. Frequency dependent dissipation lengths of wave propagation at higher heights may indicate the possibility of wave dissipation due to thermal conduction, however, the contribution from other dissipative parameters cannot be ruled out. Power-law distributed power spectra were also found at lower heights in the solar corona, which may provide viable information on the generation of longer period waves in the solar atmosphere.

  4. The plasma structure of coronal hole solar wind: Origins and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-06-01

    Whereas slow solar wind is known to be highly structured, the fast (coronal hole origin) wind is usually considered to be homogeneous. Using measurements from Helios 1 + 2, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses, structure in the coronal hole origin solar wind is examined from 0.3 AU to 2.3 AU. Care is taken to collect and analyze intervals of "unperturbed coronal hole plasma." In these intervals, solar wind structure is seen in the proton number density, proton temperature, proton specific entropy, magnetic field strength, magnetic field to density ratio, electron heat flux, helium abundance, heavy-ion charge-state ratios, and Alfvenicity. Typical structure amplitudes are factors of 2, far from homogeneous. Variations are also seen in the solar wind radial velocity. Using estimates of the motion of the solar wind origin footpoint on the Sun for the various spacecraft, the satellite time series measurements are converted to distance along the photosphere. Typical variation scale lengths for the solar wind structure are several variations per supergranule. The structure amplitude and structure scale sizes do not evolve with distance from the Sun from 0.3 to 2.3 AU. An argument is quantified that these variations are the scale expected for solar wind production in open magnetic flux funnels in coronal holes. Additionally, a population of magnetic field foldings (switchbacks, reversals) in the coronal hole plasma is examined: this population evolves with distance from the Sun such that the magnetic field is mostly Parker spiral aligned at 0.3 AU and becomes more misaligned with distance outward.

  5. A Coronal Hole Jet Observed with Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    A small blowout jet was observed at the boundary of the south coronal hole on 2011 February 8 at around 21:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) revealed an expanding loop rising from one footpoint of a compact, bipolar bright point. Magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO showed that the jet was triggered by the cancelation of a parasitic positive polarity feature near the negative pole of the bright point. The jet emission was present for 25 mins and it extended 30 Mm from the bright point. Spectra from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode yielded a temperature and density of 1.6 MK and 0.9-1.7 x 10^8 cm^-3 for the ejected plasma. Line-of-sight velocities reached up to 250 km/s. The density of the bright point was 7.6 x 10^8 cm^-3, and the peak of the bright point's emission measure occurred at 1.3 MK, with no plasma above 3 MK.

  6. The Magnetic Structure of H-alpha Macrospicules in Solar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, H.; Sakurai, T.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses in the high-speed polar solar wind have shown the wind to carry some fine-scale structures in which the magnetic field reverses direction by having a switchback fold in it. The lateral span of these magnetic switchbacks, translated back to the Sun, is of the scale of the lanes and cells of the magnetic network in which the open magnetic field of the polar coronal hole and polar solar wind are rooted. This suggests that the magnetic switchbacks might be formed from network-scale magnetic loops that erupt into the corona and then undergo reconnection with the open field. This possibility motivated us to undertake the study reported here of the structure of Ha macrospicules observed at the limb in polar coronal holes, to determine whether a significant fraction of these eruptions appear to be erupting loops. From a search of the polar coronal holes in 6 days of image- processed full-disk Ha movies from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we found a total of 35 macrospicules. Nearly all of these (32) were of one or the other of two different forms: 15 were in the form of an erupting loop, and 17 were in the form of a single column spiked jet. The erupting-loop macrospicules are appropriate for producing the magnetic switchbacks in the polar wind. The spiked-jet macrospicules show the appropriate structure and evolution to be driven by reconnection between network-scale closed field (a network bipole) and the open field rooted against the closed field. This evidence for reconnection in a large fraction of our macrospicules (1) suggests that many spicules may be generated by similar but smaller reconnection events and (2) supports the view that coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in coronal holes and in quiet regions are driven by explosive reconnection events in the magnetic network.

  7. Reconnection-Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in a Simulated Coronal-Hole Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Uritsky, Vadim M; DeVore, C Richard; Karpen, Judith T

    2016-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray jets occur frequently in magnetically open coronal holes on the Sun, especially at high solar latitudes. Some of these jets are observed by white-light coronagraphs as they propagate through the outer corona toward the inner heliosphere, and it has been proposed that they give rise to microstreams and torsional Alfv\\'{e}n waves detected in situ in the solar wind. To predict and understand the signatures of coronal-hole jets, we have performed a detailed statistical analysis of such a jet simulated with an adaptively refined magnetohydrodynamics model. The results confirm the generation and persistence of three-dimensional, reconnectiondriven magnetic turbulence in the simulation. We calculate the spatial correlations of magnetic fluctuations within the jet and find that they agree best with the M\\"{u}ller - Biskamp scaling model including intermittent current sheets of various sizes coupled via hydrodynamic turbulent cascade. The anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations and the sp...

  8. Polar Coronal Hole Ephemeral Regions, the Fast Solar Wind and the Global Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, Jonathan W.

    2010-01-01

    The X-Ray Telescope aboard Hinode has been regularly observing both the north and south solar polar coronal holes from November 2006 through March 2009. We use the observations of emerged flux regions within the coronal hole as evidenced by small x-ray bright points to study the physical properties of these regions. The width of the emerged flux region loop footpoints, the duration of the x-ray emission lifetime for the emerged flux region, the latitude of formation and whether an x-ray or EUV jet was observed were all recorded. In the present work we detail these observations and show a dependence on the width of the emerged flux region (bright point) to the number of x-ray jets observed. The distribution of base width is then related to a power law for number of emerged flux regions as a function of base width.

  9. Recent Voyager Evidence for Rapid Transport of Flare-Generated Disturbances by Polar Coronal Hole Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Miller, W. D.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W.; Sun, W.; Detman, T.; Dryer, M.; Deehr, C.

    2017-09-01

    Disturbances observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 during the past five years or more may have been transported by plasma emitted from polar coronal holes, thereby having travelled much faster from the Sun to the termination shock than previously recognized. Estimating the average speed to the shock as 750 km/s has produced consistently good associations between solar flares, or groups of them, and dynamic pressure increases at Voyager 2 and plasma wave events at Voyager 1. Furthermore, magnetograph observations confirm that polar coronal holes were present around the times of the flares to which the events at the Voyagers have been attributed. These calculations also provide revised estimates of the transport of heliospheric current sheet fluctuations. We discuss the possibilities that extrapolations from past observations and simulations based on them may provide insight into currently challenging issues and possible future developments.

  10. Correlation of High Latitude Coronal Holes with Solar Wind Streams High Above or Below the Ecliptic,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    STATEMENT (of the abstract entered In Block 20, it differenit from, Report) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 9. K EY * OROS (Cunrinn’e on reverse aide if necesary...the total scintillation peaks. The actual position of this point depends on the density spectrum of the plasma along the line of sight, but for most...line originates, rather than of the corona , where the X-ray emission originates. Therefore, the actual location and perimeter of a coronal hole in the

  11. Resonant Heating of Ions by Parallel Propagating Alfvén Waves in Solar Coronal Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xi Zhang; Jing-Xiu Wang; Chi-Jie Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Resonant heating of H, O+5, and Mg+9 by parallel propagating ioncyclotron Alfven waves in solar coronal holes at a heliocentric distance is studied using the heating rate derived from the quasilinear theory. It is shown that the particle-Alfven-wave interaction is a significant microscopic process. The temperatures of the ions are rapidly increased up to the observed order in only microseconds, which implies that simply inserting the quasilinear heating rate into the fluid/MHD energy equation to calculate the radial dependence of ion temperatures may cause errors as the time scales do not match. Different species ions are heated by Alfven waves with a power law spectrum in approximately a mass order.To heat O+5 over Mg+9 as measured by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) in the solar coronal hole at a region≥ 1.9R⊙, the energy density of Alfven waves with a frequency close to the O+5-cyclotron frequency must be at least double of that at the Mg+9-cyclotron frequency. With an appropriate wave-energy spectrum, the heating of H, O+5 and Mg+9 can be consistent with the UVCS measurements in solar coronal holes at a heliocentric distance.

  12. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from 14 exceptionally high-reaching large solar jets observed in the polar coronal holes. EUV movies from SDO/AIA show that each jet is similar to many other similar-size and smaller jets that erupt in coronal holes, but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most other jets, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R(sub Sun) in images from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. For these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun) at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most jets display oscillatory swaying having an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. We conclude that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is grossly a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the reconnected open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate from the measured spinning and swaying that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun). From these results for these big jets, we reason that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules should dissipate in the corona in the same way and could thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  13. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  14. Oblique Propagation and Dissipation of Alfv´en Waves in Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. Srivastava; B. N. Dwivedi

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the effect of viscosity and magnetic diffusivity on the oblique propagation and dissipation of Alfvén waves with respect to the normal outward direction, making use of MHD equations, density, temperature and magnetic field structure in coronal holes and underlying magnetic funnels. We find reduction in the damping length scale, group velocity and energy flux density as the propagation angle of Alfvén waves increases inside the coronal holes. For any propagation angle, the energy flux density and damping length scale also show a decrement in the source region of the solar wind (< 1.05 R⊙) where these may be one of the primary energy sources, which can convert the inflow of the solar wind into the outflow. In the outer region (> 1.21 R⊙), for any propagation angle, the energy flux density peaks match with the peaks of MgX 609.78 Å and 624.78 Å linewidths observed from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on SOHO and the non-thermal velocity derived from these observations, justify the observed spectroscopic signature of the Alfvén wave dissipation.

  15. Properties of Solar Polar Coronal Hole Plasmas Observed above the Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Laming, J. M.; Schühle, U.; Wilhelm, K.

    2001-01-01

    We determine the line-of-sight emission measure distribution and nonthermal motions as a function of height above the limb in the north and south polar coronal holes. These quantities are derived from extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra obtained from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The SUMER slit was oriented along the north-south direction for all the observations, and the spatial resolution is about 1". The spectra were obtained from a number of different types of observations in 1996. We select a group of emission lines for analysis for which, under the usual assumption of ionization equilibrium, the maximum emissivities span the temperature range from about 3×105 K up to about 1.1×106 K. We compare our results with recently published similar observations of a west limb quiet-Sun streamer region, with other coronal hole results based on SUMER spectra, and with earlier observations of the quiet Sun and coronal holes obtained from Skylab and rocket spectra. We find that the electron temperature in the polar holes increases with height above the limb, that the emission measure distribution of plasma located at line-of-sight heights less than about 60" peaks at a temperature of about 9×105 K, and that nonthermal motions sometimes, but not always, increase slightly with height above the limb. When observed, these increases level off above the limb at about 120". We speculate that the increases with height above the limb may be a manifestation of the fast solar wind. They may also be due to the reduction in transition region structures with increasing limb height. We also discuss wave heating as a cause of the line width increases.

  16. Trapping Horizons as inner boundary conditions for black hole spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, J L; Cordero-Carrion, I; Ibáñez, J M

    2007-01-01

    We present a set of inner boundary conditions for the numerical construction of dynamical black hole space-times, when employing a 3+1 constrained evolution scheme and an excision technique. These inner boundary conditions are heuristically motivated by the dynamical trapping horizon framework and are enforced in an elliptic subsystem of the full Einstein equation. In the stationary limit they reduce to existing isolated horizon boundary conditions. A characteristic analysis completes the discussion of inner boundary conditions for the radiative modes.

  17. Statistical properties of coronal hole rotation rates: Are they linked to the solar interior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagashvili, S. R.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Japaridze, D. R.; Chargeishvili, B. B.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Kukhianidze, V.; Ramishvili, G.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Poedts, S.; Khodachenko, M. L.; De Causmaecker, P.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The present paper discusses results of a statistical study of the characteristics of coronal hole (CH) rotation in order to find connections to the internal rotation of the Sun. Aims: The goal is to measure CH rotation rates and study their distribution over latitude and their area sizes. In addition, the CH rotation rates are compared with the solar photospheric and inner layer rotational profiles. Methods: We study CHs observed within ± 60° latitude and longitude from the solar disc centre during the time span from the 1 January 2013 to 20 April 2015, which includes the extended peak of solar cycle 24. We used data created by the spatial possibilistic clustering algorithm (SPoCA), which provides the exact location and characterisation of solar coronal holes using SDO/AIA193 Å channel images. The CH rotation rates are measured with four-hour cadence data to track variable positions of the CH geometric centre. Results: North-south asymmetry was found in the distribution of coronal holes: about 60 percent were observed in the northern hemisphere and 40 percent were observed in the southern hemisphere. The smallest and largest CHs were present only at high latitudes. The average sidereal rotation rate for 540 examined CHs is 13.86( ± 0.05)°/d. Conclusions: The latitudinal characteristics of CH rotation do not match any known photospheric rotation profile. The CH angular velocities exceed the photospheric angular velocities at latitudes higher than 35-40 degrees. According to our results, the CH rotation profile perfectly coincides with tachocline and the lower layers of convection zone at around 0.71 R⊙; this indicates that CHs may be linked to the solar global magnetic field, which originates in the tachocline region.

  18. X-ray Jet observations in coronal holes and evidence for MHD waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, J.; Davey, A.

    2008-05-01

    Hinode observations of polar coronal holes have revealed that X-ray jets have two distinct velocities, one near the Alfvén speed (~800 km s-1) and another near the sound speed (200 km s-1). This analysis has been reported in Cirtain et al. (2007). In addition to the evidence of Alfvén waves and evaporation flow, there are some subset of jets that appear to oscillate in the direction transverse to the jet axis. We will present studies of these oscillations using both XRT and EIS (Hinode) data, and NFI/SOT ( Hinode) data when available.

  19. An observational search for large-scale organization of five-minute oscillations on the sun. [coronal holes or sector structure relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, P. H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The large-scale solar velocity field has been measured over an aperture of radius 0.8 solar radii on 121 days between April and September, 1976. Measurements are made in the line Fe I 5123.730 A, employing a velocity subtraction technique similar to that of Severny et al. (1976). Comparisons of the amplitude and frequency of the five-minute resonant oscillation with the geomagnetic C9 index and magnetic sector boundaries show no evidence of any relationship between the oscillations and coronal holes or sector structure.

  20. SDO and Hinode observations of a blowout jet in a coronal hole

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A blowout jet occurred within the south coronal hole on 2011 February 9 at 09:00 UT and was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board the Hinode satellite during coronal hole monitoring performed as part of Hinode Operations Program No. 177. Images from AIA show expanding, hot and cold loops from a small bright point with plasma ejected in a curtain up to 30 Mm wide. The initial intensity front of the jet has a projected velocity of 200 km/s, and line-of-sight velocities measured by EIS are between 100 and 250 km/s. The jet plasma has a density of 2.7 x 10^8 cm^-3, and a temperature of 1.4 MK. During the event a number of bright kernels are seen at the base of the bright point. The kernels have sizes of 1000 km, are variable in brightness, and have lifetimes of 1-15 mins. A XRT filter ratio yields temperatures of 1.5-3.0 MK for the kernels. The ...

  1. Influence of a coronal envelope as a free boundary to global convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We explore the effects of an outer stably stratified coronal envelope on rotating turbulent convection, differential rotation, and large-scale dynamo action in spherical wedge models of the Sun. Methods: We solve the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in a two-layer model with unstable stratification below the surface, representing the convection zone, and a stably stratified coronal envelope above. The interface represents a free surface. We compare our model to models that have no coronal envelope. Results: The presence of a coronal envelope is found to modify the Reynolds stress and the Λ effect resulting in a weaker and non-cylindrical differential rotation. This is related to the reduced latitudinal temperature variations that are caused by and dependent on the angular velocity. Some simulations develop a near-surface shear layer that we can relate to a sign change in the meridional Reynolds stress term in the thermal wind balance equation. Furthermore, the presence of a free surface changes the magnetic field evolution since the toroidal field is concentrated closer to the surface. In all simulations, however, the migration direction of the mean magnetic field can be explained by the Parker-Yoshimura rule, which is consistent with earlier findings. Conclusions: A realistic treatment of the upper boundary in spherical dynamo simulations is crucial for the dynamics of the flow and magnetic field evolution.

  2. Do Solar Coronal Holes Affect the Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Arge, C. N.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2014-02-01

    The intensities and timescales of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU may depend not only on the characteristics of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but also on large-scale coronal and interplanetary structures. It has long been suspected that the presence of coronal holes (CHs) near the CMEs or near the 1-AU magnetic footpoints may be an important factor in SEP events. We used a group of 41 E≈ 20 MeV SEP events with origins near the solar central meridian to search for such effects. First we investigated whether the presence of a CH directly between the sources of the CME and of the magnetic connection at 1 AU is an important factor. Then we searched for variations of the SEP events among different solar wind (SW) stream types: slow, fast, and transient. Finally, we considered the separations between CME sources and CH footpoint connections from 1 AU determined from four-day forecast maps based on Mount Wilson Observatory and the National Solar Observatory synoptic magnetic-field maps and the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model of SW propagation. The observed in-situ magnetic-field polarities and SW speeds at SEP event onsets tested the forecast accuracies employed to select the best SEP/CH connection events for that analysis. Within our limited sample and the three analytical treatments, we found no statistical evidence for an effect of CHs on SEP event peak intensities, onset times, or rise times. The only exception is a possible enhancement of SEP peak intensities in magnetic clouds.

  3. Relation Between Coronal Hole Areas and Solar Wind Speeds Derived from Interplanetary Scintillation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Satonaka, Daiki; Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Hayashi, Keiji; Hakamada, Kazuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the relation between coronal hole (CH) areas and solar wind speeds during 1995 - 2011 using the potential field (PF) model analysis of magnetograph observations and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations by the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research (formerly Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory) of Nagoya University. We obtained a significant positive correlation between the CH areas (A) derived from the PF model calculations and solar wind speeds (V) derived from the IPS observations. The correlation coefficients between them are usually high, but they drop significantly in solar maxima. The slopes of the A - V relation are roughly constant except for the period around solar maximum, when flatter or steeper slopes are observed. The excursion of the correlation coefficients and slopes at solar maxima is ascribed partly to the effect of rapid structural changes in the coronal magnetic field and solar wind, and partly to the predominance of small CHs. It is also demonstrated that V is inversely related to the flux expansion factor (f) and that f is closely related to A^{-1/2}; hence, V ∝ A^{1/2}. A better correlation coefficient is obtained from the A^{1/2} - V relation, and this fact is useful for improving space weather predictions. We compare the CH areas derived from the PF model calculations with He i 1083 nm observations and show that the PF model calculations provide reliable estimates of the CH area, particularly for large A.

  4. Characteristic Length of Energy-Containing Structures at the Base of a Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Abramenko, V I; Dosch, A; Yurchyshyn, V B; Goode, P R; Ahn, K; Cao, W

    2013-01-01

    An essential parameter for models of coronal heating and fast solar wind acceleration that rely on the dissipation of MHD turbulence is the characteristic energy-containing length $\\lambda_{\\bot}$ of the squared velocity and magnetic field fluctuations ($u^2$ and $b^2$) transverse to the mean magnetic field inside a coronal hole (CH) at the base of the corona. The characteristic length scale defines directly the heating rate. We use a time series analysis of solar granulation and magnetic field measurements inside two CHs obtained with the New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. A data set for transverse magnetic fields obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-Polarimeter (SOT/SP) aboard {\\it Hinode} spacecraft was utilized to analyze the squared transverse magnetic field fluctuations $b_t^2$. Local correlation tracking (LCT) was applied to derive the squared transverse velocity fluctuations $u^2$. We find that for $u^2$-structures, Batchelor integral scale $\\lambda$ varies in a rang...

  5. Boundary Terms and Noether Current of Spherical Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ashworth, M C; Ashworth, Michael C.; Hayward, Sean A.

    1999-01-01

    We consider two proposals for defining black hole entropy in spherical symmetry, where the horizon is defined locally as a trapping horizon. The first case, boundary terms in a dual-null form of the reduced action in two dimensions, gives a result that is proportional to the area. The second case, Wald's Noether current method, is generalized to dynamic black holes, giving an entropy that is just the area of the trapping horizon. These results are compared with a generalized first law of thermodynamics.

  6. A new model for heating of the Solar North Polar Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlen, E.; Zengin Çamurdan, D.; Yardımcı, M.; Pekünlü, E. R.

    2017-05-01

    This article presents a new model of the North Polar Coronal Hole (NPCH) with the aim of revealing the dissipative/propagative characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. We investigate the effects of isotropic viscosity and anisotropic heat conduction on the propagation characteristics of MHD waves in the NPCH. We first model the NPCH by considering differences in the radial direction as well as in the direction perpendicular to the line of sight (los) in temperature, particle number density and non-thermal velocities between plumes and interplume lanes, for the specific case of O vi ions. This model includes parallel and perpendicular (to the magnetic field) heat conduction and viscous dissipation. Next, we derive the dispersion relations for MHD waves in cases of the absence and presence of parallel heat conduction. In the case of the absence of parallel heat conduction, we find that MHD wave dissipation depends strongly on viscosity for modified acoustic and Alfvén waves. The energy flux densities of acoustic waves vary between 104.7 and 107 erg cm-2 s-1, while the energy flux densities of Alfvén waves turn out to be between 106 and 108.6 erg cm-2 s-1. When there is parallel heat conduction, we calculate the damping length-scales and the energy flux densities of magnetoacoustic waves. Our results suggest that modified magnetoacoustic waves may provide a significant source for the observed preferential acceleration and heating of O vi ions, thus coronal plasma heating, and an extra accelerating agent for the fast solar wind in the NPCH, depending on the values of the transport coefficients.

  7. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  8. Physical Properties of the SKYLAB North Polar Coronal Hole with an Extended Base and its MHD Self-Consistent Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, S.; Ocania, G.

    1991-04-01

    RESUMEN Con base en las observaciones del Skylab del Sol en rayos X que permitieron r la forma de la frontera del hoyo coronal del polo norte y en las observaciones de l 'z que permitieron derivar un perfil de densidad para el flujo de viento solar (IC ese hoyo, Murno yjackson (1977) concluyeron que se requiere una adici6n t l clc energfa al flujo hasta al menos 5 R8. En este trabajo, recalculamos los perfiles de y de temperatura para el mismo hoyo pero considerando una frontera Cs mas ancha en la base, de acuerdo con las observaciones del coron6metro-K del IIAO, los espectroheliogramas en EUV del OSO-7 y las fotografias de la corona solar cerca de los 4 E)()O A. Se tomaron tambien las incertidumbres en el perfil de densidad electr6nica inl & a las observaciones de luz blanca y se consideraron diversos valores posibles dCl fl 'jo (lC masa 1 UA. Encontramos que las diferencias introducidas no son suficientes par clcsc' la necesidad de una energetizaci6n extensa del viento solar, pero una dC las s posibles muestra una concordancia muy buena con el modelado MHD (l( l flujo con el unico t6rmino adicional de la fuerza de Lorentz en la ecuaci6n de # (). ABSTRACT Based on the near to the Sun boundary of the Skylab north polar coroi ' l estimated from the AS & E X-ray photographs and on the density profile fi-C)I white light data, Munro and Jackson (1977) concluded that substantial energy the solar wind flux is required up to at least 5 Rs. In this paper we recalculate `eloci y and temperature profiles for the same hole but considering a different bo ' ry for flux tube which is larger at its base, according to the HAO K- obser"' (i()I0 , the OSO-7 EUV spectroheliograms and pictures of the solar 4500 A. è take into account the uncertainties inherent in the white light observations () electron density profile and consider different possible values of the solar I .' fltix at 1 AU. We that the differences introduced are not sufficient to discard ii y of an extended

  9. Interaction of CME/ICME with HSS solar wind from coronal holes: case study

    CERN Document Server

    Yermolaev, Yu I; Shugay, Yu S; Slemzin, V A; Veselovsky, I S; Rodkin, D G; Nikolaeva, N S; Borodkova, N L; Yermolaev, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we look for traces of interaction of CME/ICME with high-speed stream (HSS) of solar wind from coronal hole (CH) for two serial Carrington rotations (CRs) during December 2011 - January 2012. We analyze two cases. (1) In CR 2118 instead of predicted arrival of HSS the signatures of ICME with modified back side and compressed slow stream were observed. (2) In CR 2119 the predicted HSS was observed in time, and after arrival of preceding ICME. Our analysis shows that difference of these cases can be explained by different interactions between HSS and CME, which in the first case result in significant deflection of HSS of solar wind from the Sun-Earth line. Thus, the CH passage through the central meridian with simultaneous occurrence of CMEs in the nearby located sources can result in interaction between HSS and CME streams, deflection of the HSS stream aside of the ecliptic and changes in parameters of the solar wind.

  10. Low-Latitude Coronal Holes at the Minimum of the 23rd Solar Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Abramenko, V; Linker, J; Mikic, Z; Luhmann, J; Lee, C

    2010-01-01

    Low and mid-latitude coronal holes (CHs) observed on the Sun during the current solar activity minimum (from September 21, 2006, Carrington rotation (CR) 2048, until June 26, 2009 (CR 2084)) were analyzed using {\\it SOHO}/EIT and STEREO-A SECCHI EUVI data. From both the observations and Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) modeling, we find that the area occupied by CHs inside a belt of $\\pm 40^\\circ$ around the solar equator is larger in the current 2007 solar minimum relative to the similar phase of the previous 1996 solar minimum. The enhanced CH area is related to a recurrent appearance of five persistent CHs, which survived during 7-27 solar rotations. Three of the CHs are of positive magnetic polarity and two are negative. The most long-lived CH was being formed during 2 days and existed for 27 rotations. This CH was associated with fast solar wind at 1 AU of approximately 620$\\pm 40$ km s$^{-1}$. The 3D MHD modeling for this time period shows an open field structure above this CH. We conclude that the...

  11. Synchronic coronal hole mapping using multi-instrument EUV images: Data preparation and detection method

    CERN Document Server

    Caplan, R M; Linker, J L

    2015-01-01

    A method for the automatic mapping of coronal holes (CH) using simultaneous multi-instrument EUV imaging data is described. Synchronized EUV images from STEREO/EUVI A\\&B 195\\AA\\ and SDO/AIA 193\\AA\\ undergo preprocessing steps that include PSF-deconvolution and the application of data-derived intensity corrections that account for center-to-limb variations (limb-brightening) and inter-instrument intensity normalization. A systematic approach is taken to derive a robust limb-brightening correction technique that takes advantage of unbiased long-term averages of data and respects the physical nature of the problem. The new preprocessing greatly assists in CH detection, allowing for the use of a simplified variable-connectivity two-threshold region growing image segmentation algorithm to obtain consistent detection results. Some examples of the generated synchronic EUV and CH maps are shown, as well as preliminary analysis of CH evolutions. Several data and code products are made available to the community ({...

  12. A new model for heating of Solar North Polar Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Devlen, E; Yardımcı, M; Pekünlü, E R

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new model of North Polar Coronal Hole (NPCH) to study dissipation/propagation of MHD waves. We investigate the effects of the isotropic viscosity and heat conduction on the propagation characteristics of the MHD waves in NPCH. We first model NPCH by considering the differences in radial as well as in the direction perpendicular to the line of sight (\\textit{los}) in temperature, particle number density and non-thermal velocities between plumes and interplume lanes for the specific case of \\ion{O}{VI} ions. This model includes parallel and perpendicular (to the magnetic field) heat conduction and viscous dissipation. Next, we derive the dispersion relations for the MHD waves in the case of absence and presence of parallel heat conduction. In the case of absence of parallel heat conduction, we find that MHD wave dissipation strongly depends on the viscosity for modified acoustic and Alfven waves. The energy flux density of acoustic waves varies between $10^{4.7}$ and $10^7 \\,erg\\,cm^{-2}\\,...

  13. North-South asymmetry in the magnetic deflection of polar coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', Giuseppe; Patsourakos, Spiros; Bothmer, Volker; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field in the interplanetary medium, of the sunspots area, and of the heliospheric current sheet position, reveal a possible North-South asymmetry in the magnetic field of the Sun. We study the North-South asymmetry as inferred from measurements of the deflection of polar coronal hole jets when they propagate throughout the corona. Since the corona is an environment where the magnetic pressure is greater than the kinetic pressure, we can assume that magnetic field controls the dynamics of plasma. On average, jets during their propagation follow the magnetic field lines, highlighting its local direction. The average jet deflection is studied both in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight, and, for a reduced number of jets, in three dimensional space. The observed jet deflection is studied in terms of an axisymmetric magnetic field model comprising dipole We measured the position angles at 1 rs and at 2 rs of the 79 jets from the catalogue of Nistico et al 2009., based on the S...

  14. Kinematics of an untwisting solar jet in polar coronal hole observed by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huadong; Ma, Suli

    2012-01-01

    Using the multi-wavelength data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft, we study a jet occurred in coronal hole near the northern pole of the Sun. The jet presented distinct helical upward motion during ejection. By tracking six identified moving features (MFs) in the jet, we found that the plasma moved at an approximately constant speed along the jet's axis, meanwhile, they made a circular motion in the plane transverse to the axis. Inferred from linear and trigonometric fittings to the axial and transverse heights of the six tracks, the mean values of axial velocities, transverse velocities, angular speeds, rotation periods, and rotation radiuses of the jet are 114 km s$^{-1}$, 136 km s$^{-1}$, 0.81\\degr\\ s$^{-1}$, 452 s, and 9.8 $\\times$ 10$^{3}$ km respectively. As the MFs rose, the jet width at the corresponding height increased. For the first time, we derived the height variation of the longitudinal magnetic field strength in the jet from the...

  15. Cyclotron Resonances of Ions with Obliquely-Propagating Waves in Coronal Holes and the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Markovskii, S. A.

    2001-05-01

    UVCS/SOHO has provided observations of protons and ions in coronal holes which suggest the operation of ion-cyclotron heating and acceleration. Many models have concentrated on the interactions of particles with parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves. There is of course no reason to expect parallel propagation in the corona, so we consider here some consequences of oblique propagation. Following Stix (1992), we analytically calculate the energy absorbed by an ion moving in an obliquely-propagating electromagnetic wave. Resonances occur at harmonics of the gyro frequency, though we will show that the physical interpretations are quite different for electric field polarizations in, or perpendicular to, the plane containing k and Bo (k is wavenumber and Bo is the ambient magnetic field). Surprisingly, a resonance at the fundamental frequency can occur even if the wave is right-hand circularly polarized (i.e. opposite to the sense of the gyromotion). We suggest, therefore, that resonances with the fast/whistler branch, which are often overlooked, may play a role in the heating of ions and protons in coronal holes as long as the waves are oblique. We will discuss possible sources of such waves. We will also summarize other consequences of oblique propagation for the resonant heating of coronal holes and the origin of the fast solar wind. Stix, T.H., Waves in Plasmas, AIP, New York, 1992.

  16. Coronal Partings

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, Igor F

    2015-01-01

    The basic observational properties of the 'coronal partings'--the special type of the coronal magnetic structures, identified by a comparison of the coronal X-ray images and solar magnetograms--are considered. They represent channels inside the unipolar large-scale magnetic fields, formed by the rows of magnetic arcs directed to the neighboring fields of opposite polarity. The most important characteristics of the partings are revealed. It is found that--from the evolutionary and spatial point of view--the partings can transform to the coronal holes and visa versa. The classes of global, intersecting, and complex partings are identified.

  17. Cyclotron resonances of ions with obliquely propagating waves in coronal holes and the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Markovskii, S. A.

    2002-06-01

    There is a growing consensus that cyclotron resonances play important roles in heating protons and ions in coronal holes where the fast solar wind originates and throughout interplanetary space as well. Most work on cyclotron resonant interactions has concentrated on the special, but unrealistic, case of propagation along the ambient magnetic field, B0, because of the great simplification it gives. This paper offers a physical discussion of how the cyclotron resonances behave when the waves propagate obliquely to B0. We show how resonances at harmonics of the cyclotron frequency come about, and how the physics can be different depending on whether E⊥ is in or perpendicular to the plane containing k and B0 (k is wave vector, and E⊥ is the component of the wave electric field perpendicular to B0). If E⊥ is in the k-B0 plane, the resonances are analogous to the Landau resonance and arise because the particle tends to stay in phase with the wave during the part of its orbit when it is interacting most strongly with E⊥. If E⊥ is perpendicular to the k-B0 plane, then the resonances depend on the fact that the particle is at different positions during the parts of its orbit when it is interacting most strongly with E⊥. Our main results are our refid="df10" type="formula">equations (10), refid="df11" type="formula">(11), and refid="df13" type="formula">(13) for the secular rate of energy gain (or loss) by a resonant particle and the unfamiliar result that ions can resonate with a purely right-hand circularly polarized wave if the propagation is oblique. We conclude with some speculations about the origin of highly obliquely propagating ion resonant waves in the corona and solar wind. We point out that there are a number of instabilities that may generate such waves locally in the corona and solar wind.

  18. Synchronic Coronal Hole Mapping Using Multi-instrument EUV Images: Data Preparation and Detection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Linker, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a method for the automatic mapping of coronal holes (CHs) using simultaneous multi-instrument EUV imaging data. Synchronized EUV images from STEREO/EUVI A and B 195 Å and SDO/AIA 193 Å are preprocessed, including point-spread function deconvolution and the application of data-derived intensity corrections which account for center-to-limb variations (limb brightening) and inter-instrument intensity normalization. We systematically derive a robust limb-brightening correction that takes advantage of unbiased long-term averages of data and respects the physical nature of the problem. The new preprocessing greatly assists in CH detection, allowing for the use of a simplified variable-connectivity, two-threshold region-growing image segmentation algorithm to obtain consistent detection results. We generate synchronic EUV and CH maps, and show a preliminary analysis of CH evolution. Several data and code products are made available to the community (www.predsci.com/chd): for the period of this study (2010 June 10 to 2014 August 18), we provide synchronic EUV and CH map data at 6 hr cadence, data-derived limb-brightening corrections for STEREO/EUVI A and B 195 Å and SDO/AIA 193 Å, and inter-instrument correction factors to equate their intensities. We also provide the CH image segmentation code module (ezseg) implemented in both FORTRAN-OpenMP and GPU-accelerated C-CUDA. A complete implementation of our CH detection pipeline in the form of a ready-to-use MATLAB driver script euv2chm utilizing ezseg is also made available.

  19. Observation of High-speed Outflow on Plume-like Structures of the Quiet Sun and Coronal Holes with SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Habbal, Shadia Rifal; He, Jiansen

    2011-01-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s-1 at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun regions. Outflows are also visible in the "interplume" regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the quiet Sun and coronal holes, and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mas...

  20. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun: Insight Relative to Coronal Holes, Sunspots, and Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While mankind will always remain unable to sample the interior of the Sun, the presence of sunspots and coronal holes can provide clues as to its subsurface structure. Insight relative to the solar body can also be gained by recognizing that the Sun must exist in the condensed state and support a discrete lattice structure, as required for the production of its continuous spectrum. In this regard, the layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice advanced as a condensed model of the Sun (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47; Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press provides the ability to add structure to the solar interior. This constitutes a significant advantage over the gaseous solar models. In fact, a layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice and the associated intercalation of non-hydrogen elements can help to account for the position of sunspots and coronal holes. At the same time, this model provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms which drive solar winds and activity.

  1. Numerical solution of multiple hole problem by using boundary integral equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies a numerical solution of multiple hole problem by using a boundary integral equation.The studied problem can be considered as a supposition of many single hole problems.After considering the interaction among holes,an algebraic equation is formulated,which is then solved by using an iteration technique.The hoop stress around holes can be finally determined. One numerical example is provided to check its accuracy.

  2. Influence of a coronal envelope as a free boundary to global convective dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2015-01-01

    We explore the effects of an outer stably stratified coronal envelope on rotating turbulent convection, differential rotation, and large-scale dynamo action in spherical wedge models of the Sun. We solve the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in a two-layer model with unstable stratification below the surface, representing the convection zone, and a stably stratified outer layer, the coronal envelope. The interface emulates essentially a free surface. We compare with models that have no coronal envelope. The presence of a coronal envelope is found to modify the Reynolds stress and the $\\Lambda$-effect resulting in a weaker and non-cylindrical differential rotation. This is related to the reduced latitudinal temperature variations, which are caused by and dependent on the Coriolis force. Some simulations develop a rudimentary near-surface shear layer, which we can relate to a sign change of the meridional Reynolds stress term in the thermal wind balance equation. Furthermore, the presence of a free sur...

  3. Boundary Causality vs Hyperbolicity for Spherical Black Holes in Gauss-Bonnet

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Tomas; Keeler, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    We explore the constraints boundary causality places on the allowable Gauss-Bonnet gravitational couplings in asymptotically AdS spaces, specifically considering spherical black hole solutions. We additionally consider the hyperbolicity properties of these solutions, positing that hyperbolicity-violating solutions are sick solutions whose causality properties provide no information about the theory they reside in. For both signs of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling, spherical black holes violate boundary causality at smaller absolute values of the coupling than planar black holes do. For negative coupling, as we tune the Gauss-Bonnet coupling away from zero, both spherical and planar black holes violate hyperbolicity before they violate boundary causality. For positive coupling, the only hyperbolicity-respecting spherical black holes which violate boundary causality do not do so appreciably far from the planar bound. Consequently, eliminating hyperbolicity-violating solutions means the bound on Gauss-Bonnet couplings...

  4. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-01

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the `emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the `legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament.

  5. A Comparison of Solar Energetic Particle Events with 1 AU Magnetic Field Connections to Solar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Stephen W.; Arge, C. N.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-05-01

    The observed properties of solar energetic particle (SEP) events are known to depend on the source locations and speeds of their associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, the CME characteristics cannot account for a great deal of the variability in SEP event intensities and time scales. It has long been suspected that the presence of coronal holes (CHs) near the CMEs or near the 1 AU magnetic footpoints may be an important factor in SEP events. We use a group of E 20 MeV SEP events with origins near solar central meridian to look for possible CH effects. The CH connections from 1 AU are determined from the 4-day forecast maps based on Mount Wilson Observatory and the National Solar Observatory synoptic magnetic field maps and the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model of solar wind propagation. The observed in situ magnetic field polarities and solar wind speeds at SEP event onsets test the forecast accuracies to select the best SEP/CH connection events for analysis. The SEP event properties are then compared with the relative locations and separations of the CMEs and the 1 AU footpoints to determine whether and how the CHs may affect SEP events.

  6. Self-consistent Black Hole Accretion Spectral Models and the Forgotten Role of Coronal Comptonization of Reflection Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, James F.; García, Javier A.; Eikmann, Wiebke; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Brenneman, Laura W.; Dauser, Thomas; Fabian, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    Continuum and reflection spectral models have each been widely employed in measuring the spins of accreting black holes. However, the two approaches have not been implemented together in a photon-conserving, self-consistent framework. We develop such a framework using the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 as a touchstone source, and we demonstrate three important ramifications. (1) Compton scattering of reflection emission in the corona is routinely ignored, but is an essential consideration given that reflection is linked to the regimes with strongest Comptonization. Properly accounting for this causes the inferred reflection fraction to increase substantially, especially for the hard state. Another important impact of the Comptonization of reflection emission by the corona is the downscattered tail. Downscattering has the potential to mimic the relativistically broadened red wing of the Fe line associated with a spinning black hole. (2) Recent evidence for a reflection component with a harder spectral index than the power-law continuum is naturally explained as Compton-scattered reflection emission. (3) Photon conservation provides an important constraint on the hard state’s accretion rate. For bright hard states, we show that disk truncation to large scales R\\gg {R}{ISCO} is unlikely as this would require accretion rates far in excess of the observed \\dot{M} of the brightest soft states. Our principal conclusion is that when modeling relativistically broadened reflection, spectral models should allow for coronal Compton scattering of the reflection features, and when possible, take advantage of the additional constraining power from linking to the thermal disk component.

  7. 冕洞内矢量磁场的分布和演化%Distribution and Evolution of Vector Magnetic Fields in Coronal Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨书红

    2012-01-01

    the shifts of CH boundaries, and prove that the magnetic reconnection at CH boundaries maintains the rigid rotation of CHs. (5) Structures and evolution of polar plumes in the north polar CH. With the total solar eclipse observations, we investigate the properties and evolution of the polar plumes. The results reveal that the plumes which are closer to the CH center are more vertical. It seems that the lifetimes of plumes are much longer than the timescale of eclipse, and there may be no short timescale oscillations. The above results are helpful for us to understand the properties of CHs, and to get more insight into the evolution of CHs and the magnetic activities in CHs. As the source of fast solar wind, CHs are one kind of triggering regions of space weather. Therefore, our results can also provide an essential physical basis and observational evidence for studying the mechanism of solar wind acceleration and the course of space weather. Coronal holes (CHs) are low density and low temperature regions in the solar corona, and they are the sources of fast solar wind. Nowadays, many properties of CHs are far from being understood. Magnetic fields are the key to understand the solar phenomena. Therefore, we try to answer the questions relative to CHs by studying the distribution and evolution of magnetic fields, especially the vector magnetic fields, in CHs.

  8. Running boundary actions, Asymptotic Safety, and black hole thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, D

    2012-01-01

    Previous explorations of the Asymptotic Safety scenario in Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) by means of the effective average action and its associated functional renormalization group (RG) equation assumed spacetime manifolds which have no boundaries. Here we take a first step towards a generalization for non-trivial boundaries, restricting ourselves to action functionals which are at most of second order in the derivatives acting on the metric. We analyze two examples of truncated actions with running boundary terms: full fledged QEG within the single-metric Einstein-Hilbert (EH) truncation, augmented by a scale dependent Gibbons-Hawking (GH) surface term, and a bi-metric truncation for gravity coupled to scalar matter fields. The latter contains 17 running couplings, related to both bulk and boundary terms, whose beta-functions are computed in the induced gravity approximation. We find that the bulk and the boundary Newton constant, pertaining to the EH and GH term, respectively, show opposite RG running; pr...

  9. Solar Cycle Variation of Microwave Polar Brightening and EUV Coronal Hole Observed by Nobeyama Radioheliograph and SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Park, Jong-Yeop; Kim, Yeon-Han

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the solar cycle variation of microwave and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) intensity in latitude to compare microwave polar brightening (MPB) with the EUV polar coronal hole (CH). For this study, we used the full-sun images observed in 17 GHz of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph from 1992 July to 2016 November and in two EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å and 171 Å on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) from 2011 January to 2016 November. As a result, we found that the polar intensity in EUV is anti-correlated with the polar intensity in microwave. Since the depression of EUV intensity in the pole is mostly owing to the CH appearance and continuation there, the anti-correlation in the intensity implies the intimate association between the polar CH and the MPB. Considering the report of tet{gopal99} that the enhanced microwave brightness in the CH is seen above the enhanced photospheric magnetic field, we suggest that the pole area during the solar minimum has a stronger magnetic field than the quiet sun level and such a strong field in the pole results in the formation of the polar CH. The emission mechanism of the MPB and the physical link with the polar CH are not still fully understood. It is necessary to investigate the MPB using high resolution microwave imaging data, which can be obtained by the high performance large-array radio observatories such as the ALMA project.

  10. O VI 1032 Å intensity and Doppler shift oscillations above a coronal hole: Magnetosonic waves or quasi-periodic upflows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, S.; Raymond, J. C.; Rubinetti, S.; Taricco, C.

    2016-08-01

    On 1996 December 19, the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) conducted a special high-cadence sit-and-stare observation in the O vi 1032 Å spectral line above a polar coronal hole at a heliocentric distance of 1.38 R⊙. The ~ 9-h dataset was analyzed by applying advanced spectral techniques to investigate the possible presence of propagating waves. Highly significant oscillations in O vi intensity (P = 19.5 min) and Doppler shift (P = 7.2 min) were detected over two different portions of the UVCS entrance slit. A cross-correlation analysis between the O vi intensity and Doppler shift fluctuations shows that the most powerful oscillations were in phase or anti-phase over the same portions of the slit, thus providing a possible signature of propagating magnetosonic waves. The episodic nature of the observed oscillations and the large amplitudes of the Doppler shift fluctuations detected in our observations, if not attributable to line-of-sight effects or inefficient damping, may indicate that the observed fluctuations were produced by quasi-periodic upflows.

  11. Extraction of Active Regions and Coronal Holes from EUV Images Using the Unsupervised Segmentation Method in the Bayesian Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Arish, Saeid; Safari, Hossein; Amiri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The solar corona is the origin of very dynamic events that are mostly produced in active regions (AR) and coronal holes (CH). The exact location of these large-scale features can be determined by applying image-processing approaches to extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) data. We here investigate the problem of segmentation of solar EUV images into ARs, CHs, and quiet-Sun (QS) images in a firm Bayesian way. On the basis of Bayes' rule, we need to obtain both prior and likelihood models. To find the prior model of an image, we used a Potts model in non-local mode. To construct the likelihood model, we combined a mixture of a Markov-Gauss model and non-local means. After estimating labels and hyperparameters with the Gibbs estimator, cellular learning automata were employed to determine the label of each pixel. We applied the proposed method to a Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) dataset recorded during 2011 and found that the mean value of the filling factor of ARs is 0.032 and 0.057 for...

  12. Observational Quantification of the Energy Dissipated by Alfv\\'en Waves in a Polar Coronal Hole: Evidence that Waves Drive the Fast Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the energy carried and dissipated by Alfv\\'en waves in a polar coronal hole. Alfv\\'en waves have been proposed as the energy source that heats the corona and drives the solar wind. Previous work has shown that line widths decrease with height in coronal holes, which is a signature of wave damping, but have been unable to quantify the energy lost by the waves. This is because line widths depend on both the non-thermal velocity v_nt and the ion temperature T_i. We have implemented a means to separate the T_i and v_nt contributions using the observation that at low heights the waves are undamped and the ion temperatures do not change with height. This enables us to determine the amount of energy carried by the waves at low heights, which is proportional to v_nt. We find the initial energy flux density present was 6.7 +/- 0.7 x 10^5 erg cm^-2 s^-1, which is sufficient to heat the coronal hole and acccelerate the solar wind during the 2007 - 2009 solar minimum. Additionally, we find tha...

  13. Instability of asymptotically anti de Sitter black holes under Robin conditions at the timelike boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Araneda, Bernardo

    2016-01-01

    The static region outside the event horizon of an asymptotically anti de Sitter black hole has a conformal timelike boundary $\\mathscr{I}$, the evolution from initial data of linear fields satisfying hyperbolic equations is a well posed problem only after imposing boundary conditions at $\\mathscr{I}$. Boundary conditions preserving the action of the background isometry group on the solution space are limited to the homogeneous Dirichlet, Neumann or Robin types. We study, scalar and Maxwell fields and gravitational perturbations on asymptotically AdS black holes arising in Einstein and Lovelock theories. A decomposition in modes transforms the field equations into a set of wave equations with time independent potentials for auxiliary fields in the $x<0$ half of 1+1 Minkowski spacetime. We study systematically these equations for the case of potentials not diverging at the boundary and prove that there is always an instability if Robin boundary conditions with large $\\gamma$ (the quotient between the derivat...

  14. Coronal outflow dominated accretion discs a new possibility for low luminosity black holes?

    CERN Document Server

    Merloni, A

    2002-01-01

    The spectral energy distributions of galactic black holes in the low/hard state and of low-luminosity AGN possess many common features, the most prominent being: compact, flat (or inverted) spectrum radio cores with high brightness temperatures; excess red and infrared emission, often correlated with the radio flux; an extremely weak (or absent) quasi-thermal hump and a hard X-ray power-law with high energy cut-off. These sources are thought to be accreting at low rates and advection (or convection) dominated accretion flows are usually considered the best candidates to explain them. Here we present an alternative possibility, involving strong, unbound, magnetic coronae generated by geometrically thin, optically thick accretion discs at low accretion rates. First we show that, if angular momentum transport in the disc is due to magnetic turbulent stresses, the magnetic energy density and effective viscous stresses inside the disc are proportional to the geometric mean of the total (gas plus radiation) and gas...

  15. Long Lifetime Hole Traps at Grain Boundaries in CdTe Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, B. G.; Gachet, D.; Major, J. D.; Durose, K.

    2015-11-01

    A novel time-resolved cathodoluminescence method, where a pulsed electron beam is generated via the photoelectric effect, is used to probe individual CdTe grain boundaries. Excitons have a short lifetime (≤100 ps ) within the grains and are rapidly quenched at the grain boundary. However, a ˜47 meV shallow acceptor, believed to be due to oxygen, can act as a long lifetime hole trap, even at the grain boundaries where their concentration is higher. This provides direct evidence supporting recent observations of hopping conduction across grain boundaries in highly doped CdTe at low temperature.

  16. Radiatively Driven Winds from Effective Boundary Layer around Black Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Chattopadhyay; Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2002-03-01

    Matter accreting onto black holes suffers a standing or oscillating shock wave in much of the parameter space. The post-shock region is hot, puffed up and reprocesses soft photons from a Keplerian disc to produce the characteristic hard tail of the spectrum of accretion discs. The post-shock torus is also the base of the bipolar jets. We study the interaction of these jets with the hard photons emitted from the disc. We show that radiative force can accelerate outflows but the drag can limit the terminal speed. We introduce an equilibrium speed eq as a function of distance, above which the flow will experience radiative deceleration.

  17. Charge States and FIP Bias of the Solar Wind from Coronal Holes, Active Regions, and Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, Maria S.; Xia, LiDong; Li, Bo; Huang, ZhengHua; Wangguan, Zhipeng

    2017-02-01

    Connecting in situ measured solar-wind plasma properties with typical regions on the Sun can provide an effective constraint and test to various solar wind models. We examine the statistical characteristics of the solar wind with an origin in different types of source regions. We find that the speed distribution of coronal-hole (CH) wind is bimodal with the slow wind peaking at ∼400 km s‑1 and the fast at ∼600 km s‑1. An anti-correlation between the solar wind speeds and the O7+/O6+ ion ratio remains valid in all three types of solar wind as well during the three studied solar cycle activity phases, i.e., solar maximum, decline, and minimum. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range and its average values all decrease with the increasing solar wind speed in different types of solar wind. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range (0.06–0.40, first ionization potential (FIP) bias range 1–7) for active region wind is wider than for CH wind (0.06–0.20, FIP bias range 1–3), while the minimum value of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} (∼ 0.06) does not change with the variation of speed, and it is similar for all source regions. The two-peak distribution of CH wind and the anti-correlation between the speed and O7+/O6+ in all three types of solar wind can be explained qualitatively by both the wave-turbulence-driven and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, whereas the distribution features of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} in different source regions of solar wind can be explained more reasonably by the RLO models.

  18. The kinematics of an untwisting solar jet in a polar coronal hole observed by SDO/AIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Dong Chen; Jun Zhang; Su-Li Ma

    2012-01-01

    Using the multi-wavelength data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft,we study a jet occurring in a coronal hole near the northern pole of the Sun.The jet presented distinct upward helical motion during ejection.By tracking six identified moving features (MFs) in the jet,we found that the plasma moved at an approximately constant speed along the jet's axis.Meanwhile,the MFs made a circular motion in the plane transverse to the axis.Inferred from linear and trigonometric fittings to the axial and transverse heights of the six tracks,the mean values of the axial velocities,transverse velocities,angular speeds,rotation periods,and rotation radii of the jet are 114 km s-1,136 km s-1,0.81° s-1,452 s and 9.8 x 103 km respectively.As the MFs rose,the jet width at the corresponding height increased.For the first time,we derived the height variation of the longitudinal magnetic field strength in the jet from the assumption of magnetic flux conservation.Our results indicate that at heights of 1 × 104 ~ 7 ×104 km from the base of the jet,the flux density in the jet decreases from about 15 to 3 G as a function of B =0.5(R/R⊙ - 1)-0.84 (G).A comparison was made with other results in previous studies.

  19. Dynamical Excision Boundaries in Spectral Evolutions of Binary Black Hole Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hemberger, Daniel A; Kidder, Lawrence E; Szilágyi, Béla; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of binary black holes systems using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) are done on a computational domain that excises the regions surrounding the black holes. It is imperative that the excision boundaries are outflow boundaries with respect to the hyperbolic evolution equations used in the simulation. We employ a time-dependent mapping between the fixed computational frame and the inertial frame through which the black holes move. The time-dependent parameters of the mapping are adjusted throughout the simulation by a feedback control system in order to follow the motion of the black holes, to adjust the shape and size of the excision surfaces so that they remain outflow boundaries, and to prevent large distortions of the grid. We describe in detail the mappings and control systems that we use. We show how these techniques have been essential in the evolution of binary black hole systems with extreme configurations, such as large spin magnitudes and high mass ratios, especially during the merger, ...

  20. Influence of boundary geometry in domain wall propagation in magnetic films with asymmetric holes: Micromagnetic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alija, A; Sobrado, I; Rodriguez-RodrIguez, G; Velez, M; Alameda, J M; MartIn, J I [Dpto. Fisica. Fac. Ciencias. Universidad de Oviedo - CINN. 33007, Oviedo (Spain); Parrondo, J M R, E-mail: a.alija@cinn.e [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear and GISD. Universidad Complutense de Madrid. 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed in uniaxial magnetic films with 2D array of asymmetric arrow shape holes. In order to understand the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes, different boundary geometries conditions are used on the simulations. The depinning fields for forward and backward domain wall propagation have been calculated by the analysis of the energy landscapes as a function of the domain wall position. Domain wall depinning occurs preferentially at the free ends of the domain wall at the film boundaries. We have found that the domain wall propagation is different at the top/bottom boundaries of the simulated film which can be understood in terms of the magnetostatic energy and the chirality of the domain wall.

  1. HOT WIRE MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER ON A FILM COOLING PLATE WITH DIFFUSION HOLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This study experimentally investigated the film cooling flowfield of a single row of diffusion holes, from which the secondary air flow was injected into a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient on a flat plate. Circular-shaped holes were also tested as a basis for comparison. All the holes were inclined downstream at 35° with respect to the surface and the lateral spacing between the holes was 3 diameters of the hole. The mainstream velocity was maintained at 17 m/s and the Reynolds number based on the injection hole diameter was almost 11000. The density ratio of the jet to mainstream was 1.0, and the jet-to-mainstream velocity ratios M were 0.5 and 1.5. Normal-type and X-type hot wire anemometries were used to measure the streamwise mean velocity and its components, the normal and shear turbulent Reynolds stress components at the locations from the backward edge of the injection hole to 25 diameters downstream.

  2. Latitude variation of recurrent MeV-energy proton flux enhancements in the heliocentric radial range 11 to 20 AU and possible correlation with solar coronal hole dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Recurrent low energy (not less than 0.5 MeV) proton flux enhancements, reliable indicators of corotating plasma interaction regions in interplanetary space, have been observed on the Voyager 1 and 2 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft in the heliographic latitude range 2 deg S to 23 deg N and the heliocentric radial range 11 to 20 AU. After a period of rather high correlation between fluxes at different latitudes in early 1983, distinct differences develop. The evolution of the fluxes appears to be related to the temporal and latitudinal dynamics of solar coronal holes, suggesting that information about the latitudinal structure of solar wind stream sources propagates to these distances.

  3. Inner boundary conditions for black hole initial data derived from isolated horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, José Luis; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Marugán, Guillermo A.

    2004-12-01

    We present a set of boundary conditions for solving the elliptic equations in the initial data problem for space-times containing a black hole, together with a number of constraints to be satisfied by the otherwise freely specifiable standard parameters of the conformal thin sandwich formulation. These conditions altogether are sufficient for the construction of a horizon that is instantaneously in equilibrium in the sense of the isolated horizons formalism. We then investigate the application of these conditions to the initial data problem of binary black holes and discuss the relation of our analysis with other proposals that exist in the literature.

  4. Inner boundary conditions for black hole Initial Data derived from Isolated Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, J L; Mena-Marugán, G A

    2004-01-01

    We present a set of boundary conditions for solving the elliptic equations in the Initial Data problem for space-times containing a black hole, together with a number of constraints to be satisfied by the freely specifiable standard parameters of the Conformal Thin Sandwich formulation. These conditions altogether are sufficient for the construction of a horizon that is instantaneously in equilibrium in the sense of the Isolated Horizons formalism. We then investigate the application of these conditions to the Initial Data problem of binary black holes and discuss the relation of our analysis with other proposals that exist in the literature.

  5. Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, Nancy; Joselyn, Jo Ann; Feynman, Joan

    The early 1970's can be said to mark the beginning of The Enlightenment in the history of the Space Age, literally as well as by analogy to European history. Instruments blinded by Earth's atmosphere were lifted above and, for the first time, saw clearly and continuously the ethereal white light and sparkling x-rays from the solar corona. From these two bands of the light spectrum came images of coronal mass ejections and coronal holes, respectively. But whereas coronal holes were immediately identified as the source of high-speed solar wind streams, at first coronal mass ejections were greeted only by a sense of wonder. It took years of research to identify their signatures in the solar wind before the fastest ones could be identified with the well-known shock disturbances that cause the most violent space storms.

  6. Observations of solar coronal holes using radio (GMRT & GRH), extreme ultra-violet (SOHO-EIT) and X-ray (GOES-SXI) imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, F. R. H.; Ramesh, R.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Subramanian, P.; Cecatto, J. R.; Sawant, H. S.

    Solar observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope GMRT on 06 04 2005 at 150 MHz show evidence for a radio counterpart to a Coronal Hole CH observed as a depression in the radio brightness distribution on the solar disk In this work we compare the structural details of the radio CH using the GMRT observations and the Extreme Ultra Violet EUV and Soft X-Ray SXR images obtained with the SoHO EIT and GOES SXI respectively We also study the density temperature inside the same CH using 115 MHz data from the Gauribidanur Radioheliograph GRH We present and discuss our results for the radio counterpart to this CH focusing on the comparison of its position and size as determined from EUV and SXR with the parameters determined from the GMRT map and on the determination of plasma parameters from the GRH map

  7. The kinetic magnetoelectric effect in laterally boundary-confined ballistic two-dimensional hole gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Hai-Tao; Hu Liang-Bin; Zhang Xin-Ding; Zhu Shi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the characteristics of the kinetic magnetoelectric effect in laterally boundary-confined ballistic two-dimensional hole gases.It was shown that,though the momentum-dependent effective magnetic fields felt by charge carriers due to the spin-orbit interaction are in-plane orientated in such systems,both in-plane polarized and normal polarized nonequilibrium spin polarization densities could be electrically induced by the kinetic magnetoelectric effect,and the induced nonequilibrium spin polarizations exhibit some interesting characteristics.The characteristics we found indicate that there may be some possible relation between this effect and some recent experimental findings.

  8. The mutual influence of the boundaries of a hole and the faces of a cylindrical shell under distention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakora, S.V.; Zakora, L.V.; Chekhov, V.N.

    1995-09-10

    We consider the problem of distention of a thin circular cylindrical shell of finite length weakened by a circular slit. On the basis of the complex equations of the theory of cylindrical shells we construct a solution that makes it possible to take account of the influence of the boundaries of the hole and the faces. Using the method of boundary collocations and taking account of the conditions for single-valuedness of the displacements, we reduce the problem to a system of linear algebraic equations. We study numerically the behavior of the membrane stresses as the boundaries of the hole and the faces are moved closer together.

  9. Coronal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The lectures present the foundation of solar coronal physics with the main emphasis on the MHD theory and on wave and oscillatory phenomena. We discuss major challenges of the modern coronal physics; the main plasma structures observed in the corona and the conditions for their equilibrium; phenomenology of large scale long period oscillatory coronal phenomena and their theoretical modelling as MHD waves. The possibility of the remote diagnostics of coronal plasmas with the use of MHD oscillations is demonstrated.

  10. Through the Looking Glass: AdS-FT with time dependent boundary conditions and black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Copsey, K

    2004-01-01

    I solve for the behavior of scalars in Lorentzian AdS with time dependent boundary conditions, focusing in particular on the dilaton. This corresponds, via the AdS-CFT correspondence, to considering a gauge theory with a time dependent coupling. Changes which keep the gauge coupling nonzero result in finite but physically interesting states in the bulk, including black holes, while sending the gauge coupling to zero appears to produce a cosmological singularity in the bulk.

  11. Photospheric magnetic field of an eroded-by-solar-wind coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast wind of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic field. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.

  12. Central charges and boundary fields for two dimensional dilatonic black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinamonti, N

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we first show that within the Hamiltonian description of general relativity, the central charge of a near horizon asymptotic symmetry group is zero, and therefore that the entropy of the system cannot be estimated using Cardy's formula. This is done by mapping a static black hole to a two dimensional plane. We explain how such a charge can only appear to a static observer who chooses to stay permanently outside the black hole. Then an alternative argument is given for the presence of a universal central charge. Finally we suggest an effective quantum theory on the horizon that is compatible with the thermodynamics behaviour of the black hole.

  13. The Bisognano-Wichmann theorem for charged states and the conformal boundary of a black hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Longo

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This note concerns the study of the incremental entropy of a quantum black hole, based on Operator Algebra methods. Our results are based on the results presented in the references [6,11,12,13].

  14. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal dimming using a combination of high resolution spectro-polarimetric, spectral and broadband images which span from the deep photosphere into the corona. These observations reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings, or transient coronal holes as they are also known, are indeed the locations of open magnetic flux in the corona resulting from the launch of a CME. We will see that, as open magnetic regions, they must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. An inescapable question therefore arises - what impact does this source of fast wind have on the propagation and in-flight characteristics of the CME that initiates the coronal dimming in the first place?

  15. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  16. State-dependent bulk-boundary maps and black hole complementarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2014-01-01

    We provide a simple and explicit construction of local bulk operators that describe the interior of a black hole in the AdS/CFT correspondence. The existence of these operators is predicated on the assumption that the mapping of CFT operators to local bulk operators depends on the state of the CFT.

  17. Considering boundary conditions for black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tamaki, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We argue for black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity (LQG) by taking into account the interpretation that there is no other side of the horizon. This gives new values for the Barbero-Immirzi parameter which are fairly larger than those considered before. We also discuss its consequences.

  18. Observation of Blobs and Holes in the Boundary Plasma of EAST Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Xu, Guosheng; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent convective transport at the edge and in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of EAST was investigated by using fast reciprocating Langmuir probe. Holes, as part of plasma structures, were detected for the first time inside the shear layer. The amplitude probability distribution function...

  19. Monitoring Holes in the Sun's Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Coronal holes are where the fast solar wind streams out of the Suns atmosphere, sending charged particles on rapid trajectories out into the solar system. A new study examines how the distribution of coronal holes has changed over the last 40 years.Coronal holes form where magnetic field lines open into space (B) instead of looping back to the solar surface (A). [Sebman81]Source of the Fast Solar WindAs a part of the Suns natural activity cycle, extremely low-density regions sometimes form in the solar corona. These coronal holes manifest themselves as dark patches in X-ray and extreme ultraviolet imaging, since the corona is much hotter than the solar surface that peeks through from underneath it.Coronal holes form when magnetic field lines open into space instead of looping back to the solar surface. In these regions, the solar atmosphere escapes via these field lines, rapidly streaming away from the Suns surface in whats known as the fast solar wind.Coronal Holes Over Space and TimeAutomated detection of coronal holes from image-based analysis is notoriously difficult. Recently, a team of scientists led by Kenichi Fujiki (ISEE, Nagoya University, Japan) has developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes that relies instead on magnetic-field data for the Sun, obtained at the National Solar Observatorys Kitt Peak between 1975 and 2014. The team used these data to produce a database of 3335 coronal hole predictions over nearly 40 years.Latitude distribution of 2870 coronal holes (each marked by an x; color indicates polarity), overlaid on the magnetic butterfly map of the Sun. The low-latitude coronal holes display a similar butterfly pattern, in which they move closer to the equator over the course of the solar cycle. Polar coronal holes are more frequent during solar minima. [Fujiki et al. 2016]Examining trends in the coronal holes distribution in latitude and time, Fujiki and collaborators find a strong correlation between the total area covered

  20. Analytical Solutions for an Escape Problem in a Disc with an Arbitrary Distribution of Exit Holes Along Its Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    We analytically construct solutions for the mean first-passage time and splitting probabilities for the escape problem of a particle moving with continuous Brownian motion in a confining planar disc with an arbitrary distribution (i.e., of any number, size and spacing) of exit holes/absorbing sections along its boundary. The governing equations for these quantities are Poisson's equation with a (non-zero) constant forcing term and Laplace's equation, respectively, and both are subject to a mixture of homogeneous Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our solutions are expressed as explicit closed formulae written in terms of a parameterising variable via a conformal map, using special transcendental functions that are defined in terms of an associated Schottky group. They are derived by exploiting recent results for a related problem of fluid mechanics that describes a unidirectional flow over "no-slip/no-shear" surfaces, as well as results from potential theory, all of which were themselves derived using the same theory of Schottky groups. They are exact up to the determination of a finite set of mapping parameters, which is performed numerically. Their evaluation also requires the numerical inversion of the parameterising conformal map. Computations for a series of illustrative examples are also presented.

  1. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  2. Between-group behaviour in health care: gaps, edges, boundaries, disconnections, weak ties, spaces and holes. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braithwaite Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaps are typically regarded as a problem to be solved. People are stimulated to close or plug them. Researchers are moved to fill deficits in the literature in order to realise a more complete knowledge base, health authorities want to bridge policy-practice disconnections, managers to secure resources to remedy shortfalls between poor and idealised care, and clinicians to provide services to patients across the divides of organisational silos. Despite practical and policy work in many health systems to bridge gaps, it is valuable to study research examining them for the insights provided. Structural holes, spaces between social clusters and weak or absent ties represent fissures in networks, located in less densely populated parts of otherwise closely connected social structures. Such gaps are useful as they illustrate how communication potentially breaks down or interactivity fails. This paper discusses empirical and theoretical work on this phenomenon with the aim of analysing a specific exemplar, the structures of silos within health care organisations. Methods The research literature on social spaces, holes, gaps, boundaries and edges was searched systematically, and separated into health [n = 13] and non-health [n = 55] samples. The health literature was reviewed and synthesised in order to understand the circumstances between stakeholders and stakeholder groups that both provide threats to networked interactions and opportunities to strengthen the fabric of organisational and institutional inter-relationships. Results The research examples illuminate various network structure characteristics and group interactions. They explicate a range of opportunities for improved social and professional relations that understanding structural holes, social spaces and absent ties affords. A principal finding is that these kinds of gaps illustrate the conditions under which connections are strained or have been severed, where the

  3. Full Coverage Shaped Hole Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer with High Free-Stream Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest E. [University of North Dakota; Kingery, Joseph E. [University of North Dakota

    2015-06-17

    Full coverage shaped-hole film cooling and downstream heat transfer measurements have been acquired in the accelerating flows over a large cylindrical leading edge test surface. The shaped holes had an 8° lateral expansion angled at 30° to the surface with spanwise and streamwise spacings of 3 diameters. Measurements were conducted at four blowing ratios, two Reynolds numbers and six well documented turbulence conditions. Film cooling measurements were acquired over a four to one range in blowing ratio at the lower Reynolds number and at the two lower blowing ratios for the higher Reynolds number. The film cooling measurements were acquired at a coolant to free-stream density ratio of approximately 1.04. The flows were subjected to a low turbulence condition (Tu = 0.7%), two levels of turbulence for a smaller sized grid (Tu = 3.5%, and 7.9%), one turbulence level for a larger grid (8.1%), and two levels of turbulence generated using a mock aero-combustor (Tu = 9.3% and 13.7%). Turbulence level is shown to have a significant influence in mixing away film cooling coverage progressively as the flow develops in the streamwise direction. Effectiveness levels for the aero-combustor turbulence condition are reduced to as low as 20% of low turbulence values by the furthest downstream region. The film cooling discharge is located close to the leading edge with very thin and accelerating upstream boundary layers. Film cooling data at the lower Reynolds number, show that transitional flows have significantly improved effectiveness levels compared with turbulent flows. Downstream effectiveness levels are very similar to slot film cooling data taken at the same coolant flow rates over the same cylindrical test surface. However, slots perform significantly better in the near discharge region. These data are expected to be very useful in grounding computational predictions of full coverage shaped hole film cooling with elevated turbulence levels and acceleration. IR

  4. Between-group behaviour in health care: gaps, edges, boundaries, disconnections, weak ties, spaces and holes. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2010-12-07

    Gaps are typically regarded as a problem to be solved. People are stimulated to close or plug them. Researchers are moved to fill deficits in the literature in order to realise a more complete knowledge base, health authorities want to bridge policy-practice disconnections, managers to secure resources to remedy shortfalls between poor and idealised care, and clinicians to provide services to patients across the divides of organisational silos.Despite practical and policy work in many health systems to bridge gaps, it is valuable to study research examining them for the insights provided. Structural holes, spaces between social clusters and weak or absent ties represent fissures in networks, located in less densely populated parts of otherwise closely connected social structures. Such gaps are useful as they illustrate how communication potentially breaks down or interactivity fails. This paper discusses empirical and theoretical work on this phenomenon with the aim of analysing a specific exemplar, the structures of silos within health care organisations. The research literature on social spaces, holes, gaps, boundaries and edges was searched systematically, and separated into health [n = 13] and non-health [n = 55] samples. The health literature was reviewed and synthesised in order to understand the circumstances between stakeholders and stakeholder groups that both provide threats to networked interactions and opportunities to strengthen the fabric of organisational and institutional inter-relationships. The research examples illuminate various network structure characteristics and group interactions. They explicate a range of opportunities for improved social and professional relations that understanding structural holes, social spaces and absent ties affords. A principal finding is that these kinds of gaps illustrate the conditions under which connections are strained or have been severed, where the limits of integration between groups occurs, the

  5. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  6. Studies on Three-Dimensional Dynamic Evolution of Filaments and Coronal EUV Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.

    2014-01-01

    . The successful launch of the SDO provides us the third viewpoint to reconstruct filaments. We firstly reconstruct an eruptive filament by applying the three-viewpoint observations from STEREO A, STEREO B, and SDO, and focus on the three-dimensional evolution of a polar crown filament. We find that its eruption is anisotropic, with the latitudinal variation greater than the longitudinal one. The filament moves toward the low-latitude region with a change in inclination of about 48°. SDO observations show that part of the filament material separates from the eastern leg during the late phase of the eruption, and moves along the filament channel with a constant velocity of 140 km\\cdots^{-1}. When the flare in the nearby active region starts, the filament is accelerated simultaneously. The extrapolated coronal magnetic field shows that there are two groups of magnetic structures above the filament; the larger magnetic structures link the filament and the nearby active region; the smaller ones stretch across the polar crown filament. This indicates that the solar activities have a global characteristic. The study on the interaction of coronal EUV wave with coronal structures is an important means to understand the nature of coronal EUV wave. If the coronal EUV wave is a fast-mode magnetosonic wave, it should reflect and deflect from the areas with a large gradient of magnetosonic speed, such as in the boundaries of coronal holes and active regions. If the coronal EUV wave is not a real wave, it should stop at the boundaries of coronal holes and active regions. Using the full-disk, multi-wavelength, high spatial and temporal resolution, and continuous observations of the SDO, we investigate the interaction of the coronal EUV wave with coronal holes, active regions, and coronal bright structures. The results are as follows: (1) the coronal EUV wave has a three-dimensional dome shape, with propagation speeds ranging from 430 to 780 km\\cdots^{-1} in different directions; (2

  7. Jet phenomena above null points of the coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.; Koutchmy, S.; Golub, L.

    2009-12-01

    Short-lived plasma jets of various scales, from giant X-ray jets more than 300 Mm in extent to numerous small jets with sizes typical of macrospicules, are the phenomena observed in the solar corona in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray emission. Small jets are particularly prominent in polar coronal holes. They are close neighbors of tiny bright loops and coincide in time with their sudden brightening and increase in size. The geometric shape of the jets and their location suggest that they arise near singular null points of the coronal magnetic field. These points appear in coronal holes due to the emergence of small bipolar or unipolar magnetic structures within large-scale unipolar cells. Polar jets show a distinct vertical plasma motion in a coronal hole that introduces significant momentum and mass into the solar wind flow. Investigating the dynamics of polar jets can elucidate certain details in the problem of fast solar wind acceleration.

  8. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcope, D W; Tarr, L A

    2015-05-28

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related--i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, [Formula: see text], is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature.

  9. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  10. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  11. Solar coronal jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  12. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  13. Coronal Dynamic Activities in the Declining Phase of a Solar Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Minhwan; Hong, Sunhak; Choe, G S

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that some solar activity indicators show a double-peak feature in their evolution through a solar cycle, which is not conspicuous in sunspot number. In this letter, we investigate the high solar dynamic activity in the declining phase of the sunspot cycle by examining the evolution of polar and low latitude coronal hole areas and the statistics of splitting and merging events of coronal holes and coronal mass ejections detected by SOHO/LASCO C3 in solar cycle 23. Although the total coronal hole area is at its maximum near the sunspot minimum, in which polar coronal holes prevail, it shows a comparable second maximum in the declining phase of the cycle, in which low latitude coronal holes are dominant. The events of coronal hole splitting or merging, which are attributed to surface motions of magnetic fluxes, are also mostly populated in the declining phase of the cycle. The far-reaching C3 coronal mass ejections are also over-populated in the declining phase of the cycle. From these results ...

  14. Coronal influence on dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    We report on turbulent dynamo simulations in a spherical wedge with an outer coronal layer. We apply a two-layer model where the lower layer represents the convection zone and the upper layer the solar corona. This setup is used to study the coronal influence on the dynamo action beneath the surface. Increasing the radial coronal extent gradually to three times the solar radius and changing the magnetic Reynolds number, we find that dynamo action benefits from the additional coronal extent in terms of higher magnetic energy in the saturated stage. The flux of magnetic helicity can play an important role in this context.

  15. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  16. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  17. Coronal "wave": Magnetic Footprint Of A Cme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Demoulin, P.; Wuelser, J.

    2007-05-01

    We propose a new mechanism for the generation of "EUV coronal waves". This work is based on new analysis of data from SOHO/EIT, SOHO/MDI & STEREO/EUVI. Although first observed in 1997, the interpretation of coronal waves as flare-induced or CME-driven remains a debated topic. We investigate the properties of two "classical" SOHO/EIT coronal waves in detail. The source regions of the associated CMEs possess opposite helicities & the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep dimmings near the flare site & also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions & simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behaviour is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME & quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings & widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process. In addition we present some of the first analysis of a STEREO/EUVI limb coronal wave. We show how the evolution of the diffuse bright front & dimmings can be understood in terms of the model described above. We show that an apparently stationary part of the bright front can be understood in terms of magnetic interchange reconnections between the expanding CME & the "open" magnetic field of a low-latitude coronal hole. We use both the SOHO/EIT & STEREO/EUVI events to demonstrate that through successive reconnections, this new model provides a natural mechanism via which CMEs can become large-scale in the lower corona.

  18. Measuring the magnetic field of a trans-equatorial loop system using coronal seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David; Perez-Suarez, David; Valori, Gherardo

    2016-05-01

    First observed by SOHO/EIT, "EIT waves" are strongly associated with the initial evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and after almost 20 years of investigation a consensus is being reached which interprets them as freely-propagating waves produced by the rapid expansion of a CME in the low corona. An "EIT wave" was observed on 6 July 2012 to erupt from active region AR11514 into a particularly structured corona that included multiple adjacent active regions as well as an adjacent trans-equatorial loop system anchored at the boundary of a nearby coronal hole. The eruption was well observed by SDO/AIA and CoMP, allowing the effects of the "EIT wave" on the trans-equatorial loop system to be studied in detail. In particular, it was possible to characterise the oscillation of the loop system using Doppler velocity measurements from CoMP. These Doppler measurements were used to estimate the magnetic field strength of the trans-equatorial loop system via coronal seismology. It was then possible to compare these inferred magnetic field values with extrapolated magnetic field values derived using a Potential Field Source Surface extrapolation as well as the direct measurements of magnetic field provided by CoMP. These results show that the magnetic field strength of loop systems in the solar corona may be estimated using loop seismology.

  19. Interchange reconnection between an active region and a corona hole

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, L; Yan, X L; Xue, Z K

    2013-01-01

    With the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we present a magnetic interaction between an isolated coronal hole (CH) and an emerging active region (AR). The AR emerged nearby the CH and interacted with it. Bright loops constantly formed between them, which led to a continuous retreat of the CH boundaries (CHBs). Meanwhile, two coronal dimmings respectively appeared at the negative polarity of the AR and the east boundary of the bright loops, and the AR was partly disturbed. Loop eruptions followed by a flare occurred in the AR. The interaction was also accompanied by many jets and an arc-shaped brightening that appeared to be observational signatures of magnetic reconnection at the CHBs. By comparing the observations with the derived coronal magnetic configuration, it is suggested that the interaction between the CH and the AR excellently fitted in with the model of interchange reconnection. It appears t...

  20. Modelling quantum black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Govindarajan, T R

    2016-01-01

    Novel bound states are obtained for manifolds with singular potentials. These singular potentials require proper boundary conditions across boundaries. The number of bound states match nicely with what we would expect for black holes. Also they serve to model membrane mechanism for the black hole horizons in simpler contexts. The singular potentials can also mimic expanding boundaries elegantly, there by obtaining appropriately tuned radiation rates.

  1. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  2. Reconnection and Spire Drift in Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    It is observed that there are two morphologically-different kinds of X-ray/EUV jets in coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. In both kinds: (1) in the base of the jet there is closed magnetic field that has one foot in flux of polarity opposite that of the ambient open field of the coronal hole, and (2) in coronal X-ray/EUV images of the jet there is typically a bright nodule at the edge of the base. In the conventional scenario for jets of either kind, the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade, the downward product of interchange reconnection of closed field in the base with impacted ambient open field, and the upper product of this reconnection is the jet-outflow spire. It is also observed that in most jets of either kind the spire drifts sideways away from the bright nodule. We present the observed bright nodule and spire drift in an example standard jet and in two example blowout jets. With cartoons of the magnetic field and its reconnection in jets, we point out: (1) if the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade made by interchange reconnection, then the spire should drift toward the bright nodule, and (2) if the bright nodule is instead a compact flare arcade made, as in a filament-eruption flare, by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting sheared-field core of a lobe of the closed field in the base, then the spire, made by the interchange reconnection that is driven on the outside of that lobe by the lobe’s internal convulsion, should drift away from the bright nodule. Therefore, from the observation that the spire usually drifts away from the bright nodule, we infer: (1) in X-ray/EUV jets of either kind in coronal holes the interchange reconnection that generates the jet-outflow spire usually does not make the bright nodule; instead, the bright nodule is made by reconnection inside erupting closed field in the base, as in a filament eruption, the eruption being either a confined eruption for a standard jet or a blowout eruption (as

  3. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma

    2006-06-01

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona. Recent observations show that Magnetic Carpet is a potential candidate for solar coronal heating.

  4. Earth-Affecting Coronal Mass Ejections Without Obvious Low Coronal Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of the origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were not accompanied by obvious low coronal signatures (LCSs) and yet were responsible for appreciable disturbances at 1 AU. These CMEs characteristically start slowly. In several examples, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal coronal dimming and a post-eruption arcade when we make difference images with long enough temporal separations, which are commensurate with the slow initial development of the CME. Data from the EUV imager and COR coronagraphs of the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, which provide limb views of Earth-bound CMEs, greatly help us limit the time interval in which the CME forms and undergoes initial acceleration. For other CMEs, we find similar dimming, although only with lower confidence as to its link to the CME. It is noted that even these unclear events result in unambiguous flux rope signatures in in situ data at 1 AU. There is a tendency that the CME source regions are located near coronal holes or open field regions. This may have implications for both the initiation of the stealthy CME in the corona and its outcome in the heliosphere.

  5. Nonlinear Force-free Coronal Magnetic Stereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chifu, Iulia; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    Insights into the 3D structure of the solar coronal magnetic field have been obtained in the past by two completely different approaches. The first approach are nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations, which use photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The second approach uses stereoscopy of coronal magnetic loops observed in EUV coronal images from different vantage points. Both approaches have their strengths and weaknesses. Extrapolation methods are sensitive to noise and inconsistencies in the boundary data, and the accuracy of stereoscopy is affected by the ability of identifying the same structure in different images and by the separation angle between the view directions. As a consequence, for the same observational data, the 3D coronal magnetic fields computed with the two methods do not necessarily coincide. In an earlier work (Paper I) we extended our NLFFF optimization code by including stereoscopic constrains. The method was successfully tested with synthetic data, and within this work, we apply the newly developed code to a combined data set from SDO/HMI, SDO/AIA, and the two STEREO spacecraft. The extended method (called S-NLFFF) contains an additional term that monitors and minimizes the angle between the local magnetic field direction and the orientation of the 3D coronal loops reconstructed by stereoscopy. We find that when we prescribe the shape of the 3D stereoscopically reconstructed loops, the S-NLFFF method leads to a much better agreement between the modeled field and the stereoscopically reconstructed loops. We also find an appreciable decrease by a factor of two in the angle between the current and the magnetic field. This indicates the improved quality of the force-free solution obtained by S-NLFFF.

  6. Global Coronal Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2016-01-01

    After the {\\em Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} ({\\em SOHO}) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named "EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the {\\em Solar Dynamics Observatory} ({\\em SDO}) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal...

  7. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I. [Department of AOSS, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Downs, Cooper [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roussev, Ilia I. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Evans, Rebekah M., E-mail: igorsok@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  8. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations compared to those of an isolated loop. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting non-uniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. ...

  9. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; DeRosa, M. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2013-07-01

    The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, or CGEM, is a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin. In work that led up to the selection of this project, the team demonstrated its capability to use sequences of vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument aboard the SDO to drive a magnetofrictional (MF) model of the coronal magnetic field in AR 11158, which produced an X2.2 flare. We will implement this MF model in spherical coordinates to enable real-time, long-term modeling of the non-potential coronal magnetic field, both globally and for individual active region (ARs). The model's Earth-facing hemisphere will be driven using electric fields derived from the observed evolution of photospheric line-of-sight magnetic fields and electric currents. Far-side data inputs will be from an existing flux transport code, combined with HMI far-side observations of new active regions, with empirical parametrizations of orientation and flux. Because this model includes large-scale coronal electric currents, it is a substantial improvement over existing real-time global coronal models, which assume potential fields. Data products available from the model will include: 1) the evolving photospheric electric field, Poynting flux, and helicity flux; 2) estimates of coronal free energy and non-potential geometry and topology; 3) initial and time-dependent boundary conditions for MHD modeling of active regions; and 4) time-dependent boundary conditions and flux tube expansion factors for MHD and empirical solar wind models. Unstable configurations found from MF models will be dynamically evolved with local and global MHD codes. Modules used to derive surface electric fields from magnetic evolution will be incorporated into the SDO/HMI data pipeline, and data products will be distributed through the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) and directly to space

  10. Transverse, Propagating Velocity Perturbations in Solar Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, I; Wright, A N; Hood, A W

    2015-01-01

    This short review paper gives an overview of recently observed transverse, propagating velocity perturbations in coronal loops. These ubiquitous perturbations are observed to undergo strong damping as they propagate. Using 3D numerical simulations of footpoint-driven transverse waves propagating in a coronal plasma with a cylindrical density structure, in combination with analytical modelling, it is demonstrated that the observed velocity perturbations can be understood in terms of coupling of different wave modes in the inhomogeneous boundaries of the loops. Mode coupling in the inhomogeneous boundary layers of the loops leads to the coupling of the transversal (kink) mode to the azimuthal (Alfven) mode, observed as the decay of the transverse kink oscillations. Both the numerical and analytical results show the spatial profile of the damped wave has a Gaussian shape to begin with, before switching to exponential decay at large heights. In addition, recent analysis of CoMP (Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter)...

  11. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  12. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  13. Coronal structure analysis based on the potential field source surface modeling and total solar eclipse observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Johan; Mumtahana, Farahhati; Sutastio, Heri; Imaduddin, Irfan; Putri, Gerhana P.

    2016-11-01

    We constructed global coronal magnetic fields of the Sun during the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) 9 March 2016 by using Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model. Synoptic photospheric magnetogram data from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was used as a boundary condition to extrapolate the coronal magnetic fields of the Sun. This extrapolated structure was analyzed by comparing the alignment of the fields from the model with coronal structure from the observation. We also used observational data of coronal structure during the total solar eclipse to know how well the model agree with the observation. As a result, we could identify several coronal streamers which were produced by the large closed loops in the lower regime of the corona. This result verified that the PFSS extrapolation can be used as a tool to model the inner corona with several constraints. We also discussed how the coronal structure can be used to deduce the phase of the solar cycle.

  14. The Contribution of Coronal Jets To The Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, R; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; MikiĆ, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2016-01-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal j...

  15. Coronal Structure of Low-Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Pauline; Donati, Jean-Francois; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the change in stellar magnetic topology across the fully-convective boundary and its effects on coronal properties. We consider both the magnitude of the open flux that influences angular momentum loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission measure. We use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic field at the stellar surface and the potential-field source surface method to extrapolate a 3D coronal magnetic field for a sample of early-to-mid M dwarfs. During the magnetic reconstruction process it is possible to force a solution towards field geometries that are symmetric or antisymmetric about the equator but we demonstrate that this has only a modest impact on the coronal tracers mentioned above. We find that the dipole component of the field, which governs the large-scale structure, becomes increasingly strong as the stellar mass decreases, while the magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic flux is proportional to the magnitude of the reconstructed magnetic flux. By assuming a hydrostati...

  16. Coronal Pseudo-Streamer and Bipolar Streamer Observed by SOHO/UVCS in March 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Riley, Pete; Wang, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The last solar minimum is characterized by several peculiar aspects and by the presence of a complex magnetic topology with two different kinds of coronal streamers: pseudo-streamers and bipolar streamers. Pseudo-streamers or unipolar streamer are coronal structures which separate coronal holes of the same polarity, without a current sheet in the outer corona; unlike bipolar streamer that separate coronal holes of opposite magnetic polarity. In this study, two examples of these structures have been identified in the period of Carrington rotation 2067, by applying a potential-field source-surface extrapolation of the photospheric field measurements. We present a spectroscopic analysis of a pseudo-streamer and a bipolar streamer observed in the period 12-17 March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS; Kohl et al., 1995) onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The solar wind plasma parameters, such as kinetic temperature, electron density and ou...

  17. Effect of coronal temperature on the scale of solar chromospheric jets

    CERN Document Server

    Iijima, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of coronal temperature on the formation process of solar chromospheric jets using two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the region from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. We develop a new radiative magnetohydrodynamic code for the dynamic modeling of the solar atmosphere, employing a LTE equation of state, optically thick radiative loss in the photosphere, optically thin radiative loss in the chromosphere and the corona, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. Many chromospheric jets are produced in the simulations by shock waves passing through the transition region. We find that these jets are projected farther outward when the coronal temperature is lower (similar to that in coronal holes) and shorter when the coronal temperature is higher (similar to that in active regions). When the coronal temperature is high, the deceleration of the chromospheric jets is consistent with the model in which deceleration is determined by the periodic chromo...

  18. Coronal radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, H S; Frewen, S F N; DeRosa, M L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona has a large-scale dipole character, which maps into the bipolar field in the solar wind. Using standard representations of the coronal field, we show that high-energy ions can be trapped stably in these large-scale closed fields. The drift shells that describe the conservation of the third adiabatic invariant may have complicated geometries. Particles trapped in these zones would resemble the Van Allen Belts and could have detectable consequences. We discuss potential sources of trapped particles.

  19. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, A. C.; Martinez, F.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime 10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Certain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called ``minifilaments,'' erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancellation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted; and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sights of magnetic-field cancelation. Thus our findings support that, at least in many cases, AR coronal jets result from the same physical processes that produce coronal jets in quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. FM was supportedby the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at

  20. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  1. A data driven kinetic approach to coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Toutountzi, A; Isliker, H; Moraitis, K; Georgoulis, M; Chintzoglou, G

    2016-01-01

    Coronal heating through the explosive release of magnetic energy remains an open problem in solar physics. Several one-dimensional hydrodynamical models have been developed over the last decade, using simple approaches for the way energy is deposited and transported in the coronal plasma, namely by inserting 'nanoflares' in the form of 'hot spots' at random sites and times. Our aim in this work is to investigate the problem from a different perspective. With the help of a nonlinear force-free extrapolation method we reconstruct the coronal magnetic field of a well-studied solar active region using an observed photospheric vector magnetogram of the region as the required boundary condition. We then determine the locations, energy contents, and volumes of unstable areas within the active-region corona. These areas include strong gradients in the magnetic field and are naturally connected to three-dimensional current sheets. The statistical distributions of these volumes, their fractal structure and correspondin...

  2. The coronal fricative problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Green, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  3. Coronal Neutrino Emission in Hypercritical Accretion Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, R; Kawanaka, N

    2007-01-01

    Hypercritical accretion flows onto stellar mass black holes (BHs) are commonly considered as a promising model of central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model a certain fraction of gravitational binding energy of accreting matter is deposited to the energy of relativistic jets via neutrino annihilation and/or magnetic fields. However, some recent studies have indicated that the energy deposition rate by neutrino annihilation is somewhat smaller than that needed to power a GRB. To overcome this difficulty, Ramirez-Ruiz & Socrates (2005) proposed that high energy neutrinos from hot corona above the accretion disk might enhance the efficiency of energy deposition. We elucidate the disk corona model in the context of hypercritical accretion flows. From the energy balance in the disk and the corona, we can calculate the disk and coronal temperature, Td and Tc, and neutrino spectra, taking into account the neutrino cooling processes by neutrino-electron scatterings and neutrino pair productions. Th...

  4. SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR JETS CONFINED BY CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyper, P. F. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. R., E-mail: peter.f.wyper@nasa.gov, E-mail: c.richard.devore@nasa.gov [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Coronal jets are collimated, dynamic events that occur over a broad range of spatial scales in the solar corona. In the open magnetic field of coronal holes, jets form quasi-radial spires that can extend far out into the heliosphere, while in closed-field regions the jet outflows are confined to the corona. We explore the application of the embedded-bipole model to jets occurring in closed coronal loops. In this model, magnetic free energy is injected slowly by footpoint motions that introduce twist within the closed dome of the jet source region, and is released rapidly by the onset of an ideal kink-like instability. Two length scales characterize the system: the width (N) of the jet source region and the footpoint separation (L) of the coronal loop that envelops the jet source. We find that both the conditions for initiation and the subsequent dynamics are highly sensitive to the ratio L/N. The longest-lasting and most energetic jets occur along long coronal loops with large L/N ratios, and share many of the features of open-field jets, while smaller L/N ratios produce shorter-duration, less energetic jets that are affected by reflections from the far-loop footpoint. We quantify the transition between these behaviors and show that our model replicates key qualitative and quantitative aspects of both quiet Sun and active-region loop jets. We also find that the reconnection between the closed dome and surrounding coronal loop is very extensive: the cumulative reconnected flux at least matches the total flux beneath the dome for small L/N, and is more than double that value for large L/N.

  5. Effect of Vortex Circulation on Injectant from a Single Film-Cooling Hole and a Row of Film-Cooling Holes in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part 1. Injection Beneath the Vortex Downwash

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    distribution is unlimited ~ PERFORMING ORGAN IZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 5 MONITORING ORGANIZ ATION REPORT NUMBER(S) )a NAM E OF PERF ORMING ORGANIZATION 6b...California, March, 1987. Ort1::, A., "The Thermal Behavoir of Film Cooled Turbulent Boundary Layers as Affected by Long1tudinal Vort1ces", M.E

  6. Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Solar Wind: From the Coronal Base to the Outer Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, A. V; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a global fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model for the region that extends from the coronal base to 100 AU. The simulation domain consists of tree spherical shell subdomains with computational boundaries between them placed at 20 solar radii and 0.3 AU. The location of the first boundary ensures that the flow at the boundary is both supersonic and super-Alfvenic. A steady-state solution in the innermost (coronal) region is obtained by the time-relaxation method. The solution uses a tilted dipole model or solar magnetograms as the boundary condition at the coronal base and includes a flux of Alfven waves in the WKB approximation which provide additional acceleration for the coronal outflow in the open field regions. The intermediate region solution is constructed by the integration of steady-state equations along radius using a marching scheme. The outer region solution (0.3-100 AU) is obtained again by the time relaxation and takes into account turbulence transport and heating as well as heating, flow deceleration, and other effects due to the interstellar pickup protons treated as a separate fluid. We use the model to simulate the global steady-state structure of the solar wind from the coronal base to the heliospheric boundary and compare the results with Ulysses and Voyager observations.

  7. The Sun's Global Photospheric and Coronal Magnetic Fields: Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Mackay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, our present day understanding of the Sun’s global photospheric and coronal magnetic fields is discussed from both observational and theoretical viewpoints. Firstly, the large-scale properties of photospheric magnetic fields are described, along with recent advances in photospheric magnetic flux transport models. Following this, the wide variety of theoretical models used to simulate global coronal magnetic fields are described. From this, the combined application of both magnetic flux transport simulations and coronal modeling techniques to describe the phenomena of coronal holes, the Sun’s open magnetic flux and the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments is discussed. Finally, recent advances in non-eruptive global MHD models are described. While the review focuses mainly on solar magnetic fields, recent advances in measuring and modeling stellar magnetic fields are described where appropriate. In the final section key areas of future research are identified.

  8. Classification and Physical parameters EUV coronal jets with STEREO/SECCHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistico, Giuseppe; Bothmer, Volker; Patsourakos, Spiro; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    In this work we present observations of EUV coronal jets, detected with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. Starting from catalogues of polar and equatorial coronal hole jets (Nistico' et al., Solar Phys., 259, 87, 2009; Ann. Geophys. in press), identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008 when solar activity was at minimum, we perfom a detailed study of some events. A basic char-acterisation of the magnetic morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evo-lution. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events, identified into polar coronal holes, there were 37 Eiffel tower -type jet events commonly interpreted as a small-scale ( 35 arcsec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambi-ent unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its looptops, 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipoles footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME type jet events because they resembled classical three-part structured coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remainig 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propaga-tion. The jet events are found to be also present in equatorial coronal holes. We also present the 3-D reconstruction, temperature, velocity, and density measurements of a number of jets during their evolution.

  9. Inferring the Coronal Density Irregularity from EUV Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the density structure of the solar corona is important for modeling both coronal heating and the solar wind. Direct measurements are difficult because of line-of-sight integration and possible unresolved structures. We present a new method for quantifying such structure using density-sensitive EUV line intensities to derive a density irregularity parameter, a relative measure of the amount of structure along the line of sight. We also present a simple model to relate the inferred irregularities to physical quantities, such as the filling factor and density contrast. For quiet Sun regions and interplume regions of coronal holes, we find a density contrast of at least a factor of three to ten and corresponding filling factors of about 10-20%. Our results are in rough agreement with other estimates of the density structures in these regions. The irregularity diagnostic provides a useful relative measure of unresolved structure in various regions of the corona.

  10. Coronal Seismology -- Achievements and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Michael

    Coronal seismology is a new and fast developing branch of the solar physics. The main idea of coronal seismology is the same as of any branches of seismology: to determine basic properties of a medium using properties of waves propagating in this medium. The waves and oscillations in the solar corona are routinely observed in the late space missions. In our brief review we concentrate only on one of the most spectacular type of oscillations observed in the solar corona - the transverse oscillations of coronal magnetic loops. These oscillations were first observed by TRACE on 14 July 1998. At present there are a few dozens of similar observations. Shortly after the first observation of the coronal loop transverse oscillations they were interpreted as kink oscillations of magnetic tubes with the ends frozen in the dense photospheric plasma. The frequency of the kink oscillation is proportional to the magnetic field magnitude and inversely proportional to the tube length times the square root of the plasma density. This fact was used to estimate the magnetic field magnitude in the coronal loops. In 2004 the first simultaneous observation of the fundamental mode and first overtone of the coronal loop transverse oscillation was reported. If we model a coronal loop as a homogeneous magnetic tube, then the ratio of the frequencies of the first overtone and the fundamental mode should be equal to 2. However, the ratio of the observed frequencies was smaller than 2. This is related to the density variation along the loop. If we assume that the corona is isothermal and prescribe the loop shape (usually it is assumed that it has the shape of half-circle), then, using the ratio of the two frequencies, we can determine the temperature of the coronal plasma. The first observation of transverse oscillations of the coronal loops showed that they were strongly damped. This phenomenon was confirmed by the subsequent observations. At present, the most reliable candidate for the

  11. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  12. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  13. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  14. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    CERN Document Server

    Solodukhin, S N

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  15. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  16. Motion magnification in coronal seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Anfinogentov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features, observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual tree complex wavelet transform (DT$\\mathbb{C}$WT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes imitating exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes provided they are sufficiently small. Also, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/A...

  17. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  18. Coronal Fourier power spectra: implications for coronal seismology and coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Jack; Inglis, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171\\AA\\ and 193\\AA\\ data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly-held assumption that coronal time-series are well described by the sum of a long time-scale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of this discovery to the field of coronal seismology and the automated detections of oscillations are discussed. The power law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution ...

  19. Data-driven coronal evolutionary model of active region 11944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent availability of systematic measurements of vector magnetic fields and Doppler velocities has allowed us to utilize a data-driven approach for modeling observed active regions (AR), a crucial step for understanding the nature of solar flare initiation. We use a sequence of vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the SDO to drive magnetofrictional (MF) model of the coronal magnetic field in the the vicinity of AR 11944, where an X1.2 flare on January 7 2014 occurred. To drive the coronal field we impose a time-dependent boundary condition based on temporal sequences of magnetic and electric fields at the bottom of the computational domain, i.e. the photosphere. To derive the electric fields we use a recently improved poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD), which we call the ``PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal'' or PDFI technique. We investigate the results of the simulated coronal evolution, compare those with EUV observations from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and discuss what we could learn from them. This work is a a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin and is a part of Coronal Global Evolutionary (CGEM) Model, funded jointly by NASA and NSF.

  20. Coronal ``Wave'': Magnetic Footprint of a Coronal Mass Ejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Harra, Louise K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Démoulin, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the properties of two ``classical'' EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) coronal waves. The two source regions of the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) possess opposite helicities, and the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep core dimmings near the flare site and also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We also report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions and simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behavior is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME magnetic field and quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings and the widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process.

  1. A Solar Coronal Jet Event Triggers A Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the multi-point and multi-wavelength observation and analysis on a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event in this paper. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it propagate in a high speed over 1000 km/s . The jet erupted before and shared the same source region with the CME. The temporal and spacial relation- ship between them guide us the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario could promisingly enrich our understanding on the triggering mechanism of coronal mass ejections and their relations with coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the SDO/HMI instrument and the off- limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA 171 A passband, together provide the first detailed observation on the three-dimensional reconnection process of large-scale jets as simulated in Pariat et al. 2009. ...

  2. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Karovska; Β. Wood; J. Chen; J. Cook; R. Howard

    2000-09-01

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME structures in the solar corona using two instruments on board SOHO: LASCO and EIT.

  3. Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    1992-09-01

    Foreword to the French edition; Foreword to the English edition; Acknowledgements; Part I. Gravitation and Light: 1. First fruits; 2. Relativity; 3. Curved space-time; Part II. Exquisite Corpses: 4. Chronicle of the twilight years; 5. Ashes and diamonds; 6. Supernovae; 7. Pulsars; 8. Gravitation triumphant; Part III. Light Assassinated: 9. The far horizon; 10. Illuminations; 11. A descent into the maelstrom; 12. Map games; 13. The black hole machine; 14. The quantum black hole; Part IV. Light Regained: 15. Primordial black holes; 16. The zoo of X-ray stars; 17. Giant black holes; 18. Gravitational light; 19. The black hole Universe; Appendices; Bibliography; Name index; Subject index.

  4. An atlas of coronal electron density at 5Rs I: Data processing and calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Huw

    2015-01-01

    Tomography of the solar corona can provide cruicial constraints for models of the low corona, unique information on changes in coronal structure and rotation rates, and a valuable boundary condition for models of the heliospheric solar wind. This is the first of a series of three papers which aim to create a set of maps of the coronal density over an extended period (1996-present). The papers will describe the data processing and calibration (this paper), the tomography method (\\paperii) and resulting atlas of coronal electron density at a height of 5\\Rs\\ between years 1996-2014 (\\paperiii). This first paper presents a detailed description of data processing and calibration for the Large-Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 instrument onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the COR2 instruments of the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) package aboard the Solar Terrestial Relations Observatory (STEREO) A \\& B spacecraft. The methodology includes...

  5. Investigation of Stress Intensity Factor for Overloaded Holes and Cold-Expanded Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    analysis of repairs to fuselage skin lap-joints, wing planks and bulkhead frames. More recently he has been involved with structural and mechanical...overload stress max  peak residual hoop stress at hole boundary R radial stress at cold-worked hole T tangential stress at cold-worked hole vm

  6. EFFECT OF CORONAL TEMPERATURE ON THE SCALE OF SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima; Yokoyama, T.H., E-mail: h.iijima@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-10-20

    We investigate the effect of coronal temperature on the formation process of solar chromospheric jets using two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the region from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. We develop a new radiative magnetohydrodynamic code for the dynamic modeling of the solar atmosphere, employing an LTE equation of state, optically thick radiative loss in the photosphere, optically thin radiative loss in the chromosphere and the corona, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. Many chromospheric jets are produced in the simulations by shock waves passing through the transition region. We find that these jets are projected farther outward when the coronal temperature is lower (similar to that in coronal holes) and shorter when the coronal temperature is higher (similar to that in active regions). When the coronal temperature is high, the deceleration of the chromospheric jets is consistent with the model in which deceleration is determined by the periodic chromospheric shock waves. However, when the coronal temperature is low, the gravitational deceleration becomes more important and the chromospheric jets approach ballistic motion.

  7. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  8. Bashful ballerina unveiled: Multipole analysis of the coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I.; Mursula, K.

    2012-12-01

    Heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is the continuum of the coronal magnetic equator, dividing the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) into two sectors (polarities). Because of its wavy structure, the HCS is often called the ballerina skirt. Several studies have proven that the HCS is southward shifted during about three years in the solar declining phase. This persistent phenomenon, called the bashful ballerina, has been verified by geomagnetic indices since 1930s, by OMNI data base since 1960s, by the WSO PFSS model since mid-1970s and by the Ulysses probe measurements during the fast latitude scans in 1994-1995 and 2007. We study here the Wilcox Solar Observatory measurements of the photospheric magnetic field and the PFSS extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field. We show that the quadrupole moment of the photospheric magnetic field, which is important for the HCS asymmetry (bashful ballerina), mainly arises from the difference between northern and southern polar field strengths. According to the WSO data the minimum time quadrupole is mainly due to the difference between the highest northern and southern latitude bins. Related studies imply that the southward shift of the HCS is related to the delayed development of southern coronal holes. We also discuss the suggested connection of the HCS asymmetry to sunspot hemispheric asymmetry.

  9. More of the Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W; Leamon, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    We continue the investigation of a CME-driven coronal dimming from December 14 2006 using unique high resolution imaging of the chromosphere and corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event we observe the dynamic increase of non-thermal line broadening of multiple emission lines as the CME is released and the corona opens; reaching levels seen in coronal holes. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the non-thermal broadening towards the pre-eruption level. The dynamic evolution of non-thermal broadening is consistent with the expected change of Alfven wave amplitudes in the magnetically open rarefied dimming region, compared to the dense closed corona prior to the CME. The presented data reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings must be temporary sources of the fast solar wind. It is unclear if such a rapid transition in the thermodynamics of the corona to a solar wind state has an effect on the CME itself.

  10. The Temperature-Dependent Nature of Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Robbrecht, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The opening-up of the magnetic field during solar eruptive events is often accompanied by a dimming of the local coronal emission. From observations of filament eruptions recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager on STEREO during 2008-2009, it is evident that these dimmings are much more pronounced in 19.5 nm than in the lower-temperature line 17.1 nm, as viewed either on the disk or above the limb. We conclude that most of the cooler coronal plasma is not ejected but remains gravitationally bound when the loops open up. This result is consistent with Doppler measurements by Imada and coworkers, who found that the upflow speeds in a transient coronal hole increased dramatically above a temperature of 1 MK; it is also consistent with the quasistatic behavior of polar plumes, as compared with the hotter interplume regions that are the main source of the fast solar wind. When the open flux reconnects and closes down again, the trapped plasma is initially heated to such high temperatures that it is no longer v...

  11. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  12. The relationship between the magnetic field and the coronal activities in the polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Masumi

    The image of the polar region of the sun is changing based on the observations taken by the three telescopes aboard the Hinode satellite. Based on the data of Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode, Tsuneta et al. (2007) reported that there are many localized magnetic poles in the polar region, and the magnetic strength of the magnetic poles is over thousand Gauss. They called the strong magnetic pole in the polar region "kG-pathce". And, Cirtain, et al. (2007) and Savcheva, et al. (2007) presented that the occurrence rate of X-ray jets in the polar region is very high and 10 events/hour. Their result was obtained by the high resolution observations by X-ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. These results are very important for understanding the fast solar wind that blows from the polar region. On the other hand, in order to understand the activities in the polar region, it is very important to investigate the relationship between the magnetic environments and the coronal structures/activities. In the paper, for the purpose, we aligned the photospheric images (G-band, Stoke-IQUV of FeI), the chromospheric images (Ca II H line, Stokes-V of Na) and coronal images (X-ray) obtained by Hinode, and investigate the relationship. Basically, the co-alignment process was done based on the alignment information of the telescopes reported by Shimizu et al. (2007). And, we aligned the images using the curve of the solar limb, finally. As the result of the co-alignments, we found the following things. 1) On most kG-patches in the polar coronal hole, there is any coronal structure. 2) X-ray jets in the polar coronal hole are not always associated with the kG-patches. Some X-ray jets are associated with very weak magnetic field. And, the jets are strongly associated with the emerging/cancelling magnetic flux. The first one suggests that the coronal heating is not effective only in the magnetic field strong, such as the center of the sunspot. The second result indicates that the

  13. Moulting Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bena, Iosif; Chowdhury, Borun D.; de Boer, Jan; El-Showk, Sheer; Shigemori, Masaki

    2012-03-01

    We find a family of novel supersymmetric phases of the D1-D5 CFT, which in certain ranges of charges have more entropy than all known ensembles. We also find bulk BPS configurations that exist in the same range of parameters as these phases, and have more entropy than a BMPV black hole; they can be thought of as coming from a BMPV black hole shedding a "hair" condensate outside of the horizon. The entropy of the bulk configurations is smaller than that of the CFT phases, which indicates that some of the CFT states are lifted at strong coupling. Neither the bulk nor the boundary phases are captured by the elliptic genus, which makes the coincidence of the phase boundaries particularly remarkable. Our configurations are supersymmetric, have non-Cardy-like entropy, and are the first instance of a black hole entropy enigma with a controlled CFT dual. Furthermore, contrary to common lore, these objects exist in a region of parameter space (between the "cosmic censorship bound" and the "unitarity bound") where no black holes were thought to exist.

  14. Characteristics of EUV Coronal Jets Observed with STEREO/SECCHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Bothmer, V.; Patsourakos, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive statistical study of EUV coronal jets observed with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. A catalogue of 79 polar jets is presented, identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008, when solar activity was at a minimum. The twin spacecraft angular separation increased during this time interval from 2 to 48 degrees. The appearances of the coronal jets were always correlated with underlying small-scale chromospheric bright points. A basic characterization of the morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evolution. Though each jet appeared morphologically similar in the coronagraph field of view, in the sense of a narrow collimated outward flow of matter, at the source region in the low corona the jet showed different characteristics, which may correspond to different magnetic structures. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events there were 37 Eiffel tower-type jet events, commonly interpreted as a small-scale (˜35 arc sec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambient unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its loop tops, and 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipole footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME-type jet events because they resembled the classical coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remaining 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propagation. A few jets are also found in equatorial coronal holes. In this study we present sample

  15. Quantum gravitational effects on boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may hold the key to some of the outstanding problems in theoretical physics. In this work we analyze the perturbative quantum effects on the boundary of a gravitational system and Dirichlet boundary condtion imposed at the classical level. Our analysis reveals that for a black hole solution there exists a clash between the quantum effects and Dirichlet boundary condition: the solution of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary condition. The analysis also suggests that the violation of the Dirichlet boundary condition should be tied with a certain mechanism of information storage on the boundary.

  16. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  17. Motion Magnification in Coronal Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfinogentov, Sergey; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features that have been observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTℂWT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes that imitated exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability, and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes, provided these are sufficiently small. In addition, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/AIA EUV data cubes of a non-flaring active region allowed for the improved detection of low-amplitude decay-less oscillations in the majority of loops.

  18. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Obenschain, K

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, the by now well known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a "byproduct" of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of a coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 Teslas to 0.02 Teslas and lengths from 25000 km to 75000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets...

  19. X-Ray Spectra from MHD Simulations of Accreting Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Noble, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a new global radiation transport code coupled to a general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of an accreting, nonrotating black hole. For the first time, we are able to explain from first principles in a self-consistent way the X-ray spectra observed from stellar-mass black holes, including a thermal peak, Compton reflection hump, power-law tail, and broad iron line. Varying only the mass accretion rate, we are able to reproduce the low/hard, steep power-law, and thermal-dominant states seen in most galactic black hole sources. The temperature in the corona is T(sub e) 10 keV in a boundary layer near the disk and rises smoothly to T(sub e) greater than or approximately 100 keV in low-density regions far above the disk. Even as the disk's reflection edge varies from the horizon out to approximately equal to 6M as the accretion rate decreases, we find that the shape of the Fe Ka line is remarkably constant. This is because photons emitted from the plunging region are strongly beamed into the horizon and never reach the observer. We have also carried out a basic timing analysis of the spectra and find that the fractional variability increases with photon energy and viewer inclination angle, consistent with the coronal hot spot model for X-ray fluctuations.

  20. A Hybrid Monte Carlo Method Based Artificial Neural Networks Approach for Rock Boundaries Identification: A Case Study from the KTB Bore Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Saumen; Tiwari, R. K.

    2009-11-01

    Identification of rock boundaries and structural features from well log response is a fundamental problem in geological field studies. However, in a complex geologic situation, such as in the presence of crystalline rocks where metamorphisms lead to facies changes, it is not easy to discern accurate information from well log data using conventional artificial neural network (ANN) methods. Moreover inferences drawn by such methods are also found to be ambiguous because of the strong overlapping of well log signals, which are generally tainted with deceptive noise. Here, we have developed an alternative ANN approach based on Bayesian statistics using the concept of Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC)/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion scheme for modeling the German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB) well log data. MCMC algorithm draws an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d) sample by Markov Chain simulation technique from posterior probability distribution using the principle of statistical mechanics in Hamiltonian dynamics. In this algorithm, each trajectory is updated by approximating the Hamiltonian differential equations through a leapfrog discrimination scheme. We examined the stability and efficiency of the HMC-based approach on “noisy” data assorted with different levels of colored noise. We also perform uncertainty analysis by estimating standard deviation (STD) error map of a posteriori covariance matrix at the network output of three types of lithofacies over the entire length of the litho section of KTB. Our analyses demonstrate that the HMC-based approach renders robust means for classification of complex lithofacies successions from the KTB borehole noisy signals, and hence may provide a useful guide for understanding the crustal inhomogeneity and structural discontinuity in many other tectonically critical and complex regions.

  1. The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary at the J Anomaly Ridge, Newfoundland (IODP Expedition 342, Hole U1403B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loroch, Dominik; Deutsch, Alexander; Berndt, Jasper; Bornemann, André

    2016-07-01

    We present results of an in-situ geochemical study using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses along a ~4.3 cm long section across the K-Pg event bed, drilled during IODP Expedition 342 at J Anomaly Ridge south of St. John's, Newfoundland. This section comprises the Maastrichtian with a sharp boundary to the graded, between 1.5 and 1.8 cm thick ejecta layer with totally altered impact glass spherules, which in turn is topped by Danian sediments. The porous and clayey material required elaborate preparation in order to yield reliable data. The ejecta bed shows a highly variable depletion in rare earth elements that even results in strongly subchondritic concentrations. The Ce/Ce* varies strongly (0.81-34), Ni/Cr ranges from 0.38 to 2.79. The maximum platinum group elements (PGE) concentrations are located in one LA-spot exactly at the basis of the ejecta layer; they amount (in μg g-1) to 0.35 (Rh), 1.64 (Pd), 2.79 (Pt), and 0.86 (Au). The Nb/Ta ratio increases in the Ma from ~10 to 35.9 toward the ejecta horizon, which itself has higher Nb, Ta, Zr, and Hf concentrations than the background sedimentation, combined with low Nb/Ta (~5-10), and low Zr/Hf (~20-30). The overall result is that alteration processes changed totally the original geochemical characteristics of this K-Pg spherule bed. To explain the exorbitant element mobility at distances of hundreds of μm, we discuss a combination of mostly reducing redox processes and interaction with organic compounds. This study demonstrates the high potential of in-situ analyses with high spatial resolution at complex geological materials. Moreover, our results indicate that some caution is necessary in determining the projectile type in impactites via PGE ratios.

  2. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    OpenAIRE

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the...

  3. The influence of the stray-light component in determining coronal temperature structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Juan; ZHANG Mei

    2009-01-01

    We use a few solar partial eclipse observations made by XRT/Hinode to estimate the influence of stray-light component in determining coronal temperature structures. Our analysis shows that the stray light will largely affect the estimation of coronal temperature and change the estimated temperature structure in one coronal hole region. The stray lights mildly influence the estimated temperatures in one quiet Sun region and do not change the estimated temperature structure. This implies that the influence of stray lights differs from one region to another, and definitely needs to be considered in some regions. Whereas a carefully estimated point-spread-function Is needed to remove the stray light component, our study shows that by a simple approach such as subtracting the average intensity of distant (e.g. >1.4 solar radius) points from the data values, the influence of stray light can be largely removed, at least for the two regions we study here.

  4. The influence of the stray-light component in determining coronal temperature structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We use a few solar partial eclipse observations made by XRT/Hinode to estimate the influence of stray-light component in determining coronal temperature structures. Our analysis shows that the stray light will largely affect the estimation of coronal temperature and change the estimated temperature structure in one coronal hole region. The stray lights mildly influence the estimated temperatures in one quiet Sun region and do not change the estimated temperature structure. This implies that the influence of stray lights differs from one region to another, and definitely needs to be considered in some regions. Whereas a carefully estimated point-spread-function is needed to remove the stray light component, our study shows that by a simple approach such as subtracting the average intensity of distant (e.g. >1.4 solar radius) points from the data values, the influence of stray light can be largely removed, at least for the two regions we study here.

  5. A SOLAR CORONAL JET EVENT TRIGGERS A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Earh and Space Science School, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96, JinZhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-11-10

    In this paper, we present multi-point, multi-wavelength observations and analysis of a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it to propagate at a high speed of over 1000 km s{sup −1}. The jet erupted before the CME and shared the same source region. The temporal and spacial relationship between these two events lead us to the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario hold the promise of enriching our understanding of the triggering mechanism of CMEs and their relations to coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/HMI instrument along with the off-limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA in the 171 Å passband provide the first detailed observation of the three-dimensional reconnection process of a large-scale jet as simulated in Pariat et al. The eruption process of the jet highlights the importance of filament-like material during the eruption of not only small-scale X-ray jets, but likely also of large-scale EUV jets. Based on our observations and analysis, we propose the most probable mechanism for the whole event, with a blob structure overlaying the three-dimensional structure of the jet, to describe the interaction between the jet and the CME.

  6. Interpretation of the coronal magnetic field configuration of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Yu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the heliospheric magnetic flux on the Sun, and hence the origin of the solar wind, is a topic of hot debate.While the prevailing view is that the solar wind originates from outside coronal streamer helmets, there also exists the suggestion that the open magnetic field spans a far wider region.Without the definitive measurement of the coronal magnetic field, it is difficult to resolve the conflict between the two scenarios without doubt.We present two 2-dimensional, Alfv\\'enic-turbulence-based models of the solar corona and solar wind, one with and the other without a closed magnetic field region in the inner corona.The purpose of the latter model is to test whether it is possible to realize a picture suggested by polarimetric measurements of the corona using the FeXIII 10747\\AA\\ line, where open magnetic field lines seem to penetrate the streamer base.The boundary conditions at the coronal base are able to account for important observational constraints, especially those on the magnetic flux dis...

  7. Current systems of coronal loops in 3D MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Bingert, Sven; Peter, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetic field and current structure associated with a coronal loop. Through this we investigate to what extent the assumptions of a force-free magnetic field break down. We analyse a three-dimensional MHD model of the solar corona in an emerging active region with the focus on the structure of the forming coronal loops. The lower boundary of this simulation is taken from a model of an emerging active region. As a consequence of the emerging magnetic flux a coronal loop formes self-consistently. We investigate the current density along magnetic field lines inside (and outside) this loop and study the magnetic and plasma properties in and around this loop. The loop is defined as the bundle of field lines that coincides with enhanced emission in extreme UV. We find that the total current along the emerging loop changes its sign from being antiparallel to parallel to the magnetic field. Around the loop the currents form a complex non-force-free helical structure. This is directly related to a bipola...

  8. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  9. From Forbidden Coronal Lines to Meaningful Coronal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Philip G; Landi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We review methods to measure magnetic fields within the corona using the polarized light in magnetic-dipole (M1) lines. We are particularly interested in both the global magnetic-field evolution over a solar cycle, and the local storage of magnetic free energy within coronal plasmas. We address commonly held skepticisms concerning angular ambiguities and line-of-sight confusion. We argue that ambiguities are in principle no worse than more familiar remotely sensed photospheric vector-fields, and that the diagnosis of M1 line data would benefit from simultaneous observations of EUV lines. Based on calculations and data from eclipses, we discuss the most promising lines and different approaches that might be used. We point to the S-like [Fe {\\sc XI}] line (J=2 to J=1) at 789.2nm as a prime target line (for ATST for example) to augment the hotter 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm Si-like lines of [Fe {\\sc XIII}] currently observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP). Significant breakthroughs will be made possibl...

  10. Impulsively Generated Linear and Non-linear Alfven Waves in the Coronal Funnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present simulation results of the impulsively generated linear and non-linear Alfvén waves in the weakly curved coronal magnetic flux-tubes (coronal funnels) and discuss their implications for the coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. We solve numerically the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic equations to find the temporal signatures of the small and large-amplitude Alfvén waves in the model atmosphere of open and expanding magnetic field configuration with a realistic temperature distribution. We compute the maximum transversal velocity of both linear and non-linear Alfvén waves at different heights of the model atmosphere, and study their response in the solar corona during the time of their propagation. We infer that the pulse-driven non-linear Alfvén waves may carry sufficient wave energy fluxes to heat the coronal funnels and also to power the solar wind that originates in these funnels. Our study of linear Alfvén waves shows that they can contribute only to the plasma dynamics and heating of the funnel-like magnetic flux-tubes associated with the polar coronal holes.

  11. Superradiance by mini black holes with mirror

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2011-01-01

    The superradiant scattering of massive scalar particles by a rotating mini black hole is investigated. Imposing the mirror boundary condition, the system becomes the so called black-hole bomb where the rotation energy of the black hole is transferred to the scattered particle exponentially with time. Bulk emissions as well as brane emissions are considered altogether. It is found that the largest effects are expected for the brane emission of lower angular modes with lighter mass and larger a...

  12. Entanglement thermodynamics for charged black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Malvimat, Vinay; Sengupta, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    The holographic quantum entanglement entropy for an infinite strip region of the boundary for the field theory dual to charged black holes in A d S3 +1 is investigated. In this framework we elucidate the low and high temperature behavior of the entanglement entropy pertaining to various limits of the black hole charge. In the low temperature regime we establish a first law of entanglement thermodynamics for the boundary field theory.

  13. Moulting Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, Iosif; de Boer, Jan; El-Showk, Sheer; Shigemori, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    We find a family of novel supersymmetric phases of the D1-D5 CFT, which in certain ranges of charges have more entropy than all known ensembles. We also find bulk BPS configurations that exist in the same range of parameters as these phases, and have more entropy than a BMPV black hole; they can be thought of as coming from a BMPV black hole shedding a "hair" condensate outside of the horizon. The entropy of the bulk configurations is smaller than that of the CFT phases, which indicates that some of the CFT states are lifted at strong coupling. Neither the bulk nor the boundary phases are captured by the elliptic genus, which makes the coincidence of the phase boundaries particularly remarkable. Our configurations are supersymmetric, have non-Cardy-like entropy, and are the first instance of a black hole entropy enigma with a controlled CFT dual. Furthermore, contrary to common lore, these objects exist in a region of parameter space (between the "cosmic censorship bound" and the "unitarity bound") where no b...

  14. Area-charge inequality for black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dain, Sergio; Reiris, Martín

    2011-01-01

    The inequality between area and charge $A\\geq 4\\pi Q^2$ for dynamical black holes is proved. No symmetry assumption is made and charged matter fields are included. Extensions of this inequality are also proved for regions in the spacetime which are not necessarily black hole boundaries.

  15. Magnetic shuffling of coronal downdrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Channelled fragmented downflows are ubiquitous in magnetized atmospheres, and have recently been addressed based on an observation after a solar eruption. Aims: We study the possible back-effect of the magnetic field on the propagation of confined flows. Methods: We compared two 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of dense supersonic plasma blobs that fall down along a coronal magnetic flux tube. In one, the blobs move strictly along the field lines; in the other, the initial velocity of the blobs is not perfectly aligned with the magnetic field and the field is weaker. Results: The aligned blobs remain compact while flowing along the tube, with the generated shocks. The misaligned blobs are disrupted and merge through the chaotic shuffling of the field lines. They are structured into thinner filaments. Alfvén wave fronts are generated together with shocks ahead of the dense moving front. Conclusions: Downflowing plasma fragments can be chaotically and efficiently mixed if their motion is misaligned with field lines, with broad implications for disk accretion in protostars, coronal eruptions, and rain, for example. Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ji, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO.} {About 96 minutes before the onset of flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8$-$9 Mm) nearly kept constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fanlike ...

  17. Professionalism in practice: the Coroner's Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2017-01-02

    A coroner recently declared a district nursing service as unfit for purpose following the death of a patient and held the care given by district nurses was unprofessional and contributed to the patient's decline and death. In this article Richard Griffith considers the coroners concerns in relation to the professional standards imposed on district nurses.

  18. Bootstrapping the Coronal Magnetic Field with STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2010-05-01

    The 3D coronal magnetic field obtained from stereoscopically triangulated loops has been compared with standard photospheric magnetogram extrapolations. We found a large misalignment of 20-40 deg, depending on the complexity of an AR (Sandman et al. 2009; DeRosa et al. 2009). These studies prove that the magnetic field in the photosphere is not force-free and fundamentally cannot reproduce the coronal magnetic field. Bootstrapping with coronal loop 3D geometries are required to improve modeling of the coronal field. Such coronal field bootstrapping methods are currently developed using stereoscopically triangulated loops from STEREO/EUVI and preliminary results show already a significantly reduced misalignment of 10-20 deg.

  19. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: (i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, (ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and (iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code develo...

  20. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN PengFei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  1. Alfven Wave Solar Model: Part 1, Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, Bart; Meng, Xing; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2013-01-01

    We present the new Alfven Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfven wave turbulence. The injection of Alfven wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics includes: (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfven waves are partially reflected by the Alfven speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagat...

  2. Design study of hole positions and hole shapes for crack tip stress releasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli

    2004-01-01

    results for isotropic material and in general study the influence of having orthotropic material. Optimal shapes are by no means circular, and we focus on the shape of a single hole centered at (or in front of) the crack tip. It is shown that the stress field at the crack boundary can be significantly......The method of hole drilling near or at the crack tip is often used in fatigue damage repair. From a design optimization point of view, two questions are posed: Where should the hole(s) be drilled? And is there a better shape of the hole than a circular one? For the first question, we extend earlier...

  3. Black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with several not-quantum aspects of black holes, with emphasis on theoretical and mathematical issues related to numerical modeling of black hole space-times. Part of the material has a review character, but some new results or proposals are also presented. We review the experimental evidence for existence of black holes. We propose a definition of black hole region for any theory governed by a symmetric hyperbolic system of equations. Our definition reproduces the usual one for gravity, and leads to the one associated with the Unruh metric in the case of Euler equations. We review the global conditions which have been used in the Scri-based definition of a black hole and point out the deficiencies of the Scri approach. Various results on the structure of horizons and apparent horizons are presented, and a new proof of semi-convexity of horizons based on a variational principle is given. Recent results on the classification of stationary singularity-free vacuum solutions are reviewed. ...

  4. Converging Supergranular Flows and the Formation of Coronal Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P.; Muglach, K.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that coronal plumes are energized by magnetic reconnection between unipolar flux concentrations and nearby bipoles, even though magnetograms sometimes show very little minority-polarity flux near the footpoints of plumes. Here we use high-resolution extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images and magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to clarify the relationship between plume emission and the underlying photospheric field. We find that plumes form where unipolar network elements inside coronal holes converge to form dense clumps, and fade as the clumps disperse again. The converging flows also carry internetwork fields of both polarities. Although the minority-polarity flux is sometimes barely visible in the magnetograms, the corresponding EUV images almost invariably show loop-like features in the core of the plumes, with the fine structure changing on timescales of minutes or less. We conclude that the SDO observations are consistent with a model in which plume emission originates from interchange reconnection in converging flows, with the plume lifetime being determined by the approximately 1-day evolutionary timescale of the supergranular network. Furthermore, the presence of large EUV bright points and/or ephemeral regions is not a necessary precondition for the formation of plumes, which can be energized even by the weak, mixed-polarity internetwork fields swept up by converging flows.

  5. CONVERGING SUPERGRANULAR FLOWS AND THE FORMATION OF CORONAL PLUMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Muglach, K., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: karin.muglach@nasa.gov [Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Earlier studies have suggested that coronal plumes are energized by magnetic reconnection between unipolar flux concentrations and nearby bipoles, even though magnetograms sometimes show very little minority-polarity flux near the footpoints of plumes. Here we use high-resolution extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images and magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to clarify the relationship between plume emission and the underlying photospheric field. We find that plumes form where unipolar network elements inside coronal holes converge to form dense clumps, and fade as the clumps disperse again. The converging flows also carry internetwork fields of both polarities. Although the minority-polarity flux is sometimes barely visible in the magnetograms, the corresponding EUV images almost invariably show loop-like features in the core of the plumes, with the fine structure changing on timescales of minutes or less. We conclude that the SDO observations are consistent with a model in which plume emission originates from interchange reconnection in converging flows, with the plume lifetime being determined by the ∼1 day evolutionary timescale of the supergranular network. Furthermore, the presence of large EUV bright points and/or ephemeral regions is not a necessary precondition for the formation of plumes, which can be energized even by the weak, mixed-polarity internetwork fields swept up by converging flows.

  6. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION OF A CORONAL BRIGHT POINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Banerjee, Dipankar [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Tian, Hui, E-mail: tsamanta@iiap.res.in, E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are small-scale luminous features seen in the solar corona. Quasi-periodic brightenings are frequently observed in the BPs and are generally linked with underlying magnetic flux changes. We study the dynamics of a BP seen in the coronal hole using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager magnetogram on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and spectroscopic data from the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The detailed analysis shows that the BP evolves throughout our observing period along with changes in underlying photospheric magnetic flux and shows periodic brightenings in different EUV and far-UV images. With the highest possible spectral and spatial resolution of IRIS, we attempted to identify the sources of these oscillations. IRIS sit-and-stare observation provided a unique opportunity to study the time evolution of one footpoint of the BP as the slit position crossed it. We noticed enhanced line profile asymmetry, enhanced line width, intensity enhancements, and large deviation from the average Doppler shift in the line profiles at specific instances, which indicate the presence of sudden flows along the line-of-sight direction. We propose that transition region explosive events originating from small-scale reconnections and the reconnection outflows are affecting the line profiles. The correlation between all these parameters is consistent with the repetitive reconnection scenario and could explain the quasi-periodic nature of the brightening.

  7. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe xii coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions (shown in previous work), low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended field lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  8. Recent advances in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  9. Coronal Mass Ejections travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Souza de Mendonça, Rafael Rodrigues; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main source of intense geomagnetic storms when they are earthward directed. Studying their travel time is a key-point to understand when the disturbance will be observed at Earth. In this work, we study the CME that originated the interplanetary disturbance observed on 2013/10/02. According to the observations, the CME that caused the interplanetary disturbance was ejected on 2013/09/29. We obtained the CME speed and estimate of the time of arrival at the Lagrangian Point L1 using the concept of expansion speed. We found that observed and estimated times of arrival of the shock differ between 2 and 23 hours depending on method used to estimate the radial speed.

  10. INTEGRAL EQUATION METHOD'S APPLICATION IN HOLE-EDGE STRESS OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL PLATE WITH DIFFERENT SHAPED HOLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The strength of composite plate with different hole-shapes is always one of the most important but complicated issues in the application of the composite material. The holes will lead to mutations and discontinuity to the structure. So the hole-edge stress concentration is always a serious phenomenon. And the phenomenon makes the structure strength decrease very quickly to form dangerous weak points. Most partial damage begins from these weak points. According to the complex variable functions theory, the accurate boundary condition of composite plate with different hole-shapes is founded by conformal mapping method to settle the boundary condition problem of complex hole-shapes. Composite plate with commonly hole-shapes in engineering is studied by several complex variable stress function. The boundary integral equations are founded based on exact boundary conditions. Then the exact hole-edge stress analytic solution of composite plate with rectangle holes and wing manholes is resolved. Both of offset axis loadings and its influences on the stress concentration coefficient of the hole-edge are discussed. And comparisons of different loads along various offset axis on the hole-edge stress distribution of orthotropic plate with rectangle hole or wing manhole are made. It can be concluded that hole-edge with continuous variable curvatures might help to decrease the stress concentration coefficient; and smaller angle of outer load and fiber can decrease the stress peak value.

  11. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  12. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  13. Rotating Black Holes and Coriolis Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiaoning; Yuan, Pei-Hung; Cho, Chia-Jui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we consider the fluid/gravity correspondence for general rotating black holes. By using the Petrov-like boundary condition in near horizon limit, we study the correspondence between gravitational perturbation and fluid equation. We find that the dual fluid equation for rotating black holes contains a Coriolis force term, which is closely related to the angular velocity of the black hole horizon. This can be seen as a dual effect for the frame-dragging effect of rotating black hole under the holographic picture.

  14. Rotating black holes and Coriolis effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Jui; Wu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we consider the fluid/gravity correspondence for general rotating black holes. By using the suitable boundary condition in near horizon limit, we study the correspondence between gravitational perturbation and fluid equation. We find that the dual fluid equation for rotating black holes contains a Coriolis force term, which is closely related to the angular velocity of the black hole horizon. This can be seen as a dual effect for the frame-dragging effect of rotating black hole under the holographic picture.

  15. Rotating black holes and Coriolis effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jui Chou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider the fluid/gravity correspondence for general rotating black holes. By using the suitable boundary condition in near horizon limit, we study the correspondence between gravitational perturbation and fluid equation. We find that the dual fluid equation for rotating black holes contains a Coriolis force term, which is closely related to the angular velocity of the black hole horizon. This can be seen as a dual effect for the frame-dragging effect of rotating black hole under the holographic picture.

  16. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  17. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-07

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments.

  18. Relation of large-scale coronal X-ray structure and cosmic rays. I - Sources of solar wind streams as defined by X-ray emission and H-alpha absorption features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, A. S.; Nolte, J. T.; Sullivan, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mcintosh, P. S.; Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the corona and the interplanetary medium during Carrington rotations 1601-1607 is discussed relative to recurrent high-speed solar wind streams and their coronal sources. Only streams A, C, D, and F recur on more than one rotation. Streams A and D are associated with coronal holes, while C and F originate in the high corona (20-50 solar radii) over faint X-ray emissions. The association of the streams with holes is confirmed by earlier findings that there are no large equatorial holes without an associated high-speed stream and that the area of the equatorial region of coronal holes is highly correlated with the maximum velocity observed in the associated stream near 1 AU.

  19. Resonant absorption of kink magnetohydrodynamic waves by a magnetic twist in coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Zanyar; Karami, Kayoomars

    2016-10-01

    There is ample evidence of twisted magnetic structures in the solar corona. This motivates us to consider the magnetic twist as the cause of Alfvén frequency continuum in coronal loops, which can support the resonant absorption as a rapid damping mechanism for the observed coronal kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. We model a coronal loop with a straight cylindrical magnetic flux tube, which has constant but different densities in the interior and exterior regions. The magnetic field is assumed to be constant and aligned with the cylinder axis everywhere except for a thin layer near the boundary of the flux tube, which has an additional small magnetic field twist. Then, we investigate a number of possible instabilities that may arise in our model. In the thin tube thin boundary approximation, we derive the dispersion relation and solve it analytically to obtain the frequencies and damping rates of the fundamental (l = 1) and first/second overtone (l = 2, 3) kink (m = 1) MHD modes. We conclude that the resonant absorption by the magnetic twist can justify the rapid damping of kink MHD waves observed in coronal loops. Furthermore, the magnetic twist in the inhomogeneous layer can cause deviations from P1/P2 = 2 and P1/P3 = 3, which are comparable with the observations.

  20. Observational Consequences of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan C.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).

  1. Multidimensional modeling of coronal rain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, X; Keppens, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations which capture the initial formation and the long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in-situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match with modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into $V$-shaped like features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views on blobs which evaporate in situ, or get siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys o...

  2. Coronal Magnetism and Forward Solarsoft Idl Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The FORWARD suite of Solar Soft IDL codes is a community resource for model-data comparison, with a particular emphasis on analyzing coronal magnetic fields. FORWARD may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare to existing data. FORWARD works with numerical model datacubes, interfaces with the web-served Predictive Science Inc MAS simulation datacubes and the Solar Soft IDL Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) package, and also includes several analytic models (more can be added). It connects to the Virtual Solar Observatory and other web-served observations to download data in a format directly comparable to model predictions. It utilizes the CHIANTI database in modeling UV/EUV lines, and links to the CLE polarimetry synthesis code for forbidden coronal lines. FORWARD enables "forward-fitting" of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties.

  3. Black Holes with Zero Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Nucamendi, U; Nucamendi, Ulises; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    We consider the spacetimes corresponding to static Global Monopoles with interior boundaries corresponding to a Black Hole Horizon and analyze the behavior of the appropriate ADM mass as a function of the horizon radius r_H. We find that for small enough r_H, this mass is negative as in the case of the regular global monopoles, but that for large enough r_H the mass becomes positive encountering an intermediate value for which we have a Black Hole with zero ADM mass.

  4. Observational Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2003. Peameis, D.V., Magntetic topology of imspumlsive assd gradutal solar energetic particle Xic. H., L. Ofmran, and G. Lawvrence, Cone model for...425, 1097, 2004. Yashiro, S., N. Gopalssvamy, G. Michalek, assd R.A. Hosvard, Properties of narrow coronal Sltatstnigara~jU, A., Y.-i. Mootn, M. Dryer...G.M.,’FTit relatiomtslip hetwseen prominence ermtptions assd coronal mnass ejections.. 107(A8), 1223, doi: 10. 1029/2001 JAOO9 143, 2002. .1. Atssnn.s

  5. Interpretation of the coronal magnetic field configuration of the Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Xing Li; Hui Yu

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the heliospheric magnetic flux on the Sun,and hence the origin of the solar wind,is a topic of hot debate.While the prevailing view is that the solar wind originates from outside the coronal streamer helmets,there also exists the suggestion that the open magnetic field spans a far wider region.Without the definitive measurement of the coronal magnetic field,it is difficult to unambiguously resolve the conflict between the two scenarios.We present two 2-dimensional,Alfvénic-turbulence-based models of the solar corona and solar wind,one with and the other without a closed magnetic field region in the inner corona.The purpose of the latter model is to test whether it is possible to realize a picture suggested by polarimetric measurements of the corona using the Fe ⅩⅢ 10747(A) line,where open magnetic field lines seem to penetrate the streamer base.The boundary conditions at the coronal base are able to account for important observational constraints,especially those on the magnetic flux distribution.Interestingly,the two models provide similar polarized brightness (pB) distributions in the field of view (FOV) of SOHO/LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs.In particular,a dome-shaped feature is present in the C2 FOV even for the model without a closed magnetic field.Moreover,both models fit the Ulysses data scaled to 1 AU equally well.We suggest that:1) The pB observations cannot be safely taken as a proxy for the magnetic field topology,as is often implicitly assumed.2) The Ulysses measurements,especially the one showing a nearly uniform distribution with heliocentric latitude of the radial magnetic field,do not rule out the ubiquity of open magnetic fields on the Sun.

  6. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  7. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  8. A new method to detect the ICMEs boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrache, Cristiana

    2014-01-01

    A new method to infer the boundaries of the interplanetary coronal mass ejections is proposed. The local minima of a proton temperature anisotropy are used as potential boundaries of the interplanetary event. The low-beta plasma values are then invoked to detect at least four boundaries, two for the beginning and two for the end of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). Intermediate boundaries can be identified, as indicated by other plasma and magnetic field signatures, and mark substructures of an event. Using the algorithm we propose here, we have compiled a list with ICME events boundaries registered by \\emph{Ulysses} spacecraft during 2000-2002. Three magnetic clouds (observed on 23 January 2001, 10 June 2001 and 24 August 2001) are analysed with details. This method provides premises for an alternative way of automatic detection of the ICMEs boundaries.

  9. Characteristics of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, F.; Marchese, A. K.; Tulsee, T.

    2014-12-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a release of charged particles resulting from solar activity. These charged particles can affect electronics on spacecraft, airplanes, global positioning systems, and communication satellites. The purpose of this research was to study CME data from satellites and correlate these to other properties. Solar wind data collected by STEREO A/B and ACE satellites were analyzed. The data consisted of solar wind flux for various elements (helium through iron), as well as the components of the interplanetary magnetic field. CME events are known to cause a surge in the helium flux, as well as other particles. It is hypothesized that a CME event will cause an increase in the number of lighter elements relative to heavier particles. This is because for a given input of energy, lighter elements are expected to be accelerated to a greater extent than heavier elements. A significant increase was observed in the ratio between helium to oxygen (He/O) prior to intense CMEs. A CME event on November 4, 2003 caused an eleven-fold increase in the He/O ratio, while for another event on April 2, 2001 the He/O ratio increased from 80 to 700. A significant increase in He/O ratio is not observed during weaker CMEs. Furthermore, it was also observed that not all increases in the ratio were accompanied by CMEs. The increase in He/O ratio prior to the CME arrival might be used as a way to predict future events.

  10. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  11. A New Method for Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sibaek; Choe, Gwang-Son; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Kap-Sung

    2017-08-01

    A precise way of coronal magnetic field reconstruction (extrapolation) is an indispensable tool for understanding of various solar activities. A variety of reconstruction codes have been developed so far and are available to researchers nowadays, but they more or less bear this and that shortcoming. In this paper, a new efficient method for coronal magnetic field reconstruction is presented. The method imposes only the normal components of magnetic field and current density at the bottom boundary to avoid the overspecification of the reconstruction problem, and employs vector potentials to guarantee the divergence-freeness. In our method, the normal component of current density is imposed, not by adjusting the tangential components of A, but by adjusting its normal component. This allows us to avoid a possible numerical instability that on and off arises in codes using A. In real reconstruction problems, the information for the lateral and top boundaries is absent. The arbitrariness of the boundary conditions imposed there as well as various preprocessing brings about the diversity of resulting solutions. We impose the source surface condition at the top boundary to accommodate flux imbalance, which always shows up in magnetograms. To enhance the convergence rate, we equip our code with a gradient-method type accelerator. Our code is tested on two analytical force-free solutions. When the solution is given only at the bottom boundary, our result surpasses competitors in most figures of merits devised by Schrijver et al. (2006). We have also applied our code to a real active region NOAA 11974, in which two M-class flares and a halo CME took place. The EUV observation shows a sudden appearance of an erupting loop before the first flare. Our numerical solutions show that two entwining flux tubes exist before the flare and their shackling is released after the CME with one of them opened up. We suggest that the erupting loop is created by magnetic reconnection between

  12. Algorithm of Detecting and Filling Small Holes in Triangular Mesh Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dong-sheng; JIANG Chao; DONG Jing; LIU Rui

    2014-01-01

    In some scattered point cloud triangular mesh restoration algorithm, small triangular mesh holes problem will often affect the quality of the model. For small holes at the details, this paper propose a method for identifying and extracting hollow edge,and use a triangle growth way based on boundary edge angle to fill the empty void. First, according the relationship of the point, side and face of the triangle mesh model to identify the hole, then extracting the holes boundary edge and classifying it. Finally, using a triangle growth method based on holes boundary edge angle to fill each small holes separated from the boundary. Compared with other algorithm of filling holes, this method is high efficiency for small holes of smooth surface,and itimprovesthe quality of the triangular mesh model.

  13. Quantum "violation" of Dirichlet boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, I. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Dirichlet boundary conditions have been widely used in general relativity. They seem at odds with the holographic property of gravity simply because a boundary configuration can be varying and dynamic instead of dying out as required by the conditions. In this work we report what should be a tension between the Dirichlet boundary conditions and quantum gravitational effects, and show that a quantum-corrected black hole solution of the 1PI action no longer obeys, in the naive manner one may expect, the Dirichlet boundary conditions imposed at the classical level. We attribute the 'violation' of the Dirichlet boundary conditions to a certain mechanism of the information storage on the boundary.

  14. Disrupting Entanglement of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Leichenauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We study entanglement in thermofield double states of strongly coupled CFTs by analyzing two-sided Reissner-Nordstrom solutions in AdS. The central object of study is the mutual information between a pair of regions, one on each asymptotic boundary of the black hole. For large regions the mutual information is positive and for small ones it vanishes; we compute the critical length scale, which goes to infinity for extremal black holes, of the transition. We also generalize the butterfly effect of Shenker and Stanford to a wide class of charged black holes, showing that mutual information is disrupted upon perturbing the system and waiting for a time of order $\\log E/\\delta E$ in units of the temperature. We conjecture that the parametric form of this timescale is universal.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade of coronal loop magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2011-06-01

    The Parker model for coronal heating is investigated through a high resolution simulation. An inertial range is resolved where fluctuating magnetic energy EMk[Please see symbol]) [Please see symbol] k[Please see symbol](-2.7) exceeds kinetic energy EK(k[Please see symbol])[Please see symbol]k[Please see symbol](-0.6). Increments scale as δbℓ ~/= ℓ(-0.85) and δuℓ ~/= ℓ(+0.2) with velocity increasing at small scales, indicating that magnetic reconnection plays a prime role in this turbulent system. We show that spectral energy transport is akin to standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence even for a system of reconnecting current sheets sustained by the boundary. In this new MHD turbulent cascade, kinetic energy flows are negligible while cross-field flows are enhanced, and through a series of "reflections" between the two fields, cascade more than half of the total spectral energy flow.

  16. Ectopic folliculosebaceous units at the coronal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel

    2014-12-01

    Tyson glands were described in the 17th century as modified sebaceous glands of the coronal sulcus of the penis. However, this description and other early texts supporting the existence of Tyson glands were not accompanied by illustrations. The existence of such glands has been passing through the literature without adequate graphical demonstration, which has contributed to controversial debates. Herein we present a case of a partial penectomy performed on a 65-year-old man with a squamous cell carcinoma of the penis. In this case we identified sebaceous glands as well as folliculosebaceous units in the coronal sulcus. We also comparatively examined 12 cases of partial penectomy to search for sebaceous glands or folliculosebaceous units in the coronal sulcus or the preputium. We found neither sebaceous glands nor folliculosebaceous units at the coronal sulcus or the mucosal aspect of the prepuce. We conclude that: (1) folliculosebaceous units are possible in the coronal sulcus, as the current case illustrates for the first time in literature and (2) the current case is an oddity, probably induced by the accompanying squamous cell carcinoma, and therefore it may represent an ectopic folliculosebaceous unit rather than an anatomic variation.

  17. Coronal Jet Plasma Properties and Acceleration Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Samaiyah; Reeves, Kathy; Savcheva, Antonia; Soto, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets are transient eruptions of plasma typically characterized by aprominent long spire and a bright base, and sometimes accompanied by a small filament. Jets are thought to be produced by magnetic reconnection when small-scale bipolar magnetic fields emerge into an overlying coronal field or move into a locally unipolar region. Coronal jets are commonly divided into two categories: standard jets and blowout jets, and are found in both quiet and active regions. The plasma properties of jets vary across type and location, therefore understanding the underlying acceleration mechanisms are difficult to pin down. In this work, we examine both blow-out and standard jets using high resolution multi-wavelength data. Although reconnection is commonly accepted as the primary acceleration mechanism, we also consider the contribution chromospheric evaporation to jet formation. We use seven coronal channels from SDO/AIA , Hinode/XRT Be-thin and IRIS slit-jaw data. In addition, we separate the Fe-XVIII line from the SDO/94Å channel. We calculate plasma properties including velocity, Alfven speed, and density as a function of wavelength and Differential Emission Measure (DEM). Finally, we explore the magnetic topology of the jets using Coronal Modeling System (CMS) to construct potential and non-linear force free models based on the flux rope insertion method.

  18. Distorted black hole initial data using the puncture method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. David; Lowe, Lisa L.

    2004-12-01

    We solve for single distorted black hole initial data using the puncture method, where the Hamiltonian constraint is written as an elliptic equation in R3 for the nonsingular part of the metric conformal factor. With this approach we can generate isometric and nonisometric black hole data. For the isometric case, our data are directly comparable to those obtained by Bernstein et al., who impose isometry boundary conditions at the black hole throat. Our numerical simulations are performed using a parallel multigrid elliptic equation solver with adaptive mesh refinement. Mesh refinement allows us to use high resolution around the black hole while keeping the grid boundaries far away in the asymptotic region.

  19. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  20. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Kramar, Maxim; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chae, Jongchul [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma β are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma β falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma β are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events.

  1. Symmetry and entropy of black hole horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, O; Smolin, L; Dreyer, Olaf; Markopoulou, Fotini; Smolin, Lee

    2004-01-01

    We argue, using methods taken from the theory of noiseless subsystems in quantum information theory, that the quantum states associated with a Schwarzchild black hole live in the restricted subspace of the Hilbert space of horizon boundary states in which all punctures are equal. Consequently, one value of the Immirzi parameter matches both the Hawking value for the entropy and the quasi normal mode spectrum of the Schwarzchild black hole.

  2. Flux Cancelation as the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets are frequent transient features on the Sun, observed in EUV and X-ray emissions. They occur in active regions, quiet Sun and coronal holes, and appear as a bright spire with base brightenings. Recent studies show that many coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a minifilament. Here we investigate the magnetic cause of jet-driving minifilament eruptions. We study ten randomly-found on-disk quiet-region coronal jets using SDO/AIA intensity images and SDO/HMI magnetograms. For all ten events, we track the evolution of the jet-base region and find that (a) a cool (transition-region temperature) minifilament is present prior to each jet eruption; (b) the pre-eruption minifilament resides above the polarity-inversion line between majority-polarity and minority-polarity magnetic flux patches; (c) the opposite-polarity flux patches converge and cancel with each other; (d) the ongoing cancelation between the majority-polarity and minority-polarity flux patches eventually destabilizes the field holding the minifilament to erupt outwards; (e) the envelope of the erupting field barges into ambient oppositely-directed far-reaching field and undergoes external reconnection (interchange reconnection); (f) the external reconnection opens the envelope field and the minifilament field inside, allowing reconnection-heated hot material and cool minifilament material to escape along the reconnected far-reaching field, producing the jet spire. In summary, we found that each of our ten jets resulted from a minifilament eruption during flux cancelation at the magnetic neutral line under the pre-eruption minifilament. These observations show that flux cancelation is usually the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions.

  3. Coronal heating in multiple magnetic threads

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, K V; Browning, P K; Cargill, P J

    2015-01-01

    Context. Heating the solar corona to several million degrees requires the conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy. In this paper, we investigate whether an unstable magnetic thread within a coronal loop can destabilise a neighbouring magnetic thread. Aims. By running a series of simulations, we aim to understand under what conditions the destabilisation of a single magnetic thread can also trigger a release of energy in a nearby thread. Methods. The 3D magnetohydrodynamics code, Lare3d, is used to simulate the temporal evolution of coronal magnetic fields during a kink instability and the subsequent relaxation process. We assume that a coronal magnetic loop consists of non-potential magnetic threads that are initially in an equilibrium state. Results. The non-linear kink instability in one magnetic thread forms a helical current sheet and initiates magnetic reconnection. The current sheet fragments, and magnetic energy is released throughout that thread. We find that, under certain conditions, this ...

  4. The Fundamental Structure of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Warren, Harry; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    During the past ten years, solar physicists have attempted to infer the coronal heating mechanism by comparing observations of coronal loops with hydrodynamic model predictions. These comparisons often used the addition of sub ]resolution strands to explain the observed loop properties. On July 11, 2012, the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi ]C) was launched on a sounding rocket. This instrument obtained images of the solar corona was 0.2 ]0.3'' resolution in a narrowband EUV filter centered around 193 Angstroms. In this talk, we will compare these high resolution images to simultaneous density measurements obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on Hinode to determine whether the structures observed with Hi ]C are resolved.

  5. A unified theory of coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Solar coronal heating mechanisms are analyzed within the framework of a unified theory of heating processes. The theory is based on the standing wave equation of Ionson (1982) for the global current driven by emfs from the convection Beta less than 1. The equation has the same form as a driven LRC equation in which the equivalent inductance is scaled with the coronal loop length. The theory is used to classify various heating mechanisms inside the coronal loops. It is shown that the total global current can be obtained from an integration of the local currents, the degree of coherency between local currents being the dominant factor governing the global current amplitude. Active region loops appear to be heated by electrodynamic coupling to p-mode oscillations in the convection Beta less than 1.

  6. A Contemporary View of Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Parnell, Clare E; 10.1098/rsta.2012.0113

    2012-01-01

    Determining the heating mechanism (or mechanisms) that causes the outer atmosphere of the Sun, and many other stars, to reach temperatures orders of magnitude higher than their surface temperatures has long been a key problem. For decades the problem has been known as the coronal heating problem, but it is now clear that `coronal heating' cannot be treated or explained in isolation and that the heating of the whole solar atmosphere must be studied as a highly coupled system. The magnetic field of the star is known to play a key role, but, despite significant advancements in solar telescopes, computing power and much greater understanding of theoretical mechanisms, the question of which mechanism or mechanisms are the dominant supplier of energy to the chromosphere and corona is still open. Following substantial recent progress, we consider the most likely contenders and discuss the key factors that have made, and still make, determining the actual (coronal) heating mechanism (or mechanisms) so difficult.

  7. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  8. Transport of Large Scale Poloidal Flux in Black Hole Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Beckwith, Kris; Krolik, Julian H

    2009-01-01

    We perform a global, three-dimensional GRMHD simulation of an accretion torus embedded in a large scale vertical magnetic field orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole. This simulation investigates how a large scale vertical field evolves within a turbulent accretion disk and whether global magnetic field configurations suitable for launching jets and winds can develop. We identify a ``coronal mechanism'' of magnetic flux motion, which dominates the global flux evolution. In this coronal mechanism, magnetic stresses driven by orbital shear create large-scale half-loops of magnetic field that stretch radially inward and then reconnect, leading to discontinuous jumps in the location of magnetic flux. This mechanism is supplemented by a smaller amount of flux advection in the accretion flow proper. Because the black hole in this case does not rotate, the magnetic flux on the horizon determines the mean magnetic field strength in the funnel around the disk axis; this field strength is regulated by a combination of th...

  9. Long Fading Mid-Infrared Emission in Transient Coronal Line Emitters: Dust Echo of Tidal Disruption Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Liming; Wang, Ting-Gui; Jiang, Ning; Yang, Chenwei; Lyu, Jianwei; Zhou, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The sporadic accretion following the tidal disruption of a star by a super-massive black hole (TDE) leads to a bright UV and soft X-ray flare in the galactic nucleus. The gas and dust surrounding the black hole responses to such a flare with an echo in emission lines and infrared emission. In this paper, we report the detection of long fading mid-IR emission lasting up to 14 years after the flare in four TDE candidates with transient coronal lines using the WISE public data release. We estima...

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Coronal Evolution and Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Flux cancellation, defined observationally as the mutual disappearance of magnetic fields of opposite polarity at the neutral line separating them, has been found to occur frequently at the site of filaments (called prominences when observed on the limb of the Sun). During the second year of this project, we have studied theoretically the role that flux cancellation may play in prominence formation, prominence eruption, and the initiation of coronal mass ejections. This work has been in published in two papers: "Magnetic Field Topology in Prominences" by Lionello, Mikic, Linker, and Amari and "Flux Cancellation and Coronal Mass Ejections" by Linker, Mikic, Riley, Lionello, Amari, and Odstrcil.

  11. On the Casimir interaction between holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kabat, Daniel; Nair, V P

    2010-01-01

    We study the leading long-distance attractive force between two holes in a plate arising from a scalar field with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the plate. We use a formalism in which the interaction is governed by a non-local field theory which lives on the two holes. The interaction energy is proportional to Q_1 Q_2/r^7 at large separation r, where Q_1 and Q_2 are certain charges associated with the holes. We compute these charges for round and rectangular holes. We show that the 1/r^7 behavior is universal for separations large compared to the linear dimensions of the holes, irrespective of the spin or interactions of the bosonic field. We also study the interaction between two long thin slits, for which the energy falls off as 1/r^6.

  12. Quantum chaos and the black hole horizon

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to AdS/CFT, the analogy between black holes and thermal systems has become a practical tool, shedding light on thermalization, transport, and entanglement dynamics. Continuing in this vein, recent work has shown how chaos in the boundary CFT can be analyzed in terms of high energy scattering right on the horizon of the dual black hole. The analysis revolves around certain out-of-time-order correlation functions, which are simple diagnostics of the butterfly effect. We will review this work, along with a general bound on these functions that implies black holes are the most chaotic systems in quantum mechanics. (NB Room Change to Main Auditorium)

  13. Rotating black holes and Coriolis effect

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Jui Chou; Xiaoning Wu; Yi Yang; Pei-Hung Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the fluid/gravity correspondence for general rotating black holes. By using the Petrov-like boundary condition in near horizon limit, we study the correspondence between gravitational perturbation and fluid equation. We find that the dual fluid equation for rotating black holes contains a Coriolis force term, which is closely related to the angular velocity of the black hole horizon. This can be seen as a dual effect for the frame-dragging effect of rotating black ho...

  14. Local Operators in the Eternal Black Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2015-11-20

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence, states obtained by Hamiltonian evolution of the thermofield doubled state are also dual to an eternal black-hole geometry, which is glued to the boundary with a time shift generated by a large diffeomorphism. We describe gauge-invariant relational observables that probe the black hole interior in these states and constrain their properties using effective field theory. By adapting recent versions of the information paradox we show that these observables are necessarily described by state-dependent bulk-boundary maps, which we construct explicitly.

  15. Black holes in a box: towards the numerical evolution of black holes in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Witek, Helvi; Herdeiro, Carlos; Nerozzi, Andrea; Sperhake, Ulrich; Zilhao, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of black holes in "confining boxes" is interesting for a number of reasons, particularly because it mimics the global structure of Anti-de Sitter geometries. These are non-globally hyperbolic space-times and the Cauchy problem may only be well defined if the initial data is supplemented by boundary conditions at the time-like conformal boundary. Here, we explore the active role that boundary conditions play in the evolution of a bulk black hole system, by imprisoning a black hole binary in a box with mirror-like boundary conditions. We are able to follow the post-merger dynamics for up to two reflections off the boundary of the gravitational radiation produced in the merger. We estimate that about 15% of the radiation energy is absorbed by the black hole per interaction, whereas transfer of angular momentum from the radiation to the black hole is only observed in the first interaction. We discuss the possible role of superradiant scattering for this result. Unlike the studies with outgoing bound...

  16. Probing the puncture for black hole simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J David

    2009-01-01

    With the puncture method for black hole simulations, the second infinity of a wormhole geometry is compactified to a single "puncture point" on the computational grid. The region surrounding the puncture quickly evolves to a trumpet geometry. The computational grid covers only a portion of the trumpet throat. It ends at a boundary whose location depends on resolution. This raises the possibility that perturbations in the trumpet geometry could propagate down the trumpet throat, reflect from the puncture boundary, and return to the black hole exterior with a resolution--dependent time delay. Such pathological behavior is not observed. This is explained by the observation that some perturbative modes propagate in the conformal geometry, others propagate in the physical geometry. The puncture boundary exists only in the physical geometry. The modes that propagate in the physical geometry are always directed away from the computational domain at the puncture boundary. The finite difference stencils ensure that th...

  17. Coronal temperature profiles obtained from kinetic models and from coronal brightness measurements obtained during solar eclipses

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V; Lemaire, J F

    2012-01-01

    Coronal density, temperature and heat flux distributions for the equatorial and polar corona have been deduced by Lemaire [2012] from Saito's model of averaged coronal white light (WL) brightness and polarization observations. They are compared with those determined from a kinetic collisionless/exospheric model of the solar corona. This comparison indicates rather similar distributions at large radial distances (> 7 Rs) in the collisionless region. However, rather important differences are found close to the Sun in the acceleration region of the solar wind. The exospheric heat flux is directed away from the Sun, while that inferred from all WL coronal observations is in the opposite direction, i.e., conducting heat from the inner corona toward the chromosphere. This could indicate that the source of coronal heating rate extends up into the inner corona where it maximizes at r > 1.5 Rs well above the transition region.

  18. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Warmuth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the “classical” interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which “pseudo waves” are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  19. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA in the 94A channel, and by Hinode/XRT. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few $10^{23}rg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C...

  20. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  1. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma; Diksha Chaudhary

    2008-03-01

    One of the fundamental questions in solar physics is how the solar corona maintains its high temperature of several million Kelvin above photosphere with a temperature of 6000 K. Observations show that solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in the solar corona. The separate kinds of coronal loops may also be heated by different mechanisms. Using data from instruments onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and from the more recent Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) scientists have identified small regions of mixed polarity, termed magnetic carpet contributing to solar activity on a short time scale. Magnetic loops of all sizes rise into the solar corona, arising from regions of opposite magnetic polarity in the photosphere. Energy released when oppositely directed magnetic fields meet in the corona is one likely cause for coronal heating. There is enough energy coming up from the loops of the “magnetic carpet” to heat the corona to its known temperature.

  2. A new instability of the topological black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin, Alexandre; Maloney, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the stability of massless topological black holes in {{{AdS}}}d when minimally coupled to a scalar field of negative mass-squared. In many cases such black holes are unstable even though the field is above the BF bound and the geometry is locally AdS. The instability depends on the choice of boundary conditions for the scalars: scalars with non-standard (Neumann) boundary conditions tend to be more unstable, though scalars with standard (Dirichlet) boundary conditions can be unstable as well. This leads to an apparent mismatch between boundary and bulk results in the Vasiliev/vector-like matter duality.

  3. Using coronal seismology to estimate the magnetic field strength in a realistic coronal model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Coronal seismology is extensively used to estimate properties of the corona, e.g. the coronal magnetic field strength are derived from oscillations observed in coronal loops. We present a three-dimensional coronal simulation including a realistic energy balance in which we observe oscillations of a loop in synthesised coronal emission. We use these results to test the inversions based on coronal seismology. From the simulation of the corona above an active region we synthesise extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission from the model corona. From this we derive maps of line intensity and Doppler shift providing synthetic data in the same format as obtained from observations. We fit the (Doppler) oscillation of the loop in the same fashion as done for observations to derive the oscillation period and damping time. The loop oscillation seen in our model is similar to imaging and spectroscopic observations of the Sun. The velocity disturbance of the kink oscillation shows an oscillation period of 52.5s and a damping tim...

  4. Standing sausage modes in curved coronal slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic waveguides such as dense coronal loops can support standing modes. The ratios of the periods of oscillations for different longitudinal harmonics depend on the dispersive nature of the waveguide and so may be used as a seismological tool to determine coronal parameters. Aims: We extend models of standing sausage modes in low β coronal loops to include the effects of loop curvature. The behaviour of standing sausage modes in this geometry is used to explain the properties of observed oscillations that cannot be accounted for using straight loop models. Methods: We perform 2D numerical simulations of an oscillating coronal loop, modelled as a dense slab embedded in a potential magnetic field. The loop is field-aligned and so experiences expansion with height in addition to being curved. Standing sausage modes are excited by compressive perturbations of the loop and their properties are studied. Results: The spatial profiles of standing sausage modes are found to be modified by the expanding loop geometry typical for flaring loops and modelled by a potential magnetic field in our simulations. Longitudinal harmonics of order n > 1 have anti-nodes that are shifted towards the loop apex and the amplitude of anti-nodes near the loop apex is smaller than those near the loop footpoints. Conclusions: We find that the observation of standing sausage modes by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph in a flaring coronal loop on 12 January 2000 is consistent with interpretation in terms of the global mode (n = 1) and third harmonic (n = 3). This interpretation accounts for the period ratio and spatial structure of the observed oscillations.

  5. Effect of Size of the Computational Domain on Spherical Nonlinear Force-Free Modeling of Coronal Magnetic Field Using SDO/HMI Data

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, Tilaye; MacNeice, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field produces solar activity, including extremely energetic solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Knowledge of the structure and evolution of the magnetic field of the solar corona is important for investigating and understanding the origins of space weather. Although the coronal field remains difficult to measure directly, there is considerable interest in accurate modeling of magnetic fields in and around sunspot regions on the Sun using photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary data. In this work, we investigate effects of the size of the domain chosen for coronal magnetic field modeling on resulting model solution. We apply spherical Optimization procedure to vector magnetogram data of Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with four Active Region observed on 09 March 2012 at 20:55UT. The results imply that quantities like magnetic flux density, electric current density and free magnetic energy density of ARs of interest are...

  6. A simple method of constructing binary black hole initial data

    CERN Document Server

    Rácz, István

    2016-01-01

    By applying a parabolic-hyperbolic formulation of constraint equations and superposing Kerr-Schild black holes, a simple method is introduced to initialize time evolution of binary black hole systems. In constructing the initial data no use of boundary conditions in the strong field regime is made. The proposed new method offers a direct control on the ADM parameters of the composite system, and it could also be applied to construct initial data for multiple black holes.

  7. Modelling the Global Solar Corona II: Coronal Evolution and Filament Chirality Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Yeates, A R; Van Ballegooijen, A A

    2007-01-01

    The hemispheric pattern of solar filaments is considered using newly-developed simulations of the real photospheric and 3D coronal magnetic fields over a 6-month period, on a global scale. The magnetic field direction in the simulation is compared directly with the chirality of observed filaments, at their observed locations. In our model the coronal field evolves through a continuous sequence of nonlinear force-free equilibria, in response to the changing photospheric boundary conditions and the emergence of new magnetic flux. In total 119 magnetic bipoles with properties matching observed active regions are inserted. These bipoles emerge twisted and inject magnetic helicity into the solar atmosphere. When we choose the sign of this active-region helicity to match that observed in each hemisphere, the model produces the correct chirality for up to 96% of filaments, including exceptions to the hemispheric pattern. If the emerging bipoles have zero helicity, or helicity of the opposite sign, then this percenta...

  8. Stress Distribution of Holed Geotextile Cross-section in Civil Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Xin-ping; CHU Cai-yuan

    2005-01-01

    Stress distribution of holed geotextile cross-section under uniaxial and double-axial tension is analyzed with the boundary element method (BEM). The calculation results indicate that stress distribution of holed geotextile crosssection is greatly related to the dimension of the specimen, the size of the hole, the shape of the hole and the tensile condition, and the stress concentration area of holed geotextile from the side of the hole to 3-4 times of the hole diameter should be strengthened in order to improve quality of the projects. These results could provide guidance for engineering application of geotextiles.

  9. Periodic Variations in the Coronal Green Line Intensity and their Connection with the White-light Coronal Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan Minarovjech; Milan Rybansky; Vojtech Rusin

    2000-09-01

    We present an analysis of short time-scale intensity variations in the coronal green line as obtained with high time resolution observations. The observed data can be divided into two groups. The first one shows periodic intensity variations with a period of 5 min. the second one does not show any significant intensity variations. We studied the relation between regions of coronal intensity oscillations and the shape of whitelight coronal structures. We found that the coronal green-line oscillations occur mainly in regions where open white-light coronal structures are located.

  10. Deburring small intersecting holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  11. On the Origin of Coronal Mass Ejections: How Does the Emergence of a Magnetic Flux Rope Reorganize the Solar Corona?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussev, I. I.; Galsgaard, K.; Lugaz, N.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-12-01

    The physical causes leading to the occurrence of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun have been debated for almost four decades now. One of the leading mechanisms suggests that a CME may occur as the result of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope from the convection zone into the solar corona. This process have been investigated by a number of researchers over the years, and it has been demonstrated that an eruption of the coronal magnetic field can in principle occur. The majority of these studies, however, involve some ad-hoc prescription of the electric field at the photosphere resembling flux emergence, and they neglect the ambient coronal magnetic field. In addition, most of these flux-emergence simulations are performed in a Cartesian domain, which extends only to a few dozen pressure scale-heights into the corona. Thus, it is difficult to assess the role of boundary driving and limited computational domain on the resulting evolution of the erupting coronal magnetic field. In this paper, we present a new model of CMEs that mitigates these two effects. To achieve this, we couple the "local" magnetic-flux-emergence (MFE) model of Archontis et al. (2004) with a global MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind. The model coupling is performed using the Space Weather Modeling Framework. In the coupled model, the MFE simulation provides time-dependent boundary conditions for all MHD quantities into the global model, where the physical coupling is done at the photospheric boundary. The physical evolution of the system is followed using the BATS-R-US "ideal" MHD code well beyond the complete emergence of the magnetic flux from the convection zone. We discuss the dynamics of the flux emergence process and the related response of the pre-existing coronal magnetic field in the context of CME production.

  12. Chiral boundary conditions for singletons and W-branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeymaekers, Joris; Van den Bleeken, Dieter

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the holographic dictionary for a free massless scalar in AdS3, focusing on the `singleton' solutions for which the boundary profile is an arbitrary chiral function. We look for consistent boundary conditions which include this class of solutions. On one hand, we give a no-go argument that they cannot be interpreted within any boundary condition which preserves full conformal invariance. On the other hand, we show that such solutions fit naturally in a generalization of the Compère-Song-Strominger boundary conditions, which preserve a chiral Virasoro and current algebra. These observations have implications for the black hole deconstruction proposal, which proposes singleton solutions as candidate black hole microstate geometries. Our results suggest that the chiral boundary condition, which also contains the extremal BTZ black hole, is the natural setting for holographically interpreting the black hole deconstruction proposal.

  13. Life inside black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dokuchaev, V I

    2012-01-01

    We consider test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside a black hole, which are stable, periodic and neither come out of the black hole nor terminate at the singularity. Interiors of supermassive black holes may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on planets with the third-kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of black holes by observing their white hole counterparts.

  14. Lifecycle of a large-scale polar coronal pseudostreamer/cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guennou, Chloé; Auchere, Frederic; Seaton, Daniel; Rachmeler, Laurel

    2016-07-01

    Coronal cavities, tunnel-like areas of rarefied density, provide important information about the magnetic structures that support prominences. The magnetic energy is stored through the twisted or shared magnetic field, ultimately released through Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). To be able to forecast these energetic releases of material and prevent potential terrestrial consequences, the understanding of the cavity 3D morphology, magnetic and thermal properties are essential. The prominences embedded in the cavity only trace a small part of the magnetic field, whereas the much larger cavity provides more information about the magnetic field morphology. As a result, a clear understanding of the coronal volume of the cavity significantly advances our understanding of both the pre-eruption equilibrium and the triggers of such eruptions. Determining both morphological and thermodynamical coronal structures is difficult due to the optically thin nature of the plasma. Observations are subject to integration along the line-of-sight (LOS). This effect can strongly complicate both the derivation and the interpretation of important physical quantities. One way to deduce the 3D structure is with Solar Rotational Tomography (SRT). The 3D plasma emissivity is estimated from EUV/white light images taken from different viewpoints. Physical properties can be then derived using Differential Emission Measure analysis from multi-wavelength 3D reconstructions. We applied this technique to an exceptional large-scale coronal pseudostreamer/cavity system in the southern polar region of the solar corona that was visible for approximately a year starting in February 2014. It is unusual to see such a large closed-field structure embedded within the open polar coronal hole. We investigate this structure to document its formation, evolution and eventually its shrinking process using data from both the PROBA2/SWAP and SDO/AIA EUV imagers. We found that the cavity temperature is extremely stable

  15. Coronal properties of the luminous radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202$-$209

    CERN Document Server

    Kammoun, E S; Stern, D; Jun, H D; Graham, M; Celotti, A; Behar, E; Elvis, M; Harrison, F A; Matt, G; Walton, D J

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the joint $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$ observations of the radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202$-$209. Using an optical observation from the Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory, we revise the redshift of the source from the previously reported $z=1.77$ to $z=0.532$, and we estimate the mass of the central black hole, $\\log (M_{\\rm BH}/M_{\\odot}) = 9.08 \\pm 0.18$. The X-ray spectrum of this source can be well described by a power-law of photon index $\\Gamma = 1.82 \\pm 0.05$ with $E_{\\rm cut} = 152_{-54}^{+103}\\,{\\rm keV}$, in the rest frame of the source. Assuming a Comptonisation model, we estimate the coronal temperature to be $kT_{\\rm e}=42\\pm 3 \\,{\\rm keV}$ and $kT_{\\rm e}= 56 \\pm 3\\,{\\rm keV}$ for a spherical and a slab geometry, respectively. The coronal properties are comparable to the ones derived for local AGN, despite a difference of around one order of magnitude in black hole mass and X-ray luminosity ($L_{2-10} = 1.93\\times 10^{45}\\,{\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}}$). The quasar is X-ray lo...

  16. Primordial Universe Inside the Black Hole and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    We speculate that the early Universe was inside a primordial black hole. The interior of the the black hole is a dS background and the two spacetimes are separated on the surface of black hole's event horizon. We argue that this picture provides a natural realization of inflation without invoking the inflaton field. The black hole evaporation by Hawking radiation provides a natural mechanism for terminating inflation so reheating and the hot big bang cosmology starts from the evaporation of black hole to relativistic particles. The quantum gravitational fluctuations at the boundary of black hole generate the nearly scale invariant scalar and tensor perturbations with the ratio of tensor to scalar power spectra at the order of $10^{-3}$. As the black hole evaporates, the radius of its event horizon shrinks and the Hubble expansion rate during inflation increases slowly so the quantum Hawking radiation provides a novel mechanism for the violation of null energy condition in cosmology.

  17. USING RUNNING DIFFERENCE IMAGES TO TRACK PROPER MOTIONS OF XUV CORONAL INTENSITY ON THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Lee, J., E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Chung, S.; Katz, J.; Namkung, M

    2014-12-20

    We have developed a procedure for observing and tracking proper motions of faint XUV coronal intensity on the Sun and have applied this procedure to study the collective motions of cellular plumes and the shorter-period waves in sunspots. Our space/time maps of cellular plumes show a series of tracks with the same 5-8 minute repetition times and ∼100 km s{sup –1} sky-plane speeds found previously in active-region fans and in coronal hole plumes. By synchronizing movies and space/time maps, we find that the tracks are produced by elongated ejections from the unipolar flux concentrations at the bases of the cellular plumes and that the phases of these ejections are uncorrelated from cell to cell. Thus, the large-scale motion is not a continuous flow, but is more like a system of independent conveyor belts all moving in the same direction along the magnetic field. In contrast, the proper motions in sunspots are clearly waves resulting from periodic disturbances in the sunspot umbras. The periods are ∼2.6 minutes, but the sky-plane speeds and wavelengths depend on the heights of the waves above the sunspot. In the chromosphere, the waves decelerate from 35-45 km s{sup –1} in the umbra to 7-8 km s{sup –1} toward the outer edge of the penumbra, but in the corona, the waves accelerate to ∼60-100 km s{sup –1}. Because chromospheric and coronal tracks originate from the same space/time locations, the coronal waves must emerge from the same umbral flashes that produce the chromospheric waves.

  18. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N E; Pariat, E; Young, P R; Sterling, A C; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Moreno-Insertis, F; DeVore, C R; Archontis, V; Török, T; Mason, H; Curdt, W; Meyer, K; Dalmasse, K; Matsui, Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  19. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Katsiyannis, A C; Phillips, K J H; Williams, D R; Keenan, F P

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

  20. Chemical Fractionation and Abundances in Coronal Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, J J

    2003-01-01

    Much of modern astrophysics is grounded on the observed chemical compositions of stars and the diffuse plasma that pervades the space between stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. X-ray and EUV spectra of the hot plasma in the outer atmospheres of stars have demonstrated that these environments are subject to chemical fractionation in which the abundances of elements can be enhanced and depleted by an order of magnitude or more. These coronal abundance anomalies are discussed and some of the physical mechanisms that might be responsible for producing them are examined. It is argued that coronal abundances can provide important new diagnostics on physical processes at work in solar and stellar coronae. It seems likely that other hot astrophysical plasmas will be subject to similar effects.

  1. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meera Gupta; Rajmal Jain; Jayshree Trivedi; A. P. Mishra

    2008-03-01

    We present a preliminary study of 27 microflares observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission during July 2003 to August 2006. We found that all 27 microflares show the Fe-line feature peaking around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma temperature ≥ 9 MK. On the other hand, the spectra of microflares showhybrid model of thermal and non-thermal emission, which further supports them as possible sources of coronal heating. Our results based on the analysis show that the energy relapsed by the microflares is good enough for heating of the active corona. We discuss our results in the light of the hybrid model of microflares production.

  2. Selamento coronário em Endodontia

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Rui Pedro Barra de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Introdução: A Endodontia é a especialidade da Medicina Dentária responsável pelo estudo e tratamento da câmara pulpar, de todo o sistema de canais radiculares e dos tecidos periapicais, bem como das doenças que os afetam. O selamento da porção coronária dos dentes alvo de tratamento endodôntico apresenta-se como um critério determinante no sucesso ou insucesso do tratamento. São vários os fatores que podem proporcionar um correto selamento coronário evitando assim a microinfiltração de ...

  3. Solar Active Region Coronal Jets. II. Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/X-ray telescope, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets. The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ≲ 2\\prime\\prime ) miniature-filament (minifilament) “strands” from a magnetic neutral line where magnetic flux cancelation is ongoing, consistent with the magnetic configuration presented for coronal-hole jets in Sterling et al. (2016). Some jets strands are difficult/impossible to detect, perhaps due to, e.g., their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ˜ 1.5× {10}19 Mx hr-1. An average flux of ˜ 5× {10}18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ˜1028-1029 erg of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption build up and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  4. A two-dimensional MHD global coronal model - Steady-state streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    1992-01-01

    A 2D, time-dependent, numerical, MHD model for the simulation of coronal streamers from the solar surface to 15 solar is presented. Three examples are given; for dipole, quadrupole and hexapole (Legendre polynomials P1, P2, and P3) initial field topologies. The computed properties are density, temperature, velocity, and magnetic field. The calculation is set up as an initial-boundary value problem wherein a relaxation in time produces the steady state solution. In addition to the properties of the solutions, their accuracy is discussed. Besides solutions for dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole geometries, the model use of realistic values for the density and Alfven speed while still meeting the requirement that the flow speed be super-Alfvenic at the outer boundary by extending the outer boundary to 15 solar radii.

  5. Coronal Mass Ejections of Solar Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nat Gopalswamy

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the statistical, physical, and morphological properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) of solar cycle 23, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. The SOHO data is by far the most extensive data, which made it possible to fully establish the properties of CMEs as a phenomenon of utmost importance to Sun–Earth connection as well as to the heliosphere. I also discuss various subsets of CMEs that are of primary importance for their impact on Earth.

  6. Topics on shock waves and coronal seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A, E-mail: acosta@mail.oac.uncor.edu [Instituto de AstronomIa Teorica y Experimental, CONICET-Cordoba, Laprida 922, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisica y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Av. Velez Sarsfield 1611, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-07-15

    The usual strong and sudden energy release sources that necessarily lead to mode excitation suggest the importance of shocks and nonlinear waves in the corona. We discuss the importance of nonlinear waves as an alternative capable of accurately matching the observational cases of coronal seismology usually interpreted as linear waves. We present two case studies where we explore the goodness of the shock wave interpretation in magnetic structures of the low corona.

  7. Bridging the Gap between Coronal and Non-Coronal Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys V.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury Program "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL)" enables investigations of a broad range of problems including the character and dynamics of the wind and chromosphere of cool stars. This paper presents an investigation of the change in spectral characteristics when transitioning from the cool non-coronal objects with fluorescent emission spectra from the iron group elements, molecular hydrogen, and carbon monoxide to the warmer stars on the blue side of the Linsky-Haish dividing line in the HR diagram. These warmer objects exhibit chromospheric emission from significantly hotter environments in addition to coronal signatures, while the hybrid stars overlap in the HR-diagram with some of the non-coronal objects and share many spectral characteristics but show differences in the wind properties. We show how the wind, fluorescent features, and hot stellar signatures dramatically change with spectral class by comparing the already analyzed non-coronal objects (Alpha Ori, Gamma Cru) with the hybrid stars (Gamma Dra, Beta Gem and Alpha Aqr) and the coronal object Beta Dra. We aim to gain understanding of the physical processes in these objects' outer atmospheres and their evolutionary tracks.

  8. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James Paul; Webb, David F; Thompson, Barbara J; Colaninno, Robin C; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011, plus an event on 2010 August 7 analyzed in a previous paper, to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to t...

  9. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  10. Propagating magnetohydrodynamics waves in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, I

    2006-02-15

    High cadence Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations show that outward propagating intensity disturbances are a common feature in large, quiescent coronal loops, close to active regions. An overview is given of measured parameters of such longitudinal oscillations in coronal loops. The observed oscillations are interpreted as propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves and are unlikely to be flare-driven. A strong correlation, between the loop position and the periodicity of the oscillations, provides evidence that the underlying oscillations can propagate through the transition region and into the corona. Both a one- and a two-dimensional theoretical model of slow magnetoacoustic waves are presented to explain the very short observed damping lengths. The results of these numerical simulations are compared with the TRACE observations and show that a combination of the area divergence and thermal conduction agrees well with the observed amplitude decay. Additionally, the usefulness of wavelet analysis is discussed, showing that care has to be taken when interpreting the results of wavelet analysis, and a good knowledge of all possible factors that might influence or distort the results is a necessity.

  11. SOLUTION OF DIFFERENT HOLES SHAPE BORDERS OF FIBRE REINFORCED COMPOSITE PLATES BY INTEGRAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng; ZHENG Yanping; CHEN Zhongzhong

    2007-01-01

    Accurate boundary conditions of composite material plates with different holes are founded to settle boundary condition problems of complex holes by conformal mapping method upon the nonhomogeneous anisotropic elastic and complex function theory. And then the two stress functions required were founded on Cauchy integral by boundary conditions. The final stress distributions of opening structure and the analytical solution on composite material plate with rectangle hole and wing manholes were achieved. The influences on hole-edge stress concentration factors are discussed under different loads and fiber direction cases, and then contrast calculates are carried through FEM.

  12. Shape, position and orientational design of holes for plates with optimized eigenfrequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    2003-01-01

    A hole with a given size is placed in the interior of a plate with an arbitrary external boundary. To avoid stress concentrations the shape of the hole must be smooth (continuous curvature). The objectives of the optimization are the eigenfrequencies of the plate with the hole. The optimization i...... on finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis. Mindlin plate theory is the basis for the FE-analysis and the semi-analytical sensitivity analysis includes only the elements on the boundary of the hole.......A hole with a given size is placed in the interior of a plate with an arbitrary external boundary. To avoid stress concentrations the shape of the hole must be smooth (continuous curvature). The objectives of the optimization are the eigenfrequencies of the plate with the hole. The optimization...

  13. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2010-01-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modeling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems ...

  14. A unified theory of electrodynamic coupling in coronal magnetic loops - The coronal heating problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The coronal heating problem is studied, and it is demonstrated that Ionson's (1982) LRC approach results in a unified theory of coronal heating which unveils a variety of new heating mechanisms and which links together previously proposed mechanisms. Ionson's LRC equation is rederived, focusing on various aspects that were not clarified in the original article and incorporating new processes that were neglected. A parameterized heating rate is obtained. It is shown that Alfvenic surface wave heating, stochastic magnetic pumping, resonant electrodynamic heating, and dynamical dissipation emerge as special cases of a much more general formalism. This generalized theory is applied to solar coronal loops and it is found that active region and large scale loops are underdamped systems. Young active region loops and (possibly) bright points are found to be overdamped systems.

  15. The acceleration of electrons at a spherical coronal shock in a streamer-like coronal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Fan

    2016-03-01

    We study the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic field on the electron acceleration at a spherical coronal shock using a test-particle method. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. It shows that the closed field plays the role of a trapping agency of shock-accelerated electrons, allowing for repetitive reflection and acceleration, therefore can greatly enhance the shock-electron acceleration efficiency. It is found that, with an ad hoc pitch-angle scattering, electron injected in the open field at the shock flank can be accelerated to high energies as well. In addition, if the shock is faster or stronger, a relatively harder electron energy spectrum and a larger maximum energy can be achieved.

  16. The structure of fast sausage waves in current-carrying coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembitov, D. B.; Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We study fast sausage waves in a model coronal loop that consists of a cylindrical core with axial magnetic field and coaxial annulus with purely azimuthal magnetic field. The magnetic field is discontinuous at the tube and core boundaries, and there are surface currents with the opposite directions on these boundaries. The principal mode of fast sausage waves in which the magnetic pressure perturbation has no nodes in the radial direction can exist for arbitrary wavelength. The results for the fundamental radial mode of sausage waves are applied to the interpretation of observed periodic pulsations of microwave emission in flaring loops with periods of a few tens of seconds. Radial plasma motion has opposite directions at the tube and core boundaries. This leads to the periodic contraction and expansion of the annulus. We assume that the principal mode of fast sausage waves in the current-carrying coronal loops is able to produce a current sheet. However, the nonlinear analysis is needed to confirm this conjecture.

  17. Formalism for Primordial Black Hole Formation in Spherical Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bloomfield, Jolyon; Face, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive formalism for the description of primordial black hole formation in spherical symmetry based on the formalisms of Misner, Sharp, and Hernandez, which can be used to predict whether or not a black hole will form, and extract the resulting black hole mass when formation does occur. Rigorous derivations of all aspects of the formalism are provided, including a thorough investigation of appropriate initial and boundary conditions. We connect our formalism with numerous other approaches in the literature. Some implementation details for numerical code are provided. We include animations of simulated primordial black hole formation as supplemental material.

  18. Holographical aspects of dyonic black holes: Massive gravity generalization

    CERN Document Server

    Hendi, S H; Panahiyan, S

    2016-01-01

    The content of this paper includes studying holographical and thermodynamical aspects of dyonic black holes in the presence of massive gravity. For the first part of paper, the thermodynamical properties of the bulk which includes black holes are studied. The main focus is on critical behavior. It will be shown that the existence of massive gravitons introduces remnant for temperature for evaporation of black holes, van der Waals phase transition for non-spherical black holes and etc. The consistency of different thermodynamical approaches toward critical behavior of the black holes is proven and the physical properties near to the region of thermal instability are given. Next part of paper studies holographical aspects of the boundary theory. Magnetization and susceptibility of the boundary are extracted and the conditions for having diamagnetic and paramagnetic behaviors are investigated. It will be shown that generalization to massive gravity results into the existences of diamagnetic/paramagnetic phases i...

  19. Emerging boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a processual ontology for the emergence of man-made, linear boundaries across northwestern Europe, particularly in the first millennium BC. Over a significant period of time, these boundaries became new ways of organizing the landscape and settlements—a phenomenon that has...... of this phenomenon emerged along equivalent trajectories. At the same time, variation in the regional incorporation of these linear phenomena points toward situation-specific applications and independent development....

  20. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  1. Magnetic Properties of Metric Noise Storms Associated with Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Yuan Wen; Jing-Xiu Wang; Yu-Zong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Using Nan(c)ay Radioheliograph (NRH) imaging observations, combined with SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetogram observations and coronal magnetic field extrapolation, we studied the magnetic nature of metric noise storms that are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Four events are selected: the events of 2000 July 14,2001 April 26, 2002 August 16 and 2001 March 28. The identified noise storm sources cover or partially cover the active regions (ARs), but the centers of storm sources are offset from the ARs. Using extrapolated magnetic field lines, we find that the noise storm sources trace the boundary between the open and closed field lines. We demonstrate that the disappearance of noise storm source is followed by the appearance of the burst source. The burst sources spread on the solar disk and their distributions correspond to the extent of the CME in LASCO C2 field of view. All the SOHO/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) dimmings associated with noise storm sources are located at the periphery of noise storms where the magnetic lines of force were previously closed and low-lying. When the closed field becomes partially or fully open, the basic configurations of noise storm sources are changed, then the noise storm sources are no longer observed. These observations provide the information that the variations of noise storms manifest the restructuring or reconfiguring of the coronal magnetic field.

  2. Resonant absorption of kink MHD waves by magnetic twist in coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrahimi, Z

    2015-01-01

    There is ample evidences of twisted magnetic structures in the corona. This motivates us to consider the magnetic twist as the cause of Alfven frequency continuum in coronal loops, which can support the resonant absorption as the rapid damping mechanism for the observed coronal kink MHD oscillations. For a straight cylindrical compressible zero-beta thin flux tube with a magnetic twist in a thin boundary and straight magnetic field in the interior and exterior regions as well as a step-like radial density profile, we derive the dispersion relation and solve it analytically. Consequently, we obtain the frequencies and damping rates of the fundamental (l=1) and first/second overtones (l=2,3) kink (m=1) MHD modes. We conclude that the resonant absorption by the magnetic twist can justify the rapid damping of kink MHD waves observed in coronal loops. Furthermore, the magnetic twist in the inhomogeneous layer can achieve deviations from P_1/P_2=2 and P_1/P_3=3 of the same order of magnitude as in the observations.

  3. Closed Universes With Black Holes But No Event Horizons As a Solution to the Black Hole Information Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Tipler, F J; McGinley, M; Nichols-Barrer, J; Staecker, C; Tipler, Frank J.; Graber, Jessica; Ginley, Matthew Mc; Nichols-Barrer, Joshua; Staecker, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    We show it is possible for the information paradox in black hole evaporation to be resolved classically. Using standard junction conditions, we attach the general closed spherically symmetric dust metric to a spacetime satisfying all standard energy conditions but with a single point future c-boundary. The resulting Omega Point spacetime, which has NO event horizons, nevertheless has black hole type trapped surfaces and hence black holes. But since there are no event horizons, information eventually escapes from the black holes. We show that a scalar quintessence field with an appropriate exponential potential near the final singularity would give rise to an Omega Point final singularity.

  4. Closed universes with black holes but no event horizons as a solution to the black hole information problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.; Graber, Jessica; McGinley, Matthew; Nichols-Barrer, Joshua; Staecker, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    We show that it is possible for the information paradox in black hole evaporation to be resolved classically. Using standard junction conditions, we attach the general closed spherically symmetric dust metric to a space-time satisfying all standard energy conditions but with a single point future c-boundary. The resulting Omega Point space-time, which has NO event horizons, nevertheless has black hole type trapped surfaces and hence black holes. However, since there are no event horizons, information eventually escapes from the black holes. We show that a scalar quintessence field with an appropriate exponential potential near the final singularity would give rise to an Omega Point final singularity.

  5. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. IV. CATASTROPHIC COOLING OF LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cargill, P. J. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, S. J., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We examine the radiative cooling of coronal loops and demonstrate that the recently identified catastrophic cooling is due to the inability of a loop to sustain radiative/enthalpy cooling below a critical temperature, which can be >1 MK in flares, 0.5-1 MK in active regions, and 0.1 MK in long tenuous loops. Catastrophic cooling is characterized by a rapid fall in coronal temperature, while the coronal density changes by a small amount. Analytic expressions for the critical temperature are derived and show good agreement with numerical results. This effect considerably limits the lifetime of coronal plasmas below the critical temperature.

  6. Acceleration of Type 2 Spicules in the Solar Chromosphere - 2: Viscous Braking and Upper Bounds on Coronal Energy Input

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ~ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in inter-granular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  7. Hawking radiation inside a Schwarzschild black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Andrew J S

    2016-01-01

    The boundary of any observer's spacetime is the boundary that divides what the observer can see from what they cannot see. The boundary of an observer's spacetime in the presence of a black hole is not the true (future event) horizon of the black hole, but rather the illusory horizon, the dimming, redshifting surface of the star that collapsed to the black hole long ago. The illusory horizon is the source of Hawking radiation seen by observers both outside and inside the true horizon. The perceived acceleration (gravity) on the illusory horizon sets the characteristic frequency scale of Hawking radiation, even if that acceleration varies dynamically, as it must do from the perspective of an infalling observer. The acceleration seen by a non-rotating free-faller both on the illusory horizon below and in the sky above is calculated for a Schwarzschild black hole. Remarkably, as an infaller approaches the singularity, the acceleration becomes isotropic, and diverging as a power law. The isotropic, power-law char...

  8. Higher spin black holes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutperle, Michael; Kraus, Per

    2011-01-01

    .... We find solutions that generalize the BTZ black hole and carry spin-3 charge. The black hole entropy formula yields a result for the asymptotic growth of the partition function at finite spin-3 chemical potential...

  9. Black hole hair removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Mandal, Ipsita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-07-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair — degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  10. Black Hole Hair Removal

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-01-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair, -- degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  11. Noncommutative black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-DomInguez, J C [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); Obregon, O [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); RamIrez, C [Facultad de Ciencias FIsico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, PO Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sabido, M [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    We study noncommutative black holes, by using a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate Hawking's temperature and entropy for the 'noncommutative' Schwarzschild black hole.

  12. Black Hole Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Werner

    This chapter reviews the conceptual developments on black hole thermodynamics and the attempts to determine the origin of black hole entropy in terms of their horizon area. The brick wall model and an operational approach are discussed. An attempt to understand at the microlevel how the quantum black hole acquires its thermal properties is included. The chapter concludes with some remarks on the extension of these techniques to describing the dynamical process of black hole evaporation.

  13. Deriving Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-08-01

    The minimum-energy configuration for the magnetic field above the solar photosphere is curl-free (hence, by Ampère's law, also current-free), so can be represented as the gradient of a scalar potential. Since magnetic fields are divergence free, this scalar potential obeys Laplace's equation, given an appropriate boundary condition (BC). With measurements of the full magnetic vector at the photosphere, it is possible to employ either Neumann or Dirichlet BCs there. Historically, the Neumann BC was used with available line-of-sight magnetic field measurements, which approximate the radial field needed for the Neumann BC. Since each BC fully determines the 3D vector magnetic field, either choice will, in general, be inconsistent with some aspect of the observed field on the boundary, due to the presence of both currents and noise in the observed field. We present a method to combine solutions from both Dirichlet and Neumann BCs to determine a hybrid, "least-squares" potential field, which minimizes the integrated square of the residual between the potential and actual fields. We also explore weighting the residuals in the fit by spatially uniform measurement uncertainties. This has advantages both in not overfitting the radial field used for the Neumann BC, and in maximizing consistency with the observations. We demonstrate our methods with SDO/HMI vector magnetic field observations of active region 11158, and find that residual discrepancies between the observed and potential fields are significant, and they are consistent with nonzero horizontal photospheric currents. We also analyze potential fields for two other active regions observed with two different vector magnetographs, and find that hybrid-potential fields have significantly less energy than the Neumann fields in every case - by more than 10^{32} erg in some cases. This has major implications for estimates of free magnetic energy in coronal field models, e.g., non-linear force-free field extrapolations.

  14. Monopole black hole skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I. G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  15. Monopole Black Hole Skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I. G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  16. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs. Spin-dependen

  17. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs.

  18. Soft Hair on Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen W.; Perry, Malcolm J.; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  19. Soft Hair on Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen W; Perry, Malcolm J; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  20. Soft Hair on Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen W; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that BMS supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft ($i.e.$ zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This paper gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the ho...

  1. Chaotic Information Processing by Extremal Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2015-01-01

    We review an explicit regularization of the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence, that preserves all isometries of bulk and boundary degrees of freedom. This scheme is useful to characterize the space of the unitary evolution operators that describe the dynamics of the microstates of extremal black holes in four spacetime dimensions. Using techniques from algebraic number theory to evaluate the transition amplitudes, we remark that the regularization scheme expresses the fast quantum computation capability of black holes as well as its chaotic nature.

  2. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    OpenAIRE

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss r...

  3. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiyannis, A. C.; Mathioudakis, M.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Williams, D. R.; F. P. Keenan

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage syst...

  4. Effective theory of Black Holes in the 1/D expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Emparan, Roberto; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (eg Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this 'black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for 'black droplets', ie black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  5. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  6. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011 plus an event on 2010 August 7, analyzed in a previous paper to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are \\begin{eqnarray*}{v}{CME} ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{{{s}}}\\right] & ≈ & 2.36× {10}6 ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{ % }\\right]× {s}\\dim ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{ % }{{{s}}}\\right]\\ {m}{CME} [{{g}}] & ≈ & 2.59× {10}15≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{g}{ % }\\right]× \\sqrt{{d}\\dim } [ % ].\\end{eqnarray*} These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  7. Sound Hole Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Politzer, David

    2015-01-01

    The volume of air that goes in and out of a musical instrument's sound hole is related to the sound hole's contribution to the volume of the sound. Helmholtz's result for the simplest case of steady flow through an elliptical hole is reviewed. Measurements on multiple holes in sound box geometries and scales relevant to real musical instruments demonstrate the importance of a variety of effects. Electric capacitance of single flat plates is a mathematically identical problem, offering an alternate way to understand the most important of those effects. The measurements also confirm and illuminate aspects of Helmholtz's "bottle" resonator model as applied to musical instrument sound boxes and sound holes.

  8. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  9. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  10. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  11. Boundary layer transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  12. On Accelerated Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Letelier, P S; Letelier, Patricio S.; Oliveira, Samuel R.

    1998-01-01

    The C-metric is revisited and global interpretation of some associated spacetimes are studied in some detail. Specially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We found that the spacetime fo an accelerated Schwarzschild black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon. By using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature. We also show that the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/sqrt(27)) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated Kerr black holes. We found that they are not changed by the black hole rotation.

  13. Modified Homogeneous Data Set of Coronal Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorotovič, I.; Minarovjech, M.; Lorenc, M.; Rybanský, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences has published the intensities, recalibrated with respect to a common intensity scale, of the 530.3 nm (Fe xiv) green coronal line observed at ground-based stations up to the year 2008. The name of this publication is Homogeneous Data Set (HDS). We have developed a method that allows one to successfully substitute the ground-based observations by satellite observations and, thus, continue with the publication of the HDS. For this purpose, the observations of the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, were exploited. Among other data the EIT instrument provides almost daily 28.4 nm (Fe xv) emission-line snapshots of the corona. The Fe xiv and Fe xv data (4051 observation days) taken in the period 1996 - 2008 have been compared and good agreement was found. The method to obtain the individual data for the HDS follows from the correlation analysis described in this article. The resulting data, now under the name of Modified Homogeneous Data Set (MHDS), are identical up to 1996 to those in the HDS. The MHDS can be used further for studies of the coronal solar activity and its cycle. These data are available at http://www.suh.sk.

  14. Energetics of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, P; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate if solar coronal mass ejections are driven mainly by coupling to the ambient solar wind, or through the release of internal magnetic energy. Methods: We examine the energetics of 39 flux-rope like coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun using data in the distance range $\\sim$ 2--20 $R_{{\\o}dot}$ from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This comprises a complete sample of the best examples of flux-rope CMEs observed by LASCO in 1996-2001. Results: We find that 69% of the CMEs in our sample experience a clearly identifiable driving power in the LASCO field of view. For these CMEs which are driven, we examine if they might be deriving most of their driving power by coupling to the solar wind. We do not find conclusive evidence in favor of this hypothesis. On the other hand, we find that their internal magnetic energy is a viable source of the required driving power. We have estimated upper and lower limits on the power th...

  15. SAUSAGE OSCILLATIONS OF CORONAL PLASMA STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Hornsey, C. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Melnikov, V. F., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 196140 St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-20

    The dependence of the period of sausage oscillations of coronal loops on length together with the depth and steepness of the radial profile are determined. We performed a parametric study of linear axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic (sausage) oscillations of coronal loops modeled as a field-aligned low-{beta} plasma cylinder with a smooth inhomogeneity of the plasma density in the radial direction. The density decreases smoothly in the radial direction. Sausage oscillations are impulsively excited by a perturbation of the radial velocity, localized at the cylinder axis and with a harmonic dependence on the longitudinal coordinate. The initial perturbation results in either a leaky or a trapped sausage oscillation, depending upon whether the longitudinal wavenumber is smaller or greater than a cutoff value, respectively. The period of the sausage oscillations was found to always increase with increasing longitudinal wavelength, with the dependence saturating in the long-wavelength limit. Deeper and steeper radial profiles of the Alfven speed correspond to more efficient trapping of sausage modes: the cutoff value of the wavelength increases with the steepness and the density (or Alfven speed) contrast ratio. In the leaky regime, the period is always longer than the period of a trapped mode of a shorter wavelength in the same cylinder. For shallow density profiles and shorter wavelengths, the period increases with wavelength. In the long-wavelength limit, the period becomes independent of the wavelength and increases with the depth and steepness of the radial profile of the Alfven speed.

  16. Analytical investigations on the Coronation Gospels manuscript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Idone, Ambra; Crivello, Fabrizio; Griesser, Martina; Kirchweger, Franz; Uhlir, Katharina; Puyo, Patricia Roger

    2017-01-01

    The Coronation Gospels or Krönungsevangeliar is a manuscript kept in Vienna at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, datable to the end of VIII century A.D. and produced at Charlemagne court. It is an example of a purple codex, i.e. its parchment is coloured in purple. It has to be considered as one of the most important medieval codices, according to its use to take oath in the coronation ceremony of kings and emperors of the Holy Roman Empire up to 1792. In order to gather information of the manufacture of the manuscript and its present conservation state, a diagnostic investigation campaign has been carried out in situ with totally non-invasive techniques. X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with optical fibres (FORS), spectrofluorimetry, optical microscopy and multispectral analysis have been applied in order to identify the colourants used in the decoration of the manuscript, with the main concern to the dye used to impart the purple hue to the parchment. The information collected was useful in order to address some of the questions raised by art historians concerning its history.

  17. A Moreton Wave and its Coronal Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francile, Carlos N.; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Long, David; Cremades, Hebe; Lopez, Fernando M.; Luoni, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    On 29 March 2014, a Moreton wave was detected in AR 12017 with the Halpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1 flare. Several phenomena took place in various regimes in connection with this event, such as low coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We investigate their role and relationship with the Moreton wave to shed light on issues so far under debate. We analyze its connection with waves observed in the low corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA), as well as with the ensuing CME, via kinematics analyses. We build stack plots from sequences of images obtained at different wavelengths to track wave fronts along several directions and find links between the features observed in the chromosphere and low corona, as well as in the associated CME. We also derive the shock front properties. We propose a geometrical model of the wave to explain the observed wave fronts as the photospheric and chromospheric traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun.

  18. Association of solar coronal loops to photospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep Chitta, Lakshmi; Peter, Hardi; Solanki, Sami

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic connectivity and its evolution from the solar photosphere to the corona will play a crucial role in the energetics of the solar atmosphere. To explore this connectivity, we use high spatial resolution magnetic field observations of an active region from the balloon-borne SUNRISE telescope, in combination with the observations of coronal loops imaged in extreme ultraviolet by SDO/AIA. We show that photospheric magnetic field at the base of coronal loops is rapidly evolving through small-scale flux emergence and cancellation events with rates on the order of 10^15 Mx/s. When observed at high spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec, we find that basically all coronal loops considered so far are rooted in the photosphere above small-scale opposite polarity magnetic field patches. In the photosphere, the magnetic field threading coronal loops is interacting with opposite polarity parasitic magnetic concentrations leading to dynamic signatures in the upper atmosphere. Chromospheric small-scale jets aligned to coronal loops are observed at these locations. We will present preliminary results from 3D MHD simulations of coronal loops driven by realistic magneto-convection and discuss what role the magnetic interactions at coronal loop footpoints could play in the evolution of coronal loops and their heating.

  19. Assessment of Coronal Radiographic Parameters of the Spine in the Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Karami

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative coronal balance is very important to make a balanced spine after surgery. Other parameters like Lenke classification or main thoracic overcorrection did not affect postoperative coronal decompensation.

  20. Application of a data-driven simulation method to the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Liang Fan; Hua-Ning Wang; Han He; Xiao-Shuai Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) method for extrapolation of the solar coronal magnetic field was first developed to study the dynamic evolution of twisted magnetic flux tubes,it has proven to be efficient in the reconstruction of the solar coronal magnetic field.A recent example is the so-called data-driven simulation method (DDSM),which has been demonstrated to be valid by an application to model analytic solutions such as a force-free equilibrium given by Low and Lou.We use DDSM for the observed magnetograms to reconstruct the magnetic field above an active region.To avoid an unnecessary sensitivity to boundary conditions,we use a classical total variation diminishing Lax-Friedrichs formulation to iteratively compute the full MHD equations.In order to incorporate a magnetogram consistently and stably,the bottom boundary conditions are derived from the characteristic method.In our simulation,we change the tangential fields continually from an initial potential field to the vector magnetogram.In the relaxation,the initial potential field is changed to a nonlinear magnetic field until the MHD equilibrium state is reached.Such a stable equilibrium is expected to be able to represent the solar atmosphere at a specified time.By inputting the magnetograms before and after the X3.4 flare that occurred on 2006 December 13,we find a topological change after comparing the magnetic field before and after the flare.Some discussions are given regarding the change of magnetic configuration and current distribution.Furthermore,we compare the reconstructed field line configuration with the coronal loop observations by XRT onboard Hinode.The comparison shows a relatively good correlation.

  1. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This article builds on the results obtained in the so-called Blurring Boundaries project which was undertaken at the Law Department, Copenhagen Business School, in the period from 2007 to 2009. It looks at the sustainability of the Danish welfare state in an EU law context and on the integration ...

  2. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work to ...

  3. Bootstrapping the Coronal Magnetic Field with STEREO/EUVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus; Sandman, Anne

    2010-05-01

    The 3D coronal magnetic field obtained from stereoscopically triangulated loops has been compared with standard photospheric magnetogram extrapolations. We found a large misalignment of 20-40 deg, depending on the complexity of an AR (Sandman et al. 2009; DeRosa et al. 2009). These studies prove that the magnetic field in the photosphere is not force-free and fundamentally cannot reproduce the coronal magnetic field. Bootstrapping with coronal loop 3D geometries are required to improve modeling of the coronal field. Such coronal field bootstrapping methods are currently developed using stereoscopically triangulated loops from STEREO/EUVI and preliminary results show already a significantly reduced misalignment of 10-20 deg.

  4. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Jardine, M M; Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal field strength, coronal free magnetic energy, coronal heating and flux rope eruptions. To do this, we apply a magnetic flux transport model to describe the photospheric evolution, and couple this to the non-potential coronal evolution using a magnetofrictional technique. A flux emergence model is applied to add new magnetic flux onto the photosphere and into the corona. The parameters of this flux emergence model are derived from the solar flux emergence profile, however the rate of emergence can be increased to represent higher flux emergence rates than the Sun's. Overall we find that flux emergence has a greater effect on the non-potential coronal properties compared to differential rotation, with all the aforementioned properties incr...

  5. Observing Episodic Coronal Heating Events Rooted in Chromospheric Activity

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a multi-wavelength study of episodic plasma injection into the corona of AR 10942. We exploit long-exposure images of the Hinode and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) spacecraft to study the properties of faint, episodic, "blobs" of plasma that are propelled upward along coronal loops that are rooted in the AR plage. We find that the source location and characteristic velocities of these episodic upflow events match those expected from recent spectroscopic observations of faint coronal upflows that are associated with upper chromospheric activity, in the form of highly dynamic spicules. The analysis presented ties together observations from coronal and chromospheric spectrographs and imagers, providing more evidence of the connection of discrete coronal mass heating and injection events with their source, dynamic spicules, in the chromosphere.

  6. Einstein black holes, free scalars and AdS/CFT correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Louko, J; Louko, Jorma; Wisniewski, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    We investigate AdS/CFT correspondence for two families of Einstein black holes in d > 3 dimensions, modelling the boundary CFT by a free conformal scalar field and evaluating the boundary two-point function in the bulk geodesic approximation. For the d > 3 counterpart of the nonrotating BTZ hole and for its Z_2 quotient, the boundary state is thermal in the expected sense, and its stress-energy reflects the properties of the bulk geometry and suggests a novel definition for the mass of the hole. For the generalised Schwarzschild-AdS hole with a flat horizon of topology R^{d-2}, the boundary stress-energy has a thermal form with energy density proportional to the hole ADM mass, but stress-energy corrections from compactified horizon dimensions cannot be consistently included at least for d=5.

  7. Realistic Modeling of Fast MHD Wave Trains in Coronal Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent SDO/AIA observations we have developed realistic modeling of quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs) using 3D MHD model initiated with potential magnetic field extrapolated from the solar coronal boundary. Localized quasi-periodic pulsations associated with C-class flares that drive the waves (as deduced from observations) are modeled with transverse periodic displacement of magnetic field at the lower coronal boundary. The modeled propagating speed and the form of the wave expansions matches the observed fast MHD waves speed >1000 km/s and topology. We study the parametric dependence of the amplitude, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We investigate the interaction of multiple QFP wave trains excited by adjacent flaring sources. We use the model results to synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs, such as the recent DEM analysis. We discuss the implications of our modeling results for the seismological application of QFPs for the diagnostic of the active region field, flare pulsations, end estimate the energy flux carried by the waves.

  8. Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations

    CERN Document Server

    Rinne, Oliver; Scheel, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of K...

  9. Extended Symmetries at the Black Hole Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Donnay, Laura; González, Hernán A; Pino, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We prove that non-extremal black holes in four-dimensional general relativity exhibit an infinite-dimensional symmetry in their near horizon region. By prescribing a physically sensible set of boundary conditions at the horizon, we derive the algebra of asymptotic Killing vectors, which is shown to be infinite-dimensional and includes, in particular, two sets of supertranslations and two mutually commuting copies of the Virasoro algebra. We define the surface charges associated to the asymptotic diffeomorphisms that preserve the boundary conditions and discuss the subtleties of this definition, such as the integrability conditions and the correct definition of the Dirac brackets. When evaluated on the stationary solutions, the only non-vanishing charges are the zero-modes. One of them reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of Kerr black holes. We also study the extremal limit, recovering the NHEK geometry. In this singular case, where the algebra of charges and the integrability conditions get modified, we...

  10. Testing a Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Extrapolation Code with the Titov-Demoulin Magnetic Flux Rope Model

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    In the solar corona, magnetic flux rope is believed to be a fundamental structure accounts for magnetic free energy storage and solar eruptions. Up to the present, the extrapolation of magnetic field from boundary data is the primary way to obtain fully three-dimensional magnetic information of the corona. As a result, the ability of reliable recovering coronal magnetic flux rope is important for coronal field extrapolation. In this paper, our coronal field extrapolation code (CESE-MHD-NLFFF, Jiang & Feng 2012) is examined with an analytical magnetic flux rope model proposed by Titov & Demoulin (1999), which consists of a bipolar magnetic configuration holding an semi-circular line-tied flux rope in force-free equilibrium. By using only the vector field in the bottom boundary as input, we test our code with the model in a representative range of parameter space and find that the model field is reconstructed with high accuracy. Especially, the magnetic topological interfaces formed between the flux rop...

  11. Changing Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodkin, Evelyn; Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, workfare-style policies have become part of the institutional architecture of welfare and labor market arrangements around the world. In this article, we offer a comparative, historical view of workfare´s advance. Our analysis recognizes the complexity and diversity of what we...... call the “policies of workfare” and highlights the different paths through which these policies have developed in the U.S. and parts of Europe. We argue that it is necessary to look beyond familiar policy labels and language in order to consider workfare-style policies as part of a broader political...... project that is altering the boundary between the democratic welfare state and the market economy. We see workfare policies as boundary-changing with potentially profound implications both for individuals disadvantaged by market arrangements and for societies seeking to grapple with the increasing...

  12. Polarised black holes in AdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  13. Braneworld Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Whisker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate black holes in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld scenario. We begin with an overview of extra-dimensional physics, from the original proposal of Kaluza and Klein up to the modern braneworld picture of extra dimensions. A detailed description of braneworld gravity is given, with particular emphasis on its compatibility with experimental tests of gravity. We then move on to a discussion of static, spherically symmetric braneworld black hole solutions. Assuming an equation of state for the ``Weyl term'', which encodes the effects of the extra dimension, we are able to classify the general behaviour of these solutions. We then use the strong field limit approach to investigate the gravitational lensing properties of some candidate braneworld black hole solutions. It is found that braneworld black holes could have significantly different observational signatures to the Schwarzschild black hole of standard general relativity. Rotating braneworld black hole solutions are also discussed, an...

  14. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  15. Extremal Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, P A; Saavedra, Joel; Vasquez, Yerko

    2014-01-01

    We consider a gravitating system consisting of a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity with a self-interacting potential and an U(1) electromagnetic field. Solving the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-scalar system we find exact hairy charged black hole solutions with the scalar field regular everywhere. We go to the zero temperature limit and we study the effect of the scalar field on the near horizon geometry of an extremal black hole. We find that except a critical value of the charge of the black hole there is also a critical value of the charge of the scalar field beyond of which the extremal black hole is destabilized. We study the thermodynamics of these solutions and we find that if the space is flat then at low temperature the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole is thermodynamically preferred, while if the space is AdS the hairy charged black hole is thermodynamically preferred at low temperature.

  16. Soft Heisenberg hair on black holes in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Afshar, Hamid; Grumiller, Daniel; Merbis, Wout; Perez, Alfredo; Tempo, David; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional Einstein gravity with negative cosmological constant admits stationary black holes that are not necessarily spherically symmetric. We propose boundary conditions for the near horizon region of these black holes that lead to a surprisingly simple near horizon symmetry algebra consisting of two affine u(1) current algebras. The symmetry algebra is essentially equivalent to the Heisenberg algebra. The associated charges give a specific example of "soft hair" on the horizon, as defined by Hawking, Perry and Strominger. We show that soft hair does not contribute to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes and "black flower" generalizations. From the near horizon perspective the conformal generators at asymptotic infinity appear as composite operators, which we interpret in the spirit of black hole complementarity. Another remarkable feature of our boundary conditions is that they are singled out by requiring that the whole spectrum is compatible with regularity at ...

  17. Lifecycle of a large-scale polar coronal pseudostreamer/cavity system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé eGuennou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on an exceptional large-scale coronal pseudostreamer/cavity system in the southern polar region of the solar corona that was visible for approximately a year starting in February 2014. It is unusual to see such a large closed-field structure embedded within the open polar coronal hole. We investigate this structure to document its formation, evolution and eventually its shrinking process using data from both the PROBA2/SWAP and SDO/AIA EUV imagers. In particular, we used EUV tomography to find the overall shape and internal structure of the pseudostreamer and to determine its 3D temperature and density structure using DEM analysis. We found that the cavity temperature is extremely stable with time and is essentially at a similar or slightly hotter temperature than the surrounding pseudostreamer. Two regimes in cavity thermal properties were observed: during the first 5 months of observation, we found lower density depletion and highly multi-thermal plasma, while after the pseudostreamer became stable and slowly shrank, the depletion was more pronounced and the plasma was less multithermal. As the thermodynamic properties are strongly correlated with the magnetic structure, these results provide constraints on both the trigger of CMEs and the processes that maintain cavities stability for such a long lifetime.

  18. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  19. X-ray Emissions from Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Coronal Accretion Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kawanaka, Norita; Mineshige, Shin

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the radiation spectrum and its time variability of the black hole accretion disk-corona system based on the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation. In explaining the spectral properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), it is often assumed that they consist of a geometrically thin, optically thick disk and hot, optically thin corona surrounding the thin disk. As for a model of the corona, we adopt the simulation data of three-dimensional, non-radiative MHD accretion flows calculated by Kato and coworkers, while for a thin disk we assume a standard type disk. We perform Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations in the corona, taking into account the Compton scattering of soft photons from the thin disk by hot thermal electrons and coronal irradiation heating of the thin disk, which emits blackbody radiation. By adjusting the density parameter of the MHD coronal flow, we can produce the emergent spectra which are consistent with those of typical Seyfert galaxies. Moreover, we find rapid ...

  20. Magnetic structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We present several models of the magnetic structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). First, we model CMEs as expanding force-free magnetic structures. While keeping the internal magnetic field structure of the stationary solutions, expansion leads to complicated internal velocities and rotation, while the field structures remain force-free. Second, expansion of a CME can drive resistive dissipation within the CME changing the ionization states of different ions. We fit in situ measurements of ion charge states to the resistive spheromak solutions. Finally, we consider magnetic field structures of fully confined stable magnetic clouds containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields and having no surface current sheets. Expansion of such clouds may lead to sudden onset of reconnection events.

  1. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  2. Periodicities in Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Lou, Y Q; Fan, Z; Wang, S; Wang, J

    2003-01-01

    Mid-term quasi-periodicities in solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the most recent solar maximum cycle 23 are reported here for the first time using the four-year data (February 5, 1999 to February 10, 2003) of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). In parallel, mid-term quasi-periodicities in solar X-ray flares (class >M5.0) from the Geosynchronous Operational Environment Satellites (GOES) and in daily averages of Ap index for geomagnetic disturbances from the World Data Center (WDC) at the International Association for Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) are also examined for the same four-year time span. Several conceptual aspects of possible equatorially trapped Rossby-type waves at and beneath the solar photosphere are discussed.

  3. Kinematical properties of coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Temmer, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most dynamic phenomena in our solar system. They abruptly disrupt the continuous outflow of solar wind by expelling huge clouds of magnetized plasma into interplanetary space with velocities enabling to cross the Sun-Earth distance within a few days. Earth-directed CMEs may cause severe geomagnetic storms when their embedded magnetic fields and the shocks ahead compress and reconnect with the Earth's magnetic field. The transit times and impacts in detail depend on the initial CME velocity, size, and mass, as well as on the conditions and coupling processes with the ambient solar wind flow in interplanetary space. The observed CME parameters may be severly affected by projection effects and the constant changing environmental conditions are hard to derive. This makes it difficult to fully understand the physics behind CME evolution, preventing to do a reliable forecast of Earth-directed events. This short review focusing on observational data, shows recent methods which w...

  4. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  5. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  6. Charged Lifshitz Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pourhasan, R.; Mann, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate modifications of the Lifshitz black hole solutions due to the presence of Maxwell charge in higher dimensions for arbitrary $z$ and any topology. We find that the behaviour of large black holes is insensitive to the topology of the solutions, whereas for small black holes significant differences emerge. We generalize a relation previously obtained for neutral Lifshitz black branes, and study more generally the thermodynamic relationship between energy, entropy, and chemical pot...

  7. Perturbations around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, B

    2005-01-01

    Perturbations around black holes have been an intriguing topic in the last few decades. They are particularly important today, since they relate to the gravitational wave observations which may provide the unique fingerprint of black holes' existence. Besides the astrophysical interest, theoretically perturbations around black holes can be used as testing grounds to examine the proposed AdS/CFT and dS/CFT correspondence.

  8. Physics of black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1982-01-01

    The activity at the galactic center might be fuelled by energy release near a large black hole. In this talk I describe some relativistic effects which may be relevant to this process. I use Newtonian language so far as possible and illustrate the effects with simple  analogies. Specifically, I describe the gravitational field near a black hole, Lens‐Thirring and geodetic precession, electro‐magnetic energy extraction of the spin energy of a black hole and the structure of accretion tori arou...

  9. Stealthy but Geoeffective Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2017-08-01

    We have long known about the existence of "problem" geomagnetic storms whose origins are elusive. In more general terms, not all the 1 AU disturbances can be clearly attributed to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), high speed streams (HSSs) or corotation interaction regions (CIRs.) When interplanetary CME (ICME) signatures are found in in situ data, there is not always a flare or filament eruption on the Sun or even an obvious CME observed close to the Sun that correlates with the ICME within a reasonable time range. These ICMEs sometimes result in intense storms. Furthermore, there is a possibility that some of the more severe storms could be partly contributed by such ICMEs of unclear origin. Therefore space weather prediction will remain incomplete without properly understanding these ICMEs. Even if the ICME is paired with a CME, it is sometimes difficult to find where the latter comes from. This is often called the “stealth CME” that apparently lacks low coronal signatures (LCSs). STEREO's second and third view points have tremendously helped us determine its front-side origin and find when and where it forms and accelerates, which is important for isolating possible LCSs. Although SDO/AIA has been continuously taking full-disk EUV images in a wide temperature range since 2010, there are still a number of stealthy CMEs whose LCSs are unclear or ambiguous. It is assumed that they start at high altitudes, leaving weak or negligible LCSs. Some of them seem to involve multiple magnetic domains, and weak or open field regions. We present AIA observations of several stealthy CMEs, including recent ones, that were responsible for geomagnetic storms, emphasizing the need to compare images with long time differences and to find the periods at which the CME forms and accelerates. We also discuss uncertainties in interpreting in situ data as to whether a CME is present when data are dominated by other solar wind features, such as HSS and CIR.

  10. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  11. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahashi@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  12. Coronal loops above an Active Region - observation versus model

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a high-resolution numerical simulation of the solar corona above a stable active region. The aim is to test the field-line braiding mechanism for a sufficient coronal energy input. We also check the applicability of scaling laws for coronal loop properties like the temperature and density. Our 3D-MHD model is driven from below by Hinode observations of the photosphere, in particular a high-cadence time series of line-of-sight magnetograms and horizontal velocities derived from the magnetograms. This driving applies stress to the magnetic field and thereby delivers magnetic energy into the corona, where currents are induced that heat the coronal plasma by Ohmic dissipation. We compute synthetic coronal emission that we directly compare to coronal observations of the same active region taken by Hinode. In the model, coronal loops form at the same places as they are found in coronal observations. Even the shapes of the synthetic loops in 3D space match those found from a stereoscopic reconstruction ...

  13. Transverse Oscillations in a Coronal Loop Triggered by a Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S.; Pant, V.; Srivastava, A. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-11-01

    We detect and analyse transverse oscillations in a coronal loop, lying at the south-east limb of the Sun as seen from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The jet is believed to trigger transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. The jet originates from a region close to the coronal loop on 19 September 2014 at 02:01:35 UT. The length of the loop is estimated to be between 377 - 539 Mm. Only one complete oscillation is detected with an average period of about 32±5 min. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seismologic inversion techniques, we estimate the magnetic field inside the coronal loop to be between 2.68 - 4.5 G. The velocity of the hot and cool components of the jet is estimated to be 168 km s^{-1} and 43 km s^{-1}, respectively. The energy density of the jet is found to be greater than the energy density of the oscillating coronal loop. We therefore conclude that the jet triggered transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. To our knowledge, this is the first coronal loop seismology study using the properties of a jet propagation to trigger oscillations.

  14. Asymptotic black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  15. Asymptotic Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  16. On the existence of initial data containing isolated black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dain, S; Krishnan, B; Dain, Sergio; Jaramillo, Jose Luis; Krishnan, Badri

    2004-01-01

    We present a general construction of initial data for Einstein's equations containing an arbitrary number of black holes, each of which is instantaneously in equilibrium. Each black hole is taken to be a marginally trapped surface and plays the role of the inner boundary of the Cauchy surface. The black hole is taken to be instantaneously isolated if its outgoing null rays are shear-free. Starting from the choice of a conformal metric and the freely specifiable part of the extrinsic curvature in the bulk, we give a prescription for choosing the shape of the inner boundaries and the boundary conditions that must be imposed there. We show rigorously that with these choices, the resulting non-linear elliptic system always admits solutions.

  17. Boundary layer transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  18. Coronal properties of the luminous radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202-209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, E. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D.; Jun, H. D.; Graham, M.; Celotti, A.; Behar, E.; Elvis, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Matt, G.; Walton, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202-209. Using an optical observation from the Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory, we revise the redshift of the source from the previously reported z = 1.77 to z = 0.532, and we estimate the mass of the central black hole, log (MBH/M⊙) = 9.08 ± 0.18. The X-ray spectrum of this source can be well described by a power law of photon index Γ = 1.82 ± 0.05 with E_cut = 152_{-54}^{+103} keV, in the rest frame of the source. Assuming a Comptonization model, we estimate the coronal temperature to be kTe = 42 ± 3 keV and kTe = 56 ± 3 keV for a spherical and a slab geometry, respectively. The coronal properties are comparable to the ones derived for local active galactic nuclei, despite a difference of around one order of magnitude in black hole mass and X-ray luminosity (L2 - 10 = 1.93 × 1045 erg s-1). The quasar is X-ray loud, with an unusually flat observed optical-to-X-ray spectral slope αOX = 1.00 ± 0.02, and has an exceptionally strong optical [O III] line. Assuming that both the X-ray emission and the [O III] line are isotropic, these two extreme properties can be explained by a nearly edge-on disc, leading to a reduction in the observed ultraviolet continuum light.

  19. Electroweak Hall Effect of Neutrino and Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo

    2015-01-01

    The inversion of temperature at the solar corona is hard to understand from classical physics, and the coronal heating mechanism remains unclear. The heating in the quiet region seems contradicting with the thermodynamics and is a keen problem for physicists. A new mechanism for the coronal heating based on the neutrino radiative transition unique in the corona region is studied. The probability is enormously amplified by an electroweak Chern-Simons form and overlapping waves, and the sufficient energy is transfered. Thus the coronal heating is understood from the quantum effects of the solar neutrino.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares.

  1. MHD Waves and Coronal Seismology: an overview of recent results

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that MHD waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology which have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfven waves and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in solar flares.

  2. Formation of the current sheet in a coronal streamer

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Lionello, Roberto; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2011-01-01

    The present work is on the study of a coronal streamer observed in March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) onboard SOHO. On the basis of a spectroscopic analysis of the O VI doublet, the solar wind plasma parameters are inferred in the extended corona. The analysis accounts for the coronal magnetic topology, extrapolated through a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model. The results of the analysis show indications on the formation of the current sheet, one of the source regions of the slow coronal wind.

  3. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  4. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  5. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  6. Homogenization of some evolution problems in domains with small holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bituin Cabarrubias

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the asymptotic behavior of the wave and heat equations in periodically perforated domains with small holes and Dirichlet conditions on the boundary of the holes. In the first part we extend to time-dependent functions the periodic unfolding method for domains with small holes introduced in [6]. Therein, the method was applied to the study of elliptic problems with oscillating coefficients in domains with small holes, recovering the homogenization result with a "strange term" originally obtained in [11] for the Laplacian. In the second part we obtain some homogenization results for the wave and heat equations with oscillating coefficients in domains with small holes. The results concerning the wave equation extend those obtained in [12] for the case where the elliptic part of the operator is the Laplacian.

  7. Numerical Relativity Towards Simulations of 3D Black Hole Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, E

    1998-01-01

    I review recent developments in numerical relativity, focussing on progress made in 3D black hole evolution. Progress in development of black hole initial data, apparent horizon boundary conditions, adaptive mesh refinement, and characteristic evolution is highlighted, as well as full 3D simulations of colliding and distorted black holes. For true 3D distorted holes, with Cauchy evolution techniques, it is now possible to extract highly accurate, nonaxisymmetric waveforms from fully nonlinear simulations, which are verified by comparison to pertubration theory, and with characteristic techniques extremely long term evolutions of 3D black holes are now possible. I also discuss a new code designed for 3D numerical relativity, called Cactus, that will be made public.

  8. Boundary conditions for the gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winicour, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    A review of the treatment of boundaries in general relativity is presented with the emphasis on application to the formulations of Einstein's equations used in numerical relativity. At present, it is known how to treat boundaries in the harmonic formulation of Einstein's equations and a tetrad formulation of the Einstein-Bianchi system. However, a universal approach valid for other formulations is not in hand. In particular, there is no satisfactory boundary theory for the 3+1 formulations which have been highly successful in binary black hole simulation. I discuss the underlying problems that make the initial-boundary-value problem much more complicated than the Cauchy problem. I review the progress that has been made and the important open questions that remain. Science is a differential equation. Religion is a boundary condition. (Alan Turing, quoted in J D Barrow, ‘Theories of Everything’)

  9. Massless black holes and charged wormholes in string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Goulart, Prieslei

    2016-01-01

    We present the zero mass black holes and charged Einstein-Rosen bridges (wormholes) that arise from the five parameters dyonic black hole solution of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. These massless black holes exist individually in spacetime, different from the known massless solutions which come in pairs with opposite signs for their masses. By imposing appropriate boundary conditions the massless solution can be nonextremal, extremal or a naked singularity. The nonextremal and extremal massless solutions allow the bridge construction, and from them we obtain the first analytical charged Einstein-Rosen bridge satisfying the null energy condition ever found.

  10. Increase in Ozone hole and hence UV-B Preceding Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Before the occurrence of earthquake, the change has been observed in ozone hole as well as UV-B flux in the atmosphere of the earth. After earthquake the UV-B flux reduces, which is correlated with the fluctuation in atmospheric temperature as well as Electron flux in Sun-Earth environment. Actual measurement show a linear relationship in between Coronal Mass Ejection and increase in Solar UV- B before the earthquakes in various parts of India.

  11. Black Hole Dynamic Potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koustubh Ajit Kabe

    2012-09-01

    In the following paper, certain black hole dynamic potentials have been developed definitively on the lines of classical thermodynamics. These potentials have been refined in view of the small differences in the equations of the laws of black hole dynamics as given by Bekenstein and those of thermodynamics. Nine fundamental black hole dynamical relations have been developed akin to the four fundamental thermodynamic relations of Maxwell. The specific heats , and , have been defined. For a black hole, these quantities are negative. The d equation has been obtained as an application of these fundamental relations. Time reversible processes observing constancy of surface gravity are considered and an equation connecting the internal energy of the black hole , the additional available energy defined as the first free energy function , and the surface gravity , has been obtained. Finally as a further application of the fundamental relations, it has been proved for a homogeneous gravitational field in black hole space times or a de Sitter black hole that $C_{\\Omega,\\Phi}-C_{J,Q}=\\kappa \\left[\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial J}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{\\Omega,\\Phi}\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial \\Omega}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{J,Q}+\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial Q}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{\\Omega,\\Phi}\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial\\Phi}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{J,Q}\\right]$. This is dubbed as the homogeneous fluid approximation in context of the black holes.

  12. Black holes matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge Stjernholm

    2016-01-01

    Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).......Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015)....

  13. Perturbing supersymmetric black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Onozawa, H; Mishima, T; Ishihara, H; Onozawa, Hisashi; Okamura, Takashi; Mishima, Takashi; Ishihara, Hideki

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the perturbations of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole in the N=2 supergravity is presented. In the extreme case, the black hole responds to the perturbation of each field in the same manner. This is possibly because we can match the modes of the graviton, gravitino, and photon using supersymmetry transformations.

  14. Black hole levitron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsiwalla, X.D.; Verlinde, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.’s multicenter

  15. Newborn Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  16. Scattering by Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter on Black-hole Scattering that was commissioned for an Encyclopaedia on Scattering edited by Pike and Sabatier, to be published by Academic Press. The chapter surveys wave propagation in black-hole spacetimes, diffraction effects in wave scattering, resonances, quasinormal modes and related topics.

  17. Disregarding the 'Hole Argument'

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Bryan W

    2014-01-01

    Jim Weatherall has suggested that Einstein's hole argument, as presented by Earman and Norton (1987), is based on a misleading use of mathematics. I argue on the contrary that Weatherall demands an implausible restriction on how mathematics is used. The hole argument, on the other hand, is in no new danger at all.

  18. Lifshitz Topological Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, R B

    2009-01-01

    I find a class of black hole solutions to a (3+1) dimensional theory gravity coupled to abelian gauge fields with negative cosmological constant that has been proposed as the dual theory to a Lifshitz theory describing critical phenomena in (2+1) dimensions. These black holes are all asymptotic to a Lifshitz fixed point geometry and depend on a single parameter that determines both their area (or size) and their charge. Most of the solutions are obtained numerically, but an exact solution is also obtained for a particular value of this parameter. The thermodynamic behaviour of large black holes is almost the same regardless of genus, but differs considerably for small black holes. Screening behaviour is exhibited in the dual theory for any genus, but the critical length at which it sets in is genus-dependent for small black holes.

  19. Cosmological Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Stornaiolo, C

    2002-01-01

    In this letter we propose the existence of low density black holes and discuss its compatibility with the cosmological observations. The origin of these black holes can be traced back to the collapse of long wavelength cosmological perturbations during the matter dominated era, when the densities are low enough to neglect any internal and thermal pressure. By introducing a threshold density $\\hat{\\rho}$ above which pressure and non-gravitational interactions become effective, we find the highest wavelength for the perturbations that can reach an equilibrium state instead of collapsing to a black hole. The low density black holes introduced here, if they exist, can be observed through weak and strong gravitational lensing effects. Finally we observe that we obtained here a cosmological model which is capable to explain in a qualitative way the void formation together with the value $\\Omega=1$. But we remark that it needs to be improved by considering non spherical symmetric black holes.

  20. Primordial Black Hole Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, D; Turok, N G; Baumann, Daniel; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2007-01-01

    We reconsider the possibility that the observed baryon asymmetry was generated by the evaporation of primordial black holes that dominated the early universe. We present a simple derivation showing that the baryon asymmetry is insensitive to the initial black hole density and the cosmological model but is sensitive to the temperature-dependence of the CP and baryon-violating (or lepton-violating) interactions. We also consider the possibility that black holes stop evaporating and form Planck-mass remnants that act as dark matter. We show that primordial black holes cannot simultaneously account for both the observed baryon asymmetry and the (remnant) dark matter density unless the magnitude of CP violation is much greater than expected from most particle physics models. Finally, we apply these results to ekpyrotic/cyclic models, in which primordial black holes may form when branes collide. We find that obtaining the observed baryon asymmetry is compatible with the other known constraints on parameters.

  1. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Ghafri, Khalil Salim

    2015-01-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops namely thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglect the magnetic field perturbation and eventually reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables...

  2. The coronal magnetic field reversal observed by the SOLARC instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements for mapping coronal magnetic field have become possible since the recent development of infrared detection techniques. One urgent task that arises from the routine infrared observations is to interpret what the Stokes signals could indicate for coronal magnetic fields. It is the first time for us to successfully reveal the coronal field structure above a simple and stable sunspot on the photosphere using profiles of full Stokes parameters. In this paper, the author further points out the deficiency in any conclusions/judgements just based on incomplete polarization data. A magnetic flux reversal feature, observed from circular polarization data, may correspond to one or more coronal tubes with their front or farside arching apex there, more complicated than people imagined before. To exactly locate the infrared radiation sources, we need both circular and linear polarization data for an integrated analysis of them.

  3. Anticipating the Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are responsible for some of the most severe space weather at Earth. Major geomagnetic storms arise when CMEs carry large amounts of...

  4. Standing sausage modes in coronal loops with plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves are important for diagnosing the physical parameters of coronal plasmas. Field-aligned flows appear frequently in coronal loops.We examine the effects of transverse density and plasma flow structuring on standing sausage modes trapped in coronal loops, and examine their observational implications. We model coronal loops as straight cold cylinders with plasma flow embedded in a static corona. An eigen-value problem governing propagating sausage waves is formulated, its solutions used to construct standing modes. Two transverse profiles are distinguished, one being the generalized Epstein distribution (profile E) and the other (N) proposed recently in Nakariakov et al.(2012). A parameter study is performed on the dependence of the maximum period $P_\\mathrm{max}$ and cutoff length-to-radius ratio $(L/a)_{\\mathrm{cutoff}}$ in the trapped regime on the density parameters ($\\rho_0/\\rho_\\infty$ and profile steepness $p$) and flow parameters (magnitude $U_0$ and profile steepness $u$). For e...

  5. Black Hole Critical Phenomena Without Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, S L

    2000-01-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  6. Automatically Detecting and Tracking Coronal Mass Ejections. I. Separation of Dynamic and Quiescent Components in Coronagraph Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Huw; Byrne, Jason P.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2012-06-01

    Automated techniques for detecting and tracking coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data are of ever increasing importance for space weather monitoring and forecasting. They serve to remove the biases and tedium of human interpretation, and provide the robust analysis necessary for statistical studies across large numbers of observations. An important requirement in their operation is that they satisfactorily distinguish the CME structure from the background quiescent coronal structure (streamers, coronal holes). Many studies resort to some form of time differencing to achieve this, despite the errors inherent in such an approach—notably spatiotemporal crosstalk. This article describes a new deconvolution technique that separates coronagraph images into quiescent and dynamic components. A set of synthetic observations made from a sophisticated model corona and CME demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the technique in isolating the CME signal. Applied to observations by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs, the structure of a faint CME is revealed in detail despite the presence of background streamers that are several times brighter than the CME. The technique is also demonstrated to work on SECCHI/COR2 data, and new possibilities for estimating the three-dimensional structure of CMEs using the multiple viewing angles are discussed. Although quiescent coronal structures and CMEs are intrinsically linked, and although their interaction is an unavoidable source of error in any separation process, we show in a companion paper that the deconvolution approach outlined here is a robust and accurate method for rigorous CME analysis. Such an approach is a prerequisite to the higher-level detection and classification of CME structure and kinematics.

  7. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  8. Exploración del modelo coronal MHD de Uchida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francile, C.; Castro, J. I.; Flores, M.

    We present an analysis of the MHD model of an isothermal solar corona with radially symmetrical magnetic field and gravity. The solution in the approximation "WKB" was presented by Uchida (1968). The model is ex- plored for different coronal conditions and heights of initial perturbation to study the propagation of coronal waves and reproduce the observed char- acteristics of phenomena such as Moreton waves. Finally we discuss the obtained results. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  9. Observing the formation of flare-driven coronal rain

    OpenAIRE

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Antolin, P.; Wedemeyer, S.; Vissers, G.; E. P. Kontar; Gallagher, P

    2016-01-01

    PA. GV are funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement nr. 291058 Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop-tops in thermally unstable post-flare arcades. We detect 5 phases that characterise the post-flare decay:heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ~120 s, radiative/ enthalpy cooling dominance for ~4700 s and finally catastrophic ...

  10. Are Spicules the Primary Source of Hot Coronal Plasma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of Type II spicules has generated considerable excitement. It has even been suggested that these ejections can account for a majority of the hot plasma observed in the corona, thus obviating the need for "coronal" heating. If this is the case, however, then there should be observational consequences. We have begun to examine some of these consequences and find reason to question the idea that spicules are the primary source of hot coronal plasma.

  11. Culex coronator Dyar and Knab: a new Florida species record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John P; Walsh, Jimmy D; Cope, Eric H; Tennant, Richard A; Kozak, John A; Darsie, Richard F

    2006-06-01

    We report the first finding of Culex coronator Dyar and Knab in Florida, based on multiple adult collections from several locations in the western panhandle of Florida. GPS coordinates and habitat descriptions are given and disease implications are discussed. These records extend the known distribution of Cx. coronator from six other states (Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas), and from Mexico to Argentina.

  12. Mitochondrial genomes and comparative analyses of Culex camposi, Culex coronator, Culex usquatus and Culex usquatissimus (Diptera:Culicidae), members of the coronator group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demari-Silva, Bruna; Foster, Peter G; de Oliveira, Tatiane M P; Bergo, Eduardo S; Sanabani, Sabri S; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Sallum, Maria Anice M

    2015-01-01

    The Coronator Group currently encompasses six morphologically similar species (Culex camposi Dyar, Culex coronator Dyar and Knab, Culex covagarciai Forattini, Culex usquatus Dyar, Culex usquatissimus Dyar, and Culex ousqua Dyar...

  13. Black hole thermodynamics from a variational principle: Asymptotically conical backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    An, Ok Song; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    The variational problem of gravity theories is directly related to black hole thermodynamics. For asymptotically locally AdS backgrounds it is known that holographic renormalization results in a variational principle in terms of equivalence classes of boundary data under the local asymptotic symmetries of the theory, which automatically leads to finite conserved charges satisfying the first law of thermodynamics. We show that this connection holds well beyond asymptotically AdS black holes. In particular, we formulate the variational problem for $\\mathcal{N}=2$ STU supergravity in four dimensions with boundary conditions corresponding to those obeyed by the so called `subtracted geometries'. We show that such boundary conditions can be imposed covariantly in terms of a set of asymptotic second class constraints, and we derive the appropriate boundary terms that render the variational problem well posed in two different duality frames of the STU model. This allows us to define finite conserved charges associat...

  14. Influence of stability islands in the recurrence of particles in a static oval billiard with holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matheus; Egydio de Carvalho, R.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-10-01

    Statistical properties for the recurrence of particles in an oval billiard with a hole in the boundary are discussed. The hole is allowed to move in the boundary under two different types of motion: (i) counterclockwise periodic circulation with a fixed step length and; (ii) random movement around the boundary. After injecting an ensemble of particles through the hole we show that the surviving probability of the particles without recurring - without escaping - from the billiard is described by an exponential law and that the slope of the decay is proportional to the relative size of the hole. Since the phase space of the system exhibits islands of stability we show there are preferred regions of escaping in the polar angle, hence given a partial answer to an open problem: Where to place a hole in order to maximize or minimize a suitable defined measure of escaping.

  15. Transverse oscillations in a coronal loop triggered by a jet

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, S; Srivastava, A K; Banerjee, D

    2016-01-01

    We detect and analyse transverse oscillations in a coronal loop, lying at the south east limb of the Sun as seen from the \\textit{{Atmospheric Imaging Assembly}} (AIA) onboard \\textit{{Solar Dynamics Observatory}} (SDO). The jet is believed to trigger transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. The jet originates from a region close to the coronal loop on 19$^{\\rm th}$ September 2014 at 02:01:35 UT. The length of the loop is estimated to be between 377-539~Mm. Only one complete oscillation is detected with an average period of about $32\\pm5$~min. Using MHD seismologic inversion techniques, we estimate the magnetic field inside the coronal loop to be between $2.68 -4.5$~G. The velocity of the hot and cool components of the jet is estimated to be 168~km~s$^{-1}$ and 43~km~s$^{-1}$, respectively. The energy density of the jet is found to be greater than the energy density of the oscillating coronal loop. Therefore, we conclude that the jet {triggered} transverse oscillations in the coronal loop. To our knowledg...

  16. Stellar Differential Rotation and Coronal Timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Mackay, D H

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the timescales of evolution of stellar coronae in response to surface differential rotation and diffusion. To quantify this we study both the formation time and lifetime of a magnetic flux rope in a decaying bipolar active region. We apply a magnetic flux transport model to prescribe the evolution of the stellar photospheric field, and use this to drive the evolution of the coronal magnetic field via a magnetofrictional technique. Increasing the differential rotation (i.e. decreasing the equator-pole lap time) decreases the flux rope formation time. We find that the formation time is dependent upon the geometric mean of the lap time and the surface diffusion timescale. In contrast, the lifetime of flux ropes are proportional to the lap time. With this, flux ropes on stars with a differential rotation of more than eight times the solar value have a lifetime of less than two days. As a consequence, we propose that features such as solar-like quiescent prominences may not be easily observable on s...

  17. Radio-quiet Fast Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shocks in the interplanetary medium that produce type II radio emission. These CMEs are faster and wider on the average, than the general population of CMEs. However, when we start from fast (speed > 900 km/s) and wide (angular width > 60 degrees), more than half of them are not associated with radio bursts. In order to understand why these CMEs are radio quiet, we collected all the fast and wide (FW) CMEs detected by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and isolated those without associated type II radio bursts. The radio bursts were identified in the dynamic spectra of the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) Experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We also checked the list against metric type II radio bursts reported in Solar Geophysical Data and isolated those without any radio emission. This exercise resulted in about 140 radio-quiet FW CMEs. We identified the source regions of these CMEs using the Solar Geophysical Data listings, cross-checked against the eruption regions in the SOHO/EIT movies. We explored a number of possibilities for the radio-quietness: (i) Source region being too far behind the limb, (ii) flare size, (iii) brightness of the CME, and (iv) the density of the ambient medium. We suggest that a combination of CME energy and the Alfven speed profile of the ambient medium is primarily responsible for the radio-quietness of these FW CMEs.

  18. Anatomy of Depleted Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B., IV

    2017-01-01

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE/SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C6+/C5+ and O7+/O6+ depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Solar Coronal Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the primary process by which the magnetic field releases energy to plasma in the Sun's corona. For example, in the breakout model for the initiation of coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, reconnection is responsible for the catastrophic destabilizing of magnetic force balance in the corona, leading to explosive energy release. A critical requirement for the reconnection is that it have a "switch-on' nature in that the reconnection stays off until a large store of magnetic free energy has built up, and then it turn on abruptly and stay on until most of this free energy has been released. We discuss the implications of this requirement for reconnection in the context of the breakout model for CMEs/flares. We argue that it imposes stringent constraints on the properties of the flux breaking mechanism, which is expected to operate in the corona on kinetic scales. We present numerical simulations demonstrating how the reconnection and the eruption depend on the effective resistivity, i.e., the effective Lundquist number, and propose a model for incorporating kinetic flux-breaking mechanisms into MHO calculation of CMEs/flares.

  20. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imholt, Timothy

    2001-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communication. The early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occurs allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will affect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME’s could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  1. Are Coronal Loops Isothermal or Multithermal? Yes!

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelz, J T; Rightmire, L A; Kimble, J A; Del Zanna, G; Cirtain, J W; DeLuca, E E; Mason, H E

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly few solar coronal loops have been observed simultaneously with TRACE and SOHO/CDS, and even fewer analyses of these loops have been conducted and published. The SOHO Joint Observing Program 146 was designed in part to provide the simultaneous observations required for in-depth temperature analysis of active region loops and determine whether these loops are isothermal or multithermal. The data analyzed in this paper were taken on 2003 January 17 of AR 10250. We used TRACE filter ratios, emission measure loci, and two methods of differential emission measure analysis to examine the temperature structure of three different loops. TRACE and CDS observations agree that Loop 1 is isothermal with Log T $=$ 5.85, both along the line of sight as well as along the length of the loop leg that is visible in the CDS field of view. Loop 2 is hotter than Loop 1. It is multithermal along the line of sight, with significant emission between 6.2 $<$ Log T $<$ 6.4, but the loop apex region is out of the CDS ...

  2. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  3. Surface Flux Emergence and Coronal Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Among various active regions, delta-sunspots of aggregated spots of opposite polarities, are of particular interest due to their high productivity in energetic and recurrent eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact delta-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line (PIL). The formation of the delta-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the delta-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  4. Coronal activity from the ASAS eclipsing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Szczygiel, D M; Paczynski, B; Pojmanski, G; Pilecki, B

    2008-01-01

    We combine the catalogue of eclipsing binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) with the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). The combination results in 836 eclipsing binaries that display coronal activity and is the largest sample of active binary stars assembled to date. By using the (V-I) colors of the ASAS eclipsing binary catalogue, we are able to determine the distances and thus bolometric luminosities for the majority of eclipsing binaries that display significant stellar activity. A typical value for the ratio of soft X-ray to bolometric luminosity is L_X/L_bol ~ a few x 10^-4, similar to the ratio of soft X-ray to bolometric flux F_X/F_bol in the most active regions of the Sun. Unlike rapidly rotating isolated late-type dwarfs -- stars with significant outer convection zones -- a tight correlation between Rossby number and activity of eclipsing binaries is absent. We find evidence for the saturation effect and marginal evidence for the so-called "super-saturation" phenomena. Our work shows that wide-...

  5. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  6. Why are halo coronal mass ejections faster?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Min Zhang; Yang Guo; Peng-Fei Chen; Ming-De Ding; Cheng Fang

    2010-01-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections(CMEs)have been to be significantly faster than normal CMEs,which is a long-standing puzzle.In order to solve the puzzle,we first investigate the observed properties of 31 limb CMEs that clearly display loopshaped frontal loops.The observational results show a strong tendency that slower CMEs are weaker in white-light intensity.Then,we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of 20000 artificial limb CMEs that have an average velocity of~523 km s-1.The Thomson scattering of these events is calculated when they are assumed to be observed as limb and halo events,respectively.It is found that the white-light intensity of many slow CMEs becomes remarkably reduced when they turn from being viewed as a limb event to being viewed as a halo event.When the intensity is below the background solar wind fluctuation,it is assumed that they would be missed by coronagraphs.The average velocity of"detectable"halo CMEs is~922 km s-1,very close to the observed value.This also indicates that wider events are more likely to be recorded.The results soundly suggest that the higher average velocity of halo CMEs is due to that a majority of slow events and some of narrow fast events carrying less material are so faint that they are blended with the solar wind fluctuations,and therefore are not observed.

  7. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, N.; Singh, T.; Kiss, T. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Erdélyi, R.

    2017-03-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  8. A Catalog of Coronal "EIT Wave" Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B. J.; Myers, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) data have been visually searched for coronal "EIT wave" transients over the period beginning from 1997 March 24 and extending through 1998 June 24. The dates covered start at the beginning of regular high-cadence (more than one image every 20 minutes) observations, ending at the four-month interruption of SOHO observations in mid-1998. One hundred and seventy six events are included in this catalog. The observations range from "candidate" events, which were either weak or had insufficient data coverage, to events which were well defined and were clearly distinguishable in the data. Included in the catalog are times of the EIT images in which the events are observed, diagrams indicating the observed locations of the wave fronts and associated active regions, and the speeds of the wave fronts. The measured speeds of the wave fronts varied from less than 50 to over 700 km s(exp -1) with "typical" speeds of 200-400 km s(exp -1).

  9. Energy Release in Driven Twisted Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareford, M. R.; Gordovskyy, M.; Browning, P. K.; Hood, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in twisted magnetic fluxtubes, representing coronal loops. The main goal is to establish the influence of the field geometry and various thermodynamic effects on the stability of twisted fluxtubes and on the size and distribution of heated regions. In particular, we aim to investigate to what extent the earlier idealised models, based on the initially cylindrically symmetric fluxtubes, are different from more realistic models, including the large-scale curvature, atmospheric stratification, thermal conduction and other effects. In addition, we compare the roles of Ohmic heating and shock heating in energy conversion during magnetic reconnection in twisted loops. The models with straight fluxtubes show similar distribution of heated plasma during the reconnection: it initially forms a helical shape, which subsequently becomes very fragmented. The heating in these models is rather uniformly distributed along fluxtubes. At the same time, the hot plasma regions in curved loops are asymmetric and concentrated close to the loop tops. Large-scale curvature has a destabilising influence: less twist is needed for instability. Footpoint convergence normally delays the instability slightly, although in some cases, converging fluxtubes can be less stable. Finally, introducing a stratified atmosphere gives rise to decaying wave propagation, which has a destabilising effect.

  10. Black holes and the nature of quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1983-12-01

    Hawking and Wald have recently argued that the process of quantum black hole evaporation requires the violation of the fundamental physical law which asserts that the time evolution of quantum states is governed by unitary operators. It is shown that this violation can be avoided by a change in the global boundary conditions. It is remotely possible that astronomical observation could establish whether or not the universe has these boundary conditions in which quantum mechanical time evolution is governed by unitary operators.

  11. Black holes and the nature of quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1983-12-01

    Hawking and Wald have recently argued that the process of quantum black hole evaporation requires the violation of the fundamental physical law which asserts that the time evolution of quantum states is governed by unitary operators. I show this violation can be avoided by a change in the global boundary conditions. It is remotely possible that astronomical observation could establish whether or not the universe has these boundary conditions in which quantum mechanical time evolution is governed by unitary operators.

  12. The covariant action of higher spin black holes in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Apolo, Luis

    2015-01-01

    We propose a set of boundary terms for higher spin theories in AdS$_3$ that lead to a well-defined variational principle compatible with Dirichlet boundary conditions for the metric and higher spin fields. These boundary terms are valid for higher spin theories in the Fefferman-Graham gauge and they allow us to compute the canonical free energy of higher spin black holes directly from the Euclidean, covariant, on-shell action. Using these results we reproduce the thermodynamics of the higher spin black hole of Ammon, Gutperle, Kraus, and Perlmutter and comment on the corresponding theory of induced $\\cal{W}$-gravity at the boundary.

  13. Scalarized Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar-tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and ordinary hairy black holes. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  14. Primordial Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    MacGibbon, Jane H; Linnemann, J T; Marinelli, S S; Stump, D; Tollefson, K

    2015-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are of interest in many cosmological contexts. PBHs lighter than about 1012 kg are predicted to be directly detectable by their Hawking radiation. This radiation should produce both a diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background from the cosmologically-averaged distribution of PBHs and gamma-ray burst signals from individual light black holes. The Fermi, Milagro, Veritas, HESS and HAWC observatories, in combination with new burst recognition methodologies, offer the greatest sensitivity for the detection of such black holes or placing limits on their existence.

  15. Black Hole Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    P. Mitra

    1994-01-01

    In the talk different definitions of the black hole entropy are discussed and compared. It is shown that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S^{BH}$ (defined by the response of the free energy of a system containing a black hole on the change of the temperature) differs from the statistical- mechanical entropy $S^{SM}=-\\mbox{Tr}(\\hat{\\rho}\\ln \\hat{\\rho})$ (defined by counting internal degrees of freedom of a black hole). A simple explanation of the universality of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy (...

  16. Black hole entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, V

    1994-01-01

    In the talk different definitions of the black hole entropy are discussed and compared. It is shown that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S^{BH} (defined by the response of the free energy of a system containing a black hole on the change of the temperature) differs from the statistical- mechanical entropy S^{SM}=-\\mbox{Tr}(\\hat{\\rho}\\ln \\hat{\\rho}) (defined by counting internal degrees of freedom of a black hole). A simple explanation of the universality of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy (i.e. its independence of the number and properties of the fields which might contribute to S^{SM}) is given.

  17. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard, E-mail: b.kleihaus@uni-oldenburg.de [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Kunz, Jutta [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Yazadjiev, Stoytcho [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2015-05-11

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  18. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Kleihaus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  19. Black holes new horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Sean Alan

    2013-01-01

    Black holes, once just fascinating theoretical predictions of how gravity warps space-time according to Einstein's theory, are now generally accepted as astrophysical realities, formed by post-supernova collapse, or as supermassive black holes mysteriously found at the cores of most galaxies, powering active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the universe. Theoretical understanding has progressed in recent decades with a wider realization that local concepts should characterize black holes, rather than the global concepts found in textbooks. In particular, notions such as trapping h

  20. Black Hole Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carlip, S

    2014-01-01

    The discovery in the early 1970s that black holes radiate as black bodies has radically affected our understanding of general relativity, and offered us some early hints about the nature of quantum gravity. In this chapter I will review the discovery of black hole thermodynamics and summarize the many independent ways of obtaining the thermodynamic and (perhaps) statistical mechanical properties of black holes. I will then describe some of the remaining puzzles, including the nature of the quantum microstates, the problem of universality, and the information loss paradox.

  1. Particle-In-Cell Simulation of Electron Acceleration in Solar Coronal Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, G

    2012-01-01

    We investigate electron acceleration resulting from 3D magnetic reconnection between an emerging, twisted magnetic flux rope and a pre-existing weak, open magnetic field. We first follow the rise of an unstable, twisted flux tube with a resistive MHD simulation where the numerical resolution is enhanced by using fixed mesh refinement. As in previous MHD investigations of similar situations the rise of the flux tube into the pre-existing inclined coronal magnetic field results in the formation of a solar coronal jet. A snapshot of the MHD model is then used as an initial and boundary condition for a particle-in-cell simulation, using up to half a billion cells and over 20 billion charged particle. Particle acceleration occurs mainly in the reconnection current sheet, with accelerated electrons displaying a power law dN/dE distribution with an index of about -1.65. The main acceleration mechanism is a systematic electric field, striving to maintaining the electric current in the current sheet against losses cau...

  2. Particle-in-cell Simulation of Electron Acceleration in Solar Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, G.; Nordlund, Å.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate electron acceleration resulting from three-dimensional magnetic reconnection between an emerging, twisted magnetic flux rope and a pre-existing weak, open magnetic field. We first follow the rise of an unstable, twisted flux tube with a resistive MHD simulation where the numerical resolution is enhanced by using fixed mesh refinement. As in previous MHD investigations of similar situations, the rise of the flux tube into the pre-existing inclined coronal magnetic field results in the formation of a solar coronal jet. A snapshot of the MHD model is then used as an initial and boundary condition for a particle-in-cell simulation, using up to half a billion cells and over 20 billion charged particles. Particle acceleration occurs mainly in the reconnection current sheet, with accelerated electrons displaying a power law in the energy probability distribution with an index of around -1.5. The main acceleration mechanism is a systematic electric field, striving to maintaining the electric current in the current sheet against losses caused by electrons not being able to stay in the current sheet for more than a few seconds at a time.

  3. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE SLOWLY ROTATING KERR-NEWMAN BLACK HOLE IN THE GRAND CANONICAL ENSEMBLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JU-HUA; JING JI-LIANG

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the slowly rotating Kerr-Newman (K-N) black hole in the grand canonical ensemble with York's formalism. Some thermodynamical properties, such as the thermodynamical action, entropy,thermodynamical energy and heat capacity are studied, and solutions of the slowly rotating K-N black hole with different boundary conditions are analysed. We find stable solutions and instantons under certain boundary conditions.

  4. Polarised Black Holes in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global $AdS_{4}$ with conformal boundary $S^{2}\\times\\mathbb{R}_{t}$. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic $AdS$ behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an $AdS$ soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the $AdS$ geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both $AdS$ soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawkin...

  5. A lower bound for the mass of axisymmetric connected black hole data sets

    CERN Document Server

    Chruściel, Piotr T

    2011-01-01

    We present a generalisation of the Brill-type proof of positivity of mass for axisymmetric initial data to initial data sets with black hole boundaries. The argument leads to a strictly positive lower bound for the mass of simply connected, connected axisymmetric black hole data sets in terms of the mass of a reference Schwarzschild metric.

  6. Black holes as D3-branes on Calabi-Yau threefolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Matteo; Frè, Pietro; Iengo, Roberto; Scrucca, Claudio A.

    1998-07-01

    We show how an extremal Reissner-Nordström black hole can be obtained by wrapping a dyonic D3-brane on a Calabi-Yau manifold. In the orbifold limit T6/Z3, we explicitly show the correspondence between the solution of the supergravity equations of motion and the D-brane boundary state description of such a black hole.

  7. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Steven L Liebling

    2000-10-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  8. Black hole quantum spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corda, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introducing a black hole (BH) effective temperature, which takes into account both the non-strictly thermal character of Hawking radiation and the countable behavior of emissions of subsequent Hawking quanta, we recently re...

  9. Holographic black hole chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karch, Andreas; Robinson, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic quantities associated with black holes in Anti-de Sitter space obey an interesting identity when the cosmological constant is included as one of the dynamical variables, the generalized Smarr relation...

  10. Two-Step Coronal Transport of Solar Flare Particles from Magnetic Multipolarity Sources in a Flare Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Nian; WANG Shi-Jin

    2001-01-01

    The transport of solar flare particles in the corona is studied. Considering the problems in terms of the character istics of a sunspot group producing solar cosmic rays and solar flare processes, we find that formation of the fast propagation process is associated with annihilation of sunspots in the group with magnetic multipolarity. The slower propagation process depends on magnetic irregularities in the corona, and the evolution of the transport is related to the flare processes. Equations for the coronal transport are proposed and their initial and boundary conditions are given. The predicted results agree with the main observational features.

  11. Braneworld black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    In these lectures, I give an introduction to and overview of braneworlds and black holes in the context of warped compactifications. I first describe the general paradigm of braneworlds, and introduce the Randall-Sundrum model. I discuss braneworld gravity, both using perturbation theory, and also non perturbative results. I then discuss black holes on the brane, the obstructions to finding exact solutions, and ways of tackling these difficulties. I describe some known solutions, and conclude with some open questions and controversies.

  12. Holes in Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang

    1990-05-01

    In this Brief Report we show that a recent model proposed by Shankar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 203 (1989)], describing the motion of holes in quantum antiferromagnets is equivalent to the Schwinger model [Phys. Rev. 128, 2425 (1962)] in 1+1 dimensions. Some exact results are deduced. In addition to the superconducting long-range order found by Shankar, it is shown that there is a 2pF hole density wave existing with the superconducting pairing instability.

  13. Life Inside Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav

    2013-11-01

    It is considered the test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside the black hole (BH), which are stable, periodic and neither come out the BH nor terminate at the central singularity. Interiors of the supermassive BHs may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on the planets with the third kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of BHs by observing their white hole counterparts.

  14. Hydrodynamics and black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Oz, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how the AdS/CFT correspondence (the Holographic Principle) relates field theory hydrodynamics to perturbations of black hole (brane) gravitational backgrounds. The hydrodynamics framework is first presented from the field theory point of view, after which the dual gravitational description is outlined, first for relativistic fluids and then for the nonrelativistic case. Further details of the fluid/gravity correspondence are then discussed, including the bulk geometry and the dynamics of the black hole horizon.

  15. Black hole geometrothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Hernando

    2017-03-01

    We review the main aspects of geometrothermodynamics which is a geometric formalism to describe thermodynamic systems, taking into account the invariance of classical thermodynamics with respect to Legendre transformations. We focus on the particular case of black holes, and present a Riemannian metric which describes the corresponding space of equilibrium states. We show that this metric can be used to describe the stability properties and phase transition structure of black holes in different gravity theories.

  16. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  17. Black Hole Induced Ejections

    OpenAIRE

    Pelletier, G.

    2004-01-01

    Black Holes generate a particular kind of environments dominated by an accretion flow which concentrates a magnetic field. The interplay of gravity and magnetism creates this paradoxical situation where relativistic ejection is allowed and consequently high energy phenomena take place. Therefore Black Holes, which are very likely at the origin of powerfull astrophysical phenomena such as AGNs, micro- quasars and GRBs where relativistic ejections are observed, are at the heart of high energy a...

  18. Charged Galileon black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  19. Ultramassive Black Hole Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Fazeel; Berczik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gr...

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX SUPPLEMENT TO CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, Chaozhou; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S., E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyze longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 Å passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs’ lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hr. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely, emergence, convergence, and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of an MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of an MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 Å passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hr with an average of 1.3 hr. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between an MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within an MBF with the two polarities moving toward each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within an MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While an MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.