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Sample records for core-level photoabsorption spectroscopy

  1. Core-level photoabsorption study of defects and metastable bonding configurations in boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Jankowski, A.F.; Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Boron nitride is an interesting material for technological applications and for fundamental solid state physics investigations. It is a compound isoelectronic with carbon and, like carbon can possess sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonded phases resembling graphite and diamond. BN crystallizes in the sp{sup 2}-bonded hexagonal (h-BN), rhombohedral (r-BN) and turbostratic phases, and in the sp{sup 3}-bonded cubic (c-BN) and wurtzite (w-BN) phases. A new family of materials is obtained when replacing C-C pairs in graphite with isoelectronic B-N pairs, resulting in C{sub 2}BN compounds. Regarding other boron compounds, BN is exceptional in the sense that it has standard two-center bonds with conventional coordination numbers, while other boron compounds (e.g. B{sub 4}C) are based on the boron icosahedron unit with three-center bonds and high coordination numbers. The existence of several allotropic forms and fullerene-like structures for BN suggests a rich variety of local bonding and poses the questions of how this affects the local electronic structure and how the material accommodates the stress induced in the transition regions between different phases. One would expect point defects to play a crucial role in stress accommodation, but these must also have a strong influence in the electronic structure, since the B-N bond is polar and a point defect will thus be a charged structure. The study of point defects in relationship to the electronic structure is of fundamental interest in these materials. Recently, the authors have shown that Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is sensitive to point defects in h-BN, and to the formation of metastable phases even in amorphous materials. This is significant since other phase identification techniques like vibrational spectroscopies or x-ray diffraction yield ambiguous results for nanocrystalline and amorphous samples. Serendipitously, NEXAFS also combines chemical selectivity with point defect sensitivity.

  2. Detecting the formation of single-walled carbon nanotube rings by photoabsorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Akira; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Koji

    2016-08-01

    Photoabsorption spectroscopy was conducted on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) during the formation of ring structures. The absorption bands observed before starting the formation gradually shifted while broadening in the middle. When they finally disappeared, it was found, via atomic force microscopy observations, that almost all SWNTs were transformed into rings. The spectral changes were assumed to be due to the changes in the electronic states of SWNTs. This idea was supported by the results of an investigation using a scanning tunneling microscope. It could be said that photoabsorption spectroscopy is useful for detecting ring formation in situ.

  3. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  4. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  5. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  6. An implementation of core level spectroscopies in a real space Projector Augmented Wave density functional theory code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, M.P.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the implementation of K-shell core level spectroscopies (X-ray absorption (XAS), X-ray emission (XES), and X-ray photoemission (XPS)) in the real-space-grid-based Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) GPAW code. The implementation for XAS is based on the Haydock recursion method avoiding com...

  7. 50 years anniversary of the discovery of the core level chemical shifts. The early years of photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mårtensson, Nils [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Sokolowski, Evelyn [Tvär-Ramsdal 1, 611 99 Tystberga (Sweden); Svensson, Svante, E-mail: Svante.Svensson@fysik.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • 50 years since the discovery of t the core level chemical shift. • The pioneering years of ESCA. • A critical review of the first core electron chemical shift results. - Abstract: The pioneering years of photoelectron spectroscopy in Uppsala are discussed, especially the work leading to the discovery of the core level chemical shifts. At a very early stage of the project, the pioneering group observed what they described as evidence for chemical shifts in the core level binding energies. However, it can now be seen that the initial observations to a large extent was due to charging of the samples. It is interesting to note that the decisive experiment was realized, not as a result of a systematic study, but was obtained with a large element of serendipity. Only when a chemical binding energy shift was observed between two S2p electron lines in the same molecule, the results were accepted internationally, and the fascinating expansion of modern core level photoelectron spectroscopy could start.

  8. Electronic properties of metal-organic and organic-organic interfaces studied by photoemission and photoabsorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodtsova, Olga

    2006-07-01

    In this work systematic studies of the organic semiconductor CuPc have been presented. In general the investigation can be devided in three parts. In the first one we have studied the electronic structure of clean CuPc thin film. The next two parts are devoted to organic-organic and metal-organic interface formation, where one of the interface components is CuPc thin film. The main results of this thesis are: - The electronic structure of the pristine organic semiconductor CuPc has been obtained by a combination of conventional and resonant photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption, as well as by theoretical ab initio quantum-chemical calculations. The contributions of different atomic species as well as sites of the CuPc molecule to the electronic DOS has been established. A combined experimental and theoretical study of the unoccupied electronic density of states of CuPc was presented. - The electronic properties of the organic heterointerfaces between fullerite and pristine copper phthalocyanine were studied. Both interfaces, CuPc/C{sub 60} and C{sub 60}/CuPc, were found to be non-reactive with pronounced shifts of the vacuum level pointing to the formation of an interfacial dipole mainly at the CuPc side of the heterojunctions. The dipole values are close to the difference of the work functions of the two materials. Important interface parameters and hole-injection barriers were obtained. The sequence of deposition does not influence the electronic properties of the interfaces. - CuPc doped with potassium was studied by means of photoemission and photoabsorption spectroscopy. A detailed analysis of the core-level PE spectra allows one to propose possible lattice sites, which harbor the potassium ions. The films prepared in this thesis showed no finite electronic density of states at the Fermi level. - Two stages of the In/CuPc interface formation have been distinguished. The low-coverage stage is characterized by a strong diffusion of the In atoms into the

  9. Chemical bonding of water to metal surfaces studied with core-level spectroscopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Pettersson, L.G.M.;

    2010-01-01

    and the interaction between the water monolayer and the surface. By combining synchrotron radiation-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) techniques with density functional theory (DFT) computational methods we obtain element......-specific information on the partial local density of states, local atomic structure, geometrical parameters and molecular orientation, allowing general principles for water-metal interaction to be derived....

  10. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy on the lanthanide-induced hydrolysis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigekawa, Hidemi; Ikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Iijima, Yoshitoki; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    1996-03-01

    The electronic structures of the complexes of diphenyl phosphate (DPP), a model compound of DNA, with lanthanide ions have been investigated to shed light on the mechanism of the cerium (IV)-induced nonenzymatic hydrolysis of DNA. Binding energies of the P 2p core level of DPP were 134.2 eV for the complexes with La(III), Eu(III), and Lu(III), and was 134.4 eV for the Ce(IV) complex, when the metal/DPP molar ratio was 1:1. When the molar ratio was increased, only Ce(IV), the most active metal ion for DNA hydrolysis, showed a chemical shift of ˜0.5 eV toward the higher binding energy region. The chemical shift of ˜0.5 eV toward the higher binding energy region. The chemical shift was due to the systematic increase in the intensity of the higher binding energy component. The observed change in the electronic structure of the DPP-Ce(IV) complex may be related to the superb ability of Ce(IV) for the hydrolysis of DNA.

  11. Real-time analysis for MBE by time-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, F; Watanabe, Y; Oshima, M; Taguchi, M; Oiwa, R

    1998-05-01

    A system has been developed for the real-time analysis of surface reactions during molecular beam epitaxial growth which uses photoelectron spectroscopy with VUV light taken from synchrotron radiation. This system consists of a synchrotron radiation beamline and growth/analysis apparatus in which photoelectron spectroscopy is performed with sub-second time resolution. In this system, photoelectron spectra are measured in sequence by a 'non-scanning' measurement method that enables the acquisition of snapshot photoelectron spectra using a multi-channel detector. This non-scanning measurement method was enabled by equipping an electric field correction grid. This system was used to monitor the photoelectron spectra of a GaSb(001) surface.

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  13. Ce Core-Level Spectroscopy, and Magnetic and Electrical Transport Properties of Lightly Ce-Doped YCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Koike, Tsuyoshi; Okawa, Mario; Takayanagi, Ryohei; Takei, Shohei; Minohara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Masaki; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira; Ikenaga, Eiji; Saitoh, Tomohiko; Asai, Kichizo

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the Ce and Co core level spectroscopy, and the magnetic and electrical transport properties of lightly Ce-doped YCoO3. We have successfully synthesized single-phase Y1-xCexCoO3 for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1 by the sol-gel method. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments reveal that the introduced Ce ions are tetravalent, which is considered to be the first case of electron doping into bulk trivalent Co oxides with perovskite RECoO3 (RE: rare-earth element or Y) caused by RE site substitution. The magnitude of the effective magnetic moment peff obtained from the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility χ(T) at higher temperatures is close to that for high-spin Co2+ introduced by the Ce doping, implying that the electrons doped into the Co site induce Co2+ with a high-spin state. For x = 0.1, ferromagnetic ordering is observed below about 7 K. Electrical transport properties such as resistivity and thermoelectric power show that negative electron-like carriers are introduced by Ce substitution.

  14. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  15. Equivalent-core calculation of core-level relaxation energies in photoelectron spectroscopy: A molecular-orbital approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Zhuang, G.; Ross, P.N. [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    1998-10-01

    The equivalent-core approximation is implemented in a novel way so as to calculate core-level relaxation energies in photoelectron spectroscopy. The method is based on self-consistent field (SCF) Hartree{endash}Fock molecular-orbital calculations via linear combinations of atomic orbitals, and involves evaluating the difference of sums of two-electron Coulomb and exchange integrals, for all electrons in an atom and in its equivalent-core ion. By thus avoiding SCF calculations with a core hole present (the true final state of photoemission), this procedure is shown to significantly save computing time in comparison with an exact SCF direct-hole calculation. Application of the method in single atoms and selected molecules shows about a 10{percent} difference with respect to direct-hole calculation results. The approximation introduces about 1{endash}6 eV errors compared to the experimental results of gas phase molecules. This method thus should be a generally useful procedure for estimating relaxation energies in core spectra. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Hybridization and crystal-field effects in Kondo insulators studied by means of core-level spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Fabio

    2015-04-13

    and even for symmetries lower than tetragonal. In addition to that, HAXPES measurements on the CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 10} series are presented. A common technique for studying hybridization effects in rare earths, and their electronic structure in general, is photoelectron spectroscopy in the soft X-ray range (hv ≤ 1.5 keV). However, in this energy region surface effects are known to matter so that the picture about the hybridization interaction might be distorted with respect to the bulk. The use of hard X-rays (hν=5-10 keV) guarantees a sufficiently large probing depth for obtaining information about the actual bulk electronic structure. In a detailed quantitative analysis of HAXPES 3d core level spectra - using a combination of full multiplet calculations and a configuration interaction model (fm-CI model) - the hybridization strength can be quantified. The XAS results show that the CEF ground states of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 10} and CeOs{sub 2}Al are very similar, while it is clearly different for the non-ordering system CeFe{sub 2}Al{sub 10}. The CEF description nicely explains the magnetic anisotropy observed in susceptibility data and to a large extent the small ordered moments along the c axis. We provide a reliable quantitative description of the CEF ground state of the CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 10} compounds. Furthermore, the analysis of the HAXPES data in the fm-CI model allows to quantify the intermediate 4f valence and establishes that the exchange interaction increases within the series from Ru to Os to Fe. A substantial amount of Kondo screening is shown to be present even in the magnetically ordered Ru and Os compounds. The polarized XAS study on CeNiSn demonstrates that the monoclinic CEF is well described in a trigonal approximation, and the determined 4f ground-state wave function is consistent with results from inelastic neutron scattering for Cu-doped CeNiSn. Moreover, the systematic investigation of the CeRh{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}In{sub 5} substitution series by means

  17. Electronic Charges and Electric Potential at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces Studied by Core-Level Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Harold

    2011-08-19

    We studied LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces for varying LaAlO{sub 3} thickness by core-level photoemission spectroscopy. In Ti 2p spectra for conducting 'n-type' interfaces, Ti{sup 3+} signals appeared, which were absent for insulating 'p-type' interfaces. The Ti{sup 3+} signals increased with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness, but started well below the critical thickness of 4 unit cells for metallic transport. Core-level shifts with LaAlO{sub 3} thickness were much smaller than predicted by the polar catastrophe model. We attribute these observations to surface defects/adsorbates providing charges to the interface even below the critical thickness.

  18. sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio in amorphous carbon from C 1s core-level shifts: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerle, Rainer; Riedo, Elisa; Pasquarello, Alfredo; Baldereschi, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, we address C 1s core-level shifts in amorphous carbon. Experimental results are obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on thin-film samples of different atomic density, obtained by a pulsed-laser deposition growth process. The XPS spectra are deconvoluted into two contributions, which are attributed to sp2- and sp3-hybridized atoms, respectively, separated by 0.9 eV, independent of atomic density. The sp3 hybridization content extracted from XPS is consistent with the atomic density derived from the plasmon energy in the EELS spectrum. In our theoretical study, we generate several periodic model structures of amorphous carbon of different densities applying two schemes of increasing accuracy in sequence. We first use a molecular-dynamics approach, based on an environmental-dependent tight-binding Hamiltonian to quench the systems from the liquid phase. The final model structures are then obtained by further atomic relaxation using a first-principles pseudopotential plane-wave approach within density-functional theory. Within the latter framework, we also calculate carbon 1s core-level shifts for our disordered model structures. We find that the shifts associated to threefold- and fourfold- coordinated carbon atoms give rise to two distinct peaks separated by about 1.0 eV, independent of density, in close agreement with experimental observations. This provides strong support for decomposing the XPS spectra into two peaks resulting from sp2- and sp3-hybridized atoms. Core-hole relaxations effects account for about 30% of the calculated shifts.

  19. Photoabsorption and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for gas-phase trimethyl phosphate following valence shell excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homem, M.G.P.; Rosa, L.F.S.; Farenzena, L.S.; Hasse, A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Iza, P. [Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral, Guayaquil Guaya (Ecuador); Cavasso Filho, R.L. [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Lee, M.T.; Iga, I. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In this work we report an experimental study on photoabsorption of trimethyl phosphate (TMP) molecules in the vacuum-ultraviolet energy range. More specifically, absolute photoabsorption cross sections and photoionization yields are measured and reported in the (11.11-21.45) eV energy range. The photoionization and neutral-decay cross sections in absolute scale are also derived and reported. Details of our experimental setup and procedure for cross-section determination can be found in our previous work [1]. Essentially, the measurements were performed using a double-ion-chamber technique [2]. The experimental cross-section results are analyzed in comparison with PES measurements. Oscillator strengths sum rules over the extrapolated experimental data gives a value of 71.6 au for the static dipole polarizability of TMP, which is in excellent agreement with the value of 72.3 au reported in literature. In addition, the ionic dissociation in the same energy range has been studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry [3]. The detected product cations are C{sub 3}H{sub 9}O{sub 4}P{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}P{sup +}, CH{sub 3}O{sub 4}P{sup +}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}O{sub 3}P{sup +}, PO{sub 4}{sup +}, CH{sub 5}O{sub 2}P{sup +}, PO{sub 3}{sup +}, and CH{sub 3}{sup +}. The observed ionic branching ratios are converted in absolute scale by using the measured photoionization cross sections. The presence of two ionic metastable states corresponding to the C{sub 3}H{sub 9}O{sub 4}P{sup +} and CH{sub 3}O{sub 4}P{sup +} fragments are reported and their metastable ion mean lives are estimated in (152{+-}5) ns and (248{+-}30) ns. The results and discussion will be presented during the workshop. [1] M. G. P. Homem, P. Iza, L. S. Farenzena, R. L. Cavasso-Filho, M. T. Lee and I. Iga, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42, 235204 (2009). [2] J. A. R. Samson and Lifeng Yin, J. Opt. Soc. Am B 6, 2326 (1989). [3] F. Burmeister, L. H. Coutinho, R. R. T. Marinho, M. G. P. Homem, M. A

  20. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN's) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N2 atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar+ ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy values. These spectra-modifying effects of Ar+ ion bombardment increase with increasing the metal atom mass due to an increasing nitrogen-to-metal sputter yield ratio. The superior quality of the XPS spectra obtained in a non-destructive way from capped TMN films is evident from that numerous metal peaks, including Ti 2p, V 2p, Zr 3d, and Hf 4f, exhibit pronounced satellite features, in agreement with previously published spectra from layers grown and analyzed in situ. In addition, the N/metal concentration ratios are found to be 25-90% higher than those obtained from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces, and in most cases agree very well with the RBS and ToF-E ERDA values. The N 1 s BE:s extracted from

  1. Quantitative photoabsorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of H2S and D2S at 49-240 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako

    1987-01-01

    Photoabsorption and fluorescence cross sections of H2S and D2S were measured in the 49-240 nm region using synchrotron radiation as a light source. Fluorescence from photoexcitation of H2S appears at 49-97 nm, but not in the long wavelength region. Fluorescence spectra were dispersed, and used to identify the emitters to be H2S(+) (A), SH(+)(A), and H(n greater than 2). The fluorescence quantum yield is about 6 percent. Photoexcitation of D2S at 49-96 nm produces fluorescence with a quantum yield of about 5 percent. The emitters are identified from the fluorescence spectra to be D2S(+)(A), SD(+)(A), and D(n greater than 2). The Franck-Condon factors for the SH(+) and SD(+) (A-X) transitions were determined. The SD(A-X) fluorescence was observed from photoexcitation of D2S at 100-151 nm, for which the fluorescence cross section and quantum yield were measured.

  2. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  3. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Mogi, D. [Development and Marketing Department, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka, Kogyo Co., Ltd., Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0063 (Japan); Tanioka, T. [Shibukawa Development Research Laboratory, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka Kogyo Co., Ltd., Shibukawa City, Gunma 377-8513 (Japan); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, allée de la Chimie 3, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  4. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km).

  5. 1S core-level spectroscopy of graphite: The effects of phonons on emission and absorption and validity of the final-state rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, C.P.; Schnatterly, S.E.; Zutavern, F.J.; Aton, T.; Cafolla, T.; Carson, R.D.

    1985-04-15

    We have used both electron-induced soft x-ray emission and fast inelastic electron scattering to observe 1S core-level emission and absorption in graphite near threshold. Linear phonon coupling with partial relaxation is found to quantitatively explain the absorption linewidth, the emission broadening, and the unusually large difference between emission and absorption threshold energies (Stokes shift). Both emission and absorption line shapes quantitatively obey the final-state rule, which asserts that the best single-particle potential describing these many electron processes is the final-state potential.

  6. Initial stages of Lutetium growth on Si (111)-7 × 7 probed by STM and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smykalla, Lars; Shukrynau, Pavel; Hietschold, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of small amounts of Lutetium with the Si (111)-7 × 7 reconstructed surface was investigated in detail using a combination of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS and UPS). Various immobile and also fastly moving atoms and nanocluster were found in the initial growth of the Lu/Si interface. Density functional theory calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the most attractive adsorption sites for the Lu atoms are basins around Si rest-atoms and there is no strong interaction between Lu and Si at the initial steps of film growth. However Lu nanocluster could also be found on other adsorption sites which results in a different voltage dependence in STM. Coverage-dependent STM images reveal the growth of a closed Lu metal overlayer by joining of the clusters. The existence of a stoichiometric Lu silicide compound was not detected on the surface in the initial growth for deposition at room temperature.

  7. A Mechanistic Study of CO2 Reduction at the Interface of a Gallium Phosphide (GaP) Surface using Core-level Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Kristen [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission into the atmosphere has increased tremendously through burning of fossil fuels, forestry, etc.. The increased concentration has made CO2 reductions very attractive though the reaction is considered uphill. Utilizing the sun as a potential energy source, CO2 has the possibility to undergo six electron and four proton transfers to produce methanol, a useable resource. This reaction has been shown to occur selectively in an aqueous pyridinium solution with a gallium phosphide (GaP) electrode. Though this reaction has a high faradaic efficiency, it was unclear as to what role the GaP surface played during the reaction. In this work, we aim to address the fundamental role of GaP during the catalytic conversion, by investigating the interaction between a clean GaP surface with the reactants, products, and intermediates of this reaction using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have determined a procedure to prepare atomically clean GaP and our initial CO2 adsorption studies have shown that there is evidence of chemisorption and reaction to form carbonate on the clean surface at LN2 temperatures (80K), in contrast to previous theoretical calculations. These findings will enable future studies on CO2 catalysis.

  8. A Mechanistic Study of CO2 Reduction at the Interface of a Gallium Phosphide (GaP) Surface using Core-level Spectroscopy - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Kristen [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission into the atmosphere has increased tremendously through burning of fossil fuels, forestry, etc.. The increased concentration has made CO2 reductions very attractive though the reaction is considered uphill. Utilizing the sun as a potential energy source, CO2 has the possibility to undergo six electron and four proton transfers to produce methanol, a useable resource. This reaction has been shown to occur selectively in an aqueous pyridinium solution with a gallium phosphide (GaP) electrode. Though this reaction has a high faradaic efficiency, it was unclear as to what role the GaP surface played during the reaction. In this work, we aim to address the fundamental role of GaP during the catalytic conversion, by investigating the interaction between a clean GaP surface with the reactants, products, and intermediates of this reaction using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have determined a procedure to prepare atomically clean GaP and our initial CO2 adsorption studies have shown that there is evidence of chemisorption and reaction to form carbonate on the clean surface at LN2 temperatures (80K), in contrast to previous theoretical calculations. These findings will enable future studies on CO2 catalysis.

  9. Radiationless S 1 → S 0 phenyl deactivation pathway: an investigation of iodine-marked bi-phenyl on a silicon surface by means of time resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelswirth, Martin; Dachraoui, Hatem; Mattay, Jochen; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    The S 1 → S 0 radiationless deactivation of iodine terminated bi-phenyl immobilized on a silicon surface was probed by analysing the I4d signature (BE: 45.6 eV, 47.3 eV) by means of High Harmonic Generation (HHG) based photoelectron spectroscopy. Modifications of the 4d5/2,3/2 spectroscopic contents spanning about 0.2 ps after UV activation (266 nm) were verified as showing a transient molecular response character. A localization to the terminated phenyl substructure in the complex structural environment on the surface was ensured according to the core-level nature of the recorded I4d. The activation of the bi-phenyl achieved by UV irradiation, corresponding to the UV absorption band-edge, was verified as being dominated by a Bπ → Bπ* phenyl excitation. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) modellings were therefore performed. They were matched to Configuration Interaction semi-empirical calculations (CI-MNDO) verifying the Rustagi-Ducuing relation. The simulated singlet-singlet excitation spectrum was referenced to the spectra of an iodine terminated monomer and a linear oligophenyl chain (N = 8). Thus the deactivation response studied was assigned to a conical intersection promoted ? reaction pathway.

  10. Valence and ionic lowest-lying electronic states of ethyl formate as studied by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption, He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmiałek, M. A., E-mail: smialek@pg.gda.pl [Department of Control and Energy Engineering, Faculty of Ocean Engineering and Ship Technology, Gdańsk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Łabuda, M.; Guthmuller, J. [Department of Theoretical Physic and Quantum Information, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdańsk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Département de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules (PhLAM), UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V.; Jones, N. C. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, Building 1520, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-09-14

    The highest resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of ethyl formate, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OCHO, yet reported is presented over the wavelength range 115.0–275.5 nm (10.75–4.5 eV) revealing several new spectral features. Valence and Rydberg transitions and their associated vibronic series, observed in the photoabsorption spectrum, have been assigned in accordance with new ab initio calculations of the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths. Calculations have also been carried out to determine the ionization energies and fine structure of the lowest ionic state of ethyl formate and are compared with a newly recorded He(I) photoelectron spectrum (from 10.1 to 16.1 eV). New vibrational structure is observed in the first photoelectron band. The photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of ethyl formate in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  11. Core level shifts of intercalated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Ulrike A.; Petrović, Marin; Gerber, Timm; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Grånäs, Elin; Arman, Mohammad A.; Herbig, Charlotte; Schnadt, Joachim; Kralj, Marko; Knudsen, Jan; Michely, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Through intercalation of metals and gases the Dirac cone of graphene on Ir(111) can be shifted with respect to the Fermi level without becoming destroyed by strong hybridization. Here, we use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to measure the C 1s core level shift (CLS) of graphene in contact with a number of structurally well-defined intercalation layers (O, H, Eu, and Cs). By analysis of our own and additional literature data for decoupled graphene, the C 1s CLS is found to be a non-monotonic function of the doping level. For small doping levels the shifts are well described by a rigid band model. However, at larger doping levels, a second effect comes into play which is proportional to the transferred charge and counteracts the rigid band shift. Moreover, not only the position, but also the C 1s peak shape displays a unique evolution as a function of doping level. Our conclusions are supported by intercalation experiments with Li, with which, due to the absence of phase separation, the doping level of graphene can be continuously tuned.

  12. Electron impact dissociation and VUV photoabsorption of frozen formamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaraman, Bhala; Raja Sekhar, B. N.; Nair, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of an extensive study of formamide (HCONH2) ices carried out under experimental conditions that simulate those found in the interstellar medium (ISM). Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) and Infrared (IR) spectroscopic techniques were used to measure photoabsorption cross sections...... of these ices and to detect the chemical/physical changes induced by electron irradiation. HCONH2 dissociation induced by 1 keV electron irradiation was monitored in the solid phase at 30 K using IR spectroscopy and products of electron irradiation identified to be OCN, CO and CO2, where OCN was found...... to be stable even in the crystalline phase....

  13. Ba 4/ital d/ core-level spectroscopy in the YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 6. 9/ high-/ital T//sub /ital c// superconductor: Existence of a surface-shifted component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, R.; Olson, C. G.; Yang, A.; Gu, C.; Lynch, D. W.; Arko, A. J.; List, R. S.; Bartlett, R. J.; Veal, B. W.; Liu, J. Z.; and others

    1989-08-01

    Two sets of spin-orbit split Ba 4/ital d/ core-level photoemission peaks were observed in a crystal of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 6.9/. From constant final-state measurements taken as a function of kinetic energy, the low-binding-energy doublet is identified as a surface component. Possible origins of the surface shift are discussed.

  14. Core-level spectra from graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Sernelius, Bo

    2014-01-01

    We calculate core-level spectra for pristine and doped free-standing graphene sheets. Instructions for how to perform the calculations are given in detail. Although pristine graphene is not metallic the core-level spectrum presents low-energy tailing which is characteristic of metallic systems. The peak shapes vary with doping level in a characteristic way. The spectra are compared to experiments and show good agreement. We compare to two different pristine samples and to one doped sample. Th...

  15. Photoelectron-photoabsorption (PePa) database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.; Mason, Nigel J.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a recently launched Photoelectron-Photoabsorption Database is presented. The database was developed in order to gather all the photoelectron and photoabsorption spectra measured by various collaborators over the years as well as to ease the access to the data to the potential users. In the paper the main features of the database were described and its outline explained. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  16. Photoabsorption of small sodium and magnesium clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We predict the strong enhancement in the photoabsorption of small Mg clusters in the region of 4-5 eV due to the resonant excitation of the plasmon oscillations of cluster electrons. The photoabsorption spectra for neutral Mg clusters consisting of up to N=11 atoms have been calculated using it a...... deformation is analysed. The reliability of the used calculation scheme has been proved by performing the test calculation for a number of sodium clusters and the comparison of the results obtained with the results of other methods and experiment....

  17. K-shell Photoabsorption of Oxygen Ions

    CERN Document Server

    García, J; Bautista, M A; Gorczyca, T W; Kallman, T R; Palmeri, P

    2004-01-01

    Extensive calculations of the atomic data required for the spectral modelling of the K-shell photoabsorption of oxygen ions have been carried out in a multi-code approach. The present level energies and wavelengths for the highly ionized species (electron occupancies 2 4, lack of measurements, wide experimental scatter, and discrepancies among theoretical values are handicaps in reliable accuracy assessments. The radiative and Auger rates are expected to be accurate to 10% and 20%, respectively, except for transitions involving strongly mixed levels. Radiative and Auger dampings have been taken into account in the calculation of photoabsorption cross sections in the K-threshold region, leading to overlapping lorentzian shaped resonances of constant widths that cause edge smearing. The behavior of the improved opacities in this region has been studied with the XSTAR modelling code using simple constant density slab models, and is displayed for a range of ionization parameters.

  18. A Theoretical Study of Photoabsorption Cross Sections of Na2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-Hua; GAO Xiang; HAN Xiao-Ying; LI Jia-Ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ In the framework of quantum defect theory, we calculate photoabsorption cross sections of Na2+. Based on our calculations, there is an absorption window in the photoabsorption cross sections of Na2+, and more than one bump above the absorption window. The calculated photoabsorption cross sections provide an explanation for the abnormal bump in the experimental measurements of Hudson, which is a long-standing experimental puzzle.

  19. Time-resolved soft X-ray core-level photoemission spectroscopy at 880 °C using the pulsed laser and synchrotron radiation and the pulse heating current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yukawa, R.; Kanzaki, S.; Mukojima, K.; Matsuda, I.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system for tracking the temporal variation in an electronic state of a heated sample. Our pump-probe method used laser and synchrotron radiation pulses on a silicon surface that was heated by a synchronized pulse current that did not interfere with the measurements. The transient surface photovoltage effect on the Si 2p core spectra was measured from room temperature to 880 °C and was found to be consistent with the thermal carrier distributions in silicon crystals at the corresponding temperatures. This versatile technique may have applications studying molecular dynamics on high temperature surfaces such as in catalytic reactions.

  20. Site-specific fragmentation caused by core-level photoionization in F(3)SiCH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(3) vapor: comparison between Si:1s and 2p photoionizations by means of photoelectron-photoion-photoion triple-coincidence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Takemoto, Mai; Prümper, Georg; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Tamenori, Yusuke; Suzuki, Isao H; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-28

    Site-specific fragmentation caused by Si:1s and 2p core-level photoionizations in F(3)SiCH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(3) vapor was studied by energy-selected-photoelectron photoion-photoion triple-coincidence spectroscopy. The difference between the chemical shifts of the two Si sites is larger for the 1s ionization than for the 2p (2s) ionization. The fragmentation caused by the Si:1s ionization is more violent than that caused by the Si:2p ionization. The ions and ion pairs showing high site specificity for the Si:1s ionization belong to small fragments compared to those in the Si:2p ionization. Criteria for high site-specificity in fragmentation are discussed in conjunction with the present results.

  1. Core level binding energies of functionalized and defective graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Kaukonen, Markus; Havu, Paula; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ayala, Paola; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2014-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a widely used tool for studying the chemical composition of materials and it is a standard technique in surface science and technology. XPS is particularly useful for characterizing nanostructures such as carbon nanomaterials due to their reduced dimensionality. In order to assign the measured binding energies to specific bonding environments, reference energy values need to be known. Experimental measurements of the core level signals of the elements present in novel materials such as graphene have often been compared to values measured for molecules, or calculated for finite clusters. Here we have calculated core level binding energies for variously functionalized or defected graphene by delta Kohn-Sham total energy differences in the real-space grid-based projector-augmented wave density functional theory code (GPAW). To accurately model extended systems, we applied periodic boundary conditions in large unit cells to avoid computational artifacts. In select cases, we compared the results to all-electron calculations using an ab initio molecular simulations (FHI-aims) code. We calculated the carbon and oxygen 1s core level binding energies for oxygen and hydrogen functionalities such as graphane-like hydrogenation, and epoxide, hydroxide and carboxylic functional groups. In all cases, we considered binding energy contributions arising from carbon atoms up to the third nearest neighbor from the functional group, and plotted C 1s line shapes by using experimentally realistic broadenings. Furthermore, we simulated the simplest atomic defects, namely single and double vacancies and the Stone-Thrower-Wales defect. Finally, we studied modifications of a reactive single vacancy with O and H functionalities, and compared the calculated values to data found in the literature.

  2. The surface core level shift for lithium at the surface of lithium borate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, David [Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7765 (United States); Ketsman, I.; Xiao, Jie [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Losovyj, Ya.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Petrosky, J.; McClory, J. [Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7765 (United States); Burak, Ya.V.; Adamiv, V.T. [Institute of Physical Optics, Dragomanov 23, Lviv 79005 (Ukraine); Dowben, P.A., E-mail: pdowben@unl.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The shallow Li 1s core level exhibits a surface-to-bulk core level shift for the stoichiometric Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(1 1 0) surface. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy was used to indentify Li 1s bulk and surface core level components at binding energies -56.5+-0.4 and -53.7+-0.5 eV, respectively. We find photoemission evidence for surface states of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}(1 1 0) that exist in the gap of the projected bulk density of states. The existence of surface states is consistent with the large surface-to-bulk core level shift for the Li 1s core.

  3. Density-dependent photoabsorption cross sections of atomic Xe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xiao-Guang

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the photoabsorption cross sections of atomic xenon with number densities varying from ideal gas to condensed matter has been studied by an alternative view in the present work. The alternative expressions of the photoabsorption cross sections presented by Sun et al recently were used with the local field models that has proven to be generalized easily to multiatomic systems including molecules and condensed phase systems. The present results show that the variation of the photoabsorption cross sections of atomic xenon in the giant resonance region from the isolated to the condensed conditions is very small, which agrees well with the variation law of the solid and gas experiments.

  4. Core-level magnetic circular dichroism in 3d and 4f magnetic systems (invited) (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, T.

    1994-05-01

    With the recent availability of circulary polarized synchrotron radiation over a wide photon energy range from VUV to hard X rays, the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) in core-level photoabsorption has rapidly attracted growing interest, both experimentally and theoretically. This novel technique can provide element-specific and site-selective information about the magnetic and the electronic states in various magnetic substances because the core-level MCD process involves optical transitions in which the one-electron initial states are well localized and have well-defined angular momenta. In order to get insight into the local magnetic states in 3d and 4f magnetic systems, we have studied MCD of ferrites, Fe1-xPtx alloys, and mixed-valence CeRh3B2 at the core-absorption edges in the VUV˜soft x-ray region. The experiments were performed by utilizing directly characterized, circularly polarized undulator radiation and off-plane synchrotron radiation1 in conjunction with an ultrahigh vacuum compatible superconducting magnet of special design.2 Clear MCD signals were observed for CeRh3B2 in the prethreshold region of the Ce 4d→4f (N4,5) edges. A comparison of the experimental MCD spectrum with theoretical ones3 for uniaxial crystal fields of Δc=0 and 0.2 eV shows that the experimental spectrum qualitatively agrees with the theoretical one for Δc=0 eV. Theory predicts that the MCD pattern for ΔcCeRh3B2. We will also present the MCD data in the M2,3 core-absorption region for ferrites (Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4) and Fe1-xPtx alloys, discussing the results.

  5. Determination of Degree of Ionization of Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and Poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy‑4 hydroxyphenylazo)benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) in Layer-by-Layer Films using Vacuum Photoabsorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Q; Gomes, Paulo J.; Ribeiro, Paulo A.;

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions govern most of the properties of supramolecular systems, which is the reason determining the degree of ionization of macromolecules has become crucial for many applications. In this paper, we show that high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy (VUV) can b...

  6. Core level photoemission of rotaxanes : A summary on binding energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendoza, S. M.; Berna, J.; Perez, E. M.; Kay, E. R.; Mateo-Alonso, A.; De Nadai, C.; Zhang, S.; Baggerman, J.; Wiering, P. G.; Leigh, D. A.; Prato, M.; Brouwer, A.M.; Rudolf, P.; Nadaï, C. De

    2008-01-01

    Several rotaxanes were studied by XPS in the form of thin films or monolayers on gold substrates. Here we report a database of photoemission spectra of the C 1s, N 1s and F 1s core levels. Binding energy ranges are summarized, classifying the core levels according to the chemical groups that form pa

  7. Core level photoemission of rotaxanes: A summary on binding energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, S.M. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Berna, J.; Perez, E.M.; Kay, E.R. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, King' s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Mateo-Alonso, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); De Nadai, C. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Spectroscopie Electronique, Facultes Universitaires Notre Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Zhang, S. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, King' s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Baggerman, J.; Wiering, P.G. [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129, NL-1018 WS Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leigh, D.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, King' s Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Prato, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Brouwer, A.M. [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129, NL-1018 WS Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: P.Rudolf@rug.nl

    2008-09-15

    Several rotaxanes were studied by XPS in the form of thin films or monolayers on gold substrates. Here we report a database of photoemission spectra of the C 1s, N 1s and F 1s core levels. Binding energy ranges are summarized, classifying the core levels according to the chemical groups that form part of the rotaxanes.

  8. Determination of degree of ionization of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo)benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) in layer-by-layer films using vacuum photoabsorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Q; Gomes, P J; Ribeiro, P A; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Mason, N J; Oliveira, O N; Raposo, M

    2013-01-08

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions govern most of the properties of supramolecular systems, which is the reason determining the degree of ionization of macromolecules has become crucial for many applications. In this paper, we show that high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy (VUV) can be used to determine the degree of ionization and its effect on the electronic excitation energies of layer-by-layer (LbL) films of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo)benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO). A full assignment of the VUV peaks of these polyelectrolytes in solution and in cast or LbL films could be made, with their pH dependence allowing us to determine the pK(a) using the Henderson-Hasselbach equation. The pK(a) for PAZO increased from ca. 6 in solution to ca. 7.3 in LbL films owing to the charge transfer from PAH. Significantly, even using solutions at a fixed pH for PAH, the amount adsorbed on the LbL films still varied with the pH of the PAZO solutions due to these molecular-level interactions. Therefore, the procedure based on a comparison of VUV spectra from solutions and films obtained under distinct conditions is useful to determine the degree of dissociation of macromolecules, in addition to permitting interrogation of interface effects in multilayer films.

  9. Core-level photoemission from alkali metals on Ru(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shek, M. (Department of Physics, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, New York 10021 (USA)); Hrbek, J. (Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (USA)); Sham, T.K. (Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada NA65B7 (Canada)); Xu, G. (Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (USA))

    1990-02-15

    We report soft-x-ray photoemission results on the core-level binding energies of Li, Na, K, and Cs adsorbed on Ru(001). For all four alkali metals, the saturated alkali-metal--Ru interface core level and the second- (surface-) layer core-level binding energies differ by as much as 0.85--1.25 eV. Surface versus bulklike core-level shifts are reported for Li, K, and Cs, which are 0.55 eV for Li and {similar to}0.25 eV for the other two. For increasing coverages of Li, Na, and K in direct contact with Ru, there are significant decreases in the core-level binding energies, the total shift ranging from {similar to}{minus}1.25 eV for Li to {similar to}{minus}0.80 eV for K; the shift for Cs is small and the reasons for the deviation are discussed. A comparison between our observations and the prediction from the thermodynamic model of Johannson and Martensson is also given.

  10. Origin of metallic surface core-level shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Abrikosov, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The unique property of the open 4f energy shell in the lanthanide metals is used to show that the initial-state energy shift gives an insufficient description of surface core-level shifts. Instead a treatment, which fully includes the final-state screening, account for the experimentally observed...

  11. Ionic Structure and Photoabsorption in Medium Sized Sodium Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kümmel, S; Reinhard, P G

    1998-01-01

    We present ground-state configurations and photoabsorption spectra of Na-7+, Na-27+ and Na-41+. For the first time, both the ionic structure and the photoabsorption spectra of medium-size sodium clusters beyond Na-20 have been calculated self-consistently with a non-spherical treatment of the valence electrons in density functional theory. We use a local pseudopotential that has been adjusted to experimental bulk properties and the atomic 3s level of sodium. Our studies have shown that both the ionic structure of the ground state and the positions of the plasmon resonances depend sensitively on the pseudopotential used in the calculation, which stresses the importance of its consistent use in both steps.

  12. Photoabsorption on nuclei in the shadowing threshold region

    CERN Document Server

    Muccifora, V; Deppman, A; De Sanctis, E; Mirazita, M; Polli, E; Rossi, P; Burgwinkel, R; Hannappel, J; Klein, F; Menze, D W; Schwille, W J; Wehnes, F

    1998-01-01

    The energy and nuclear mass dependences of the total hadronic cross section in the energy range 0.5-2.6 GeV have been measured at Bonn using the SAPHIR tagged photon beam. The measurement, performed on C, Al, Cu, Sn and Pb, provides the first photoabsorption data in the region 1.2-1.7 GeV. The results show a significant reduction of the photoabsorption strength on the bound nucleon compared to the free nucleon case in the whole energy region. Above 1.2 GeV this reduction decreases with the nuclear density and can be interpreted as a signature of a low energy onset of the shadowing effect.

  13. New determination of the core-level life-time broadenings in mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martensson, Nils, E-mail: nils.martensson@fysik.uu.se; Svensson, Svante

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We report core-level life-time widths for mercury in the gas phase. • Photoelectron spectra for the 4p, 4d, 4f and 5p levels are analyzed. • A Coster–Kronig like CI effect is observed for the 4d{sub 3/2} level. - Abstract: Previously recorded and published photoelectron spectroscopic data for mercury in the gas phase has been reanalyzed. The life-time broadenings have been determined for a large number of core levels. It is then seen that a recent detailed derivation of core-level line-widths based on X-ray emission spectroscopy give life-time widths that are generally too large. The 4d{sub 3/2}4d{sub 5/2}nd Coster–Kronig (CK) transition is also discussed. We find that the additional broadening of the 4d{sub 3/2} level for mercury metal is indeed due to a CK decay, in contrast to recent claims. In atomic mercury, however, the CK process in energetically forbidden. In spite of this we find that the 4d{sub 3/2} level is broadened also in this case. We propose that this is due to a mixing between the 4d{sub 3/2} hole state and discrete 4d{sub 5/2}nd states.

  14. First-principles calculation of core-level binding energy shift in surface chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combined with third generation synchrotron radiation light sources, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with higher energy resolution, brilliance, enhanced surface sensitivity and photoemission cross section in real time found extensive applications in solid-gas interface chemistry. This paper reports the calculation of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) using the first-principles density functional theory. The interplay between the CLS calculations and XPS measurements to uncover the structures, adsorption sites and chemical reactions in complex surface chemical processes are highlight. Its application on clean low index (111) and vicinal transition metal surfaces, molecular adsorption in terms of sites and configuration, and reaction kinetics are domonstrated.

  15. Surface core-level shifts for simple metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1994-01-01

    . We discuss the surface shifts of the electrostatic potentials and the band centers in order to trace the microscopic origin of the SCLS in the simple metals and find that the anomalous subsurface core-level shifts in beryllium are caused by charge dipoles, which persist several layers into the bulk......We have performed an ab initio study of the surface core-level binding energy shift (SCLS) for 11 of the simple metals by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method. Initial- and final-state effects are included within the concept of complete....... We furthermore conclude that the unexpected negative sign of the SCLS in beryllium is predominantly an initial-state effect and is caused by the high electron density in this metal....

  16. Comparative study of the core level photoemission of the ZrB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Duran, A. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico); Falconi, R. [Division Academica de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Cunduacan, Tabasco, CP 86690, AP 24 (Mexico); Flores, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, Zapopan Jal 45101 (Mexico); Escamilla, R., E-mail: rauleg@servidor.unam.m [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) were used to investigate the binding energies and valence band for ZrB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 12}. The Zr 3d and B 1s core levels were identified. The Zr 3d core level shows a spin-orbit split 3d{sub 5/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} while that for B 1s core level exhibited a single symmetric peak, these being typical of zirconium and boride signals. Comparing the Zr 3d and B 1s core levels with metallic Zr, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} reference materials only a negative chemical shift for Zr 3d associated to ZrB{sub 2} was observed, which suggests that the charge transfer model based on the concept of electronegativity was not applicable to explain the superconductivity in the ZrB{sub 12} sample. The measured valence band using UPS is consistent with the band-structure calculations indicating a higher density of states (DOS) at E{sub F} for ZrB{sub 12} respect to ZrB{sub 2}. Finally, we found that the weak mixed B-p and Zr-d states for ZrB{sub 12} is crucial for the superconductivity due to the state population increased the DOS at the E{sub F}.

  17. High-resolution photoabsorption spectrum of jet-cooled propyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacovella, U. [Laboratorium für Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Holland, D. M. P. [STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Boyé-Péronne, S. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, UMR 8214, CNRS and Univ. Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Joyeux, D.; Archer, L. E.; Oliveira, N. de; Nahon, L. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Xu, Hong; Pratt, S. T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    The absolute photoabsorption cross section of propyne was recorded between 62 000 and 88 000 cm{sup −1} by using the vacuum-ultraviolet, Fourier-transform spectrometer at the Synchrotron Soleil. This cross section spans the region including the lowest Rydberg bands and extends above the Franck-Condon envelope for ionization to the ground electronic state of the propyne cation, X{sup ~+}. Room-temperature spectra were recorded in a flowing cell at 0.9 cm{sup −1} resolution, and jet-cooled spectra were recorded at 1.8 cm{sup −1} resolution and a rotational temperature of ∼100 K. The reduced widths of the rotational band envelopes in the latter spectra reveal new structure and simplify a number of assignments. Although nf Rydberg series have not been assigned previously in the photoabsorption spectrum of propyne, arguments are presented for their potential importance, and the assignment of one nf series is proposed. As expected from previous photoelectron spectra, Rydberg series are also observed above the adiabatic ionization threshold that converge to the v{sub 3}{sup +} = 1 and 2 levels of the C≡C stretching vibration.

  18. The Spin and Flavour Dependence of High-Energy Photoabsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, S D

    1999-01-01

    We review the present data on high-energy, spin-dependent photoabsorption. We find a strong isotriplet term in $(\\sigma_A - \\sigma_P)$ which persists from $Q^2 \\sim 0.25$GeV$^2$ to high $Q^2$ polarised deep inelastic scattering. For $Q^2 \\sim 4$GeV$^2$ and $x$ between 0.01 and 0.12 the isotriplet part of $g_1$ behaves as $g_1^{(p-n)} \\sim x^{-{1 \\over 2}}$, in contrast to soft Regge theory which predicts that $g_1^{(p-n)}$ should converge as $x \\to 0$. The isotriplet, polarised structure function $2x g_1^{(p-n)}$ is significantly greater than the isotriplet, unpolarised structure function $F_2^{(p-n)}$ in this kinematic region. We analyse the low $Q^2$ photoabsorption data from E-143 and SMC and use this data to estimate the high-energy Regge contribution to the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum-rule.

  19. Photoabsorption spectrum of helium trimer cation—Theoretical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalus, René [Centre of Excellence IT4Innovations and Department of Applied Mathematics, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Karlický, František [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials and Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, Tř. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Lepetit, Bruno [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Paidarová, Ivana [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, ASCR, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Praha (Czech Republic); Gadea, Florent Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie et de Physique Quantiques, IRSAMC and UMR5626 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2013-11-28

    The photoabsorption spectrum of He{sub 3}{sup +} is calculated for two semiempirical models of intracluster interactions and compared with available experimental data reported in the middle UV range [H. Haberland and B. von Issendorff, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 8773 (1995)]. Nuclear delocalization effects are investigated via several approaches comprising quantum samplings using either exact or approximate (harmonic) nuclear wavefunctions, as well as classical samplings based on the Monte Carlo methodology. Good agreement with the experiment is achieved for the model by Knowles et al., [Mol. Phys. 85, 243 (1995); Mol. Phys. 87, 827 (1996)] whereas the model by Calvo et al., [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 124308 (2011)] exhibits non-negligible deviations from the experiment. Predictions of far UV absorption spectrum of He{sub 3}{sup +}, for which no experimental data are presently available, are reported for both models and compared to each other as well as to the photoabsorption spectrum of He{sub 2}{sup +}. A simple semiempirical point-charge approximation for calculating transition probabilities is shown to perform well for He{sub 3}{sup +}.

  20. Variation of photoabsorption cross section of atomic silver from isolated to condensed conditions*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xiao-Guang; Gong Yu-Bing; Qu Zhao-Jun

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the local-field on the photoabsorption cross section of the atomic silver is studied in detail by using the Clausius-Mossotti(CM)model and the Onsager model separately.The variations of the photoabsorption cross section of atomic silver with number density and radius of the environmental interaction cavity are studied systematically by using more general expressions for the photoabsorption cross sections,proposed by Sun et al recently.It has proved to be reasonable to model the optical response properties of bulky material by coupling the property of isolated atom with the environmental effccts in the present work.

  1. Many-electron correlations in computations of sodium atom photoabsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Konovalov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of many-electron correlations in photoabsorption processes has been investigated. The results of numerical computations of photoionization cross sections of sodium atom are presented. The many-body effects such as interchannel correlations resulting in autoionization resonance peaks, as well as effects of atomic core polarization were taken into account in the computations in terms of RPAE. Polarization corrections were accounted for using both static and dynamic polarization potentials. The influence of correlations on the position and the form of resonance peaks was studied. The obtained results demonstrate necessity of taking into account polarization effects, especially for clarification of autoionization resonance peaks position and the cross-section magnitudes in the low energy range. The best agreement with experimental data was reached with the model of dynamic polarization potential based on Dyson equation.

  2. Compton scattering from nuclei and photo-absorption sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2011-12-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new “constituent quark model” sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition, we extract the α=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high-energy proton data, we find that the α=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman.

  3. Compton Scattering and Photo-absorption Sum Rules on Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshteyn, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new ``constituent quark model'' sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition we extract the J=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high energy proton data we find that the J=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman. We discuss phenomenological implications of this new result.

  4. Relationships Between Complex Core Level Spectra and Materials Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelin, Constance J.; Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Chambers, Scott A.; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-01

    The XPS of many oxides are quite complex and there may be several peaks of significant intensity for each subshell. These peaks arise from many-electron effects, which normally are treated with configuration interaction (CI) wavefunctions where static correlation effects are taken into account. It is common to use semiempirical methods to determine the matrix elements of the CI Hamiltonian and there are few rigorous CI calculations where parameters are not adjusted to fit experiment. In contrast, we present, in the present work, theoretical XPS spectra obtained with rigorous CI wavefunctions for CeO2 where the XPS are especially complex; several different core levels are studied. This study uses an embedded CeO8 cluster model to represent bulk CeO2 and the relativistic CI wavefunctions are determined using four-component spinors from Dirac-Fock calculations. In particular, we examine the importance of interatomic many-body effects where there is a transfer of electrons from occupied oxygen 2p orbitals into empty cation orbitals as it is common to ascribe the complex XPS to this effect. We also contrast the importance of many-body charge-transfer effects for the isoelectronic cations of Ce4+ and La3+. The long-range goal of this work is to relate the XPS features to the nature of the chemical bonding in CeO2 and we describe our progress toward this goal.

  5. Photoabsorption in sodium clusters: first principles configuration interaction calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Pradip Kumar; Rai, Deepak Kumar; Shukla, Alok

    2017-05-01

    We present systematic and comprehensive correlated-electron calculations of the linear photoabsorption spectra of small neutral closed- and open-shell sodium clusters (Nan, n = 2 - 6), as well as closed-shell cation clusters (Nan+, n = 3, 5). We have employed the configuration interaction (CI) methodology at the full CI (FCI) and quadruple CI (QCI) levels to compute the ground, and the low-lying excited states of the clusters. For most clusters, besides the minimum energy structures, we also consider their energetically close isomers. The photoabsorption spectra were computed under the electric-dipole approximation, employing the dipole-matrix elements connecting the ground state with the excited states of each isomer. Our calculations were tested rigorously for convergence with respect to the basis set, as well as with respect to the size of the active orbital space employed in the CI calculations. These calculations reveal that as far as electron-correlation effects are concerned, core excitations play an important role in determining the optimized ground state geometries of various clusters, thereby requiring all-electron correlated calculations. But, when it comes to low-lying optical excitations, only valence electron correlation effects play an important role, and excellent agreement with the experimental results is obtained within the frozen-core approximation. For the case of Na6, the largest cluster studied in this work, we also discuss the possibility of occurrence of plasmonic resonance in the optical absorption spectrum. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-70728-3

  6. Some Exact Properties of the Nonequilibrium Response Function for Transient Photoabsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Perfetto, E

    2015-01-01

    The physical interpretation of time-resolved photoabsorption experiments is not as straightforward as for the more conventional photoabsorption experiments conducted on equilibrium systems. In fact, the relation between the transient photoabsorption spectrum and the properties of the examined sample can be rather intricate since the former is a complicated functional of both the driving pump and the feeble probe fields. In this work we critically review the derivation of the time-resolved photoabsorption spectrum in terms of the nonequilibrium dipole response function $\\chi$ and assess its domain of validity. We then analyze $\\chi$ in detail and discuss a few exact properties useful to interpret the transient spectrum {\\em during} (overlapping regime) and {\\em after} (nonoverlapping regime) the action of the pump. The nonoverlapping regime is the simplest to address. The absorption energies are indeed independent of the delay between the pump and probe pulses and hence the transient spectrum can change only b...

  7. Autoionization resonances in the photoabsorption spectra of Fe{sup n+} iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalov, A. V., E-mail: alkonvit@yandex.ru; Ipatov, A. N., E-mail: andrei-ipatov@mail.ru [Peter the Great St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The photoabsorption cross sections of a neutral iron atom, as well as positive Fe{sup +} and Fe{sup 2+} ions, are calculated in the relativistic random-phase approximation with exchange in the energy range 20–160 eV. The wavefunctions of the ground and excited states are calculated in the single-configuration Hartree–Fock–Dirac approximation. The resultant photoabsorption spectra are compared with experimental data and with the results of calculations based on the nonrelativistic spin-polarized version of the random-phase approximation with exchange. Series of autoionization resonance peaks, as well as giant autoionization resonance lines corresponding to discrete transitions 3p → 3d, are clearly observed in the photoabsorption cross sections. The conformity of the positions of calculated peaks of giant autoionization resonances with experimental data is substantially improved by taking into account additionally the correlation electron–electron interaction based on the model of the dynamic polarization potential.

  8. Photoemission with high-order harmonics: A tool for time-resolved core-level spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Holl; Raarup, Merete Krog; Balling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    realization allows the sample, located in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, to be illuminated by 106 65-eV photons per laser pulse at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The spectral width of a single harmonic is 0.77 eV (FWHM), and a few harmonics are selected by specially designed Mo/Si multi-layer mirrors. Photoelectrons...

  9. Tautomerism in 5-aminotetrazole investigated by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and {Delta}SCF calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, R.M., E-mail: ruipinto@fct.unl.pt [CFA, Centro de Fisica Atomica, Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Dias, A.A. [CFA, Centro de Fisica Atomica, Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Coreno, M. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, Rome I-00016 (Italy); Simone, M. de [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Giuliano, B.M. [Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, J.P.; Costa, M.L. [CFA, Centro de Fisica Atomica, Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-resolution XPS of 5-aminotetrazole reveals different tautomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5ATZ exists mainly in the 2H-form. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results obtained with DSCF are in good agreement with the observed binding energies. - Abstract: The C 1s and N 1s photoelectron spectra of gas-phase 5-aminotetrazole (5ATZ) were recorded using synchrotron radiation, with the aim of evaluating 1H/2H tautomer population ratios. The core-electron binding energies (CEBEs) were estimated from computational results, using the delta self-consistent-field ({Delta}SCF) approach. Simulated spectra were generated using these CEBEs and the results from GAUSSIAN-n (Gn, n = 1, 2 and 3) and Complete Basis Set (CBS-4M and CBS-Q) methods. Results reveal the almost exclusive predominance of the 2H-tautomer, with a 1H/2H ratio of ca. 0.12/0.88, taken from a gross analysis of the XPS C 1s spectrum, recorded at 365 K.

  10. Photoabsorption Assignments for the C̃(1)B2 ← X̃(1)A1 Vibronic Transitions of SO2, Using New Ab Initio Potential Energy and Transition Dipole Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H; Poirier, Bill

    2017-02-09

    The high resolution spectroscopy of the SO2 molecule is of great topical interest, in a wide variety of contexts ranging from origins of higher life, to astrophysics of the interstellar medium, to environmental chemistry. In particular, the C̃(1)B2 ← X̃(1)A1 UV photoabsorption spectrum has received considerable attention. This spectrum exhibits a highly regular progression of ∼20 or so strong peaks, spaced roughly 350 cm(-1) apart, which is comparable to the C̃(1)B2 bending vibrational frequency. Accordingly, they have for decades been largely attributed to the (1, v2('), 2) ← (0, 0, 0) bend progression. Using a highly accurate new ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the C̃(1)B2 state, we compute vibrational energy levels and wave functions, and compare with a photoabsorption calculation obtained using the same PES and corresponding C̃(1)B2 ← X̃(1)A1 transition dipole surface (TDS). We find that the above putative assignment is incorrect, contradicting even general qualitative trends-thus necessitating a very different dynamical picture for this highly unusual molecule.

  11. Systematic Structure in the K-Edge Photoabsorption Spectra of the 4d Transition Metals: Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, J. E.; Jepsen, O.; Andersen, Ole Krogh;

    1978-01-01

    The K-edge photoabsorption spectra of the 4d metals calculated by the linear augmented-plane-wave method yield good agreement with the measured data. The prominent systematic features of the spectra, most easily discussed in terms of the l=1 projected density of final states, are simply related t...

  12. Surface core-level shifts for Pt single-crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetzold, R. C.; Apai, G.; Shustorovich, E.; Jaeger, R.

    1982-10-01

    The (111) and (110) surfaces of Pt, clean, oxidized, and covered by CO, have been investigated for surface 4f core-level binding-energy shifts. For the (111) face the surface Pt4f72 core level was shifted by 0.40+/-0.05 eV to lower binding energy relative to the bulk peak. On the (110)-(1×2) reconstructed surface similarly shifted peaks at 0.21+/-0.05 and 0.55+/-0.05 eV were observed. Chemisorbed carbon monoxide shifts the Pt(111) surface-related core level by 1.3 eV to higher binding energy. Formation of subsurface oxygen did not produce changes in the Pt(111)4f72 core-level binding energies. The results obtained are explained and their possible implications are discussed.

  13. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  14. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  15. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in core-level photoemission from ferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menchero, Jose Gabriel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    In this thesis we present a theoretical investigation of angle- and spin-resolved core-level photoemission from ferromagnetic Fe and Ni. We also consider magneto-dichroic effects due to reversal of the photon helicity or reversal of the sample magnetization direction. In chapter 1, we provide a brief outline of the history of photoemission, and show how it has played an important role in the development of modern physics. We then review the basic elements of the theory of core-level photoemission, and discuss the validity of the some of the commonly-used approximations. In chapter 2, we present a one-electron theory to calculate spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra for an arbitrary photon polarization. The Hamiltonian includes both spin-orbit and exchange interactions. As test cases for the theory, we calculate the spin polarization and magnetic dichroism for the Fe 2p core level, and find that agreement with experiment is very good.

  16. Core-level X-ray photoemission spectral shift through the successive phase transitions in layered TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizu, Takahiko [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Mimura, Kojiro [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)], E-mail: mimura@ms.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Shim, Yong Gu [Department of Physics and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Wakita, Kazuki [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino 275-0016 (Japan); Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Science, Baku, AZ-1143 (Azerbaijan); Taguchi, Yukihiro; Ichikawa, Kouichi [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2008-12-31

    Temperature-dependent change in core-level electronic structures of the layered semiconductor-ferroelectric TlInS{sub 2} with incommensurate phase has been investigated by means of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the relative peak position for each core level (Tl 4f, In 3d and S 2p) is found to differ very much in the regions bordering each other at the normal-incommensurate phase transition point of 218 K. The obtained data suggest that the charge distribution in TlInS{sub 2} dramatically changes upon passing from the normal phase (T > 218 K) to the spatially modulated incommensurate phase (T < 218 K)

  17. Contribution of forbidden orbits in the photoabsorption spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, A.; Dando, P. A.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2003-02-01

    In a previous work [Phys. Rev. A 66, 013410 (2002)], we noted a partial disagreement between quantum R matrix and semiclassical calculations of photoabsorption spectra of molecules in a magnetic field. We show that this disagreement is due to a nonvanishing contribution of processes, which are forbidden according to the usual semiclassical formalism. Formulas to include these processes are obtained by using a refined stationary phase approximation. The resulting higher order in ħ contributions also account for previously unexplained “recurrences without closed orbits.” Quantum and semiclassical photoabsorption spectra for Rydberg atoms and molecules in a magnetic field are calculated and compared to assess the validity of the first-order forbidden orbit contributions.

  18. Contribution of forbidden orbits in the photoabsorption spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Matzkin, A; Monteiro, T S

    2003-01-01

    In a previous work [Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{66}, 0134XX (2002)] we noted a partial disagreement between quantum R-matrix and semiclassical calculations of photoabsorption spectra of molecules in a magnetic field. We show this disagreement is due to a non-vanishing contribution of processes which are forbidden according to the usual semiclassical formalism. Formulas to include these processes are obtained by using a refined stationary phase approximation. The resulting higher order in $\\hbar$ contributions also account for previously unexplained ``recurrences without closed-orbits''. Quantum and semiclassical photoabsorption spectra for Rydberg atoms and molecules in a magnetic field are calculated and compared to assess the validity of the first-order forbidden orbit contributions.

  19. First-Principles Correlated Electron Calculations of Photoabsorption in Small Sodium Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Priya, Pradip Kumar; Shukla, Alok

    2016-01-01

    We present correlated electron calculations of the linear photoabsorption spectra of small neutral closed- and open-shell sodium clusters (Na$_{n}$, n=2-6), as well as closed-shell cation clusters (Na$_{n}$$^{+}$, n=3, 5). We have employed the configuration interaction (CI) methodology at the full CI (FCI) and quadruple CI (QCI) levels to compute the ground, and the low-lying excited states of the clusters. For most clusters, besides the minimum energy structures, we also consider their energetically close isomers. The photoabsorption spectra were computed under the electric-dipole approximation, employing the dipole-matrix elements connecting the ground state with the excited states of each isomer. Our calculations were tested rigorously for convergence with respect to the basis set, as well as with respect to the size of the active orbital space employed in the CI calculations. Excellent quantitative agreement is observed between our results, and experiments, where available.

  20. The closed-orbit and the photoabsorption spectra of lithium atom in varyingmagnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang De-Hua; Ding Shi-Liang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using a simple analytic formula from closed orbit theory, we have calculated the photoabsorption spectra of Li atom in different magnetic fields. Closed orbits in the corresponding classical system have also been obtained for B=5.96T. We demonstrate schematically that the closed orbits disappear gradually with the decrease of the magnitude of the magnetic field. This gives us a good method to control the closed orbits in the corresponding system by changing the magnetic field, and thus changing the peaks in the photoabaorption spectra. By comparing the photoabsorption spectra of Li atom with those of hydrogen case, we find the core-scattered effects play an important role in multi-electron Rydberg atoms.

  1. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggel, J.J. [Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K. [Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschraft, Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  2. High-resolution vacuum-ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of 1-butyne and 2-butyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacovella, U. [Laboratorium für Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Holland, D. M. P. [STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Boyé-Péronne, S.; Gans, B. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, UMR 8214, CNRS and Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Archer, L. E. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Xu, H.; Pratt, S. T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The absolute photoabsorption cross sections of 1- and 2-butyne have been recorded at high resolution by using the vacuum-ultraviolet Fourier-Transform spectrometer at the SOLEIL Synchrotron. Both spectra show more resolved structure than previously observed, especially in the case of 2-butyne. In this work, we assess the potential importance of Rydberg states with higher values of orbital angular momentum, l, than are typically observed in photoabsorption experiments from ground state molecules. We show how the character of the highest occupied molecular orbitals in 1- and 2-butyne suggests the potential importance of transitions to such high-l (l = 3 and 4) Rydberg states. Furthermore, we use theoretical calculations of the partial wave composition of the absorption cross section just above the ionization threshold and the principle of continuity of oscillator strength through an ionization threshold to support this conclusion. The new absolute photoabsorption cross sections are discussed in light of these arguments, and the results are consistent with the expectations. This type of argument should be valuable for assessing the potential importance of different Rydberg series when sufficiently accurate direct quantum chemical calculations are difficult, for example, in the n ≥ 5 manifolds of excited states of larger molecules.

  3. Ab initio surface core-level shifts and surface segregation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the surface core-level energy shifts of the 4d and 5d transition metals by means of local-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Final-state effects are included by treating the core-ionized atom as an impurity located...

  4. Coverage dependence of photoemission core levels of alkali-metal overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sham, T.K.; Shek, M.; Xu, G.; Hrbek, J.

    1989-05-01

    Photoemission from alkali-metal core levels (Li 1s, Na 2s, K 3p, Cs 5p, and 4d) has been studied for different alkali-metal coverages on Ru(001) using synchrotron radiation from the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The alkali atoms interacting directly with the Ru substrate show coverage-dependent binding-energy shifts towards the Fermi level, with the largest shift for Li (1.1 eV) and the smallest ones for K and Cs. At coverages > 1 monolayer (ML), the core-level shift between the second (surface) and the first (interface) layer is observed in all alkali overlayers. At ''thin'' multilayer coverages (/similar to/3 ML), all alkali overlayers exhibit three sets of core-level photoemission bands which are assigned to the interface, the immediate ''bulk,'' and the surface in increasing binding energy. At coverages >5 ML (''thick'' multilayer) all alkali metals exhibit bulklike properties and surface--atom core-level binding-energy shifts are observed in all cases.

  5. Modeling Shallow Core-Level Transitions in the Reflectance Spectra of Gallium-Containing Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoute, Nicholas; Aspnes, David

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of covalent materials is typically approached by band theory. However, shallow core level transitions may be better modeled by an atomic-scale approach. We investigate shallow d-core level reflectance spectra in terms of a local atomic-multiplet theory, a novel application of a theory typically used for higher-energy transitions on more ionic type material systems. We examine specifically structure in reflectance spectra of GaP, GaAs, GaSb, GaSe, and GaAs1-xPx due to transitions that originate from Ga3d core levels and occur in the 20 to 25 eV range. We model these spectra as a Ga^+3 closed-shell ion whose transitions are influenced by perturbations on 3d hole-4p electron final states. These are specifically spin-orbit effects on the hole and electron, and a crystal-field effect on the hole, attributed to surrounding bond charges and positive ligand anions. Empirical radial-strength parameters were obtained by least-squares fitting. General trends with respect to anion electronegativity are consistent with expectations. In addition to the spin-orbit interaction, crystal-field effects play a significant role in breaking the degeneracy of the d levels, and consequently are necessary to understand shallow 3d core level spectra.

  6. Deep layer-resolved core-level shifts in the beryllium surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    Core-level energy shifts for the beryllium surface region are calculated by means of a Green’s function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Both initial- and final-state effects in the core-ionization process are fully accounted for. Anomalously large energy shifts...

  7. Core level excitations — A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedlein, R.; Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Jong, de M.P.; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F.B.; Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.

    2014-01-01

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB2(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp 3-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is rev

  8. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  9. The generalized nuclear contact and its application to the photoabsorption cross-section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Ronen; Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, The Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem (Israel); Bazak, Betzalel [The Hebrew University, The Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem (Israel); Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2016-04-15

    Using the zero-range model, it was demonstrated recently that Levinger's quasi-deuteron model can be utilized to extract the nuclear neutron-proton contact. Going beyond the zero-range approximation and considering the full nuclear contact formalism, we rederive here the quasi-deuteron model for the nuclear photoabsorption cross-section and utilize it to establish relations and constraints for the general contact matrix. We also define and demonstrate the importance of the diagonalized nuclear contacts, which can be also relevant to further applications of the nuclear contacts. (orig.)

  10. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  11. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...... of the hole in this manner. In a second example, a hole is created in an inner shell by the first pulse, and the second probe pulse couples an even more tightly bound state to that hole. The hole decays in this example by Auger electron emission, and the absorption spectroscopy follows the decay of the hole...

  12. Absolute photoabsorption cross section of C{sub 60} in the extreme ultraviolet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, T. [Department of Vacuum UV Photoscience, Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Kou, J. [Department of Vacuum UV Photoscience, Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Haruyama, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kubozono, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Mitsuke, K. [Department of Vacuum UV Photoscience, Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan) and Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: mitsuke@ims.ac.jp

    2005-06-15

    The absolute photoabsorption cross section curve of C{sub 60} has been determined by means of mass spectrometry with the photon source of monochromatized synchrotron radiation of h{nu} = 24.5-150 eV. Description has been made on a high-temperature source of gaseous fullerenes and an efficient time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The cross section was estimated by assuming an approximate expression of the number density of C{sub 60} in the ionization region. The resultant values were 762, 241, and 195 Mb at h{nu} = 24.5, 90, and 110 eV, respectively, with about 10% errors. The cross section curve was then normalized at h{nu} = 25 eV to the absolute photoabsorption cross section reported by Jaensch and Kamke [R. Jaensch, W. Kamke, Mol. Mater. 13 (2000) 143], the most reliable data so far available in the valence excitation region of C{sub 60}. Accordingly, the present cross section data were altered to 407, 144, and 114 Mb at h{nu} = 25, 90, and 110 eV, respectively.

  13. High-resolution photoabsorption cross section measurements of sulfur dioxide between 198 nm and 325 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, Peter; Blackie, Douglas; Blackwell-Whitehead, Richard; Pickering, Juliet; Rufus, James; Thorne, Anne

    Accurate photoabsorption cross section data at a range of temperatures are required for the incorporation of sulfur dioxide into atmospheric photochemical models. In addition to its role in the terrestrial atmosphere, sulfur dioxide is observed in significant concentrations in the atmospheres of Venus and Io. Our laboratory measurement program focuses on the very congested SO2 spectrum in the ultraviolet. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have recorded high-resolution (resolving power (λ/∆λ) = 450,000) absorption spectra in the 198 to 325 nm region over a range of temperatures from 160 K to 295 K. This high resolving power allows resolutions approaching those required to fully resolve the Doppler profile of SO2 in the UV. We have reported absolute photoabsorption cross sections at 295 K [Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16585 (1999); Rufus et al. JGR Planets 108, doi:10.1029/2002JE001931,(2003)]. Further measurements, at 160 K in the 198 to 200 nm region and at 195 K in the 220 to 325 nm region, have been recorded and analyzed. We present an overview of our new measured cross sections at temperatures and pressures comparable to those found in planetary atmospheres. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  14. Effects of vibrational motion on core-level spectra of prototype organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2008-08-21

    A computational approach is presented for prediction and interpretation of core-level spectra of complex molecules. Applications are presented for several isolated organic molecules, sampling a range of chemical bonding and structural motifs. Comparison with gas phase measurements indicate that spectral lineshapes are accurately reproduced both above and below the ionization potential, without resort to ad hoc broadening. Agreement with experiment is significantly improved upon inclusion of vibrations via molecular dynamics sampling. We isolate and characterize spectral features due to particular electronic transitions enabled by vibrations, noting that even zero-point motion is sufficient in some cases.

  15. Core level excitations—A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlein, R., E-mail: friedl@jaist.ac.jp; Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Yamada-Takamura, Y. [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1, Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Jong, M. P. de; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F. B. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J. [The Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-05-14

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp{sup 3}-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is revealed that the lower Si 2p binding energies and the low onset in the NEXAFS spectra as well as the occurrence of satellite features in the core level spectra are attributed to the screening by low-energy valence electrons and interband transitions between π bands, respectively. The analysis of observed Si 2p intensities related to chemically distinct Si atoms indicates the presence of at least one previously unidentified component. The presence of this component suggests that the observation of stress-related stripe domains in scanning tunnelling microscopy images is intrinsically linked to the relaxation of Si atoms away from energetically unfavourable positions.

  16. Exploring the core level shift origin of sulfur and thiolates on Pd(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarezza, Roberto Carlos; Carro, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    Thiol molecules on planar metal surfaces are widely used for building sensing and electronic devices and also as capping agents to protect and to control the size and shape of nanoparticles. In the case of Pd the thiol molecules exhibit a complex behavior because C-S bond scission is possible, resulting in a significant amount of co-adsorbed S. Therefore identification of these species on Pd is a key point for many applications, a task that is usually achieved by XPS. Here we show, from DFT calculations, that the core level shift (CLS) of the S 2p binding energy (BE) of thiol and sulfur on different thiol-Pd(111) surface models strongly depends on the adsorbed or subsurface state of sulfur atoms. Our results reflect the complexity of S 2p BE behavior and contribute to understanding and reanalyzing the experimental data of thiolated Pd surfaces.

  17. Adlayer Core-Level Shifts of Random Metal Overlayers on Transition-Metal Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Kudrnovský, J.; Scheffler, M.

    1997-01-01

    We calculate the difference of the ionization energies of a core electron of a surface alloy, i.e., a B atom in a A(1-x)B(x) overlayer on a fee B(001) substrate, and a core electron of the clean fee B(001) surface using density-functional theory. We analyze the initial-state contributions and the...... the initial-state trends are explained in terms of the change of inter- and intra-atomic screening upon alloying. A possible role of alloying on the chemical reactivity of metal surfaces is discussed....... and the screening effects induced by the core hole, and study the influence of the alloy composition for a number of noble metal-transition metal systems. Our analysis clearly indicates the importance of final-state screening effects for the interpretation of measured core-level shifts. Calculated deviations from...

  18. Core-level electronic properties of nanostructured NiO coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacin, S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.gutierrez@uam.es; Preda, I.; Hernandez-Velez, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, J.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Soriano, L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-10-31

    Nanostructured NiO films with different thicknesses were grown on nanoporous alumina membrane substrates by reactive evaporation of Ni in an oxygen atmosphere. The reactive deposition process was assisted by a low energy oxygen ion-beam in order to increase the NiO input into the pores. Surface morphology and structure of the films were analyzed by SEM and XPS. SEM observations reveal a well adhered film of NiO on the substrate. This film appears to be uniform and presents a rather irregular nanostructured morphology, built of NiO clusters with sizes ranging between 5 and 30 nm. The core-level electronic properties of this nanostructured NiO film result to be similar to those of an ultrathin film about one monolayer thick. This behaviour can be explained by the large surface to volume ratio of both systems.

  19. Photoemission and core-level magnetic circular dichroism studies of diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, A. [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, Universtiy of Tokyo, 1-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan) and Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, SPring-8, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujimori@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Okabayashi, J. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, SPring-8, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Mizokawa, T. [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, Universtiy of Tokyo, 1-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Okamoto, J. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, SPring-8, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Mamiya, K. [Photon Factory, IMSS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Saitoh, Y. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, SPring-8, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Muramatsu, Y. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, SPring-8, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Oshima, M. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ohya, S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2005-06-15

    An overview is given on the photoemission studies of the electronic structure of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS's), in particular of the prototypical ferromagnetic DMS Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As. Configuration-interaction cluster-model analyses of the photoemission data allow us to estimate the p-d exchange coupling constant and hence to predict how to increase the Curie temperature in new materials. Spectra near the Fermi level combined with the transport and optical properties suggest a highly incoherent metallic state for the ferromagnetic metallic phase. It is shown that new insight into the chemically and magnetically inhomogeneous states of DMS's can be gained by the temperature and magnetic field dependence of core-level magnetic circular dichroism signals.

  20. Performance of the TPSS Functional on Predicting Core Level Binding Energies of Main Group Elements Containing Molecules: A Good Choice for Molecules Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo Bellafont, Noèlia; Viñes, Francesc; Illas, Francesc

    2016-01-12

    Here we explored the performance of Hartree-Fock (HF), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functionals in predicting core level 1s binding energies (BEs) and BE shifts (ΔBEs) for a large set of 68 molecules containing a wide variety of functional groups for main group elements B → F and considering up to 185 core levels. A statistical analysis comparing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments shows that BEs estimations are very accurate, TPSS exhibiting the best performance. Considering ΔBEs, the three methods yield very similar and excellent results, with mean absolute deviations of ∼0.25 eV. When considering relativistic effects, BEs deviations drop approaching experimental values. So, the largest mean percentage deviation is of 0.25% only. Linear trends among experimental and estimated values have been found, gaining offsets with respect to ideality. By adding relativistic effects to offsets, HF and TPSS methods underestimate experimental values by solely 0.11 and 0.05 eV, respectively, well within XPS chemical precision. TPSS is posed as an excellent choice for the characterization, by XPS, of molecules on metal solid substrates, given its suitability in describing metal substrates bonds and atomic and/or molecular orbitals.

  1. Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections In The Ultraviolet: N2, SO2, S2, CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Stark, G.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J. C.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    Our research program focuses on the measurement of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement efforts on molecular nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, diatomic sulfur, and carbon dioxide are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed absorption features in 14N2 and its isotopologues as a function of temperature. SO2: Using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published cross sections at room temperature from 198 to 325 nm, at 198 K from 213 to 325 nm, and at 160 K from 199 to 220 nm. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have designed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S2 vapor. Measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution will be complemented by coupled-channel calculations. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 87 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we have recorded preliminary data of the room temperature spectrum in the 87 to 106 nm region.

  2. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections in the Ultraviolet for Astronomical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.

    2008-09-01

    Our research program is dedicated to the measurement and modeling of vacuum ultraviolet and UV molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and diatomic sulfur are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 91 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we are analyzing recent measurements of cross sections between 91 and 106 nm. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet absorption spectrum between 198 and 325 nm. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections, and we are completing work on low-temperature measurements over the same spectral region. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are beginning an effort to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on theoretical calculations and laboratory measurements. Coupled-channel calculations will be complemented by measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution.

  3. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections for Planetary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, G.; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J.

    2010-12-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, diatomic sulfur, and carbon dioxide are in progress. Molecular Nitrogen: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. Sulfur Dioxide: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet SO2 absorption spectrum. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections from 198 to 325 nm and 160 K cross sections from 199 to 220 nm. We have completed work on further low-temperature measurements from 220 to 325 nm. Diatomic Sulfur: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have designed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S2 vapor. Measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution will be complemented by coupled-channel calculations. Carbon Dioxide: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 87 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we have

  4. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections in the Ultraviolet for Planetary Atmospheres Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A. N.; Pickering, J.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Blackie, D.

    2008-09-01

    Our research program is dedicated to the measurement and modeling of vacuum ultraviolet and UV molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and diatomic sulfur are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 91 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we are analyzing recent measurements of cross sections between 91 and 106 nm. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet absorption spectrum between 198 and 325 nm. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections, and we are completing work on low-temperature measurements over the same spectral region. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are beginning an effort to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on theoretical calculations and laboratory measurements. Coupled-channel calculations will be complemented by measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution.

  5. Photoabsorption and desorption studies on thiophene-based polymers following sulphur K-shell excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Rita, J.R.; Arantes, C.; Araujo, G. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Roman, L.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Micaroni, L. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rocco, M.L.M., E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) measurements at the S K-shell excitation energies were performed on three thiophene-based polymer films, following their NEXAFS spectra. {yields} For poly(thiophene) (PT) and poly(3-methylthiophene) (P3MT) it was found that the S 1s {yields} {pi}*, {sigma}* (S-C) excitation produces S{sup +} desorption efficiently, showing the importance of the resonant Auger process for breaking the C-S bond. {yields} In the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) S{sup +} desorption seems to be suppressed due to the orientation of 3-hexyl side-chains on the surface. {yields} Desorption ion yield curves for molecular fragments reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum, indicating that the indirect process is here predominant. - Abstract: Photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) and NEXAFS studies have been performed on thiophene-based polymers at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source following sulphur K-shell photoexcitation. For poly(thiophene) (PT) and poly(3-methylthiophene) (P3MT) it was found that the S 1s {yields} {pi}*, {sigma}{sup *} (S-C) excitation produces S{sup +} desorption efficiently. On the other hand, S{sup 2+} desorption is enhanced at higher energy excitations. These results are interpreted in terms of the Auger-stimulated ion desorption mechanism. For poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) S{sup +} desorption seems to be suppressed, which may be due to the hexyl side-chains. Desorption ion yield curves for molecular fragments reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum, being dominated by the indirect process.

  6. Sulphur Dioxide: High Resolution Ultra-Violet Photoabsorption Cross Section Measurements at 200K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackie, D.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Stark, G.; Pickering, J. C.; Rufus, J.; Thorne, A.; Smith, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    Sulphur Dioxide plays an important role not only within the Earth's atmosphere but also within the complex chemistry of both the upper atmosphere of Venus and the volcanically active Jovian moon Io. The lack of high resolution laboratory studies has prevented the full, accurate determination of absorption cross sections which are the basis for reliable photochemical models. High resolution laboratory measurements of SO2 are essential to resolve the complex SO2 spectrum and yield accurate photoabsorption cross sections. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier Transform Spectrometer new high resolution (λ/δλ ~ 450,000) measurements have been recorded over a range of temperatures and pressures. As part of an on-going series of measurements, current laboratory work focused on photoabsorption cross sections of SO2 at 200K across the wavelength range 220 → 325 nm. These measurements not only compliment previous room temperature measurements obtained at Imperial College in the 190 → 220 nm and 220 → 328 nm ranges (Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16, 585 (1999) and Rufus et al.,( JGR Planets 108, 2, 5 (2003)), but also coincide with the wavelength regions being recorded by the Venus Express mission through the UV-IR spectrometer SPICAV (ESA-SCI(2001)6). Our new measurements will allow accurate analysis of the chemical processes in the upper atmosphere of Venus. These absorption cross section measurements are the first to be acquired at this resolution, temperature and pressure. Results will be presented. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  7. Manifestation of screening effects and A-O covalency in the core level spectra of A site elements in the ABO3 structure of Ca1-xSrxRuO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi Shankar; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of Ca2p and Sr3d core level spectra in Ca1-xSrxRuO3 using photoemission spectroscopy. Core level spectra in this system exhibit multiple features and unusual evolution with the composition and temperatures. Analysis of the core level spectra in conjunction with the band structure results indicates final state effects due to different core hole screening channels. Such screening in the photoemission final states can be attributed to the large A-O covalency in these systems. Changes in the core level spectra with temperature and composition suggest significant modification in A-O (A=Ca/Sr) covalency in Ca-dominated samples, which gradually reduces with the increase in Sr content and becomes insignificant in SrRuO3 . This study thus provides a direct evidence of cation-oxygen covalency and its evolution with temperature, which may be useful in understanding the unusual ground state properties of these materials.

  8. Dealloying of Cu{sub x}Au studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, Parasmani, E-mail: parasmani.rajput@northwestern.edu [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Gupta, Ajay [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Detlefs, Blanka [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Kolb, Dieter M. [Institute for Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Potdar, Satish [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Zegenhagen, Jörg [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The shift in binding energy of Cu and Au lines in CuAu alloys is opposite to expected from the nobility of the elements. ► The magnitude of the chemical shifts of the metal lines in CuAu alloys is strongly influenced by finite size effects and disorder. ► Cu 3s and/or Au 4f cross-sections are not well described by theory (Scofield). The Cu 3s photoabsorption cross-section seems to be strongly overestimated. ► We find/confirm that (CuAu) dealloying proceeds into depth like a spinodal decomposition. -- Abstract: We studied pristine and leached ultra-thin Cu{sub x}Au (x ≈ 4) films by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Au 4f and Cu 3s core levels show a shift in binding energy which is opposite to expected from the nobility of the elements, which is explained by charge transfer involving differently screening s and d valence levels of the elements [W. Eberhardt, S.C. Wu, R. Garrett, D. Sondericker, F. Jona, Phys. Rev. B 31 (1985) 8285]. The magnitude of the chemical shifts of the metal lines is strongly influenced by the finite size and disorder of the films. Angular dependent photoelectron emission allowed to assess the alloy composition as a function of depth larger than 5 nm. The potential controlled dealloying proceeds into depth like a spinodal decomposition with Cu going into solution and the remaining Au accumulating in the surface region. The compositional gradient did not lead to a significant broadening of the metal photoelectron lines suggesting a non-local screening mechanism.

  9. The closed-orbit and the photoabsorption spectra of the Rydberg hydrogen atom between two parallel metallic surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang De-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Using the closed orbit theory,we study the classical motion and calculate the photoabsorption spectra of Rydberg hydrogen atom between two parallel metallic surfaces.The results show that the metallic surfaces have a significant effect on the photoabsorption process.When the distances between the hydrogen atom and the two metallic surfaces are close to a critical value dc,the number of the closed orbits is the greatest.When the distance larger or smaller than dc,the number of the closed orbits decreases and the absorption spectra are shown to exhibit a damping oscillation.This work is an interesting new application of closed-orbit theory and is of potential experimental interest.

  10. Silane photoabsorption spectra near the Si 2p thresholds: the geometry of Si 2p excited SiH4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卫华; 许如清; 李家明

    2003-01-01

    Based on the multiple-scattering self-consistent-field method, we have studied the photoabsorption spectra near the Si 2p thresholds of silane. According to our calculations, the clear assignments of the inner-shell photoabsorption spectra are provided. In comparison with the high-resolution experimental spectra, the geometric structure of the Si 2p-excited SiH4** is recommended to be of a C2v symmetry. More specifically, the Si 2p-excited Si4** have two bond lengths of 2.50 a.u. and another two bond lengths of 2.77 a.u., and the corresponding two bond angles are 104.0° and 112.5° respectively.

  11. Photoabsorption spectra of (Mo/W)@Au12Si60 clusters from time-dependent DFT calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-11-14

    The electronic structure and photoabsorption spectrum of encapsulated (Mo/W)@Au12Si60 clusters are theoretically investigated via static and time-dependent density functional theory. The photoabsorption spectrum is calculated both at the scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupling levels. The encapsulated (Mo/W)@Au12 clusters interact with the Si and thus stabilize the Si60 cage. The spin-orbit coupling strongly affects the optical properties of (Mo/W)@Au12 clusters as it leads to a splitting of spectral lines together with an intensity redistribution, whereas the spectra of (Mo/W)@Au12Si60 clusters show hardly any difference. The nanoscale properties thus can be tuned by choosing the endohedral metal atom, while keeping the optical properties unaffected. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Core-Level Modeling and Frequency Prediction for DSP Applications on FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs provide a promising technology that can improve performance of many high-performance computing and embedded applications. However, unlike software design tools, the relatively immature state of FPGA tools significantly limits productivity and consequently prevents widespread adoption of the technology. For example, the lengthy design-translate-execute (DTE process often must be iterated to meet the application requirements. Previous works have enabled model-based, design-space exploration to reduce DTE iterations but are limited by a lack of accurate model-based prediction of key design parameters, the most important of which is clock frequency. In this paper, we present a core-level modeling and design (CMD methodology that enables modeling of FPGA applications at an abstract level and yet produces accurate predictions of parameters such as clock frequency, resource utilization (i.e., area, and latency. We evaluate CMD’s prediction methods using several high-performance DSP applications on various families of FPGAs and show an average clock-frequency prediction error of 3.6%, with a worst-case error of 20.4%, compared to the best of existing high-level prediction methods, 13.9% average error with 48.2% worst-case error. We also demonstrate how such prediction enables accurate design-space exploration without coding in a hardware-description language (HDL, significantly reducing the total design time.

  13. Can circular dichroism in core-level photoemission provide a spectral fingerprint of adsorbed chiral molecules?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegretti, F [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Polcik, M [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D 14195 Berlin (Germany); Sayago, D I [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D 14195 Berlin (Germany); Demirors, F [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D 14195 Berlin (Germany); O' Brien, S [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Nisbet, G [Centre for Applied Catalysis, Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Lamont, C L A [Centre for Applied Catalysis, Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Woodruff, D P [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    The results of experimental measurements and theoretical simulations of circular dichroism in the angular distribution (CDAD) of photoemission from atomic core levels of each of the enantiomers of a chiral molecule, alanine, adsorbed on Cu(1 1 0) are presented. Measurements in, and out of, substrate mirror planes allow one to distinguish the CDAD due to the chirality of the sample from that due to a chiral experimental geometry. For these studies of oriented chiral molecules, the CDAD is seen not only in photoemission from the molecular chiral centre, but also from other atoms which have chiral geometries as a result of the adsorption. The magnitude of the CDAD due to the sample chirality differs for different adsorption phases of alanine, and for different emission angles and energies, but is generally small compared with CDAD out of the substrate mirror planes which is largely unrelated to the molecular chirality. While similar measurements of other molecules may reveal larger CDAD due to molecular chirality, the fact that the results for one chiral molecule show weak effects means that such CDAD is unlikely to provide a simple and routine general spectral fingerprint of adsorbed molecular chirality.

  14. Theoretical Study of Photoabsorption Spectra near Si 2p Edges of Silanes: to Determine Orientations of Adsorbed Silanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANC Wei-Hua; LI Jia-Ming

    2007-01-01

    In the frame work of quantum defect theory, photoabsorption spectra near Si 2p edges of silane have been studied.When silanes are adsorbed on a physical surface and excited by polarized x-ray photons, relative intensities of the spectra will be different from that of free molecules. Such features can be used to determine orientations of adsorbed silanes based on selection rules.

  15. A laboratory experimental setup for photo-absorption studies using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, A; Saraswati, P; Sunanda, K

    2002-01-01

    The photophysics beamline, which is being installed at the 450 MeV Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Indus-l, is a medium resolution beamline useful for a variety of experiments in the VUV region viz. 500-2000 A. One of the major applications of this beamline is gas-phase photo-absorption studies. An experimental set up to be used for these experiments was designed, developed and tested in our laboratory. The setup consists of a high vacuum absorption cell, 1/4 m monochromator and detection system. For the purpose of testing, xenon and tungsten continuum sources were used and absorption spectra were recorded in the UV region. This setup was used to record the absorption spectrum of a few molecules like acetone, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in order to evaluate the performance of the experimental system which will subsequently be used with the photophysics beamline. Details of the design, fabrication and testing of the absorption cell and experimental procedures are presented in this repor...

  16. Low and room temperature photoabsorption cross sections of NH3 in the UV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F. Z.; Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.; Caldwell, J.

    1998-12-01

    Using synchrotron radiation as a continuum light source, we have measured the absolute absorption cross sections of NH3 with a spectral bandwidth (FWHM) of 0.5 Å. The photoabsorption cross sections of NH3 have been measured from 1750 to 2250 Å under temperature conditions of 295, 195, and 175 K. Significant temperature effects in the absorption threshold region which are mainly due to the presence of hot band absorption are observed. The cross section value at peaks and valleys for the vibrational progressions of the (0,0) to (4,0) bands vary between -80% and +40% as the temperature of NH3 changes from 295 to 175 K. In contrast to this, the changes of cross section values, Pc,T, are found to vary less than 20% for the (v', 0) vibrational progressions with v' >= 5. The measured separations between the doublet features of the (0,0), (1,0), and (2,0) bands are found to decrease as the temperature of NH3 decreases. The shifts of peak positions of Pc,T with respect to the corresponding room temperature absorption peaks show a sudden change at v' = 3 which appears to agree with the trend observed in the homogeneous line widths of the vibrational bands of NH3 ([Vaida et al., 1987]; [Ziegler, 1985]; [Ziegler, 1986]). The unusual behavior of the line widths has been attributed to the A~ state potential surface which has a dissociation barrier.

  17. Photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections for formaldehyde in the vacuum-ultraviolet energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H. K.; Prudente, F. V.; Medina, A.; Marinho, R. R. T.; Homem, M. G. P.; Machado, L. E.; Fujimoto, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    We report a theoretical-experimental investigation on the interaction of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation with formaldehyde (H2CO) in the gas phase. Experimentally, the absolute photoabsorption cross sections and the photoionization quantum yields were measured in the (11.0-21.5) eV range using the double-ion chamber technique. Also, the absolute photoionization and neutral-decay cross sections were derived from these data. In addition, in the same energy region, the dissociation pattern was obtained with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer using the photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique, and the absolute photoionization cross sections were derived for each ionic fragment observed. Moreover, theoretical photoionization cross sections were calculated for the ionization of the four outermost molecular valence orbitals (2b2, 1b1, 5a1, and 1b2) from the threshold to 35 eV. The calculations were performed using the iterative Schwinger variational method to solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the exact static-exchange level of approximation. In general, there is a good agreement between our experimental and previous data reported in the literature. Our theoretical results show a fair qualitative agreement with the experimental data and with previous theoretical results. Above 20 eV, a better quantitative agreement with the experimental data is also observed.

  18. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohmura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC-triethylene glycol (TEG–C60 molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D+ and A- in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  19. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmura, Satoshi, E-mail: s.ohmura.m4@cc.it-hiroshima.ac.jp [Research Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Civil Engineering and Urban Design, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Tsuruta, Kenji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Shimojo, Fuyuki [Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 Japan (Japan); Nakano, Aiichiro [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Computer Science, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, CA90089-024 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-triethylene glycol (TEG)–C{sub 60} molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D{sup +} and A{sup -}) in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  20. First-principles nonequilibrium Green's function approach to transient photoabsorption: Application to atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Perfetto, E; van Leeuwen, R; Stefanucci, G

    2015-01-01

    We put forward a first-principle NonEquilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) approach to calculate the transient photoabsorption spectrum of optically thin samples. The method can deal with pump fields of arbitrary strength, frequency and duration as well as for overlapping and nonoverlapping pump and probe pulses. The electron-electron repulsion is accounted for by the correlation self-energy, and the resulting numerical scheme deals with matrices that scale quadratically with the system size. Two recent experiments, the first on helium and the second on krypton, are addressed. For the first experiment we explain the bending of the Autler-Townes absorption peaks with increasing the pump-probe delay $\\t$, and relate the bending to the thickness and density of the gas. For the second experiment we find that sizable spectral structures of the pump-generated admixture of Kr ions are fingerprints of {\\em dynamical correlation} effects, and hence they cannot be reproduced by time-local self-energy approximations. Remar...

  1. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Leif I., E-mail: lij@ifm.liu.se; Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene.

  2. Introducing many-body physics using atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Dietrich; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Atoms constitute relatively simple many-body systems, making them suitable objects for developing an understanding of basic aspects of many-body physics. Photoabsorption spectroscopy is a prominent method to study the electronic structure of atoms and the inherent many-body interactions. In this article the impact of many-body effects on well-known spectroscopic features such as Rydberg series, Fano resonances, Cooper minima, and giant resonances is studied, and related many-body phenomena in other fields are outlined. To calculate photoabsorption cross sections the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) model is employed. The conceptual clearness of TDCIS in combination with the compactness of atomic systems allows for a pedagogical introduction to many-body phenomena.

  3. UV photoabsorption cross sections of CO, N2, and SO2 for studies of the ISM and planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Rufus, J.; Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Stark, Glenn; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    We report high-resolution laboratory measurements of photoabsorption cross sections of CO, N2, and SO2 in the wavelength range 80 to 320 nm. The motivation is to provide the quantitative data that are needed to analyze observations of absorption by, and to model photochemical processes in, the interstellar medium and a number of planetary atmospheres. Because of the high resolution of the spectrometers used, we can minimize distortion of the spectrum that occurs when instrument widths are greater than the widths of spectral features being measured. In many cases, we can determine oscillator strengths of individual rotational lines - a unique feature of our work.

  4. Uncertainties of the neutronic calculations at core level determined by the KARATE code system and the KIKO3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panka, Istvan; Kereszturi, Andras [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Reactor Analysis Dept.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper the uncertainties of the neutronic calculations at core level - originating from the uncertainties of the basic nuclear data - are presented. The investigations have been made for a VVER-1000 core (Kozloduy-6) defined in the frame of the OECD NEA UAM benchmark. In the first part of the paper, the uncertainties of the effective multiplication factor, the assembly-wise radial power distribution, the axial power distribution and the rod worth are shown. After that the preliminary evaluation of the uncertainties of the neutron kinetic calculations are presented for a rod movement transient at HZP (Hot Zero Power) state, where the uncertainties of the time dependent core and assembly powers and the dynamic reactivity were evaluated. In both cases, we will see that the most important quantities - at core level and at HZP state - have a considerable uncertainty which is originating from the uncertainties of the basic cross section library in these investigations. (orig.)

  5. Core levels, valence band structure and unoccupied states of clean InN surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmerlich, Marcel; Eisenhardt, Anja; Schaefer, Juergen A.; Krischok, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik and Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In this study we used a surface analytics system directly connected to a MBE growth module to study the surface properties of thin InN films. The samples were prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) templates and exhibited a 2 x 2 reconstruction after growth. The prepared samples were analysed by photoelectron spectroscopy as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). For the occupied states, a very good agreement to available theoretical calculations is found. Although, the valence band maximum is located at 1.6 eV, indicating strong downward band bending of {proportional_to}0.9 eV, photoemission is detected up to E{sub F}. This indicates that the Fermi level is pinned above the conduction band minimum, as recently predicted. The spin-orbit splitting of the In 4d level at 17.8 eV could be resolved using He II radiation. Furthermore, from the fine structure of the secondary electron cascade peak we extract the energy of different unoccupied states 0 eV to 9 eV above the vacuum level. These measurements enable us to identify features in the InN EELS spectra, with a loss energy larger than 16 eV, as interband transitions from the In 4d level.

  6. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, N.A.; Fisher, R.F.; Asher, S.E.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1987-07-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is used to study hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Core-level and plasma excitations were examined as a function of hydrogen content. This technique and its interpretation reveals a consistent picture of the electron excitations within this important material. The a-Si:H thin films were fabricated by rf sputtering. Their hydrogen concentrations ranged from 0% to 15%. Hydrogen content was determined by infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inspection of the silicon Auger-KLL peak confirmed the silicon core levels.

  7. A study of the valence shell electronic states of s-triazine by photoabsorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, D.M.P.; Shaw, D.A.; Stener, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    absorption bands due to excitation from the 1e00 or 6e0 orbitals. The interpretation of the experimental spectrum has been guided by transition energies and oscillator strengths, for Rydberg and valence states, calculated with the time-dependent version of density functional theory and with the coupled...

  8. Laboratory measurements and modeling of molecular photoabsorption in the ultraviolet for planetary atmospheres applications: diatomic sulfur and sulfur monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on diatomic sulfur (S _{2}) and sulfur monoxide (SO) are in progress. S _{2}: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S _{2} absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S _{2} from 240 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have constructed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S _{2} vapor at a temperature of 800 K. High-resolution measurements of the absorption spectrum of the strong B - X system of S _{2} were completed using the NIST VUV-FTS at Gaithersburg, Maryland. These measurements are currently being incorporated into a coupled-channel model of the absorption spectrum of S _{2} to quantify the contributions from individual band features and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the strong predissociation signature of the B - X system. A successful coupled channels model can then be used to calculate the B - X absorption spectrum at any temperature. SO: There has been a long-standing need for high-resolution cross sections of sulfur monoxide radicals in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions, where the molecule strongly predissociates, for modeling the atmospheres of Io and Venus, and most recently for understanding sulfur isotope effects in the ancient (pre-O _{2}) atmosphere of Earth. We have produced a measurable column of SO in a continuous-flow DC discharge cell, using SO _{2} as a parent molecule. Photoabsorption measurements were recently recorded on the DESIRS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, taking advantage of the high-resolution VUV-FTS on that beamline. A number of

  9. Density functional study of photoabsorption in metallic clusters using an exchange-correlation potential with correct long-range behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, M.B. [Dpto. de Matematicas y Computacion, Universidad de Burgos, Burgos (Spain); Balbas, L.C. [Dpto. de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain)

    2002-06-17

    The atomic exchange-correlation (xc) potential with the correct -1/r asymptotic behaviour constructed by Parr and Ghosh (Parr R G and Ghosh S K 1995 Phys. Rev. A 51 3564) is adapted here to study, within time density functional theory, the linear response to external fields of (i) neutral and charged sodium clusters, and (ii) doped clusters of the type Na{sub n}Pb (n=4, 6, 16). The resulting photoabsorption cross sections are compared to experimental results, when available, and to results from previous calculations using local and non-local xc functionals. The calculated static polarizabilities and plasmon frequencies are closer to the experimental values than previous results. (author)

  10. A Time-Dependent Approach to High-Resolution Photoabsorption Spectrum of Rydberg Atoms in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Xue-Bin; LIU Hong-Ping; SHI Ting-Yun

    2008-01-01

    A robust time-dependent approach to the high-resolution photoabsorption spectrum of Rydberg atoms in magnetic fields is presented. Traditionally we have to numerically diagonalize a huge matrix to solve the eigen-problem and then to obtain the spectral information. This matrix operation requires high-speed computers with large memories. Alternatively we present a unitary but very easily parallelized time-evolution method in an inexpensive way, which is very accurate and stable even in long-time scale evolution. With this method, we perform the spectral calculation of hydrogen atom in magnetic field, which agrees well with the experimental observation. It can be extended to study the dynamics of Rydberg atoms in more complicated cases such as in combined electric and magnetic fields.

  11. Inner-shell photoabsorption spectra--A theoretical study to determine the geometry structure of the core excited methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on multi-scattering self-consistent field method, the photoabsorption spectra near C 1s threshold of CH4 (near-threshold structure) have been studied with the broken symmetry from Td. The most possible geometry of the core excited CH**4 is determined as the C3v symmetry; the core excited CH**4 molecules have the same bond angle (109.5°) as that of the ground state CH4 and consist of one shorter bond length (1.91 a.u.) and three longer bond lengths (2.04 a.u.). The three longer bond lengths are almost the same as that of the ground state CH4, and the averaged bond length (2.01 a.u.) of core excited CH**4 is shorter than that of the ground state CH4 (2.06 a.u.).

  12. Length Scale Dependence of Periodic Textures for Photoabsorption Enhancement in Ultra-thin Silicon Foils and Thick Wafers

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, K; Liu, G; Nogami, J; Kherani, N P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we simulate a front surface inverted pyramidal grating texture on 2 to 400 micron thick silicon and optimize it to derive maximum photocurrent density from the cell. We identify a one size fits all front grating period of 1000 nm that leads to maximum photo-absorption of normally incident AM1.5g solar spectrum in silicon (configured with a back surface reflector) irrespective of the thickness of the crystalline silicon absorbing layer. With the identification of such universally optimized periodicity for the case of an inverted pyramidal grating texture, a common fabrication process can be designed to manufacture high-efficiency devices on crystalline silicon regardless of wafer thickness. In order to validate the results of the simulation, we fabricated high resolution inverted pyramidal textures on a 400 micron thick silicon wafer with electron beam lithography to compare the reflectance from submicron and wavelength scale periodic textures. The experimental reflectance measurements on textur...

  13. Laboratory Measurements And Modeling Of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections In The Ultraviolet: N2, So2, S2, Co2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A. N.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J.

    2010-10-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, diatomic sulfur, and carbon dioxide are in progress. N2: We measure line f-values and widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces the observed features in all N2 isotopomers as a function of temperature. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet SO2 absorption spectrum. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published cross sections from 198 to 325 nm (295 K) and from 199 to 220 nm (160 K). We have completed work on further low-temperature measurements from 220 to 325 nm. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross sections in the ultraviolet. We have begun to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm. We have designed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S2 vapor. Measurements of S2 absorption features at high resolution will be complemented by coupled-channel calculations of the relevant transitions. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 87 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region. We have recently completed preliminary room temperature measurements in the 87 to 106 nm region. We acknowledge grant support from NASA (NNX08AE78G), STFC-PPARC, and ARC (DP0558962).

  14. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žitnik, M., E-mail: matjaz.zitnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 21, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cao, W. [Research Centre for Molecular Materials, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, M.N. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Simon, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-10-15

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  15. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  16. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Juanjuan [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Université-Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, UMR 8214, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Orsay ISMO, Bâtiment 351, Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Kara, Abdelkader, E-mail: abdelkader.kara@ucf.edu, E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Pasquali, Luca [Dipartimento di Ingegneria “E. Ferrari,” Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy); IOM-CNR, s.s. 14, Km. 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Esaulov, Vladimir A., E-mail: abdelkader.kara@ucf.edu, E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Université-Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, UMR 8214, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Orsay ISMO, Bâtiment 351, Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); IOM-CNR, s.s. 14, Km. 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  18. Influence of multiple scattering of relativistic electrons on the linewidth of Parametric X-ray Radiation produced in the extremely Bragg geometry in the absence of photoabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    The multiple scattering effect on the linewidth of backward Parametric X-ray Radiation (PXR) produced in the extremely Bragg geometry by low energy relativistic electrons traversing a single crystal is discussed. It is shown that there are conditions when the influence of photoabsorption on the linewidth can be neglected, and only the multiple scattering process of relativistic electrons in crystals leads to the PXR lines broadening. Based on obtained theoretical and numerical results for the linewidth broadening caused by multiple scattering of 30 and 50 MeV relativistic electrons in a Si crystal of various thicknesses, an experiment could be performed to help in revealing the scattering effect on the PXR lines in the absence of photoabsorption. This leads to more accurate understanding of the influence of scattering process on the linewidth of backward PXR and helps to better construct a table-top narrow bandwidth X-ray source for both scientific and industrial applications.

  19. Silane photoabsorption spectra mear the Si 2p thresholds:the geometry of Si 2p excited SiH4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卫华; 李家明; 等

    2003-01-01

    Based on the multiple-scattering self-consistent-field method,we have studied the photoabsorption spectra near the Si 2p thresholds of silane,According to our calculations,the clear assignments of the inner-shell photoabsorption spectra are provided.In comparison with the high-resolution experimental spectra,the geometric structure of the Si 2p-excited SiH4 is recommended to be of a C2v symmetry.More specifically,the Si 2p-excited SiH4** have two bond lengths of 2.50 a.u. and another two bond lengths of 2.77 a.u.,and the corresponding two bond angles are 104.0° and 112.5° respectively.

  20. Strong light scattering and broadband (UV to IR) photoabsorption in stretchable 3D hybrid architectures based on Aerographite decorated by ZnO nanocrystallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiginyanu, Ion; Ghimpu, Lidia; Gröttrup, Jorit; Postolache, Vitalie; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Payami, Nader; Feidenhansl, Robert; Schulte, Karl; Adelung, Rainer; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In present work, the nano- and microscale tetrapods from zinc oxide were integrated on the surface of Aerographite material (as backbone) in carbon-metal oxide hybrid hierarchical network via a simple and single step magnetron sputtering process. The fabricated hybrid networks are characterized for morphology, microstructural and optical properties. The cathodoluminescence investigations revealed interesting luminescence features related to carbon impurities and inherent host defects in zinc oxide. Because of the wide bandgap of zinc oxide and its intrinsic defects, the hybrid network absorbs light in the UV and visible regions, however, this broadband photoabsorption behavior extends to the infrared (IR) region due to the dependence of the optical properties of ZnO architectures upon size and shape of constituent nanostructures and their doping by carbon impurities. Such a phenomenon of broadband photoabsorption ranging from UV to IR for zinc oxide based hybrid materials is novel. Additionally, the fabricated network exhibits strong visible light scattering behavior. The developed Aerographite/nanocrystalline ZnO hybrid network materials, equipped with broadband photoabsorption and strong light scattering, are very promising candidates for optoelectronic technologies.

  1. ELECTRONIC-STRUCTURE OF LA2-XSRXNIO4 STUDIED BY PHOTOEMISSION AND INVERSE-PHOTOEMISSION SPECTROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EISAKI, H; UCHIDA, S; MIZOKAWA, T; NAMATAME, H; FUJIMORI, A; VANELP, J; KUIPER, P; SAWATZKY, GA; HOSOYA, S; KATAYAMAYOSHIDA, H

    1992-01-01

    The electronic structure of La2-xSrxNiO4 is studied by use of photoemission spectroscopy, bremsstrahlung-isochromat spectroscopy (BIS), and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. Quantitative analyses are made on the valence-band and Ni 2p core-level photoemission spectra through configuration-interacti

  2. ELECTRONIC-STRUCTURE OF LA2-XSRXNIO4 STUDIED BY PHOTOEMISSION AND INVERSE-PHOTOEMISSION SPECTROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EISAKI, H; UCHIDA, S; MIZOKAWA, T; NAMATAME, H; FUJIMORI, A; VANELP, J; KUIPER, P; SAWATZKY, GA; HOSOYA, S; KATAYAMAYOSHIDA, H

    1992-01-01

    The electronic structure of La2-xSrxNiO4 is studied by use of photoemission spectroscopy, bremsstrahlung-isochromat spectroscopy (BIS), and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. Quantitative analyses are made on the valence-band and Ni 2p core-level photoemission spectra through

  3. Simulations of light induced processes in water based on ab initio path integrals molecular dynamics. I. Photoabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Ondřej; Ončák, Milan; Slavíček, Petr

    2011-10-01

    We have performed large-scale simulations of UV absorption spectra of water clusters (monomer to octamer) using a combination of ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics with reflection principle. The aim of the present work is four-fold: (1) To explore the transition from isolated molecules to bulk water from the perspective of UV photoabsorption. (2) To investigate quantum nuclear and thermal effects on the shape of the water UV spectra. (3) To make an assessment of the density functional theory functionals to be used for water excited states. (4) To check the applicability of the QM/MM schemes for a description of the UV absorption. Within the path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD)/reflection principle approach both the thermal and quantum vibrational effects including anharmonicities are accounted for. We demonstrate that shape of the spectra is primarily controlled by the nuclear quantum effects. The excited states and transition characteristics of the water clusters were calculated with the time-dependent density functional theory and equation-of-motion coupled clusters singles and doubles methods. Based on our benchmark calculations considering the whole UV spectrum we argue that the BHandHLYP method performs best among the 6 functionals tested (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, BNL, CAM-B3LYP, LC-ωPBE, and M06HF). We observe a gradual blueshift of the maximum of the first absorption peak with the increasing cluster size. The UV absorption spectrum for the finite size clusters (i.e., the peak centers, peak widths, and photoabsorption cross section) essentially converges into the corresponding bulk water spectrum. The effect of distant molecules accounted for within the polarizable continuum model is shown to be almost negligible. Using the natural transition orbitals we demonstrate that the first absorption band is formed by localized excitations while the second band includes delocalized excited states. Consequently, the QM/MM electrostatic embedding scheme can only be

  4. Ab initio description of photoabsorption and electron transfer in a doubly-linked porphyrin-fullerene dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramariuc, Oana; Hukka, Terttu I; Rantala, Tapio T; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2009-06-01

    Structure, photoabsorption and excited states of two representative conformations obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a doubly-linked porphyrin-fullerene dyad DHD6ee are studied by using both DFT and wavefunction based methods. Charge transfer from the donor (porphyrin) to the acceptor (fullerene) and the relaxation of the excited state are of special interest. The results obtained with LDA, GGA, and hybrid functionals (SVWN, PBE, and B3LYP, respectively) are analyzed with emphasis on the performance of used functionals as well as from the point of view of their comparison with wavefunction based methods (CCS, CIS(D), and CC2). Characteristics of the MD structures are retained in DFT optimization. The relative orientation of porphyrin and fullerene is significantly influencing the MO energies, the charge transfer (CT) in the ground state of the dyad and the excitation of ground state CT complex (g-CTC). At the same time, the excitation to the locally excited state of porphyrin is only little influenced by the orientation or cc distance. TD-DFT underestimates the excitation energy of the CT state, however for some cases (with relatively short donor-acceptor separations), the use of a hybrid functional like B3LYP alleviates the problem. Wavefunction based methods and CC2 in particular appear to overestimate the CT excitation energies but the inclusion of proper solvation models can significantly improve the results.

  5. Photoabsorption cross sections of organic molecules in the VUV at low temperatures : application to Titan's atmosphere observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Jolly, A.; Schwell, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    To build photochemical models of planetary atmospheres and to interpret observations the photoabsorption cross sections of molecules are needed A critical review of the absorption coefficient available in the vacuum ultraviolet domain VUV 110-210 nm for organic molecules present or expected to be present in Titan s atmosphere showed a critical lack of data In particular many absorption cross sections have never been measured at low temperature The lack is even greater for molecules not commercially available since even at room temperature absolute absorption coefficients are not available or erroneous A new specific absorption cell has thus been designed to o measure the absorption cross sections in the VUV range at low temperature characteristic of Titan s atmosphere The first molecules that we have studied are HCN HC3N and C4H2 We used the Berlin synchrotron facility BESSY to obtained those new absorption coefficients including the first spectra in the 110 to 210 nm range at the low temperature representative of Titan s atmosphere The effect of the temperature on the spectra will be discussed A application to the determination of photodissociation rate of those molecules will be showed And an application to the interpretation of VUV observations of Titan s atmosphere obtained by the UV spectrometer UVIS on board the CASSINI spacecraft will be presented

  6. Time-resolved photoabsorption in finite systems: A first-principles NEGF approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, E.; Uimonen, A.-M.; van Leeuwen, R.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a first-principles NonEquilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) approach to time-resolved photoabsortion spectroscopy in atomic and nanoscale systems. The method is used to highlight a recently discovered dynamical correlation effect in the spectrum of a Krypton gas subject to a strong ionizing pump pulse. We propose a minimal model that captures the effect, and study the performance of time-local approximations versus time-nonlocal ones. In particular we implement the time-local Hartree-Fock and Markovian second Born (2B) approximation as well as the exact adiabatic approximation within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory framework. For the time-nonlocal approximation we instead use the 2B one. We provide enough convincing evidence for the fact that a proper description of the spectrum of an evolving admixture of ionizing atoms requires the simultaneous occurrence of correlation and memory effects.

  7. Core level photoemission spectroscopy and chemical bonding in Sr2Ta2O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-01-01

    structural and XPS data for other Sr- and Ta-containing oxide compounds. The new data point for Sr2Ta2O7 is consistent with the previously derived relationship for a set of Sr-bearing oxides. The binding energy difference Delta(O-Sr) was found to decrease with increasing bond distance L(Sr-O)....

  8. Transmission measurement of photo-absorption cross section of aluminum in soft X-ray region of 50 to 250 eV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Kai; CUI Ming-Qi; ZHENG Lei

    2008-01-01

    The photo-absorption cross section of aluminum was obtained from the ratio of transmission of aluminum thin-films with different area densities from 50 to 250 eV with synchrotron radiation monochromatic beam.Two samples with different area densities were used to minimize the uncertainty caused by the sample surface oxidation and systematic factors of the X-ray source,beamline,and detector.The experimental results are in good agreement with the published data and FEFF program calculations in general.

  9. Spin-Orbit Effects in Spin-Resolved L2,3 Core Level Photoemission of 3d Ferromagnetic Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; Yu, S W; Butterfield, M; Tobin, J G

    2007-10-02

    We present spin-resolved 2p core level photoemission for the 3d transition metal films of Fe and Co grown on Cu(100). We observe clear spin asymmetry in the main 2p core level photoemission peaks of Fe and Co films consistent with trends in the bulk magnetic moments. The spin polarization can be strongly enhanced, by variation of the experimental geometry, when the photoemission is undertaken with circularly polarized light, indicating that spin-orbit interaction can have a profound in spin polarized photoemission. Further spin polarized photoemission studies using variable circularly polarized light at high photon energies, high flux are indicated, underscoring the value of synchrotron measurements at facilities with increased beam stability.

  10. Ligand field splittings in core level transitions for transition metal (TM) oxides: Tanabe-Sugano diagrams and (TM) dangling bonds in vacated O-atom defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovsky, Gerry; Wu, Kun; Pappas, Brian; Whitten, Jerry

    2013-04-01

    Defect states in the forbidden band-gap below the conduction band edge are active as electron traps in nano-grain high-) transition metal (TM) oxides with thickness >0.3 nm, e.g., ZrO2 and HfO2. These oxides have received considerable attention as gate-dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, and more recently are emerging as candidates for charge storage and memory devices. To provide a theoretical basis for device functionality, ab-initio many-electron theory is combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study O K edge and TM core level transitions. These studies identify ligand field splittings (ΔLF) for defect state features,. When compared with those obtained from O-atom and TM-atom core spectroscopic transitions, this provides direct information about defect state sun-nm bonding arrangements. comparisons are made for (i) elemental TiO2 and Ti2O3 with different formal ionic charges, Ti4+ and Ti3+ and for (ii) Magneli Phase alloys, TinO2n-1, n is an integer 9>=n>3, and (TiO2)x(HfO2)1-x alloys. The alloys display multi-valent behavior from (i) different ionic-charge states, (ii} local bond-strain, and (iii) metallic hopping transport. The intrinsic bonding defects in TM oxides are identified as pairs of singly occupied dangling bonds. For 6-fold coordinated Ti-oxides defect excited states in 2nd derivative O K pre-edge spectra are essentially the same as single Ti-atom d2 transitions in Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams. O-vacated site defects in 8-fold coordinated ZrO2 and HfO2 are described by d8 T-S diagrams. T-S defect state ordering and splittings are functions of the coordination and symmetry of vacated site bordering TM atoms. ΔLF values from the analysis of T-S diagrams indicate medium range order (MRO) extending to 3rd and 4th nearest-neighbor (NN) TM-atoms. Values are different for 6-fold Ti, and 8-fold ZrO2 and HfO2, and scale inversely with differences in respective formal ionic radii. O-vacated site bonding

  11. Photoabsorption Spectra of (SiO2)n (n≤5) Clusters on the Basis of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dan-Dan; ZHANG Hong

    2010-01-01

    @@ The photoabsorption spectra of (SiO2)n (n= 2-5) clusters[including isomers (D3h,D2d) structures of (SiO2)3 and (C2v,D2h,D4h ) structures of (SiO2)4]are calculated by using time-dependent density-function theory.The equilibrium geometries,the binding energy,the gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals and vertical ionization potential for corresponding structures are computed using several methods with different types of the basis functions.It is found that the polarizability functions are necessary for the basis functions when optimize the structures of silicon oxide clusters.For different geometries of various clusters and the related isomers,their spectra are very different.Meanwhile,the comparison between using local-density generalized-gradient approximations for exchange-correlation potentials shows that both the calculated spectra present the same spectral feature.We suggest that the calculated photoabsorption spectra could be taken as a tool to elucidate the isomers and clusters structure.

  12. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Berry, G.; Rockett, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  13. Characterization of Ge-nanocrystal films with photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bostedt, C; Willey, T M; Nelson, A J; Franco, N; Möller, T; Terminello, L J

    2003-01-01

    The Ge 3d core-levels of germanium nanocrystal films have been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The experiments indicate bulk-like coordinated atoms in the nanocrystals and suggest structured disorder on the nanoparticle surface. The results underline the importance of the surface on the overall electronic structure of this class of nanostructured materials.

  14. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  15. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  16. Circular Dichroism in the 3d and 4d Core Photoabsorption for Ferromagnetic Ce Compounds —Interplay of Hybridization, Spin Orbit Interaction and Crystal Field—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Takeo; Imada, Shin

    1990-04-01

    The Ce 3d- and 4d-core photoabsorption spectra (3d XAS and 4d XAS) of ferromagnetic mixed valent Ce compounds are calculated on the basis of the impurity Anderson model. The model takes into account the Coulomb interaction producing multiplet structures, the spin-orbit interaction, the crystal field effect and the molecular field acting on the 4f spin. The calculation shows a strong circular dichroism even for the Ce magnetic moment of ˜0.5 μB. The dichroism is furthermore shown to be a powerful method to measure the spin and orbital contributions to the 4f moment. On the basis of the calculation, the 4f magnetic state of the ferromagnet CeRh3B2 is discussed.

  17. Measurement of the total photoabsorption cross section on a proton in the energy range 600-1500 MeV at the GRAAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalini, O. [Universita di Roma II Tor Vergata (Italy); Bellini, V. [Universita di Catania (Italy); Bocquet, J. P.; Calvat, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, IN2P3 (France); D' Angelo, A. [Universita di Roma II Tor Vergata (Italy); Didelez, J.-P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, IN2P3 (France); Di Salvo, R.; Fantini, A. [Universita di Roma II Tor Vergata (Italy); Ghio, F.; Girolami, B. [INFN Sezione di Roma I (Italy); Guidal, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, IN2P3 (France); Giusa, A. [Universita di Catania (Italy); Hourany, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, IN2P3 (France); Ignatov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Kunne, R. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, IN2P3 (France); Lapik, A. M.; Sandri, P. Levi [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Lleres, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, IN2P3 (France); Moricciani, D. [Universita di Roma II Tor Vergata (Italy); Mushkarenkov, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); and others

    2008-01-15

    The total photoabsorption cross section on a free proton was measured at the GRAAL facility in the energy range E{sub {gamma}} = 600-1500 MeV. The large-aperture LAGRAN{gamma}E detector and a liquid hydrogen target were used in the experiment performed with a back-scattered Compton gamma beam. To improve the accuracy, two alternative methods were employed. First, a subtraction method of using empty-target measurements allowed the cross section {sigma}{sub tot} to be evaluated directly because of a low level of the electromagnetic background. Second, an algorithm for evaluating {sigma}{sub tot} on the basis of summing the dominating partial cross sections was developed. Experimental results obtained for {sigma}{sub tot} by the two methods are compared with existing data.

  18. Photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections of NH3, PH3, H2S, C2H2, and C2H4 in the VUV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, T. J.; Chien, T. S.; Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation as a continuum light source, the photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections of NH3, PH3, H2S, C2H2, and C2H4 have been measured from their respective ionization thresholds to 1060 A. The vibrational constants associated with the nu(2) totally symmetric, out-of-plane bending vibration of the ground electronic state of PH3(+) have been obtained. The cross sections and quantum yields for producing neutral products through photoexcitation of these molecules in the given spectral regions have also been determined. In the present work, autoionization processes were found to be less important than dissociation and predissociation processes in NH3, PH3, and C2H4. Several experimental techniques have been employed in order to examine the various possible systematic errors critically.

  19. K-shell photoabsorption and photoionisation of trace elements. I. Isoelectronic sequences with electron number 3 ≤N ≤ 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Mendoza, C.; Bautista, M. A.; Witthoeft, M. C.; Kallman, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. With the recent launching of the Hitomi X-ray space observatory, K lines and edges of chemical elements with low cosmic abundances, namely F, Na, P, Cl, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn, can be resolved and used to determine important properties of supernova remnants, galaxy clusters and accreting black holes and neutron stars. Aims: The second stage of the present ongoing project involves the computation of the accurate photoabsorption and photoionisation cross sections required to interpret the X-ray spectra of such trace elements. Methods: Depending on target complexity and computer tractability, ground-state cross sections are computed either with the close-coupling Breit-Pauli R-matrix method or with the autostructure atomic structure code in the isolated-resonance approximation. The intermediate-coupling scheme is used whenever possible. In order to determine a realistic K-edge behaviour for each species, both radiative and Auger dampings are taken into account, the latter being included in the R-matrix formalism by means of an optical potential. Results: Photoabsorption and total and partial photoionisation cross sections are reported for isoelectronic sequences with electron numbers 3 ≤ N ≤ 11. The Na sequence (N = 11) is used to estimate the contributions from configurations with a 2s hole (i.e. [2s]μ) and those containing 3d orbitals, which will be crucial when considering sequences with N > 11. Conclusions: It is found that the [2s]μ configurations must be included in the target representations of species with N ≥ 11 as they contribute significantly to the monotonic background of the cross section between the L and K edges. Configurations with 3d orbitals are important in rendering an accurate L edge, but they can be practically neglected in the K-edge region.

  20. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Denlinger, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)][Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  1. Contribution of multielectron excitation to F 1s photoabsorption process in CaF{sub 2} studied by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oura, M. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)]. E-mail: oura@spring8.or.jp; Taguchi, M. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Mukoyama, T. [Kansai Gaidai University, 16-1 Nakamiya-Higashino-cho, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1001 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Shin, S. [RIKEN/SPring-8, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); ISSP/University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2005-06-15

    The photoexcited F K{alpha} X-ray intensity's evolution was measured for CaF{sub 2} with fine energy-step from the [1s2p] double excitation threshold to the saturation region, where square brackets indicate hole states. The observed evolution was directly compared with the X-ray absorption spectrum, and the contribution of multielectron excitation to the absorption spectrum was successfully resolved. The F-K fluorescence XANES spectra were calculated based on the coherent second-order optical processes for comparison.

  2. Electron band bending and surface sensitivity: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of polar GaN surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoš, I.; Romanyuk, O.; Paskova, T.; Jiříček, P.

    2017-10-01

    The role of electron band bending and surface sensitivity in determining the core level binding energies by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is investigated. A dominating contribution of surface atomic layers to photoemission intensity is confirmed for normal photoemission. The energy of the photoelectron core level peak does not deviate from core level peak energies of electrons photoemitted from the surface atomic layers of the crystal. The higher surface sensitivity regime, achieved e.g. at off-normal photoelectron detection angle, can be used to study the surface potential barrier in just a few topmost atomic layers. In addition, it is demonstrated that core level binding energy measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reflect the electron attenuation anisotropy. In particular, core level binding energy changes with emission angle and correlates with the forward focusing directions in a crystal. This effect is demonstrated by measuring the polar angle dependence of Ga 3d core levels on clean GaN(0001) and GaN(000 1 bar) surfaces with a higher and a lower band bending, respectively. The effect is explained by variation of emission depth in a crystal for normal and off-normal photoelectron emission angles.

  3. 4d → 4f resonance in photoabsorption of cerium ion Ce3+ and endohedral cerium in fullerene complex {\\rm{Ce}}@{{{\\rm{C}}}_{82}}^{+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrange-Kashenock, G.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical investigation of the single-photoionization spectra in the 4d-resonance region (120-150 eV) for the ionic cerium Ce3+ and cerium in the endohedral complex {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ (in practice, {{{Ce}}}3+@{{{{C}}}82}2-) is presented. The fullerene cage is modeled by ab initio spherical jellium shell with an accurate account for the real distribution of carbon electron density. The oscillator strengths are calculated within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) approach for phototransitions from the outermost shells of the ion Ce3+ with and without the influence of the potential generated by a fullerene cage. It is shown that the integrated oscillator strengths have the main contribution from the Ce3+ 4d → 4f (ten possible from the phototransitions {}2F{7/2,5/2}\\to {}2D{3/2,5/2},{}2F{5/2,7/2},{}2G{5/2,7/2}) resonance photoexcitations. The corresponding precise MCDF values for the oscillator strengths and the transition energies are presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the resonance {f}4d\\to 4f oscillator strengths are slightly affected by the presence of the cage potential, despite the fact that the spectral levels structure is changed when the effect of this potential is included. The Auger 4d -1 decay from the cerium free ion Ce3+ and the encapsulated endohedral ion Ce3+@ are considered within the two-step model and the corresponding Lorentzian profiles are presented. This model clearly reveals the correspondence of the complex resonance profile in the Ce3+ photoabsorption to the fine structure of ion energy levels. The smoothing of the resonance profile in the photoabsorption of the endohedral system {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ compared with the free ion Ce3+ is attributed to increasing the linewidths of the Auger transitions. This increase is estimated from the relevant experiment (Müller et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 133001) to be strong; as at least three times the value for an isolated ion. The presence of the confining fullerene

  4. Simultaneously promoting charge separation and photoabsorption of BiOX (X = Cl, Br) for efficient visible-light photocatalysis and photosensitization by compositing low-cost biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Huang, Hongwei; Yu, Shixin; Tian, Na; Dong, Fan; Du, Xin; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-11-01

    Exploration of novel and efficient composite photocatalysts is of great significance for advancing the practical application of photocatalysis. BiOX (X = Cl, Br) is a kind of promising photocatalysts, but the charge separation efficiency and photoabsorption need to be ameliorated. In this work, we first employ a low-cost and easily accessable carbon material biochar to modify BiOX (X = Cl, Br) and develop biochar/BiOX (X = Cl, Br) composite photocatalysts via a facile in-situ deposition method. The as-prepared composites are detailedly characterized by SEM, SEM-mapping, TEM, XRD and XPS, and DRS result demonstrates that the visible-light absorption of BiOX (X = Cl, Br) catalysts can be exceedingly enhanced by biochar. The biochar/BiOX (X = Cl, Br) composites are found to unfold remarkably enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity toward degradation of MO and photocurrent generation. The strengthened photocatalytic performance mainly stems from the profoundly improved charge separation and delivery efficiency, as evidenced by the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), photoluminescence (PL), and time-resolved PL decay spectra. Additionally, the biochar exerts importance in enhancing the two different types of photochemical reactions of BiOBr and BiOCl, in which the photocatalytic mechanisms are found to be photocatalysis and photosensitization process, respectively. The present work may open up a new avenue for framing economic and efficient photocatalytic materials and new composite materials for photoelectric application.

  5. HC3N and C4H2 low temperature VUV photoabsorption cross sections: application to their observation in Titan's atmosphere by UVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilan, Y.; Ferradaz, T.; Fray, N.; Jolly, A.; Schwell, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    To interpret observations of Titan's high atmosphere obtained by the UV spectrometer UVIS on board the CASSINI spacecraft, the photoabsorption cross sections of molecules are needed. A critical review of the absorption coefficient available in the vacuum ultraviolet domain (VUV: 110-210 nm) for organic molecules present or expected to be present in Titan's atmosphere, showed a critical lack of data. In particular, many absorption cross sections have never been measured at low temperature. The lack is even greater for molecules not commercially available since, even at room temperature, absolute absorption coefficients are not available or erroneous. A new specific absorption cell has thus been designed to measure the absorption cross sections in the VUV range at low temperature characteristic of Titan's atmosphere. We have measured HC3N and C4H2 spectra using the Berlin synchrotron facility (BESSY) to obtain new absorption coefficients in the 110 to 190 nm range, at the low temperature representative of Titan's atmosphere. The effect of the temperature on the spectra will be discussed. And, an application to the interpretation of VUV observations of Titan's atmosphere obtained by UVIS will be presented.

  6. Core-level binding-energy shifts due to end effects in polymers: A Hartree-Fock Green's-function study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, M.; Ladik, J.

    1985-10-01

    Hartree-Fock Green's-function studies of end effects on the core-level structure of metallic and insulating quasi-one-dimensional model polymers reveal additional core peaks outside the bulk bands. In the metallic case, shifts to both lower (~-150 meV) and higher (~+50 meV) binding energies are observed, whereas in the insulating case, split-off peaks occur only at the lower-binding-energy side (~-150 meV). It is shown that a positive or negative net valence population alone does not determine the direction of the shift. The binding-energy changes are determined by a detailed balance between the energy loss due to a decrease in the electron-nuclear attraction and the energy gain due to a decrease in the electron-electron repulsion experienced by the core electrons of the end atoms. This can probably also explain why for some metal surfaces, shifts towards lower, and for others, shifts towards higher, binding energies are found. In the valence region of the investigated lithium chains, the ends do not produce localized end states.

  7. The Evolution of Ga and As Core Levels in the Formation of Fe/GaAs(001): A High Resolution Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J W; Neal, J R; Shen, T H; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Waddill, G D; Matthew, J D; Greig, D; Hopkinson, M

    2006-12-08

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 {angstrom} results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two new As environments of metallic character; one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in-situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three new environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface-resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical make-up of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  8. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001):A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Shen, Tiehan; Morton, Simon; Tobin, James; Waddill, George Dan; Matthew, Jim; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-14

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 Angstrom results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  11. Total photoabsorption cross section on nuclei measured in energy range 0.5-2.6 GeV; Misura della sezione d`urto di fotoassorbimento tra 0.5 e 2.6 GeV su nuclei ed analisi dei dati

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirazita, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1998-03-01

    The total photoabsorption cross section on several nuclei has been measured in the energy range 0.5 - 2.6 GeV. Nuclear data show a significant reduction of the absorption strength with respect to the free nucleon case suggesting a shadowing effect at low energies.

  12. Electronic spectroscopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is

  13. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  14. High temperature thermal stability of the HfO{sub 2}/Ge (100) interface as a function of surface preparation studied by synchrotron radiation core level photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chellappan, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rajesh.chellappan2@mail.dcu.ie [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Gajula, Durga Rao; McNeill, David [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Hughes, Greg [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-02-15

    High resolution soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SXPS) have been used to study the high temperature thermal stability of ultra-thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO{sub 2} layers (∼1 nm) on sulphur passivated and hydrofluoric acid (HF) treated germanium surfaces. The interfacial oxides which are detected for both surface preparations following HfO{sub 2} deposition can be effectively removed by annealing upto 700 °C without any evidence of chemical interaction at the HfO{sub 2}/Ge interface. The estimated valence and conduction band offsets for the HfO{sub 2}/Ge abrupt interface indicated that effective barriers exist to inhibit carrier injection.

  15. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  17. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction of Epitaxial Growth SiC on Si(100) Using C60 and Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-Fang; LIU Jin-Feng; XU Peng-Shou; PAN Hai-Bin

    2007-01-01

    The formation of silicon carbide upon deposition of C60 and Si on Si(100) surface at 850 ℃ is studied via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The C 1s, O 1s and Si 2p core-level spectra and the RHEED patterns indicate the formation of 3C-SiC.

  18. Electron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegbahn, Kai

    Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery of X radiation in 1895 in Wörzburg resulted in an immediate break-through not only in physics but also in Society, the latter mainly because of its sensational radiological applications. Within a short time it furthermore indirectly led to the discovery of radioactivity by Henri Becquerel. The discovery of X radiation opened the gate to modern atomic physics, and radioactivity to nuclear physics. Later on, the discovery of X-ray diffraction by Laue, Friedrich and Knipping in 1912 initiated the field of X-ray spectroscopy with its fundamental contributions to atomic and crystal structures. Secondary electrons were early observed in the scattered radiation when X-rays were hitting a sample. The development of the corresponding electron spectroscopy had to wait a much longer time for its maturity. A survey of electron spectroscopy is presented.

  19. Electronic states of neutral and ionized tetrahydrofuran studied by VUV spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, A. [Synchrotron Soleil, DISCO beamline, L' Orme des Merisiers, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Giuliani, A. [Cepia, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), 44 - Nantes (France); Limiao-Vieira, P. [Lisboa Univ. Nova, Lab. de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Dept. de Fysica, Caparica (Portugal); Limao-Vieira, P.; Mason, N. [Open Univ., Centre of Molecular and Optical Sciences, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Milton Keynes, MK (United Kingdom); Duflot, D. [Lille Univ. des Sciences et Technologies, Lab. de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules (PhLAM), UMR CNRS 8523, Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches Lasers et Applications, CERLA, FR CNRS 2416, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Milosavljevic, A.R.; Marinkovic, B.P. [Laboratory for atomic collision processes, Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia (Yugoslavia); Hoffmann, S.V. [Aarhus Univ., Institute for Storage Ring Facilities (Denmark); Delwiche, J.; Hubin-Franskin, M.J. [Liege Univ., Laboratoire de Spectroscopie d' Electrons Diffuses, Institut de Chimie (Belgium)

    2009-01-15

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 5.8 - 10.6 eV with absolute cross-section measurements derived. In addition, an electron energy loss spectrum was recorded at 100 eV and 10 degrees over the 5 - 11.4 eV range. The He(I) photoelectron spectrum was also collected to quantify ionisation energies in the 9 - 16.1 eV spectral region. These experiments are supported by the first high-level ab initio calculations performed on the excited states of the neutral molecule and on the ground state of the positive ion. The excellent agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to solve several discrepancies concerning the electronic state spectroscopy of THF. The present work reconsiders the question of the lowest energy conformers of the molecule and its population distribution at room temperature. (authors)

  20. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  1. Modern Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the basic ideas of modern spectroscopy. Both the angular momenta and wave-nature approaches to the determination of energy level patterns for atomic and molecular systems are discussed. The interpretation of spectra, based on atomic and molecular models, is considered. (LC)

  2. Astronomical Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopy is one of the most important tools that an astronomer has for studying the universe. This chapter begins by discussing the basics, including the different types of optical spectrographs, with extension to the ultraviolet and the near-infrared. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of how spectrographs are used, and the trade-offs involved in designing an observational experiment. It then covers observing and reduction techniques, noting that some of the standard practices of flat-fielding often actually degrade the quality of the data rather than improve it. Although the focus is on point sources, spatially resolved spectroscopy of extended sources is also briefly discussed. Discussion of differential extinction, the impact of crowding, multi-object techniques, optimal extractions, flat-fielding considerations, and determining radial velocities and velocity dispersions provide the spectroscopist with the fundamentals needed to obtain the best data. Finally the chapter combines the previous materi...

  3. Grain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  4. Soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of selected neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' dell' Universita, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Giuliano, Barbara M. [Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Plekan, Oksana [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Feyer, Vitaliy [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Electronic Properties (PGI-6), Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse, 52428 Juelich (Germany); Richter, Robert [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Prince, Kevin C., E-mail: kevin.prince@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurotransmitter molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoelectron spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak hydrogen bonding. -- Abstract: The valence molecular orbitals and core levels of tyramine, tryptamine and tryptophol in the gas phase have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and theoretical methods. The energies of the outer valence region spectrum are found to be in agreement with previously reported He I spectra, while new data on the inner valence molecular orbitals are reported. The structures in the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen core level spectra of these molecules have been identified and assigned. These compounds are characterised by conformers with hydrogen bonding in which the {pi} systems of the phenol and indole groups act as hydrogen acceptors, but a spectroscopic signature of this hydrogen bond was not observed. This is in contrast with our previous spectra of amino acids, where conformers with specific hydrogen bonding showed strong effects in core level spectra. We attribute the difference to the weaker strength of the {pi}-hydrogen bonding.

  5. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  6. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  7. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  8. Correlation between Charge State of Insulating NaCl Surfaces and Ionic Mobility Induced by Water Adsorption: A Combined Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Force Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdaguer, Albert; Jose Segura, Juan; Fraxedas, Jordi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-03

    In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) and scanning force microscopy were used to characterize the surface discharge induced by water layers grown on (001) surfaces of sodium chloride single crystals. The APPES studies show that both kinetic energy (KE) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Na 2s and Cl 2p core level peaks, monitored as a function of relative humidity (RH), mimic surface conductivity curves measured using scanning force microscopy. The KE position and FWHM of the core level peaks therefore are directly related to the solvation and diffusion of ions at the NaCl(100) surface upon adsorption of water.

  9. The electronic states of 1,2,3-triazole studied by vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and a comparison with ab initio configuration interaction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Michael H.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Jones, Nykola C.;

    2011-01-01

    -cluster (singles, doubles, and triples) and complete active space self-consistent field procedures agree well with experimental values. Variations in bond lengths with the electronic state are discussed. The lowest energy UV band (∼5.5–6.5 eV) is assigned to three electronically excited states and demonstrates...

  10. The electronic states of 1,2,4-triazoles: A study of 1H- and1-methyl-1,2,4-triazole by vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and a comparison with ab initio configuration interaction computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Michael H.; Camp, Philip J.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning;

    2012-01-01

    ,2,4-triazoles, the first ionization energy bands show complex vibrational structure on the low-energy edges of otherwise unstructured bands. Detailed analysis of these bands confirms the presence of three ionized states. The 6–7 eV VUV spectral region shows an unusual absorption plateau, which is interpreted...

  11. Optical constants of magnetron-sputtered boron carbide thin films from photoabsorption data in the range 30 to 770 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufli, Regina; Aquila, Andrew L; Salmassi, Farhad; Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Gullikson, Eric M

    2008-09-01

    This work discusses the experimental determination of the optical constants (refractive index) of DC-magnetron-sputtered boron carbide films in the 30-770 eV photon energy range. Transmittance measurements of three boron carbide films with thicknesses of 54.2, 79.0, and 112.5 nm were performed for this purpose. These are believed to be the first published experimental data for the refractive index of boron carbide films in the photon energy range above 160 eV and for the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure regions around the boron K (188 eV), carbon K (284.2 eV), and oxygen K (543.1 eV) absorption edges. The density, composition, surface chemistry, and morphology of the films were also investigated using Rutherford backscattering, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and extreme ultraviolet reflectance measurements.

  12. SIMP spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, Yonit [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kuflik, Eric [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Center for Japanese Studies, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e{sup +}e{sup −} colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  13. Quadrupole transitions revealed by Borrmann spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifer, Robert F; Collins, Stephen P; Laundy, David

    2008-07-10

    The Borrmann effect-a dramatic increase in transparency to X-ray beams-is observed when X-rays satisfying Bragg's law diffract through a perfect crystal. The minimization of absorption seen in the Borrmann effect has been explained by noting that the electric field of the X-ray beam approaches zero amplitude at the crystal planes, thus avoiding the atoms. Here we show experimentally that under conditions of absorption suppression, the weaker electric quadrupole absorption transitions are effectively enhanced to such a degree that they can dominate the absorption spectrum. This effect can be exploited as an atomic spectroscopy technique; we show that quadrupole transitions give rise to additional structure at the L(1), L(2) and L(3) absorption edges of gadolinium in gadolinium gallium garnet, which mark the onset of excitations from 2s, 2p(1/2) and 2p(3/2) atomic core levels, respectively. Although the Borrmann effect served to underpin the development of the theory of X-ray diffraction, this is potentially the most important experimental application of the phenomenon since its first observation seven decades ago. Identifying quadrupole features in X-ray absorption spectroscopy is central to the interpretation of 'pre-edge' spectra, which are often taken to be indicators of local symmetry, valence and atomic environment. Quadrupolar absorption isolates states of different symmetries to that of the dominant dipole spectrum, and typically reveals orbitals that dominate the electronic ground-state properties of lanthanides and 3d transition metals, including magnetism. Results from our Borrmann spectroscopy technique feed into contemporary discussions regarding resonant X-ray diffraction and the nature of pre-edge lines identified by inelastic X-ray scattering. Furthermore, because the Borrmann effect has been observed in photonic materials, it seems likely that the quadrupole enhancement reported here will play an important role in modern optics.

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy and the dipole approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmers, O.; Hansen, D.L.; Wang, H. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is a powerful technique because it directly probes, via the measurement of photoelectron kinetic energies, orbital and band structure in valence and core levels in a wide variety of samples. The technique becomes even more powerful when it is performed in an angle-resolved mode, where photoelectrons are distinguished not only by their kinetic energy, but by their direction of emission as well. Determining the probability of electron ejection as a function of angle probes the different quantum-mechanical channels available to a photoemission process, because it is sensitive to phase differences among the channels. As a result, angle-resolved photoemission has been used successfully for many years to provide stringent tests of the understanding of basic physical processes underlying gas-phase and solid-state interactions with radiation. One mainstay in the application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is the well-known electric-dipole approximation for photon interactions. In this simplification, all higher-order terms, such as those due to electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions, are neglected. As the photon energy increases, however, effects beyond the dipole approximation become important. To best determine the range of validity of the dipole approximation, photoemission measurements on a simple atomic system, neon, where extra-atomic effects cannot play a role, were performed at BL 8.0. The measurements show that deviations from {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} expectations in angle-resolved valence photoemission are observable for photon energies down to at least 0.25 keV, and are quite significant at energies around 1 keV. From these results, it is clear that non-dipole angular-distribution effects may need to be considered in any application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that uses x-ray photons of energies as low as a few hundred eV.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy study of the electronic structures at CoPc/Bi(111) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haoliang; Liang, Zhaofeng; Shen, Kongchao; Hu, Jinbang; Ji, Gengwu; Li, Zheshen; Li, Haiyang; Zhu, Zhiyuan; Li, Jiong; Gao, Xingyu; Han, Huang; Jiang, Zheng; Song, Fei

    2017-07-01

    Self-assembly of functional molecules on solid substrate has been recognized as an appealing approach for the fabrication of diverse nanostructures for nanoelectronics. Herein, we investigate the growth of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) on a Bi(111) surface with focus on the interface electronic structures utilizing photoelectron spectroscopy. While charge transfer from bismuth substrate to the molecule results in the emergence of an interface component in the Co 3p core level at lower binding energy, core-levels associated to the molecular ligand (C 1s and N 1s) are less influenced by the adsorption. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations also support the empirical inference that the molecule-substrate interaction mainly involves the out-of-plane empty Co 3d orbital and bismuth states. Finally, valence band spectra demonstrate the molecule-substrate interaction is induced by interface charge transfer, agreeing well with core level measurements. Charge transfer is shown to be mainly from the underlying bismuth substrate to the empty states located at the central Co atom in the CoPc molecules. This report may provide a fundamental basis to the on-surface engineering of interfaces for molecular devices and spintronics.

  16. Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy of Inner Shell Transitions Using Time-Of Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuping; Jiang, Neng; Weiss, A. H.

    2003-03-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) has been shown to have unique advantages over conventional electron collision induced Auger techniques, including the ability to eliminate the secondary electron background and selectively probe the top-most atomic layer on the sample surface. Here we report on the development of a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer which combines features high efficiency magnetic transport and parrallel energy measurment with high resolution by using an innovative timing method. The new TOF-PAES system, was used to make the first quantitative comparative measurements of the Auger intensities associated with the annihilation of positrons with the deep core levels (1s) of S KLL (180eV), C KLL (270eV), N KLL (360eV), and O KLL (510eV). Experimental results of Auger probabilities at outer core level (3s, 3P) of Cu M2,3VV (60eV), M1VV (105eV) are compared with the theoretical value of Jensen and Weiss. Quantitatively study the surface adsorbate process on Cu is performed and concentration changes of surface components are obtained. These results demonstrate that TOF-PAES can be used to obtain quantitative,top-layer specific, information from chemically important elements including those with relatively deep core levels (e.g. C and O).

  17. Chiroptical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurst, Jerome E.

    1995-09-01

    A brief review of the literature, and Chemical and Engineering News in particular, reveals that the determination and use of optical activity is of increasing importance in today's commercial and research laboratories. The classical technique is to measure [alpha]D using a manual or recording polarimeter to provide a single value, the specific rotation at 589 nm. A spectropolarimeter can be used to determine optical activity through the UV-Visible spectrum (Optical Rotatory Dispersion [ORD]). At wavelengths far removed from electronic absorption bands, optical activity arises from circular birefringence, or the difference in the refractive index for left- and right-circularly polarized light; i.e., nL - nR does not equal zero for chiral materials. If the optical activity is measured through an absorption band, complex behavior is observed (a Cotton Effect curve). At an absorption band, chiral materials exhibit circular dichroism (CD), or a difference in the absorption of left- and right-circularly polarized light; epsilon L minus epsilon R does not equal zero. If the spectropolarimeter is set for the measurement of CD spectra, one observes what appears to be a UV-Vis spectrum except that some absorption bands are positive while others may be negative. Just as enantiomers have specific rotations that are equal and opposite at 589 nm (sodium D line), rotations are equal and opposite at all wavelengths, and CD measurements are equal and opposite at all wavelengths. Figure 1 shows the ORD curves for the enantiomeric carvones while Figure 2 contains the CD curves. The enantiomer of carvone that has the positive [alpha]D is obtained from caraway seeds and is known to have the S-configuration while the R-enantiomer is found in spearmint oil. Figure 1. ORD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones Figure 2. CD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones While little can be done to correlate stereochemistry with [alpha]D values, chiroptical spectroscopy (ORD and/or CD) often can be used to assign

  18. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of chalcopyrite solar cell components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloskovskii, A.; Jenkins, C. A.; Ouardi, S.; Balke, B.; Fecher, G. H.; Dai, X.-F.; Gruhn, T.; Johnson, B.; Lauermann, I.; Caballero, R.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Felser, C.

    2012-02-01

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to examine the partial density of states of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe), a semiconducting component of solar cells. The investigated, thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films were produced by multi-stage co-evaporation. Details of the measured core level and valence band spectra are compared to the calculated density of states. The semiconducting type electronic structure of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 is clearly resolved in the hard x-ray photoelectron spectra.

  19. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  20. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  1. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  2. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  3. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  4. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  5. Photoelectric characteristics of silicon P—N junction with nanopillar texture: Analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Jia-Ou; Yi, Fu-Ting; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Nian; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2014-09-01

    Silicon nanopillars are fabricated by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching with the cesium chloride (CsCl) islands as masks originally from self-assembly. Wafers with nanopillar texture or planar surface are subjected to phosphorus (P) diffusion by liquid dopant source (POCl3) at 870 °C to form P—N junctions with a depth of 300 nm. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to measure the Si 2p core levels of P—N junction wafer with nanopillar texture and planar surface. With a visible light excitation, the P—N junction produces a new electric potential for photoelectric characteristic, which causes the Si 2p core level to have a energy shift compared with the spectrum without the visible light. The energy shift of the Si 2p core level is -0.27 eV for the planar P—N junction and -0.18 eV for the nanopillar one. The difference in Si 2p energy shift is due to more space lattice defects and chemical bond breaks for nanopillar compared with the planar one.

  6. Direct work function measurement by gas phase photoelectron spectroscopy and its application on PbS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Scheele, Marcus; Crumlin, Ethan; Mao, Baohua; Chang, Rui; Rani, Sana; Faiz, Mohamed; Wang, Suidong; Alivisatos, A Paul; Liu, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Work function is a fundamental property of a material's surface. It is playing an ever more important role in engineering new energy materials and efficient energy devices, especially in the field of photovoltaic devices, catalysis, semiconductor heterojunctions, nanotechnology, and electrochemistry. Using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), we have measured the binding energies of core level photoelectrons of Ar gas in the vicinity of several reference materials with known work functions (Au(111), Pt(111), graphite) and PbS nanoparticles. We demonstrate an unambiguously negative correlation between the work functions of reference samples and the binding energies of Ar 2p core level photoelectrons detected from the Ar gas near the sample surface region. Using this experimentally determined linear relationship between the surface work function and Ar gas core level photoelectron binding energy, we can measure the surface work function of different materials under different gas environments. To demonstrate the potential applications of this ambient pressure XPS technique in nanotechnology and solar energy research, we investigate the work functions of PbS nanoparticles with various capping ligands: methoxide, mercaptopropionic acid, and ethanedithiol. Significant Fermi level position changes are observed for PbS nanoparticles when the nanoparticle size and capping ligands are varied. The corresponding changes in the valence band maximum illustrate that an efficient quantum dot solar cell design has to take into account the electrochemical effect of the capping ligand as well.

  7. Photoabsorption and photoionization of chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flesch, R.; Ruehl, E.; Hottmann, K.; Baumgaertel, H. (Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany))

    1993-01-28

    Photoprocesses of chlorine dioxide in the near-UV have become highly important for stratospheric photoprocesses at high latitudes, especially in Antarctica. Chlorine dioxide has been identified among other absorbers because of its specific absorption cross section in the near-UV. Possible contributions of chlorine dioxide photochemistry to polar ozone depletion have been discussed recently. The high-resolution He I photoelectron spectrum and the absolute (vacuum-UV) absorption cross section (6-25 eV) as well as the ionic fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OCIO) are reported. The photoelectron spectrum is interpreted in terms of exchange splitting effects of the various singlet and triplet cation states as well as by comparison to chemically related molecules. The vacuum-UV absorption spectrum shows different Rydberg series converging to the cation states. These Rydberg series and their vibrational progressions are assigned by term value arguments, dipole selection rules, and comparison with the photoelectron spectrum. Photoionization mass spectrometry is used for measurements of the ionization and fragmentation threshold of OCIO. The major fragment is ClO[sup +] which occurs above 13.4 eV. Thermomechanical data such as heats of formation and bond dissociation energies are derived. No evidence for isomerization of OClO[sup +] is found, as observed for the electronically excited neutral molecule. 54 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Electronic study of Al substituted La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phase, D. M., E-mail: dmphase@csr.res.in; Kumar, Manish, E-mail: dmphase@csr.res.in; Wadikar, A. D., E-mail: dmphase@csr.res.in; Choudhary, R. J., E-mail: dmphase@csr.res.in [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore-452001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Polycrystalline samples of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−X}Al{sub X}O{sub 3} (X=0, 0.05, 0.15) are prepared using solid state reaction route. Photoemission spectroscopy measurements were performed on these samples to investigate their electronic properties. Al shows 3+ oxidation state in both Al doped samples while no effect of Al doping is found on the core level spectrum of La 4d and Ca 2p orbitals and they were found in 3{sup +} and 2{sup +} oxidation state respectively in all the samples . Mn 2p core level photoemission measurements indicates that for 5% Al doped sample (lower doping) Al ions replaces the Mn{sup 3+} ions while they substitute Mn{sup 4+} in 15 % Al doped sample ((higher doping)

  9. Band alignment at the interface of PbTe/SnTe heterojunction determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Tianyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Lu, Pengqi; Chen, Lu; Xu, Gangyi; Zhou, Jie; Wu, Huizhen

    2016-11-01

    We report the determination of band alignment of PbTe/SnTe (111) heterojunction interfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Multiple core levels of Pb and Sn were utilized to determine the valence band offset (VBO) of the heterojunction. The XPS result shows a type-III band alignment with the VBO of 1.37+/- 0.18 \\text{eV} and the conduction band offset (CBO) of 1.23+/- 0.18 \\text{eV} . The experimental determination of the band alignment of the PbTe/SnTe heterojunction shall benefit the improvement of PbTe/SnTe-related optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  10. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhi

    2007-01-01

    We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.……

  11. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.

  12. Spectroscopy for Dummies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René

    This presentation will give short introduction to the most pertinent topics of optical spectroscopy. The following topics will be discussed: • The origin of spectra in UV, VIS and IR spectral range • Spectroscopic methods like absorption, luminescence and Raman • Wavelength dispersive optical...... components • Materials for use optical spectroscopy • Spectrometer geometries • Detectors for use in spectrometer • Practical examples of optical spectroscopy The objective of this presentation is to give the audience a good feel for the range of possibilities that optical spectroscopy can provide....

  13. Advances in DUV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mogensen, Claus Tilsted

    The would-be advantages of deep UV (DUV) spectroscopy are well known, but the potential applications have so far not been fully realized due to technological limitations and, perhaps, lack of bright ideas. However, new components and new knowledge about DUV spectra and spectroscopic methods...... combined with increasing needs for solutions to practical problems in environmental protection, medicine and pollution monitoring promise a new era in DUV spectroscopy. Here we shall review the basis for DUV spectroscopy, both DUV fluorescence and DUV Raman spectroscopy, and describe recent advances...

  14. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A few recent applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, M., E-mail: mtaguchi@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Takata, Y.; Chainani, A. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We discuss recent applications of HAXPES carried out at BL29XU in SPring-8. ► We provide a brief description of the salient features of the instrument. ► The recoil effect of photoelectrons in core levels and valence band are discussed. ► We overview HAXPES studies of a series of 3d transition metal compounds. ► The extended cluster model for explaining well-screened feature is presented. -- Abstract: In this report, we discuss a few recent applications of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) carried out at the RIKEN beamline BL29XU in SPring-8. We first provide a brief description of the salient features of the instrument in operation at BL29 XU in SPring-8. HAXPES studies on the recoil effect of photoelectrons in core levels and valence band states are presented. The experiments show remarkable consistency with theoretical results and indicate the role of phonon excitations in the recoil effect of photoelectrons. We then overview HAXPES applied to the study of a series of 3d transition metal (TM) compounds. The HAXPES experimental results often show an additional well-screened feature in bulk sensitive electronic structure of strongly correlated compounds compared to surface sensitive spectra. The extended cluster model developed by us for explaining this well-screened feature is validated for a series of TM compounds. These results show that HAXPES is a valuable tool for the study of doping and temperature dependent electronic structure of solids with tremendous potential for future activities.

  15. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  16. Metallomic EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-09-01

    Based on explicit definitions of biomolecular EPR spectroscopy and of the metallome, this tutorial review positions EPR in the field of metallomics as a unique method to study native, integrated systems of metallobiomolecular coordination complexes subject to external stimuli. The specific techniques of whole-system bioEPR spectroscopy are described and their historic, recent, and anticipated applications are discussed.

  17. Heterodyned holographic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, NG

    1997-01-01

    In holographic spectroscopy an image of an interference pattern is projected onto a detector and transformed back to the input spectrum. The general characteristics are similar to those of Fourier transform spectroscopy, but the spectrum is obtained without scanning. In the heterodyned arrangement o

  18. Progress in field spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milton, E.J.; Schaepman, M.E.; Anderson, K.; Kneubühler, M.; Fox, N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews developments in the science of field spectroscopy, focusing on the last twenty years in particular. During this period field spectroscopy has become established as an important technique for characterising the reflectance of natural surfaces in situ, for supporting the vicarious c

  19. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  20. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  1. Foundations of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stenholm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    A simple presentation of the theoretical foundations of steady-state laser spectroscopy, this text helps students to apply theory to calculations with a systematic series of examples and exercises. 1984 edition.

  2. Hadron Spectroscopy -- Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, E S

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of theoretical progress in hadron spectroscopy and nonperturbative QCD is presented. Attention is focussed on recent lattice gauge theory, the Dyson-Schwinger formalism, unquenching constituent models, and some beyond the Standard Model physics.

  3. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  4. Evaluation of the fluorinated antisticking layer by using photoemission and NEXAFS spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruyama, Yuichi; Nakai, Yasuki; Matsui, Shinji [University of Hyogo, Graduate School of Science, Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, Ako, Hyogo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The electronic structures of four kinds of fluorinated self-assembled monolayers (F-SAMs) with different chain length, which were used for an antisticking layer, were investigated by the photoemission and the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopies. From the photoemission spectra in the wide and in the C 1s core-level regions, chemical compositions and components of the F-SAMs with different chain length were evaluated. By using the curve fitting analysis of the photoemission spectra in C 1s core-level region, it was found that the CF{sub 3} site is located at the top of the surface in the C sites of the F-SAM. From the C K-edge NEXAFS spectra of the F-SAMs as a function of the incidence angle of the excitation photon, it was shown that the σ*(C-F) and σ*(C-C) orbitals in the F-SAMs are parallel and perpendicular to the surface, respectively. This indicates that the C-C chain in (CF{sub 2}){sub n} part of the F-SAMs is perpendicular to the surface. Based on these results, the electronic structures of the F-SAMs are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  6. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  7. Coincidence Auger spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penent, F. [LCPMR, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris 5 (France) and DIAM, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris 5 (France)]. E-mail: penent@ccr.jussieu.fr; Lablanquie, P. [LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91898 Orsay (France); Hall, R.I. [DIAM, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris 5 (France); Palaudoux, J. [LCPMR, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris 5 (France); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Hikosaka, Y. [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); IMS, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Aoto, T. [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Eland, J.H.D. [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3DW (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-15

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) are (with X-ray emission spectroscopy, XES) powerful analytical tools for material science and gas phase studies. However, the interpretation of Auger spectra can be very difficult due to the number and complexity of the involved processes. A deeper analysis, that allows a better understanding of relaxation processes following inner shell ionization, is possible with coincidence Auger spectroscopy. This method gives a new insight into electron correlation and allows disentangling of complex Auger electron spectra. In this paper, we present some examples related to gas phase coincidence Auger electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The detection in coincidence of an Auger electron with a threshold photoelectron presents two main advantages which are good energy resolution and high coincidence count rates. This technique has also provided new results on double Auger decay processes. A further qualitative breakthrough has been made with the development of a new experimental set-up based on a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer. This opens up the field of multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy and allows a most detailed analysis with characterization of all possible decay pathways following inner shell ionization.

  8. A study of the Fe-based superconductor SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Y L; Cui, Y J; Cheng, C H; Zhao, Y [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhang, H [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn

    2009-01-15

    The electronic structure of the Fe-based superconductor SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (x = 0 and 0.2) is studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) through comparing the band structures of the nonsuperconducting parent material SmFeAsO and the superconducting SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2} (T{sub c} = 52.5 K). A small peak centered at 0.2 eV below the Fermi level, E{sub F}, in the valence band is observed in the parent material SmFeAsO, which is due to the low-spin state of the Fe 3d electrons. With fluorine doping, the peak at 0.2 eV disappears and a broad plateau forms near the Fermi level; in the meantime, the density of states at E{sub F} is slightly suppressed. The O 1s and Sm 3d core levels shift towards high energy by {approx}0.55 eV with fluorine doping, but in a sharp comparison, the Fe 2p and As 3d core levels do not shift significantly (the binding energy shift is less than 0.01 eV). It is deduced from the core-level shifts that the Fermi level of the system moves up by 0.55 eV by fluorine doping.

  9. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O epitaxial thin films with a high lithium content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumara, L. S. R., E-mail: KUMARA.Rosantha@nims.go.jp; Yang, Anli [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sakata, Osami, E-mail: SAKATA.Osami@nims.go.jp [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Synchrotron X-ray Group, Quantum Beam Unit, NIMS, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J3-16, Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Akifumi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J3-16, Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Taguchi, Munetaka [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-07-28

    The core-level and valence-band electronic structures of Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O epitaxial thin films with x = 0, 0.27, and 0.48 were studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A double peak structure, consisting of a main peak and a shoulder peak, and a satellite structure were observed in the Ni 2p{sub 3/2} core-level spectra. The intensity ratio of the shoulder to main peak in this double peak structure increased with increasing lithium content in Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O. This lithium doping dependence of the Ni 2p{sub 3/2} core-level spectra was investigated using an extended cluster model, which included the Zhang–Rice (ZR) doublet bound states arising from a competition between O 2p – Ni 3d hybridization and the Ni on-site Coulomb interaction. The results indicated that the change in the intensity ratio in the main peak is because of a reduction in the ZR doublet bound states from lithium substitutions. This strongly suggests that holes compensating Li doping in Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O are of primarily ZR character.

  10. AES (auger electron spectroscopy) and EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy) analysis of TlBaCaCuO/sub x/ thin films at 300 K and at 100 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.J.; Swartzlander, A.; Kazmerski, L.L.; Kang, J.H.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-10-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy line-shape analysis of the Tl(NOO), Ba(MNN), Ca(LMM), Cu(LMM) and O(KLL) peaks has been performed in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) on magnetron sputter deposited TlBaCaCuO/sub x/ thin films exhibiting a superconducting onset at 110K with zero resistance at 96K. AES and EELS analyses were performed at 300K and at 100K. Changes in the Auger line shapes and in the EELS spectra as the temperature is lowered below the critical point are related to changes in the electronic structure of states in the valence band (VB). Bulk and surface plasmon peaks are identified in the EELS spectra along with features due to core level transitions. Electron beam and ion beam induced effects are also addressed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  12. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  13. Dielectric spectroscopy in agrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skierucha, W.; Wilczek, A.; Szypłowska, A.

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents scientific foundation and some examples of agrophysical applications of dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The aim of agrophysics is to apply physical methods and techniques for studies of materials and processes which occur in agriculture. Dielectric spectroscopy, which describes the dielectric properties of a sample as a function of frequency, may be successfully used for examinations of properties of various materials. Possible test materials may include agrophysical objects such as soil, fruit, vegetables, intermediate and final products of the food industry, grain, oils, etc. Dielectric spectroscopy techniques enable non-destructive and non-invasive measurements of the agricultural materials, therefore providing tools for rapid evaluation of their water content and quality. There is a limited number of research in the field of dielectric spectroscopy of agricultural objects, which is caused by the relatively high cost of the respective measurement equipment. With the fast development of modern technology, especially in high frequency applications, dielectric spectroscopy has great potential of expansion in agrophysics, both in cognitive and utilitarian aspects.

  14. Chiral Rotational Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Robert P; Barnett, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy: a new technique that enables the determination of the individual optical activity polarisability components $G_{XX}'$, $G_{YY}'$, $G_{ZZ}'$, $A_{X,YZ}$, $A_{Y,ZX}$ and $A_{Z,XY}$ of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample whilst yielding an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centres. The principles that underpin chiral rotational spectroscopy can also be exploited in the search for molecular chirality in space, which, if found, may add weight to hypotheses that biological homochirality and indeed life itself are of cosmic origin.

  15. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Levin, Ira W.

    2011-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, commonly associated with IR absorption and Raman scattering, has provided a powerful approach for investigating interactions between biomolecules that make up cellular membranes. Because the IR and Raman signals arise from the intrinsic properties of these molecules, vibrational spectroscopy probes the delicate interactions that regulate biomembranes with minimal perturbation. Numerous innovative measurements, including nonlinear optical processes and confined bilayer assemblies, have provided new insights into membrane behavior. In this review, we highlight the use of vibrational spectroscopy to study lipid-lipid interactions. We also examine recent work in which vibrational measurements have been used to investigate the incorporation of peptides and proteins into lipid bilayers, and we discuss the interactions of small molecules and drugs with membrane structures. Emerging techniques and measurements on intact cellular membranes provide a prospective on the future of vibrational spectroscopic studies of biomembranes.

  16. Spectroscopy for the Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Hopkins, Scott; Power, William P.; Leung, Tong; Hepburn, John

    2015-06-01

    Undergraduate students in all areas of science encounter one or more types of spectroscopy as an essential tool in their discipline, but most never take the advanced physics or chemistry courses in which the subject is normally taught. To address this problem, for over 20 years our department has been teaching a popular Introductory Spectroscopy course that assumes as background only a one-term introductory chemistry course containing a unit on atomic theory, and a familiarity with rudimentary calculus. This survey course provides an introduction to microwave, infrared, Raman, electronic, photoelectron and NMR spectroscopy in a manner that allows students to understand many of these phenomena as intuitive generalizations of the problem of a particle in a 1-D box or a particle-on-a-ring, and does not require any high level mathematics.

  17. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitler, Axel; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    "This book presents the current state of knowledge in the field of terahertz spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive source of information for beginners and experienced researchers alike whose interests lie in this area. The book aims to explain the fundamental physics that underpins terahertz  technology and to describe its key applications. Highlights of scientific research in the field of terahertz science are also outlined in some chapters, providing an overview as well as giving an insight into future directions for research.  Over the past decade terahertz spectroscopy has developed into one of the most rapidly growing areas of its kind, gaining an important impact across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Due to substantial advances in femtosecond laser technology, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has established itself as the dominant spectroscopic technique for experimental scientists interested in measurements at this frequency range. In solids and liquids THz radiation is in reso...

  18. Quantum control of the XUV photoabsorption sp ectrum of helium atoms via the carrier-envelop e-phase of an infrared laser pulse%红外激光载波包络相位对氦原子的极紫外光(XUV)吸收谱的量子调控研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨增强; 张力达

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the quantum control of the XUV photoabsorption spectrum of helium atoms via the carrier-envelope-phase (CEP) of an infrared (IR) laser pulse by numerically solving the time-dependent one-dimensional (1D) two-electron Schrödinger equation. The advantage of the 1D model is that the associated time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) can be solved numerically with high precision as taking full account of the interaction between the electrons and without making any assumptions about the dominant physical mechanisms. In our study, a single attosecond XUV pulse with broad bandwidth is used to create a wave packet consisting of several doubly-excited states. Helium atoms subjected to the XUV pulse can be ionized through two different pathways: either direct ionization into the continuum or indirect ionization via the autoionization of doubly excited states. The interference of these two paths gives rise to the well-known Fano line shape in the photoabsorption spectrum, which is determined by the ratio and relative phases of the two paths. In the presence of an IR laser pulse, however, we find that the Fano line profiles are strongly modified, in good agreement with recent experimental observations [C. Ott et al., Science 340, 716 (2013); C. Ott et al., Nature 516, 374 (2014)]. At certain time delays, we can observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections, indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We fit the absorption spectra with the Fano line profiles giving rise to the CEP-dependent Fano q parameters, which are modulated from extremely large positive value to extremely large negative value. Since the q parameter is proportional to the ratio between the dipole matrix of the indirect ionization path and the dipole matrix of the direct ionization path;these results indicate that the quantum interference between the two ionization paths can be e

  19. Photoemission Spectroscopy Characterization of Attempts to Deposit MoO2 Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to deposit molybdenum dioxide (MoO2 thin films have been described. Electronic structure of films, deposited by thermal evaporation of MoO2 powder, had been investigated with ultraviolet photoemission and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS. The thermally evaporated films were found to be similar to the thermally evaporated MoO3 films at the early deposition stage. XPS analysis of MoO2 powder reveals presence of +5 and +6 oxidation states in Mo 3d core level along with +4 state. The residue of MoO2 powder indicates substantial reduction in higher oxidation states while keeping +4 oxidation state almost intact. Interface formation between chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc-Cl and the thermally evaporated film was also investigated.

  20. X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Single-State Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-07-14

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on metal and semiconductor surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature polycrystalline Cu foils and Ge(100). Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  2. FTIR Rotational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Ron; Henderson, Giles

    1987-01-01

    Presented are representative examples of the spectra and the analyses for a linear molecule (HC1), a symmetric top molecule (NH3), and an asymmetric top (H2O). Any combination of these projects could be incorporated in a physical chemistry or molecular spectroscopy laboratory. (RH)

  3. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    frequencies (Ching and Weston, 1971). RESULTS Measured resonance frequencies of absorption lines, which were attributed to adult (~ 1.3 khz) and juvenile ...of adult and juvenile sardines. These results suggest that bioacoustic absorption spectroscopy measurements permit isolation of juvenile from adult...from broadband tomographic transmission loss measurements over large areas . 2. Depths of sardines and contours of phytoplankton concentrations vs. time

  4. Broadband Transmission EPR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9–10 GHz range. Most (bio)molecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination

  5. Speculations in hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, J M

    2005-01-01

    A selected survey is presented of the recent progress in hadron spectroscopy. This includes spin-singlet charmonium states, excitations of charmonium and open-charm mesons, double-charm baryons, and pentaquark candidates. Models proposing exotic bound states or resonances are reviewed. The sector of exotic mesons with two heavy quarks appears as particularly promising.

  6. Laser spectroscopy of protonium

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    1999-01-01

    High-precision laser spectroscopy of protonium (pp) is one of the future experiments being considered by ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. A possible scheme to produce protonium in vacuum and to detect laser transitions is presented, and implications of reaching high precision are discussed. (7 refs).

  7. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  8. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  9. Photoemission spectroscopy of composition and doping of high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeras, P.; Berger, H.; Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique; Ma, J.; Onellion, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    The authors present a systematic study of compositional and doping effects in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} high-{Tc} superconductors performed with photoemission spectroscopy. The study has been extended to Y-doping and I-intercalation of Bi-2212 high quality single crystals. The main results is that each type of dopant affects the crystal composition in its own way. Yttrium affects the Ca and Sr planes, producing a charge transfer into the CuO planes. For I-doping, they find that the main effect is a change in the interplanar distance, but X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) allows to see that the decrease of the critical temperature is not caused only by a structure parameter, but by a over-doping of copper planes (hole doping). They performed also a comparative study by Angle Resolved Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy [ARUPS] between this sample and an oxygen annealed specimen. XPS Cu2p core level data establish that the hole concentration in the CuO{sub 2} planes is essentially the same for these two kinds of samples. ARUPS measurements show that electronic structure of the normal states near the Fermi level has been strongly affected by iodine intercalation.

  10. Mid-infrared upconversion spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Andersen, H. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is emerging as an attractive alternative to near-infrared or visible spectroscopy. MIR spectroscopy offers a unique possibility to probe the fundamental absorption bands of a large number of gases as well as the vibrational spectra of complex molecules. In this paper...

  11. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Tietje, I C; Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Testera, G; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Nesteruk, K P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Fesel, J V; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  12. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  13. Electron structure of excited configurations in Ca2V2O7 studied by electron-induced core-ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance-potential spectroscopy, and x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curelaru, I. M.; Strid, K.-G.; Suoninen, E.; Minni, E.; Rönnhult, T.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the electron-induced core-ionization loss (CILS) spectra, the appearance-potential (APS) spectra, and the x-ray-photoelectron (XPS) spectra of Ca2V2O7, that is a prototype for a series of luminescent materials with general formula M2V2O7(M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, Hg). From the analysis of the data provided by the edge spectroscopies (CILS and APS) and their comparison with the XPS binding energies, we deduced the electronic structure of the outer orbitals (occupied and empty) involved in these processes. Our data illustrate the strong many-body effects that occur in the excitation and decay of localized atomiclike configurations within the big ionic cluster V2O4-7. Excitation of core levels in calcium, outside the V2O4-7 ion, seems to involve more extended orbitals, since the screening is more efficient. Usefulness of complementary studies by x-ray emission and Auger electron spectroscopy is anticipated.

  14. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  15. Chiral rotational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy, a technique that enables the determination of the orientated optical activity pseudotensor components BX X, BY Y, and BZ Z of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample and provides an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral solely by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centers. A basic design for a chiral rotational spectrometer together with a model of its functionality is given. Our proposed technique offers the more familiar polarizability components αX X, αY Y, and αZ Z as by-products, which could see it find use even for achiral molecules.

  16. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jungmann, Klaus P

    2016-01-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 $\\mu$s. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular groun dstate hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular Quantum Electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  17. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-09-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  18. Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Villar, Susana E; Edwards, Howell G M

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is proposed as a valuable analytical technique for planetary exploration because it is sensitive to organic and inorganic compounds and able to unambiguously identify key spectral markers in a mixture of biological and geological components; furthermore, sample manipulation is not required and any size of sample can be studied without chemical or mechanical pretreatment. NASA and ESA are considering the adoption of miniaturised Raman spectrometers for inclusion in suites of analytical instrumentation to be placed on robotic landers on Mars in the near future to search for extinct or extant life signals. In this paper we review the advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of complex specimens with relevance to the detection of bio- and geomarkers in extremophilic organisms which are considered to be terrestrial analogues of possible extraterrestial life that could have developed on planetary surfaces.

  19. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  20. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  1. Core-level excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, R.; Plenge, J.; Rühl, E.

    2006-03-01

    Inner-shell excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-excitation regime is reported. The electronic structure of the element-selectively excited radical is studied by X-ray absorption and total cation yields. A comparison of both approaches allows us to estimate the absolute photoionization cross-section and the ionization yield near the Cl 2p- and O 1s-absorption edges. The latter quantity is characteristically enhanced in core-ionization continua. We observe below both core-absorption edges intense core-to-valence-transitions. These are assigned in comparison with related work on core-excited sulfur dioxide. These results give clear evidence that the highest molecular orbital of OClO is half-filled. High-resolution spectra recorded in the Cl 2p-regime show evidence for Rydberg transitions. The extrapolation of the term values of the low-lying Rydberg states allows us to derive the Cl 2p-ionization energy of OClO. Fragmentation of core-excited OClO is reported. Photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (PEPICO) spectra are recorded, indicating that singly and doubly charged fragments are formed. Fission of the doubly and multiply charged OClO leads to singly charged fragments. These are measured by photoion-photoion-coincidence (PIPICO) spectra, where characteristic changes in intensity of the fission channels in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-continuum are observed.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy in astronomy has increased dramatically in the past ten years. The broad design considerations are discussed in terms of wavelength coverage and resolution. Three rough resolution ranges, lambda/Delta lambda of approximately 100, 1000 and 10,000, are identified in which various types of astronomical problems can be studied. Numerous existing systems are briefly discussed and references are given to more complete descriptions.

  3. Applications in Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    Characterization of Titanium Dioxide Semiconductor Powders and Crystals . 84 Anatase or rutile .... ............. ... 84 Reduction of powders...PA spectroscopy of titanium dioxide (TiO21 powders and rutile crystals is discussed in Chapter IV. Anatase powders treated in U2 at temperatures above...6006C were converted to the rutile structure as confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The rutile (powder and crystals) and the anatase (.powder) TiO 2 were

  4. Theory and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John F.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between quantum-mechanical theory and spectroscopy is one of the most fertile interfaces in all of science, and has a richly storied history. Of course it was spectroscopy that provided essentially all of the evidence that not all was well (or, perhaps more correctly put, complete) with the world of 19th century classical physics. From the discoveries of the dark lines in the solar spectrum by Fraunhöfer in 1814 to the curiously simple geometric formula discovered seventy years later that described the hydrogen atom spectrum, spectroscopy and spectroscopists have consistently identified the areas of atomic and molecular science that are most in need of hard thinking by theoreticians. The rest of the story, of course, is well-known: spectroscopic results were used to understand and motivate the theory of radioactivity and ultimately the quantum theory, first in its immature form that was roughly contemporaneous with the first World War, and then the Heisenberg-Schrödinger-Dirac version that has withstood the test of time. Since the basic principles of quantum mechanics ware first understood, the subject has been successfully used to understand the patterns found in spectra, and how these relate to molecular structure, symmetry, energy levels, and dynamics. But further understanding required to attain these intellectual achievements has often come only as a result of vital and productive interactions between theoreticians and spectroscopists (of course, many people have strengths in both areas). And indeed, a field that might be termed "theoretical spectroscopy" was cultivated and is now an important part of modern molecular science.

  5. The spectroscopy of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, R.

    1982-01-01

    Problems in the spectroscopy of the planet are discussed. Two major problems are focused on: the almost total domination of the spectrum by CO2 (including almost every conceivable isotropic combination) makes the search for other species difficult; and the knowledge that no wavelengths short of the the microwave penetrate through the Venus cloud decks, which means that UV, visible, and IR remote sensing can investigate only the middle and upper atmosphere. The problem of intense multiple scattering is also considered.

  6. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  7. Dielectric spectroscopy of polyaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, R.D.; Matveeva, E.M. [Polytechnical Univ. of Valencia, (Spain)

    1993-12-31

    Polyaniline films (PANI) are being considered as attractive new galvanic sources, electrochromic displays, chemical sensors, etc. So far much work has been done to study their optical, electrochemical and electrical properties. However, there are still doubts about the basic electric conductivity mechanisms of PANI. The aim of this paper is to study the influence of water molecules and acid anions on the properties of PANI films by dielectric spectroscopy.

  8. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  9. Layman friendly spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentic, Stipo; Sessions, Sharon

    Affordable consumer grade spectroscopes (e.g. SCiO, Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE) are becoming more available to the general public. We introduce the concepts of spectroscopy to the public and K12 students and motivate them to delve deeper into spectroscopy in a dramatic participatory presentation and play. We use diffraction gratings, lasers, and light sources of different spectral properties to provide a direct experience of spectroscopy techniques. Finally, we invite the audience to build their own spectroscope--utilizing the APS SpectraSnapp cell phone application--and study light sources surrounding them in everyday life. We recontextualize the stigma that science is hard (e.g. ``Math, Science Popular Until Students Realize They're Hard,'' The Wall Street Journal) by presenting the material in such a way that it demonstrates the scientific method, and aiming to make failure an impersonal scientific tool--rather than a measure of one's ability, which is often a reason for shying away from science. We will present lessons we have learned in doing our outreach to audiences of different ages. This work is funded by the APS Outreach Grant ``Captain, we have matter matters!'' We thank New Mexico Tech Physics Department and Physics Club for help and technical equipment.

  10. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  11. Local variation in Bi crystal sites of epitaxial GaAsBi studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, P.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Lahti, A.; Puustinen, J.; Tuominen, M.; Hilska, J.; Mäkelä, J.; Dahl, J.; Yasir, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Osiecki, J. R.; Schulte, K.; Guina, M.; Kokko, K.

    2017-02-01

    Epitaxial Bi-containing III-V crystals (III-V1-xBix) have attracted increasing interest due to their potential in infrared applications. Atomic-scale characterization and engineering of bulk-like III-V1-xBix properties (e.g., Bi incorporation and defect formation) are challenging but relevant to develop applications. Toward that target, we report here that the traditional surface-science measurement of photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is a potential, non-destructive method to be combined in the studies of bulk-like properties, when surface effects are properly removed. We have investigated epitaxial GaAs1-xBix films, capped by epitaxial AlAs layers, with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy. The Bi5d core-level spectra of GaAs1-xBix together with ab-initio calculations give direct evidence of variation of Bi bonding environment in the lattice sites. The result agrees with photoluminescence (PL) measurement which shows that the studied GaAs1-xBix films include local areas with higher Bi content, which contribute to PL but do not readily appear in x-ray diffraction (XRD). The measured and calculated Bi core-level shifts show also that Ga vacancies and Bi clusters are dominant defects.

  12. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  13. Multiphoton Ionization as a clock to Reveal Molecular Dynamics with Intense Short X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, L; Murphy, B; Tarantelli, F; Kukk, E; Cryan, J P; Glownia, M; Bucksbaum, P H; Coffee, R N; Chen, M; Buth, C; Berrah, N

    2013-01-01

    We investigate molecular dynamics of multiple ionization in N2 through multiple core-level photoabsorption and subsequent Auger decay processes induced by intense, short X-ray free electron laser pulses. The timing dynamics of the photoabsorption and dissociation processes is mapped onto the kinetic energy of the fragments. Measurements of the latter allow us to map out the average internuclear separation for every molecular photoionization sequence step and obtain the average time interval between the photoabsorption events. Using multiphoton ionization as a tool of multiple-pulse pump-probe scheme, we demonstrate the modi?cation of the ionization dynamics as we vary the x-ray laser pulse duration.

  14. Active Beam Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2008-03-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) plays a pivotal role in the diagnostics of hot fusion plasmas and is implemented currently in most of the operating devices. In the present report the main features of CXRS are summarized and supporting software packages encompassing "Spectral Analysis Code CXSFIT", "Charge Exchange Analysis Package CHEAP", and finally "Forward Prediction of Spectral Features" are described. Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) is proposed as indispensable cross-calibration tool for absolute local impurity density measurements and also for the continuous monitoring of the neutral beam power deposition profile. Finally, a full exploitation of the `Motional Stark Effect' pattern is proposed to deduce local pitch angles, total magnetic fields and possibly radial electric fields. For the proposed active beam spectroscopy diagnostic on ITER comprehensive performance studies have been carried out. Estimates of expected spectral signal-to-noise ratios are based on atomic modelling of neutral beam stopping and emissivities for CXRS, BES and background continuum radiation as well as extrapolations from present CXRS diagnostic systems on JET, Tore Supra, TEXTOR and ASDEX-UG. Supplementary to thermal features a further promising application of CXRS has been proposed recently for ITER, that is a study of slowing-down alpha particles in the energy range up to 2 MeV making use of the 100 keV/amu DNB (Diagnostic Neutral Beam) and the 500 keV/amu HNB (Heating Neutral Beam). Synthetic Fast Ion Slowing-Down spectra are evaluated in terms of source rates and slowing-down parameters

  15. Review on Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    I review some of the lattice results on spectroscopy and resonances in the past years. For the conventional hadron spectrum computations, focus has been put on the isospin breaking effects, QED effects, and simulations near the physical pion mass point. I then go through several single-channel scattering studies within L\\"uscher formalism, a method that has matured over the past few years. The topics cover light mesons and also the charmed mesons, with the latter case intimately related to the recently discovered exotic $XYZ$ particles. Other possible related formalisms that are available on the market are also discussed.

  16. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  17. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  18. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Fourier transforms in spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2000-01-01

    This modern approach to the subject is clearly and logically structured, and gives readers an understanding of the essence of Fourier transforms and their applications. All important aspects are included with respect to their use with optical spectroscopic data. Based on popular lectures, the authors provide the mathematical fundamentals and numerical applications which are essential in practical use. The main part of the book is dedicated to applications of FT in signal processing and spectroscopy, with IR and NIR, NMR and mass spectrometry dealt with both from a theoretical and practical poi

  20. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takashi; Iwamae, Atsushi (eds.) [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Science

    2008-07-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-23

    devices same is (C22-C24). A spectrometer based on adc SQUID that is ,I suitable for NQR and low-frequency NMR spectroscopy has is been developed (C25...relatively few papers that saE is have a primarily instrumental focus. This is due in part to s the tendency of spectrometer and probe vendors not to publish...from NOE data, etc. sNoe i This has been reflected in two trends in data processing SEN0S 12 hardware. Spectrometer vendors are starting to move awav 9

  2. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL.

  3. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  4. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  5. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy at electrified interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wieckowski, Andrzej; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Reviews the latest theory, techniques, and applications Surface vibrational spectroscopy techniques probe the structure and composition of interfaces at the molecular level. Their versatility, coupled with their non-destructive nature, enables in-situ measurements of operating devices and the monitoring of interface-controlled processes under reactive conditions. Vibrational Spectroscopy at Electrified Interfaces explores new and emerging applications of Raman, infrared, and non-linear optical spectroscopy for the study of charged interfaces. The book draws from hu

  7. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  8. Adsorption of ethylene on Sn and In terminated Si(001) surface studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Petr; Sobotík, Pavel; Kocán, Pavel; Ošt'ádal, Ivan; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Acres, Robert George; Matolín, Vladimír

    2016-09-07

    Interaction of ethylene (C2H4) with Si(001)-Sn-2 × 2 and Si(001)-In-2 × 2 at room temperature has been studied using core level (C 1s) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and scanning tunneling microscopy. Sn and In form similar dimer chains on Si(001)2 × 1, but exhibit different interaction with ethylene. While ethylene adsorbs on top of Sn dimers of the Si(001)-Sn-2 × 2 surface, the Si(001)-In-2 × 2 surface turned out to be inert. Furthermore, the reactivity of the Sn terminated surface is found to be considerably decreased in comparison with Si(001)2 × 1. According to the proposed adsorption model ethylene bonds to Sn dimers via [2 + 2] cycloaddition by interacting with their π dimer bonds. In contrast, indium dimers do not contain π bonds, which renders the In terminated Si(001) surface inert for ethylene adsorption.

  9. Adsorption of ethylene on Sn and In terminated Si(001) surface studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Petr; Sobotík, Pavel; Kocán, Pavel; Ošt'ádal, Ivan; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Acres, Robert George; Matolín, Vladimír

    2016-09-01

    Interaction of ethylene (C2H4) with Si(001)-Sn-2 × 2 and Si(001)-In-2 × 2 at room temperature has been studied using core level (C 1s) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and scanning tunneling microscopy. Sn and In form similar dimer chains on Si(001)2 × 1, but exhibit different interaction with ethylene. While ethylene adsorbs on top of Sn dimers of the Si(001)-Sn-2 × 2 surface, the Si(001)-In-2 × 2 surface turned out to be inert. Furthermore, the reactivity of the Sn terminated surface is found to be considerably decreased in comparison with Si(001)2 × 1. According to the proposed adsorption model ethylene bonds to Sn dimers via [2 + 2] cycloaddition by interacting with their π dimer bonds. In contrast, indium dimers do not contain π bonds, which renders the In terminated Si(001) surface inert for ethylene adsorption.

  10. Chemical-state analysis of organic semiconductors using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Yutaka; Kohno, Teiichiro; Minakata, Takashi; Konishi, Tokuzo; Gullikson, Eric M; Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2012-02-16

    The chemical states of organic semiconductors were investigated by total-electron-yield soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TEY-XAS) and first-principles calculations. The organic semiconductors, pentacene (C(22)H(14)) and pentacenequinone (C(22)H(12)O(2)), were subjected to TEY-XAS and the experimental spectra obtained were compared with the 1s core-level excited spectra of C and O atoms, calculated by a first-principles planewave pseudopotential method. Excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated spectra were obtained for both materials. Using this methodology, we examined the chemical states of the aged pentacene, and confirmed that both C-OH and C═O chemical bonds are generated by exposure to air. This result implies that not only oxygen but also humidity causes pentacene oxidation.

  11. Native target chemistry during reactive dc magnetron sputtering studied by ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M.; Hultman, L.

    2017-07-01

    We report x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of native Ti target surface chemistry during magnetron sputtering in an Ar/N2 atmosphere. To avoid air exposure, the target is capped immediately after sputtering with a few-nm-thick Al overlayers; hence, information about the chemical state of target elements as a function of N2 partial pressure pN2 is preserved. Contrary to previous reports, which assume stoichiometric TiN formation, we present direct evidence, based on core-level XPS spectra and TRIDYN simulations, that the target surface is covered by TiNx with x varying in a wide range, from 0.27 to 1.18, depending on pN2. This has far-reaching consequences both for modelling of the reactive sputtering process and for everyday thin film growth where detailed knowledge of the target state is crucial.

  12. Single-State Electronic Structure Measurements Using Time-Resolved X-Ray Laser Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Hunter, J

    2004-11-11

    We demonstrate single-shot x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy on semiconductor and metal surfaces with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux (>10{sup 12}/pulse), monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the city, chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Static valence band and shallow core-level photoemission spectra are presented for ambient temperature Ge(100) and polycrystalline Cu foils. Surface contamination was removed by UV ozone cleaning prior to analysis. In addition, the ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials. Time-resolved electron time-of-flight photoemission results for ultra-thin Cu will be presented.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Björnham, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) is an experimental technique that is commonly used to assess information of the strength, energy landscape, and lifetime of noncovalent bio-molecular interactions. DFS traditionally requires an applied force that increases linearly with time so that the bio-complex under investigation is exposed to a constant loading rate. However, tethers or polymers can modulate the applied force in a nonlinear regime. For example, bacterial adhesion pili and polymers with worm-like chain properties are examples of structures that show nonlinear force responses. In these situations, the theory for traditional DFS cannot be readily applied. In this work we expand the theory for DFS to also include nonlinear external forces while still maintaining compatibility with the linear DFS theory. To validate the theory we modeled a bio-complex expressed on a stiff, an elastic and a worm-like chain polymer, using Monte Carlo methods, and assessed the corresponding rupture force spectra. It was found th...

  14. Quantum-Limited Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Truong, Gar-Wing; May, Eric F; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a ten-fold improvement in the accuracy of the excited-state (6P$_{1/2}$) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity-dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35ppm within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzm...

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue ischaemia can be a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional oxygenation monitoring modalities measure systemic oxygenation, but regional tissue oxygenation is not monitored. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive monitor for measuring regional oxygen saturation which provides real-time information. There has been increased interest in the clinical application of NIRS following numerous studies that show improved outcome in various clinical situations especially cardiac surgery. Its use has shown improved neurological outcome and decreased postoperative stay in cardiac surgery. Its usefulness has been investigated in various high risk surgeries such as carotid endarterectomy, thoracic surgeries, paediatric population and has shown promising results. There is however, limited data supporting its role in neurosurgical population. We strongly feel, it might play a key role in future. It has significant advantages over other neuromonitoring modalities, but more technological advances are needed before it can be used more widely into clinical practice.

  16. Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Ken M

    2011-01-01

    Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs is a complete guide for amateur astronomers who are looking for a new challenge beyond astrophotography. The book provides a brief overview of the history and development of the spectroscope, then a short introduction to the theory of stellar spectra, including details on the necessary reference spectra required for instrument testing and spectral comparison. The various types of spectroscopes available to the amateur are then described. Later sections cover all aspects of setting up and using various types of commercially available and home-built spectroscopes, starting with basic transmission gratings and going through more complex models, all the way to the sophisticated Littrow design. The final part of the text is about practical spectroscope design and construction. This book uniquely brings together a collection of observing, analyzing, and processing hints and tips that will allow the amateur to build skills in preparing scientifically acceptable spectra data. It...

  17. Spectroscopy of radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Dammalapati, Umakanth; Jungmann, Klaus; Willmann, Lorenz [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    Radium has been identified as a potential candidate for experiment al searches for violations of fundamental symmetries like parity (P), time reversal (T) and charge conjugation. In particular is shows a high sensitivity to T a nd P violating permanent electric dipole moments and also to atomic parity viola tion effects. This sensitivity arises from the unique atomic level scheme of rad ium. In the course of the setup of such experiments we need to improve the experimental data on radium. Within the TRI{mu}P (Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: microlaboratories for fundamental Physics) facility at KVI, we are setting up an radioactive atomic beam of {sup 225}Ra and the laser system for performing the spectroscopy. This is guided closely by the requirements for experimental searches for symmetry violating effect.

  18. Spectroscopy Made Easy: Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Piskunov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Context. The Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME) package has become a popular tool for analyzing stellar spectra, often in connection with large surveys or exoplanet research. SME has evolved significantly since it was first described in 1996, but many of the original caveats and potholes still haunt users. The main drivers for this paper are complexity of the modeling task, the large user community, and the massive effort that has gone into SME. Aims. We do not intend to give a comprehensive introduction to stellar atmospheres, but will describe changes to key components of SME: the equation of state, opacities, and radiative transfer. We will describe the analysis and fitting procedure and investigate various error sources that affect inferred parameters. Methods. We review the current status of SME, emphasizing new algorithms and methods. We describe some best practices for using the package, based on lessons learned over two decades of SME usage. We present a new way to assess uncertainties in derived stellar pa...

  19. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  20. Hadron Spectroscopy at PANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Fioravanti, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    FAIR a new International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Reaserach, is under construction at Darmstadt, in Germany. This will provide scientists in the world with outstanding beams and experimental conditions for studying matter at the level of atoms, nuclei, and other subnuclear constituents. An antiproton beam with intensity up to 2x10$^7$ $\\bar{p}/s$ and high momentum resolution will be available at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) where the $\\bar{P}$ANDA (Antiproton Annihilation At Darmstadt) detector will be installed. In this paper we will illustrate the details of the $\\bar{P}$ANDA scientific program related to hadron spectroscopy, after a brief introduction about the FAIR facility and the $\\bar{P}$ANDA detector.

  1. Transit spectroscopy with GTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osorio M.R. Zapatero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to different ground-based surveys and space missions, nowadays we have a fairly large sample of discovered extra-solar planets to study and, without a doubt, this number will increase in the future. One of the most succesful techniques that allows us to prove the physical properties and atmospheric composition of these exoplanets is transmission spectroscopy. The level of precision that is require to measure these effects provides a technical challenge that is solved by using big telescopes and stable instruments to reach low noise levels. In this article, we will discuss the use of the 10m class telescope GTC to observed planetary transits in spectroscopic mode and some of the results that we are currently obtaining.

  2. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, V L

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique.

  3. Theory overview on spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed

    2011-08-15

    A theoretical overview of the exotic spectroscopy in the charm and beauty quark sector is presented. These states are unexpected harvest from the e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders and a permanent abode for the majority of them has yet to be found. We argue that some of these states, in particular the Y{sub b}(10890) and the recently discovered states Z{sub b}(10610) and Z{sub b}(10650), discovered by the Belle collaboration are excellent candidates for tetraquark states [bq][ anti b anti q], with q=u,d light quarks. Theoretical analyses of the Belle data carried out in the tetraquark context is reviewed. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  5. Analyzing Impedance Spectroscopy Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoed Tsur; Sioma Baltianski

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution we briefly discuss several analysis techniques for impedance spectroscopy experiments. A number of different approaches, which differ even by the definition of the problem, are used in the literature. Some aimed towards finding an equivalent circuit. Others aimed towards finding directly dielectric properties of the material under an assumed model. Others towards finding distribution of relaxation times, either parametric or point-by point. No matter what the approach is, this will always be an ill-posed problem in the sense that there exist a large number of possible solutions that solve the problem (mathematically) equally well. Therefore some a-priori knowledge about the system must be used. In addition, we should remember that the ultimate goal is to get physical insight about the system.

  6. Broadband local dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A route to extend the measurement bandwidth of local dielectric spectroscopy up to the MHz range has been devised. The method is based on a slow amplitude modulation at a frequency Ω of the excitation field oscillating at a frequency ω and the coherent detection of the modulated average electric force or force gradient at Ω. The cantilever mechanical response does not affect the measurement if Ω is well below its resonant frequency; therefore, limitations on the excitation field frequency are strongly reduced. Demonstration on a thin poly(vinyl acetate) film is provided, showing its structural relaxation spectrum on the local scale up to 45 °C higher than glass temperature, and nanoscale resolution dielectric relaxation imaging near conductive nanowires embedded in the polymer matrix was obtained up to 5 MHz frequency, with no physical reason to hinder further bandwidth extension.

  7. Photoemission spectroscopy study of a multi-alkali photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ettema, A R H

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a photoemission study of the highest core levels of the elements and the electron escape barrier (work function) in a multi-alkali photocathode are presented. The core levels indicate that the alkali atoms are in an oxidized state and therefore the compound Na sub 2 KSb can be regarded as an ionic semiconductor. The measured escape barrier of the Cs sub 2 O surface layer is determined as 2.3 eV.

  8. Broadband terahertz spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhui Fan

    2011-01-01

    1.Introduction Spanning the frequency range between the infrared (IR) radiation and microwaves,terahertz (THz) waves are,also known as T-rays,T-lux,or simply called THz,assigned to cover the electromagnetic spectrum typically from 100 GHz (1011 Hz) to 10 THz (1013 Hz),namely,from 3 mm to 30 μm in wavelength,although slightly different definitions have been quoted by different authors.For a very long time,THz region is an almost unexplored field due to its rather unique location in the electromagnetic spectrum.Well-known techniques in optical or microwave region can not be directly employed in the THz range because optical wavelengths are too short and microwave wavelengths are too long compared to THz wavelengths.%An overview of the major techniques to generate and detect THz radiation so far, especially the major approaches to generate and detect coherent ultra-short THz pulses using ultra-short pulsed laser, has been presented. And also, this paper, in particularly, focuses on broadband THz spectroscopy and addresses on a number of issues relevant to generation and detection of broadband pulsed THz radiation as well as broadband time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) with the help of ultra-short pulsed laser. The time-domain waveforms of coherent ultra-short THz pulses from photoconductive antenna excited by femtosecond laser with different pulse durations and their corresponding Fourier-transformed spectra have been obtained via the numerical simulation of ultrafast dynamics between femtosecond laser pulse and photoconductive material. The origins of fringes modulated on the top of broadband amplitude spectrum, which is measured by electric-optic detector based on thin nonlinear crystal and extracted by fast Fourier transformation, have been analyzed and the major solutions to get rid of these fringes are discussed.

  9. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  10. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.;

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  11. The light meson spectroscopy program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Elton S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries of a number of unexpected new charmomium-like meson states at the BaBar and Belle B-factories have demonstrated how little is still known about meson spectroscopy. In this talk we will review recent highlights of the light quark spectroscopy from collider and fixed target experiments.

  12. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A.

    1980-01-01

    A heterodyne spectrometer was constructed and applied to problems in infrared astronomical spectroscopy. The instrument offers distinct observational advantages for the detection and analysis of individual spectral lines at Doppler-limited resolution. Observations of carbon dioxide in planetary atmospheres and ammonia in circumstellar environments demonstrate the substantial role that infrared heterodyne techniques will play in the astronomical spectroscopy of the future.

  13. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  14. The light meson spectroscopy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Recent discoveries of a number of unexpected new charmomium-like meson states at the BaBar and Belle B-factories have demonstrated how little is still known about meson spectroscopy. In this talk we will review recent highlights of the light quark spectroscopy from collider and fixed target experiments.

  15. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  16. Laser Spectroscopy and Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    The spectrum of a frequency comb, commonly generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser consists of several hundred thousand precisely evenly spaced spectral lines. Such laser frequency combs have revolutionized the art measuring the frequency of light, and they provide the long-missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks. The invention of the frequency comb technique has been motivated by precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom. The availability of commercial instruments is facilitating the evolution of new applications far beyond the original purpose. Laser combs are becoming powerful instruments for broadband molecular spectroscopy by dramatically improving the resolution and recording speed of Fourier spectrometers and by creating new opportunities for highly multiplexed nonlinear spectroscopy, such as two-photon spectroscopy or coherent Raman spectroscopy. Other emerging applications of frequency combs range from fundamental research in astronomy, chemistry, or attosecond science to telecommunications and satellite navigation.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy for Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Fenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Advancements in early and improved diagnosis could help prevent a significant number of these deaths. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique which has received considerable attention recently with regards to applications in clinical oncology. Raman spectroscopy has the potential not only to improve diagnosis of cancer but also to advance the treatment of cancer. A number of studies have investigated Raman spectroscopy for its potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of cancers. In this paper the most recent advances in dispersive Raman spectroscopy, which have demonstrated promising leads to real world application for clinical oncology are reviewed. The application of Raman spectroscopy to breast, brain, skin, cervical, gastrointestinal, oral, and lung cancers is reviewed as well as a special focus on the data analysis techniques, which have been employed in the studies.

  18. Operando fuel cell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Ian Michael

    The active state of a catalyst only exists during catalysis (1) provided the motivation for developing operando spectroscopic techniques. A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was designed to interface with commercially available instruments for acquisition of infrared spectra of the catalytic surface of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) during normal operation. This technique has provided insight of the complex processes occurring at the electrode surface. Nafion, the solid electrolyte used in most modern-day polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), serves many purposes in fuel cell operation. However, there is little known of the interface between Nafion and the electrode surface. Previous studies of complex Stark tuning curves of carbon monoxide on the surface of a platinum electrode were attributed the co-adsorption of bisulfite ions originating from the 0.5M H2SO4 electrolyte used in the study(2). Similar tuning curves obtained on a fuel cell MEA despite the absence of supplemental electrolytes suggest the adsorption of Nafion onto platinum (3). The correlation of spectra obtained using attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) and polarization modulated IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to a theoretical spectrum generated using density functional theory (DFT) lead to development of a model of Nafion and platinum interaction which identified participation of the SO3- and CF3 groups in Nafion adsorption. The use of ethanol as a fuel stream in proton exchange membrane fuel cells provides a promising alternative to methanol. Relative to methanol, ethanol has a greater energy density, lower toxicity and can be made from the fermentation of biomass(4). Operando IR spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation pathway of ethanol and Stark tuning behavior of carbon monoxide on Pt, Ru, and PtRu electrodes. Potential dependent products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and carbon monoxide are identified as well as previously

  19. Spectroscopy from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Swayze, G. A.; Carlson, R.; Grundy, W.; Noll, K.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews detection of materials on solid and liquid (lakes and ocean) surfaces in the solar system using ultraviolet to infrared spectroscopy from space, or near space (high altitude aircraft on the Earth), or in the case of remote objects, earth-based and earth-orbiting telescopes. Point spectrometers and imaging spectrometers have been probing the surfaces of our solar system for decades. Spacecraft carrying imaging spectrometers are currently in orbit around Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, and Saturn, and systems have recently visited Jupiter, comets, asteroids, and one spectrometer-carrying spacecraft is on its way to Pluto. Together these systems are providing a wealth of data that will enable a better understanding of the composition of condensed matter bodies in the solar system. Minerals, ices, liquids, and other materials have been detected and mapped on the Earth and all planets and/or their satellites where the surface can be observed from space, with the exception of Venus whose thick atmosphere limits surface observation. Basaltic minerals (e.g., pyroxene and olivine) have been detected with spectroscopy on the Earth, Moon, Mars and some asteroids. The greatest mineralogic diversity seen from space is observed on the Earth and Mars. The Earth, with oceans, active tectonic and hydrologic cycles, and biological processes, displays the greatest material diversity including the detection of amorphous and crystalline inorganic materials, organic compounds, water and water ice. Water ice is a very common mineral throughout the Solar System and has been unambiguously detected or inferred in every planet and/or their moon(s) where good spectroscopic data has been obtained. In addition to water ice, other molecular solids have been observed in the solar system using spectroscopic methods. Solid carbon dioxide is found on all systems beyond the Earth except Pluto, although CO2 sometimes appears to be trapped in other solids rather than as an ice on some

  20. Hadron Spectroscopy in COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) aimed at studying the structure and spectrum of hadrons. In the naive Constituent Quark Model (CQM) mesons are bound states of quarks and antiquarks. QCD, however, predict the existence of hadrons beyond the CQM with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). One main goal of COMPASS is to search for these states. Particularly interesting are so called spin-exotic mesons which have J^{PC} quantum numbers forbidden for ordinary q\\bar{q} states. Its large acceptance, high resolution, and high-rate capability make the COMPASS experiment an excellent device to study the spectrum of light-quark mesons in diffractive and central production reactions up to masses of about 2.5 GeV. COMPASS is able to measure final states with charged as well as neutral particles, so that resonances can be studied ...

  1. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) aimed at studying the structure and spectrum of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer has a good acceptance for charged as well as neutral particles over a wide kinematic range and thus allows to access a wide range of reactions. Light mesons are studied with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The spectrum of light mesons is investigated in various final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions at squared four-momentum transfers to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to search for new states. Among these is a new resonance-like signal, t...

  2. Laser spectroscopy of radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Dammalapati, Umakanth; Jungmann, Klaus; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    Searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fundamental particles are sensitive probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. Fundamental EDMs can experience enhancements in atomic and molecular systems. In particular, isotopes of the heavy alkaline earth element radium exhibit the largest known enhancement factors for any atomic systems due to their atomic and nuclear structure. A sensitive search for EDMs will require an efficient use of the rare isotopes, which are available from radioactive sources or at rare isotope facilities like TRI{mu}P at KVI. Here, laser cooling and trapping methods play a crucial role. The main transitions from the ground state have been identified by laser spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the strongest cooling transitions 7s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-7s7p {sup 1}P{sub 1} suffers from strong leakage to metastable states, similar to the case of barium. We describe the experimental approach to determine the wavelength of the three needed repump transitions, which then will permit an efficient capture of radium atoms into a magneto optical trap.

  3. Broadband transmission EPR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred R Hagen

    Full Text Available EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9-10 GHz range. Most (biomolecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin - nuclear spin interactions and electron spin - electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8-2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed.

  4. Meson spectroscopy at COMPASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grube Boris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is to study the structure and dynamics of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer used by the experiment has large acceptance and covers a wide kinematic range for charged as well as neutral particles and can therefore measure a wide range of reactions. The spectroscopy of light mesons is performed with negative (mostly π− and positive (p, π+ hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/c. The light-meson spectrum is measured in different final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions with squared four-momentum transfer t to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 (GeV=c2. The flagship channel is the π−π−π+ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently world’s largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to observe new states. Among these is a new axial-vector signal, the a1(1420, with unusual properties. Novel analysis techniques have been developed to extract also the amplitude of the π−π+ subsystem as a function of 3π mass from the data. The findings are confirmed by the analysis of the π−π0π0 final state.

  5. Spectroscopy Made Easy: Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Nikolai; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME) package has become a popular tool for analyzing stellar spectra, often in connection with large surveys or exoplanet research. SME has evolved significantly since it was first described in 1996, but many of the original caveats and potholes still haunt users. The main drivers for this paper are complexity of the modeling task, the large user community, and the massive effort that has gone into SME. Aims: We do not intend to give a comprehensive introduction to stellar atmospheres, but will describe changes to key components of SME: the equation of state, opacities, and radiative transfer. We will describe the analysis and fitting procedure and investigate various error sources that affect inferred parameters. Methods: We review the current status of SME, emphasizing new algorithms and methods. We describe some best practices for using the package, based on lessons learned over two decades of SME usage. We present a new way to assess uncertainties in derived stellar parameters. Results: Improvements made to SME, better line data, and new model atmospheres yield more realistic stellar spectra, but in many cases systematic errors still dominate over measurement uncertainty. Future enhancements are outlined.

  6. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  7. Meson spectroscopy with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS is dedicated to the study of hadron structure and dynamics. In the physics programme using hadron beams, the focus is on the detection of new states, in particular the search for $J^{PC}$ exotic states and glueballs. After a short pilot run in 2004 (190 GeV/c negative pion beam, lead target), we started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting an unprecedented statistics with a negative hadron beam (190 GeV/c) on a liquid hydrogen target. A similar amount of data with positive hadron beam (190 GeV/c) has been taken in 2009, as well as some additional data with negative beam on nuclear targets. The spectrometer features a large angular acceptance and high momentum resolution and also good coverage by electromagnetic calorimetry, crucial for the detection of final states involving $\\pi^0$ or $\\eta$. A first important result is the observation of a significant $J^{PC}$ spin exotic signal consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$ in the pilot run dat...

  8. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2016-11-29

    The goal of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is to study the structure and dynamics of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer used by the experiment has large acceptance and covers a wide kinematic range for charged as well as neutral particles and can therefore measure a wide range of reactions. The spectroscopy of light mesons is performed with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The light-meson spectrum is measured in different final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions with squared four-momentum transfer $t$ to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently world's largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to observe new states. Among these is a new axial-vector signal, the $a_1(1420)$, with unusual properties. Novel analysis techniques have been...

  9. Meson spectroscopy at COMPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Boris

    2016-11-01

    The goal of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is to study the structure and dynamics of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer used by the experiment has large acceptance and covers a wide kinematic range for charged as well as neutral particles and can therefore measure a wide range of reactions. The spectroscopy of light mesons is performed with negative (mostly π-) and positive (p, π+) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/c. The light-meson spectrum is measured in different final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions with squared four-momentum transfer t to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 (GeV=c)2. The flagship channel is the π-π-π+ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently world's largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to observe new states. Among these is a new axial-vector signal, the a1(1420), with unusual properties. Novel analysis techniques have been developed to extract also the amplitude of the π-π+ subsystem as a function of 3π mass from the data. The findings are confirmed by the analysis of the π-π0π0 final state.

  10. Practical Raman spectroscopy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenabeele, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an open-learning approach to Raman spectroscopy providing detail on instrumentation, applications and discussions questions throughout the book. It provides a valuable guide to assist with teaching Raman spectroscopy which is gaining attention in (analytical) chemistry, and as a consequence, teaching programs have followed. Today, education in Raman spectroscopy is often limited to theoretical aspects (e.g. selection rules), but practical aspects are usually disregarded. With these course notes, the author hopes to fill this gap and include information about Raman instrumentat

  11. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Fourier-transform spectroscopy of 13C17O and deperturbation analysis of the A1Π (υ=0-3) levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakalla, R.; Niu, M. L.; Field, R. W.; Heays, A. N.; Salumbides, E. J.; Stark, G.; Lyons, J. R.; Eidelsberg, M.; Lemaire, J. L.; Federman, S. R.; de Oliveira, N.; Ubachs, W.

    2017-03-01

    The high-resolution B1Σ+→A1Π (0, 0) and (0, 3) emission bands of the less-abundant 13C17O isotopologue have been investigated by Fourier-transform spectroscopy in the visible region using a Bruker IFS 125HR spectrometer at an accuracy 0.003 cm-1. These spectra are combined with high-resolution photoabsorption measurements of the 13C17O B1Σ+←X1Σ+ (0, 0), B1Σ+←X1Σ+ (1, 0) and C1Σ+←X1Σ+ (0, 0) bands recorded with an accuracy of 0.01 cm-1 using the vacuum ultraviolet Fourier-transform spectrometer, installed on the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron. In the studied 17,950-22,500 cm-1 and 86,800-92,100 cm-1 regions, 480 transitions have been measured. These new experimental data were combined with data from the C→A and B→A systems, previously analyzed in 13C17O. The frequencies of 1003 transitions derived from 12 bands were used to analyze the perturbations between the A1Π (υ=0-3) levels and rovibrational levels of the d3Δi, e3Σ-, a'3Σ+, I1Σ- and D1Δ states as well as to a preliminary investigation of weak irregularities that appear in the B1Σ+ (υ=0) level. Deperturbed molecular constants and term values of the A1Π state were obtained. The spin-orbit and L-uncoupling interaction parameters as well as isotopologue-independent spin-orbit and rotation-electronic perturbation parameters were derived.

  13. Excited electronic structure of methylcyanoacetylene probed by VUV Fourier-transform absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, N.; Gans, B.; Vieira Mendes, L. A.; Gronowski, M.; Guillemin, J.-C.; De Oliveira, N.; Douin, S.; Chevalier, M.; Crépin, C.; Kołos, R.; Boyé-Péronne, S.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution photoabsorption spectrum of gas-phase methylcyanoacetylene (CH3C3 N) has been recorded from 44 500 to 130 000 cm-1 at room temperature with a vacuum ultraviolet Fourier-transform spectrometer on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline (SOLEIL). The absolute photoabsorption cross section in this range is reported for the first time. Valence shell transitions and Rydberg series converging to the ground state X˜+2E of the cation as well as series converging to electronically excited states (A˜+A21 and C˜+) are observed and assigned. Time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations have been performed to support the assignment of the experimental spectrum in the low energy range. A tentative scaling of the previously measured CH3C3N+ ion yield by Lamarre et al. [17] is proposed, based on the comparison of the absorption data above the first ionization potential with the observed autoionization structures.

  14. The Solar Spectroscopy Explorer Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Bookbinder, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Spectroscopy Explorer (SSE) concept is conceived as a scalable mission, with two to four instruments and a strong focus on coronal spectroscopy. In its core configuration it is a small strategic mission ($250-500M) built around a microcalorimeter (an imaging X-ray spectrometer) and a high spatial resolution (0.2 arcsec) EUV imager. SSE puts a strong focus on the plasma spectroscopy, balanced with high resolution imaging - providing for break-through imaging science as well as providing the necessary context for the spectroscopy suite. Even in its smallest configuration SSE provides observatory class science, with significant science contributions ranging from basic plasma and radiative processes to the onset of space weather events. The basic configuration can carry an expanded instrument suite with the addition of a hard X-ray imaging spectrometer and/or a high spectral resolution EUV instrument - significantly expanding the science capabilities. In this configuration, it will fall at the small end...

  15. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FTIR studies of vanadium barium phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majjane, Abdelilah [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Vitreux et Cristallisés, Université Ibn Tofail, Faculté des Sciences, Kénitra 14090 (Morocco); Chahine, Abdelkrim, E-mail: abdelkrimchahine@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Vitreux et Cristallisés, Université Ibn Tofail, Faculté des Sciences, Kénitra 14090 (Morocco); Et-tabirou, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Vitreux et Cristallisés, Université Ibn Tofail, Faculté des Sciences, Kénitra 14090 (Morocco); Echchahed, Bousselham [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie, Corrosion et Environnement, Université Ibn Tofail, Faculté des Sciences, Kénitra (Morocco); Do, Trong-On [Département de génie chimique, Université Laval, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Breen, Peter Mc [Département de chimie, Université Laval, G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Barium vanadophosphate glasses, having composition 50BaO–xV{sub 2}O{sub 5}–(50 − x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, (x = 0–50 mol%), were prepared by conventional melt quench method. Density, molar volume and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) were measured as a function of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. Structural investigation was done using XPS and FTIR spectroscopy. First, substitution of the P{sub 2}O{sub 5} by the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the metaphosphate 50BaO–50P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass increases the density and T{sub g} and decreases the molar volume. When the amount of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} increases, all these properties show a reverse trend. XPS measurement found in the O1s, P2p, and V2p core level spectra indicate the presence of primarily P–O–P, P–O–V and V–O–V structural bonds, the asymmetry in the P 2p spectra indeed arises from the spin-orbit splitting of P 2p core level, and more than one valence state of V ions being present. IR spectroscopy reveals the depolymerization of the phosphate glass network by systematic conversion of metaphosphate chains into pyrophosphate groups and then orthophosphate groups. Even though metaphosphate to pyrophosphate conversion is taking place due to breaking of P–O–P linkages, formation of P–O–V and P–O–Ba linkages provide cross linking between short P-structural units, which make the glass network more rigid. Above 10–20 mol% V{sub 2}O{sub 5} content, network is highly depolymerized due to the formation of orthophosphate units and V–O–V bridge bonds, resulting in poor cross-linking, making the glass network less rigid. - Highlights: • Barium–vanadium–phosphate glasses. • Structure has been investigated by XPS and IR spectra. • Variation in structure and properties with substitution of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} for P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • Conversion of metaphosphate to pyrophosphate and finally to orthophosphate. • Substitution of P–O–P linkages by P–O–V, P–O–Ba and V–O–V linkages.

  17. In situ investigations of laser and thermally modified As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers: Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrat, O., E-mail: o.b.kondrat@gmail.com; Holomb, R.; Popovich, N.; Mitsa, V. [Institute of Solid State Physics and Chemistry, Uzhhorod National University, Pidhirna Str., 46, 88000 Uzhhorod (Ukraine); Veres, M. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Csik, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Feher, A. [Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Tsud, N.; Matolín, V. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vondráček, M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Prince, K. C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, in Area Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-12-14

    As-deposited, annealed, and in situ As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers, illuminated by blue (405 nm) and red (650 nm) laser light, were studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT electronic structure calculations. Changes in composition and local atomic coordination occurring in the irradiated region of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were monitored by analysis of As 3d and S 2p core levels. These studies show that both the thermal treatment and the red laser illumination of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers decrease the concentration of homopolar (As-As and S-S) bonds. From the other hand, an increasing concentration of As-rich structural units (s.u.) with a homopolar As-As bond was observed under in situ blue laser illumination of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers. Molecular orbital energies were calculated for different As- and S-centered s.u. and used for the interpretation of the core levels and valence band spectra. The surface local structure of the As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers and its photoinduced transformation are discussed in detail.

  18. Electronic and geometric properties of Au nanoparticles on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Lim, Dong Chan; Dietsche, Rainer; Bertram, Nils; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-01-26

    Au nanoparticles grown on mildly sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surfaces were studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared with those of Ag nanoparticles on the same substrate. By varying the defect densities of HOPG and the Au coverages, one can create Au nanoparticles in various sizes. At high Au coverages, the structures of the Au films significantly deviate from the ideal truncated octahedral form: the existence of many steps between different Au atomic layers can be observed, most likely due to a high activation barrier of the diffusion of Au atoms across the step edges. This implies that the particle growth at room temperature is strongly limited by kinetic factors. Hexagonal shapes of Au structures could be identified, indicating preferential growth of Au nanostructures along the (111) direction normal to the surface. In the case of Au, XPS studies reveal a weaker core level shift with decreasing particle size compared to the 3d level in similarly sized Ag particles. Also taking into account the Auger analysis of the Ag particles, the core level shifts of the metal nanoparticles on HOPG can be understood in terms of the metal/substrate charge transfer. Ag is (partially) positively charged, whereas Au negatively charged on HOPG. It is demonstrated that XPS can be a useful tool to study metal-support interactions, which plays an important role for heterogeneous catalysis, for example.

  19. Optical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of PbGeO3 and Pb5Ge3O11 single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Sabharwal; S N Jha; Sangeeta

    2010-08-01

    Pb5Ge3O11 crystals are found to exhibit pale yellow colouration while PbGeO3 are colourless. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show lead deficiency in both the crystals. The results also reveal a stronger ionic character for PbGeO3 as compared to Pb5Ge3O11 crystal. The binding energy of Ge3 core level in the case of Pb5Ge3O11 crystal is found to be smaller than the binding energy of germanium oxide, thereby indicating the incomplete oxidation of Ge ions in the crystal lattice. On gamma ray irradiation, the transmission of both the crystals is observed to deteriorate uniformly over the entire wavelength range, which has been attributed to the oxidation of some of the lattice Pb ions. On gamma irradiation the changes observed in O1 core level energies for both the crystals are seen to be consistent with the changes noted in the Pb47/2 and Ge3 spectra. Interestingly, the results reveal oxidation of surface Ge atoms with atmospheric oxygen under gamma irradiation.

  20. Localised IR spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    CERN Document Server

    Yarrow, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    IR absorption spectroscopy of hemoglobin was performed using an IR optical parametric oscillator laser and a commercial atomic force microscope in a novel experimental arrangement based on the use of a bottom-up excitation alignment. This experimental approach enables detection of protein samples with a resolution that is much higher than that of standard IR spectroscopy. Presented here are AFM based IR absorption spectra of micron sized hemoglobin features

  1. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Chemical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Chemical Detection by Ellen L. Holthoff and Paul M. Pellegrino ARL-RP-0410 September 2012...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-RP-0410 September 2012 Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Chemical Detection Ellen L. Holthoff and Paul M...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) September 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photoacoustic

  2. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  3. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques.

  4. Assessing Field Spectroscopy Metadata Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Rasaiah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the proposed criteria for measuring the quality and completeness of field spectroscopy metadata in a spectral archive. Definitions for metadata quality and completeness for field spectroscopy datasets are introduced. Unique methods for measuring quality and completeness of metadata to meet the requirements of field spectroscopy datasets are presented. Field spectroscopy metadata quality can be defined in terms of (but is not limited to logical consistency, lineage, semantic and syntactic error rates, compliance with a quality standard, quality assurance by a recognized authority, and reputational authority of the data owners/data creators. Two spectral libraries are examined as case studies of operationalized metadata policies, and the degree to which they are aligned with the needs of field spectroscopy scientists. The case studies reveal that the metadata in publicly available spectral datasets are underperforming on the quality and completeness measures. This paper is part two in a series examining the issues central to a metadata standard for field spectroscopy datasets.

  5. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of oxygen-containing layers formed by a linear potential scan on stepped gold (111) films in aqueous 1 M sulphuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Nieto, Felipe J. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimica Teoricas y Aplicadas INIFTA, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Member of Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: rodrini@inifta.unlp.edu.ar; Fachini, Esteban; Cabrera, Carlos R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Arvia, Alejandro J. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimica Teoricas y Aplicadas INIFTA, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data of oxygen-containing layers (O-layers) made on stepped gold (111) film electrodes from aqueous 1 M sulphuric acid by single linear potential scans at 0.10 V s{sup -1} and 298 K are reported. The potential scan covered from the open circuit potential to anodic switching potential E{sub as} = 2.50 V versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) and holding times at E{sub as} in the range 30-300 s. The anodic charge density q{sub a} determined from the oxidation and reduction voltammetric scan is in the range 0.20 {<=} q{sub a} {<=} 2.5 mC cm{sup -2}. For the potential E = 0.5 V, in the absence of O-layers, the S 2p core level spectrum indicates the presence of sulphate/bisulphate adsorbates. For E{sub as} > 1.3 V, the O 1s core level spectrum involves the contribution from water, OH- and O-species. These spectra are deconvoluted utilising either three or four Gaussian contributions with values of peaked binding energy and full width at half-maximum height (FWMH) in good agreement with expectations. The envelope of these XPS O 1s signals after correction for the contribution of sulphate/bisulphate adsorbates and adventitious carbon approaches the XPS signal that has been reported for the core level spectrum in the O 1s region of oxidised gold surfaces produced by laser pulses at different molecular oxygen pressures. The O/OH concentration ratio in the O-layer increases with E{sub as} ageing time t{sub ag} and cathodic charge density q{sub c}. The hydrous nature of the O-layer, evaluated through the analysis of the core level spectra in the O 1s region, decreases as E{sub as} and t{sub ag} are increased. Results are interesting to unravel the composition and structure of electrochemically grown O-layers at the surface of the gold substrate, and the influence of the history of these O-layers on the respective XPS features.

  7. Hard X-ray PhotoElectron Spectroscopy of transition metal oxides: Bulk compounds and device-ready metal-oxide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgatti, F., E-mail: francesco.borgatti@cnr.it [Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM)-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park, Trieste I-34149 (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Hard X-ray PhotoElectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES) applied to buried interfaces of systems involving Transition Metal Oxides. • Enhanced contribution of the s states at high kinetic energies both for valence and core level spectra. • Sensitivity to chemical changes promoted by electric field across metal-oxide interfaces in resistive switching devices. - Abstract: Photoelectron spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tool to unravel the electronic structure of strongly correlated materials also thanks to the extremely large dynamic range in energy, coupled to high energy resolution that this form of spectroscopy covers. The kinetic energy range typically used for photoelectron experiments corresponds often to a strong surface sensitivity, and this turns out to be a disadvantage for the study of transition metal oxides, systems where structural and electronic reconstruction, different oxidation state, and electronic correlation may significantly vary at the surface. We report here selected Hard X-ray PhotoElectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES) results from transition metal oxides, and from buried interfaces, where we highlight some of the important features that such bulk sensitive technique brings in the analysis of electronic properties of the solids.

  8. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  9. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  10. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  11. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  12. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  13. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Groot, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years visible pump/mid-infrared (IR) probe spectroscopy has established itself as a key technology to unravel structure-function relationships underlying the photo-dynamics of complex molecular systems. In this contribution we review the most important applications of mid-infrared absorption difference spectroscopy with sub-picosecond time-resolution to photosynthetic complexes. Considering several examples, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic antennas and electron transfer in reaction centers and even more intact structures, we show that the acquisition of ultrafast time resolved mid-IR spectra has led to new insights into the photo-dynamics of the considered systems and allows establishing a direct link between dynamics and structure, further strengthened by the possibility of investigating the protein response signal to the energy or electron transfer processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy with Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Kulik, Sergei P; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2015-01-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared (IR) optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing, and health diagnostics. Current IR spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the IR range, which faces challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here we develop a spectroscopy technique, which allows spectral measurements in the IR range using visible spectral range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC). The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an IR photon, which travels through the media. This allows determining properties of the media in the IR range from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional IR spectroscopy techniques, as it uses well-developed optical components for the visible range.

  15. The role of cesium suboxides in low-work-function surface layers studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Ag-O-Cs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.-J.; Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The oxidation of cesium on silver substrates has been studied using photoyield measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The occurrence of two O1s peaks in the core-level spectrum at 527.5 and 531.5-eV binding energy for cesium and oxygen exposures giving the optimum photoyield proves that two oxides of cesium exist in high-photoyield surfaces, and not Cs2O alone as previously thought. From the shape and position of the cesium peaks and the Auger parameter, the assignment of the O1s peaks at 527.5- and 531.5-eV binding energies to oxygen in Cs2O and Cs11O3, respectively, can be made. Hence the total cesium-oxygen layer is a mixed phase consisting of Cs2O + Cs11O3, approximately 20-40 A thick.

  16. Ultrabroadband spectroscopy for security applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Sunniva; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrabroadband spectroscopy is a promising novel approach to overcome two major hurdles which have so far limited the application of THz spectroscopy for security applications: the increased bandwidth enables to record several characteristic spectroscopic features and the technique allows...... for remote detection. However, for real applications several parameters still have to be optimized. A comprehensive evaluation of the potential of this technique includes for example a detailed study of the generation process in an air plasma. We present some aspects of our joint theoretical and experimental...... evaluation of the technique for defense and civil security applications....

  17. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a new analytical tool that provides a simple nondestructive technique for obtaining information about the electronic absorption spectrum of samples such as powders, semisolids, gels, and liquids. It can also be applied to samples which cannot be examined by conventional optical methods. Numerous applications of this technique in the field of inorganic and organic semiconductors, biology, and catalysis have been described. Among the advantages of photoacoustic spectroscopy, the signal is almost insensitive to light scattering by the sample and information can be obtained about nonradiative deactivation processes. Signal saturation, which can modify the intensity of individual absorption bands in special cases, is a drawback of the method.

  18. Recent Beijing Spectroscopy (BES) results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI WeiGuo

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental results from Beijing Spectroscopy (BES) are reviewed,in-cluding the hadron spectroscopy from J/ψdecays,and a number of new states are found or confirmed,including σ,κ;X(1835),ωψ threshold enhancement in J/ψ→γωψ,a broad resbnance in J/ψ→K+K-π0,decay studies of ψ(2S) and χCJ,as well as the results of ψ(3770) non-DD decays.The current status of BEPCⅡ/BESⅢ,the major upgrade of BEPC/BESⅡ,is also reported.

  19. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  20. Quantum spectroscopy of plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2013-01-01

    We use frequency entangled photons, generated via spontaneous parametric down conversion, to measure the broadband spectral response of an array of gold nanoparticles exhibiting Fano-type plasmon resonance. Refractive index sensing of a liquid is performed by measuring the shift of the array resonance. This method is robust in excessively noisy conditions compared with conventional broadband transmission spectroscopy. Detection of a refractive index change is demonstrated with a noise level 70 times higher than the signal, which is shown to be inaccessible with the conventional transmission spectroscopy. Use of low photon fluxes makes this method suitable for measurements of photosensitive bio-samples and chemical substances.

  1. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy : XII International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Allegrini, Maria; Sasso, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    This text includes all the recent advances in the field of laser spectroscopy. Major results span from the control of matter by electromagnetic fields (trapping and coding) to high precision measurements on simple atomic systems and to quantum optics with single atoms. It includes a report of the Bose-Einstein condensation achieved by laser-cooling of rubidium atoms. Achievements in the technology of tunable sources, in particular of miniaturized solid state devices, are also reported. Most recent advances in molecular spectroscopy are illustrated with emphasis on "cooled" spectra, clusters and high accuracy frequency references. Topics such as atomic interferometry and microcavity quantum optics are also covered.

  3. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  4. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  5. Recent progress of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of uranium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Fujimori, Atsushi [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamagami, Hiroshi [Condensed Matter Science Divisions, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Etsuji; Haga, Yoshinori [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ōnuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Recent progresses in the soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies (hν ≳ 100 eV) for uranium compounds are briefly reviewed. The soft X-ray PES has enhanced sensitivities for the bulk U 5f electronic structure, which is essential to understand the unique physical properties of uranium compounds. In particular, the recent remarkable improvement in energy resolutions from an order of 1 eV to 100 meV made it possible to observe fine structures in U 5f density of states. Furthermore, soft X-ray ARPES becomes available due to the increase of photon flux at beamlines in third generation synchrotron radiation facilities.The technique made it possible to observe bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces of uranium compounds and therefore, the results can be directly compared with theoretical models such as band-structure calculations. The core-level spectra of uranium compounds show a systematic behavior depending on their electronic structures, suggesting that they can be utilized to determine basic physical parameters such as the U 5f-ligand hybridizations or Comlomb interaction between U 5f electrons. It is shown that soft X-ray PES provides unique opportunities to understand the electronic structures of uranium compounds.

  6. Layer resolved spectroscopy of potassium adsorbed on a Ru(001) surface: Photoemission and thermal desorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbek, J. (Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (US)); Shek, M. (Department of Physics, Hunter College of CUNY, New York, New York 10021); Sham, T.K. (Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada); Xu, G. (Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, 11973)

    1989-11-01

    High-resolution photoemission spectroscopy and thermal desorption were used to study the coverage dependence of the K 3{ital p}{sub 3/2,1/2} core levels of K overlayers on Ru(001). Three doublets were observed to evolve sequentially and to shift to higher binding energy with increasing coverage of potassium. The doublets were assigned to photoemission from the interface (first layer), bulk'' (second layer), and surface (third layer). Spin--orbit splitting was observed for the first time in the condensed potassium phase by photoemission. The results are discussed in terms of the equivalent core approximation using a Born--Haber cycle. In the thermal desorption data three coverage regimes can be distinguished: a first layer desorbing with first-order kinetics and a strongly decreasing heat of adsorption ({ital E}{sub {ital A}} =2.80--0.87 eV); a second layer with zero-order desorption kinetics and {ital E}{sub {ital A}} =0.78 eV; a third layer and multilayers with the same kinetic order but with {ital E}{sub {ital A}} increasing from 0.78 to 0.93 eV, which is close to the heat of sublimation of potassium.

  7. Electron momentum spectroscopy and linear combination of atomic orbitals calculation of bulk Na sub 2 O

    CERN Document Server

    Mikajlo, E A; Ford, M J

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental measurement of the electronic structure of Na sub 2 O in the solid phase using electron momentum spectroscopy and compares the results with ab initio calculations performed within the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) approximation. While Hartree-Fock (HF) can reproduce elastic properties we find it overestimates splitting of the oxygen valence bands by around 30% and the width of the O 2p band by a factor of 2. Our experimental values are 15.85 +- 0.2 and 0.6 +- 0.2 eV for these two quantities, respectively. Density functional methods are significantly better, with the hybrid functional PBE0 predicting the oxygen bandgap to within the experimental error. PBE0 also gives the best estimate of the Na core level energies. In contrast, HF performs best for the splitting between the oxygen and sodium bands. Our experimental values of 32.85 +- 0.2 and 27.45 +- 0.2 eV for the Na 2p-Na 2s and O 2p-Na 2p splittings agree well with previous measurements. Distribution of el...

  8. Electron dynamics and intermolecular energy transfer in aqueous solutions studied by X-ray electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Bernd

    2009-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements from a vacuum liquid microjet are performed to investigate the electronic structure of aqueous solutions. Here, focus is on the excited-state dynamics of chloride and hydroxide anions in water, following core-level excitation. A series of Cl^-(aq) charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) states, and their ultrafast relaxation, on the time scale of the core hole, is identified from the occurrence of spectator Auger decay. Resonant oxygen 1s excitation of aqueous hydroxide, in contrast, leads to non-local decay, involving energy transfer into a neighboring water molecule. This channel is argued to arise from the weak hydrogen donor bond of OH^-(aq), and thus identifies a special transient hydration configuration, which can explain hydroxide's unusual and fast transport in water. Analogous measurements from pure water point to a similar relaxation channel, which is concluded from a strong isotope effect. The characteristic resonance spectral features are considerably stronger for H2O(aq) than for D2O(aq). As for OH^-(aq) the results can be understood in terms of energy transfer from the excited water molecule to a neighbor water molecule.

  9. The applications of in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy to the study of electron beam nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiahn J; Howitt, David G; Gierhart, Brian C; Smith, Rosemary L; Collins, Scott D

    2009-06-01

    An in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) technique has been developed to investigate the dynamic processes associated with electron-beam nanofabrication on thin membranes. In this article, practical applications germane to e-beam nanofabrication are illustrated with a case study of the drilling of nanometer-sized pores in silicon nitride membranes. This technique involves successive acquisitions of the plasmon-loss and the core-level ionization-loss spectra in real time, both of which provide the information regarding the hole-drilling kinetics, including two respective rates for total mass loss, individual nitrogen and silicon element depletion, and the change of the atomic bonding environment. In addition, the in situ EELS also provides an alternative method for endpoint detection with a potentially higher time resolution than by imaging. On the basis of the time evolution of in situ EELS spectra, a qualitative working model combining knock-on sputtering, irradiation-induced mass transport, and phase separation can be proposed.

  10. Band bending at copper and gold interfaces with ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Nicoleta G.; Ştoflea, Laura E.; Tănase, Liviu C.; Bucur, Ioana Cristina; Chirilă, Cristina; Negrea, Raluca F.; Teodorescu, Cristian M.

    2015-11-01

    Interfaces formed by gold and copper on single crystal layers of (0 0 1) PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 (PZT) produced by pulsed laser deposition and exhibiting outwards polarization are analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The stoichiometry of the layers reproduces reasonably that of the PZT target. The band bending occurring at the interface between PZT and the metals is investigated by analyzing the core level shifts as function on the metal deposition. It is found that for Au/PZT(0 0 1) the gold layer is not continuous and the observed band bendings can be attributed to a Schottky mechanism, whereas for Cu/PZT(0 0 1) the copper layer is continuous; in this latter case, the observed band bendings towards higher energies (lower binding energies) can be attributed to a concomitant bending due to the Schottky effect together with the disappearance of the initial bending due to the outwards polarization of the samples. Metal Pb is observed to segregate only in the case of Cu/PZT(0 0 1), therefore the surface self-reduction might also be connected to the presence of a metal with lower work function, which for larger coverage forms a continuous metal layer, able to provide electrons to the surface. High resolution transmission electron spectroscopy yielded the disappearance of the tetragonal distortion in the case of Cu/PZT(0 0 1), in line with the assumption of disappearance of the polarization-induced band bending.

  11. Photoabsorption by ground-state alkali-metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisheit, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Principal-series oscillator strengths and ground-state photoionization cross sections are computed for sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. The degree of polarization of the photoelectrons is also predicted for each atom. The core-polarization correction to the dipole transition moment is included in all of the calculations, and the spin-orbit perturbation of valence-p-electron orbitals is included in the calculations of the Rb and Cs oscillator strengths and of all the photoionization cross sections. The results are compared with recent measurements.

  12. Electronic structure of Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} single crystal as determined from X-ray spectroscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocheretova, V.A. [National Technical University “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 37 Peremogy Avenue, Kyiv 03036 (Ukraine); Parasyuk, O.V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Eastern European National University, 13 Voli Avenue, Lutsk 43025 (Ukraine); Fedorchuk, A.O. [Department of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, Lviv National University of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnologies, Pekarska St., 50, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine); Khyzhun, O.Y., E-mail: khyzhun@ipms.kiev.ua [Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Street, Kyiv 03142 (Ukraine)

    2015-06-15

    We report on studies of the electronic structure of Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} single crystal by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). In particular, X-ray photoelectron core-level and valence-band spectra for pristine and Ar{sup +} ion-irradiated surfaces of the Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} single crystal have been recorded. Our XPS results indicate that Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} is rather rigid with respect to Ar{sup +} ion-irradiation: such a treatment does not induce any significant changes of values of the binding energies of core-level electrons as well as of the shapes of the XPS core-level and valence-band spectra of the Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} surface. For the Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} single crystal, the XES bands representing the energy distribution of mainly the valence Cu d, Cd d, Ge p and Se p states have been measured and compared on a common energy scale with its XPS valence-band spectrum. Such a comparison allows for concluding that the Cu 3d and Cd 4d states contribute mainly at the top and at the bottom of the valence band, respectively, while the Ge 4p and Se 4p states in the central and upper portions of the band. These experimental findings are found to be in agreement with literature data of band-structure calculations for this compound. - Highlights: • Electronic structure of Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} single crystal is studied by XPS and XES. • Low hygroscopicity is characteristic of Cu{sub 2}CdGeSe{sub 4} single crystal surface. • Cu 4d states contribute mainly at the bottom of the valence band. • Cu 3d states contribute predominantly at the top of the valence band. • Ge 4p and Se 4p states contribute in the central and upper portions of the band.

  13. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  14. The European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godby, Rex

    2007-03-01

    The ETSF (www.etsf.eu) is being created as a permanent output of the EU-funded Nanoquanta Network of Excellence (www.nanoquanta.eu, 2004-8), which joins 10 groups and over 100 researchers in research on the theory and simulation of spectroscopy of electrons in matter, and related excited-state electronic properties including quantum transport. The ETSF is intended to contribute significantly to nanoscience and nanotechnology through the development and application of theoretical spectroscopy, involving close collaboration between theorists (the existing Nanoquanta groups together with further theoretical groups) and a new community of experimental and industrial researchers who wish to apply modern theories of spectroscopy. In this talk I shall review some of the scientific output of the project so far, including the development of new ideas and techniques in many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density-functional theory, and their application to a variety of prototype and actual systems including quantum transport in nanostructures, optical absorption in biological molecules and advanced materials, optical properties of nanoclusters and nanotubes, non-linear optical response, and spectroscopies of complex surfaces. I shall also briefly describe the network's integration activities, including code interoperability and modularity, training of internal and external researchers, and the legal, financial and organizational preparations for the ETSF.

  15. Heavy quark spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165164

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of $3.0 fb^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions collected with the LHCb detector has yielded a broad range of results in spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons with heavy quark(s) inside. We review the LHCb results which have been obtained over the last year.

  16. Raman spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    First volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  17. Picosecond spectroscopy of dihydro biliverdin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Manfred; Brunner, Harald; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1991-10-01

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy was performed on dihydro biliverdin, a model for the chromophore in the plant pigment phytochrome, a chromoprotein governing plant growth. Close agreement between the model compound and the native chromophore proves the importance of the saturated pyrrol ring for the decay kinetics and renders chromophore protonation in phytochrome unlikely.

  18. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given. (DWL)

  19. Workshop on heavy hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The recent developments in heavy hadron spectroscopy at LHCb have shown that LHCb has a unique potential in the field, combining hadronic production mechanisms to a powerful identification system. In this short workshop we focus on the recent results from LHCb and theoretical developments with attention to the future perspectives, in the context of the potential of current and future experiments.

  20. Retroreflecting polarization spectroscopy enabling miniaturization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groswasser, D; Waxman, A; Givon, M; Aviv, G; Japha, Y; Keil, M; Folman, R

    2009-09-01

    We describe and characterize alternative configurations for Doppler-free polarization spectroscopy. The suggested apparatus enables complete pump/probe beam overlap and allows substantial miniaturization. Its utility and performance for narrow linewidth, high-stability frequency locking is discussed for the /5S(1/2)F=2>-->/5P(3/2)F(')>D(2) transition in (87)Rb.

  1. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  2. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  3. Open charm spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Recent charm spectroscopy results from Dalitz plot analyses of $B$ decays to open charm final states at LHCb are presented. The decay modes used are $B^{+} \\to D^{-} K^{+} \\pi^{+}$, $B^{0} \\to \\overline{D}{}^{0} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B^{0} \\to \\overline{D}{}^{0} K^{+} \\pi^{-}$.

  4. Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ochkin, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    Providing an up-to-date overview on spectroscopical diagnostics of low temperature plasma Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma covers the latest developments and techniques. Written by a distinguished scientist and experienced book author this text is applicable to many fields in materials and surface science as well as nanotechnology and contains numerous appendices with indispensable reference data.

  5. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  6. Growth of an Ultrathin Zirconia Film on Pt3Zr Examined by High-Resolution X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Desorption, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin (∼3 Å) zirconium oxide films were grown on a single-crystalline Pt3Zr(0001) substrate by oxidation in 1 × 10–7 mbar of O2 at 673 K, followed by annealing at temperatures up to 1023 K. The ZrO2 films are intended to serve as model supports for reforming catalysts and fuel cell anodes. The atomic and electronic structure and composition of the ZrO2 films were determined by synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) (including depth profiling), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oxidation mainly leads to ultrathin trilayer (O–Zr–O) films on the alloy; only a small area fraction (10–15%) is covered by ZrO2 clusters (thickness ∼0.5–10 nm). The amount of clusters decreases with increasing annealing temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO was utilized to confirm complete coverage of the Pt3Zr substrate by ZrO2, that is, formation of a closed oxide overlayer. Experiments and DFT calculations show that the core level shifts of Zr in the trilayer ZrO2 films are between those of metallic Zr and thick (bulklike) ZrO2. Therefore, the assignment of such XPS core level shifts to substoichiometric ZrOx is not necessarily correct, because these XPS signals may equally well arise from ultrathin ZrO2 films or metal/ZrO2 interfaces. Furthermore, our results indicate that the common approach of calculating core level shifts by DFT including final-state effects should be taken with care for thicker insulating films, clusters, and bulk insulators. PMID:25688293

  7. Growth of an Ultrathin Zirconia Film on Pt3Zr Examined by High-Resolution X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Desorption, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Choi, Joong-Il Jake; Mayr-Schmölzer, Wernfried; Weilach, Christian; Rameshan, Christoph; Mittendorfer, Florian; Redinger, Josef; Schmid, Michael; Rupprechter, Günther

    2015-02-05

    Ultrathin (∼3 Å) zirconium oxide films were grown on a single-crystalline Pt3Zr(0001) substrate by oxidation in 1 × 10(-7) mbar of O2 at 673 K, followed by annealing at temperatures up to 1023 K. The ZrO2 films are intended to serve as model supports for reforming catalysts and fuel cell anodes. The atomic and electronic structure and composition of the ZrO2 films were determined by synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) (including depth profiling), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oxidation mainly leads to ultrathin trilayer (O-Zr-O) films on the alloy; only a small area fraction (10-15%) is covered by ZrO2 clusters (thickness ∼0.5-10 nm). The amount of clusters decreases with increasing annealing temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO was utilized to confirm complete coverage of the Pt3Zr substrate by ZrO2, that is, formation of a closed oxide overlayer. Experiments and DFT calculations show that the core level shifts of Zr in the trilayer ZrO2 films are between those of metallic Zr and thick (bulklike) ZrO2. Therefore, the assignment of such XPS core level shifts to substoichiometric ZrO x is not necessarily correct, because these XPS signals may equally well arise from ultrathin ZrO2 films or metal/ZrO2 interfaces. Furthermore, our results indicate that the common approach of calculating core level shifts by DFT including final-state effects should be taken with care for thicker insulating films, clusters, and bulk insulators.

  8. Electronic structure of aromatic amino acids studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhua; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Prince, Kevin C.

    2009-07-01

    The electronic structure of phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, and 3-methylindole in the gas phase was investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the C, N, and O K-edges. The XPS spectra have been calculated for the four principal conformers of each amino acid, and the spectra weighted by the Boltzmann population ratios calculated from published free energies. Instead of the single peaks expected from the stoichiometry of the compounds, the N 1s core level spectra of phenylalanine and tryptophan show features indicating that more than one conformer is present. The calculations reproduce the experimental features. The C and O 1s spectra do not show evident effects due to conformational isomerism. The calculations predict that such effects are small for carbon, and for oxygen it appears that only broadening occurs. The carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectra of these aromatic amino acids are similar to the published data of the corresponding molecules in the solid state, but show more structure due to the higher resolution in the present study. The N K-edge spectra of tryptophan and 3-methylindole differ from phenylalanine and tyrosine, as the first two both contain a nitrogen atom located in a pyrrole ring. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra of aromatic amino acids do not show any measurable effects due to conformational isomerism, in contrast to the photoemission results. Calculations support this result and show that variations of the vertical excitation energies of different conformers are small, and cannot be resolved in the present experiment. The O NEXAFS spectra of these three aromatic compounds are very similar to other, simpler amino acids, which have been studied previously.

  9. Electronic structures of U X3 (X =Al , Ga, and In) studied by photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Kobata, Masaaki; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structures of U X3 (X =Al , Ga , and In ) were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy to understand the relationship between their electronic structures and magnetic properties. The band structures and Fermi surfaces of UAl3 and UGa3 were revealed experimentally by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), and they were compared with the result of band-structure calculations. The topologies of the Fermi surfaces and the band structures of UAl3 and UGa3 were explained reasonably well by the calculation, although bands near the Fermi level (EF) were renormalized owing to the finite electron correlation effect. The topologies of the Fermi surfaces of UAl3 and UGa3 are very similar to each other, except for some minor differences. Such minor differences in their Fermi surface or electron correlation effect might take an essential role in their different magnetic properties. No significant changes were observed between the ARPES spectra of UGa3 in the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases, suggesting that UGa3 is an itinerant weak antiferromagnet. The effect of chemical pressure on the electronic structures of U X3 compounds was also studied by utilizing the smaller lattice constants of UAl3 and UGa3 than that of UIn3. The valence band spectrum of UIn3 is accompanied by a satellitelike structure on the high-binding-energy side. The core-level spectrum of UIn3 is also qualitatively different from those of UAl3 and UGa3. These findings suggest that the U 5 f states in UIn3 are more localized than those in UAl3 and UGa3.

  10. Imaging spectroscopy for characterisation of grass swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Imaging spectroscopy, imaging spectrometry, remote sensing, reflection, reflectance, grass sward, white clover, recognition, characterisation, ground cover, growth monitoring, stress detection, heterogeneity quantificationThe potential of imaging spectroscopy as a tool for characterisation

  11. Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A collection of 22 introductory exercise problems for the course "Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (QCS)".......A collection of 22 introductory exercise problems for the course "Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (QCS)"....

  12. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  13. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  14. Contributions to the theory of electron spectroscopy. Applications of the relativistic multiple-scattering theory; Beitraege zur Theorie der Elektronenspektroskopie. Anwendungen der relativistischen Vielfachstreutheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henk, J.

    2004-12-17

    Electron spectroscopy provides access to fundamental properties of solids, such as the geometric, electronic, and the magnetic structure. The latter are necessary for the understanding of a variety of basic but nevertheless important effects. The present work outlines recently developed theoretical approaches to electron spectroscopies. Most of the collected results rely on first-principles calculations, as formulated in multiple-scattering theory, and are contrasted with experimental findings. One topic involves spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy which is addressed for magnetic surfaces and ultrathin films. Exemplary results comprise magnetic dichroism in both valence-band and core-level photoemission as well as the temperature dependence of magnetic properties of ultrathin films. Another topic is spin-dependent ballistic transport through planar tunnel junctions, focusing here on the zero-bias anomaly. In most of the cases, spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is an essential ingredient and, hence, favors a relativistic description. Prominent effects of SOC are illustrated by means of the electronic structure of rare gases adsorbed on a substrate and by the splitting of surface states on Au(111). Concerning magnetism, the magnetic anisotropy of Ni films on Cu(001) is discussed, focusing in particular on the spin reorientation transition induced by lattice distortions in ultrathin films. (orig.)

  15. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2Π_u - X^2Σ_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 1×10-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich

  16. Using optical nanofibers for spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Fernandez, R; Bruse, F; Dan, C; Karapetyan, K; Rehband, O; Stiebeiner, A; Wiedemann, U; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We review our recent progress in the production and characterization of tapered optical fibers with a sub-wavelength diameter waist. Such fibers exhibit a pronounced evanescent field and are therefore a useful tool for highly sensitive evanescent wave spectroscopy of adsorbates on the fiber waist or of the medium surrounding. We use a carefully designed flame pulling process that allows us to realize preset fiber diameter profiles. In order to determine the waist diameter and to verify the fiber profile, we employ scanning electron microscope measurements and a novel accurate in situ optical method based on harmonic generation. We use our fibers for linear and non-linear absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of surface-adsorbed organic molecules and investigate their agglomeration dynamics. Furthermore, we apply our spectroscopic method to quantum dots on the surface of the fiber waist and to caesium vapor surrounding the fiber. Finally, towards dispersive measurements, we present our first results on buil...

  17. Analytical Spectroscopy Using Modular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brian M.; Danielson, Neil D.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Sommer, André J.

    2003-12-01

    This article describes the development of three analytical spectroscopy experiments that compare the determination of salicylic acid (SA) content in aspirin tablets. The experiments are based on UV vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies and utilize modular spectroscopic components. Students assemble their own instruments, optimize them with respect to signal-to-noise, generate calibration curves, determine the SA content in retail aspirin tablets, and assign features in the respective spectra to functional groups within the active material. Using this approach in the discovery-based setting, the students gain invaluable insight into method-specific parameters, such as instrumental components, sample preparation, and analytical capability. In addition, the students learn the fundamentals of fiber optics and signal processing using the low-cost CCD based spectroscopic components.

  18. Velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1989-03-01

    The use of velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy (VADS) to measure center-of-mass kinetic-energy distributions of nascent photofragments produced in pulsed-initiation photolysis/probe experiments is described and demonstrated. In VADS, pulsed photolysis and probe laser beams counterpropagate through the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The theoretical principles of VADS and the mathematical interpretation of VADS data are explained and illustrated with diagrams; the experimental setup is described; and results for the photodissociation of HI, H2S, and NH3 are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. VADS is shown to give much higher kinetic-energy resolution than conventional Doppler spectroscopy.

  19. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika M. K.; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S.; Horowitz, Gary L.

    2002-11-01

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r2 values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media.

  20. Molecular Spectroscopy of Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has been a powerful tool in the study of molecules in gas phase, condensed phase, and at interfaces. The transition from in vitro spectroscopy to spectroscopic imaging of living systems is opening new opportunities to reveal cellular machinery and to enable molecule-based diagnosis (Science 2015, 350: 1054). Such a transition involves more than a simple combination of spectrometry and microscopy. In this presentation, I will discuss the most recent efforts that have pushed the physical limits of spectroscopic imaging in terms of spectral acquisition speed, detection sensitivity, spatial resolution and imaging depth. I will further highlight significant applications in functional analysis of single cells and in label-free detection of diseases.

  1. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  2. Spectroscopy of the Heaviest Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roderick

    2009-10-01

    The specific ``magic'' proton and neutron numbers, representing major spherical shell gaps, beyond 208Pb are a matter of considerable debate. It is well established that nuclei near Z=100, N=152 (252Fm) have well-deformed prolate shapes. By performing prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy on deformed transfermium nuclei we can learn about the single-particle structure, shell gaps, pairing correlations, and excitation modes in the heaviest nuclei. After a brief overview of state-of-the-art measurements, I will describe recent results from experiments at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory which use the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). I will then discuss the prospects of a new generation of spectroscopy measurements on the heaviest elements when the BGS is used in conjunction with the GRETINA gamma--ray tracking array.

  3. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  4. Baryon spectroscopy in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek B. Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; David Richards; Anthony G. Williams; James Zanotti

    2004-04-01

    We review recent developments in the study of excited baryon spectroscopy in lattice QCD. After introducing the basic methods used to extract masses from correlation functions, we discuss various interpolating fields and lattice actions commonly used in the literature. We present a survey of results of recent calculations of excited baryons in quenched QCD, and outline possible future directions in the study of baryon spectra.

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy with actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potzel, W.; Moser, J.; Asch, L.; Kalvius, G.M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.)

    1983-01-01

    Although formally equivalent to the lanthanide (4f) elements, the light actinides show a much more varied behaviour due to the larger spatial extent and ionizability of the 5f electrons. The application of Moessbauer spectroscopy for the determination of electronic properties of the actinides is outlined. Emphasis is put on high pressure Moessbauer experiments using the 60 keV transition in /sup 237/Np to study questions of delocalization of 5f electrons.

  6. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Hummer, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A review on the quantitative spectroscopy (QS) of hot stars is presented, with particular attention given to the study of photospheres, optically thin winds, unified model atmospheres, and stars with optically thick winds. It is concluded that the results presented here demonstrate the reliability of Qs as a unique source of accurate values of the global parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and elemental abundances) of hot stars.

  7. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  8. Continuum spectroscopy of light nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charity R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonance spectroscopy of light nuclei is discussed with emphasis on the invariant-mass measurements performed with the HiRA detector. For three-body exit channels, we consider the exact conditions necessary such that the decay can be described as either sequential or prompt. However experimentally, we find some cases where the decay is intermediate between these two limits. Finally, two-proton decay from isobaric analog states is discussed.

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hüfner, Stefan

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy presents an up-to-date introduction to the field by treating comprehensively the electronic structures of atoms, molecules, solids and surfaces Brief descriptions are given of inverse photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission and photoelectron diffraction Experimental aspects are considered throughout the book, and the results are carefully interpreted by theory A wealth of measured data is presented in the form of tables for easy use by experimentalists

  10. Flatfielding in Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    similar to that of a Michelson interferometer used for Fourier- transform spectroscopy (FTS) with the return mir- rors replaced by fixed diffraction...Cheben, I. Powell, S. Janz, and D. Xu, “Wavelength- dispersive device based on a Fourier-transform Michelson -type arrayed waveguide grating,” Opt. Lett...C. R. Englert, J. G. Cardon, R. R. Conway, C. M. Brown, and J. Wimperis. “Robust monolithic ultraviolet interferometer for the SHIMMER instrument on

  11. Spectroscopy, scattering, and KK molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The author presents a pedagogical description of a new theoretical technique, based on the multichannel Schroedinger equation, for simultaneously applying the quark model to both meson spectroscopy and meson-meson scattering. This is an extension of an earlier analysis which led to the prediction that the f{sub o}(975) and a{sub o}(980) scalar mesons are K{bar K} molecular states.

  12. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  13. Decoherence Spectroscopy for Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Trubko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence due to photon scattering in an atom interferometer was studied as a function of laser frequency near an atomic resonance. The resulting decoherence (contrast-loss spectra will be used to calibrate measurements of tune-out wavelengths that are made with the same apparatus. To support this goal, a theoretical model of decoherence spectroscopy is presented here along with experimental tests of this model.

  14. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is based on the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by analyte molecules. The absorbed energy is measured by detecting pressure fluctuations in the form of sound waves or shock pulses. In contrast to conventional absorption spectroscopy (such as UV/Vis spectroscopy), PAS allows the determination of absorption coefficients over several orders of magnitude, even in opaque and strongly scattering samples. Small absorption coefficients, such as those encountered during trace gas monitoring, can be detected with cells with relatively short pathlengths. Furthermore, PA techniques allow absorption spectra of solid samples (including powders, chips or large objects) to be determined, and they permit depth profiling of layered systems. These features mean that PAS can be used for on-line monitoring in technical processes without the need for sample preparation and to perform depth-resolved characterization of industrial products. This article gives an overview on PA excitation and detection schemes employed in analytical chemistry, and reviews applications of PAS in process analytical technology and characterization of industrial products.

  15. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  16. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Zanoni, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Stranges, S. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); IOM-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Alagia, M. [IOM-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste, Italy and IOM-CNR Democritos, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-04-07

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the {sigma}/{pi} hyperconjugation in EtFC and the {pi}-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  17. Electronic properties of atomic layer deposition films, anatase and rutile TiO2 studied by resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, C.; Richter, M.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2016-07-01

    The TiO2 films are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using titanium isopropoxide precursors at 250 °C and analyzed using resonant photoemission spectroscopy (resPES). We report on the Ti2p and O1s core levels, on the valence band (VB) spectra and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, and on the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES) profiles at the O1s and the Ti3p absorption edges. We determine the elemental abundance, the position of the VB maxima, the partial density of states (PDOS) in the VB and in the conduction band (CB) and collect these data in a band scheme. In addition, we analyze the band-gap states as well as the intrinsic states due to polarons and charge-transfer excitations. These states are found to cause multiple Auger decay processes upon resonant excitation. We identify several of these processes and determine their relative contribution to the Auger signal quantitatively. As our resPES data allow a quantitative analysis of these defect states, we determine the relative abundance of the PDOS in the VB and in CB and also the charge neutrality level. The anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2 are analyzed in the same way as the TiO2 ALD layer. The electronic properties of the TiO2 ALD layer are compared with the anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2. In our comparative study, we find that ALD has its own characteristic electronic structure that is distinct from that of anatase and rutile. However, many details of the electronic structure are comparable and we benefit from our spectroscopic data and our careful analysis to find these differences. These can be attributed to a stronger hybridization of the O2p and Ti3d4s states for the ALD films when compared to the anatase and rutile polymorphs.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, James Shaw

    Raman spectroscopy was used in conjunction with x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate structural and compositional information on a variety of samples. Raman was used on the unique La 2NiMnO6 mixed double perovskite which is a member of the LaMnO3 family of perovskites and has multiferroic properties. Raman was also used on nanodiamond films as well as some boron-doped carbon compounds. Finally, Raman was used to identify metal-dendrimer bonds that have previously been overlooked. Vibrational modes for La2NiMnO6 were ascribed by comparing spectra with that for LaMnO3 bulk and thin film spectra. The two most prominent modes were labeled as an asymmetric stretch (A g) centered around 535 cm-1 and a symmetric stretch (B g) centered around 678 cm. The heteroepitaxial quality of La2NiMnO 6 films on SrTiO3 (100) and LaAlO3 (100) substrates were examined using the Raman microscope by way of depth profile experiments and by varying the thickness of the films. It was found that thin films (10 nm) had much greater strain on the LaAlO3 substrate than on the SrTiO3 substrate by examining the shifts of the Ag and the Bg modes from their bulk positions. Changes in the unit cell owing to the presence of oxygen defects were also monitored using Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the Ag and Bg modes shifted between samples formed with different oxygen partial pressures. These shifts could be correlated to changes in the symmetry of the manganese centers due to oxygen defects. Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the structural and compositional characteristics of carbon materials. Nanocrystalline diamond coated cutting tools were examined using the Raman Microscope. Impact, abrasion, and depth profile experiments indicated that delamination was the primary cause of film failure in these systems. Boron doped material of interest as catalyst supports were also examined. Monitoring of the G-mode and intensities of the D- and G-modes indicated that

  19. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  20. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  1. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Isotope-edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying structural and dynamical properties of peptides and proteins with site-specific resolution. Labeling of selected amide carbonyls with (13)C results in detectable sidebands of amide I' vibrations, which provide information about local conformation and/or solvent exposure without structural perturbation to the protein. Incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids at specific positions is achieved by the chemical synthesis of the studied proteins. We describe the basic procedures for synthesis of (13)C isotopically edited protein samples, experimental IR spectroscopic measurements, and analysis of the site-specific structural changes from the thermal unfolding IR data.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy at High Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Goncharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is one of the most informative probes for studies of material properties under extreme conditions of high pressure. The Raman techniques have become more versatile over the last decades as a new generation of optical filters and multichannel detectors become available. Here, recent progress in the Raman techniques for high-pressure research and its applications in numerous scientific disciplines including physics and chemistry of materials under extremes, earth and planetary science, new materials synthesis, and high-pressure metrology will be discussed.

  3. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  4. Self-Powered Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    publications, 1 more in preparation, 1 archival conference paper, and 2 invention disclosures . 15. SUBJECT TERMS spectroscopy, nanoparticles, medical...name and address of the organization(s) financially responsible for and monitoring the work. 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S). Enter, if...analyzing  the  chemical  composition  of  many   materials :  the  interaction  of  optical  photons   with  the  underlying

  5. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Experimental techniques in hadron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianotti P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD is the theory of the strong interaction, but the properties of the hadrons cannot be directly calculated from the QCD Lagrangian and alternative approaches are then used. In order to test the different models, precise measurements of hadron properties are of extreme importance. This is the main motivation for the hadron spectroscopy experimental program carried out since many years with different probes and different detectors. A survey of some recent results in the field is here presented and commented, together with the opportunities offered by the forthcoming experimental programs.

  7. Cars Spectroscopy of Propellant Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Harris, K. Aron, and J. Fendell "N2 and 00 Vibrational CARS and H2 Rotational CARS Spectroscopy of CHI/N20 Flames," Proceedings of the Nineteenth...JANNAF Combustion Meeting, CIIA Publication No. 366, 1982, p 123. 21. K. Aron, L. E. Harris, and J. Fendell , "N and CO Vibrational CARS and H2 Rotational...9 6 5 . p 3 8 4 . . . . . 23. J. Fendell , L. E, Harris, and K. Aron, "Theoretical Calculation of 11 CARS S-Branches for Propellant Flames

  8. Nonlinear and magic ponderomotive spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Kaitlin

    2015-01-01

    In ponderomotive spectroscopy an amplitude-modulated optical standing wave is employed to probe Rydberg-atom transitions, utilizing a ponderomotive rather than a dipole-field interaction. Here, we engage nonlinearities in the modulation to drive dipole-forbidden transitions up to the fifth order. We reach transition frequencies approaching the sub-THz regime. We also demonstrate magic-wavelength conditions, which result in symmetric spectral lines with a Fourier-limited feature at the line center. Applicability to precision measurement is discussed.

  9. Exoplanet Transmission Spectroscopy using KMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Parviainen, Hannu; Thatte, Niranjan; Barstow, Joanna K; Evans, Thomas M; Gibson, Neale

    2015-01-01

    KMOS (K-Band Multi Object Spectrograph) is a novel integral field spectrograph installed in the VLT's ANTU unit. The instrument offers an ability to observe 24 2.8"$\\times$2.8" sub-fields positionable within a 7.2' patrol field, each sub-field producing a spectrum with a 14$\\times$14-pixel spatial resolution. The main science drivers for KMOS are the study of galaxies, star formation, and molecular clouds, but its ability to simultaneously measure spectra of multiple stars makes KMOS an interesting instrument for exoplanet atmosphere characterization via transmission spectroscopy. We set to test whether transmission spectroscopy is practical with KMOS, and what are the conditions required to achieve the photometric precision needed, based on observations of a partial transit of WASP-19b, and full transits of GJ 1214b and HD 209458b. Our analysis uses the simultaneously observed comparison stars to reduce the effects from instrumental and atmospheric sources, and Gaussian processes to model the residual system...

  10. Gallstone identification by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Asima; Laxmi, B. V.; Jena, Sidhartha S.; Khulbe, P. K.; Bist, Hari D.; Agarwal, Asha

    1998-04-01

    Gallstones have been classified as being cholesterol type and pigment type. The classification is important for diet control of the patient to avoid recurrence of the stone. Spectroscopy is a sensitive technique to determine the composition of the gallstone both in-vitro and in-vivo. this work deals with the fluorescence spectroscopy of gallstone. For fluorescence spectroscopic studies of gallstone, samples were excited with 5 mw of 488 nm line of argon-ion laser and spectra were recorded with a SPEX 1877E triplemate attached with a cooled PMT and DM3000R data acquisition system. Fluorescence spectra from pure cholesterol and bilirubin were also recorded for comparison. Different types of gallstones: mixed, cholesterol, pigment type were studied. All spectra exhibited a very broad band, 500 to 800 nm and sometimes two bands, depending on type of stone. Pure cholesterol shows three prominent fluorescence peaks at 513, 550, 583 nm along with two peaks at approximately 568 and 586 nm. Pure bilirubin shows prominent peak at 628 nm, without any Raman line. From fluorescence spectra different types of stones are identified. Different gallstones studied show a mixture of cholesterol and bilirubin types and the ratio of the two varies from one sample type to another.

  11. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  12. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  13. Quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Song Bin

    2015-01-01

    The concept of nonlinear quantum-beat pump-probe Auger spectroscopy is introduced by discussing a relatively simple four-level model system. We consider a coherent wave packet involving two low-lying states that was prepared by an appropriate pump pulse. This wave packet is subsequently probed by a weak, time-delayed probe pulse with nearly resonant coupling to a core-excited state of the atomic or molecular system. The resonant Auger spectra are then studied as a function of the duration of the probe pulse and the time delay. With a bandwidth of the probe pulse approaching the energy spread of the wave packet, the Auger yields and spectra show quantum beats as a function of pump-probe delay. An analytic theory for the quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy will be presented, which allows for the reconstruction of the wave packet by analyzing the delaydependent Auger spectra. The possibility of extending this method to a more complex manifold of electronic and vibrational energy levels is also discussed.

  14. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  15. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.;

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a tra......A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed...... in a transmission spectrum and it is very sensitive to the constituent materials as well as both lateral and vertical dimensions of the structures. This makes LSPR spectroscopy interesting for a number of applications including nanometrology. Like scatterometry, LSPR spectroscopy requires test structures...

  16. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  17. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  18. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  19. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of As and Ga out-diffusion in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, C.; Woicik, J. C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lysaght, P.; Price, J.; Huang, J. [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Rd., Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2012-08-06

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate stacks as deposited and annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C, 500 Degree-Sign C, and 700 Degree-Sign C to test for out-diffusion of substrate elements. Ga and As core-level intensities increase with increasing anneal temperature, while the In intensity decreases. HAXPES was performed at two different beam energies to vary the surface sensitivity; results demonstrate Ga and As out-diffuse into the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film. Analysis suggests the presence of an interlayer containing Ga and As oxides, which thickens with increasing anneal temperature. Further diffusion, especially of Ga, into the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film is also observed with increasing anneal temperature.

  20. Understanding the role of buried interface charges in a metal-oxide-semiconductor stack of Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, J. R.; Opila, R. L. [University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States); Weiland, C. [Synchrotron Research, Inc., Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) analyses were carried out on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) samples consisting of Si, thick and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a Ti metal cap. Using Si 1s and C 1s core levels for an energy reference, the Al 1s and Si 1s spectra were analyzed to reveal information about the location and roles of charges throughout the MOS layers. With different oxide thicknesses (2 nm and 23 nm), the depth sensitivity of HAXPES is exploited to probe different regions in the MOS structure. Post Ti deposition results indicated unexpected band alignment values between the thin and thick films, which are explained by the behavior of mobile charge within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer.

  1. A study of reversible gamma-induced structural transformations in vitreous Ge23.5Sb11.8S64.7 by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalskiy, Andriy; Jain, Himanshu; Miller, Alfred C; Golovchak, Roman Ya; Shpotyuk, Oleh I

    2006-11-16

    The structural origin of reversible gamma-induced effects in vitreous Ge(23.5)Sb(11.8)S(64.7) has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in valence band spectrum from gamma-irradiation suggest a decrease of sulfur lone pair electron concentration accompanied by changes in bonding states of S and Ge. The appearance of additional doublets in the core-level XPS spectra of Ge, Sb, and S atoms for gamma-irradiated sample is described by the formation of over- and under-coordinated charged defect pairs (Ge(3)(-)-S(3)(+)) as a result of radiation treatment. The results verify the switching of Ge-S covalent bonds into S-S bonds as the main microstructural mechanism for gamma-induced optical effects in this glass.

  2. Surface inspection using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, G. L.; Smyrl, N. R.; Williams, D. M.; Meyers, H. M., III; Barber, T. E.; Marrero-Rivera, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a tool for surface inspection is described. Laboratory instruments and portable instruments can support remote sensing probes that can map chemical contaminants on surfaces with detection limits under the best of conditions in the sub-nanometer range, i.e.. near absolute cleanliness, excellent performance in the sub-micrometer range, and useful performance for films tens of microns thick. Examples of discovering and quantifying contamination such as mineral oils and greases, vegetable oils, and silicone oils on aluminum foil, galvanized sheet steel, smooth aluminum tubing, and sandblasted 7075 aluminum alloy and D6AC steel. The ability to map in time and space the distribution of oil stains on metals is demonstrated. Techniques associated with quantitatively applying oils to metals, subsequently verifying the application, and non-linear relationships between reflectance and the quantity oil are described.

  3. Dielectric Spectroscopy in Biomaterials: Agrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia El Khaled

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Being dependent on temperature and frequency, dielectric properties are related to various types of food. Predicting multiple physical characteristics of agri-food products has been the main objective of non-destructive assessment possibilities executed in many studies on horticultural products and food materials. This review manipulates the basic fundamentals of dielectric properties with their concepts and principles. The different factors affecting the behavior of dielectric properties have been dissected, and applications executed on different products seeking the characterization of a diversity of chemical and physical properties are all pointed out and referenced with their conclusions. Throughout the review, a detailed description of the various adopted measurement techniques and the mostly popular equipment are presented. This compiled review serves in coming out with an updated reference for the dielectric properties of spectroscopy that are applied in the agrophysics field.

  4. Single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Jonne; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Gaub, Hermann E; Muller, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The controlled adhesion of cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix is crucial for tissue development and maintenance. Numerous assays have been developed to quantify cell adhesion. Among these, the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) has recently been established. This assay permits the adhesion of living cells to be studied in near-physiological conditions. This implementation of AFM allows unrivaled spatial and temporal control of cells, as well as highly quantitative force actuation and force measurement that is sufficiently sensitive to characterize the interaction of single molecules. Therefore, not only overall cell adhesion but also the properties of single adhesion-receptor-ligand interactions can be studied. Here we describe current implementations and applications of SCFS, as well as potential pitfalls, and outline how developments will provide insight into the forces, energetics and kinetics of cell-adhesion processes.

  5. Towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, J [CERN-EP/APE, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Fendel, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Herrmann, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Koenig, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pahl, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pittner, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schatz, B [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Haensch, T W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2003-02-14

    Cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap will open up a fascinating field of very precise CPT tests by ultrahigh-resolution laser spectroscopy. Equally exciting is the prospect for experiments on the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. For both types of experiment it is of great importance to have antihydrogen as cold as possible. Laser cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1S-2P transition at Lyman-{alpha} (121.56 nm). The highest cooling efficiency, lowest temperature, and best magnetic sublevel selectivity is expected for continuous coherent radiation. We present an account of the first source for continuous coherent radiation at Lyman-{alpha} and discuss possible applications in experiments with antihydrogen.

  6. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  7. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  8. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  9. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.E.

    1977-10-01

    The use of modulation spectroscopy to study the electronic properties of solids has been very productive. The construction of a wide range Wavelength Modulation Spectrometer to study the optical properties of solids is described in detail. Extensions of the working range of the spectrometer into the vacuum ultraviolet are discussed. Measurements of the reflectivity and derivative reflectivity spectra of the lead chalcogenides, the chalcopyrite ZnGeP/sub 2/, the layer compounds GaSe and GaS and their alloys, the ferroelectric SbSI, layer compounds SnS/sub 2/ and SnSe/sub 2/, and HfS/sub 2/ were made. The results of these measurements are presented along with their interpretation in terms of band structure calculations.

  10. Spectroscopy of Isolated Prebiotic Nucleobases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svadlenak, Nathan; Callahan, Michael P.; Ligare, Marshall; Gulian, Lisa; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Nachtigallova, Dana; Hobza, Pavel; deVries, Mattanjah

    2011-01-01

    We use multiphoton ionization and double resonance spectroscopy to study the excited state dynamics of biologically relevant molecules as well as prebiotic nucleobases, isolated in the gas phase. Molecules that are biologically relevant to life today tend to exhibit short excited state lifetimes compared to similar but non-biologically relevant analogs. The mechanism is internal conversion, which may help protect the biologically active molecules from UV damage. This process is governed by conical intersections that depend very strongly on molecular structure. Therefore we have studied purines and pyrimidines with systematic variations of structure, including substitutions, tautomeric forms, and cluster structures that represent different base pair binding motifs. These structural variations also include possible alternate base pairs that may shed light on prebiotic chemistry. With this in mind we have begun to probe the ultrafast dynamics of molecules that exhibit very short excited states and search for evidence of internal conversions.

  11. The COMPASS Hadron Spectroscopy Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, A

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS for the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a large acceptance and high momentum resolution spectrometer including particle identification and calorimetry and is therefore ideal to access a broad range of different final states. Following the promising observation of a spin-exotic resonance during an earlier pilot run, COMPASS focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the years 2008 and 2009. A data set, world leading in terms of statistics and resolution, has been collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on either liquid hydrogen or nuclear targets. Spin-exotic meson and glueball candidates formed in both diffractive dissociation and central production are presently studied. Since the beam composition includes protons, the excited baryon spectrum is also accessible. Furthermore, Primakoff reactions have the potential to determine radiative widths of the resonances and to probe chiral pe...

  12. Coherent Derivation of Equations for Differential Spectroscopy and Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy : An Undergraduate Tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, M.; Granasen, G.; Groenlund, C.

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a spectroscopic method that is frequently used in health care and sports medicine to monitor oxygenation parameters in biological tissue. This tutorial provides a coherent derivation of equations for differential spectroscopy and spatially resolved spectroscopy,

  13. Coherent Derivation of Equations for Differential Spectroscopy and Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy : An Undergraduate Tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, M.; Granasen, G.; Groenlund, C.

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a spectroscopic method that is frequently used in health care and sports medicine to monitor oxygenation parameters in biological tissue. This tutorial provides a coherent derivation of equations for differential spectroscopy and spatially resolved spectroscopy,

  14. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel and photoacoustic spectroscopy method for using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.; Green, David

    2005-03-29

    Methods and apparatus for analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically coupled with the vessel body. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  15. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessels and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods for using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.

    2006-02-14

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically positioned near the sample cells. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  16. Band alignments at interface of ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tao; Li, Ruifeng; Kong, Weiguang; Zhang, Bingpo; Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The band alignments at ZnO/HC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3} interface were measured by XPS. • The valence-band offset was determined to be 1.86 ± 0.10 eV. • The conduction-band offset was concluded to be 0.05 ± 0.10 eV. • The ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction has a type-I band alignment. • The desired band alignment is benefit for the new generation of solar cells. - Abstract: The band alignments at the interface of ZnO/HC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3} (FAPbI{sub 3}) heterojunction were measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Core levels of Pb 5d and Zn 3d were utilized to align the valence-band offset (VBO). The VBO was determined to be 1.86 ± 0.30 eV, and the conduction-band offset (CBO) was concluded to be 0.05 ± 0.30 eV, manifesting that the ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction has a type-I band alignment. The data of the band alignment of ZnO/FAPbI{sub 3} heterojunction may benefit the design and development of novel perovskite solar cells (PSCs).

  17. Probing the Electronic Structure of a Photoexcited Solar Cell Dye with Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Lynch, Michael S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Khalil, Munira

    2012-06-21

    This study uses transient X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy and timedependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to directly visualize the charge density around the metal atom and the surrounding ligands following an ultrafast metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) process in the widely used RuII solar cell dye, Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). We measure the Ru L-edge XA spectra of the singlet ground (1A1) and the transient triplet (3MLCT) excited state of N34 and perform TD-DFT calculations of 2p core-level excitations, which identify a unique spectral signature of the electron density on the NCS ligands. We find that the Ru 2p, Ru eg, and NCS orbitals are stabilized by 2.0, 1.0, and 0.6 eV, respectively, in the transient 3MLCT state of the dye. These results highlight the role of the NCS ligands in governing the oxidation state of the Ru center.

  18. In situ hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy of barrier-height control at metal/PMN-PT interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, E.; Petraru, A.; Quer, A.; Soni, R.; Kalläne, M.; Pertsev, N. A.; Kohlstedt, H.; Rossnagel, K.

    2016-06-01

    Metal-ferroelectric interfaces form the basis of novel electronic devices. A key effect determining the device functionality is the bias-dependent change of the electronic energy-level alignment at the interface. Here, hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is used to determine the energy-level alignment at two metal-ferroelectric interfaces—Au versus SrRuO3 on the relaxor ferroelectric Pb (Mg1 /3Nb2 /3 )0.72Ti0.28O3 (PMN-PT)—directly in situ as a function of electrical bias. The bias-dependent average shifts of the PMN-PT core levels are found to have two dominant contributions on the 0.1 -1-eV energy scale: one depending on the metal electrode and the remanent electric polarization and the other correlated with electric-field-induced strain. Element-specific deviations from the average shifts are smaller than 0.1 eV and appear to be related to predicted dynamical charge variations in PMN-PT. In addition, the efficiency of ferroelectric polarization switching is shown to be reduced near the coercive field under x-ray irradiation. The results establish HAXPES as a tool for the in operando investigation of metal-ferroelectric interfaces and suggest electric-field-induced modifications of the polarization distribution as a novel way to control the barrier height at such interfaces.

  19. Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/AlN heterojunction investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CNRS-International-NTU-THALES Research Alliances/UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2016-04-18

    The band alignment between AlN and Atomic-Layer-Deposited (ALD) HfO{sub 2} was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The shift of Al 2p core-levels to lower binding energies with the decrease of take-off angles θ indicated upward band bending occurred at the AlN surface. Based on the angle-resolved XPS measurements combined with numerical calculations, valence band discontinuity ΔE{sub V} of 0.4 ± 0.2 eV at HfO{sub 2}/AlN interface was determined by taking AlN surface band bending into account. By taking the band gap of HfO{sub 2} and AlN as 5.8 eV and 6.2 eV, respectively, a type-II band line-up was found between HfO{sub 2} and AlN.

  20. The initial atomic layer deposition of HfO2/Si(001) as followed in situ by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Karavaev, Konstantin; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2008-09-01

    We have grown HfO2 on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl4 and H2O as precursors. The early stages of the ALD were investigated with high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We observed the changes occurring in the Si2p, O1s, Hf4f, Hf4d, and Cl2p core level lines after each ALD cycle up to the complete formation of two layers of HfO2. From the analysis of those variations, we deduced the growth properties of HfO2. The first layer consists of a sparse and Cl-contaminated oxide because of the incomplete oxidation, and the second layer is denser than the first one and with an almost stoichiometric O /Hf ratio. At the completion of the second layer, the x-ray absorption spectra revealed the change of the Hf-oxide chemical state due to the transition from the thin Hf-oxide to the bulklike HfO2.

  1. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  2. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  3. Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Rubidium: An Undergraduate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, V.; Hingant, B.; Allafort, A.; Pigeard, M.; Roch, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe two complementary nonlinear spectroscopy methods which both allow one to achieve Doppler-free spectra of atomic gases. First, saturated absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the 5S[subscript 1/2] [right arrow] 5P[subscript 3/2] transition in rubidium. Using a slightly modified experimental…

  4. Raman spectroscopy and its urological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath S Hanchanale

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: Raman spectroscopy is an exciting tool for real-time diagnosis and in vivo evaluation of living tissue. The potential applications of Raman spectroscopy may herald a new future in the management of various malignant, premalignant, and other benign conditions in urology.

  5. Soil spectroscopy: an opportunity to be seized

    OpenAIRE

    NOCITA MARCO; Stevens, Antoine; van Wesemael Bas; Brown, David J.; Shepherd, Keith D; TOWETT Eick; VARGAS, Ronald; Montanarella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The trade-off between the growing need for large scale soil information and its high cost could be resolved by a widespread use of visible and infrared spectroscopy. A recent workshop by the European Commission – Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), focused on the measures to foster the global monitoring of soils based on spectroscopy.

  6. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Saliva Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Jopi J W; Raittila, Jussi; Rieppo, Lassi; Lappalainen, Reijo; Kullaa, Arja M; Myllymaa, Sami

    2016-09-01

    Saliva provides a valuable tool for assessing oral and systemic diseases, but concentrations of salivary components are very small, calling the need for precise analysis methods. In this work, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using transmission and photoacoustic (PA) modes were compared for quantitative analysis of saliva. The performance of these techniques was compared with a calibration series. The linearity of spectrum output was verified by using albumin-thiocyanate (SCN(-)) solution at different SCN(-) concentrations. Saliva samples used as a comparison were obtained from healthy subjects. Saliva droplets of 15 µL were applied on the silicon sample substrate, 6 drops for each specimen, and dried at 37 ℃ overnight. The measurements were carried out using an FT-IR spectrometer in conjunction with an accessory unit for PA measurements. The findings with both transmission and PA modes mirror each other. The major bands presented were 1500-1750 cm(-1) for proteins and 1050-1200 cm(-1) for carbohydrates. In addition, the distinct spectral band at 2050 cm(-1) derives from SCN(-) anions, which is converted by salivary peroxidases to hypothiocyanate (OSCN(-)). The correlation between the spectroscopic data with SCN(-) concentration (r > 0.990 for transmission and r = 0.967 for PA mode) was found to be significant (P < 0.01), thus promising to be utilized in future applications.

  7. Brain MR Spectroscopy: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Arsalan Zamani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in brain MR spectroscopy can be classified in"nthree different fields: MR spectroscopy with a higher"nstrength scanner, integration of MR spectroscopy with"nother imaging techniques in the diagnosis of brain"ntumors, and the topic of MRS in psychiatric diseases."nMRS with a higher strength magnet: The theoretical"nadvantage of a 3T magnet over a 1.5T magnet is an"nexpected two fold increase in signal to noise ratio. In"nIran J Radiol 2011, 8 (Supp.1 S63"nfact because of other factors (increased susceptibility"neffects, difficulty in achieving good shimming, shorter"nT1 values and the SAR issue this improved signal/"nnoise ratio is less than a factor of two. Nevertheless,"nin MRS with a higher strength magnet, there is a"ndefinite improved spectral resolution. This under"nproper condition allows a better separation of peaks"nthat were close together (or even superimposed on one"nanother on a 1.5T magnet. Imaging lactate becomes"nmore challenging as we will see."nAs the MRS has becomes better refined and its"ncapabilities better understood, it has found its way"ninto multiple imaging algorithms of brain tumors. One"nof the best known of these begins by dividing lesions"non the basis of whether they enhance or not and then,"nduring the rest of the algorithm uses MRS results in"nconjunction with DWI, and perfusion imaging toward"na more accurate diagnosis. The accuracy of these"nalgorithms is being tested but the results so far have"nbeen promising. The role of MRS in these algorithms"nis on differentiation of non-enhancing lesions (nonneoplastic"nvs. neoplastic and in the differentiation"nof high grade neoplasm into primary and metastatic"ndisease."nMRS in psychiatric disease: MR imaging in general"nand MRS in particular, have been used in psychiatry"nfor almost 30 years now. As imaging has evolved and"nimproved it has become more and more clear that"npsychiatric disease, like organic disease, has its own"nneuropathology. Although

  8. Direct observation of ring-opening dynamics in strong-field ionized selenophene using femtosecond inner-shell absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Closser, Kristina D.; Prendergast, David; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy is used to explore strong-field ionization induced dynamics in selenophene (C4H4Se). The dynamics are monitored in real-time from the viewpoint of the Se atom by recording the temporal evolution of element-specific spectral features near the Se 3d inner-shell absorption edge (˜58 eV). The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by first-principles time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The experiments simultaneously capture the instantaneous population of stable molecular ions, the emergence and decay of excited cation states, and the appearance of atomic fragments. The experiments reveal, in particular, insight into the strong-field induced ring-opening dynamics in the selenophene cation, which are traced by the emergence of non-cyclic molecules as well as the liberation of Se+ ions within an overall time scale of approximately 170 fs. We propose that both products may be associated with dynamics on the same electronic surfaces but with different degrees of vibrational excitation. The time-dependent inner-shell absorption features provide direct evidence for a complex relaxation mechanism that may be approximated by a two-step model, whereby the initially prepared, excited cyclic cation decays within τ1 = 80 ± 30 fs into a transient molecular species, which then gives rise to the emergence of bare Se+ and ring-open cations within an additional τ2 = 80 ± 30 fs. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest a close relationship between σ* excited cation states and the observed ring-opening reactions. The findings demonstrate that the combination of femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopy with ab initio estimates of spectroscopic signatures provide new insights into complex, ultrafast photochemical reactions such as ring-opening dynamics in organic molecules in real-time and with simultaneous sensitivity for electronic and structural

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  10. Al capping layers for nondestructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of transition-metal nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greczynski, Grzegorz, E-mail: grzgr@ifm.liu.se; Hultman, Lars [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Petrov, Ivan [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden and Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Greene, J. E. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801(United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analyses of materials that have been air exposed typically require ion etching in order to remove contaminated surface layers. However, the etching step can lead to changes in sample surface and near-surface compositions due to preferential elemental sputter ejection and forward recoil implantation; this is a particular problem for metal/gas compounds and alloys such as nitrides and oxides. Here, the authors use TiN as a model system and compare XPS analysis results from three sets of polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in a separate vacuum chamber. The films are either (1) air-exposed for ≤10 min prior to insertion into the ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) XPS system; (2) air-exposed and subject to ion etching, using different ion energies and beam incidence angles, in the XPS chamber prior to analysis; or (3) Al-capped in-situ in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. The authors show that thin, 1.5–6.0 nm, Al capping layers provide effective barriers to oxidation and contamination of TiN surfaces, thus allowing nondestructive acquisition of high-resolution core-level spectra representative of clean samples, and, hence, correct bonding assignments. The Ti 2p and N 1s satellite features, which are sensitive to ion bombardment, exhibit high intensities comparable to those obtained from single-crystal TiN/MgO(001) films grown and analyzed in-situ in a UHV XPS system and there is no indication of Al/TiN interfacial reactions. XPS-determined N/Ti concentrations acquired from Al/TiN samples agree very well with Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil analysis results while ion-etched air-exposed samples exhibit strong N loss due to preferential resputtering. The intensities and shapes of the Ti 2p and N 1s core level signals from Al/TiN/Si(001) samples do not change following long-term (up to 70 days) exposure to ambient conditions

  11. Velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1989-03-01

    The technique of velocity-aligned Doppler spectrosocopy (VADS) is presented and discussed. For photolysis/probe experiments with pulsed initiation, VADS can yield Doppler profiles for nascent photofragments that allow detailed center-of-mass (c.m.) kinetic energy distributions to be extracted. When compared with traditional forms of Doppler spectroscopy, the improvement in kinetic energy resolution is dramatic. Changes in the measured profiles are a consequence of spatial discrimination (i.e., focused and overlapping photolysis and probe beams) and delayed observation. These factors result in the selective detection of species whose velocities are aligned with the wave vector of the probe radiation k/sub pr/, thus revealing the speed distribution along k/sub pr/ rather than the distribution of nascent velocity components projected upon this direction. Mathematical details of the procedure used to model VADS are given, and experimental illustrations for HI, H/sub 2/S, and NH/sub 3/ photodissociation are presented. In these examples, pulsed photodissociation produces H atoms that are detected by sequential two-photon, two-frequency ionization via Lyman-..cap alpha.. with a pulsed laser (121.6+364.7 nm), and measuring the Lyman-..cap alpha.. Doppler profile as a function of probe delay reveals both internal and c.m. kinetic energy distributions for the photofragments. Strengths and weaknesses of VADS as a tool for investigating photofragmentation phenomena are also discussed.

  12. Active beam spectroscopy for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Hellermann, M.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R. [Association Euratom-Fom, FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands); Hawkes, N.C.; Mullane, M.O.; Zastrow, K.D. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Krasilnikov, A.; Tugarinov, S. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Lotte, P. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; McKee, G. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Malaquias, A. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Rachlew, E. [Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan (KTH), Stockholm(Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    The latest status of 'Active Beam' related spectroscopy aspects as part of the ITER diagnostic scenario is presented. A key issue of the proposed scheme is based on the concept that in order to achieve the ultimate goal of global data consistency, all particles involved, that is, intrinsic and seeded impurity ions as well as helium ash ions and bulk plasma ions and also the plasma background data (e.g. magnetic and electric fields, electron density and temperature profiles) need to be addressed. A further sensible step in this direction is the decision of exploiting both a dedicated low-energy, low-power diagnostic beam (DNB, 2.2 MW 100 keV/amu) as well as the high-power, high-energy heating beams (HNB, 17 MW 500 keV/amu) for maximum diagnostic information. The authors report some new aspects referring to the use of DNB for motional Stark effect (MSE) where the main idea is to treat both beams (HNB and DNB) as potential diagnostic tools with complementary roles. The equatorial ports for the DNB promise excellent spatial resolution, however, the angles are less favourable for a polarimetric MSE exploitation. HNB can be used as probe beam for diagnosing slowing-down fusion alpha with a birth energy of 3,5 MeV.

  13. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic VC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechkivska, Olha; Morse, Michael D

    2013-12-19

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy has been applied to diatomic VC, providing the first optical spectrum of this molecule. The ground state is determined to be a (2)Δ3/2 state that arises from the 1σ(2)1π(4)2σ(2)1δ(1) configuration. The r0" ground-state bond length is 1.6167(3) Å. The manifold of excited vibronic states in the visible portion of the spectrum is quite dense, but two possible vibrational progressions have been identified. It is noted that VC joins CrC, NbC, and MoC as species in which the metal ns-based 3σ orbital is unoccupied, resulting in large dipole moments in the ground states of these molecules. In the corresponding 5d metal carbides, however, the 3σ orbital is occupied, leading to different ground electronic states of the 5d congeners, TaC and WC.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of atomic radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Alexander; Jungmann, Klaus; Santra, Bodhaditya; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth elements radium (Ra) offers a unique sensitivity to a parity and time reversal violating permanent electric dipole moments (EDM). In particular, Ra exhibits the largest known atomic enhancements factors for EDMs. The intrinsic sensitivity arises from the specific atomic and nuclear structure of Ra. All Ra isotopes with nuclear spin I are radioactive. The lifetimes are shorter than 15 d. Several Ra isotopes are available at the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI. For the exploitation of the sensitivity Ra atoms have to be collected in a neutral atom trap. The main laser cooling is done on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 482.7 nm, similar to the laser cooling and trapping of the chemical homologue barium. Laser spectroscopy of the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transitions is presented. The light at this wavelength is provided by frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire laser in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal. Of particular interest is the decay branching of the excited state to the metastable D-states. Such measurements are indispensable input for current atomic structure calculations, which are necessary for the analysis of a EDM measurement using Ra.

  15. FCS and Single Molecule Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigler, Rudolf

    The idea to develop Fluorescence Fluctuation spectroscopy started when working in Manfred Eigens' Laboratory in G¨ottingen in the Max Planck Institute for Physical Chemistry as a postdoctoral fellow. I had just finished the construction and testing of a fluorescence T-jump machine [1] when Jean Pierre Changeux from Institut Pasteur arrived in G¨ottingen with a bag of freshly isolated nicotinic acetyl choline receptor to use the new fluorescence T-jump apparatus for relaxation kinetic studies of the receptor. Due to the high concentration of detergents present in the preparation and limited conductivity of the solvent leading to strong cavitation in the T-jump cell we could not perform the temperature relaxation experiments. However, this experience raised the question whether the analysis of equilibrium fluctuations by observing changes in the quantum yield of fluorescence would not be an alternative way to follow kinetic processes. In this way all problems related to the instantaneous temperature change could be avoided.

  16. Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Quinonimides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Ekram; Deng, Shihu; Gozem, Samer; Krylov, Anna; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wenthold, Paul G.

    2017-08-16

    Structures and energetics of o-, m- and p-quinonimide anions (OC6H4N) and quinoniminyl radicals have been investigated by using negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. Modeling of the photoelectron spectrum of the ortho isomer shows that the ground state of the anion is a triplet, while the quinoniminyl radical has a doublet ground state with a doublet-quartet splitting of 35.5 kcal/mol. The para radical has doublet ground state, but a band for a quartet state is missing from the photoelectron spectrum indicating that the anion has a singlet ground state, in contrast to previously reported calculations. The theoretical modeling is revisited here, and it is shown that accurate predictions for the electronic structure of the para quinonimide anion require both an accurate account of electron correlation and a sufficiently diffuse basis set. Electron affinities of o- and p-quinoniminyl radicals are measured to be 1.715 ± 0.010 and 1.675 ± 0.010 eV, respectively. The photoelectron spectrum of the m-quinonimide anion shows that the ion undergoes several different rearrangements, including a rearrangement to the energetically favorable para isomer. Such rearrangements preclude a meaningful analysis of the experimental spectrum.

  17. Rotational spectroscopy of interstellar PAHs

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been part of the standard model of the interstellar medium, and are believed to play important roles in its physics and chemistry. Yet, up to now it has not been possible to identify any specific molecule among them. In this paper, a new observational avenue is suggested to detect individual PAHs, using their rotational line emission at radio frequencies. Previous PAH searches based on rotational spectroscopy have only targeted the bowl-shaped corannulene molecule, with the underlying assumption that other polar PAHs are triaxial and as a consequence their rotational emission is diluted over a very large number of lines and unusable for detection purposes. In this paper the rotational spectrum of quasi-symmetric PAHs is computed analytically, as a function of the level of triaxiality. It is shown that the asymmetry of planar, nitrogen-substituted symmetric PAHs is small enough that their rotational spectrum, when observed with a resolution of about a MHz, has ...

  18. Lifetime Resolved Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Berland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been widely used investigate molecular dynamics and interactions in biological systems. FCS typically resolves the component species of a sample either through differences in diffusion coefficient or molecular brightness. Diffusion based assays currently have a major limitation which requires that the diffusion coefficients of component species in a sample must be substantially different in order to be resolved. This criterion is not met in many important cases, such as when molecules of similar molecular weight bind to each other. This limitation can be overcome, and resolution of FCS measurements enhanced, by combining FCS measurements with measurements of fluorescence lifetimes. By using of global analysis on simultaneously acquired FCS and lifetime data we show that we can dramatically enhance resolution in FCS measurements, and accurately resolve the concentration and diffusion coefficients of multiple sample components even when their diffusion coefficients are identical provided there is a difference in the lifetime of the component species. We show examples of this technique using both simulations and experiments. It is expected that this method will be of significance for binding assays studying molecular interactions.

  19. Microwave Spectroscopy of 2-PENTANONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Maike; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Kleiner, Isabelle; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Methyl propyl ketone (MPK) or 2-Pentanone is known to be an alarm pheroromone released by the mandibular glands of the bees. It is a highly volatile compound. This molecule was studied by a combination of quantum chemical calculations and microwave spectroscopy in order to get informations about the lowest energy conformers and their structures.The rotational spectrum of 2-pentanone was measured using the molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer in Aachen operating between 2 and 26.5 GHz. Ab initio calculations determine 4 conformers but only two of them are observed in our jet-beam conditions.The lowest conformer has a C_{1} structure and its spectrum shows internal rotation splittings arising from two methyl groups. The internal splittings of 305 transitions for this conformer were analyzed using the XIAM code It led to the determination of the values for the barrier heights hindering the internal rotation of two methyl groups of 239 cm^{-1} and 980 cm^{-1} respectively. The next energy conformer has a C_{s} structure and the analysis of the internal splittings of 134 transitions using the XIAM code and the BELGI code led to the determination of internal rotation barrier height of 186 cm^{-1}. Comparisons of quantum chemistry and experimental results will be discussed. H. Hartwig, H. Dreizler, Z. Naturforsch. 51a, 923 (1996). J. T. Hougen, I. Kleiner and M. Godefroid, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 163, 559-586 (1994).

  20. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  1. Organ mapping using parelectric spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaschke, T [Department of Physics, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Sivaramakrishnan, R [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Gross, M [Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, Charite University Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kramer, K D [Department of Physics, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-21

    Whenever physical methods are used in the field of diagnostics, it is necessary to find an unambiguous mapping of the properties of the tested tissues (e.g. normal or pathologic) to their answer to the respective analysis tool such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultrasound, x-rays or the relatively new method of parelectric spectroscopy (PS). The well-established non-invasive NMR method has, by now, a sufficiently wide-spread atlas of such mappings. This has to be contrasted to the situation of the PS method where first experiments showed the fulfilment of conditions necessary for any reliable diagnosis, namely the uncertainties of the results being small compared to the differences between the normal and pathologic state of the tissues under test. To help close this gap, we present here results of the behaviour of 12 different organs of mice, taken 20 min after excision and give the dependence of the two most essential PS parameters, the dipole density {delta}{epsilon} and the mobility f{sub 0}, on the type of healthy organs. To be able to use tumorous tissues preserved in formaldehyde after excision for comparison purposes, we have been measuring the changes of some organs between the fresh state and the preserved state under formaldehyde for over 180 min each.

  2. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented.

  3. Critical Metadata for Spectroscopy Field Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Rasaiah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A field spectroscopy metadata standard is defined as those data elements that explicitly document the spectroscopy dataset and field protocols, sampling strategies, instrument properties and environmental and logistical variables. Standards for field spectroscopy metadata affect the quality, completeness, reliability, and usability of datasets created in situ. Currently there is no standardized methodology for documentation of in situ spectroscopy data or metadata. This paper presents results of an international experiment comprising a web-based survey and expert panel evaluation that investigated critical metadata in field spectroscopy. The survey participants were a diverse group of scientists experienced in gathering spectroscopy data across a wide range of disciplines. Overall, respondents were in agreement about a core metadataset for generic campaign metadata, allowing for a prioritization of critical metadata elements to be proposed including those relating to viewing geometry, location, general target and sampling properties, illumination, instrument properties, reference standards, calibration, hyperspectral signal properties, atmospheric conditions, and general project details. Consensus was greatest among individual expert groups in specific application domains. The results allow the identification of a core set of metadata fields that enforce long term data storage and serve as a foundation for a metadata standard. This paper is part one in a series about the core elements of a robust and flexible field spectroscopy metadata standard.

  4. Frequency comb velocity-modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Laura C; Cossel, Kevin C; Coffey, Tyler; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A

    2011-08-26

    We have demonstrated a new technique that provides massively parallel comb spectroscopy sensitive specifically to ions through the combination of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with velocity-modulation spectroscopy. Using this novel system, we have measured electronic transitions of HfF⁺ and achieved a fractional absorption sensitivity of 3×10⁻⁷ recorded over 1500 simultaneous channels spanning 150  cm⁻¹ around 800 nm with an absolute frequency accuracy of 30 MHz (0.001  cm⁻¹). A fully sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements is acquired in 30 min.

  5. Frequency Comb Velocity-Modulation Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Laura C; Coffey, Tyler; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new technique that provides massively parallel comb spectroscopy sensitive specifically to ions through the combination of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with velocity modulation spectroscopy. Using this novel system, we have measured electronic transitions of HfF+ and achieved a fractional absorption sensitivity of 3 x 10-7 recorded over 1500 simultaneous channels spanning 150 cm-1 around 800 nm with an absolute frequency accuracy of 30 MHz (0.001 cm-1). A fully sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements is acquired in 30 minutes.

  6. Handbook of Applied Solid State Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vij, D. R

    2006-01-01

    Solid-State spectroscopy is a burgeoning field with applications in many branches of science, including physics, chemistry, biosciences, surface science, and materials science. Handbook of Applied Solid-State Spectroscopy brings together in one volume information about various spectroscopic techniques that is currently scattered in the literature of these disciplines. This concise yet comprehensive volume covers theory and applications of a broad range of spectroscopies, including NMR, NQR, EPR/ESR, ENDOR, scanning tunneling, acoustic resonance, FTIR, auger electron emission, x-ray photoelectron emission, luminescence, and optical polarization, and more. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals and current methods and procedures, together with the latest applications and developments in the field.

  7. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Elfick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (biochemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We discuss the benefits and limitations of all techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in biomedicine—both in vivo (using fiber endoscopes and in vitro (in optical microscopes.

  8. Hypernuclear spectroscopy program at JLab Hall C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, O.; Baturin, Pavlo; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bosted, Peter; Carlini, Roger; Chen, X.; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, AJI; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gan, Liping; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Halkyard, Rebekah; Honda, D.; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hu, S.; Hungerford, Ed; Ispiryan, Mikayel; Johnston, Kathleen; Jones, Mark; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kato, Seigo; Kawama, Daisuke; Keppel, Cynthia; Li, Ya; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Maruyama, Nayuta; Matsumura, Akihiko; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Navasardyan, Tigran; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Pamela, Priscilla; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera Castillo, Roberto; Roche, Julie; Rodriguez, Victor; Sato, Yoshinori; Seva, Tomislav; Tang, Liguang; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Sumihama, Mizuki; Song, Y.; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Hirokazu; Tvaskis, Vladas; Vulcan, William; Wang, B.; Wells, Steven; Yan, Chen; Yuan, Lulin; Zamkochian, S.

    2008-05-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2008.01.029
    Hypernuclear production by the (e,e?K+) reaction has unique advantages in hypernuclear spectroscopy of the S=?1 regime. The second-generation spectroscopy experiment on 12C, 7Li and 28Si targets has been recently carried out at JLab Hall C with a new experimental configuration (Tilt method) and also using a new high-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS). The experiment is described and preliminary results are presented together with the empasis of significance of the (e,e?K+) reaction for ? hypernuclear spectroscopy and its future prospects.

  9. Attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yukihiro; Morisawa, Yusuke; Goto, Takeyoshi; Tanabe, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Recently, far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy of solid and liquid states has been a matter of keen interest because it provides new possibilities for studying electronic structures and transitions of almost all kinds of molecules. It has also great potential for a variety of applications from quantitative and qualitative analysis of aqueous solutions to environmental and geographical analyses. This review describes the state-of- the-art of FUV spectroscopy; an introduction to FUV spectroscopy, the development of FUV spectrometers, investigations on electronic transitions and structure, its various applications, and future prospects.

  10. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  11. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Quan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  13. Active beam spectroscopy for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellermann, M.G. von, E-mail: mgvh@jet.u [FOM Institute Rijnhuizen, Euratom Association, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Barnsley, R. [ITER Organization, 13108 St.-Paul-Lez-Durance, Cadarache (France); Biel, W. [Institut fuer Energieforschung, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Euratom Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Delabie, E. [FOM Institute Rijnhuizen, Euratom Association, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hawkes, N. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom Association, Culham OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Jaspers, R. [FOM Institute Rijnhuizen, Euratom Association, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Johnson, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ-08548 (United States); Klinkhamer, F. [TNO Science and Industry, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628CK Delft (Netherlands); Lischtschenko, O. [FOM Institute Rijnhuizen, Euratom Association, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Marchuk, O. [Institut fuer Energieforschung, Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Euratom Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Schunke, B. [ITER Organization, 13108 St.-Paul-Lez-Durance, Cadarache (France); Singh, M.J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gurajat 384828 (India); Snijders, B. [TNO Science and Industry, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628CK Delft (Netherlands); Summers, H.P. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom Association, Culham OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Thomas, D. [ITER Organization, 13108 St.-Paul-Lez-Durance, Cadarache (France); Tugarinov, S. [TRINITI Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092 (Russian Federation); Vasu, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gurajat 384828 (India)

    2010-11-11

    Since the first feasibility studies of active beam spectroscopy on ITER in 1995 the proposed diagnostic has developed into a well advanced and mature system. Substantial progress has been achieved on the physics side including comprehensive performance studies based on an advanced predictive code, which simulates active and passive features of the expected spectral ranges. The simulation has enabled detailed specifications for an optimized instrumentation and has helped to specify suitable diagnostic neutral beam parameters. Four ITER partners share presently the task of developing a suite of ITER active beam diagnostics, which make use of the two 0.5 MeV/amu 18 MW heating neutral beams and a dedicated 0.1 MeV/amu, 3.6 MW diagnostic neutral beam. The IN ITER team is responsible for the DNB development and also for beam physics related aspects of the diagnostic. The RF will be responsible for edge CXRS system covering the outer region of the plasma (1>r/a>0.4) using an equatorial observation port, and the EU will develop the core CXRS system for the very core (0

  14. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  15. News from Online: More Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-09-01

    rising from a cup of hot coffee. Next is an applet with atoms in a parabolic magnetic trap at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/applets/bec.html. The height of the magnetic trap can be changed in order to allow for escape of the most energetic atoms, resulting in cooling so that the Bose-Einstein Condensate is formed. Physics 2000 demands robust computing power. Check the system requirements on the introductory screen before venturing too far into this site. Martin V. Goldman, from the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the Director of Physics 2000, which received support from the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the National Science Foundation. David Rea is the Technical Director, and many others help make this excellent site possible. Mark your calendars: October 31 through December 3, 1999! Bookmark this site-- http://www.ched-ccce.org/confchem/1999/d/index.html --and sign up. The Winter 1999 CONFCHEM Online Conference will focus on Developments in Spectroscopy and Innovative Strategies for Teaching Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Curriculum. Scott Van Bramer of Widener University is the conference chair. Experts will present six papers, each to be followed by online discussions. CONFCHEM Online Conferences are sponsored by the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education's Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE). Several Online Conferences are held each year--all are well worth your time. World Wide Web Addresses EMSpectrum Explorer http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/EMSpectrum/emspectrum.html Light and Energy http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/index.html Emission Spectrum Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/emission/index.html Absorption Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/absorption/index.html Removing Color with a Single Filter from Colored Light http://mc2.cchem

  16. Neural networks for nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, P.E.; Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In this paper two applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in nuclear spectroscopy analysis are discussed. In the first application, an ANN assigns quality coefficients to alpha particle energy spectra. These spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality coefficients represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with quality coefficients by an expert and used to train the ANN expert system. Our investigation shows that the expert knowledge of spectral quality can be transferred to an ANN system. The second application combines a portable gamma-ray spectrometer with an ANN. In this system the ANN is used to automatically identify, radioactive isotopes in real-time from their gamma-ray spectra. Two neural network paradigms are examined: the linear perception and the optimal linear associative memory (OLAM). A comparison of the two paradigms shows that OLAM is superior to linear perception for this application. Both networks have a linear response and are useful in determining the composition of an unknown sample when the spectrum of the unknown is a linear superposition of known spectra. One feature of this technique is that it uses the whole spectrum in the identification process instead of only the individual photo-peaks. For this reason, it is potentially more useful for processing data from lower resolution gamma-ray spectrometers. This approach has been tested with data generated by Monte Carlo simulations and with field data from sodium iodide and Germanium detectors. With the ANN approach, the intense computation takes place during the training process. Once the network is trained, normal operation consists of propagating the data through the network, which results in rapid identification of samples. This approach is useful in situations that require fast response where precise quantification is less important.

  17. Element-specific characterization of transient electronic structure of solvated Fe(II) complexes with time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kiryong; Cho, Hana; Schoenlein, Robert W; Kim, Tae Kyu; Huse, Nils

    2015-11-17

    Polypyridyl transition-metal complexes are an intriguing class of compounds due to the relatively facile chemical designs and variations in ligand-field strengths that allow for spin-state changes and hence electronic configurations in response to external perturbations such as pressure and light. Light-activated spin-conversion complexes have possible applications in a variety of molecular-based devices, and ultrafast excited-state evolution in these complexes is of fundamental interest for understanding of the origins of spin-state conversion in metal complexes. Knowledge of the interplay of structure and valence charge distributions is important to understand which degrees of freedom drive spin-conversion and which respond in a favorable (or unfavorable) manner. To track the response of the constituent components, various types of time-resolved X-ray probe methods have been utilized for a broad range of chemical and biological systems relevant to catalysis, solar energy conversions, and functional molecular devices. In particular, transient soft X-ray spectroscopy of solvated molecules can offer complementary information on the detailed electronic structures and valence charge distributions of photoinduced intermediate species: First-row transition-metal L-edges consist of 2p-3d transitions, which directly probe the unoccupied valence density of states and feature lifetime broadening in the range of 100 meV, making them sensitive spectral probes of metal-ligand interactions. In this Account, we present some of our recent progress in employing picosecond and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses from synchrotron sources to investigate element specific valence charge distributions and spin-state evolutions in Fe(II) polypyridyl complexes via core-level transitions. Our results on transient L-edge spectroscopy of Fe(II) complexes clearly show that the reduction in σ-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of π-backbonding upon spin-crossover. This underscores

  18. Ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy of disordered materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We perform THz spectroscopic investigations of the dielectric function of disordered materials in the THz region. Specifically, we consider amorphous materials and perform ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy of chalcogenide glasses where we observe the transition from universal scaling...

  19. spectroscopy: implications for aerosol polluted sites in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trace gases, F TIR, spectroscopy, aerosols, and atmospheric pollution. Introduction: ... high altitude station ~l l 59 meters above sea level. ... the effects of altitude on trace gas absorption line ..... Measurements Made Near Kiruna Sweden in the.

  20. Solid-State Spectroscopy An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmany, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods have opened up a new horizon in our knowledge of solid-state materials. Numerous techniques using electromagnetic radiation or charged and neutral particles have been invented and worked out to a high level in order to provide more detailed information on the solids. The text presented here is an updated description of such methods as they were originally presented in the first edition. It covers linear response of solids to electromagnetic radiation in a frequency range extending from megahertz or gigahertz as used in spin resonance spectroscopy, to infrared spectroscopy and various forms of spectroscopy in the visible and near visible spectral range. It extends to spectroscopy in the UV and x-ray spectral range and eventually several spectroscopic methods are addressed in the frequency range of g radiation. Likewise linear response to irradiation with particles such as electrons, positrons, muons, neutrons, and atoms is discussed. Instrumental and technical background is provided as we...